Electricity Sector Matrix 

Country:  Uganda         Status: Feb. 27, 2014 

Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 

Electricity Sector Policy 
Electricity Act, 1999; allowed for Independent Power Producers (IPPs), 
created the Electricity Regulatory Authority (ERA) and the Rural 
Electrification Fund (REF) with 5% levy on all bulk electricity. 

 

Electricity Sector unbundled (yes/no),  Yes, since 2001. The former Uganda Electricity Board (UEB) was split up 
since when? 
into three separate companies. 

 

Electricity Act (name, year …) 

Regulation of the electricity sector; 
mandate; organization, autonomy 
status 

Master plans / Least Cost Power 
Development Plans / capacity 
expansion plan 

Grid expansion plans 

Electricity Regulatory Authority (ERA) since 2000; sets the tariffs, issues 
feasibility and installation permits and operation licenses; publishes 
annual sector performance reports; ERA sets performance parameters in 
licenses, such as grid losses, collection and connection targets, 
investment targets etc. 
National Energy Policy approved in 2002; Least Cost Generation Plan 
developed by ERA for 2013‐2018. 
 
A Hydropower Development Master Plan has been developed with 
support from JICA. 
 
Hydro power plants In preparation: 
Karuma HPP: 600 MW (UEGCL) 
Isimba HPP: 183 MW (UEGCL) 
Ayago HPP: 600 MW (UEGCL) 
The first two are treated as development projects and funded from the 
Energy Fund. 
 
Several national transmission lines at EPC development stage, plus 
international connections: Uganda‐Kenya, Uganda‐Rwanda. 

www.era.or.ug 

 

Maps detailing the transmission 
network topology in 2009, 2015, 
2020 and 2025 can be found in 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 
MEMD, “The Development of a 
Power Sector Investment Plan for 
Uganda”, January 2011. 

Yes, e.g. Bujagali HPP in operation since 2012, and excess electricity from 
sugar factories Kakira Sugar Works (total installed 20 MW) and Kinyara 
Sugar Works (total installed 7 MW). Sugar Corporation of Uganda Ltd 
IPPs allowed / operating? 
(SCOUL) will provide excess electricity after rehabilitation currently 
undertaken. 
A Renewable Energy Policy has been elaborated by MEMD in 2007, with 
RE electricity share targets 
the main objective of increasing the use of modern renewable energy to 
61% of the total primary energy consumption by the year 2017. 
Standard Power Purchase Agreement established in March 2005; 
Standardized PPAs have been established for hydropower projects by 
ERA.  
 
Feed‐in tariffs (FiT) in place since 2007, first only covering bagasse 
cogeneration and hydropower (REFIT Phase I, 2007‐2009), limited success 
due to tariffs based on avoided rather than generation costs and due to 
not‐creditworthiness of state utility UMEME, in charge of purchasing the 
electricity. Subsequently review of REFIT in 2010 and increase of tariffs 
Power Purchase Agreements; Feed‐in 
based on updated levelised costs of production, starting January 2011. 
tariffs 
 
GET FiT has been developed jointly by  GoU, ERA, KfW and Deutsche 
Bank. GET FiT will pay a premium on top of the existing FiT and is 
expected to attract investment of approx.. 125 MW in phase 1 and even 
more in phase 2. Phase I was started end of May 2013 and will support 
about 15 RE electricity projects with between 1 and 20 MW following a 
tender process. Apart from this, the World Bank offers a Partial Risk 
Guarantee and Deutsche Bank in collaboration with local commercial 
banks will provide private debt/equity financing. 

 

MEMD, The Renewable Energy 
Policy, 2007 

Heinrich Böll Stiftung/World 
Future Council, Powering Africa 
through feed‐in tariffs, February 
2013 
 
ERA, Uganda Renewable Energy 
Feed‐in Tariff (REFIT), Phase 2, 
Guidelines, Revised 15th 
November 2012 
 
Deutsche Bank, GET Fit Plus, April 
2011 
 
Deutsche Bank, Policy Paper, Get 
FiT in Uganda, November 20, 2013

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 
ERA’s Performance in 2012/13 
and Business Plan for 2013/14 

Wheeling policy 

ERA will develop wheeling policy. 

