KUWAIT FINANCIAL SECTOR
Banking, Finance and Stock Exchange 
     

Submitted to  

Mr. Sheikh Usman
Submitted by

Mohammed Amin  Shahid Mehmood  Khuram Hayat    Nosherwan Ali    Masood Alam   

MI08MBA02 MI08MBA46 MI08MBA54 MI07MBA68 MI07MBA54

Hailey College of Banking and Finance
University of the Punjab, Lahore 

     

 

We dedicate this effort to our parents and respected teachers, especially to Mr. Usman Sheikh, who gave us an opportunity to explore understand.
 

Preface 
  The report seeks to develop a better understanding of the potential for Banking, finance and  Stock Exchange of Kuwait and Economy structure of the State.  The study uses a analysis based approach to examine rules, regulation and current situation  of  the  financial  sector.  The  analysis  structure  was  provided  by  Mr.  Usman  Sheikh,  This  procedure ranges within Banking and ForEx sector and a little within industrial.  Rather,  the  purpose  of  the  study  is  to  better  understand  the  systematic  approach  of  the  State for the improvements of Financial and Economic position.  The  contributions  to  this  report  by  different  sources  other  than  the  group  fellows  are  pleased, especially from the teachers and the seniors.  Mohammed Amin 

Shahid Mehmood  Khuram Hayat  Nosherwan Ali  Masood Alam 
                       

Contents 
KUWAIT ............................................................................................................................................................ 1  INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................................... 1  ECONOMY OF KUWAIT ................................................................................................................................................. 1  FOREIGN RELATIONS OF KUWAIT .................................................................................................................................... 3  International disputes ...................................................................................................................................... 4  Middle East ....................................................................................................................................................... 4  Europe .............................................................................................................................................................. 6  Holy See ............................................................................................................................................................ 6  Rest of world .................................................................................................................................................... 6  BANKING AND FINANCE .................................................................................................................................... 9  CENTRAL BANK OF KUWAIT ......................................................................................................................................... 10  Establishment of the Central Bank ................................................................................................................. 10  Objectives of the Central Bank ....................................................................................................................... 10  Operations of the Central Bank ...................................................................................................................... 10 
Relations with the Government .................................................................................................................................... 10  Relations with Local Banks ............................................................................................................................................ 11  Gold and Foreign Exchange Operations Inside and Outside the Country ...................................................................... 11  Accounts and Statements .............................................................................................................................................. 12  General Provisions ......................................................................................................................................................... 12 

Organization of Banking Business .................................................................................................................. 13 
Establishment of Banks ................................................................................................................................................. 13  Registration of Banks ..................................................................................................................................................... 14  Deletion from Register and Liquidation of Banks .......................................................................................................... 15  Activities Not to be Undertaken by Banks ..................................................................................................................... 16  Provisions Relating to Supervision ................................................................................................................................. 17  Specialized Banks........................................................................................................................................................... 19  Inspection of Banks and Institutions Subject to Supervision by the Central Bank ......................................................... 19  Accounts and Statements .............................................................................................................................................. 20  Administrative Penalties ................................................................................................................................................ 21  Islamic Banks ................................................................................................................................................................. 23 

BANKING SECTOR IN KUWAIT ...........................................................................................................................  8  2 LOCAL BANKS .......................................................................................................................................................... 28  Commercial banks .......................................................................................................................................... 28  Specialized banks ............................................................................................................................................ 28  Islamic Banks .................................................................................................................................................. 28  LIABILITY MIX OF BANKS ............................................................................................................................................ 29  ASSET COMPOSITION OF BANKS ................................................................................................................................... 30  KUWAIT BANKING SECTOR RISKS MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................................. 31  KUWAIT STOCK EXCHANGE ..............................................................................................................................  2  3 LISTED COMPANIES AT KSE ......................................................................................................................................... 32  BROKERAGE FIRMS.................................................................................................................................................... 38  TRADING CYCLE IN KUWAIT STOCK EXCHANGE ................................................................................................................ 38  THE RULES AND CONDITIONS ...................................................................................................................................... 39  Listing Shareholding Companies in the Official Market .................................................................................. 39  Participation of Non‐Kuwaitis in Kuwaiti Shareholding Companies ............................................................... 42  KUWAIT STOCK EXCHANGE ANALYSIS ............................................................................................................................ 45  Opening and Closing Stock ............................................................................................................................. 45  Highest and Lowest Stock ............................................................................................................................... 46  Volume and Value Analysis ............................................................................................................................ 46 

Kuwait Financial Sector 

Kuwait 
Introduction 
The  State  of  Kuwait  is  a  sovereign  Arab  emirate  situated  in  the  northeast  of  the  Arabian  Peninsula in Western Asia. It is bordered by Saudi Arabia to the south and Iraq to the north  and lies on the northwestern shore of the Persian Gulf. The name Kuwait is derived from the  Arabic "akwat", the plural of "kout", meaning fortress built near water. The emirate covers  an area of 20,000 square kilometres (6,880 sq mi) and has a population of about 2.9 million.  Historically, the region was the site of Characene, a major Parthian port for trade between  India and Mesopotamia. The Bani Utbah tribes were the first permanent Arab settlers in the  region and laid the foundation of the modern emirate. By 19th century, Kuwait came under  the  influence  of  the  Ottoman  Empire  and  after  the  World  War  I,  it  emerged  as  an  independent sheikhdom under the protection of the British Empire. Kuwait's large oil fields  were discovered in the late 1930s. After it gained independence from the United Kingdom in  1961, the nation's oil industry saw unprecedented growth. In 1990, Kuwait was invaded and  annexed by neighboring Iraq. The seven month‐long Iraqi occupations came to an end after  a direct military intervention by United States‐led forces. Nearly 750 Kuwaiti oil wells were  set  ablaze  by  the  retreating  Iraqi  army  resulting  in  a  major  environmental  and  economic  catastrophe.  Kuwait's  infrastructure  was  badly  damaged  during  the  war  and  had  to  be  rebuilt.  Kuwait  is  a  constitutional  monarchy  with  a  parliamentary  system  of  government,  with  Kuwait  City  serving  as  the  country's  political  and  economic  capital.  The  country  has  the  world's fifth largest oil reserves and is the eleventh richest country in the world per capita.  Petroleum  and  petroleum  products  now  account  for  nearly  95%  of  export  revenues,  and  80% of government income. Kuwait is regarded as one of the most economically developed  countries  in  the  Arab  League  and  is  designated  as  a  major  non‐NATO  ally  of  the  United  States. 

Economy of Kuwait 
Kuwait is a small, relatively open economy with proven crude oil reserves of about 96 billion  barrels  (15  km³),  i.e.  about  10%  of  world  reserves.  Petroleum  accounts  for  nearly  half  of  GDP, 90% of export revenues, and 95% of government income. Kuwait lacks water and has  practically no arable land, thus preventing development of agriculture. About 75% of potable  water must be distilled or imported. Higher oil prices reduced the budget deficit from $5.5  billion to $3 billion in 1999, and prices are expected to remain relatively strong throughout  2000. The government is proceeding slowly with reforms. It inaugurated Kuwait's first free‐ trade zone in 1999 and will continue discussions with foreign oil companies to develop fields  in the northern part of the country. 

1 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Economy of Kuwait  Currency  Fiscal year  Trade organisations 
 

Kuwaiti dinar (KD)  1 April–31 March  WTO and OPEC 

Statistics  GDP ranking  GDP  GDP growth  GDP per capita  GDP by sector  Inflation  Labour force  Unemployment  Main industries 

76th (2004)   $157.9 billion (2008 est.)  8.1% (2008 est.)  $60,800 (2008 est.)  agriculture  (0.3%),  industry  (52.2%),  services  (47.5%)  (2007  est.)  11.7% (2008 est.)  2.225  million;  note:  non‐Kuwaitis  represent  about  80%  of  the  labor force (2008 est.)  2.2% (2004 est.)  petroleum,  petrochemicals,  cement,  shipbuilding  and  repair,  desalination, food processing, construction materials 

 

Trading Partners  Exports  Main partners  Imports  Main Partners 

$95.46 billion f.o.b. (2008 est.)  Japan 19.9%, South Korea 17%, Taiwan 11.2%, Singapore 9.9%,  United States 8.4%, Netherlands 4.8%, China 4.4% (2007)  $26.54 billion f.o.b. (2008 est.)  United  States  12.7%,  Japan  8.5%,  Germany  7.3%,  China  6.8%,  South  Korea  6.6%,  Saudi  Arabia  6.2%,  Italy  5.8%,  United  Kingdom 4.6% (2007)  $14.21 billion (29.6% of GDP) (2004 est.)  $38.82 billion (31 December 2008 est.)  $113.3 billion (2008 est.)  $63.55 billion (2008 est.)  NA 

Public finances  Public debt  External debt  Revenues  Expenses  Economic aid 

For purchasing power parity comparisons, the US Dollar is exchanged at 0.48 Kuwaiti Dinars  only. Average wages in 2007 hover around $4,250 per month for Kuwaitis. As for skilled and  experienced non‐Kuwaiti (Engineers, Doctors, and Managers), the average monthly salary is  hiked  up  tremendously,  to  an  average  of  $10,000+  a  month  excluding  living  and  other  benefits. Please, also keep in mind that Kuwait is a tax free country, so all the above figures  reflect actual take home numbers. 

2 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Kuwait is a small country with massive oil reserves, whose economy has been traditionally  dominated  by  the  state  and  its  oil  industry.  During  the  1970s,  Kuwait  benefited  from  the  dramatic  rise  in  oil  prices,  which  Kuwait  actively  promoted  through  its  membership  in  the  Organization  of  Petroleum  Exporting  Countries  (OPEC).  The  economy  suffered  from  the  triple shock of a 1982 securities market crash, the mid‐1980s drop in oil prices, and the 1990  Iraqi  invasion  and  occupation.  The  Kuwaiti  Government‐in‐exile  depended  upon  its  $100  billion  in  overseas  investments  during  the  Iraqi  occupation  in  order  to  help  pay  for  the  reconstruction. Thus, by 1993, this balance was cut to less than half of its pre‐invasion level.  The wealth of Kuwait is based primarily on oil and capital reserves, and the Iraqi occupation  severely damaged both.  In the closing hours of the Persian Gulf War in February 1991, the Iraqi occupation forces set  ablaze  or  damaged  749  of  Kuwait's  oil  wells.  All  of  these  fires  were  extinguished  within  a  year. Production has been restored, and refineries and facilities have been modernized. Oil  exports surpassed their pre‐invasion levels in 1993 with production levels only constrained  by OPEC quotas. 

Foreign Relations of Kuwait 
Since its independence in 1961, Kuwait maintained strong international relations with most  countries, especially nations within the Arab world. Its vast oil reserves give it a prominent  voice in global economic forums and organizations like the OPEC.  Kuwait's  troubled  relationship  with  neighboring  Iraq  formed  the  core  of  its  foreign  policy  from  late  1980s  onwards.  Its  first  major  foreign  policy  problem  arose  when  Iraq  claimed  Kuwaiti  territory.  Iraq  threatened  invasion,  but  was  dissuaded  by  the  United  Kingdom's  ready  response  to  the  Amir's  request  for  assistance.  Kuwait  presented  its  case  before  the  United Nations and successfully preserved its sovereignty. UK forces were later withdrawn  and  replaced  by  troops  from  Arab  League  nations,  which  were  withdrawn  in  1963  at  Kuwait's request.  On  August  2,  1990,  Iraq  invaded  and  occupied  Kuwait.  Largely  through  the  efforts  of  King  Fahd bin Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia who was instrumental in obtaining the help of the U.S., a  multinational  coalition  was  assembled,  and,  under  UN  auspices,  initiated  military  action  against  Iraq  to  liberate  Kuwait.  Arab  states,  especially  the  other  five  members  of  the  Gulf  Cooperation  Council  (Saudi  Arabia,  Bahrain,  Qatar,  Oman,  and  the  United  Arab  Emirates),  Egypt,  and  Syria,  supported  Kuwait  by  sending  troops  to  fight  with  the  coalition.  Many  European and East Asian states sent troops, equipment, and/or financial support.  After  its  liberation,  Kuwait  largely  directed  its  diplomatic  and  cooperative  efforts  toward  states  that  had  participated  in  the  multinational  coalition.  Notably,  many  of  these  states  were  given  key  roles  in  the  reconstruction  of  Kuwait.  Conversely,  Kuwait's  relations  with  nations that had supported Iraq, among them Jordan, Sudan, Yemen, and Cuba, have proved  to be either strained or nonexistent. 

3 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Since  the  conclusion  of  the  Gulf  War,  Kuwait  has  made  efforts  to  secure  allies  throughout  the world, particularly United Nations Security Council members. In addition to the United  States,  defense  arrangements  have  been  concluded  with  the  United  Kingdom,  Russia,  and  France. Close ties to other key Arab members of the Gulf War coalition — Egypt and Syria —  also have been sustained.  Kuwait's foreign policy has been dominated for some time by its economic dependence on  oil  and  natural  gas.  As  a  developing  nation,  its  various  economies  are  insufficient  to  independently support it. As a result, Kuwait has directed considerable attention toward oil  or natural gas related issues.  With the outbreak of the War on Iraq, Kuwait has taken a strongly pro‐U.S. stance, having  been  the  nation  from  which  the  war  was  actually  launched.  It  supported  the  Coalition  Provisional  Authority,  with  particular  stress  upon  strict  border  controls  and  adequate  U.S.  troop presence.  Kuwait is a member of the UN and some of its specialized and related agencies, including the  World  Bank  (IBRD),  International  Monetary  Fund  (IMF),  World  Trade  Organization  (WTO),  General  Agreement  on  Tariffs  and  Trade  (GATT);  African  Development  Bank  (AFDB),  Arab  Fund  for  Economic  and  Social  Development  (AFESD),  Arab  League,  Arab  Monetary  Fund  (AMF),  Council  of  Arab  Economic  Unity  (CAEU),  Economic  and  Social  Commission  for  Western  Asia  (ESCWA),  Group  of  77  (G‐77),  Gulf  Cooperation  Council  (GCC),  INMARSAT,  International  Development  Association  (IDA),  International  Finance  Corporation,  International  Fund  for  Agricultural  Development,  International  Labour  Organization  (ILO),  International Marine Organization, Interpol, IOC, Islamic Development Bank (IDB), League of  Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (LORCS), Non‐Aligned Movement, Organization of Arab  Petroleum  Exporting  Countries  (OAPEC),  Organization  of  the  Islamic  Conference  (OIC),  Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), and the International Atomic Energy  Agency (IAEA). 

