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AZUSA PACIFIC

UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT


ECON 356 Labor Economics
Dr. Tobing
Fall 2014 M (4:20PM-7:20PM)
3 units
INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION:
Elwin Tobing, Ph.D.
Office Hours: Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays: 10:30AM - 11 :30 AM
Office location: Wilden Hall, Room 2038
Email: etobing@apu.edu
Phone: Extension x 3824; Fax (626) 815-3802; Emergency phone number (714) 924 - 0829 (No calls
between 1OPM - 7 AM)

APU MISSION AND PURPOSE STATEMENT:


"Azusa Pacific University is an evangelical Christian community of disciples and scholars who seek to
advance the work of God in the world through academic excellence in liberal arts and professional
programs of higher education that encourage students to develop a Christian perspective of truth and
life."
SBM MISSION AND PURPOSE STATEMENT:
"School of Business and Management faculty, staff, and students passionately pursue academic
excellence and spiritual enrichment to advance the work of God in business and society around the
world."
AACSB ASSURANCE OF LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES:
Competent Business Knowledge
Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge in multiple business disciplines, including
management, finance, marketing, accounting and economics.
Critical Thinking Ability
Students will be able to identify and solve business problems using analytical and critical thinking
skills.
Christian Business Ethics
Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to evaluate business decisions based on a
Christian perspective.
Capable Communication Skills
Students will be able to convey ideas clearly through professional written communication.
Students will be able to express ideas effectively through professional oral presentations.
Collaborative Teamwork Ability
Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to function as an effective business team member.
Comprehensive Global Awareness
Students will be able to identify cultural, economic and political aspects of business in a global
environment.

ECON 356 Labor Economics Syllabus, Fall 2014, Page 1

COURSE INFORMATION:
Catalog: This course examines thE~ allocation of labor in a society among its various possible uses. We
consider the role of markets in a/locating this labor, issues of market power, and the role of government
policy in accomplishing social objectives. Wage determination, job search and labor productivity are also
discussed. Prerequisites ECON 251 Principles of Microeconomics. Familiarity with college-level algebra
is important as we will use algebraic and graphical analysis extensively. Those who are struggling with
basic algebra should utilize my office hours.

COURSE CREDIT DESCRIPTION: (RECWIRED)


Following the APU Credit Hour policy, to meet the identified student learning outcomes of this course,
the expectations are that this 3-unit course, delivered over a 15-week term will approximate:

_g_ hours I week classroom or direct faculty instruction


_Q_ hours I week internship
__Qd_ hours I week online work
__Qd_ hours I week research
_Q_ hours I week other academic: work

In addition, out-of-class student work will approximate a minimum of 6 hours each week.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

By the end of this course, students should be able to demonstrate mastery of the following learning outcomes.
The classroom assignments that the instructor will use to assess mastery are identified in the table.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME


Clearly discuss the role of values in labor market
activity and articulate an understanding of a set of
core Christian values that impact labor market
outcomes.
Understand fundamental principles and theories about
the allocations of labor in a society, the relationship
between wages and both the supply of and the
demand for labor.

AACSB LEARNING
GOAL
Christian Business
Ethics/Ethical
economic decision
making
Competent Business
Economic Knowledge

ASSIGNMENTS USED
TO ASSESS
Faith Integration
Assignments,
Class
Discussion/Participation

Exam, Homeworks, and


Writing Assignments

Understand how to identify and discuss the various


factors that affect labor efficiency and productivity,
including the role of relative market power among
employers, employees and labor unions in the
determination of wages and labor costs.

Critical Thinking
Ability

Apply course material to improve thinking, problem


solving, and decisions related to labor allocation,
issues of market power, and the role of government
policy in accomplishing social objectives.

Critical Thinking
Ability, Capable
Communication Skills

Exams, Homeworks,
and Writing
Assignments

Apply their understanding of labor markets to current


conditions in the domestic and global economies.

Comprehensive
National and Global
Awareness

Exams, Homeworks,
and Writing
Assignments

ECON 356 Labor Economics Syllabus, Fall 2014, Page 2

Exam, Homeworks, and


Writing Assignments

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK AND STUDY RESOURCES:


Required Text:
Labor Economics (6th edition) by George Borjas. McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2010.
Recommended (but not required) Text:
Modern Labor Economics: Theory and Public Policy (10th Edition) by Ronald G. Ehrenberg and Robert S.
Smith. Addison-Wesley. (Last topic on "Globalization and labor market" will be taken from Chapter 16 of this
book)
Copyright Responsibilities:
Students and faculty are both authors and users of copyrighted materials. As a student you must know the
rights of both authors and users with resp1ct to copyrighted works to ensure compliance. It is equally
important to be knowledgeable about legally permitted uses of copyrighted materials. Information about
copyright compliance, fair use and websites for downloading information legally can be found at
http://apu.libguides.com/content.php?pid=241554&search_ terms=copyright