Future sector reform 

Several reforms and adjustments to general rural electrification 
programme expected to be phased‐in until 2016, including establishment  ERA’s Performance in 2012/13 
of simplified model of service delivery in rural areas. Electricity Act to be  and Business Plan for 2013/14 
reviewed and amended. 

Utilities 
GENERATION 
Uganda Electricity Generation Company Ltd (UEGCL) ‐ s: 
Kiira HPP – 200 MW (commissioned 2000/2003/2007) 
Nalubaale HPP – 180 MW (commissioned 1954; refurbished 1991‐1997) 
Both plants not fully available due to droughts and other effects. 
Both power stations were handed over in April 2003 to Eskom Uganda 
Ltd (EUL) – subsidiary of Eskom South Africa ‐ under a 20‐year concession 
agreement for operation and maintenance. Ownership of the asset 
remained with UEGCL. 
 
Main utilities (s=state owned; 
Thermal Power Plants (based on 100% imported HFO): 
p=private; m=mixed), shareholders 
Electro‐Maxx Ltd – Tororo: 50 MW (since 2012) 
Jacobsen Uganda Power Plant Ltd – Namanve: 50 MW 
 
Other Hydropower: 
Bujagali Energy Ltd (BEL) 250 MW ‐ m 
Commissioned in August 2012. Public Private Partnership between 
Government of Uganda, the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development 
and Sithe Global. They formed BEL to own and operate the power plant 
on a 30‐year concession, after which the plant will be transferred to GoU.

www.uegcl.co.ug 
 
Wikipedia: List of Power Stations 
in Uganda 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 

 
Africa EMS (Energy Management Systems) Mpanga Ltd 18 MW 
(commissioned Feb. 2011) ‐ p 
Tronder Power Ltd – Bugoye 13 MW (commissioned in 2011) ‐ p 
Kasese Cobalt Company Ltd (KCCL) 9.9 MW ‐ p 
Kilembe Mines Ltd 5 MW ‐ p 
Eco Power – Ishasha 6.5 MW ‐ p 
Hydromax Ltd – Buseruka 9.0 MW‐ p 
 
Total installed capacity: 683 MW, peak demand about 400‐450 MW 
(2012)  
 
GIS‐map of power stations: http://www.gis‐uganda.de/Energy‐GIS/ 
Generation (GWh produced in year 
No information yet. 
….) 
Generation type (coal, hydro, wind 
…) and capacities of main utilities 
(MW) 

Large Hydro (Nalubaale, Kiira, Bujagali): 630 MW (not fully available) 
Small Hydro: 65 MW 
Stand‐by HFO Thermal Power Plants: 100 MW 

 
 

Generation by fuel source (GWh) in 
No information yet. 
year … 

 

Peak load (MW) in year … 

About 525 MW in June 2012. 

Needs to be verified. 

Uganda Electricity Transmission Company Ltd. (UETCL) ‐ Only customer 
mandated by the Government of Uganda to buy and transmit power in 
the country. Owns the transmission mains of above 33 kV and acts as 
system operator. 

www.uetcl.co.ug 

TRANSMISSION 

Utility (ies) 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 

Length and capacity of HV lines 

No information yet. 

 

Electricity trade (export/import) 

Minor amounts were exported to neighboring countries in 2012, e.g. 57 
 
GWh to Tanzania, and small amounts to Kenya, DR of Congo and Rwanda.