International disputes 
In  November  1994,  Iraq  formally  accepted  the  UN‐demarcated  border  with  Kuwait  which  had been spelled out in Security Council Resolutions 687 (1991), 773 (1993), and 883 (1993);  this formally ends earlier claims to Kuwait and to Bubiyan and Warbah islands; ownership of  Qaruh  and  Umm  al  Maradim  islands  disputed  by  Saudi  Arabia.  Kuwait  and  Saudi  Arabia  continue negotiating a joint maritime boundary with Iran; no maritime boundary exists with  Iraq in the Persian Gulf. 

Middle East 
Iran:  On  July  13,  2008,  Kuwaiti  lawmaker  Jassem  Al‐Kharafi  publicly  accused  the  West  of  "provoking"  Iran  on  the  nuclear  issue.  In  his  interview  with  state‐owned  Kuwait  TV,  Al‐ Kharafi said, "What is happening is that there are provocative Western statements, and Iran 

4 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  responds  in  the  same  way...  I  believe  that  a  matter  this  sensitive  needs  dialogue  not  escalation, and it shouldn't be dealt with as if Iran were one of America's states."  Iraq: Kuwaiti lawmaker Al‐Ameeri opposes forgiving Iraq's debt. The debt, estimated at $16  billion, represents loans Kuwait made to Baghdad in the Saddam Hussein era, mostly during  the 1980‐1988 Iraq‐Iran war. Al‐Ameeri argues that, "The debt owed by Iraq to Kuwait is the  right  of  the  Kuwaiti  people  and  no  one  has  the  right  to  negotiate  over  them."  Al‐Ameeri  believes that the Kuwaiti voices calling to forgive the debt and compensation "should not be  heeded  and  they  do  not  represent  the  Kuwaiti  people."  He  further  opposes  the  debt  forgiveness because Iraq has considerable oil wealth and because the, "Kuwaiti people shed  their blood" during the 1990 Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. "The issue is a red line for Kuwait and  no Kuwaiti will ever concede these loans," Al‐Ameeri has been quoted as saying.  On November 8, 2008, Kuwaiti lawmaker Al‐Mulla proposed that Kuwait allow Iraq to back  pay  its  debt  to  Kuwait  in  natural  gas.  The  Arab  Times  quoted  Al‐  Mulla  as  saying,  "In  this  manner, Kuwait can take the loans back from Iraq and put an end to the shortage of fuel in  its power stations."   On  April  25,  2007,  Kuwaiti  lawmaker  Saleh  Ashour  called  in  a  statement  for  reopening  Kuwait's embassy in Baghdad and for strongly supporting the government in Baghdad. But  Al‐Ghanim said he believes that it was too early to reopen the Kuwaiti embassy in Baghdad  and that this issue should wait until security situations improve.   Israel:  On  December  28,  2008,  Kuwaiti  lawmakers  Mikhled  Al‐Azmi,  Musallam  Al‐Barrak,  Marzouq  Al‐Ghanim,  Jaaman  Al‐Harbash,  Ahmad  Al‐Mulaifi,  Mohammad  Hayef  Al‐Mutairi,  Ahmad  Al‐Saadoun,  Nasser  Al‐Sane,  and  Waleed  Al‐Tabtabaie  protested  in  front  of  the  National  Assembly  building  against  the  attacks  by  Israel  on  Gaza.  Protesters  burned  Israeli  flags, waved banners reading, "No to hunger, no to submission" and chanted "Allahu Akbar."  Israel  launched  air  strikes  against  Hamas  in  the  Gaza  Strip  on  December  26  after  Hamas  launched  rockets  into  the  Israeli  town  of  Sderot  following  the  expiration  of  a  six‐month  ceasefire on December 18.  On  January  3,  2009,  Nasser  Al‐Sane,  Waleed  Al‐Tabtabaie,  Adnan  Abdulsamad,  and  other  MPs protested in front of the National Assembly against the Israeli attacks on Gaza.   After  Friday  prayers  on  January  8,  2009,  Jamaan  Al‐Harbash  and  several  other  MPs  again  protested  in  front  of  the  National  Assembly  urging  Arab  leaders  to  take  a  stronger  stand  against the Israeli attacks and open Rafah Crossing to end an embargo imposed by Israel on  the residents of Gaza.  Saudi Arabia: Although Kuwait and Saudi Arabia are strong allies and cooperate within OPEC  and  the  GCC,  Riyadh  disputes  Kuwait's  ownership  of  the  Qaruh  and  Umm  al  Maradim  islands.   Yemen: As a member of the UN Security Council in 1990 and 1991, Yemen abstained on a  number of resolutions concerning the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and voted against the "use of  5 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  force resolution." Kuwait responded by canceling aid programs, cutting diplomatic contact,  and expelling thousands of Yemeni workers. 

Europe 
Denmark:  On  November  6,  2006,  the  Kuwaiti  parliament  voted  22‐15  to  approve  severing  diplomatic  ties  with  Denmark  over  the  Jyllands‐Posten  Muhammad  cartoons  controversy  and spending about US$50 (€39.20) million to defend the prophet's image in the West. Both  votes  were  nonbinding,  meaning  the  Cabinet  does  not  have  to  abide  by  them.  Kuwaiti  lawmaker  Abdulsamad  voted  in  favor  of  cutting  diplomatic  ties,  saying,  ""We  have  to  cut  diplomatic  and  commercial  ties  with  Denmark...We  don't  have  to  eat  Danish  cheese."  Al‐ Rashid  voted  against  cutting  diplomatic  ties,  arguing  that  Muslims  have  to  be  positive  and  remember  that  it  were  some  individuals,  not  governments,  who  insulted  the  Prophet  Muhammad. Al‐Rashid was quoted as saying, "We here in Kuwait curse Christians in many of  our  mosques,  should  those  (Christian)  countries  boycott  Kuwait?"  In  February  2008,  MP  Abdullah Al‐Roumi called for an end to Kuwait's Demark boycott and was quoted as saying,  "No Muslim can accept this insult against the Prophet... It is a form of terrorism."    Greece: Greece was one of the 34 member countries in the coalition which assisted in the  liberation of Kuwait from Iraq in 1991 during the Gulf War. Greece also participated in the  UNICOM mission to patrol the demilitarized zone along the Kuwait‐Iraq border.  

Holy See 
Russia:: On 28 December 1991, Kuwait recognised the Russian Federation as the successor  state to the Soviet Union. Russia has an embassy in Kuwait City, and Kuwait has an embassy  in  Moscow.  The  current  Ambassador  of  Russia  to  Kuwait  is  Alexander  Kinshchak,  who  was  appointed by Russian President Vladimir Putin on 28 January 2008, and who presented his  credentials  to  Emir  Sabah  Al‐Ahmad  Al‐Jaber  Al‐Sabah  on  28  April  2008.  The  current  Ambassador of Kuwait to Russia is Nasser Haji Al‐Muzayen, who presented his credentials to  Vladimir Putin on 11 December 2007.   Turkey:  The  Ministry  of  Foreign  Affairs  in  Turkey  describes  the  current  relations  at  "outstanding levels". Bilateral trade between the two countries is around 275 Million dollars.  The  two  countries  have  recently  signed  fifteen  agreements  for  cooperation  in  tourism,  health, environment, economy, commercial exchange and oil. 

Rest of world 
 India:  Kuwait  is  India's  second  largest  supplier  of  crude  oil  and  non‐oil  bilateral  trade  was  over one billion US dollars in 2008. In light of these close trade relations, the two countries  have  bound  themselves  to  both  a  Mutual  Promotion  and  Reciprocal  Protection  of  Investments (BIPA) agreement and a Double Taxation Avoidance Agreement (DTAA). In June  2006, Emir Al‐Sabah visited India, and in April 2007 the two countries inked a Memorandum  of Understanding (MoU) on Labor, Employment and Manpower Development.   6 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Pakistan: After the end of the first Gulf War in 1991 Pakistani army engineers were involved  in a programme of mine clearance in the country. Kuwait was also the first country to send  aid to isolated mountain villages in Kashmir after the quake of 2005, also offering the largest  amount of aid in the aftermath of the quake ($100m).   People's Republic of China: China and Kuwait initiated diplomatic relations in 1971. In 2007,  Kuwait  exported  $2.3  billion  worth  of  goods  to  China  ($2.1  billion  of  which  was  oil)  and  Kuwait imported $1.3 billion of goods from China.  In  2007,  Kuwait  supplied  China  with  95,000  barrels  of  oil  per  day,  accounting  for  2.6%  of  China's  total  crude  oil  imports.  Saudi  Arabia  was  China's  top  supplier  with  its  shipments  jumping  69.8  percent  to  3.84  million  tons  (939,000  bpd),  followed  by  Angola  with  2.06  million  tons  (503,000  bpd),  down  27.1  percent.  Iran  became  third,  with  imports  from  the  country  shrinking  35.3  percent  to  1.18  million  tons  (289,000  bpd).  China  is  the  world's  second‐biggest  oil  consumer  after  the  US.  Abdullatif  Al‐Houti,  Managing  Director  of  International  Marketing  at  state‐run  Kuwait  Petroleum  Corporation  (KPC),  told  KUNA  in  October that Kuwait is on course for its China‐bound crude oil export target of 500,000 bpd  by  2015,  but  success  will  heavily  depend  on  the  Sino‐Kuwaiti  refinery  project.  The  two  countries  have  been  in  talks  for  the  planned  300,000  bpd  refinery  in  China's  southern  Guangdong  Province.  The  complex  is  expected  to  be  on‐stream  by  2012,  but  the  joint  venture  still  awaits  approval  from  the  National  Development  and  Reform  Commission,  China's top economic planning agency.   United States: The United States opened a consulate in Kuwait in October 1951, which was  elevated to embassy status at the time of Kuwait's independence 10 years later. The United  States supports Kuwait's sovereignty, security, and independence, as well as its multilateral  diplomatic efforts to build greater cooperation among the GCC countries.  Strategic  cooperation  between  the  United  States  and  Kuwait  increased  in  1987  with  the  implementation  of  a  maritime  protection  regime  that  ensured  the  freedom  of  navigation  through the Persian Gulf for 11 Kuwaiti tankers that were reflagged with U.S. markings.  The U.S.‐Kuwaiti strategic  partnership intensified dramatically again after Iraq's invasion of  Kuwait.  The  United  States  spearheaded  UN  Security  Council  demands  that  Iraq  withdraw  from  Kuwait  and  its  authorization  of  the  use  of  force,  if  necessary,  to  remove  Iraqi  forces  from  the  occupied  country.  The  United  States  also  played  a  dominant  role  in  the  development  of  the  multinational  military  operations  Desert  Shield  and  Desert  Storm  that  liberated  Kuwait.  The  U.S.‐Kuwaiti  relationship  has  remained  strong  in  the  post‐Gulf  War  period.  Kuwait  and  the  United  States  worked  on  a  daily  basis  to  monitor  and  to  enforce  Iraq's  compliance  with  UN  Security  Council  resolutions,  and  Kuwait  has  also  provided  the  main platform for Operation Iraqi Freedom since 2003.  Since  Kuwait's  liberation,  the  United  States  has  provided  military  and  defense  technical  assistance  to  Kuwait  from  both  foreign  military  sales  (FMS)  and  commercial  sources.  The  U.S.  Office  of  Military  Cooperation  in  Kuwait  is  attached  to  the  American  embassy  and  7 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  manages the FMS program. There are currently over 100 open FMS contracts between the  U.S. military and the Kuwait Ministry of Defense totaling $8.1 billion. Principal U.S. military  systems currently purchased by the Kuwait Defense Forces are Patriot Missile systems, F‐18  Hornet  fighters,  the  M1A2  main  battle  tank,  AH‐64D  Apache  helicopter,  and  a  major  recapitalization of Kuwait's Navy with U.S. boats.  Kuwaiti  attitudes  toward  American  products  have  been  favorable  since  the  Gulf  War.  In  1993, Kuwait publicly announced abandonment of the secondary and tertiary aspects of the  Arab  boycott  of  Israel  (those  aspects  affecting  U.S.  firms).  The  United  States  is  currently  Kuwait's largest supplier of goods and services, and Kuwait is the fifth‐largest market in the  Middle  East.  U.S.  exports  to  Kuwait  totaled  $2.14  billion  in  2006.  Provided  their  prices  are  reasonable,  U.S.  firms  have  a  competitive  advantage  in  many  areas  requiring  advanced  technology,  such  as  oil  field  equipment  and  services,  electric  power  generation  and  distribution equipment, telecommunications gear, consumer goods, and military equipment.  Kuwait also is an important partner in the ongoing U.S.‐led campaign against international  terrorism,  providing  assistance  in  the  military,  diplomatic,  and  intelligence  arenas  and  also  supporting  efforts  to  block  financing  of  terrorist  groups.  In  January  2005,  Kuwait  Security  Services  forces  engaged  in  gun  battles  with  local  extremists,  resulting  in  fatalities  on  both  sides in the first such incident in Kuwait's history.                            8 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector 

Banking and Finance 
Before  independence  in  1961,  foreign  monies,  largely  the  Indian  rupee  in  the  period  between  1930  and  1960,  circulated  in  Kuwait.  At  independence  the  Kuwaiti  dinar  was  introduced,  and  a  currency  board  was  established  to  issue  dinar  notes  and  to  maintain  reserves. In 1959 the Central Bank of Kuwait was created and took over the functions of the  currency board and the regulation of the banking system.   The  first  bank  in  Kuwait  was  established  in  1941  by  British  investors.  Subsequent  laws  prohibited foreign banks from conducting business in the country. When the British bank's  concession ended in 1971, the government bought 51 percent ownership. In 1952 another  bank,  the  National  Bank  of  Kuwait,  the  largest  commercial  bank,  was  founded.  The  establishment  of  several  other  banks,  all  under  Kuwaiti  ownership,  followed.  Some  specialized  financial  institutions  also  emerged:  the  Credit  and  Savings  Bank,  established  in  1965  by  the  government  to  channel  funds  into  domestic  projects  in  industry,  agriculture,  and  housing;  the  Industrial  Bank  of  Kuwait,  established  in  1974  to  fill  the  gap  in  medium‐  and long‐term industrial financing; and the private Real Estate Bank of Kuwait. By the 1980s,  Kuwait's banks were among the region's largest and most active financial institutions. Then  came the Suq al Manakh stock market crash in 1982.   The large revenues of the 1970s left many private individuals with substantial funds at their  disposal. These funds prompted a speculation boom in the official stock market in the mid‐ 1970s that culminated in a small crash in 1977. The government's response to this crash was  to  bail  out  the  affected  investors  and  to  introduce  stricter  regulations.  This  response  unintentionally contributed to the far larger stock market crash of the 1980s by driving the  least risk‐averse speculators into the technically illegal alternate market, the Suq al Manakh.  The Suq al Manakh had emerged next to the official stock market, which was dominated by  several older wealthy families who traded, largely among themselves, in very large blocks of  stock. The Suq al Manakh soon became the market for the new investor and, in the end, for  many old investors as well.   Share dealings using postdated checks created a huge unregulated expansion of credit. The  crash  of  the  unofficial  stock  market  finally  came  in  1982,  when  a  dealer  presented  a  postdated  check  for  payment  and  it  bounced.  A  house  of  cards  collapsed.  Official  investigation  revealed  that  total  outstanding  checks  amounted  to  the  equivalent  of  US$94  billion from about 6,000 investors. Kuwait's financial sector was badly shaken by the crash,  as was the entire economy. The crash prompted a recession that rippled through society as  individual  families  were  disrupted  by  the  investment  risks  of  particular  members  made  on  family credit. The debts from the crash left all but one bank in Kuwait technically insolvent  held up only by support from the Central Bank. Only the National Bank of Kuwait, the largest  commercial bank, survived the crisis intact. In the end, the government stepped in, devising  a  complicated  set  of  policies,  embodied  in  the  Difficult  Credit  Facilities  Resettlement  Program.  The  implementation  of  the  program  was  still  incomplete  in  1990  when  the  Iraqi  invasion changed the entire financial picture.  9 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector 

Central Bank of Kuwait 
Establishment of the Central Bank 
The Central Bank of Kuwait began operating in April 1969 in accordance with Law No. 32 of  1968  concerning  Currency,  the  Central  Bank  of  Kuwait  and  the  Organisation  of  Banking  Business.  Bank supervision: The Central Bank of Kuwait supervises the banking sector in the country. 