COURSE CALENDAR/SCHEDULE:
Course Outline
ASSIGNMENTS

9/8

Ch. 2 Labor Supply

9/15

Ch. 2 Labor Supply

9/22

Ch. 3 Labor Demand

HW #1 due 9/22

9/29

Ch. 3 Labor Demand

HW #2 due 10/1

10/6

Ch. 4 Labor Market Equilibrium

Midterm Exam #1, 10/6 (Chs 2 and 3)

10/13

Ch. 4 Labor Market Equilibrium

10/20

Ch. 5 Compensating Wage Differential

10/27

Ch. 6 Human Capital

HW #3 due, 10/27

11/3

Ch. 7 The Wage Structure

Midterm Exam #2, 11/3 (Chs 4, 5, and 6)

11/10

Ch. 8 Labor Mobility

11/17

Ch. 1o Labor Unions

11/24

Ch. 11 Incentive Pay

HW #4 due 11/24

12/1

Globalization and the labor market

Paper is due.

12/8

Final Exam 9:45

to 11 :45 a.m.

This syllabus may be revised during the semester by the professor as needed, including dates for exams. Any
revisions to the syllabus will be announced in class.

ASSIGNMENTS:
1. Homework Assignments

All homework assignment questions are taken from the textbook's review questions and problems at the end
of each chapter.
HW #1 due 9/22 in class:
Review questions #5, #8,
ECON 356 Labor Economics Syllabus, Fall 2014, Page 3

Problems 2-6, 2-10, 2-14


HW #2 due 10/1 in class:
Review questions #4, #12
Problems 3-4, 3-7, 3-12
HW #3 due 10/27 in class:
Chapter 4: Problems 4-2, 4-3, 4-"IO
Chapter 5: Problems 5-3, 5-1 O
HW #4, due 11 /24 in class:
Chapter 7: Problems 7-2, 7-6
Chapter 8: Problems 8-7, 8-10
Chapter 10: Problems 10-3, 10-8

2. Writing Assignment-Individual paper


I

Objective
To assess how well students can understand the basic theories of labor economics and apply their acquired
knowledge on the subjects discussed in class to real labor economic problems.
Format and Grading
The paper is about 2,000 words written in one-and-half-spaced form (excluding tables, data or graphs).
Grading is based on the organization, analytical and informational content as well as the clarity of the paper.
The paper carries 20 percent of your final grade, plus 5 percent for presentation .
Subject:
Select and analyze one topic in relation to the various topics discussed in class: i.e. the demand for labor,
labor market elasticities, labor supply, investment in human capital, unions and the labor market, inequality in
earnings between high-skilled and low-skilled workers, demography and wage inequality, youth unemployment
during recession, the effects of globalization on US labor market, and etc.
Suggested Steps
The first step: Collect information (articles) and relevant economic data related to the topic of your interest. I
suggest that you choose at least two articles for main references . These articles could be publications in the
Wall Street Journal, the Economist, Journal of Economic Perspective, and etc.
The second step: Read and understand thoroughly the issues related to the topic you selected.
The third step: Discuss the thesis/hypothesis/problems discussed in your main references and then elaborate
your discussion with the knowledge you have acquired from the course.
Graphs and tables are welcome to support your analysis (but put them in appendix) . The paper should be
submitted both as a hard copy in class and electronically via email.

Deadline
Paper due on December 1 in class.

INFORMATION LITERACY AND USE OF THE LIBRARY: (REQUIRED)


Information literacy is defined as "a set of abilities requiring individuals to recognize when information is
needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information" (American Library
Association, 1989). In this course, teaching and learning processes will employ the following information
literacy standards, as endorsed by the American Association for Higher Education (1999), the Association of
College and Research Libraries (2000), and the Council of Independent Colleges (2004).
The students in this course will:
ECON 356 Labor Economics Syllabus,IFall 2014, Page 4

determine the nature and extent of the information needed.


access needed information effectively and efficiently.
evaluate information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or
her knowledge base and value system.
individually or as a member of a group, use information effectively to accomplish a specific
purpose.
understand many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information
and accesses and uses information ethically and legally.

This course requires students to complete course assignments using resources available from the University
Libraries. Research assistance and subject guides for this course are available at http://apu.libguides.com/
GRADE DETERMINATION:

There will be two (2) midterm exams in this course that will gauge your level of understanding of the materials.
In addition, you need to complete four (4) homework assignments, (almost) weekly report, one final
comprehensive exam (questions will be skewed toward the last materials covered after the second midterm
exam), and one term paper
Factors contributing to final grade:
Two (2) midterm exam
Four homework assignments (each 5%)
One term-paper
(Almost) weekly report & class participation
Final Exam
Total

30%
17.5%
12.5%
15%
25%
100%

Grading Scale: PLUS/MINUS grading will be applied in this class

100-93% =A
92-90% =A-

89-87% = B+
86- 83% = B
82-80% = B-

79-77% = C+
76-73% = c
72 - 70% = C-

69-67% = D+
66 - 63% = D
62- 60% = D-

59- 0% = F

Grading Criteria for Assignments and Final Grade:

GRADE

CRITERIA

Superior knowledge regardin~1 details, assumptions, implications, history; superior thinking with
information relevant to application, critique, and relationship to other information.
More than adequate knowled9e regarding technical terms, distinctions, and possesses an ability to
use information.