DISTRIBUTION 

Utilities 

Umeme Ltd, operates under a concession with a structural monopoly on 
the distribution of electricity across Uganda, distributing 99% of 
electricity in Uganda through a single buyer model. Umeme took over the 
distribution and supply from Uganda Electricity Distribution Company 
Ltd (UEDCL) under concession for 20 years, commencing 1 March 2005. 
UEDCL continues to own the distribution network that has been leased to 
Umeme under the Privatisation Agreements. Umeme purchases 
electricity from UETCL. Major shareholder of the stock listed company is 
Actis LPP, a private equity manager of investment funds specializing in 
emerging markets, with CDC Group being the largest investor. 
 
Other small distributor is: Ferdsult Energy Services (www.ferdsult.net), 
operating in south west Uganda. 

www.umeme.co.ug 
 
www.uedcl.co.ug 
 
Umeme, Annual report 2012 

Length of MV and LV lines 

Umeme: Approx. 25,000 km in total, concentrated in the southeast of 
Uganda. Of those 11,100 km MV lines and 14,900 km LV lines (2012) 

Umeme, Annual report 2012 

Development of on‐grid customer 
base 

Umeme: 
55,000 new connections in 2012 (+12% against 2011) 
305,000 customers in 2008, 513,000 at the end of 2012. 
 
Domestic – 468,461 
Commercial – 42,355 
Industrial Medium – 1946 
Industrial Large – 367 

 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 

Street Lighting ‐ 369 
Electricity purchased by Umeme from UETCL: 2,622 GWh for 597,000 bn 
Ushs. (2012) 
 
Sales by Umeme to end‐users: 1,937 GWh (2012); increase of 12% against 
2011 (1,735 GWh) 
 
Number of consumers of Umeme: 513,500 (end of 2012) 
 
Umeme revenue of 834 billion Ushs in 2012 from customer sales (up by 
Sales in GWh and local currency in  88% against 2011 due to increased end‐user tariffs). 72% of sales 
revenues from government, commercial and industrial consumers, 28%  Umeme, Annual report 2012 
year … (per consumer of tariff 
from domestic consumers. 
sector) 
 
Sales by sector 2012: 
‐ Domestic 
 
455 GWh  ‐ 235 bn Ushs 
‐ Commercial   
230 GWh – 111 bn Ushs 
‐ Industrial medium size  338 GWh – 180 bn Ushs 
‐ Industrial large size 
913 GWh – 307 bn Ushs 
‐ Street‐lighting   
1 GWh – 1 bn Ushs 
 
Per capita power demand was only around 70 kWh/a in 2009.  
Demand is growing at more than 10%/a, demand trend may outstrip 
supply before end of 2014. According to the current National 
 
Demand forecast national grid (MW) 
Development Plan, demand is expected to reach 1,520 MW by 2015 and 
would far exceed installed capacity by then. 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 

Tariffs / cost coverage / subsidies 

Electricity tariffs 

Tariffs were raised by average 52% in January 2012, primarily due to 
removal of sector subsidies. Tariffs were partly decreased in January 
2014. 
 
Tariffs as of Jan. 2014 for energy: 
Domestic:   
 
520.4 Shs/kWh 
Commerce:    
474.4 Shs/kWh  
Medium Industry:  
452.0 Shs/kWh 
Large‐industrial:  
310.4 Shs/kWh 
Street‐lights:    
488.8 Shs/kWh 
 
Fixed monthly charge are 3,360 Shs for domestic and commercial 
customers. 

ERA, Statement on the 2014 
Electricity end‐user tariffs 

Lifeline tariffs in place 

Yes, Shs 150/kWh for the first 15 kWh every month. 

 

Tariffs cost‐covering? Tariff increases 
planned? 

Tariffs are not cost‐covering. For thermal power, cost‐reflective tariff 
 
was estimated at 964 UShs per kWh, while the end‐user tariff is far lower.

Level and source of subsidies 

No Government subsidy provided for tariffs, but e.g. capacity payment 
for HFO thermal power plants (Shs. 59.5 billion in 2014). Between 2006‐
2011, about US$ 900 million were spent on subsidies for thermal power 
plants. In fiscal year 2011/12 alone, Government budgeted Ushs. 417 
billion for electricity subsidies. 