Objectives of the Central Bank 
The objectives of the Central Bank shall be:  To exercise the privilege of the issue of currency on behalf of the State;  1. To endeavor to secure the stability of the Kuwaiti currency and its free convertibility  into foreign currencies;  2. To  endeavor  to  direct  credit  policy  in  such  a  manner  as  to  assist  the  social  and  economic progress and the growth of national income;  3. To control the banking system in the State of Kuwait;  4. To serve as Banker to the Government;  5. To render financial advice to the Government 

Operations of the Central Bank 
Relations with the Government  The Central Bank will offer advice to the Government in order to facilitate the realization of  its objectives and functions, and the Government will consult the Bank in matters relating to  monetary and credit policy.  The Central Bank shall act as banker and fiscal agent for the Government. On this basis:  a. Government  funds  in  Kuwaiti  Dinars  on  current  accounts  shall  be  held  solely  with  the Bank. No interest shall be paid by the Bank on such deposits.  b. The Bank shall in general carry out, free of charge, banking transactions and services  relating to the Government inside and outside the country.  c. The  Government  may  place  funds  in  Kuwaiti  Dinars  with  local  banks,  after  seeking  the opinion of the Central Bank and in a manner not conflicting with the monetary  policy in force.  d. The Minister of Finance may entrust the Central Bank with the administration of any  other Government funds in accordance with the conditions agreed upon at the time. 

10 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  e. The Ministry of Finance shall transfer to the Central Bank such amounts as may be  necessary  for  the  implementation  of  any  particular  monetary  policy,  after  the  Minister of Finance has approved such policy.  Relations with Local Banks  The Central Bank may:  a. Open deposit accounts for banks and financial institutions operating in the State of  Kuwait, and for public credit institutions.  b. Open  deposit  accounts  for  other  institutions,  upon  approval  of  the  Minister  of  Finance. No interest shall be paid on the accounts referred to in the preceding two  paragraphs except in such special cases as may be decided by the Board of Directors  of the Central Bank and approved by the Minister of Finance.  c. Open accounts in Kuwaiti Dinars with banks.  d. Participate with banks in any scheme relating to the insurance of deposits.  The Central Bank may carry out the following operations with banks only, and not otherwise:  a. Sell, purchase, discount or rediscount commercial papers, provided that these shall  mature within one year from the date of acquisition, discount or rediscount by the  Bank.  b. Give  loans  or  advances,  in  emergency  cases,  through  current  account  for  a  period  not exceeding six months against such collateral as the Bank may consider adequate.  Gold and Foreign Exchange Operations Inside and Outside the Country  The Central Bank may:  a. Purchase, sell, import and export gold and silver coins and bullion;  b. Carry out foreign exchange operations and transfers of all kinds;  c. Open  accounts  with  foreign  central  banks  or  other  banks  and  with  international  financial or monetary institutions;  d. Open  accounts  for  central  banks,  or  other  foreign  banks  and  for  international  financial  or  monetary  institutions,  and  act  as  correspondent  for  such  banks  and  institutions;  e. Grant  advances  or  credits  to  central  banks,  other  foreign  banks  or  international  financial or monetary institutions, and obtain credits, advances or loans from them,  provided that such operations are within the scope of its functions as central bank;  f. Purchase,  sell,  discount  or  rediscount  bills  or  securities  or  certificates  issued  or  guaranteed  by  foreign  governments  or  international  financial  or  monetary  institutions,  provided  that  they  are  expressed  in  freely  convertible  currencies  and  are easily negotiable in financial markets;  g. Purchase  and  sell  foreign  bonds  or  bills  other  than  those  issued  or  guaranteed  by  foreign  governments  or  international  financial  or  monetary  institutions,  provided 

11 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  that they are expressed in convertible foreign currencies and are easily negotiable in  financial markets;  h. Purchase and sell commercial papers acceptable to foreign banks.  The Central Bank may:  a. Invest the Pension Fund set up for the benefit of the officials and employees of the  Bank,  and  grant  loans  to  such  officials  and  employees  in  accordance  with  the  regulations decided by the Board of Directors;  b. Own  only  such  immovable  property  as  assigned  for  running  the  business  of  the  Bank;  c. In general, carry out all operations customarily carried out by central banks and not  inconsistent with the exercise of its powers or the discharge of its duties under this  Law, and undertake such duties as may be assigned to it under any other law.   Accounts and Statements  The financial year of the Central Bank shall be the same as the financial year ofthe State.  The bases for evaluation of the assets of the Central Bank shall be specified by decree.  Credit  balances  on  this  account  shall  not  be  entered  in  the  Profit  and  Loss  Account  of  the  Bank. Debit balances shall be met by the Government unless the Board of Directors decides  otherwise.  The  accounts  of  the  Central  Bank  shall  be  audited  by  one  auditor  or  more.  The  Council  of  Ministers shall, on the proposal of the Minister of Finance, select the auditor or auditors and  fix their fees.  The Governor of the Central Bank shall submit to the Minister of Finance:  a. A monthly statement showing the assets and liabilities of the Bank. Such statement  shall be published in the Official Gazette.  b. An  annual  report  on  the  Bank's  operations,  including  the  Balance  Sheet  and  the  Profit  and  Loss  Account  for  the  ending  financial  year,  and  a  general  review  of  the  monetary,  banking,  financial  and  economic  affairs.  This  report  shall  be  submitted  not later than four months after the end of the financial year.  c. A  report  on  the  events  affecting  the  monetary  or  financial  position,  including  the  causes and outcome of such events and recommendations for handling them.  General Provisions  The  Central  Bank  shall  be  exempt  from  all  taxes,  duties  and  financial  dues  whatsoever,  whether they be for the treasury, municipalities or any other public institution or body. 

12 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  The  Bank  shall  also  be  exempt  from  the  advance  payment  of  judicial  fees,  deposits  and  guarantees, and settlement thereof shall be deferred until the case under litigation has been  decided.  Debts  due  to  the  Central  Bank  shall  be  treated  in  the  same  way  as  debts  due  to  the  Government, and shall take priority over debts due to other  creditors. Such  debts shall  be  collected by the same procedures provided for the collection of debts due to the State.  The Central Bank may only be liquidated by a law specifying the liquidation procedures and  their dates. 

Organization of Banking Business 
Establishment of Banks  Banks are those institutions whose basic and usual functions involve the receipt of deposits  for  use  in  banking  operations,  such  as:  the  discount,  purchase  and  sale  of  commercial  papers, granting of loans and advances, issuing and collecting cheques, placing of public and  private  loans,  dealing  in  foreign  exchange  and  precious  metals,  and  any  other  credit  operations  or  operations  considered  by  the  Law  of  Commerce  or  by  custom  as  banking  operations.  For  the  purposes  of  implementation  of  the  provisions  of  this  Law,  and  unless  otherwise  provided,  the  branches  of  any  bank  operating  in  the  State  of  Kuwait  shall  be  considered as one bank.  The provisions of this Chapter shall not apply to:  a. Public credit institutions set up by law.  b. Financial  and  investment  institutions  and  companies  even  if  they  are  permitted  by  their  articles  of  association  to  receive  deposits  and  execute  investment  operations  and some banking operations.  c.  Real estate companies which undertake the partition of land or the construction of  buildings and the sale thereof on credit.   The Board of Directors of the Central Bank may ‐ upon approval of the Minister of Finance ‐  subject all or some of the institutions and companies referred to, or today rules which the  Board of Directors may draw up for purposes of supervision and which are in harmony with  the  nature  of  the  activities  of  such  institutions  and  companies.  The  opinion  of  the  Central  Bank  shall  be  sought  in  respect  of  the  Articles  of  Association  and  Memorandums  of  Agreement  relating  to  financial  and  investment  companies,  or  amendments  thereto,  in  order to ascertain the economic viability of such companies.   Without  prejudice  to  the  provisions  of  the  Law  of  Commerce,  wherever  they  are  not  in  conflict  with  the  provisions  of  this  Law,  banking  business  may  only  be  practiced  by  institutions set up in the form of joint‐stock companies, the shares of which are placed for  public subscription. 