Basic knowledge needed to function and carry on learning regarding major principles, central
terms, major figures, also possesses an awareness of field or discipline.

Serious gaps in knowledge, confusion of concepts and categories, inability to recall basic
information.

ECON 356 Labor Economics Syllabus, Fall 2014, Page 5

Absence of knowledge, incapable of carrying on a conversation about the subject, misunderstand


most concepts , confuses all categories

COURSE POLICIES:
Classroom Environment
Annoying and disruptive behaviors such as arriving late, leaving early, engaging neighbors in
conversation, leaving and reentering the class could distract students around you and the professor.
Please do avoid them. The use of electronic communication devices such as cell phones, IPod, and
pagers is prohibited during the class. Students caught texting in class will be given zero in one of the
exams.
Participation and Attendance
Class attendance is expected and will be taken. You should not miss any classes. If you must miss a
class, please inform me beforehand or as soon afterward as possible. Students who arrive after class
has begun or depart before class is over will be counted as absent. Points will be deducted from a
student's final score for absences (excused or unexcused) according to the following schedule:

0 to 2 = O;

3 or more

= 20 points each.

Missing Exams
No makeup exams will be given without a typewritten and signed petition fully explaining and
documenting why the exam was missed. The petition must be submitted prior to the writing of the
exam in question. If the absence is due to illness, proper documentation from a medical doctor will be
required which must be handed in to the professor no later than 5 business days after the date of the
exam-otherwise it will not be accepted.
Honor Code
All university and departmental policies affecting student work, appeals, and grievances, as outlined in
the Undergraduate Catalog and/or Department Handbook will apply, unless otherwise indicated in this
syllabus.
Academic Integrity:
The mission of Azusa Pacific University includes cultivating in each student not only the academic skills that
are required for a university degree, but also the characteristics of academic integrity that are integral to a
sound Christian education. It is therefore part of the mission of the university to nurture in each student a
sense of moral responsibility consistent with the biblical teachings of honesty and accountability. Furthermore,
a breach of academic integrity is viewed not merely as a private matter between the student and an instructor
but rather as an act which is fundamentally inconsistent with the purpose and mission of the entire university.
A complete copy of the Academic Integrity Policy is available in the Office of Student Life, the Office of the
Vice Provost for Undergraduate Programs, and online.

Expectations for this course regarding academic integrity in this class


o

Expectations are consistent with those outlined in the academic integrity policy

Consequences for violations of academic integrity in this class


o
o

Consequences are consistent with those outlined in the academic integrity policy
Any type of plagiarism will result in an "F" in the class (a more stringent consequence
than that suggested in the policy)

University or Department Policies

ECON 356 Labor Economics Syllabus, Fall 2014, Page 6

-I

All university and departmental policies affecting student work, appeals, and grievances, as outlined in the
Undergraduate Catalog and/or Department Handbook will apply, unless otherwise indicated in this syllabus.

Support Services
Students in this course who have a disability that might prevent them from fully demonstrating their abilities
should contact an advisor in the Learning Enrichment Center (ext. 3849) as soon as possible to initiate
disability verification and discuss accommodations that may be necessary to ensure full participation in the
successful completion of course requiremimts.

FAITH INTEGRATION TOPICS

Week 1 & 2

Biblical perspective on "Inquiry into economic and business research."

Week 3 & 4

Biblical perspective on "employment"

Week 5 & 6

Biblical perspective on "productivity."

Week 7 & 8

Biblical perspective on "profit."

Week 9 & 10

Biblical perspective on "wage."

Week 11 & 12

Biblical perspective on Biblical perspective on "collective bargaining."

Week 13 &14

Biblical perspective on "being a Christian in business and economics today."

ECON 356 Labor Economics Syllabus, Fall 2014, Page 7

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RECEIPT BY STUDENT:

Faculty may want to include a separate page for students to sign, acknowledging receipt and comprehension
of the syllabus.
I have received a copy of the syllabus for ECON 350 Intermediate Macroeconomics. I have read the syllabus
and have been ottered an opportunity to ask questions about it. I understand and agree to the requirements of
this syllabus.

Signature: _ _ _ __ __________ __ _ __
Date: _________________

ECON 356 Labor Economics Syllabus, Fall 2014, Page 8