 

Financial situation of main utilities 

No information yet. 

 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 

Performance: Losses/efficiencies/service reliability 
Generation efficiency 
Transmission losses, trends and 
targets 

Distribution losses (technical/non‐
technical 

No information yet. Generation mainly with hydropower. 
Transmission losses about 4% (2011).  
 
Transmission needs substantial refurbishment to reduce power losses. 
Distribution losses: 26.1% in 2012 (down from 27.3% in 2011), target of 
14.7% for 2018, following agreement between Umeme and ERA. 
According to Umeme, half of grid losses due to the physical state of the 
grid and half are due to illegal connections. In comparison: distribution 
losses were 38% in 2005. 
Umeme is implementing a pilot project supported by AFD, KfW and 
others to refurbish the grid and install pre‐paid meters in districts with 
highest grid loss rates. 

 
 

ERA, Annual Report 2010/11 

ERA engaged consultant in 2010/11 to advice on distribution losses and 
non‐collection rates. Reduction target in Umeme Ltd distribution losses 
of 20% in 2014 (down from 23% in 2013). 

Non‐charged/paid revenues 

Average hours of blackouts, targets 
for improved performance 

Collection rate of Umeme 94% (2012), down from 98.9% in 2011 due to 
increased tariffs; 17,000 pre‐paid meters were installed at the end of 
2012. 
The number of blackouts and the need for load shedding has been 
reduced due to the full commissioning of the Bujagali HPP in 2012. But 
further power shortcuts expected in the near future due to strongly 
growing electricity demand (about 10%/a). 

 

 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 

Energy access and off‐grid electrification 

Electrification rate (urban/rural) 

Electrification targets 

About 12% of the population has access to electricity. Total connections 
on‐grid: 513,000 (2012); less than 5% of rural population = about 180,000 
customers; target in Rural Electrification Strategy and Plan 2001‐2010 of 
10% was clearly failed; investment by private‐sector engagement has 
been low so far; current rural electrification providers are too small with 
predominantly domestic customers, low consumption per connection 
and low revenue levels. Even in Kampala, less than 40% of households 
are connected to the grid.  
 
In period 2001‐2012 over 400 grid extension projects, but with consumer 
connection rates well below planned levels (instead of 400,000 new 
consumers only …). Instead of 80,000 projected solar PV installations, 
only 7,000 were actually installed under government‐sponsored projects. 
National Development Plan wants to achieve full electrification by 2035. 
Indicative Rural Electrification Master Plan (IREMP) was completed in 
2008. The IREMP has mapped the whole country on the basis of all grid‐
connectable load centres and prioritized projects in tranches to be 
implemented in sequenced periods.  
 
Universal electrification by 2040; displacement of kerosene lighting in all 
Ugandan homes by 2030; rural electrification target of 22% by 2022; on‐
grid services to provide approx. 1.28 million new connections by 2022, 
and off‐grid services about 140,000 new installations of solar PV systems 
and mini‐grid distribution connections.  
 
Annual rural electrification plans to be developed by REA and adopted 
by REB. Investment requirements 2013‐2022 about US$ 920 million, plus 
US$ million for capacity building, plus US$ 30 for financing needs, 

GoU, Rural Electrification Strategy 
and Plan 2013‐2022, September 
2012 
 
National Development Plan 
2010/11 – 2014/15 
 
MEMD, Sustainable Energy for All, 
Country Rapid Assessement and 
Gap Analysis Uganda, June 2012 

GoU, Rural Electrification Strategy 
and Plan 2013‐2022, September 
2012 
 
GoU, National Budget Framework 
Paper FY 2013/14 – FY 2017/2018 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Rural Electrification Agency in place? 

Status and plans for off‐grid rural 
electrification 

Operators of isolated grids etc. 

Explanation 
subsidies on connections fees, house‐wiring, purchase of appliances etc. 
 
Ushs 25.73bn were foreseen for the Rural Electrification Programme in 
fiscal year 2013/14. 
 
Grid Development Plan in place. 
Yes, Rural Electrification Agency, since 2001 (Electricity Statutory 
Instrument No. 75/2001 as mandated by Section 65 of the Electricity Act), 
along with Rural Electrification Board; centralized authority for planning 
and implementing the resource requirements of the rural electrification 
programme. Also Rural Electrification Fund. 
Preference given to energy services offered in tandem with on‐grid 
electrification services in concession territories. 
 
Over 30,000 PV systems installed. 
 
The Energy for Rural Transformation (ERT) project was carried out in two 
phases, ending in February 2009 and June 2013 resp. The objective was 
to increase access to energy and information and communication 
technologies in rural Uganda. Under ERT I market development and 
output‐based grants were provided to private companies to install PV 
systems on households. Under ERT II the PV Targeted Market Approach 
(PVTMA) was instituted to provide consumers with credit facilities and 
subsidies to enable faster acquisition of solar systems. The Uganda 
Energy Credit Capitalisation Company Ltd. (UECCC) was put in place to 
offer credit to renewable energy projects so that they can reach financial 
closure and actual construction. 
West Nile Rural Electrification Company – WNERECo, operates under a 
20‐year concession contract to supply power to the West  Nile region 
 
Uganda Rural Electrification Company Ltd ‐ URECL 

References and Remarks 

www.rea.or.ug 

Presentation by James Baanabe, 
Commissioner Energy Resources, 
Ministry of Energy and Mineral 
Development, August 1, 2012 
 
ueccc.or.ug 

 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 

Regulation for setting up isolated 
grids, incl. micro‐grids (concession 
territories in place?) 

Rural electrification services and infrastructure shall be managed by duly 
licensed non‐governmental concession holders; service territory 
expansion plans regularly updated by REA; electricity tariffs determined  GoU, Rural Electrification Strategy 
and approved by ERA; enhanced support provided for small distributed 
and Plan 2013‐2022, September 
power generation; special rules and regulation will allow for direct 
2012 
purchase of electricity from generators or engage in own small‐scale 
power plants. 

Policy for BoP electricity supply (low‐
level electrification) 

No information yet. 

 

Energy Efficiency 

Demand‐side Management 
programmes 

Energy Efficiency activities 

Umeme carried out a competitive tendering process for bulk purchasing 
of 800,000 CFLs using the World Banks’s International Competitive 
Bidding approach in July 2006. 600,000 of those lamps for distributed 
 
free of charge to households and small commercial consumers. The rest 
was kept as replacement for failing lamps or sold at the purchasing price. 
Energy efficiency measures were carried out within the Energy Advisory 
Project supported by GTZ. Households were sensitized on energy saving 
measures, energy audits were carried out in industries.  
 
The Ministry of Energy in conjunction with the Uganda Cleaner 
Production Centre supported by UNIDO carried out training on Energy 
Management. An Energy Efficiency Directory was developed, published   
and circulated among potentials users of energy. An Energy Efficiency 
Guide for Institutions was prepared and published. It provided 
information regarding efficient use of energy in establishments like hotels 
and commercial buildings.  
 
Sector specific EE programs were launched for Tea Factories and Small 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 

and Medium‐scale industries. A guide on “Energy management for the 
tea industry” has been drafted to enable those companies reduce their 
energy consumption and bills. ERA has published hints on efficient 
electricity usage for households. Regular annual EE weeks are taking 
place. 
 
An EE and Conservation Bill has been developed by the Energy Ministry 
(June 2011), but not been approved by the Cabinet yet. 
 
An EE Strategy and Investment Plan 2010‐2020 has been developed by 
MEMD and GTZ (now GIZ) and was released in September 2009, but 
cannot be formally implemented with the absence of the EE and 
conservation law. 
 
Minimum Energy Performance Standards have been developed for 5 
appliances (refrigerators, air‐con, motors, CFLs and freezers. 

Other Issues 
 

 
 
Author: Detlef Loy