13 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector   Banks founded or co‐founded by the Government, and branches of foreign banks licensed  to  operate  in  the  State  of  Kuwait,  may  be  exempted  from  the  provisions  of  the  preceding  Paragraph by a decision of the Council of Ministers.  Funds allocated for opening a foreign bank’s branch in the State of Kuwait, shall not be less  than  fifteen  million  Dinars.  This  amount  may  be  increased  by  decision  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank.  The  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank  lays  down  the  bases, rules and regulations to be complied with in regard to the operation of branches of  foreign banks in the State of Kuwait. A foreign bank’s branch shall be deemed as one bank in  the application of the provisions of this Law.  Before  the  formalities  of  incorporation  are  processed,  the  applications  to  establish  banks  should  be  presented  to  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank  to  issue  the  recommendations necessary.  Registration of Banks  Without  prejudice  to  the  provisions  of  the  Law  of  Commerce  and  the  Law  of  Commercial  Companies,  wherever  they  are  not  in  conflict  with  the  provisions  of  this  Law,  no  banking  institution is allowed to start operation until it has been registered in the Register of Banks  at the Central Bank.  No institutions other than those registered in the Register of Banks are allowed to practice  banking  business  or  use  in  their  business  addresses,  publications  or  advertisements  the  terms:  "bank,  banker,  bank  owner"  or  any  other  wording  the  usage  of  which  may  mislead  the public as to the nature of the institution. No institutions other than those registered in  the  Central  Bank  Register  of  Banks  or  Register  of  Investment  Companies  are  allowed  to  receive money for investment from third parties.  The  Central  Bank  may  ‐  where  necessary  ‐  ascertain  by  any  means  it  deems  fit  that  no  particular  company  or  individual  firm  violates  the  provisions  of  the  preceding  two  paragraphs.  Without  prejudice  to  any  severer  penalty  under  any  other  law,  anyone  who  violates the provisions of the first, second and third paragraphs of this Article shall be liable  to  imprisonment  for  a  term  not  exceeding  two  years  and  the  payment  of  a  fine  not  exceeding a hundred thousand Dinars, or to either of these penalties.  The  licensing  body  shall,  at  the  Central  Bank  request,  revoke  the  operating  license  of  the  business  which  exercised  the  contravening  activity,  and  undertake  all  necessary  arrangements to prevent its repeated exercise of such activity.  Registration or refusal of registration of banks shall be affected by a decision of the Minister  of Finance on the recommendation of the Board of Directors of the Central Bank.  The  Minister  of  Finance  shall,  on  the  recommendation  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central Bank, issue regulations for the registration of banks, including the rules, procedures  and dates for registration, amendments and publication of registration.  14 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  a. Registered  banks  shall  notify  the  Central  Bank  of  any  amendments  they  intend  to  make  to  their  Memorandums  of  Agreement  or  Articles  of  Association.  If  such  amendments  are  approved  in  principle  by  the  Central  Bank,  the  formalities  necessary  for  processing  them  may  then  be  accomplished  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  Law  of  Commercial  Companies.  Such  amendments  shall  not  be  effective until they have been entered in the Register of Banks.  b. Amendment of entries related to other data which are subject to registration in the  Register  but  not  involving  amendment  of  the  Articles  of  Association  or  Memorandums  of  Agreement  may  be  effected  upon  approval  thereof  by  the  Governor of the Central Bank.  Deletion from Register and Liquidation of Banks  Without  prejudice  to  the  provisions  of  the  Law  of  Commercial  Companies,  no  bank  may  cease is operations or merge with any other bank unless it is given advance permission by  the  Minister  of  Finance  on  the  recommendation  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank. The Board of Directors of the Central Bank shall, in such a case, ascertain that the bank  has discharged all its obligations towards its customers and creditors in accordance with the  general provisions laid down in this respect.   A bank may be deleted from the Register of Banks  a. At its own request;  b. If  it  does  not  start  business  within  one  year  from  the  date  it  is  notified  of  the  decision regarding its registration in the Register of Banks;  c. If it is declared bankrupt;  d. If it merges with another bank;  e. If it ceases its operations or if its liquidity or solvency are endangered;  f. If it commits any act in violation of the provisions of this Law.  The  deletion  of  any  bank  under  (e)  and  (f)  above  shall  not  be  proposed  until  the  bank  concerned has been notified of the proposal and given an opportunity to express its views.  The Minister of Finance shall, on the proposal of the Board of Directors of the Central Bank,  issue a decision regarding the deletion. The decision shall be effective from the date of its  publication  in  the  Official  Gazette.  Before  proposing  the  deletion  from  the  register  of  any  bank the liquidity or solvency of which is endangered, the Board of Directors of the Central  Bank may take any or all of the following measures:  a. Forbid the bank from undertaking certain operations, or set limits on the business of  the bank;  b. Appoint a temporary controller to supervise the progress of the bank's business;  c. Assign  the  Central  Bank  to  manage  the  bank  for  a  certain  period  of  time,  and  thereafter decide whether the bank can carry on by itself or should be deleted from  the  Register  and  liquidated.  Expenses  incurred  for  management  purposes  shall  be  borne by the bank involved.  15 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  In  all  cases,  the  Central  Bank  may  ‐  if  it  deems  it  in  the  interest  of  depositors  ‐  ask  the  appropriate  court  to  issue  a  decision  prohibiting  measures  against  the  bank  involved  and  staying all lawsuits filed against. Such a decision shall be valid for one year. Every bank which  it  has  been  decided  to  delete  from  the  Register  of  Banks  shall  be  liquidated.  The  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank  shall  specify  the  rules  for  liquidating  the  transactions  outstanding at the time the decision is issued.  Activities Not to be Undertaken by Banks  Banks must not:  a. Engage in trade or industry, or own any goods unless such goods have been acquired  in settlement of debts due to them. Such goods shall be sold by the bank within one  year from the date of acquisition;  b. Purchase  any  real  estate  other  than  the  required  for  conducting  their  business  or  accommodating their staff, unless such property has been acquired in settlement of  debts.  In  the  latter  case,  the  bank  shall  sell  the  real  estate  within  a  period  not  exceeding three years. The said period, however, may be extended by a decision of  the Board of Directors of the Central Bank;  c. Own  or  deal  in  their  own  shares  unless  such  shares  have  been  acquired  in  settlement of debts due to them, and provided that they sell them within two years  from the date of acquisition.  Banks may:  a. Purchase,  for  their  own  account,  shares  of  other  commercial  companies  within  a  limit of 50% of the bank's own funds. This limit may not be exceeded without prior  approval by the Central Bank.  b. Own shares or other assets held with them in settlement of debts due to them. In  such cases, the bank shall dispose of these assets within two years from the date of  acquisition.  To be a member of a Bank's Board of Directors, or in charge of the Executive Staff of a bank,  or  Deputy  or  Assistant  thereof,  or  to  continue  occupying  any  of  these  posts,  requires  the  fulfillment of the following conditions:  a. Not  to  have  been  adjudged  guilty  in  an  offense  involving  dishonesty,  or  breach  of  trust;  b. Not to have been declared bankrupt;  c. Not to have abstained from payment, even once;  d. To be of good reputation;  e. To have adequate experience in banking, financial or economic affairs in  f. Compliance  with  the  Rules  and  Regulations  laid  down  under  a  resolution  of  the  Board of Directors of the Central Bank of Kuwait;  g. Not  to  be  a  member  of  a  Board  of  Directors  or  staff  in  any  of  the  other  banks  operating in the State of Kuwait.  16 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Chairmen of banks' Boards of Directors shall notify the Central Bank of Kuwait of nominees  to the membership of that Board, thirty days prior to the date fixed for the meeting of the  General  Assembly  expected  to  be  held  to  elect  the  members  of  the  Board  of  Directors.  Moreover,  the  Central  Bank  of  Kuwait  shall  be  notified  of  the  names  of  the  candidates  standing  for  holding  the  positions  referred  to  in  the  preceding  paragraph.  The  Board  of  Directors of the  Central  Bank  of  Kuwait  shall  have  the  right  within  twenty‐one  days  from  the  date  of  its  notification to object to the appointment of any such nominees under a resolution showing  the relevant reason, for failure to fulfill the required conditions.  Such  objection  shall  result  in  the  exclusion  of  the  nominee  in  question  from  candidacy  for  the Board of Directors or from occupying any such positions, as the case may be. Nominees  not  notified  to  the  Central  Bank  or  candidates  objected  to  by  the  Central  Bank  of  Kuwait  according to the provisions of this  The Board of Directors of the Central Bank may request from the Board of Directors of the  concerned  bank  the  removal  of  any  of  those  mentioned  in  the  first  paragraph,  if  those  occupying  these  posts  lose  –during  the  time  of  their  service  ‐  any  of  the  conditions  mentioned  in  this  article,  or  if  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank  sees  in  that  measure  the  safeguard  of  the  depositors  funds  or  shareholders  interests  or  the  bank’s  general  interest.  If  the  removal  does  not  take  place,  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank shall have the right to issue a resolution showing the relevant reason for the removal  of any of the above mentioned from their posts, and make a relevant entry in the Register of  Banks.  Banks  must  not,  in  any  form,  give  loans  or  overdrafts  through  current  account  or  issue  guarantees  in  favor  of  the  members  of  their  Boards  of  Directors  without  prior  permission  from the General Assembly.  Such  loans,  advances  and  guarantees  shall  be  subject  to  the  rules  applied  by  the  bank  to  other customers. This prohibition shall not include the opening of documentary credits. No  bank may issue "Travelers' Cheques" without prior permission from the Central Bank.  Provisions Relating to Supervision  The Central Bank may issue to the banks such instructions as it deems necessary to realize its  credit or monetary policy or to ensure the sound progress of banking business.  This provision applies to units subject to the supervision of the Central Bank of Kuwait.  Branches of foreign banks are bound to comply with that ratio within three years from the  date of their licensing to operate in the State of Kuwait.  The  Kuwaiti  banks,  branches  of  foreign  banks,  and  units  mentioned  in  the  first  paragraph,  operating at the time of application of this law shall carry out the necessary adjustments in  17 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  compliance  with  the  provisions  of  this  Article  within  three  years  from  the  date  of  its  application.  The Board of Directors of the Central Bank may ‐ whenever necessary – draw up rules and  regulations  to  which  all  banks  shall  adhere  in  order  to  ensure  their  liquidity  and  solvency,  particularly  with  regard  to  the  ratios  which  must  be  maintained  between  the  following  items:  • • • The bank's own funds on the one hand and the amount of its liabilities on the other;  The bank's liquid funds on the one hand and the aggregate of its term and demand  liabilities on the other;  The amount of the banks own funds on the one hand and the amount of its liabilities  in the form of acceptances and guarantees on the other. 

In  the  instructions  issued  and  notified  by  the  Central  Bank  to  the  banks,  the  Central  Bank  shall  define  the  meaning  of  the  terms:  "bank's  own  funds",  "liquid  funds",  "liabilities"  and  such other items.  The Board of Directors of the Central Bank may, upon approval of the Minister of Finance:  1. Fix  for  banks  the  maximum  amount  for  discount  or  loan  operations,  or  for  other  banking operations which they may carry out with effect from a certain date.  2. Fix for banks:  a. The  minimum  amount  which  customers  must  pay  in  cash  to  cover  the  opening of documentary credits;  b. The  maximum  amount  which  may  be  lent  to  any  single  person  –  whether  natural or juristic ‐ in proportion to the bank's own funds;  c. The proportion of the bank's funds which must be deposited in cash with the  Central Bank;  d. The  proportion  of  the  bank's  funds  which  must  be  invested  in  the  local  market;  e. The  rate  of  interest  which  the  banks  shall  pay  on  deposits,  and  the  maximum  rates  of  interest  and  commission  which  they  may  charge  their  customers.  Decisions  issued  by  the  Central  Bank  in  application  of  the  provisions  of  the  preceding  two  Articles  shall  have  no  retroactive  effect  and  shall  not  hinder  the  execution  of  agreements  concluded between banks and their customers prior to the issue of such decisions.  In the event exceptional circumstances arise and threaten the regularity of banking business,  the Governor of the Central Bank may ‐ upon approval of the Minister of Finance ‐ order the  banks  to  close  temporarily  and  to  stop  all  their  operations.  The  banks  shall,  then,  resume  their  operations  by  a  decision  to  be  issued  by  the  Governor  of  the  Central  Bank  and  approved by the Minister of Finance. 

18 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Specialized Banks  Specialized  banks  are  meant  to  be  those  banks  the  main  function  of  which  is  to  finance  certain economic sectors, such as the real estate, industrial or agricultural sectors, and which  do not basically receive demand deposits.  Specialized  banks  shall  be  subject  to  the  provisions  relating  to  the  organization  of  banking  business,  wherever  such  provisions  are  not  in  conflict  with  the  nature  of  the  activities  of  these banks.  The Board of Directors of the Central Bank may lay down special rules for the supervision of  each type of the specialized banks. Such rules shall, in particular, cover the following:  a. Terms for receipt of deposits.  b. The maximum limit for the value of bonds specialized banks may issue, as well as the  terms for such issue.  c. The terms relating to loans and other credit facilities given by specialized banks.  d. The rules relating to participation in establishing other companies, or the purchase  of their shares.  Inspection of Banks and Institutions Subject to Supervision by the Central Bank  a. The  Central  Bank  may,  at  any  time,  inspect  banks  and  financial  companies  and  institutions subject to the Central Bank supervision under the provisions of this Law,  in  addition  to  branches,  companies  and  banks  that  operate  abroad  and  are  subsidiaries of Kuwaiti banks. Co‐ordination shall be carried out in this regard with  the central banks or banking supervision authorities in the concerned countries. The  banking supervision authorities in the other countries shall carry out the inspection  of  branches  of  their  banks  operating  in  the  State  of  Kuwait.  In  this  regard,  co‐ ordination with the Central Bank of Kuwait shall precede inspection.  b. Central  Bank  staff  authorized  to  conduct  inspection  shall  have  the  right  to  see  the  accounts,  books,  records,  instruments  and  all  documents  they  deem  necessary  for  inspection. They may ask any member of the board of directors, or any official of the  bank  or  institution  to  submit  and  give  such  data  and  information  they  deem  necessary for the purposes of inspection. Review of books, records and instruments  shall be carried out within the premises of the bank or institution inspected.  c. The  Central  Bank  shall  make  a  comprehensive  report  on  the  findings  of  inspection  made in any bank or institution. The report shall incorporate recommendations on  the  measures  the  Central  Bank  deems  useful  for  rectifying  any  unsound  position  discovered through inspection. The Governor of the Central Bank shall send a copy  of  the  report  to  the  Chairman  of  the  Board  of  Directors  or  to  the  Manager  of  the  bank or institution inspected. The Governor of the Central Bank may fix a period of  grace for the bank or institution to eliminate violations or correct unsound positions  discovered  through  inspection.  Periodic  dates  and  rules  relating  to  inspection  shall  be set by the Board of Directors of the Central Bank.  19 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Without prejudice to any severer penalty under any other law, every member of the board  of directors, manager, or official of the bank or institution inspected who refuses to submit  information  and  data  or  to  present  books,  records,  and  instruments  required  by  the  inspector for inspection purposes, or who gives information or data while knowing that it is  untrue,  shall  be  liable  to  imprisonment  for  a  term  not  exceeding  three  months  and  to  the  payment  of  a  fine  not  less  than  one  hundred  but  not  exceeding  two  hundred  twenty‐five  Dinars, or to either of these two punishments.  Central Bank officials authorized to conduct inspection shall ‐ during the term of their service  and after quitting their jobs ‐ maintain the secrecy of accounts, books and instruments they  review by virtue of their duty. They shall not disclose any information relating to the affairs  of banks or institutions inspected, or to the affairs of their customers, except in such cases  where it is permissible to do so by law.   Without  prejudice  to  any  severer  punishment  under  any  other  law,  every  person  who  violates  the  prohibition  provided  for  in  the  preceding  paragraph  shall  be  liable  to  imprisonment  for  a  period  not  exceeding  three  months  and  to  the  payment  of  a  fine  not  exceeding  two  hundred  twenty‐five  Dinars,  or  to  either  of  these  two  punishments,  plus  discharge from service.  Accounts and Statements  Banks shall do the following:  a. End their financial year on the thirty‐first of December every year;  b. Submit to the Central Bank, within three months from the end of their financial year,  their Balance Sheet and Profit and loss Account.  Foreign  bank  branches  permitted  to  be  opened  under  the  provisions  of  this  Law  shall  maintain  independent  accounts  for  all  their  operations  in  Kuwait,  including  balance‐sheets  and profit and loss accounts.  The Central Bank may ask the banks to submit such statements, information and statistical  data as the Bank considers necessary to carry out its functions. The Central Bank may also  establish a system for the collection of statistics on banking  credit on periodical basis. The  nature  of  such  statements,  information  and  statistical  data,  as  well  as  their  forms  and  the  periods during which they should be submitted, shall be specified by the Board of Directors  of the Central Bank.  Banks  must  submit  to  the  Central  Bank  all  data,  information  and  statistics  it  requests,  in  accordance  with  the  system  the  Central  Bank  lays  down  for  this  purpose.  All  these  information shall remain confidential, except for statistical data in an aggregate form, data  and information exchanged between the Central Bank of Kuwait and other central banks and  banking supervision authorities, in fulfillment of the objectives of aggregate supervision on  banks, branches and companies that are subsidiaries of these banks. Exchange of these data 

