2009

Workshop Handbook
Pottery Tools and Ceramic Studio Resources

Brought to you by the publishers of

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2009 Workshop Handbook Pottery Tools and Studio Resources
The clay tools and reference material offered here are meant to be accessible enough to be applicable to all kinds of ceramic work, regardless of your current skill level or experience. They are refined enough to be useful for advanced pottery projects, and easy enough to make so that you could use them in a beginning ceramics class. If you’ve ever made your own pottery tool, you know how it can individualize your pottery. A clay tool made with your own hands makes a mark like no other tool. Some of these pottery tools require no other tools beyond those you already have for making pottery. A clay stamp for your name is a tool that is about as individual as it gets. One of the best things about making your own clay tool, or simply buying a new tool for a pottery project, is that it can help you find a new way of looking at a familiar process. These pottery tools will kick start your efforts in the studio. We hope that you’ll find some inspiration in these pages that opens your eyes, your mind and your hands to something new and exciting.

Clay Tools: Forming
Ingenious gadgets and techniques to make your pottery projects easier and maybe a little more interesting.

Dividing Web
by Sylvia Shirley
A popular time-saving clay tool that is indispensable when sectioning the surface of pottery in preparation for decoration.

Clay Tools: Decoration
Simple pottery tools you can make that will let you spend less time preparing and more time decorating your pottery.

Clay Tool Manufacturers and Suppliers
Don’t lose this list! It has anything and everything you need to locate pottery tools, equipment, and supplies for the clay studio.

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Clay Tools: Forming
Right Angle Jig
Many years ago while handbuilding a large form, I needed a support for the slabs while joining the edges, so I built a right angle jig to support the form in progress. Over the years, this has become an invaluable tool when building architectural forms. I use a simple structure that supports boards with slabs at a right angle while attaching them. This system is used for various architectural segments such as corbels, square tops of capitals or square vessels. Begin with two pieces of ½-inch plywood cut to 12×15 inches. Cut a right angle shape out of each piece. To connect these notched ends, cut two 15-inch-long braces and one 14-inch-long brace from 4-inch-wide plywood boards. Attach the braces to each side and the middle. Two sheets of plywood complete the jig. Cut out all the clay pieces during the same session and store overnight on sheetrock or gypsum board under Create the form from ½-inch plywood. plastic. Tip: Design tarpaper patterns then cut and press them onto the slab. Use tarpaper patterns much like sewing patterns but plan for the thickness of the clay. Store and reuse tarpaper patterns. Use a 45° bevel cutter to cut the edges of the Two plywood boards complete the jig. shapes that will later be joined at right angles. You can also use a cutoff wire held tightly and pulled along the edge, or a fettling knife held at a 45° angle. On the second day, or after the slabs have stiffened, score and slip the Butted slabs with 45° angles placed edge of one and place in in jig. the plywood cradle. Score and slip a second slab and slide it down to meet the edge of the first slab. Fill the seam with a coil and smooth with a rib. To remove, tilt the whole works and slide the boards and slabs onto the table. Gently pull the boards away from the clay, All four sides and the bottom are joined in the jig. which should stand free.

Terra-cotta corbels constructed using the right angle jig.

After joining the remaining two sides, attach the bottom, then attach the other assembled sides to complete the basic form. Remove from the jig and finish the exterior seams the same as the interior seams. To work on the top and bottom, sandwich the form with bats and flip it over. Finish the surface with ribs or a Surform tool. has a much shorter lifespan, I consider it a good trade-off. —Marcia Selsor, Brownsville, Texas

Circular Slabs
To begin, roll out a slab of clay large enough for your mold. For this plate I rolled the clay to 3⁄8 of an inch thick using 3⁄8-inch dowel rods on each side of the clay as a guide. To create different-size circles, use a disc cutter that has an arm with multiple holes. Place a needle tool in the appropriate hole, then swing the arm in a circle to cut the clay. Lightly wipe the clay with a damp sponge to smooth the surface. Tip: I roll out slabs on heavy-duty interfacing material rather than canvas as it avoids having to remove the canvas marks. Even though interfacing has a much shorter lifespan, I consider it a good trade-off. —Denise Wilz, Green Lane, Pennsylvania