20 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  and  information  shall  be  in  accordance  with  the  arrangements  agreed  on  between  the  Central Bank of Kuwait and the concerned central banks or banking supervision authorities.  The  Central  Bank  may  establish  a  System  of  Risks  for  the  purpose  of  assisting  banks  to  evaluate  the  financial  positions  of  persons  applying  to  them  for  credit,  and  to  enable  the  Central  Bank  to  be  constantly  aware  of  the  trends  of  banking  credit  and  to  assist  in  the  application of the system of discount and rediscount at the Central Bank.  The Board of Directors of the Central Bank shall lay down the rules and procedures for the  System, and shall fix the data and returns relating to its enforcement. Data and information  acquired  through  the  System  of  Risks  shall  only  be  disclosed  to  persons  who  should  be  advised thereof under the rules laid down for the implementation of the System.  Without prejudice to any severer punishment under any other law, anyone who violates this  prohibition  shall  be  liable  to  imprisonment  for  a  term  not  exceeding  three  months  and  to  the  payment  of  a  fine  not  exceeding  two  hundred  twenty‐five  Dinars,  or  to  either  one  of  these two punishments, plus discharge from service in all cases.  The auditor shall indicate in his annual report the rules and means relied upon in verifying  the existence of assets, the methods applied in their evaluation thereof, and the process of  assessing  outstanding  liabilities.  The  auditor’s  annual  report  shall  include  the  auditor’s  opinion on the adequacy of internal control systems applied in the bank, and the sufficiency  of provisions against any decline in assets value and against the bank liabilities, along with  determining the shortage in these provisions if applicable.  The auditor shall clarify in his report whether the operations audited were contrary to any  rules or provisions of the Law concerning the Central Bank and the Organization of Banking  Business, or to the regulations and decisions issued in pursuance of the said Law. A copy of  the report shall be forwarded to the Governor of the Central Bank.  The auditor shall ‐on request of the Central Bank– check and audit any transactions carried  out by the bank whose accounts are audited by him and present a report accordingly to the  Central  Bank.  Furthermore,  the  auditor  shall  sign  any  statements  or  accounting  data  forwarded by the bank to the Central Bank. Such signature shall testify to the correctness of  theses statements and data.  The auditor may not receive any loans ‐ whether with or without collateral ‐ or guarantees  from the bank the accounts of which he audits.  Administrative Penalties  1. If a bank violates the provisions of this Law or the decisions and instructions issued  in  pursuance  thereof,  or  the  provisions  of  its  Articles  of  Association,  or  fails  to  submit the documents, statements or information which it is required to submit to  the  Central  Bank,  or  submits  statements  discrepant  with  facts,  the  following  penalties may be imposed:  21 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  a. Warning.  b. Impose financial penalties that are commensurate with the graveness of the  violation, and do not exceed fifty thousand Dinars.  c. Temporarily  suspend  some  or  all  operations  usually  carried  out  by  the  Central Bank with banks.  d. Prohibit  the  bank  from  carrying  out  certain  operations,  or  imposing  any  other limitations on its business.  e. Request  the  removal  or  replacement  of  the  employee  responsible  for  the  violation, if that employee is among those in charge of the main sectors of  the bank’s activity.  f. Consider the member of the bank’s Board of Directors, which is responsible  for the violation, unfit for the Board membership.  g. Appoint  a  temporary  controller  to  supervise  the  progress  of  work  at  the  bank.  The  powers  and  competences  of  that  controller  shall  be  determined  by the Board of Directors of the Central Bank.  h. Dissolve  the  bank’s  Board  of  Directors  and  appoint  a  commissioner  to  manage the bank until the election of a new Board.  i. Deleting from the Register of Banks.  2. The penalties provided for in paragraphs (a) and (c) shall be imposed by a decision of  the  Governor.  The  penalties  provided  for  in  paragraphs  (b),  (d),  (e),  (f),  (g)  and  (h)  shall  be  imposed  by  a  decision  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank.  The  penalty provided for in paragraph (i) shall be imposed by a decision of the Minister  of  Finance,  after  the  approval  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank,  and  after perusal of the concerned bank’s explanation in this regard. Unless involving a  third  party’s  rights,  any  money  achieved  by  the  violating  bank  as  a  result  of  the  committed  violations,  shall  become  the  property  of  the  Public  Treasury.  Furthermore,  all  financial  gains  achieved  by  a  member  of  the  bank’s  Board  of  Directors, or the bank’s employee, as a result of committed violations shall become  the  property  of  the  Public  Treasury.  The  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank  of  Kuwait lays down the rules and principles to be applied in determining the amounts  that shall become the property of Public Treasury.  3. Members of Board of Directors, the officer in charge of the Executive Staff, General  Managers,  Deputies  or  Assistants  thereof,  Sector  Managers,  and  Branch  Managers  of the violating bank shall –all within their respective competences‐ be responsible  for deliberately committing any act that resulted in the bank’s violation of this Law  and the decisions and instructions issued in pursuance thereof or the provisions of  the bank’s Articles of Association, or for failing to submit the documents, statements  or information which it is required to submit to the Central Bank, or for submitting  statements discrepant with facts. The person responsible for the violation shall bear  all ensuing damages to the bank, its shareholders or third parties, as a result of the  violation.  Except for cases allowed by the law, any member of the bank’s Board of Directors, or bank  manager or employee or worker, shall not disclose any information –during the period of his  employment  or  after  leaving  work  at  the  bank‐  regarding  the  affairs  of  the  bank  or  its  22 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  customers, or other banks’ affairs, which he may have become aware of due to the activities  inherent in his position.  Without prejudice to any severer punishment under any other law, anyone who violates the  prohibition mentioned in the previous paragraph shall be liable to imprisonment for a term  not  exceeding  three  months  and  the  payment  of  a  fine  not  exceeding  two  hundred  and  twenty five Dinars, or to either of these punishments, plus dismissal from the service.  Islamic Banks  Islamic  Banks  exercise  the  activities  pertaining  to  banking  business,  and  any  activities  considered  by  the  Law  of  Commerce  or  by  customary  practice  as  banking  activities,  in  compliance  with  the  Islamic  Shari'ah  principles.  Islamic  banks  ordinarily  accept  all  types  of  deposits,  in  the  form  of  current,  savings,  or  investment  accounts,  whether  for  fixed  terms  and purposes or otherwise. These banks carry out financing operations for all terms, using  Shari'ah  Contracts,  such  as:  Murabaha,  Musharakah  and  Mudarabah.  Furthermore,  these  banks provide various types of banking and financial services to their customers and to the  public.  They  conduct  financial  and  direct  investment  operations  whether  on  their  own  account  or  on  the  account  of  other  parties  or  in  partnership  with  others,  including  establishment  of  companies  or  holding  equity  participations  in  existing  companies  or  companies under establishment, which undertake various economic activities, in accordance  with both Islamic Shari'ah principles and controls laid down by the Board of Directors of the  Central Bank, and all that in compliance with the provisions of this Law.  The  Central  Bank  shall  lay  down  the  rules  and  controls  that  regulate  the  activities  of  branches of foreign Islamic banks authorized to operate in the State of Kuwait. Insofar as the  provisions of this Law are concerned, the branches of any foreign Islamic bank operating in  the State of Kuwait shall be considered as one bank.  As  an  exception  of  the  provisions  of  the  Commercial  Companies  Law  pertaining  to  the  establishment of companies, and of the provisions of this Law (on Islamic banks) pertaining  to  capital  and  share  percentages  of  founders'  subscription,  Kuwaiti  banks  –  with  the  approval of the Central Bank – may establish subsidiary companies to conduct activities of  Islamic  Banks  in  accordance  with  Shari'ah  principles  and  the  provisions  of  this  Law.  Each  Kuwaiti  bank  may  not  establish  more  than  one  company  with  only  one  premises,  and  the  capital of the company shall not be less than fifteen million Kuwaiti Dinars. The founder bank  shall  subscribe  for  a  share  of  not  less  than  51%  in  the  capital  of  the  company,  and  shall  maintain that percentage at all times after the establishment. The remaining shares shall be  placed  for  public  subscription.  If  placement  is  not  entirely  covered  by  public  subscription,  the remaining shares shall be covered by the founder bank itself.  Apart  from  the  exception  stipulated  in  the  preceding  paragraph,  the  subsidiary  company  mentioned  in  that  paragraph,  which  conducts  its  activity  in  accordance  with  the  Shari'ah  principles,  shall  be  considered  an  independent  Islamic  bank  in  the  application  of  the  provisions  of  this  Law.  The  bank  shall  not  sell  or  transfer  the  property  of  its  subsidiary  23 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  company  or  any  part  thereof  to  any  other  party.  Before  starting  the  formalities  of  incorporation,  applications  for  establishing  Islamic  banks  shall  be  presented  to  the  Central  Bank, together with the following documents:  a. A statement citing the founders' names, nationalities, addresses, and shares in the  bank's capital;  b. A draft of the Memorandum of Agreement and Articles of Association;  c. The feasibility study for establishing the bank; and  d. Any other documents that the Central Bank may require.  Application  forms  for  establishing  branches  of  foreign  Islamic  banks  shall  be  presented  to  the Central Bank, together with the following documents:  a. A  copy  of  the  Memorandum  of  Agreement  and  Articles  of  Association  of  the  applicant bank;  b. The feasibility study for establishing the branch;  c. Evidence that the Headquarters of the foreign Islamic bank is subject to the parent  country  supervisory  authority,  together  with  the  relevant  approval  thereof  to  establish the branch applied for, and  d. Any other documents that the Central Bank may require.  Applications to establish Islamic banks or a branch of foreign Islamic bank shall be submitted  to the Board of Directors of the Central Bank for its approval in principle or refusal thereof.  The license given to establish a branch of a foreign Islamic bank shall not be transferable to  any other party. Islamic banks shall be registered in a special register for Islamic Banks at the  Central  Bank,  pursuant  to  applications  presented  to  the  Central  Bank  on  relevant  forms.  Registration  therein  shall  be  affected  by  a  decision  of  the  Minister  of  Finance  on  recommendation of the Board of Directors of the Central Bank. Islamic Banks shall not start  operation until they have been registered in that Register.  Islamic banks shall not establish branches inside or outside Kuwait without prior permission  from  the  Central  Bank,  and  before  having  these  branches  registered  in  the  Islamic  Bank  Register. The Minister of Finance shall, on the recommendation of the Board of Directors of  the  Central  Bank,  issue  an  Islamic  Bank  Register  Bylaw  that  shall  include  rules,  procedures  and  timings  of  effecting,  amending  and  declaring  Register  entries.  In  keeping  with  the  provisions of the Law of Commercial Companies, and without prejudice to the provisions of  this Law, registration of Islamic banks in the Register shall require the following:  a. The  bank  takes  the  form  of  a  joint‐stock  company  that  places  its  shares  for  public  subscription.  Branches  of  foreign  Islamic  banks,  once  permitted  in  the  State  of  Kuwait,  may  be  excluded  from  this  provision  by  a  decision  of  the  Council  of  Ministers, upon the proposal of the Board of Directors of the Central Bank and the  approval of the Minister of Finance.  b. The  Central  Bank  approves  the  bank's  Memorandum  of  Agreement  and  Articles  of  Association.  24 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Registration  of  branches  of  foreign  Islamic  banks  in  the  Register,  shall  require  provision  of  the following documents to the Central Bank:  a. An  affidavit  by  the  Headquarters  of  the  foreign  bank  declaring  its  commitment  to  any rights of depositors and creditors as well as all liabilities that may accrue on the  branch;  b. Evidence of the transfer of the minimum amount of funds allocated for the branch  operations in the State of Kuwait, as stipulated in this Law;  c. Any other commitment, document or instrument that the Central Bank may require.  Without prejudice to the provisions and the provisions of enforced laws, the paid‐up capital  of any Islamic bank shall not be less than seventy‐five million Kuwaiti Dinars. The founders'  share in the bank capital shall not recede below 10% nor exceed 20% .  With  regard  to  the  branches  of  foreign  Islamic  banks  the  amount  of  funds  allocated  for  a  branch  in  the  State  of  Kuwait  shall  not  be  less  than  fifteen  million  Kuwaiti  Dinars.  The  founders'  share  in  the  amount  of  funds  allocated  for  a  branch  in  Kuwait  may  be  amended  and so the amount of funds allocated for the branch increased by a decision of the Board of  Directors of the Central Bank, when necessary.  If the capital of a bank or the amount of funds allocated for a branch of foreign Islamic bank  fall below the required minimum limit as a result of operational losses or other reasons, the  bank shall cover the difference within such a period as may be specified by the Central Bank.  Each Islamic  bank shall have an independent Shari'ah Supervisory Board, comprised of not  less than three members appointed by the bank's General Assembly. The Memorandum of  Agreement  and  Articles  of  Association  of  the  bank  shall  specify  the  establishment  of  the  Board  as  well  as  its  formulation,  powers,  and  workings.  In  case  of  a  conflict  of  opinions  among members of the Shari'ah Supervisory Board concerning a Shari'ah rule, the board of  directors of the designated bank may transfer the matter to the Fatwa Board in the Ministry  of Awqaf and Islamic Affairs that shall be the final authority on the matter.  The  Shari'ah  Supervisory  Board  shall  annually  submit  to  the  bank's  General  Assembly  a  report comprising its opinion on the bank's operations in terms of their compliance with the  Islamic Shari'ah principles and any comments it may have in this respect. This report shall be  included in the bank's Annual Report.  The Central Bank may:  a. Open  accounts  denominated  in  Kuwaiti  Dinar  or  foreign  currencies  with  Islamic  banks;  b. Open accounts denominated in Kuwaiti Dinar or foreign currency for Islamic banks;  c. Authorize Islamic banks to participate in the Clearing Chamber. Such actions shall be  performed in accordance with the terms and conditions that are not in contradiction  with the Islamic Shari'ah principles and are as decided by the Central Bank. 

25 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  The Central Bank may carry out the following operations:  a. Provide emergency finance to Islamic  banks for a  period not exceeding six months  using  instruments  and  methods  that  conform  with  the  Islamic  Shari'ah  principles,  and in accordance with the terms and conditions set by the Board of Directors of the  Central Bank. The term of such finance may be extended for a period not exceeding  further six months.  b. Sell  to  and  purchase  from  Islamic  banks  securities  and  other  instruments  that  comply with the Islamic Shari'ah principles.  c. Issue  instruments  that  comply  with  the  Islamic  Shari'ah  principles,  in  accordance  with  the  limits  and  conditions  set  by  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank.  Dealing  in  these  instruments,  by  sale  and  purchase,  may  be  carried  out  with  both  Islamic banks and other institutions subject to the supervision of the Central Bank.  Islamic banks shall be under the obligation to fully repay sight deposits to their depositors  upon request, while such deposits shall not incur any losses. Owners of investment deposits  shall  participate  in  the  profits  and  losses  from  the  bank's  business  in  proportion  to  the  amounts of their participation in the investment, pursuant to the contracts concluded with  them in this regard, and in accordance with the provisions of this Law.  The  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Central  Bank  shall  set  the  rules  and  regulations  for  the  supervision  of  Islamic  banks  with  respect  to  liquidity,  solvency,  and  business  organization,  including in particular:  a. A system for liquidity and elements thereof;  b. Capital adequacy standards through specifying the ratio of capital to asset elements;  c. Rules for calculation of the required provisions for asset risks.  The Board of Directors of the Central Bank may specify for Islamic Banks all or some of the  following:  a. The maximum value of operations pertaining to a specific activity;  b. The  maximum  limit  of  a  bank's  equity  holdings  in  companies  that  it  incorporates,  participates in establishment, or owns shares therein; and the rules and regulations  thereof,  in  addition  to  the  maximum  limit  of  a  bank's  participation  in  any  single  project;  c. The  maximum  limit  of  a  single  customer's  liability  to  the  bank  while  granting  a  relative advantage to subsidiaries of the bank according to the conditions laid down  by the Central Bank;  d. The amount of funds that must be invested in the local market;  e. The  portion  of  deposits  with  the  bank  that  must  be  deposited  in  cash  with  the  Central Bank;  f. The  rules  and  regulations  that  must  be  observed  in  a  bank's  relationship  with  its  customers, and between its customers and shareholders. 

26 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Without prejudice to the provisions of this Law, Islamic banks shall not own or deal in private  residential buildings and plots in the State of Kuwait with the exception of those:  a. Acquired or dealt in for the purposes of executing finance operations that have been  agreed  to  or  are  being  concluded  with  customers  in  accordance  with  the  methods  and forms of funding that are in compliance with the Islamic Shari'ah principles;  b. Required for the conduct of their business or for the accommodation or recreation  of their staff;  c. Acquired by reversion of title in settlement of others' unfulfilled obligations towards  them,  provided  that  these  are  sold  off  within  a  period  not  exceeding  three  years  from  the  date  of  reversion.  The  said  period,  however,  may  be  extended  by  a  decision of the Board of Directors of the Central Bank, when necessary.  Unless otherwise stipulated in this section, Islamic banks shall be subject to the provisions of  this Law without prejudice to the Islamic Shari'ah principles.                               

27 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector 

Banking Sector in Kuwait 
Regulatory steps to enhance and diversify the economic activity are likely to provide a solid  base  for  sustained  economic  growth.  The  conducive  macroeconomic  environment  and  increased government and private sector spending is likely to give a further fillip to bolster  economic growth. The biggest beneficiary from the strong economic growth is the financial  and banking sector.  Significant  mega  projects  in  the  oil  and  gas  sector  underpinned  the  strong  growth  in  the  banking  sector.  The  increasing  demand  for  and  supply  of  raw  materials,  consumables  and  other  consumer  items  resulted  in  trading  sector  too  registering  strong  growth.  Real  estate  sector  continues  to  expand  as  more  real  estate  development  projects  are  already  under  implementation or are in the pipeline. Consolidated assets of local banks grew by 24.9% y‐o‐ y to reach KD27.0bn at the end of 2006, thanks to the credit facilities to residents growing by  26.3% to KD14.9bn. During the period 2003‐06, the consolidated assets of local banks grew  at a CAGR of 12.8% from KD18.8bn in 2003 to KD27.0bn in 2006 

Local Banks 
Commercial banks 
• • • • • • • • • • • National Bank of Kuwait (NBK)  Commercial Bank of Kuwait (CBoK)  Gulf Bank (GB)  Al‐Ahli Bank of Kuwait (ABK)  The Bank of Kuwait & the Middle East (BKME)  Burgan Bank (BB)  The Branch of the Bank of Bahrain & Kuwait  The Branch of the BNP Paribas Bank  The Branch of HSBC Middle East Bank  The Branch of the National Bank of Abu Dhabi  The Branch of Citibank of New York 

Specialized banks 
• • Kuwait Real Estate Bank (KREB)  Industrial Bank of Kuwait 

Islamic Banks 
• • Kuwait Finance House (KFH)  Boubyan Bank (Boubyan) 

28 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector 

Liability Mix of Banks 
Private  sector  deposits  (both  sight  deposits  in  KD  and  quasi‐money)  continued  to  register  strong growth during the last three years. Private sector deposits increased from KD9.9bn in  2003 to KD15.3bn in 2006, recording CAGR of 15.5% as compared to the overall liabilities of  local  banks’  growth  of  12.8%  during  the  same  period.  The  contribution  of  private  sector  deposits  to  total  liabilities  increased  from  52.7%  in  2003  to  56.6%  in  2006.  Sight  deposits  increased  from  KD2.1bn  in  2003  to  KD2.9bn  in  2006,  registering  CAGR  of  11.0%  for  the  period under review. Proportion of sight deposits to total liabilities declined marginally from  11.3% in 2003 to 10.7% in 2006. Quasi‐money deposits increased from KD7.8bn in 2003 to  KD12.4bn in 2006, CAGR of 16.7% for the period 2003‐06. Share of quasi‐money deposits to  total  liabilities  increased  from  41.4%  in  2003  to  45.8%  in  2006.  Own  funds  increased  from  KD2.0bn  in  2003  to  KD3.1bn  in  2006,  registering  a  CAGR  of  15.9%  for  the  period  under  consideration.  Contribution  of  own  funds  to  overall  balance  sheet  size  of  local  banks  increased  from  10.7%  in  2003  to  11.6%  in  2006.  The  local  inter‐bank  deposits  to  consolidated balance sheet of local banks declined from 13.6% in 2003 to 4.8% in 2006.  Amount in KD mn   Assets   Cash   Sight Deposits with CBK   Time Deposits with CBK   CBK Bonds   Claims on Government   Public Debt Instruments   Debt Purchase Bonds   Claims on Private Sector   Other Local investments   Credits Facilities to Residents   Foreign Assets   Local Interbank Deposits   Other Assets   Total Assets   Liabilities   Private Sector Deposits   Sight Deposits in KD   Quasi ‐ Money   Government Deposits   Foreign Liabilities   Own Funds   Local Interbank Deposits   Other Liabilities   Total Liabilities   2003     91   108   348   ‐    2,232   818     959   8,419   2,425   2,914   498   18,814       2,117   7,790   634   1,925   2,009   2,561   1,778   18,814   2004     75   175   126   ‐    2,146   604     1,019   9,867   3,192   1,405   535   19,144       2,643   8,481   842   1,822   2,311   1,369   1,676   19,144   2005     106   112   440   124     2,085   378     1,109   11,827   3,794   1,014   622   21,612       3,149   9,359   996   2,260   2,800   853   2,195   21,612   2006     149   50   926   356     1,989   176     1,215   14,934   5,246   1,291   659   26,989       2,894   12,370   1,434   3,117   3,130   1,302   2,742   26,989  

Consolidated Balance Sheet of Local Banks in Kuwait  The  overall  deposits,  which  includes  both  private  sector  as  well  as  Government  deposits  increased from KD10.5bn in 2003 to reach KD16.7bn in 2006, recording CAGR of 16.6% for  29 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  the period under review. For the year ended 2006, these deposits increased from KD13.5bn  in 2005 to KD16.7bn in 2006, a y‐o‐y growth of 23.7%. Private sector deposits increased from  KD9.9bn in 2003 to KD15.3bn in 2006, registering CAGR of 15.5% for the period 2003‐06. The  share  of  private  sector  deposits  to  total  deposits  declined  from  94.0%  in  2003  to  91.4%  in  2006. On the other hand, Government deposits registered a CAGR of 31.3% from KD634mn  in  2003  to  KD1,434mn  in  2006.  Contribution  of  Government  deposits  to  total  deposits  increased from 6.0% in 2003 to 8.6% in 2006. 

Asset Composition of Banks 
Credit facilities to residents during the period under review grew at a CAGR of 21.0% from  KD8.4bn  in  2003  to  reach  KD14.9bn  in  2006.  The  deployment  by  way  of  credit  facilities  to  residents increased during this period resulting in its contribution to consolidated assets of  local  banks  increase  from  44.8%  in  2003  to  55.3%  in  2006.  Foreign  assets  too  witnessed  strong growth during the period 2003‐06, as it registered a CAGR of 29.3% as it grew from  KD2.4bn in 2003 to reach KD5.2bn in 2006 resulting in higher contribution towards overall  consolidated  assets  of  local  banks.  Share  of  foreign  assets  to  consolidated  assets  of  local  banks increased from 12.9% in 2003 to 19.4% in 2006. Credit facilities to residents increased  by 26.3% y‐o‐y in 2006 as compared to the previous year. Deployment towards this segment  increased  from  KD8.4bn  in  2003  to  reach  KD14.9bn  in  2006,  recording  CAGR  of  21.0%.  Within  this  segment,  credit  for  personal  facilities  and  real  estate  contributed  62.8%  of  the  total  credit  facilities  to  residents  in  2006.  The  contribution  of  these  two  segments  was  at  57.9% in 2003. 
Amount in KD mn Trade Industry Construction Agriculture and Fishing Non-bank Financial Institutions Personal Facilities Consumer loans Installment Loans Purchase of Securities Other Loans Real Estate Crude Oil and Gas Public Services Other Total 2003 1,072 442 633 49 650 749 1,558 755 380 1,434 73 1 623 8,419 2004 1,276 447 592 23 781 736 2,075 908 451 2,030 55 0 495 9,867 2005 1,371 468 770 19 933 789 2,448 1,248 653 2,539 52 5 534 11,827 2006 1,702 606 1,070 36 1,427 756 3,167 1,637 527 3,288 51 5 662 14,934

Sectoral Distribution of Balances of Utilized Cash Credit Facilities to Residents  Credit to personal facilities grew at a CAGR of 20.9% from KD3.4bn in 2003 to reach KD6.1bn  in 2006, resulting in share to total credit facilities at 40.8% in 2006. Deployment towards real  estate sector grew at a CAGR of 31.9% from KD1.4bn in 2003 to reach KD3.3bn in 2006. The  30 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  proportion of real estate to total credit facilities to residents increased from 17.0% in 2003  to 22.0% in 2006. Within personal facilities, deployment towards installment loans and loans  for  purchase  of  securities  contributed  78.9%  of  the  disbursement  by  way  of  personal  facilities.  Installment  loans  and  loans  for  purchase  of  securities  contributed  67.2%  of  the  total personal facilities in 2003. Installment loans as percentage of the total credit facilities  to  residents  were  18.5%  in  2003,  which  increased  to  21.2%  in  2006.  Similarly,  loans  for  purchase of securities as percentage of total credit facilities to residents increased from 9.0%  in 2003 to 11.0% in 2006. 

Kuwait Banking Sector Risks Management 
Banks in Kuwait benefited from strong economic growth during the last three years on the  back of high oil prices and production. The strength of domestic demand continues to fuel  momentum  in  non‐oil  activities.  Growth  of  the  private  sector  is  on  the  back  of  increased  investment in infrastructure and expansion projects.  Government’s efforts to diversify the economy and improve the investment climate through  regulatory  and  structural  measures  in  various  sectors  augur  well  for  the  banking  sector.  Buoyancy in the capital market activity helped banks register strong profitability by way of  enhanced  fee  income  and  gains  on  their  investment  portfolio.  Despite  the  correction  in  regional markets in 2006, banks continued to register earnings growth on the back of strong  core banking business.  On  the  funding  side,  banks  are  increasing  their  branch  network  in  order  to  enhance  its  deposit base. We believe the growth in time deposits is likely to remain strong over the next  two years as banks structure innovative products coupled with higher rates offered. In order  to  support  loan  growth,  banks  will  require  increasing  their  deposit  franchise.  Most  banks  witnessed a surge in their cost of funds in 2006, as banks were offering higher rates on term  deposits to attract depositors. As a consequence, their cost of funding has increased. With  the  demand  for  funds  being  strong  due  to  strong  economic  growth  and  massive  infrastructure  projects  in  different  sectors,  we  expect  banking  sector’s  growth  to  remain  strong.  The near‐term view for the Kuwaiti banks is likely to be influenced by developments in the  domestic  economy,  fluctuations  in  the  oil  price  and  the  level  of  public  spending.  High  oil  prices  are  resulting  in  high  liquidity  in  the  banking  system  and  increased  government  spending. Going forward, buoyant operating environment, increased government spending  and  positive  business  and  consumer  sentiment  are  likely  to  be  the  key  drivers  for  the  banking sector.  In a nutshell, core underlying banking income is likely to remain strong. Government thrust  towards  providing  further  impetus  to  economic  growth  is  likely  to  benefit  the  banking  sector. In our opinion, the long‐term outlook for the banking sector is positive on the back of  buoyant core banking activities 

31 | P a g e    

Kuwa ait Financia al Sector 

Kuw wait St tock   Exch hange e 
The  Kuwait  Stock  Excha ange  (KSE)  is  the  national  stock m market  of  The  State  of  Kuwait.  everal share  holding com mpanies (such h as NBK in  1952) existe ed in Kuwait t prior to  Although se the creation n of the KSE,  it was not u until October r 1962 that a a law was pa assed to orga anize the  country's sto ock market.  The Kuwait S Stock Exchan nge is also am mong the fir rst and larges st stock exch hanges in the e Persian  Gulf region,  and is now  gaining prom minence as o one of the m most potentially important in the  world.  • ck Exchange  shall enjoy  an independ dent judicial  personality  with the  The  Kuwait Stoc on  de  its  s  right  of  litigatio in  a  mod facilitating  the  performance  of  i functions for  the  pose of realising the objectives of its s organizatio on in the bes st manner w within the  purp scop pe of regulat tions and law ws governing g the Stock Ex xchange ope erations.   The  Stock  Excha ange  shall  w within  its  act tivity  act  to  direct  and  r rationalize  dealing  in  cks and secur rities, within n the scope o of its powers in order to d develop and stabilize  stoc dealing in securities in a ma anner securin ng safe, easy y and accurate transactio ons so as  to avoid any con nfusion in de ealings.   The  Stock  Excha ange,  in  pursuance  of  th research  and  the  studies  conclud by  it  he  ded  and  its follow up p of the secu urity dealing process sha all render appropriate ad dvice and  opin nion  to  the  c competent  g government  authorities  regarding  th financial  status  of  he  the  Stock Exchange member companies s and means  of promotin ng their efficiency for  realization of their relevant objectives.  participate  with  the  com w mpetent  aut thorities  in  order  to  The  Stock  Exchange  shall  p egration among the financial and the e economic activities  realize coordination and inte movement so as to assist in achieving the economic and the financial  and the capital m elopment an nd stability of the state.  deve The  Stock Excha ange staff shall continue  to develop  the systems and the me ethods of  rities, beside es introducin ng modern  te echniques su uch as those e applied  dealing in secur dvanced stoc ck markets for the purpo ose of achiev ving a sound financial pos sition for  in ad the Kuwait Stock k Exchange o on both, regi ional and international le evels.   The  Stock  Excha ange  shall  ac to  encour ct  rage  saving,  promote  inv vestment  aw wareness  ong  d  eans  for  investment  of  funds  in  amo citizens,  protect  depositors  and create  me secu urities, in a m manner bene eficial to the economy 

Listed Co ompanies at KSE   
BA ANKS   10 01  10 02  10 03  10 04 

NBK  GBK  CBK  ABK 

Nat tional Bank o of Kuwait  Gulf Bank of Ku uwait  Com mmercial Bank of Kuwait t  Al‐A Ahli Bank of Kuwait  32 | P a g e  

 

Kuwa ait Financia al Sector  10 05  10 06  10 07  10 08  10 09    IN NVESTMENT T  20 01  20 02  20 03  20 04  20 05  20 06  20 07  20 08  20 09  21 10  21 11  21 12  21 13  21 14  21 15  21 16  21 17  21 18  21 19  22 20  22 21  22 22  22 23  22 24  22 25  22 26  22 27  22 28  22 29  23 30  23 31  23 32  23 33  23 34  23 35  23 36  23 37  BKME  KIB  BURG  KFIN  BOUBYA AN  Ban nk of Kuwait and the Mid ddle East  Kuw wait Internat tional Bank Bur rgan Bank  Kuw wait Finance e House  Bou ubyan Bank K.S.C. 