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Clay Tools: Forming The Slip Cup
For multiple lines, I use a small plastic container with a tight fitting lid. I cut three small-diameter drinking straws to about 2 inches in length, and insert them in a straight line approximately 1 inch from the top, with about ¼ inch of the straw inside the container. I apply glue around each hole to seal it and tape the straws together on the outside so they are always the same distance apart, otherwise they’ll move while you’re using it. Trim the outside straw ends so they’re all the same length. Fill the container with slip that is thin enough to pour from the straws but not too fast. Replace the lid and test the consistency. This tool can be used to make straight and/ or wavy lines. —Denise Wilz, Green Lane, Pennsylvania dry, mount the plastic bat on your bat pins, insert a terra-cotta tile and throw your pot. You can quickly remove the tile and insert a fresh one for your next pot. A terra-cotta tile costs about 30 cents, so it makes a really cheap bat. —Sylvia Shirley, Pittsburg, Kansas

Squeeze and Score
With a little squeeze, this tool automatically supplies water to the clay you are scoring to make attachments. To make it, you will need an empty glue bottle and a piece of coat hanger or heavy wire that is 1 inch longer than the height of the bottle and slightly larger in diameter than the hole in the cap. Sharpen one end of the wire with a file or grinder and insert it through the hole in the cap. You will need to cut off the stopper inside the cap first. Bend the blunt end of the wire at a 90° angle so it rests against the bottom of the bottle (this will provide stability when scoring). Fill the bottle with water and squeeze. Drops of water will run down to the tip of the wire, wetting the clay that you are scoring. If water does not squeeze out, just move the wire left and right to make the hole bigger and try again. —Paveen Chunhaswasdikul, Gadsden, Alabama

Quick-Change Artist

Temporary Template
I have found that rigid foam-core board, used by artists and framers, is a handy material for creating templates for repeated shapes to be thrown on the wheel. It can be easily cut with a single-edge blade or a mat knife, and it can be sanded smooth. Since it is paper on both sides, it must be made waterproof, and emulsion wax resist works great. Do not use an acrylic spray, because it will melt the foam in the core. I have used these templates for as many as 25 duplicate forms. They can be used for interior as well as exterior shapes. —Robert Brown, Miami, Florida
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For throwing mugs and small bowls, I use a quick-change bat system. To make one, you need one square plastic bat that attaches to your wheel head with bat pins, PVC molding from the hardware store, PVC cement, and some commercial 6-inch-square terra-cotta tiles. Cut the PVC molding into two 5-inch lengths and two 4¼-inch lengths. Place one of the terra-cotta tiles in the center of the plastic bat and dry-fit the PVC molding around it, leaving two corners open to make it easy to remove the tiles. Glue down the molding with the cement and let it dry. Remove the tile from the assembly while it dries or you won’t get it out later. Once it’s

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Dividing Web

by Sylvia Shirley

This handy guide makes it easy to divide the surface of any round pot into as many as twelve equal sections. Whether you’re decorating, darting, paddling or attaching handles and spouts, you’ll want to keep a few of these around the studio.

Making the Web

Use a photocopier to enlarge this wheel to the desired size. Attach it to a wheel head-sized circle of cardboard. Cover with plastic wrap or have it laminated at an office supply store. The numbers refer to the number of divisions desired and are repeated at equal intervals around the circle.
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Dividing Web

The Pointer
½-inch holes

Popsicle stick 10-24 × 2½-inch machine screw washer washer 10-24 wing nut

The pointer helps you transfer marks from the dividing web to the pot. Make sure the bottom of the pointer block is square and the front side is perpendicular. The arms can be made from Popsicle sticks.

2×2×6-inch wood block

Using the Dividing Web

Center a pot on the wheel. Draw circles on the pot using a red felt-tip pen. Align the pointer with the selected line and position the Popsicle sticks to touch the pot. Tighten the wing nuts. Make a tic mark on the pot at the end of the Popsicle stick using the red felt pen. Move the pointer to the next position and repeat.

Ideas to Get Started

Accurately marking off divisions on your form opens up a world of potential design work. Once the desired number of marks are made, decorate as desired, using sgrafitto, trailed slip, brushed oxides, etc.

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Studio Tools: Decoration
A Tango of Texture
Rossheim has found that the color of her bowls speaks loudly to her audience, so both Rossheim and Marrinson add only the tiniest bit of texture to finish off a vessel. Through trial and error, Rossheim discovered that a box of wooden pencils that she sharpened and taped together create an effective pencil stippler. Once pieces have dried to the right hardness, the stippler can be applied to the outside surface of a bowl to create the textures that add interest to the piece without overshadowing the form and color. The only hitch is to watch the amount of pressure being applied. Too much force will puncture the surface and require repair. If the work can’t be repaired, it’s back to the drawing board. —Emily Rossheim, Starksboro, Vermont

Glaze Patterns
Glaze application methods are as infinite as our imagination. Nearly every item around my studio or house has the potential to be a glaze applicator. It just takes a little imagination to see the potential, and experimenting is key to discovering new ideas. For every new idea, there is a pile of attempts. But don’t be too quick to discard the failures. Hidden in almost every failure are the beginnings of a new success, you just need to look at it in the right context. —Frank James Fisher, Milford, Michigan

Using a sponge roller, roll the glaze over the cheesecloth.

Peel away cheesecloth to reveal texture. Experiment with other open materials such as lace, nylon window screen, etc.

Pinning Parallel Lines
I became frustrated by not being able to draw parallel lines in curves or arcs on my work when it is leather hard. If I tried to draw the lines separately, it would never work, and even if I held two tools at once, one would always wander. I found that a clothespin actually performs this task wonderfully. I sharpen the ends you use as a handle (if you were actually using it as a clothespin) and use these points to draw the lines. They are held at a consistent distance apart, and are infinitely adjustable between open and closed. To adjust the space between the points, I put various small cylindrical objects in the groove of the “mouth” of the pin (pen caps, pencils, dowels). The larger the object in the mouth, the closer the lines become. This tool has become a staple in our studio. —Ken Magee, Tallahassee, Florida

Roll the glaze onto the domed pills of the bubble wrap.

Roll your form across the glazed bubble wrap.

Sprigs from Nature
Sprigs are press-molded clay pieces added to leather-hard work. They are created using small molds made of bisque-fired clay or plaster. Begin by using the finest grain clay you have. While porcelain is best, I have used fine-grain white stoneware with good results. Shape the exterior of the mold by rolling or tapping on a cloth surface. To make it easier to hold on to, make the mold long or add a handle to the back. Flatten the front of it. If desired, add texture by pressing the mold on a textured cloth or other surface.
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Studio Tools: Decoration A Tango of Texture
Rossheim has found that the color of her bowls speaks loudly to her audience, so both Rossheim and Marrinson add only the tiniest bit of texture to finish off a vessel. Through trial and error, Rossheim discovered that a box of wooden pencils that she sharpened and taped together create an effective pencil stippler. Once pieces have dried to the right hardness, the stippler can be applied to the outside surface of a bowl to create the textures that add interest to the piece without overshadowing the form and color. The only hitch is to watch the amount of pressure being applied. Too much force will puncture the surface and require repair. If the work can’t be repaired, it’s back to the drawing board. —Emily Rossheim, Starksboro, Vermont

perpendicular to the wheel head. An extruder I became frustrated by not stamps is to wrap a clay slab around a tubular can also produce tubular shapes for rolling being able to draw parallel lines dowel or stamps. Just cap the ends with slabs, leaving shape (a cardboard tube, wooden small holes in the center to allow dowels to be used as handles. Interesting surfaces can be obtained by cutting the cylinders into sections and reassembling the parts into different positions.

Rolling Stamps The simplest method of creating rolling Pinning Parallel Lines

plastic pipe), which provide a rigid backing when applying a texture to the slabs. A piece of newspaper placed between the form and the clay will prevent sticking when removing the support. Stamps also can be made by throwing a cylindrical or conical form. The center spout is pulled up first, then the outer wall is raised to form the working surface of the stamp, which will be carved when leather hard. Make sure that the outer surface is

After bisque firing, simply roll the stamps over the surface of the clay with the palm of the hand while varying the pressure to correspond to the width of the stamp. The rolling stamp is ideal for quickly decorating a platter rim. The stamp, held rigidly in a fixed position, quickly prints out the repeated pattern as the wheel spins. Lifting at the right moment can be tricky, but a little practice is all you need. —William Shinn, Santa Maria, California
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Manufacturers and Suppliers
Quickly locating one of hundreds of ceramic businesses is easy with this locator. You’ll be able to easily find suppliers nearby and all the suppliers offering various products and services. Companies are arranged alphabetically by state, then by city.
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ARIZONA Marjon Ceramics Inc. (Phoenix) Dolan Tools (Scottsdale) Marjon Ceramics Inc. (Tucson) ARKANSAS Flat Rock Clay Supplies (Fayetteville) CALIFORNIA Phoenix Ceramic & Fire Supply (Arcata) W.P. Dawson Inc. (Brea) Glaze Mixer (Cardiff) Ceramic Services (Chino) Kemper Tools (Chino) Laguna Clay Co. (City of Industry) Graber’s Pottery Inc. (Claremont) The Chinese Clay Art, USA (Cupertino) Creative Industries (El Cajon) Mud in Mind (El Cajon) Chris Henley Tools (Encinitas) Duncan Enterprises (Fresno) B & W Tile Co. Inc. (Gardena) Geil Kilns Co. (Huntington Beach) Art Decal Corp. (Long Beach) Echo Ceramics (Los Angeles) West Coast Kiln (Lucerne Valley) Nasco Arts & Crafts (Modesta) Olsen Kiln (Mountain Center) Freeform Clay & Supply (National City) Falcon Company (Olivenhain) Aftosa (Richmond) Jiffy Mixer Co. Inc. (Riverside) Industrial Minerals Co. (Sacramento) HyperGlaze/Richard Burkett (San Diego) Ceramics & Crafts Supply Co. (San Francisco) Japan Pottery Tools (San Francisco) Lily Pond Products (Sanger) Aardvark Clay & Supplies (Santa Ana) Clay Planet (Santa Clara) California Pot Tools (Santa Paula) Peter Pugger Mfg., Inc. (Ukiah) Ceramic ArtSpace (Van Nuys) Pure & Simple Pottery Products (Willits) Ceramics Unlimited, Inc. COLORADO Herring Designs, LLC (Breckenridge) Carbondale Clay Center (Carbondale) Ceramic Design Group Ltd. (Denver) Killam Gas Burner Co. (Denver) Mile Hi Ceramics, Inc. (Denver) Bluebird Mfg. Inc. (Ft. Collins) BNZ Materials Inc. (Littleton) Glyptic Modeling Tools (Loveland) CONNECTICUT Rusty Kiln Ceramic Studio (North Windham) R.T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc. (Norwalk) Duralite Inc. (Riverton) DELAWARE J. & J. Ceramic Studio (Dover) Nabertherm, Inc. (New Castle)

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www.marjonceramics.com www.dolantools.net www.marjonceramics.com www.flatrockclay.com www.phoenixceramic.com www.kiln-sitter.com www.glazemixer.com www.ceramicservices.com www.kempertools.com www.lagunaclay.com www.graberspottery.com www.chineseclayart.com www.creativewheels.com www.mudinmind.com www.hominid.net/chris.htm www.duncanceramics.com www.bwtile.com www.kilns.com www.artdecalcorp.com (decals) www.echoceramics.com www.westcoastkiln.com www.enasco.com www.olsenkilns.com www.freeformclay.com www.aftosa.com www.jiffymixer.com www.clayimco.com www.hyperglaze.com (software for glazes) www.ceramicssf.com www.japanpotterytools.com www.lilypond.com www.aardvarkclay.com www.clay-planet.com www.peterpugger.com www.ceramicartspace.com www.pureandsimplepottery.com www.ceramicsunlimited.com

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www.herringdesigns.com www.carbondaleclay.org www.jonathankaplanceramics.com www.killamburner.com www.milehiceramics.com www.bluebird-mfg.com www.bnzmaterials.com www.glyptic.com www.rustykiln.com www.rtvanderbilt.com www.duralite.com

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Manufacturers and Suppliers
FLORIDA Atlantic Pottery Supply Inc. (Atlantic Beach) Jen-Ken Kilns (Lakeland) Summit Kilns (Land O Lakes) C and R Products, Inc. (Ocala) Bennett Pottery Supply (Ocoee) Calcoworld Ceramic Decals (Orlando) Axner Co. Inc. (tradename of Laguna Clay Co.) (Oviedo) Highwater Clays of Florida (St. Petersburg) St. Petersburg Clay Company Inc. (St. Petersburg) The Arts Center (St. Petersburg) Armory Art Center (W. Palm Beach) GEORGIA Davens Ceramic Center (Atlanta) Creative Glazes (Duluth) Olympic Kilns (Flowery Branch) Larkin Refractory Solutions (Lithonia) Kickwheel Pottery Supply Inc. (Tucker) HAWAII Ceramics Hawaii Ltd. (Honolulu) IDAHO The Potter’s Center (Boise) Wendt Pottery (Lewiston) ILLINOIS U.S. Pigment Corp. (Bloomingdale) Great Lakes Clay & Supply (Carpentersville) Metomic Corporation (Chicago) Paasche Airbrush Co. (Chicago) Sapir Studios (Chicago) Ceramic Supply Chicago (Evanston) Badger Air Brush Co. (Franklin Park) Dick Blick Art Materials (Galesburg) Crystal Productions (Glenview) Shimpo Ceramics (Nidec-Shimpo America Corp.) (Itasca) Midwest Ceramics (Joliet) International Decal Corp. (Northbrook) Art Clay World, USA (Oak Lawn) MJR Tumblers (Pecatonica) INDIANA United Art & Education (Ft. Wayne) American Art Clay Co., Inc. (Amaco/Brent) (Indianapolis) Brickyard Ceramics & Crafts (Indianapolis) Sugar Creek Industry, Inc. (Linden) Royal and Langnickel Brush Mfg. (Merrillville) Cattle Barn Clay Co. (Royal Center) IOWA Johnson Gas Appliance Co. (Cedar Rapids) Bartlett Instrument Co. (Ft. Madison) KANSAS Creative Paradise (Goddard) Bracker’s Good Earth Clays (Lawrence) Soldner Clay Mixers by Muddy Elbow Mfg. (Newton) Evans Ceramic Supply (Wichita) Starlite Mold Company (Wichita) KENTUCKY Old Hickory Clay Co. (Hickory) Groovy Tools (Lawrenceburg) LOUISANA Alligator Clay Company (Baton Rouge) Blue Diamond Kilns (Metarie) MAINE Portland Pottery Supply (Portland) Miracle Bat (York) MARYLAND Baltimore Clayworks (Baltimore) Buyers Market of American Craft (Baltimore) Chesapeake Ceramics Supply (Baltimore)

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www.atlanticpotterysupply.com www.jenkenkilns.com www.swiftweb.com/summit www.candrproducts.com www.bennettpottery.com www.calcoworld.com (decals) www.axner.com www.highwaterclays.com/hwcflorida.html www.stpeteclay.com www.theartscenter.org www.armoryart.org www.davensceramiccenter.com www.creativeglazes.com www.greatkilns.com www.larkinrefractory.com www.kickwheel.com

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www.greatclay.com www.metomic.com (lamp parts) www.paascheairbrush.com (display stands) www.ceramicsupplychicago.com www.badgerairbrush.com www.dickblick.com www.crystalproductions.com www.shimpoceramics.com www.midwestcas.net www.timrg.com www.artclayworld.com

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www.unitednow.com www.amaco.com www.brickyardceramics.com www.sugarcreekind.com www.royalbrush.com www.cattlebarnclay.com www.johnsongas.com www.bartinst.com

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www.handbuilding.com www.brackers.com www.soldnerequipment.com www.evansceramics.com www.starlitemolds.com www.oldhickoryclay.com www.groovy-tools.com

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www.alligatorclay.com www.bluediamondkiln.com • www.portlandpottery.com www.miraclebat.com • • • www.baltimoreclayworks.org www.americancraft.com www.ceramicsupply.com
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Manufacturers and Suppliers
Clayworks Supplies, Inc. (Baltimore) PotteryTools.com (Sinkburg) MASSACHUSETTS Portland Pottery Supply South (Braintree) Amherst Potters Supply (Hadley) Gare Inc. (Harverhill) The Potters Shop and School (Needham) Sheffield Pottery Inc. (Sheffield) Ceramics Consulting Services (Southampton) Boston Kiln Sales & Service (Watertown) Saint-Gobain Ceramics (Worcester) MICHIGAN Pebble Press, Inc. (Ann Arbor) Evenheat Kiln Inc. (Caseville) Runyan Pottery Supply Inc. (Clio) West Michigan Clay (Hamilton) Crossroads Pottery & Clay Company (Jackson) Manitou Arts (Leland) Har-Bon Ceramics & Decals (Presque Isle) Rovin Ceramics (Taylor) MINNESOTA Minnesota Clay Co. USA (Edina) Master Kiln Builders (Farmington) Dunghanrach Clay Co. (Melrose) Brown Tool Co. (Minneapolis) Continental Clay Co. (Minneapolis) Smith-Sharpe Fire Brick Supply (Minneapolis) Triarco Arts & Crafts LLC (Plymouth) MISSISSIPPI Dogwood Ceramic Supply (Gulfport) Whistle Press (Petal) MISSOURI KC Metro Ceramic & Pottery Supplies (Kansas City) L&R Specialties Inc (Nixa) Krueger Pottery, Inc. (St. Louis) MONTANA Archie Bray Foundation (Helena) NEVADA Cress Mfg. Co. (Carson City) Aardvark Clay & Supplies (Las Vegas) Bison Studios (Las Vegas) Pottery West (Las Vegas) BigCeramicStore.com (Sparks) Nevada Dan’s (Sparks) NEW HAMPSHIRE Creative Hobbies, Inc. (Bellmawr) Midlantic Clay (Bellmawr) NEW JERSEY Instar Beautiful Decals (E. Brunswick) Curran Pfeiff Corp. (Edison) Hobby Colorobbia (Elmowwod Park) Hammill & Gillespie Inc. (Livingston) Ceramic Supply Inc. (Lodi) New Brunswick Lamp Shade Co. (North Brunswick) AmericanPotters.com (Rockaway) L&L Kiln Mfg. Inc. (Swedesboro) Lamp Specialties (Westville) NEW MEXICO Coyote Clay & Color (Albuquerque) New Mexico Clay, Inc. (Albuquerque) Taos Clay (El Prado) Santa Fe Clay (Santa Fe) NEW YORK Charles A. Hones Inc. (Amityville) East Valley Supply (Andover) Studio Sales Pottery Supply (Avon) The Mudpit (Brooklyn)

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www.clayworkssupplies.com www.potterytools.com www.portlandpottery.com www.amherstpotters.com www.gare.com

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www.sheffield-pottery.com www.fixpots.com www.bostonkiln.com www.refractories.saint-gobain.com

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• • • • • • • • • • • • www.evenheat-kiln.com www.runyanpotterysupply.com www.westmichiganclay.com www.crossroadspottery.net www.manitouarts.net www.harbon.com (decals) www.rovinceramics.com www.minnesotaclayusa.com www.kilnbuilders.com www.browntool.com www.continentalclay.com www.kilnshelf.com www.triarcoarts.com www.dogwoodceramics.com www.whistlepress.com www.kcmetroceramic.com www.claydogs.com www.kruegerpottery.com www.archiebray.org www.cressmfg.com www.aardvarkclay.com www.bisonstudios.com www. potterywest.com www.bigceramicstore.com www.potterywheel.com www.creative-hobbies.com www.midlanticclay.com • • www.instardecals.com (decals) www.curranpfeiff.com www.hobbycolorobbia.com www.hamgil.com www.eceramicsupply.com www.nbls.com (lamp shades) www.americanpotters.com www.hotkilns.com www.lamp-specialties.com www.coyoteclay.com www.nmclay.com www.taosclay.com www.santafeclay.com www.charlesahones.com www.evsupply.com (ceramics repair epoxy) www.studiosalespottery.com www.mudpitnyc.com

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Manufacturers and Suppliers
Vent-A-Kiln Corp. (Buffalo) Ceramic Arts Library (Corning) PCF Studios (Honeoye) Bailey Pottery Equipment (Kingston) Artfixtures (New York) Rockland Colloid Corp. (Piermont) Clayscapes Pottery Inc. (Syracuse) Northeast Ceramic Supply (Troy) Alpine Kilns and Equipment LLC (Warwick) Doo-Woo Tools LLC (Warwick) Kiln-Ray Services (Warwick) Rochester Ceramics, Inc. (Webster) NORTH CAROLINA Highwater Clays, Inc. (Asheville) Lark Books (Asheville) Carolina Clay Connection (Charlotte) Claymakers (Durham) Resco Products Inc. (Greensboro) Mudtools (Hendersonville) Williams Supply (Star) Speedball Art Products Co. (Statesville) Fat Cat Pottery Inc. (Wilmington) OHIO National Artcraft Co. (Aurora) A & K Clay Company LLC (Bethel) Laguna Clay Co. (Byesville) Olympic Enterprises Inc. (Campbell) Vulcan Kilns (Centerville) Funke Fired Arts (Cincinnati) Aegean Sponge Co. (Cleveland) Columbus Clay (Columbus) Mudmats (Columbus) RAM Products Inc. (Columbus) Cornell Studio Supply (Dayton) Wise Screenprint (Dayton) Innovative Ceramic Corp. (East Liverpool) Mason Color Works Inc. (East Liverpool) Mayco Colors (Hilliard) Maryland Refractories Co. (Irondale) Ohio Ceramic Supply Inc. (Kent) Krumor Inc. (Valley View) Orton Ceramic Foundation (Westerville) OREGON The Kiln Elements Co. (Birkenfeld) Aim Kiln Mfg. (Corvallis) Georgies Ceramic & Clay Co. Inc. (Eugene) Georgies Ceramic & Clay Co. Inc. (Portland) Mudshark (Portland) PotteryVideos.com (Portland) Skutt Ceramic Products (Portland) Thomas Stuart Wheels (Portland) Southern Oregon Pottery Supply (Talent) PENNSYLVANIA Ceramic Services Inc. (Bensalem) Insulating Firebrick, Inc. (Butler) The Clay Place (Carnegie) M&M Pottery Supply (Corry) Del Val Potter’s Supply Co. (Glenside) Penn-Mo Fire Brick Co. (Harrisburg) The Ceramic Shop (Philadelphia) Standard Ceramic Supply Co. (Pittsburgh) Frog Pond Pottery (Pocopson) Placid Ceramics (Washington) Petro Mold Co (Waterford)

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www.ventakiln.com www.ceramicartslibrary.com www.pcfstudios.com www.baileypottery.com www.artfixtures.com (display stands) www.rockaloid.com www.clayscapespottery.com www.alpinekilns.com www.doowoo.com www.kilnray.com www.rochesterceramics.com www.highwaterclays.com www.larkbooks.com www.carolinaclay.com www.claymakers.com www.rescoproducts.com www.mudtools.com www.williamssupplync.com www.speedballart.com www.fatcatpottery.com www.nationalartcraft.com www.akclay.com www.lagunaclay.com www.olympicdecals.com www.vulcankiln.com www.funkefiredarts.com www.aegeansponge.com www.columbusclay.com www.mostlymud.com www.ramprocess.com www.wisescreenprint.com (decals) www.innovativeceramic.com (inks/decals) www.masoncolor.com www.maycocolors.com www.mrcgrog.com www.ohioceramic.com (thermocouples and RTDs) www.ortonceramic.com www.kilnelements.com www.aimkilns.com www.georgies.com www.georgies.com www.mudsharkstudios.org www.potteryvideos.com www.skutt.com www.thomasstuart.com www.southernoregonpottery.com www.kilnman.com www.insulatingfirebrick.com www.clayplace.com www.delvalpotters.com www.penn-mo.com www.theceramicshop.com www.standardceramic.com www.masteringglazes.com www.placidceramics.com www.petromolds.com

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RHODE ISLAND Dew Claw Studios (Pawtucket) SOUTH CAROLINA Clay-King.com (Spartanburg) Coastal Ceramics (Summerville) SOUTH DAKOTA Pacer Corp. (Custer) Dakota Potters Supply (Sioux Falls) TENNESSEE Ward Burner Systems (Dandridge) Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts (Gatlinburg) The Clay Lady (Herdersonville) Mid-South Ceramic Supply Co. (Nashville) TEXAS Armadillo Clay & Supplies (Austin) Trinity Ceramic Supply Inc. (Dallas) American Ceramic Supply Co. (Ft. Worth) Texas Pottery Supply & Clay Co. (Ft. Worth) Dry Creek Pottery (Granbury) Ceramic Store Inc. (Houston) Bella Bisque, Inc. (Kyle) Display Your Art by Glassica (Liberty Hill) Paragon Industries, L.P. (Mesquite) Old Farmhouse Pottery (Rusk) Clayworld Inc. (San Antonio) GSM Enterprises (San Antonio) Etc., Etc., Etc. (Wichita Falls) UTAH Capital Ceramics Inc. (Salt Lake City) VIRGINIA Spun Earth Pottery (Forest) The Kiln Doctor Inc. (Front Royal) Tin Barn Pottery Supply at Manassas Clay (Manassas) Campbell’s Ceramic Supply Inc. (Richmond) ClayPeople (Richmond) WASHINGTON North Star Equipment Inc. (Cheney) Giffin Tec Inc. (Lummi Island) Crucible Kilns (Seattle) New Century Ceramic Arts Inc. (Seattle) Seattle Pottery Supply (Seattle) Precision Terrefirma (Spokane) Rings & Things Wholesale (Spokane) Clay Art Center (Tacoma) Scott Creek Pottery Inc. (Tacoma) WEST VIRGINIA Danser, Inc. (Parkersburg) WISCONSIN MKM Pottery Tools LLC (Appleton) Nasco Arts & Crafts (Ft. Atkinson) Sax Arts & Crafts (New Berlin) A.R.T. Studio Clay Co. Inc. (Sturtevant) AUSTRALIA Venco Products (Kelmscott WA ) CANADA Plainsman Clay Ltd. (Medicine Hat) Greenbarn Potters Supply Ltd. (Surrey) Bamboo Tools (Hi Tech Marketing) (Surrey) Ceramic Arts & Crafts Supply (Burlington) Euclids Kilns & Elements (Oakville) Euclid’s/The Pottery Supply House Ltd. (Oakville) Cone Art Kilns Inc. (Richmond Hill) Tucker’s Pottery Supplies Inc. (Richmond Hill) Spectrum Glazes (Toronto) Digitalfire Corp. (Cornwall) Edouard Bastarache Inc. (Sorel-Tracy)

www.ceramicartsdaily.org | Copyright © 2009, Ceramic Publications Company | 2009 Workshop Handbook | 11

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www.capitalceramics.com www.spunearth.com www.thekilndoctor.com www.manassasclay.com www.claysupply.com www.claypeople.net www.northstarequipment.com www.giffingrip.com www.seattlepotterysupply.com www.paperclayart.com www.seattlepotterysupply.com www.precision-terrafirma.com www.rings-things.com www.clayartcenter.net www.scottcreekpottery.com www.danserinc.com www.mkmpotterytools.com www.enasco.com www.saxarts.com www.artclay.com www.venco.com

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