KINV  FACIL  IFA  NINV  KPROJ  AINV  COAST  TII  SECH  IIC  SGC  IFC  MARKAZ Z  KMEFIC  IIG  AIG  TID  ALAMAN N  ALOLA  ALMAL  GIH  AAYAN  BAYANIN NV  GLOBAL L  OSOUL  GULFINV VEST  KFIC  KAMCO  ILIC  KTINVES ST  NIH  ISKAN  MADAR  ALDEERA A  ALSAFAT T  BURGAN NGRP  EKTTITA AB 

Kuw wait Investm ment Compan ny  Com mmercial Facilities Comp pany  Inte ernational Fi inancial Advi isors  Nat tional Invest tments Comp pany  Kuw wait Investm ment Projects s Company  Al‐A Ahleia Holding Company y  Coa ast Investme ent and Deve elopment Company  The e Internation nal Investor ( (KSCC)  Sec curities Hous se K.S.C.C  Ind dustrial Inves stments Com mpany (KSCC) )  Sec curities Grou up Company (KSCC)  Inte ernational Fi inance Comp pany (K.S.C.C C)  Kuw wait Financia al Centre S.A A.K.C  Kuw wait and Mid ddle East FIN N. INV. CO. KS SCC  Inte ernational In nvestment Group K.S.C.C C  Are ef Investmen nt Group (KSC CC)  The e Investment t Dar Co. (KS SCC)  Al‐A Aman Invest tment CO. K.S.C.C  Firs st Investmen nt Company ( (K.S.C.C.)  Al‐Mal Investm ment Compan ny (K.S.C.C.)  Gulf Investmen nt House (K.S S.C.C.)  Aay yan Leasing a and Investment CO. (K.S.C.C)  Bay yan Investme ent CO. K.S.C C.C.  Glo obal Investment House K K.S.C.C  Oso oul Investme ent CO. K.S.C C.C  Gulfinvest Inter rnational K.S S.C.C.  Kuw wait Finance e and Investm ment CO. KSC C  KIP PCO Asset Ma anagement C Company KSC ‐ KAMCO  Inte ernational Le easing and In nvestment C CO.  Kuw wait Invest C CO. (HOLDING G) K.S.C.C  Nat tional Intern national CO. ( (HOLDING)  Housing Financ ce CO. S.A.K.C C  Al‐Madar Finan nce and Inves stment CO.  Al‐Deera Holdin ng CO. K.S.C. .C  Al‐S Safat Investm ment CO. K.S S.C.C  Bur rgan Group H Holding CO. K.S.C.C  Ekt ttitab Holding CO. K.S.C.C C  33 | P a g e  

 

Kuwait Financial Sector  238  239  240  241  242  243  244  245  246    INSURANCE   301  302  303  304  305  306  307    REAL ESTATE  401  402  403  404  405  406  407  408  409  410  411  412  413  414  415  416  417  418  419  420  421  422  QURAINHLD  SOKOUK  ALMADINA  NOOR  TAMINV  EXCH  DAMACKWT  KSHC  STRATEGIA  Al Qurain Holding CO.  Sohouk Holding CO. S.A.K.C  Al‐Madina for Finance and Investment CO.  Noor Financial Investment K.S.C.C  Al‐Tamdeen Investment CO. K.S.C.C  Kuwait Bahrain International Exchange CO  Damac Kuwaiti Holding CO. K.S.C.C.  Kuwait Syrian Holding CO K S C HOLDING  Strategia Investment CO. (K.S.C.C.) 

KINS  GINS  AINS  WINS  KUWAITRE  FTI  WETHAQ 

Kuwait Insurance Company  Gulf Insurance Company  Al‐Ahleia Insurance Company  Warba Insurance COMPANY  Kuwait Reinsurance COMPANY K.S.C.C.  First Takaful Insurance COMPANY K.C.S.C  Wethaq Takaful Insurance COMPANY K.C.S.C. 

KRE  URC  NRE  SRE  PEARL  TAM  IIPC  AREEC  MREC  ARABREC  UREC  ERESCO  MABANEE  INJAZZAT  JEEZAN  INVESTORS  IRC  ALTIJARIA  SANAM  AAYANRE  AQAR  ALAQARIA 

Kuwait Real Estate COMPANY  United Real Estate COMPANY  National Real Estate COMPANY  Salhiah Real Estate COMPANY  Pearl of Kuwait Real Estate COMPANY  Tamdeen Real Estate COMPANY  International Investment Projects CO KSC  Ajial Real Estate Entertainment CO. KSCC  Al‐Massaleh Real Estate CO. [K.S.C.C]  Arab Real Estate CO. (K.S.C.CLOSED)  Union Real Estate CO. (KSCC)  Al‐Enma'a Real Estate CO. (K.S.C.CLOSED)  Mabanee Company ( S.A.K.C )  Injazzat Real Estate Development CO (K.S.C.C.)  Jeezan Holding CO. K.S.C.C  Investors Holding Group CO.KSCC  International Resorts CO. K.S.C.C  The Commercial Real Estate CO. K.S.C.C  Sanam Real Estate CO. K.S.C.C  A'ayan Real Estate CO. S.A.K.C  Aqar Real Estate Investments CO. S.A.K.C  Kuwait Real Estate Holding CO. K.S.H.C  34 | P a g e  

 

Kuwait Financial Sector  423  424  425  426  427  428  429  430  431  432  433  434  435    INDUSTRIAL  501  502  503  504  505  506  507  508  509  510  511  512  513  514  515  516  517  518  519  520  521  522  523  524  525  526  527  528  MAZAYA  ADNC  THEMAR  GRAND  TIJARA  TAMEERK  ARKAN  SAFATGLB  ARGAN  ABYAAR  MUNSHAAT  FIRSTDUBAI  KBT  Al‐Mazaya Holding CO. S.A.K.C  Al‐Dar National Real Estate CO. K.S.C.C  Al‐Themar International Holding CO.  Grand Real Estate Projects (K.S.C.C)  Tijara and Real Estate Investment CO. KSCC  Tameer Real Estate Investment CO. K.S.C.C  Arkan Al‐Kuwait Real Estate CO. K.S.C.C  Safat Global Holdings K.S.C  Alargan International Real Estate CO.  Abyaar Real Estate Development CO. KSCC  Munshaat Real Estate Projects CO K.S.C.C  First Dubai for Real Estate Development  Kuwait Business Town Real Estate CO. 

NIND  PIPE  KCEM  REFRI  CABLE  SHIP  MARIN  PCEM  PAPER  MRC  KFOUC  ACICO  UIC  BPCC  GGMC  HCC  ALKOUT  KPAK  KBMMC  NICBM  ROCKS  EQUIPMENT  MENAHOLD  NCCI  GYPSUM  ALQURAIN  SALBOOKH  IKARUS 

National Industries Group (HOLDING)  Kuwait Pipes Industries and Oil Services  Kuwait Cement Company  Refrigeration Industries COMPANY  Gulf Cable and Electrical Industries COM  Heavy Engineering and Ship Building CO.  Contracting and Marine Services COMPANY  Portland Cement Company  Shuaiba Industrial CO. (K.S.C.C)  Metal and Recycling CO.  Kuwait Foundry CO. (S.A.K.C)  ACICO Industries CO.[K.S.C.C]  United Industries CO. (K.S.C.CLOSED)  Boubyan Petrochemicals CO. (K.S.C)  Gulf Glass Manufacturing CO. K.S.C.C  Hilal Cement CO. (KSCC)  Alkout Industrial Projects CO. (K.S.C.C)  Kuwait Packing Materials MANUFACTURING  Kuwait Building Materials MANUFACTURING  National Industries COMPANY  Gulf Rocks COMPANY S.A.K.C.  Equipment Holding Company K.S.C.C.  Mena Holding CO. K.S.C  National Company for Consumer Industries  Kuwait Gypsum MANUFACTURING & TRADING CO  Qurain Petrochemical INDUSTRIES CO.K.S.C  Salbookh Trading CO. K.S.C.C.  Ikarus Petroleum INDUSTRIES CO. K.S.C.C. 

35 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector    SERVICES  601  602  603  604  605  606  607  608  609  610  611  612  613  614  615  616  617  618  619  620  621  622  623  624  625  626  627  628  629  630  631  632  633  634  635  636  637  638  639  640  641  642  643 

KCIN  KHOT  AGLTY  SHOP  ZAIN  SENERGY  EDU  IPG  CLEANING  SULTAN  AGHC  TRANSPORT  NMTC  KGL  CABLETV  ASC  NAPESCO  KCPC  KSH  EYAS  HITSTELEC  ALSAFWA  HUMANSOFT  KPPC  NAFAIS  NSH  AREFENRGY  SAFWAN  GPI  GFC  TAHSSILAT  MAYADEEN  ABAR  IFAHR  CGC  JEERANH  PAPCO  SAFTEC  MTCC  UPAC  ABRAJ  ALAFCO  MHC 

Kuwait National Cinema  Kuwait Hotels COMPANY  The Public Warehousing Company  Kuwait Commercial Complex COMPANY  Mobile Telecommunications COMPANY K.S.C  Al Safat Energy HOLDING COMPANY K.S.C.C  Kuwait Educational Services COMPANY  Independent Petroleum Group  National Cleaning CO. (S.A.K.C)  Sultan Center Food CO. (KSCC)  Al‐Arabi Group HOLDING CO. (K.S.C)  The Transport and Warehousing Group CO. (K. S. C.)  National Mobile Telecommunications KSC  Kuwait and Gulf Link Transport CO. (KSCC)  Kuwait Cable Vision (S.A.K.)  Automated Systems Company (K.S.C.C)  National Petroleum Services CO. K.S.C.C.  Kuwait Company for Process Plant CONS.&CONT  Kuwait Slaughter House CO. K.S.C.C  Eyas For Higher and Technical Education  Hits Telecom Holding CO. K.S.C  Al‐Safwa Group CO. K.S.C.C HOLDING  Human Soft HOLDING CO. K.S.C.C  Privatization Holding Company  Nafais Holding Company K.S.C CLOSED  National Slaughter House CO. K.S.C.C  Aref Energy HOLDING CO. K.S.C.C.  Safwan Trading and Contracting CO. K.S.C.C  Gulf Petroleum Investment (S.A.K.C)  Gulf Franchising HOLDING CO. K.S.C.C.  Credit Rating and Collection K.S.C.C.  National Ranges COMPANY K.S.C.C.  Burgan Well Drilling (K.S.C.C.)  IFA Hotels and Resorts CO. K.S.C.C  Combined Group Contracting CO (S.A.K.C)  Jeeran Holding CO. S.A.K.C  Palms Agro Production CO. K.S.C.C.  Al‐Safat TEC HOLDING COMPANY K.S.C.C  Mushrif Trading and Contracting CO.  United Projects Group K.S.C.C  Al‐Abraj Holding CO. S.A.K.C  Aviation Lease and Finance CO. K.S.C.C  Al‐Mowasat Holding CO. S.A.K.C  36 | P a g e  

 

Kuwait Financial Sector  644  645  646  647  648  649  650  651  652  653  654  655  656  657    FOOD  701  702  703  704  705  706    NON‐KUWAITI  804  805  806  807  808  809  810  811  812  813  814  817  818  819  820  MASHAER  OULAFUEL  VILLAMODA  FUTURE  NETWORK  HAYATCOMM  MUBARRAD  MUNTAZAHAT  ATC  YIACO  JAZEERA  SOOR  KNA  FUTUREKID  Haj and Umrah Services Consortium CO KSCC  Oula Fuel Marketing COMPANY K.S.C  Villa Moda Life Style K.S.C.C  Future Communications CO. GLOBAL K.S.C.C  Network Holding CO. K.S.C.C  Hayat Communications CO. K.S.C.C  Mubarrad Transport CO. K.S.C.C.  Kuwait Resorts COMPANY K.S.C.C.  Advanced Technology COMPANY K.S.C.C  Yiaco Medical CO. K.S.C.C  Jazeera Airways CO. K.S.C.  Soor Fuel Marketing CO. K.S.C  Kuwait National Airways CO. K.S.C.  Future Kid Entertainment and Real Estate 

CATTL  DANAH  POULT  FOOD  UFIG  KOUTFOOD 

Livestock Transport and Trading COMPANY  Danah Alsafat Foodstuff COMPANY  Kuwait United Poultry COMPANY  Kuwait Food Company (AMERICANA)  United Foodstuff Industries Group CO.  Kout Food Group K.S.C.C. 

SCEM  GCEM  QCEM  FCEM  RKWC  ARIG  UGB  EKHOLDING  BKIKWT  GFH  CIB  INOVEST  AUB  BBK  ITHMR 

Sharjah Cement and Industrial Development  Gulf Cement COMPANY  Umm Al‐Qaiwain Cement INDUSTRIES COMPANY  Fujairah Cement INDUSTRIES COMPANY  Ras Al Khaimah CO. FOR WHITE CEMENT(PSC)  Arab Insurance Group B.S.C.  United Gulf Bank (B.S.C) E.C  Egypt Kuwait Holding CO. (S.A.E)  Bahrain Kuwait Insurance CO. BSC  Gulf Finance House E.C.  Commercial International Bank (EGYPT)  Inovest (B.S.C)  Ahli United Bank B.U.C  Bank of Bahrain and Kuwait B.S.C  Ithmaar Bank B.S.C 

37 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  PARALLEL MARKET  2003  BAREEQ  2004  REAM  2005  AFAQ  2006  ALSHAMEL  2007  SAFRE  2008  AJWAN  2009  MENA  2010  SPEC  2011  MASAKEN  2012  DALQAN  2013  ALEID  2014  MIDAN  2015  FLEX  2016  ALMUDON   

Al‐Bareeq Holding CO. K.S.C.C.  Real Estate Asset Management CO. (REAM)  Afaq Educational Services CO. K.S.C.C.  Al‐Shamel International HOLDING CO. KSCC  Al Safat Real Estate CO. K.S.C.C  Ajwan Gulf Real Estate CO.(K.S.C.C)  Mena Real Estate COMPANY (K.S.C.C)  Specialized Group HOLDING CO. (K.S.C.C)  Al Masaken International Real Estate REAL ESTATE DEV. CO.  Dulaqan Real Estate CO. K.S.C.C.  Al Eid Food CO. (K.S.C.C)  Al‐Maidan Dental Clinic CO. (K.S.C.C)  Flex Resorts and Real Estate CO. (K.S.C.C)  Al Mudon International Real Estate CO (K.S.C.C) 

Brokerage Firms  
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • Al‐Etehad Union Securities Brokerage Co  EFG‐Hermes IFA Brokerage  Al‐Muthana Financial Brokerage Co  Al‐Robaeya Brokerage  Al‐Seef Brokerage Co  Al‐Sharq Financial Brokerage Co  Al‐Arabi Brokerage Co  K.I.C Financial Brokerage Co  Watani Financial Brokerage Co  KFIC Financial Brokerage Co  Al‐Waseet Financial Business Co   Al‐Wataniya National Finance Brokerage Co.  First Securities Brokerage Co  Al‐Awsat Middle East Financial Brokerage Firm Co 

Trading Cycle in Kuwait Stock Exchange 
1. Open an account at the Kuwait Clearing Company (KCC).  2. A Copy of the civil identification, the name of the bank the client deals with (3 K.D  for individuals, 5 K.D for corporate).  3. Choose one of the registered Brokerage Firms in KSE.  4. When  issuing  a  selling  order,  share  certificates  should  be  presented  the  following  day after the transaction.  5. When  issuing  a  buying  order,  payment  should  be  submitted  to  the  broker  the  following day before 11:00 am if the client’s balance with KCC is insufficient. 

38 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  6. Commission  is  calculated  1.250  K.D  for  each  one  Thousand  K.D,  commission  is  calculated  1  K.D  for  each  one  Thousand  K.D  for  transaction  of  Fifty  Thousand  K.D  and above.  7. A cheque will be issued by KCC in favor of the client every Sunday and Wednesday.  8. KSE account is accredited 500 fils for each executed transaction.  9. Share prices can fluctuate 5 pricing units daily according to its category.  Note: The One Kuwaiti Dinar is equivalent to 1,000 fils. The price& share are not permitted  to increase or to decrease more than 5 units per day.   Example: A share with a value of 300 fils cannot increase more than 325 fils or decrease less  than 275 fils daily during its daily trading. 

The Rules and Conditions 
Listing Shareholding Companies in the Official Market  
After  the  perusal  of  the  Amiri  Decree  issued  on  14/08/1983  organizing  the  Kuwait  Stock  Exchange.  And the Decision no (35) of the Minister of Commerce and Industry for the year 1983 issuing  the by laws of KSE.  And  the  KSE  Committee  Decision  no  (3)  for  the  year  2004  concerning  the  rules  of  listing  companies in the Official Market and the Parallel Market.  And  the  KSE  Committee  Decision  no.  (7)  for  the  year  2005  to  add  two  conditions  to  the  listing conditions.  And  the  market  committee’s  decision  no  (1)  for  the  year  2007  concerning  the  rules  and  conditions for listing shareholding companies in the official market.  And  the  approval  of  the  market  committee  in  its  meeting  no  (9)  dated  2/11/2008.     The following has been decided:  Article  1:  The  rules  and  procedures  annexed  with  this  resolution  shall  be  enforceable  regarding the application form for listing shareholding companies in the market as well as its  revision and its determination.   Article 2: This law shall be enforceable from the date of its issuance. It shall be published in  the  official  gazette  and  shall  cancel  all  resolutions  that  collide  with  it.  The  market  director  must implement it.   

39 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Article (1)  The  shareholding  companies  requesting  listing  of  their  shares  in  the  Official  Market  shall  satisfy the following conditions.  Article (2)  The  company’s  issued  capital  should  be  fully  paid  and  should  not  be  less  than  (10)  million  Kuwaiti Dinars or any equivalent amount in foreign  currency, and the shareholders’ equity  rights shall not be less than 115% of the weighted average of the paid‐up capital in each of  the last two fiscal years, according to the annual audited financial reports prior to the listing  request from the financial auditor and approved by the company’s general assembly.  Article (3)  The  company’s  shares  shall  be  tradable  according  to  the  law  under  which  they  were  established taking into account that the period required to trade shareholders’ or founder's  shares is not less than that required in the Kuwaiti commercial companies law for trading the  shares of shareholders and founder's in Kuwaiti shareholding companies.  Article (4)  The company shall have achieved  net  profit in the last two fiscal years, and the yearly net  profit shall not be less than 7.5% of the weighted average of the paid‐up capital at the end of  each fiscal year.  Article (5)  If the listing request is from a closed company which had increased its capital more than 50%  during a single fiscal year, a period of one year should have passed from the last date of the  capital increase’s notice.  Article (6)  If the listing request is from a closed company which had changed its legal structure from a  limited liability company to a closed shareholding company, a period of three years should  have passed from the date of notice in the commercial registry of the change of structure.  Article (7)  30% of the company’s capital should be distributed to a number of shareholders according  to  the  schedule  guide  authorized  by  market  committee  where  the  ownership  of  each  one  isn’t below two trading units according to the book value of the latest fiscal year. In case the  company  can’t  provide  this  percentage,  30%  the  company’s  capital  shall  be  offered  for  private placement by a specialized company independent from the company that requested  listing.  40 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  Article (8)  The company should attain the approval of its general assembly to list its shares in Kuwait  Stock Exchange.  Article (9)  The company’s board members shall pledge to adhere with all the rules and regulations set  by Kuwait Stock Exchange, and to provide KSE management with all the required data and  information provided that this information is correct and reliable.   Article (10)  The  company  shall  provide  its  shareholders’  registry  to  the  clearing  company  and  adhere  with all the instructions issued by KSE in this regard.  Article (11)  A non‐Kuwaiti company should be listed in its country of origin stock market.  Article (12)  Any company wishing to enlist will be subjected to a reserve of 25% of its paid‐up capital at  the  clearing  chamber  for  a  period  of  2  years  from  the  enlisting  date.  The  names  of  shareholders  owning  this  percent  will  be  specified  with  the  knowledge  of  the  company’s  board of directors.  Article (13)  The company shall pay a registration fee of 10,000 Kuwaiti Dinars and an annual subscription  fee of (0.05%) of the company’s paid‐up capital but not exceeding 50,000 Kuwaiti Dinars.  Article (14)  The  company  shall  fulfill  KSE  listing  procedures  during  four  months  from  the  date  of  notification of Market approval which shall be considered void in case of incompliance with  this period.   Article (15)  In  addition  to  the  fulfillment  of  all  the  listing  rules  in  the  articles  above,  the  market  committee has the right to authorize or reject listing of a company in light of the company’s  profits, financial status, its importance to the national economy and the success in achieving  its  objectives;  for  that  sake  it  is  permitted  to  request  from  the  proposed  company  any  reports or extra information including turning to any specialized party to study these reports 

41 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  and information, in case the committee decides to reject the listing request it must enclose a  reason.  

Participation of Non­Kuwaitis in Kuwaiti Shareholding Companies 
Referring  to  the  commercial  companies  law  issued  in  the  law  no.  15  for  year  1960  and  all  amended laws thereto;  And persual to the law no. 32 for year 1968 concerning the monetary and the Central Bank  and the monetary profession and all amended laws thereto;  And persual to the Amiree Decree no. 31 for year 1990 with regards to regulating the trading  in securities and the establishment of mutual funds;  And  following  the  law  no  2  for  year  1999  concerning  the  promulgation  of  interests  in  securities in the shareholding companies.  And following the law no 20 for year 2000 relevant to the approval for non‐Kuwaitis to own  securities in Kuwaiti shareholding companies.  And  perusal  to  the  Decree  issued  in  August  14  1983  concerning  organizing  Kuwait  Stock  Exchange.  And  following  the  Decree  issued  on  August  8,  1984  governing  registration  of  brokers  and  their assistants in Kuwait Stock Exchange.  And  relating  to  the  Decree  issued  on  December  27  1986  with  regards  to  organizing  the  settlement of the trading activity and the Clearing Company in the Kuwait Stock Exchange.  And  following  the  internal  bylaws  of  Kuwait  Stock  Exchange  issued  by  the  ministerial  resolution no. 25 for year 1983.  And after the ratification of the Council of Ministers. It has been decided upon the following:  Article (1)  In  implementing  the  jurisdiction  of  this  resolution,  the  following  terms  and  expressions  indicated will have the confronting meaning:  • • Non‐Kuwaitis:  Any  individual  person  or  company  (entity)  not  carrying  the  Kuwaiti  nationality and is investing his capital in Kuwait shareholding companies.  Shareholding Companies: Kuwaiti Shareholding Companies enlisted in Kuwait Stock  Exchange  and  which  non‐Kuwaitis  own  shares  in  or  may  attain  approval  to  participate in its establishment.  Trading:  Buying  and  selling  shares  of  shareholding  companies  enlisted  in  Kuwait  Stock Exchange according to the provisions dealt with in the Exchange.  42 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  • • Establishment: The right to establish shareholding companies through participating  in its establishment where subscription in its capital is considered as establishment.  Clearing and Settlement: Settling liabilities accrued on all procedures undertaken in  Kuwait  Stock  Exchange  and  specifying  the  position  of  parties  through  the  Clearing  Chamber.  Ownership  and  Consolidated  Management:  Any  economic  or  juristic  affiance  through  ownership  or  management,  and  is  considered  as  a  kind  of  consolidated  ownership and management:  o Anything owned from shares in the shareholding companies by the investor  personally or being a guardian for his minors.  o  Anything  acquired  by  the  individual  establishment  owned  by  the  investor  and the companies that are affiliated partners in.  o  Financial  companies  owned  by  the  investor  exceeding  50%  percent  of  it’s  capital or those that are under his domination and that is according to what  is specified by the IAS.  o  Any economic or juristic relation associated to the investor granting him the  right to dominate over and that is according to what is specified by the IAS.  Overlaping interests: Any interest that may permit one party to dominate over or to  excersice impressive influence over another party in the event of taking financial and  operative decisions. This will be according to the following:  o The  relation‐ship  between  the  investing  company’s  Board  of  Directors  and  the principal shareholders and owners, i.e., anyone that possess 5% or more  of the capital.  o  Distinctive  management parties in  the investing  company  (manager of  the  executive  team  and  the  deputy  executive  manager,  his  assistants  and  the  executive managers and all managers with corresponding degree).  o Subsidiary companies which the investor owns more than 50% of it’s capital  or dominates over.  o  Associated companies which mean companies that the investor owns 20%  of its capital and has impressive influence (effect) over. 

Article (2)  With  consideration  of  the  jurisdiction  of  article  no.  3  of  this  resolution  it  is  permitted  for  non‐Kuwaitis  to  own  and  trade  shares  of  shareholding  companies  listed  in  Kuwait  Stock  Exchange according to the regulation indicated in this resolution. They will also be granted  the  permission  to  join  in  establishing  public  shareholding  companies  according  to  the  determined procedures in this regards applied to Kuwaitis in this regards.  Article (3)  The non‐Kuwaiti investor shall be permitted to own and to trade in bank share. He will be  conditioned  to  attain  the  approval  of  the  Central  Bank  of  Kuwait  if  this  investor  wishes  to  own  more  than  5%  of  the  capital  of  any  bank.  This  applies  to  any  individual  or  group  of  investors  connected  by  juristic  or  economic  means  either  by  mutual  ownership  or  by  43 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector  consolidated management or by joint interest will be considered as a single investor entity.  It  is  prohibited  for  non‐Kuwaiti  investors  to  exceed  the  ownership  of  49%  in  the  capital  of  any  individual  bank,  except  after  attaining  a  preceding  approval  from  the  Council  of  Ministers, and after consulting of the Central Bank of Kuwait.  Article (4)  Trading  in  shares  which  are  allowed  for  non‐Kuwaitis  to  own,  will  be  through  the  brokers  registered  at  the  Kuwait  Stock  Exchange  according  to  the  provisions  governed  at  the  Exchange.  Article (5)  It is prohibited for non‐Kuwaitis to buy or sell shares which are permitted for them to own  outside  the  premises  of  Kuwait  Stock  Exchange.  It  is  also  prohibited  for  companies  whose  shares are sold and bought to register any trading action outside the Exchange to registering  transaction in its records, accordingly.  Article (6)  Companies  which  acts  as  portfolio  managers  will  be  required  to  provide  the  Kuwait  Stock  Exchange with a monthly report comprising the selling and buying activity it had undergone  through for each non‐Kuwaiti client. The Exchange Administration will have the authority to  investigate over the authenticity of those reports if it sees necessary.  Article (7)  Non‐Kuwaitis will have the privilege of voting and nominating rights in the shares they own  in  the  Kuwait  shareholding  companies  in  addition  to  the  rights  guaranteed  by  law  for  shareholders in those companies.  Article (8)  Aside  from  what  has  been  mentioned  above  all  laws,  Decrees,  bylaws,  resolutions,  regulations and provisions carried out at the Kuwait Stock Exchange with relation to trading  in  securities,  settling  liabilities,  transfer  of  ownership  and  announcements  of  interest  in  shareholding Companies will be applied to non‐Kuwaiti investors.  Article (9)  Kuwait Stock Exchange will handle within specialized area all operations conducted for the  account of non‐Kuwaitis on shares listed in the Exchange as well as analyzing and studying  the effect of these operations on the performance of the market. 

44 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector 

Kuwait Stock Exchange Analysis 
Opening and Closing Stock  
Open  High  Value  Wt. Index  6991.111111  7008.711111  55267375.56  384.0544444  Close  Low  Deal    6995.7  6950.177778  6182   

An analysis of Kuwait Stock Exhange for the period of january 1, 2010 to January 13, 2010  carried out during the prepartion of this report.  Sector wise average opening and closing stock is shown below;     Banking  Investment  Insurance  Real Eatate  Industrial  Services  Foods  Non‐Kuwaities  Mutual Finds  Parallel Markets  Open  8359.2  5536.125  712.7875  2788.6625  5408.8375  14751.4875  4221.525  7273  0  1080.3875  Close  8357.1375  5528.375  2886.35  2792.1  5419.35  14790.325  4247.4375  7270.9625  2764.1  1234.3 

The  analysis  shows  that  the  higest  stock  in  the  market  is  Services,  Banking  and  Non‐ Kuwaities sector respectively. Mutual Funds sector beared a zero opening stock during the  analysis period. 
16000 14000 12000 10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0 Open Close

  45 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector 

Highest and Lowest Stock 
   Banking  Investment  Insurance  Real Eatate  Industrial  Services  Foods  Non‐Kuwaities  Mutual Finds  Parallel Markets 
16000 14000 12000 10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0 High Low

High  8385.6125  5564.3875  1065.7125  2800.125  5420.925  14819.475  4258.175  7286.775  0  925.8375 

Low  8275.45  5481.7875  700.4  2771.475  5365.6125  14668.85  4198.4875  7222.7  0  924.3625 

 

Volume and Value Analysis 
Banking  Investment  Insurance  Real Eatate  Industrial  Services  Foods  Non‐Kuwaities  Mutual Finds  Parallel Markets    Vol  6734375  167563750  191875  139266875  12224687.5  117889375  8310625  34033125  0  100000  Value  4637756.25  16375510  79943.75  10167056.25  3715345  17800291.25  1513802.5  3117221.25  0  11595  Deal  259.625  1905.125  8.5  1143.25  478.5 1990.625  188.5  393.75  0  3  46 | P a g e    

Kuwait Financial Sector 

Value
20000000 18000000 16000000 14000000 12000000 10000000 8000000 6000000 4000000 2000000 0

Value

   

47 | P a g e    

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful