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CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

P
FOR VARIOUS CITIES OF MA
ADHYA PRADESH

CITY DEVEELOPMENT PLAN FOR MA


ANDAV
MANDA
AV
(DISTRICT DHAR), MADHYA PRADESSH
http://indolinkenglish.files.word
dpress.com/2011/08/logo.jpg
FINAL REPORT
SEPTEMBER, 2013

PREPARED BY:
IDFC, DELHI
SUBMITTED TO:
URBAN ADMIN
NISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMEENT (UADD)
GOVERNMENT OF MADHYA PRADESH
PROJECT COORDINATION:
CITY MANAGERS
M
ASSOCIATION, MADHYA PRADEESH

City Development Plan for Mandav


RESOLUTION PA SSED BY MANDAV PARISHA D (DISTRICT DHAR)

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

CHECKLISTS: MANDA V (DISTRICT DHAR)


CITY PROFILE
CompanyName
ULB Name
Whether the Sectoral Analysis report is as per UADD requisites

Town Brief

Geographical location (Town)


Average rainfall (annual)
Height above mean sea level
Municipal area (1991)
Municipal area (2001)
Municipal area (2011)
Date of Constitution of ULB

In one or two
sentences

Population

Historic importance

Population Year 1981 (under Municipal boundary only)


Population Year 1991 (under Municipal boundary only)
Population Year 2001 (under Municipal boundary only)
Population Year 2011 (under Municipal boundary only)
Name of Population projection Method
Projected population adopted Year 2015
Projected population adopted Year 2025
Projected population adopted Year 2035

Land Use

Land Use
Residential
Commercial
Public - semi public
Agriculture
Industrial
Roads
Green area
Sensitive
Water bodies
Total

Latitude
Longitude
MM
Mts
Sq kms
Sq kms
Sq kms
Date

Town level

% Standard (as
per UDPFI)
50 to 55
2 to 3
8 to 10

IDFC
Mandav
Yes
22 20 11 N,
75 24 56 E
833.1
609.6

24.87 (42.2 according to NP)


1997
The earliest reference to Mandu is available in the Sanskrit inscription of 555 AD, which tells
that Mandu was a fortified city even in 6th century BC.Mandu, due to its strategic position and
natural defences, was an important place with a rich and varied history. It was an important
military outpost and its military past can be gauged by the circuit of the battlemented wall,
which is nearly 37 km (23 mi) and is punctuated by 12 gateways.
NA
became NP in 1997
8544
10659
Weighted average
11689
14682
18400
Land use (Tentative in Sq kms )

Land use (Tentative in percentage)

2.01
0.02
0.38

8.08
0.08
1.53

0.00

0.01

0.04

24.87

100.00

3 to 4
5 to 6
(transport)
15 to 18
8 to 10 (for
ecological uses)

131

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


CITY PROFILE (WARD WISE)

Ward #

Name of ward

Ward
Population
(2011)
Area (sq kms)
Density
(PPSqkm)
Male

Ward 1

Ward
12
Bhag
Rani
wans
Tarapur
Dariya
Jama
Eco-point
Neelkant
Rampura Lal Bangla
Roopmat h
Gate
Khan
Masjid
Ward
h Ward
Ward
Ward
i Ward Gate
Ward
Ward
Ward
Ward

Ward 2 Ward 3 Ward 4 Ward 5

Ram
Gadashah
Mandir
Ward
Ward

Jahaz
Mahal
Ward

Ward 6

Ward 7 Ward 8 Ward 9 Ward 10 Ward 11

Ward
13

Ward
14

Ward 15

Mansin
gi Ward

Kanadi
pura
Ward

Jahangir
pur Gate
Ward

Total

736

660

1011

527

745

666

422

994

521

811

595

777

705

795

694

10659

0.66

1.16

1.24

0.9

1.25

3.58

1.47

1.98

0.89

1.76

1.67

3.56

1.55

1.03

2.18

24.88

1115.2

569.0

815.3

585.6

596.0

186.0

287.1

502.0

585.4

460.8

356.3

218.3

454.8

771.8

318.3

428.4

335

342

456

262

382

335

204

516

280

420

312

418

372

403

348

5385

401

318

555

265

363

331

218

478

241

391

283

359

333

392

346

5274

SC (2001)

156

30

22

217

ST (2001)

304

205

375

180

380

398

364

807

397

713

493

593

592

579

448

6828

Female

BPL
Sex ratio
Literacy rate
(%)

7197
1233

773

929

970

903

865

954

977

971

972

1004

993

830

976

923

70.2

65.4

49.2

78.8

65.9

36

29.5

30.2

30.1

18.7

18.3

23.5

17

19.2

13.3

No. of Primary 1 Girl's 1 school


schools/schoo School, 2
cum
ls
schools hostel
No. of Primary
Health Centre
No. of
Households
Primary
occupation
(Majority)
Seconday
occupation

1
Private
school

15 primary
schools, 1 middle
school, 1 higher
secondary school,
2 tribal student
hostels, 1 Sanskrit
School

1 School

107

81

109

101

114

82

42

145

74

113

84

91

87

114

64

1408

agricult
ure

agricult
ure

agricultu
re

Agriculture

NA

NA

NA

NA

agricultur
e
NA

NA

NA

agricultureagriculture
NA

NA

NA

agric
agricultur agricultur agricultur
agricultur
agriculture
ultur
e
e
e
e
e
NA

NA

NA

132

NA

NA

NA

City Development Plan for Mandav


shop/resta shop/rest
Tertiary
urant
aurant
occupation
owners owners
No. of SS/LS
industrial
units
No. of
Commercial
establishment
s
No. of Slum
pockets
Slum
population
No. of Slum
Households
No. of
Individual
water
connections in
the ward
No. of
Community
water
connections
No. of
Commercial
water
connections
No. of
Tubewells
No. of
Handpumps
No. of OHTs
% Coverage of
piped water
supply
No. of
Individual
Toilets

2013

NA

shop/re
staurant
owners

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

shop/
restaurant/
hotels for local
and tourist
requirement

yes

yes

yes

200

22

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

3,898

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

666

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

306

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

26

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

16.80%

49

29

60

69

207

133

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

No. of
Individual
48
11
56
42
0
Septic tanks
No. of
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Community
Septic tanks
No. of
Community
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
toilets
% of
population NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Open
defecation
No. of Dust
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
bins
Wardwise
Waste
138.368 124.08 190.068 99.076 140.06
generated
(Kgs)
Road
sweeping (1 once in 2 once in 2 once in 2 once in once in 2
time or 2
days
days
days
2 days
days
times)
Total no. of
sanitary
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
workers in the
ward
Length of
Pucca road
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
(Mts)
Length of
Kuccha road
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
(Mts)
Length of
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
State Highway
Length of
National
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Highway
Length of
Road side
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
drains Pucca
(Mts)

157

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

152.468

111.86

146.0
76

132.54

149.46

130.472

2003.892

125.208

79.336 186.872 97.948

never

never

never

never

never

never

neve
r

never

never

never

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

15

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

14000

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

14000

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

134

2900

City Development Plan for Mandav


Length of
Natural drains
(Nallah)
Pucca/Channe
lized (Mts)
Length of
Natural drains
(Nallah)
Kuttcha (Mts)
No. of
Streetlights
No. of
Electricity
connections

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

700

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

527

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

574

Rewa
Kund

Baz
Bahad
ur's
Palac
e,
Rupm
ati's
Pavili
on

Rewa
Kund

Baz
Bahad
ur's
Palac
e,
Rupm
ati's
Pavili
on

Fort
wall

Fort
wall

Jahangir
puri Gate

Royal
Complex,
Hoshang
Name of
Shah's
Royal
Ram Chappan
Tourist site if
Tomb,
Complex Mandir Mahal
any
GadaShah
Palace and
Shop,
Royal
Malik
Complex,
Hathi
Muglith's
Hoshang
Chappan
Mahal,
Name of
Shah's
Tarapur Mosque,
Mahal,
Royal Asharfi
Darya
Dai Ka
Heritage site if Tomb, Fort Wall
Songarh Gate, Jali
Chor Kot, Fort wall
Mahal, Dai
Complex Mahal
Khan's
any
GadaShah
Mahal ki Chhoti
Ek
Tomb, Lal
Palace and
Khamba
Behen ka
Sarai
Shop,
Mahal, Sarai
Baolis
Bus stop (No.)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bus
stand(No.)
Parks (No.)
Playground(N
o.)
No. of
Residential
properties
No. of
Commercial
properties

2013

96

30

71

88

115

135

404

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Total Property
tax collection
(in Rs.)
Property tax
coverage(in
%)
Available
Government
land (Sq kms)
Remarks

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Sewerage
Drainage
SWM

Physical Infrastructure

Water Supply

SECTORAL ANALYSIS
Existing Source
Source
Tubewell
Well
No. of Tubewell / River / Well
26
Water Supplied by Tubewell / River / Well in MLD
Total water supply in the town (MLD)
Existing Supply rate (LPCD) considering distribution losses
Water Charges per household per month (Rs.) Flat/Metered
% Coverage under paid water supply
Whether any treatment plant exists (Y/N),If yes mention capacity (MLD)
Proposed source (Surface)
Total sewage generation (MLD)
Whether any treatment plant exists (Y/N),If yes mention capacity
Total no. of individual septic tanks
Total no. of community septic tanks
Total no. of Sewage/Mud pumps available with the ULB
Frequency of Cleaning Individual Septic tanks
Frequency of Cleaning Community Septic tanks
Name of natural nallah (Storm water drain)
Length of natural nallah (Storm water drain) Kms
Ultimate disposal point of nallah
Length of road side drain (Kms)
Coverage of road side drainage w.r.t roads (%)
Ultimate disposal point of Road side drains
Any treatment plant/procedure adopted
Per capita Solid waste generation (Considering Standards) (in gms)
Total SW generation (in Tons)
Frequency of SW collection by the ULB (1 time per day/2 times per day)
Collection efficiency of the ULB (%)
Any initiative for DTDC (Yes /No)

136

River/Lake
Sagar talab
2.5
2.5
100 lpcd
30 (flat)
16.80%
WTP (1x3 lakh litre)
More ponds to be constructed
0.19
No
157
NA
0
6 months (as per requirement)
NA
Rampura drain
NA
Sagar talab
2.9
NA
Sagar talab
No
250
2 MT
1
66
Yes

Traffic &
transportation
Street lighting
Power

Physical Infrastructure

Roads

City Development Plan for Mandav


Any initiative for scientific disposal of waste
Name of dumping/ landfill site
Is the existing site Dumping site or allotted site for Scientific disposal
Area of allotted landfill site for Scientific disposal
Distance of the Dumping site/landfill site from main settlement area (Kms)
No. of Tractor trolleys/vehicles available with the ULB for carrying Solid waste to the LF site
If site for Scientific disposal is not allotted then whether formally requested by the ULB
Name of National Highway passing from or nearby from the town (NH-XYZ)
Distance of National Highway if nearby from the town (NH-XYZ) in Kms
Name of State Highway passing from or nearby from the town (SH-XYZ)
Distance of State Highway if nearby from the town (SH-XYZ) in Kms
CC
Total length of Pucca roads (Kms)
WBM
Total (kms)
Total length of Kuccha roads (kms)
(kms)
Gap w.r.t Standards
(kms)
Total no. of vehicles in the town
Bus stand (yes/No)
Any intracity mass transport mode (yes/no)
No
1
Name of locations facing major traffic issues
2
3
Name of the street beautified as per the instructions of UADD
Total no. of street lights
No. of Streetlights under working condition
No. of Streetlights having Tubes
No. of Streetlights having CFL
No. of Streetlights having Incandescent bulbs
No. of Streetlights having LED
No. of Streetlights having LPS
400 KV
Location of Substation http://www.mptransco.nic.in
220KV
132KV
Total no. of residential connections
Total no. of Commercial connections
Any subsidy for BPL (Y/N)

Heritage &
tourism

Heritage &
tourism

Duration of Electricity supply per day (in Hrs)

Name of Heritage site/s

137

2013

No
Ward no. 3, ahead of Dhoop Baodi near Lohani Caves
Allotted site
NA
In core Ward 4
Trolleys + tractor
not applicable
NH-3
39 kms
SH-31
13 kms
10
3
14
14
709
Yes
Jami Masjid junction
Junction near Jain Temple
None
527
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

Bagdi
217
94
Y
Plan to provide 24 hr electricity in core area - about 16 hrs at
present. Some wards do not have electricity connections
Over 60 structural monuments, and some caves - significant
ones - Gateways,Jahaz Mahal,Hindola Mahal,Tomb of
Hoshang Shah,Jami Masjid,Roopmati's Pavillion and 12
structures under MP Department of Archaeology

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


Ownership/agency

Prevailing Heritage Act/s

Name of Tourist site/s


Ownership/agency

Health

Environment

Total no. of Pilgrims/ Tourists visiting town per day


Name of River/Lake/Forest range/Any specific species
Prevailing Environmental Act/s
Areas facing threats
No. of Primary Health centres/Dispensary
Government
Beds
Private
Beds
N
Name of town
Distance (Kms)
15
1
0
nil

No. of Hospitals
Multispeciality hospital if any (Y/N)

Education
Social security schemes

Social Infrastructure

Name of Nearby town reffered for Treatment


No. of Primary schools
No. of Secondary/High schools
No. of Colleges
No. of ITI
No. of Beneficiaries under SJSRY (Street Vendor)
No. of Beneficiaries under Haath thela/Rickshaw chalak yojna
No. of Rain Basera/Night Shelter
Ownership of Rain Basera (with ULB/Rental)
No. of Beneficiaries under Gharelu Kamkaji Mahila Yojana

Name of other Social security schemes

Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), MP State Department of


Archaeology
The Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and
Remains Act 1958 and Madhya Pradesh Ancient Monuments
and
Archaeological Sites and Remains Act, 1964
Three groups of monuments under ASI, Chappan Mahal
Museum, Jain Mandir, Ram Mandir
ASI and State Department of Archaeology, Temple trusts
Avg 1590 per day (avergae 5.8 lakh per annum acros last 4
yrs)
Sagar talab and many other ponds/baobab/ Khurasani Imli
Madhya Pradesh Public Forestry Act 2001, Wild Life
(Protection) Act 1972, The Water (Prevention and Control of
Pollution) Act, 1974, Municipal solid waste rules, 2000
Forest land, ponds
1
1
6
none
none
Nalcha
10

Name of Scheme
Social Security Pension (Samajik
Suraksha Pension)
Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Vriddhavastha
Pension Yojana
Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Nihshakt
Pension Yojana
Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Vidhwa Pension
Yojana
Rashtriya Parivar Sahayta

138

6
Beneficiaries
56
87
17
79
0

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Jan Shri Beema Yojana


Swarn Jayanti Shehri Rozgar Yojana Training
Swarn Jayanti Shehri Rozgar Yojana Loan
Bachat Evam Sakh Samiti
Total

651
40
5
2
951

SECTORAL ANALYSIS

NA

0
0

No. of Primary school in the


slum pocket

No. of Primary Health


centres in the slum pocket

Beneficiaries under social


security schemes

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Yes

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Yes

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Yes

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Yes

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

no
Unnotified

Unnotified

666

521

Any interventions under


IHSDP (Y/N)

No. of Temporary pattas


distributed

NA

No. of Handpumps

Yes

No. of Community taps

Ward population

NA

0
0

No. of Permanent pattas


distributed

NA

No. of Kuccha houses

NA

No. of Semi pucca houses

NA
3

1011

No. of Pucca houses

NA

660

No. of Community toilets

2 NA

No. of Individual toilets

NA

736

Individual water
connections

Slum population

Unnotified
Unnotified
Notifie
d
Unnotified
Unnotified
Unnotified
Unnotified

NA

4
5

Notified/ Un-notified

Name of Slum pocket/


reference name

Ward No

Slums & Urban Poor

N
N
N
N
N
N
N

no

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

139

2013
NA
10

NA

11

NA
NA

12

NA
NA

13

14

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

15
NA
Total

City Development Plan for Mandav


Unnotified
Unnotified
Unnotified
Unnotified
Unnotified
Unnotified

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

811

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

595

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

777

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

No
No
No
No
No
No

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

705
Notifie
d
795
Unnotified
Unnotified

694

7971

N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N

306

REFORMS ACTION PLAN


Reforms

Achieved
(Y/N)

Timeline to achieve reforms till 2015


2012-13

2013-14

Full migration of double accounting System


Property tax reforms, 85% coverage ratio and 90% collection
ratio
Levy of user charges : full recovery of O & M charges for
sewerage, water supply and SWM
Internal earmarking of basic services to urban poor
E-governance
Provision of basic services to urban poor including security of tenure
at affordable prices, improved housing, water supply, sanitation

140

2014-15

2015-16

Any City specific


Strategies
adopted

Preliminary
estimate (if any)
for
implementation

Implementing
agency

City Development Plan for Mandav

Capital Expenditures

Revenue Expenditure

Capital
Receipts

Revenue Income

MUNICIPAL FINANCE
Year
Rates and Tax Revenue
Assigned Revenues & Compensation
Rental Income from Municipal Properties
Fees (User Chargesc included under taxes)
Sale & Hire Charges
Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies
Income from Investments
Interest Earned
Other Income
Total - Revenue Income
Grants, Contribution for specific purposes
Secured Loans
Unsecured Loans
Deposits
Deposit works
Total Capital Receipts
Establishment Expenses
Administrative Expenses
Operations & Maintenance
Interest & Finance Charges
Programme Expenses
Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies
Miscellaneous Expenses
Transfer to Fund
Total - Revenue Expenditure
Fixed Assets
Capital Work-in-Progress
Investments -General Fund
Investments-Other Funds
Stocks/Inventory
Loans, Advances and Deposits
Other Assets
Miscellaneous Expenditure
Total Capital Expenditure
Total Income
Total Expenditure

2005-06
1a
1b
1c
1d
1e
1f
1g
1h
1i
2a
2b
2c
2d
2e
3a
3b
3c
3d
3e
3f
3g
3h
4a
4b
4c
4d
4e
4f
4g
4h

2006-07
35.57
0.74
33.76

2007-08
40.14
0.97
2.37

2008-09
37.85
1.49
11.65

2009-10
59.06
1.36
3.11

2010-11
80.43
1.26
3.99

70.07
31.1

43.48
34.06

50.99
58.26

63.53
43.13

85.68
117.48

31.1
14.89
21.79
19.49

34.06
12.66
19.82
6.54

58.26
14
16.41
2.68

43.13
20
17.08
15.71

117.48
19.89
21.63
16.03

188.44

150.62

200.6

202.58

378.19

1.96

1.1

1.92

0.57

246.57

190.74

235.61

255.94

435.74

2.89

1.66

1.89

1.44

1.84

2.89
101.17
249.46

1.66
77.54
192.4

1.89
109.25
237.5

1.44
106.66
257.38

1.84
203.16
437.58

Note: Refer Madhya Pradesh Municipal Accounting Manual for further details. Can be downloaded from "Download" Section of www.mpurban.gov.in.

141

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: MANDAV


The project for preparation of City Development Plan (CDP) for Mandav is an initiative by Urban
Administration and Development Department (UADD), Government of MP, to initiate inclusive, planned and
environmentally sustainable growth in small towns of the State.

Mandav, also known as Mandu, is a historic walled town spread over 24.87 square kilometers, located to the
North of River Narmada and West of NH3, in south eastern part of Dhar District. It is situated atop a plateau,
part of the Central Vindhyachal hilly region. Lying 600 metres above mean sea level, the town has a
picturesque location and indigenous species of flora such as Khurasani Imli, for which it is widely known.

The town was converted to an NP in 1997, though merging of surrounding villages with the village Mandav.
The current municipal boundary converges with the limits of the historic town, defined by fortification walls.
th

The town finds reference as a hill fort form the 6 century AD, known as Mandapadurg and Mandhavgarh. In
the subsequent centuries, Mandav had association with Gurjara Pratiharas of Kanauj, Parmaras, Imperial &
Malwa Sultanate, Mughals & Marathas. The town still retains parts of the outer and inner fortification walls
and numerous historical monuments. Of the existing monuments, 60 are centrally protected by the
Archaeological Survey of India while 12 are under the State Department of Archaeology. The Group of
Monuments at Mandu is on the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List and the town is a significant tourist
destination for MP, being part of tourism circuit-Ujjain, Indore, Maheshwar and Omkareshwar.

The population density of Mandav is quite low at 2.53 ppha, as nearly 50% of the population is living in villages
scattered over forest land. With 81.6% ST population, the town has the resource of indigenous tribal
knowledge systems, with respect to flora including medicinal plants, arts and crafts. The majority of population
is dependent on agriculture, despite the conversion to NP and tourism forms the other source of income.

Some significant issues faced by the population are poor social and physical infrastructure facilities, poverty
due to poor access to education and employability or entrepreneurship and lack of industrial base.
Parameter

Existing

Projected by 2035

Population

10,659

18,400

Parameter

Existing

Projected by 2035
Details

Water supply

0.2 MLD

Details

Primarily from Sagar Talab and

3.11 MLD

Mallipura Talab

From Sakalda Talab,


Mallipura Talab and
Sagar Pond

Sewerage

0.18 MLD

Discharged

untreated

into

2.33 MLD

forests
SWM

0.6 MT

Decentralized Reed bed


Treatment sites

Open disposal site near Lohani

6.82 MT

Composting sites +

Caves. Proposed Trenching

(3.41 MT

recycling of other waste

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


ground also proposed near

compostable

Lohani Caves (Tourist attraction)

waste)
1400 DUs

Slum

Since only 100 DUs in

Nearly all DUs kuccha due to ASI

population

Mandav are pukka

regulations

Focus on insitu
upgradation according

due to ASI regulations,

to the requirement of

BPL population has

the populace under

been considered: 7197

Interest Subsidy

persons

Housing for Urban Poor


(ISHUP) Scheme

The key projects proposed under each sector are:

Economic Base: Enhancing tourism based economy, extending tourist season, extending economic
benefits of tourism to villagers, setting up solar and wind farms, better regional connectivity, literacy
drives, improved educational facilities, vocational training and capacity building of local population,
encouraging pisciculture, poultry and dairy, setting up HHIs and SSIs based on local resources, crafts
and traditions, promotion of drip irrigation, better market access to local products, provision of loans
for setting up small scale businesses, integration of tourism, heritage conservation, environmental
protection and livelihood generation,.

Water supply: Provision of new WTP and OHTs, consideration of water supply from Narmada,
desiltation and revival of ponds and creation of new ponds, conservation of catchment of ponds and
revival of water channels to ponds, provision of pond based irrigation system planned considering
ground terrain, increasing coverage of supply lines, development of more ponds, storage of storm
water runoff in ponds for irrigation, revival of kunds and baoris, introduction of drip irrigation.

Sewerage and sanitation: Development of interceptor drains to divert all waste water to reed bed
based systems (decentralized waste water facility), treated wastewater to be reused, laying of trunk
sewer along main road in core area, covering open drains with grating, provision of public toilets and
community toilets and their maintenance, appropriate maintenance and management of existing
public toilets, implementation of sanitation project to eliminate open defecation.

Storm water drainage: Desiltation of ponds and spreading fertile silt on farms, afforestation,
dedicated storm water network, conservation of ponds and natural drainage channels, especially
through Master Plan, development of recharge basins and rain water harvesting structures.

Solid Waste Management: Decentralized waste treatment facilities, segregation, composting,


recycling and biogas generation, involvement of communities living in peripheral villages,
discontinuing use of present trenching grounds at Lohani caves and Doob Baori and cleaning of the
sites, recyclable material to be collected by private parties at district level and taken to recycling
plants in Indore.

Transportation: Provision of Link to NH3 via Jhabri Village, possible rail link to the town to be
explored, widening and resurfacing of regional roads, strengthening of tourist circuit parking
provision and tourist transport hub at Dhamnod, preparation and implementation of a Traffic

ii

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Management Plan, provision of ropeway from Lohani Gufa to Songarh, initiating IPTs for villages,
provision of access roads to all monuments, regular maintenance of roads, provision of parking areas
at city and regional level, starting of tourist and luxury buses, pedestrianisation of congested core
area and alternate clean public transport provision for tourists, linking all existing and potential visitor
attractions with appropriate bus stop shelters.

Urban poor: Connectivity to all villages, revival of ponds for pisciculture and agriculture, provision of
water supply connection to peripheral settlements from Sagar Talab, insitu redevelopment in rural
settlements, increasing income generation of local population from tourism and alternate sources
such as industries based on local flora, crafts and traditions, provision of basic infrastructure to all
settlements.

Environment: Stopping deforestation and undertaking large scale afforestation with plantation of
indigenous species, fuel and fodder trees, provision of grazing grounds, desiltation of ponds, pond
catchment conservation, conservation of drainage channels, garden development along Sagar Talab,
cautious water front development of Sagar Talab as the pond is the source of water supply for the
town and should not be polluted, water front conservation with involvement of tribal population
dependent on these, creation of more ponds to restore water balance in the region, adequate
management of solid waste, development of gardens and revival of baoris, removal of encroachment
form forest land.

Land use, fire fighting and electricity: Afforestation and development of recreational areas, cautious
development to ensure continuity of heritage status and inscription as UNESCO World Heritage Site;
distribution of electricity to and street lighting for peripheral settlement areas and core area,
developing wind farms, solar farms and biogas plants, provision of 3 phase electricity and street
lighting of peripheral settlements, provision of 3 fire fighting vehicles and a fire station, provision of
LED based fixtures with automated switches, solar street lights in public places, provision of electricity
for tourist infrastructure needs (light and sound show etc) with 24 hr supply, APDRP required, control
of electricity theft.

Social infrastructure: Decentralised health and education facilities for the peripheral settlements,
provision of computer and tourism related training institutes, training centre for guides, development
of low cost accommodation for visitors, agriculture training institute/support centre, developing
institutions for technical education and training in handicrafts and HHI trades like stitching, agarbatti
making, souvenir making, etc., setting up training centres for womens empowerment through
livelihood generation, provision of community centre, setting up petrol pump in vicinity, developing
CHC with good health facilities for the town, developing gardens, playgrounds and greens for resident
population and tourists, provision of bank.

Heritage and Tourism: Preparation of Heritage Resource Management Plan that includes systematic
survey and documentation of all above and below ground structures, expansion of tourist circuit with
Dhamnod as transport and accommodation hub, connectivity with NH3 via Jhabri Village, better
access roads, increasing tourist season, increasing stay of tourist, information and interpretation

iii

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


centre, organizing sound and light show and night lighting, ropeway from Lohani Caves to Songarh ,
development of gardens, issuing licenses to trained guides, development of PPP projects with
inclusion of local community, awareness generation and propagation of heritage of Mandav.

IEC and Urban Governance: Capacity building of NP officials, e-governance, NP/TCPO to undertake
detailed topographic surveys of municipal area, provision of dedicated development authority office,
housing board office, an Architect and designated Town Planning officer in the town, setting up of
Mandav Heritage Resource Management Authority, computerization of data, maintenance of regular
photographic record of NP Properties, mapping of services, single web portal to ensure coordination
between Government Departments, enforcement authority and staff to be provided to various
departments to ensure stricter enforcement. E.g.: Forest Department, Nagar Parishad.

Summary of CIP:
Total
S.

Sector of

Investment by

Investment by 2027

Investment by

Investment (In

No.

Investment

2017(In Crore)

(In Crore)

2037(In Crore)

Crore)

Water Supply

Sewerage

21.65

7.74

0.08

29.47

0.73

0.02

0.03

0.79

6.07

3.11

0.32

9.51

Storm Water
3

Drainage
Solid Waste

Management

0.55

0.00

0.00

0.55

Sanitation

2.88

1.07

0.48

4.43

30.55

9.93

0.00

40.48

12.29

21.17

23.78

57.25

0.58

0.08

0.13

0.79

5.88

6.72

0.00

12.60

30.63

24.76

36.78

92.16

1.27

5.08

8.28

14.62

34.50

38.90

32.66

106.07

Traffic &
6

Transportation
Electricity &

Street Lighting

Fire Fighting
Basic Services

9
10

for Urban Poor


Environment
Urban

11

Governance
Heritage and

12

Tourism

13

Education

3.94

2.92

1.59

8.45

14

Health

2.12

1.85

0.00

3.97

15

Social

1.13

0.39

0.00

1.52

iv

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Total
S.

Sector of

Investment by

Investment by 2027

Investment by

Investment (In

No.

Investment

2017(In Crore)

(In Crore)

2037(In Crore)

Crore)

Infrastructure &
Other Projects
Total

154.80

123.73

104.11

382.65

Responsible agencies or Departments for each sector:


Total
S.

Investment

No.

Sector of Investment

Water Supply

(In Crore)

Responsible agency/deptt.

29.47

NP

Sewerage

0.79

NP

Storm Water Drainage

9.51

NP

Solid Waste Management

0.55

Private Contractor

Sanitation

4.43

NP

Traffic & Transportation

40.48

State PWD + Private Contractor + MP Tourism

Electricity & Street Lighting

57.25

MPEB + Private Party

Fire Fighting

Basic Services for Urban Poor

0.79
12.60

NP
Beneficiaries + NP
Forest Department + NP + MNREGA Nodal Agency

10

Environment

92.16

+ MP Tourism

11

Urban Governance

14.62

NP + Private Party
MP Tourism + Mandav Heritage Resource
Management Authority + Private Party + ASI + State

12

Heritage

106.07

Department of Archaeology

13

Education

8.45

State Education Dept

14

Health

3.97

State Health Dept

1.52

Misc

Social Infrastructure & Other


15

Projects

Some of the key projects emphasized by the Citizens to be taken up in Phase 1 are:

Preparation of Heritage Resource Management Plan and Mandav Heritage Resource management
Authority, above and below ground surveys of heritage resources, creation of database on the
mapping of the resources, ownership and services, conservation and adaptive reuse and
interpretation of the protected and unprotected resources, leading to nomination as world heritage
site.

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


Improved access at city and regional level by construction of roads and provision of tourist bus service
and IPTs, enabling movement of local population and tourists to and within the city with better
linkage to existing and potential visitor attractions and settlements.

Extending the stay of the tourists in keeping with carrying capacity, development of tourist
infrastructure that benefits the local population, promotion of livelihood opportunities based on local
culture, resources and knowledge systems.

Setting up of research and dissemination centre for cultural heritage resources including knowledge
systems and traditional arts and crafts.

Afforestation, conservation of water bodies, conservation and recharge of catchment areas, creation
of more ponds, provision of water supply to peripheral areas.

Insitu upgradation of houses in peripheral settlements and provision of basic services to these areas.

Decentralised solid waste and waste water management.

Vocational training to promote skill development and setting up of HHIs and SSIs, promotion of
agriculture and improved market access for local goods.

The cost of all projects is estimated at 366.49 Cr including projects on Economic base, Tourism and Social
Infrastructure (382.65 Cr including projects on social infrastructure and urban governance; and excluding
projects on economic base). For this, the NP would have to generate an amount of 19.73 Cr in first 5 years.
Since the NP can only generate around 9 or 10 Cr, the remaining amount is proposed to be given by State
Government as loan or grant to the ULB.

vi

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I
Chapter 1 : Intr oduction
1. 1
1. 2
1. 3
1. 4

Pr oj ec t In trodu ct ion
S cop e of Wo rk
M eth odo logy Ad opt ed
Pr og r es s s o far

1
1
4
5

Chapter 2 : Intr oduction to the T own

2. 1 In t rod u ct ion t o th e To wn
2. 2 Hi s tor ic al Im p ort an c e
2. 3 D i str ic t In fo r mat ion
2. 4 Lo cat ion
2. 5 Phy s iog raphy and La ndfo r m ( C en su s, 20 0 1; Analy ti cal not e and Di st ric t
Re s ou r ce Ma p s)
2. 6 M u n i cip a l A r ea a n d P la n n in g A re a

Chapter 3 : Demographic Profile of Mandav


3. 1
3. 2
3. 3
3. 4
3. 5

8
8
9
11
13
19

20

Pop u la tion Gro wth T ren d


Pop u la tion Pr oj ec tio n
Pop u la tion D en s ity
Ot her P opul ati on In dica tor s
I s su e s

20
20
21
22
23

Chapter 4 : Socio-Ec onomic Profile of Mandav

24

4. 1 S e x R ati o
4. 2 L it era cy Rat e
4. 3 A v er ag e H ou s eh ol d Siz e
4. 4 Wo rk fo rc e P art ic ipa tion
4. 5 In d u s tri al Ac ti v ity
4. 6 Trad e an d Co m m er c e
4. 7 Lab ou r
4. 8 Tou r i s m
4. 9 S WO T An a ly si s
4. 10 I ss u e s
4. 11 Ci ty Sp ec if ic St rat e gi e s an d A cti on P lan

24
24
25
25
25
28
29
29
30
31
31

Chapter 5 : Physical Pl anning and Growth Management

33

5. 1 Sp ati al G ro wth T re n d s
5. 2 Sp ati al Di stri buti on of Popu lat ion
5. 3 Mu ni cipa l L e vel Ma p p in g and Ward D el in eat i on Ma p
5. 4 Lan d u se An aly si s
5. 5 M a st er Plan Pr o vi s i on s
5. 6 Hou s in g S c en ar io
5. 7 Pr e s en t an d Fu tu r e Hou sin g De ma n d
5. 8 Il l eg al Co lon ie s
5. 9 Fu tu r e gro w th P os s i b ili ti e s
5. 10 Ci ty Sp ec if ic St rat e gi e s an d A cti on P lan

Chapter 6 : Water Supply

33
34
35
36
37
40
41
42
42
43

44
i

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


6. 1 E x i stin g wa te r su p p l y sy st e m
44
6. 2 Q u a li ty a n d q u a n t ity o f w a t er a t sou rc e
44
6. 3 Q u a li ty a n d q u a n t ity o f w a t er in d is t r ib u t i on sy st e m
44
6. 4 W a t e r su p p ly con n e ct i o n s
45
6. 5 Ot her sou rc e s a nd Wat er R e sour c e s i n and around th e to wn
46
6. 6 Wa te r Di st rib u tion Arr an g e m en t s
46
6. 7 In t e rn al D i str ib u t ion N et w ork s
47
6. 8 Wa te r t re at m en t fa c ili ti e s
47
6. 9 C o mp ar ati v e analy s i s wi th UD PF I, CPH EEO g u id eli n e s and Pr e se n t a nd Fut u r e
De m a n d a n d Su p p ly Ga p s
47
6. 10 Wat er ta ri f f
48
6. 11 St atu s of Ground Wat er in th e R eg ion
49
6. 12 Wat er Su p p ly Pro je ct s
49
6. 13 W a t er su p p ly sc en a rio in p er ip h er a l v il la g e s
49
6. 14 SW O T An aly s i s
51
6. 15 I ss u e s
51
52
6. 16 Ci ty sp ec i fi c str at e gi e s an d ac tio n p l an

Chapter 7 : Sewerag e

54

7. 1 E x i stin g s e w era g e sy st e m
54
7. 2 M ea n s o f s ew a g e d i s p o s a l
55
7. 3 C o mp ar ati v e analy s i s wi th UD PF I, CPH EEO g u id eli n e s and Pr e se n t a nd Fut u r e
De m a n d a n d Su p p ly Ga p s
55
7. 4 S WO T An a ly si s
55
7. 5 I s su e s
56
7. 6 C ity sp e ci f ic st rat e gi e s an d A cti on P lan
56

Chapter 8 : Sanitati on
8. 1
8. 2
8. 3
8. 4
8. 5
8. 6
8. 7
8. 8

57

Ex i stin g san ita tion syst e m


H o u s eh o ld t oi le t s ( D r y L a t rin e s a n d Flu sh lat rin e s)
Pu b li c t oil et s
P r e s en t Sh o r t a g e a n d P r o je ct ed D e man d
S an it ati on p r oj ec t s
S WO T An a ly si s
I s su e s
C ity sp e ci f ic st rat e gi e s an d A cti on P lan

Chapter 9 : Solid Waste Management

57
57
57
58
58
59
59
60

61

9. 1 Qua n ti ty o f W a st e G en era te d
61
9. 2 C on st itu en t s o f mu n ici p al w a st e
61
9. 3 C u r r en t p r a ct ic e s o f Sol id wa st e m a n a ge m en t a n d V eh i cl e s for sol id wa st e
col l ect ion and Tr an sp o r tatio n
61
9. 4 Wa s te stor ag e & se g re gat ion
62
9. 5 P r i ma r y a n d s e con d a r y c ol le ct io n
62
9. 6 Pr oc e s si n g an d d is p osa l
62
9. 7 R eu s e an d r e cy c lin g
62
9. 8 E sti m ati on o f wa st e col l ect ion
63
9. 9 S ta ff s tr en gth
63
9. 10 Co mp arat i v e an aly si s w ith U DP FI, C PHEEO guid e lin e s an d Pr e s en t and Fu tur e
De m a n d a n d Su p p ly Ga p s
63

ii

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

9. 11 SW O T An aly s i s
9. 12 I ss u e s
9. 13 Ci ty Sp ec if ic St rat e gi e s an d A cti on P lan

Chapter 10: Dr ainage

63
64
64

65

10 .1 E xi st in g D rai n ag e S y st e m
65
10 .2 Maj or wa te r b o d i e s
66
10 .3 Pr im ary, seconda ry and t er tia ry dr ain s
66
10 .4 Fl ood p ron e a r ea s and f loo din g in ca tch m e n t ar ea of majo r na lla h
66
10 .5 Co mp arat i v e an aly si s w ith U DP FI, C PHEEO guid e lin e s an d Pr e s en t and Fu tur e
De m a n d a n d Su p p ly Ga p s
66
10 .6 Prop o se d P roj ec t s
66
10 .7 SW O T An aly s i s
66
10 .8 I ss u e s
67
10 .9 Ci ty Sp ec if ic St rat e gi e s and A cti on P lan
67

Chapter 11: Tr affic and Trans portati on

68

11 .1 E xi st in g tr af f ic & tr ansp ort ati on sc en ari o


11 .2 V eh i cl e p op u l ati on
11 .3 D eta il s o f Ro ad s
11 .4 Ag en ci e s in t ra ff ic & tran sp ort ati on
11 .5 T ra v el ch a rac te ri s ti c s
11 .6 Publ ic tra n sp or t/ m ass tran sit an d Int e r - c i ty bu s tr an sp o rt
11 .7 T ra ff ic man a g em en t an d ci rcu lat ion
11 .8 In t er m ed i at e p u b li c tr an sp or t
11 .9 Par kin g r eq u ir e m e n ts
11 .1 0 Co mp a rat i ve an a l y si s w ith U DP FI, C PHE E O gu id el in e s an d Pr e s en t an d
Fu tu re D e mand and Su p p ly Gap s
11 .1 1 I s su e s
11 .1 2 S WO T An aly si s
11 .1 3 City Sp e ci fi c Str at eg i e s and A cti on P lan

Chapter 12: El ectricity, Street Lighting and Fire Fighti ng

68
68
71
72
72
72
73
73
73
73
74
74
74

76

12 .1 E xi st in g situ ati on o f Str e et li gh t s


76
12 . 2 Fi r e se r vi c e, v eh i cl e s a n d eq u ip m en t fo r fi r e fi gh t in g a n d R es cu e o p er a t i on s
76
12 .3 Po wer g enerat ion a nd di st ribu tion
76
12 .4 Co mp arat i v e an aly si s w ith U DP FI, oth er gu ide lin e s and P r es en t an d Futu r e
De m a n d a n d Su p p ly Ga p s
79
12 .5 SW O T An aly s i s
79
12 .6 I ss u e s
80
12 .7 Ci ty sp ec i fi c str at e gi e s and ac tio n pl an
80

Chapter 13: Urban Poor and their Accessibi lity to Basic Services

82

13 .1 Po v erty in T ow n
82
13 .2 S epar at e i n for mat i on on BP L Po pula tion an d Sl um Popu lat ion
82
13 . 3 Slu m s in t h e To wn a n d Gen e r a l Ch a r a ct er i s t ic s o f S lu m s/ A r ea s w it h u r b a n
p oor
82
13 .4 Loc ati on o f Slu m s on To wn Map
85
13 .5 Sta tu s o f Slu m s
85

iii

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


13 . 6 L a n d O wn er sh ip a n d T en u r e S ta t u s
13 . 7 Un id en t i f ie d slu m s a n d h o m el e s s p o p u la tio n /p a v e m en t d w el l er s
13 .8 Ur b an b as ic se r vi c e s in slu m s (i n l in e with J N N U RM s 7 p oin t ch art e r)
13 .9 So cia l s ec u ri ty sch e m es an d b en e fi ci ari e s
13 .1 0 Co mp a rat i ve An a l y si s w ith U DP FI, C PHE E O gu id el in e s an d Pr e s en t an d
fu t u r e h o u s in g d e ma n d
13 .1 1 S WO T An aly si s
13 .1 2 I s su e s
13 .1 3 City spe ci f ic strat eg i e s and act ion plan

Chapter14: Social Infr astructur e


14 .1
14 .2
14 .3
14 .4
14 .5
14 .6
14 .7

E d u c ati on
He alth
Sp o rt s an d R e cr eat ion
Co mp ari s on wi th U DP FI gu id e lin e s a n d CPH E E O Gu id e lin e s
SW O T An aly s i s
I ss u e s
Ci ty Sp ec if ic St rat e gi e s and A cti on P lan

94
94
95
95
95
95
96
96
96

98

16 .1 Id en ti f ica tio n o f H er ita g e S tru ctur e s /A re a s


16 .2 E xi st in g S tatu s of H er ita g e Bu il din g s
16 .3 E xi st in g R e gu la tio n s/ H er ita ge G u id el in e s
16 .4 He rit ag e Is s u e s
16 .5 To u ri s m Pot en tia l of t h e To wn
16 .6 Po s sib il ity of T ou r i s m Ci rcu it s a t th e R eg io n al L e v el
16 .7 Co mp arat i v e an aly si s w ith U DP FI gui d e lin e s
16 .8 SW O T an aly s is
16 .9 I ss u e s
16 .1 0 City spe ci f ic strat eg i e s and A cti on P lan

17 .1
17 .2
17 .3
17 .4

89
89
89
90
91
92
92

94

Fl ora an d Fau n a
E n v ir on men tal C on ce rn s
Pol lu t ion Le v e l s
Ci ty Gr e en Sp a c es
Wat er F ron t D e v el op m en t an d Con s e r vat io n
E xi st in g e n vir on m e n tal re gu lat ion s
SW O T an aly s is
I ss u e s
Ci ty Sp ec if ic St rat e gi e s and A cti on P lan

Chapter 16: Heritag e and Conservati on

Chapter 17

86
87
87
87

89

Chapter 15: Environment


15 .1
15 .2
15 .3
15 .4
15 .5
15 .6
15 .7
15 .8
15 .9

85
85
86
86

Institutional Framework

98
10 2
10 2
10 3
10 4
10 6
10 7
10 7
10 8
10 8

111

In tr od u c tio n
In sti tu ti on s an d O r gan i s ati on s
I ss u e s
Ci ty Sp ec if ic St rat e gi e s and A cti on P lan

Chapter 18: Municipal Finance

11 1
11 1
11 5
11 5

117

18 .1 In tr od u c tio n

11 7

iv

City Development Plan for Mandav


18 . 2
18 .3
18 .4
18 . 5
18 .6

R e ve n u e A cc ou n t / Fin a n c ial P o s it i o n
R e ve n u e C o mp o si ti on
E xp en d i tu r e P att er n
K ey Fina nc ial I ndi c at o r s
Maj or Ob s er vat ion s

Chapter 19: Vision, Sectoral Goals and Str ategies


19 .1 Vi s ion
19 .2 S ec tora l Go al s an d Str at eg ie s

2013
11 7
11 7
12 1
12 2
12 2

123
12 3
12 3

Chapter 20: Municipal Reforms

126

PART II
Chapter 21: INVESTMENT PRIORITIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS
21.1 Project Quantification and Phasing
21.2 Key Considerations
21.3 Economic Base
21.4 Water Supply
21.5 Sewerage
21.6 Sanitation
21.7 Drainage
21.8 Solid Waste Management
21.9 Urban Poor
21.10 Transportation
21.11 Environment
21.12 Land Use, Electricity and Streetlighting
21.13 Social Infrastructure
21.14 Heritage and Tourism
21.15 IEC Reforms
21.16 Institutional Reforms

133
134
134
136
139
142
142
143
145
146
147
150
152
155
157
166
167

Chapter 22: CITY INVESTMENT PLAN

169

22.1 Project Costing and Sources of Funding


22.2 Economic Base
22.3 Water Supply
22.4 Sewerage
22.5 Sanitation
22.6 Drainage
22.7 Solid Waste Management
22.8 Urban Poor
22.9 Transportation
22.10 Environment
22.11 Land Use, Electricity and Street Lighting
22.12 Social Infrastructure
22.13 Heritage and Tourism
22.14 IEC
22.15 Institutional Reforms
22.16 City Investment Plan Summary

169
169
176
181
182
184
187
189
191
194
198
203
206
220
222
224

Chapter 23: FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN

228
v

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

LIST OF ANNEXURE
Annexure I: List of Attendees in Kick of Workshop

vii

Annexure II: Minutes of Kick off Workshop

ix

Annexure III: Photographs of Kick off Workshop

xii

Annexure IV: Minutes of Dhar Collectorate Meeting

xiii

Annexure V: List of Attendees: Second Stakeholder Workshop

xvi

Annexure VI: Photographs: Second stakeholder Workshop

xx

Annexure VII: Minutes of Meeting: Second Stakeholder Workshop

xxi

Annexure VIII: Steering Committee

xxiii

Annexure IX: Citizen Forum

xxiv

Annexure X: Minutes of Meeting: District Level Meeting

xxv

Annexure XI: List of Attendees: District Level Meeting

xxvii

Annexure XII: Pictures: Third Stakeholder Workshop

xxviii

Annexure XIII: Minutes of Meeting: Third Stakeholder Workshop

xxix

Annexure XIV: List of Attendees: Third Stakeholder Workshop

xxxi

Annexure XV: Details of Municipal Cadre

xxxii

Annexure XVI: Minutes of Meeting: Second District Level Presentation

xxxv

Special Paper: Transportation

xxxvi

Special Paper: Socio-Economic Development of Scheduled Tribes

vi

xlv

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.1 Project Introduction
Under the Madhya Pradesh Government initiative of Preparation of City Development Plan for various Cities
of Madhya Pradesh, IDFC was awarded the project for Preparation of City Development Plan for Mandav in
October, 2011 by the Urban Administration and Development Department of Government of Madhya Pradesh.
Aim of CDP
The City Development plans are dedicated to the goal of creating cities which are economically productive,
efficient, equitable and responsive. The City Development Plan will focus on the comprehensive development
of the city through the development of economic and social infrastructure, upliftment of quality of life for
urban poor, strengthening the Municipal bodies and their financing mechanisms, enhanced accountability and
transparency; and elimination of legal and other bottlenecks which have impacted the land and housing
market in the city. The City Development Plan will set the platform to usher the city towards urban sector
reforms which will initiate direct investment in the city infrastructure.

1.2 Scope of Work


The plan preparation will include the following stages:
1) Analysis of the existing situation
An analysis of the existing situation of the city shall be taken up to assess where the city is. This would be
based on reconnaissance survey, secondary data collection, household surveys, public consultations and
individual stakeholder consultations. The analysis shall focus on the following sectors:

Demography

Economic base

Financial profile of the Municipality

Infrastructure

Water supply

Sewerage

Solid waste management

Drainage

Traffic and Transportation

Street lighting

Physical and environmental aspects of the city

Urban poor

Housing

Heritage and Environment

Institutions related to service delivery in the city

Broad Land Use

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City Development Plan for Mandav

The categories under Inadmissible components of the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission
(JNNURM) shall also be included. Based on the data collection and surveys, an analysis of the present status of
the city shall be done to identify the potential areas for development and the bottlenecks. Based on the
understanding of the evolution and functioning of the city, an analysis to understand the Citys Strengths,
Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) shall be undertaken to identify the issues of concern and the
potential sectors for the citys development.
2) Development of a vision for the city
The City Development Plan would aim at developing a vision for the citys future based on consultations with
the citizens representatives. A city vision would be formulated based on an assessment of the existing
situation to determine where the city is and where it wants to go. Vision for the city shall be developed
based on assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the city and identification of the sectors where the city
has maximum potential for growth. This vision would bank upon the cities competitive advantages in the
local, regional and national context while considering the preferences of the citys residents.
A vision for the future development of the city over the next 25 years, which is based on consensus amongst
the citizens, shall be identified and all the future objectives, strategies and targets shall have to be aligned with
this vision. The outcomes and milestones for the vision would be defined within a time frame.
3) Sectoral goals and Strategies
In line with the vision formulated for the development of the city, the prime sectors would be identified which
need to be focused on in order to materialize the vision for the city. This would be done in consultation with
the citizens representatives. After identifying the priority sectors, a strategy for the development of each
sector shall be formulated in consultation with the citizens and based on this, the sectoral goal and targets
shall be defined. Mandatory and Optional reforms in governance, as listed under JNNURM, shall also be
proposed.
4) Prioritization of strategies and evaluation of alternate strategies
The Sectoral strategies and goals shall be prioritized and selected based on the relevance to the Vision and to
the upliftment of urban poor. A well defined prioritization strategy shall be formulated for selection of
strategies.
5) Identification and Prioritization of Projects
Based on stakeholder consultations, relevance to the vision and maximum impact, a set of projects shall be
identified which need to be implemented in order to attain the Vision. These projects shall be sectoral and
shall be prioritized based on strategic planning. A broad Master Plan for the city would also be prepared to
direct future growth of the city. This will also facilitate in aligning the future growth of the priority sectors with
the citys spatial framework.

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

6) Preparation of City Investment Plan


A City investment plan shall be made to outline the flow of investments required for attainment of the City
Vision in a phased manner and the possible sources of funding for the same. The sources of funding available
at National, State and ULB level shall be analyzed to formulate a mechanism for financing the projects related
to the city vision through better management and utilization of the existing financial resources as well as
creating opportunities for fresh flow of funds.
7) Finalization of City Development Plan
Based on the above steps, the Draft City Development Plan shall be put in the public domain to get opinion of
the Stakeholders on the same. Based on these comments, a Final City Development Plan shall be presented to
the Stakeholders through a workshop. The aim of this workshop shall be to develop endorsement for the City
Development Plan and to inculcate a sense of ownership amongst the citizens. The final City Development Plan
shall then be submitted.

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

1.3 Methodology Adopted


Award of Contract and Team Mobilization
CITY ASSESSMENT
RECONNAISSANCE SURVEY
KICK OFF WORKSHOPS & FORMULATION OF STEERING

Physical and environmental


aspects of the city

Institutions related to service


Secondary data collection
delivery in the city

Sectoral data collection

Slums and Basic Services for

Demography
Urban Poor

Economic base

Housing; Industries

Infrastructure

Financial
profile
of
the
Municipality
Water supply; Sewerage
Solid waste management
Drainage; Street lighting
Traffic and Transportation

INCEPTION REPORT

DATA ANALYSIS AND CITY PROFILING

Sectoral Analysis
City Profiling

Issues and road Blocks

SWOT Analysis

Universalization of basic services to Urban


Poor

FUTURE PERSPECTIVE AND CITY VISION


Second round of stakeholder consultations
Formulation of Vision for the City for next 25 years
Formulation of Sectoral Goals and Strategies through Incorporation of best practices
Formulation of Alternative Strategies
Identification of Projects

PRESENTATION AT DISTRICT AND STATE


STRATEGIES AND PRIORITY ACTIONS

Analysis of governance framework and reform action plan


Finalization of vision, sectoral goals and strategies
Prioritization of actions and strategies
Preliminary funding estimates

CITY INVESTMENT PLAN

Project costing
Determination of sources of funding
Scheduling of priority actions
Development of CIP

DRAFT CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN WITH CIP


PRESENTATION AT DISTRICT AND STATE LEVEL
FINAL CDP

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

List of deliverables
1) Inception report (including report of Kick off workshop)
nd

2) City Profile, Sector Analysis, City Vision, strategy and priority projects (including report on 2 Workshop)
3) Draft CDP (including City Level Workshop)
4) Final CDP

Time Schedule/Work Plan

Team Structure
Experts

Team Leader

Economist

Governance Advisor

Social Development Expert

Municipal finance Expert

Municipal engineer

Urban Planner

Research and Support Team


1 Planner; 1 Conservation Architect, 2 Urban Designers and 1 Architect

1.4

Progress so far

The contract for the Project was signed in the third week of October and the Project team conducted a
reconnaissance survey of the city in the second week of November and initiated consultations with the Nodal
Officer, data collection and surveys.

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

In order to ensure higher level of participations by the Urban Local Bodies (ULBs), a District level Meeting
th

under the Chairmanship of Collector, Dhar was conducted on 15 November, 2011 where the CMOs of 8
towns of Dhar district, including Mandav, were briefed on the process and outcomes of the City Development
Plan (CDP). Details of the meeting are given in Annexure.
The process of consultations and data collection for Mandav started with meetings with the CMO and other
ULB Officials. Collection of primary data available with the ULBs was initiated with the distribution of the list of
data identified in the toolkit. The project team contacted the ULBs in each city and collected the data that was
readily available, with a request for additional data required. Apart from the ULB, data collection from other
related departments at town and district level like Forest Department, DUDA, TCPD, etc. was also initiated. A
major thrust of the field-based research was to map the existing spatial and land use structure of the city and
to understand the socio-economic condition of the citizens.
Kick off Workshop and Inception Report
th

The kick off workshop for Mandav City Development Plan was conducted on 25 November, 2011 under the
Chairmanship of CMO, Mandav. The workshop was attended by NP Officials, Citizen representatives, Farmer
representatives, tribals, Journalists, traders, among others. The meeting began with a presentation by the IDFC
team introducing the scope, process and coverage of the City Development Plan. This was followed by a
briefing of the onsite observations made by the team. After the objectives, goals and process of CDP
preparation were explained to the attendees, the citizens were invited to give their views on the key issues,
status of infrastructure provision, condition of urban poor, growth potentials and other aspects of the city. The
inception report was submitted in November, 2011.
Second Stakeholder Workshop
Another trip of the town was conducted in January, 2012 for data collection and discussions with key officials
rd

and citizens. The second stakeholder workshop for City Development Plan, Mandav was held on 3 February,
2012 in NP, Mandav under the Chairmanship of Municipal President. The workshop saw a high turnout. The
participants included prominent Councillors, senior citizens, Government officials, NP officials, taxi drivers,
journalists; and others. The workshop began with a presentation by the IDFC team on the sectoral analysis,
SWOT (Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats) analysis and understanding of the town. As a part of the
workshop, the vision for the town was also formulated and discussions on existing and proposed land use were
also undertaken.
The minutes of the meetings and list of participants are attached as Annexure.
Third Stakeholder Workshop
th

The third stakeholder workshop was held on 24 September, 2012 and the CDP was approved by the Parishad
in 2013.

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Key points raised by Stakeholders during consultations


The key points raised by various stakeholders during the stakeholder consultations were:

The planning for Mandav city has usually been done in a sect oral manner which focuses more on the
tourism and heritage aspects and pays little or no attention to the rural wards and agricultural areas
outside the core city

The villages that have been included in the Municipal boundary have still not been provided with basic
services but at the same time, due to inclusion in Municipal boundary, these villages cannot access the
facilities provided by the Gram Panchayat

The economic benefits of tourism need to be extended to the villagers

The Southern point of Mandav, which is not even provided with a proper access road; has the potential
to be connected to the NH3. This alternate entrance to Mandav will not only ease the traffic access to
the town but will also provide more livelihood opportunities to villagers

The Temria pond, Sagar talab and other ponds in the town need to be desilted, the present capacity of the
ponds has been reduced due to siltation

Mandav has the potential to the included in the World Heritage Site listing

Presently, the tourist traffic to Mandav is limited largely to 3 monsoon months. The tourists stay in
neighbouring towns and visit Mandav for a few hours. Most tourists only visit a few monuments in the
core area. Hence, there is a need to extend the tourist stay in Mandav by introducing more tourist
activities like cultural events at night

Mandav needs to be provided with an alternate source of water supply as Sagar Talab dries out due to
siltation and water usage for irrigation

The access road to Dharampuri needs to be improved

More employment generation and educational infrastructure needs to be undertaken for the tribal
population

The traditional trees of Mandav need to be restored as these are also a means of livelihood for the tribal
population. Deforestation along the slopes of the plateau has led to extensive erosion and siltation of
water bodies in the valley.

Activities like sound and light show and cultural events need to be introduced in Mandav to attract
tourists to spend more time in the town.

A walkway along the valley can be developed connecting NP guest house to Songarh fort. This would offer
the tourists with a beautiful view of the valley.

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

CHAPTER 2: INTRODUCTION TO THE TOWN


2.1 Introduction to the Town

Figure 2.1: Location of Mandav in the State and the District Dhar. Source: Census of India

The town of Mandav is located in Dhar District of Madhya Pradesh. Located strategically on a plateau,
historically the town was a military stronghold in the form of a hill fort. Parts of the fortification are still intact
and define the town boundary. It is an important place from tourist, archaeological and historical points of
view, with a number of monuments protected by the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) and some more
under the State Department of Archaeology. Enclosed by forest areas that extend into the town boundary,
Mandav is dominated by tribal population and the economy is based on tourism and agriculture.

2.2 Historical Importance


Mandav is a historically and architecturally significant fort complex set on a hill top. The strategic location was
recognized from the ancient period as a stronghold. The famous ruler Vakpati Munja from the Parmara
th

th

dynasty who ruled over Malwa from the 9 13 century, excavated the Munja Sagar at Mandav, also known
as Mandhavgarh and Mandu.

In the year 1305, A.D. the whole of Malwa passed into the hands of Al-ud-din Khalji when Dhar and Mandu
were also captured. Dhar continued to be under Delhi Sultans until the reign of Muhammed II. At that time,
Dilawar Khan Ghuri was the Governor of Malwa. In 1401 A.D. Dilawar Khan Ghuri, Governor of Malwa under
the imperial Sultanate assumed royalty and established an independent Kingdom of Malwa, with his capital at
Dhar. His son and successor, Hoshang Shah moved the capital to Mandu. Hoshang Shah died in 1435 A.D. and
was entombed in the splendid mausoleum which is still existing at Mandu. On Hoshang's death his son, Ghazni
Khan, succeeded him. He ordered his capital Mandu to be called "Shadiabad (the City of Joy). In 1436 AD,
Malwa came under Khalji Sultans who continued to rule Malwa till 1531 A.D. Later, Malwa was captured by
Sher Shah and was placed under the charge of Shujat Khan. Shujat Khan was succeeded by his son Baz
Bahadur. Mandu and its environs reverberated with the stories of romance of Rupmati and Baz Bahadur.

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

When Baz Bahadur was defeated and put to fight by the Mughal army, his beloved Rupmati took poison and
put an end to her life to escape dishonour.

In the administrative organization of Akbar, Dhar was the Chief town of a Mahal in Mandu Sarkar of the Subah
of Malwa. Akbar stayed at Dhar for seven days, while directing the invasion of Deccan. He also visited Mandu a
number of times. Mandu was also a favourite resort of Emperor Jahangir, who stayed here for over six months
in 1616 A.D. In his memoirs, Jahangir paid glowing tributes to the pleasant climate and pretty scenery at
Mandu. Noorjahan shot four tigers with six bullets, from the back of an elephant, near Mandu.

Along with these historical associations and political significance, the monuments at Mandav are architectural
landmarks and reflect a unique vocabulary of Islamic architecture. The architectural style of these forms an
important link in the development of the Indo Islamic architecture in the country in the medieval period.

At present, Mandav is one amongst the significant tourist destinations of Madhya Pradesh and the most
important one in the Dhar District. At the State level, there are four main tourist circuits, of which Mandu is on
the eastern most one that includes Ujjain, Indore, Maheshwar and Omkareshwar. There is potential to expand
the circuit to include destinations of cultural significance and eco-tourism as a complete package or on
thematic basis to more areas around Mandav such as Dharampuri and Burhanpur to the South, Dhar and
Mohankheda Tirth (near Rajgarh) to the North and North west, Bagh Caves and the Katthiwada region in
Alirajpur to the West.

Historically, the hill fort was connected to Dhar, being the military stronghold of the seat of power in Dhar.
Mandav has a number of places of tourist interest that includes areas of architectural significance, such as
Jahaz Mahal, Hindola Mahal, Tomb of Hoshang Shah, Palaces of Rani Rupmati and Baz Bahadur, Nilkanth
Palace, water tanks and stepwells; archaeological significance and those of environmental and religious
tourism. It has potential to be developed as an ecotourism and adventure sport tourist destination.

2.3 District Information


0

Dhar District is situated in the south western part of Madhya Pradesh and lies between 22 01and 23 09' North
0

latitudes and 74 29' and 75 42 east longitudes. It forms a part of Indore division and is 61 km. west of Indore.
Dhar derives its name from dhara-nagari which means the city of sword-blades, a name possibly given with
regard to its having been founded, conquered or held by the strength of the sword. Historically and culturally,
Dhar district has occupied an important place from the ancient to the modern period. Dhar city served as a
th

capital city for Parmara rulers upto the 13 century AD and later as capital of the Malwa Sultanate. It was an
important centre of revolt during the first war of independence in 1857.

Economy of the district is mainly dependent on agriculture and the district is famous for the group of
th

th

monuments at Mandu and the Bagh Caves with paintings dating back to 5 7 century period. Mandav is a
major tourism attraction in the district, bringing in national and international tourists.

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Dhar District has a higher growth rate, sex ratio and density compared to that of the State and a lower literacy
rate. The District ranks as 7th amongst the 50 districts of the State as per the decadal growth rate, with Indore
District having the highest growth rate of 32.7. It ranks 21st in terms of Literacy rate and 15th in terms of sex
ratio as per the 2011 Provisional Census Data.
Table 2.1: Demographics for Madhya Pradesh, 2011

State

Population

Growth Rate

Sex Ratio

Madhya Pradesh

72,597,565

20.3

930

Literacy
Rate
70.6

Density/sq.
km
236

Source: Provisional data, Census of India 2011

Table 2.2: Demographics for the District Dhar, 2001 and 2011

27.3

Proportion of
population (0-6 years)
19.5

Sex
Ratio
955

Literacy
Rate
52.5

Density/sq.
km
213

25.53

16.0

961

60.57

268

Year

Population

Growth Rate

2001

1,740,329

2011

2,184,672

Source: Provisional data, Census of India 2011

The population of the district has increased from a figure of 1,740,329 in 2001 to 2,184,672 in 2011. Although
the population has grown over the decade, the rate of growth has declined. Between 1991 and 2001, the
growth rate for the district was 27.3, whereas the rate is 25.53 in 2011. The proportion of children between
the age of 0 to 6 has also declined in the district. Sex ratio has improved and literacy rate is suggestive of
advancement. Density has also increased from 213 to 268 persons/square kilometre.

The 2001 Census information divides the District onto 7 tehsils, though as per information from the District
Statistical Handbook, 2009, the District is divided into 8 tehsils the additional one being Dahi (Source:
http://dhar.nic.in/admin.htm). The tehsils of the District are further divided into 13 CD Blocks. Mandav is a
part of the Dhar Tehsil that has the maximum area and population amongst all tehsils of the District as per the
2001 Census data as illustrated by the table below.
Table 2.3: Tehsil Details of Dhar District

1991

2001

Name of Tehsil

Population

Population

Area(sq.km)

Badnawar
Sardarpur
Dhar
Gandhwani
Kukshi
Manawar
Dharampuri

154,121
184,943
312,411
98,568
293,380
205,532
118,457

193,688
230,251
431,636
122,172
356,206
254,924
151,452

1010.44
1245.45
1678.58
452.56
1394.55
1025.00
398.70

Population per
square kilometre
192
185
257
270
255
249
380

Source: Census of India, 2001

The town of Mandav is a part of the Nalcha Block within the Dhar Tehsil that ranks 10th in terms of population
amongst the 14 blocks of the District and has the lowest sex ratio of 856, as seen in the following table.

10

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Table 2.4: Block wise demographic information

Block/District
Dhar
Tirla
Nalcha
Badnavar
Kukshi
Bagh
Nisarpur
Dahi
Manavar
Umarban
Gandhwani
Sardarpur
Dharampuri
Dhar District

Male
88210
36728
101942
98626
47153
45887
39247
47341
75454
53489
106132
72635
148844
961688

Population
Female
Sex Ratio
82179
932
35278
960
87299
856
95062
964
46268
981
45462
991
38627
984
46221
976
73438
973
52543
982
102384
965
71272
981
222724
1496
998757
1038

Total
170389
72006
189241
193688
93421
91349
77874
93562
148892
10832
208516
143907
371568
1960445

Population in the age group of 0-4years


Male
Female
Sex Ratio
Total
9252
8463
915
17715
8033
7686
957
15791
11677
11247
963
22924
16983
15794
930
32782
7248
6932
956
14180
10583
10622
1004
21205
7068
6512
921
13580
9391
9081
967
18472
11971
11118
929
23089
10766
10208
948
20974
14045
13716
976
27761
21953
20743
945
42696
10921
10369
949
21290
149896
142491
951
292387

Source: Statistical Handbook for Dhar 2009

2.4 Location
Madhya Pradesh is located in the heart of the country, surrounded by the states of Rajasthan, Gujarat,
Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh and Uttar Pradesh. The district is situated in the south western part of Madhya
o.

Pradesh and lies between 22 01 and 23 .09 North latitudes and 74 29 and 75 42 East longitudes. District
Dhar is surrounded by tribal population dominated Jhabua and Alirajpur districts to the west. Ratlam district
lies to the north of the district, Ujjain to north east, Indore to east, Khargone to south east and Barwani district
its south.

The NH 59/SH22 cuts through the middle of the district while NH 3 cuts through its south east corner. Mandav
is located 300 kms from the state capital Bhopal, 35 kms from the district headquarter Dhar and approx 85
kms from Indore. Rail and air connectivity to Mandav is through Indore. Its geographical coordinates are
22207 N -752457 E.

11

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Figure 2.2: Linkages and location of


Mandav

Mandav

12

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

2.5 Physiography and Landform (Census, 2001; Analytical note and District Resource Maps)
The Dhar District extends over three
physiographic divisions- the Malwa
Plateau

in

the

north,

Central

Vindhyachal hilly region and Southern


Narmada Valley, however, the valley is
again closed up by the hills in the south
western part.

Topography and natural settings


The north eastern part of the District is
the highest with an elevation of 600750 mts above Mean Sea Level (MSL),
while

the

central

part

has

Figure 2.3: Relief and Slope of Mandav

the

maximum slope ranging from 20-80 mts/km. This is primarily because the ridge of the Vindhyas passes through
this part of the district. The southern part of the District is the lowest, being in the basin of River Narmada.
Mandav lies in the belt having a general elevation of 300-450 metres above MSL and a slope of 10-20 mts/km.

Mandav is a part of the Vindhyachal region. The Central hilly region comprises ENE-WSW trending ridges which
have steep slopes and scarp faces on the southern side. The highest elevation in the district i.e. 751 meters
above mean sea level is located in this region. A part of the Vindhyachal Range extends in the Dhar District in a
crescentic belt generally from south-east to north-west. A strip of hilly area represents the range 5 to 20
kilometres in width. It is about 5 km. wide near village Dhani, the south-eastern boundary near Mograbav in
the centre. It is about 10 km further widening to 20 km west of Tanda. To the west of Bagh and Kukshi, the
Range stands disconnected by the valley of the Mahi and Hatni. It restarts along the Narmada in the southwest. The northern spur (peak 543.76 metres) forms the boundary between the Sardarpur tehsil and Jhabua
district. It extends from the peak of Gomanpura (556.26 metres) to Bajrangarh in Jhabua. Another spur
extends towards Jhabua in the north-west. The great Vindhyachal range extends generally from west to east
and scarps at most of its length towards the south. In Dhar also the southward scarps are well marked the wall
rising from 400 to 600 metres. However, in the western part their faces have been eroded back into long and
deep rugged valleys of the tributary hills of the Narmada. In fact the strong currents of the small streams on
the steep southern side have cut back at their heads. The numerous streams of the Narmada valley find their
sources on the Malwa plateau. The main line of the highest peaks has been left to the south of their present
courses.

In the eastern and central parts of the Vindhyachal in Dhar the main hill range is continuous but in the west
deep channels of the rivulets dissect it. The range slopes towards the north and gradually meets the Malwa

13

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City Development Plan for Mandav

plateau. Numerous spurs also extend over the Malwa plateau in the north. But in the western half in the
district one may also find a series of denuded ridges alternating with the parallel stream-channels and running
for some kilometers from north to south. The phenomenon leads the marked excel of the Range into a local
confusion, unless one tries to trace the line of the main peaks. The highest peak of the district Mograba
(751.03 meters) lies in the central part Nikanth (702.26 meters) lies further east and Shikarpura hill raises up to
698.91 meters. The famous historical fort of Mandugarh towers (the flat topped) about 600 meters, above the
mean sea level.
Mandav is situated at the top of an offshoot of the Vindhyan Range, rising 2,079 feet above the sea level and
separated from the main plateau of Malwa by a deep ravine, which is forested with magnificent trees. The
gorge encircles the Mandu hill on three sides and emerges into the Nimar plain that lies 1200 feet below the
fort on the south. The top of the hill is almost flat, except a few knolls and extends 4.5 to 6 kms from north to
south and 6 to 7.5 kms from east to west. The table land is interspersed by many lakes and pools.

Drainage
The Central hilly region forms water divide between the Northward flowing rivers of Mahi and Chambal
drainage and the southward flowing tributaries of the Narmada River including Baghain, Uri, Man and Karam
rivers. The drainage pattern in the northern part is sub-dendritic to sub parallel, whereas it is dendritic with
local sub parallel pattern in the southern part.

The southern part of the district lies in the catchment area of the Narmada, which forms the southern
boundary. Chambal, Mahi and Bagh rivers flowing northerly drain the northern Malwa plateau region. The
Chambal and its tributaries drain the north eastern part; it forms the catchment area of the Ganga. The north
western part drains into the Mahi. The water dividing line between the Narmada and the Chambal and the
Mahi are separated by the off shoot range, which runs along the Sardarpur Jhabua boundary. Water from
Mandav drains into the Karam River, which is a tributary of the Narmada River.

The Narmada River flows along the southern boundary of the district in a different valley from east to west
o

with a southern inclination along a mega lineament. It rises from the Amarkantak plateau (22 40) of the
o

Satpura range in Shahdol district. Flowing to the west it touches the district at Lasangaon (75 31 East) at the
confluence with the Karam. It forms the southern boundary of the district along with that of the West Nimar
for about 107 kilometres. It receives Boad, Dob, Mahali and Crol on its left while Kamar, Man and Bagh join its
right bank.

14

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Geology
Dhar district consists of units of
extrusive origin, denudational and
fluvial origins. As seen in figure 2.5,
Mandav

lies

in

denudational

plateau with a denudational slope to


its south characterised by a steep
escarpment.

According to District

Resource Map, a minor lineament


runs close to the Mandav region in
the North, thereby increasing the
recharge potential of the foothills in

Mandav

this region.

Figure 2.4: Geology of Mandav

In terms of lithology, Mandav is constituted by Indore Formation (Compound pahoehoe and Aa flows with
mega-porphyritic flow at the top 6 flows) and Kankaria-Pirukheri Formation (simple porphyritic flows with
mega-porphyritic flow at the top 7 flows) that come under the Deccan Trap (Malwa Group) group with
respect to strategraphic status (see figure 2.5). Iron-ore was reported to be found in Nimanpur itself but was
not worked. Other minerals found in the region are sandstone, red and yellow ochres, potters, clay and lime.
The iron-ore deposits in the district are found in irregular masses of breccias and important occurrence are at
Bagh in Kukshi Tehsil, but these deposits are not supposed to be large enough to make their exploitation
economical.

15

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


Figure 2.5: Geology and Minerals
Map, District Resource Map-Dhar
District, MP, Geological Survey of
India

16

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Most part of the District has


shallow black soil and has
Aquifers with Primary Intergranular Porosity, except the
central belt that has medium
black soil and is underlain by
Discontinuous

Aquifers

in

porous formations, as seen in


figure 2.6 and 2.7. In Dhar
district the soils were classified
into kali or black and bhuri or
brown. Brown soils are the

Figure 2.6: Soil Map, District Planning Series-Dhar District, MP, Survey of India

most

valuable

for

growing

excellent kharif and Rabi crops.


Deep kali soil being more
retentive of moisture than
good bhuri in the same class is
more suitable for Rabi crops. A
great part of the Nimar soil
(where Narmada separates the
former Dharampuri and Thikri)
is

characterized

as

bhuri

pahoroti, i.e. brown stony


which is a shallow soil used
chiefly for kharif crops. The
area of the district which
mostly

covers

the

old

disjointed part of the former


state of Dhar presents in its
Figure 2.7: Hydrogeology Map, District Planning Series-Dhar District, MP, Survey of India

lower parts, a phenomenon of


rising lands from Narmada

valley into rugged and broken hills and valley with water sources and soil that is not too rich. The water
potential of the Mandav region is high in the foothills but owing to the location of town on top of a plateau
and underlying basalt rocks, the groundwater potential around the town is limited. According to District
Resource Map, the depth to water table in and around Mandav is between 6 to 9m.

17

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Climate
The district and the town enjoy a pleasant climate. It is generally dry except in the monsoon season. The year
may be divided into four seasons. The hot season from March to about the middle of June is followed by the
monsoon season lasting up to end of September. October and November may be termed the post-monsoon
season. The period from December to February is the cold season. There is no meteorological observatory in
the district. After February there is steady increase in temperatures. May is the hottest month with the mean
O

daily maximum at about 40 C. The days are very hot during the summer with the maximum temperature on
0

individual days sometimes rising up to about 44 C or 45 C. With the onset of the south-west monsoon by the
second week of June there is appreciable drop in temperature and the weather is cool and pleasant. In
September, day temperature rises and in October, it reaches a secondary maximum. After October, day and
night temperature decrease rapidly, January is generally the coldest month with the mean daily maximum at
O

about 27 C and the mean daily minimum at about 10 C. Cold waves affect the district in the area of passing
western disturbances across northern India and the minimum temperature may drop down occasionally to
o

about the freezing point of water. The average maximum temperature of Mandav is 44.5 C, average minimum
o

temperature as 18 C.
Figure 2.8: Climatic
Conditions Map,
District Planning SeriesDhar District, MP,
Survey of India

The average annual rainfall in the district is 833.1 mm. The southern and south eastern part of the district gets
less rainfall than elsewhere but in the southern parts in the region of Mandav the rainfall is higher. Over the
last five years, the rainfall has been lesser than usual, with an average rainfall of 750 mm (Source: NP,
Mandav), due to which there has been a scarcity of water.

Winds are generally light in the post-monsoon and winter seasons and strengthen in the summer and
monsoon seasons. Winds blow mostly from direction between southwest and north-west during the monsoon

18

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

months. In the post- monsoon and winter seasons the winds are mainly north-eastern or eastern. By March
winds from directions between south-west and north-west appear and by April these become predominant
and continue in the rest of summer and the monsoon season.

Amongst the districts of


MP, Dhar is proven as
having

potential

for

generation of wind energy


with a capacity of 50 MW.

Figure 2.9: Potential Sites of


Wind power generation in MP,
Source: Economic Survey of MP
2009-10; MPUVNL

2.6 Municipal Area and Planning Area


Presently, the NP area is approximately 42.2 sqkm (spread over 15 wards) which is much higher than other
NPs. This is because the NP boundary was delineated around 1997 to include the surrounding villages (in order
to reach the minimum population needed to be declared as a NP. Since, the town area itself did not have the
required population, the peripheral villages were included in the NP). These villages now cannot avail any of
the Gram Panchayat (GP) facilities and are not provided any facilities/services by the NP. During the Kick off
workshop, the villagers expressed a willingness to be included in the GP boundary again. The region was
earlier a GP, was then declared a SADA area (Special Area Development Authority) and was then declared a
NP. Ward no. 1 to 5 are predominantly urban, whereas, ward 6 to 15 are predominantly rural in character.

The main town is confined to a few houses along the central spine (spread over an area of approx. 5 sq kms),
which would account for a population of 3679. The remaining population is scattered in farmlands and forests
which spread across the NP boundary. This population comprises of tribals who live in hutments and practice
agriculture.

Discrepancies in NP area
According to NP documents, the NP area is approximately 42.2 sqkm. But when the Municipal boundary was
overlaid on satellite imagery, the Municipal area comes out to be 24.87sqkm.
A Master Plan for the town was prepared for the target year 2011. But this Master Plan has not been yet.
According to the Master Plan, the Investment area for the town comes out to be 25.74 sqkm. According to
superimposition on satellite imagery, the investment area comes out to be the same (25.74 sqkm).

19

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

CHAPTER 3: DEMOGR APHIC PROFILE OF MA NDAV


3.1 Population Growth Trend
Mandav has a total population of 10,659 according to Preliminary Census estimates for 2011 (Nagar Parishad,
Mandav). According to the Census, Mandav can be classified as a Class IV town (towns with populations 10,000
to 19,999 people). The population figures for the years 1991, 2001 and 2011 are presented in table 3.1 along
with the data available on number of households, household size, gender and sex ratio.
Table 3.1: Demographic profile of Mandav

Year

Total

Male

Female

1991
2001
2011

6,660
8,544
10,659

4,370
5,385

4,174
5,274

Number of
Households
1408
1821

Household Size

Sex ratio

6.1
5.85

955
979

Source: Census 2001 and Preliminary Census estimates, Census 2011

The number of households in the town is 1821 (Preliminary Census estimates, 2011). The population of
Mandav as per 2001 census was 8,544 and a sex ratio of 955. The population increased to 10,659 in 2011 and
the sex ratio increased to 979.

As presented in table 3.2, the decadal growth rate of Mandav from 2001 to 2011 is 24.75%. Decadal growth
rate was 28.28% between 1991 and 2001; hence, the decadal growth rate for the town has gone down over
the last decade. The growth rate for Mandav in 2011 is higher than the State and national rates over the same
decades. Mandavs decadal growth rate was higher than the District figure for 1991-2001 but lower than the
District figure for 2001-2011.

Table 3.2: Decadal Growth Rate

Year

Population

1991
2001
2011

6,660
8,544
10,659

Decadal
Growth Rate
(%)
28.28
24.75

Decadal Growth
Rate (%)India

Decadal Growth Rate


(%) MP

23.86
21.34
17.6

27.24
24.34
20.30

Decadal Growth
rate (%) Dhar
District
29.3
27.3
25.53

Source: Decadal growth for India and MP from Census of India, 2001 and 2011

3.2 Population Projection


Table 3.3 presents the population projections using linear, geometric, exponential and weighted average
methods. The projected population for 2035 for Mandav is 18,400 according to Weighted Average Method.
Table 3.3: Population Projections

Year

Linear
Method

Geometric Method (Simple


Rate of Growth)

Exponential
Method

Weighted
Average

2015

11459

11836

11710

11689

2020

12459

13490

13171

13106

2025

13458

15377

14814

14682

2030

14458

17527

16663

16439

2035

15458

19978

18742

18400

20

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Projected Population
20000
15000
10000
5000
0
2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

Figure 3.1: Population Projection by the Weighted Average Method

3.3 Population Density


The population density of the town for 2011 comes out to be 252.6 persons per sq km or 2.53 persons per
hectare (@10,659 persons over 42.2 sqkm). But considering that the Municipal area according to satellite
imagery comes out to be approximately 24.87 sqkm, the average density comes out to be 4.29 ppha. As per
UDPFI guidelines, the average density for small hilly towns is 45-75 persons per hectare. Compared to this,
Mandav has a very low density. Distribution of the population in the 15 wards has been tabulated in Table 3.4.
Table 3.4: Ward Wise Population, area and density (2011)

Ward No.

Wards

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Gadashah Ward
Ram Mandir Ward
Jahaz Mahal Ward
Jama Masjid Ward
Rampura Ward
Lal Bangla Ward
Dariya Khan Ward
Neelkanth Ward
Tarapur Gate Ward
Eco-point Ward
Rani Roopmati Ward
Bhagwansh Gate Ward
Mansingi Ward
Kanadipura Ward
Jahangirpur Gate Ward
Total

Total
Population
736
660
1011
527
745
666
422
994
521
811
595
777
705
795
694
10,659

Ward Wise
Area (Sqkm)
0.66
1.16
1.24
0.90
1.25
3.58
1.47
1.98
0.89
1.76
1.67
3.56
1.55
1.03
2.18
24.87

Ward wise density


(Persons/ha)
11.22
5.68
8.16
5.87
5.95
1.86
2.88
5.01
5.86
4.62
3.56
2.19
4.56
7.70
3.18

Note: The wards highlighted in blue are predominantly urban in character; other wards are predominantly rural
in character.
The ward wise density was calculated on the basis of the actual areas attained on the basis of satellite imagery.
As can be seen from the table above, the ward wise density for Mandav is very low. The highest density is in
Ward 1 (11ppha). It can also be seen that except for Ward 9 and 14, the density of wards with urban character
is marginally higher than that of wards with largely rural character. The ward wise distribution of population in
2011 reflects that Jahaz Mahal Ward and Neelkath Ward have the highest population; whereas Dariya Khan
Mahal had the least population.

21

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

3.4 Other Population Indicators


Other population indicators for Mandav are presented in table 3.5.
Table 3.5: Other population indicators from Census 2001 and 2011

Total population
Population of children aged 0-6
years
Sex ratio of children aged 0-6
years
Total schedule caste population
Total schedule tribe population
Percent schedule caste
Percent schedule tribe
Sex ratio of schedule caste
Sex ratio of schedule tribe

Mandav
8,544

2001
District Dhar
288184

1,813

47470

939

901

181
6,968
2.1
81.6
905
970

23052
50422
8
17.5
921
925

Mandav
10,659
2,003

2011
District Dhar
2,184,672
349,262

956
-

In 2001, 21.2% of the total population of Mandav were children aged 0 to 6. The sex ratio for this section was
939 and higher than 901, the district figure for the same. Table 3.6 shows that the sex ratio for 0-6 age group
has improved from 939 females per 1000 males to 956 females per 1000 males over the last decade.

Amongst all the towns of the District, Mandav has the lowest proportion of Scheduled Castes (2.1%) and
highest proportion of Scheduled Tribes (81.6%) as per the 2001 Census. The table also indicates that the
proportion of schedule caste for Mandav is much less than the district figure, but this reverses for the schedule
tribe percentage which is higher for the town in comparison to the district proportion. The sex ratio for the
town for schedule castes is lower than the district figure, but sex ratio of scheduled tribes is much higher that
the district figure.
Table 3.6: Ward wise SC/ST population (2001)

Ward
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Wards

Total

Gadashah Ward
Ram Mandir Ward
Jahaz Mahal Ward
Jama Masjid Ward
Rampura Ward
Lal Bangla Ward
Dariya Khan Ward
Neelkanth Ward
Tarapur Gate Ward
Eco-point Ward
Rani Roopmati Ward
Bhagwansh Gate Ward
Mansingi Ward
Kanadipura Ward
Jahangirpur Gate Ward
Total

701
438
710
532
770
398
364
807
406
713
493
593
592
579
448
8,544

Scheduled
Tribe
304
205
375
180
380
398
364
807
397
713
493
593
592
579
448
6828

Source: Census, 2001

22

Scheduled
Caste
156
30
22
09
217

Backward
classes
311
77
335
322
386
1413

General
Population
86
86

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

The ward wise population distribution across casts reflects that the entire population of 9 out of the 15 wards
comprises of scheduled tribes. The Ram Mandir Ward has a high concentration of scheduled caste population.
5 wards have people from backward classes residing, while only one ward Gadashah Ward has general
population.

3.5 Issues

The high tribal population of the town needs to be seen as an asset and the impact of tourism growth on
the people is an important factor to be assessed.

Being under NP jurisdiction since 1997, the villages now cannot avail any of the Gram Panchayat (GP)
facilities and are not provided any facilities/services by the NP. The villagers expressed a willingness to be
included in the GP boundary again.

The HH size in the town is nearly 6. Though it has gone down over the last decade, it is still above average.

The density of the town is extremely low.

23

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

CHAPTER 4: SOCIO-EC ONOMIC PROFILE OF MANDAV


4.1 Sex ratio
Table 4.1: Sex Ratio

2001
Total
8,544

Males
4,370

2011

Females
4,174

Sex ratio*
955

Total
10,659

Males
5385

Females
5274

Sex ratio*
979

Source: Census of India, 2001 and Preliminary Census Estimates for 2011

* No. of females per 1000 male population (Female pop./Male pop. X 1000)
The sex ratio for Mandav was 955 in 2001 which is better than the State average of 920 and National average
of 933 for India for the same decade. The sex ratio of Mandav has further improved to 979 as per Preliminary
Census Estimates of 2011. The corresponding value for MP is 930 and for India is 940 for 2011. This reflects
that the sex ratio of Mandav is much higher than the State and national levels. A key reason for this is that
since there are no employment opportunities in the town, the male population migrates to neighbouring
towns in search of work. Another reason for this could be the high status given to females in tribal culture.
Table 4.2: Ward Wise Male Female Population and Sex Ratio (2011)

Ward No.

Wards

Total

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Gadashah Ward
Ram Mandir Ward
Jahaz Mahal Ward
Jama Masjid Ward
Rampura Ward
Lal Bangla Ward
Dariya Khan Ward
Neelkanth Ward
Tarapur Gate Ward
Echo-point Ward
Rani Roopmati Ward
Bhagwansh Gate Ward
Mansingi Ward
Kanadipura Ward
Jahangirpur Gate Ward
Total

736
660
1011
527
745
666
422
994
521
811
595
777
705
795
694
10,659

Male
population
335
342
456
262
382
335
204
516
280
420
312
418
372
403
348
5385

Female
Population
401
318
555
265
363
331
218
478
241
391
283
359
333
392
346
5274

Sex Ratio
1197
930
1217
1011
950
988
1069
926
861
931
907
859
895
973
994
979

Source: Preliminary Census Estimates, 2011

The ward wise analysis of distribution of male-female population reflects that Ward No. 1, 3, 4 and 7 have sex
ratios more than 1000. Hence, these wards would need more women centric capacity building and livelihood
generation (House hold industry based).

4.2 Literacy Rate


Table 4.3: Literacy Rate

Total
population

No. of
literates

% of
literates

2001
2011

2,675
4,770

39.7%
44.75%

No. of
literate
Males
1,751
2,835

% of
literate
Males
51.0%
52.64%

Source: Census of India, 2001 for 2001 data and Preliminary Census Data, 2011

24

No. of
literate
Females
924
1,935

% of
literate
Females
28.0%
36.69%

Gap in MaleFemale
Literacy Rate
22.9
15.95

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

As per the Census 2001 data, Mandav had the lowest literacy in the District. The literacy rates have improved
slightly to 44.75% over the last decade. The values from 2001 and 2011 reflect that the gap in male and female
literacy rate has reduced over the last decade. The increase in female literacy rate over the last decade is
significant. The literacy rate of India is at 74.04% and that of the state of Madhya Pradesh is 70.6% according
to 2011 Census data. The literacy rate of Mandav (44.75%) is extremely low compared to both the State and
national values.

4.3 Average Household Size


Number of households in Mandav as per the Preliminary Census estimates for 2011 are 1821. For a population
of 10,659, the HH size comes out to be is 5.85 (@1821 HHs for 10,659 persons). The HH size was 6.1 according
to 2001 (@1408 HHs for 8,544 persons) reflecting a trend of slight reduction in HH size over the decade.

4.4 Workforce Participation


The Work Participation rate for Mandav as per Census 2001 comes out to be 41.5%. Total Workers in Mandav
as per 2001 Census are 3,544 (41.5%) of which 2,068 (47.3%) are males and 1,476 (35.4%) are females. The
main workers are 2801 (32.8%) whereas marginal workers are 743 (8.7%). This indicates the high percentage
of unemployment in the town but the WPR rates are still better than other comparable towns. This can be
attributed to the agricultural and tourism base of the town.
Table 4.4: Distribution of Main and Marginal Workers, 2001

Total Workers (Main Workers)


Persons % Males % Females
2801

32.8 1755 40.2

1046

%
25.1

Total Workers (Marginal Workers)


Persons
%
Males
%
Females
743

8.7

313

7.2

430

%
10.3

Total Workers
Number
%
3544

41.5

Source: Census of India, 2001


Table 4.5: Non workers

Persons

Male

Female

5000 (58.5%)

2302

2698

Source: Census of India, 2001

4.5 Industrial Activity


The rural and urban Workforce Participation Rate (WPR) in the Dhar Tehsil as per the 2001 Census is tabulated
in Table 4.6.
Table 4.6: Distribution of Work Force by Category in Dhar Tehsil, 2001

Cultivators
M
%
F
39,362 33.74 22,790
36,313 92.25 21,286
3,049
7.75
1,504
Agricultural Labour
Total
%
M
%
F
Dhar Tehsil 51,203 29.11 24,052 20.62 27,151
Dhar (Rural) 47,672 93.10 22,268 92.58 25,404
Dhar (Urban) 3,531 6.90
1,784
7.42
1,747
Total
%
Dhar Tehsil 62,152 35.34
Dhar (Rural) 57,599 92.67
Dhar (Urban) 4,553 7.33

Source: Census, 2001

25

Other Workers
Total
%
M
%
F
%
59,710 33.95 51,275 43.95 8,435 14.24
14,443 24.19 12,174 23.74 2,269 26.90
45,267 75.81 39,101 76.26 6,166 73.10
Workers in Household Industries
%
Total
%
M
%
F
%
45.85 2,810 1.60 1,970 1.69
840 1.42
93.57 1,775 63.17 1,215 61.68 560 66.67
6.43 1,035 36.83 755 38.32 280 33.33
%
38.49
93.40
6.60

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

In the Dhar Tehsil, about 35% of the


t total workers are cultivators, with other workerss close behind at 34%,
followed by agricultural labourers at
a 29% and only 2% being workers in House Hold indusstries.
Figure 4.1: Distrib
bution of total workers in the Dhar Tehsil across various categorie
es

Other Workers
34%

Cultivators
35%
Agricultural
Labourers
29%

Workers in HH
Industry
2%

As per the 2001 census, the categorries of workers in the town are as tabulated below.
Table 4.7: Distribution of Workers by Sex in
n 4 Categories of Economic Activity (2001)

Household Industry
Other Workers
Workers
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Perssons Males Females
Cultivators

2140

1198

Agriccultural Labourers

942

677

295

382

%) (14.3%) (25.9%)
(60.4%) (57.9%) (63.8%) (19.1%

20 (0.6%)

13
(0.6%)

7 (0.5%)

70
07

562

145

(19.9%) (27.2%) (9.8%)

Source: Census of India, 2001


Figure 4.2: Distribution of Workers in 4 Categories of Economic Activity (2001)

Other Workers
20%
Workers in HH
industry
1%

Cultivators
60%

Agricultural
labour
19%
The 2001 Census data reflects that Mandav had the highest proportion of cultivators (60
0.4%) in the District.
Industrial Base
Currently, Mandav does not have any industrial base. The only industry that contributes to the economy of the
modity manufactured in
town is the Tourism industry. As per the Census 2001 data, the most important comm
t
The paper board
Mandav was Paper Board which waas also an important commodity exported out of the town.
factories are not operational any more.
m
Around 40 years ago, the town had a vibrantt handloom trade with
several tribal workers involved in making
m
cotton bed sheets, towels, etc. for supply to hospitals and most of
the tribals were involved in this handloom
h
trade. But there are hardly any artisans now.
n
Some Bagh print
artisans were also there but now only a few remain. Training programme in stitching was conducted a few
years ago but since the villagers do not have access to raw material, this could not be taaken up as a SSI as cost
cannot be recovered due to poor transportation facilities. Earlier tribals were also involved in Griha udyog
f
and cotton thread work. Details related to tourrism as an industry are
related to strengthening of cotton fibres
given in the Chapter on Heritage an
nd Conservation.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Mandi
The town does not have a Mandi and is dependent on towns like Dhar and Dhamnod (35 kms away) for day to
day supplies. Since the town is located at a height, the truck drivers ask for triple the normal fare for delivery
of goods to Mandav. Hence, the town needs to be provided with an Up Mandi. Since Mandav is known in the
region for non grain crops, an Up Mandi for non grain items can be set up.

Agriculture
The tribals living in Mandav (81.6% tribal population in 2001) are primarily farmers. The 2001 Census reflects
that Wheat and soyabean were produced in significant quantities in Mandav. These continue to be produced
and exported out of Mandav. Other crops cultivated here are chana and cotton. Wheat, gram and peas are
produced in the Rabi season (winter harvest) and corn, soyabean, moong and chholey are produced in the
Kharif season (autumn harvest). The soil is fertile black cotton soil but due to soil erosion, the depth of soil is
low (2-3 feet). Drip and sprinkler irrigation were tried in the region but are not suitable for the main crops. A
variety of hybrid corn was also introduced a few years back. Agricultural loans are required for the farmers. In
general, the agricultural produce in the region is low and the population is dependent on the plains for their
basic needs. Khirni, Sitaphal and other such crops which are economically lucrative for the farmers are
seasonal and can only be grown once a year.

The crops for which Mandav is famous in the region include Mhau, Gond, Khirni (fruit), Khurasani Imli, Sitaphal
(Custard Apple) and Kheera Kakdi. Custard apple and long gourd (kakri) are produced in October-November.
These crops fetch the farmers a good price and are traded as far as Indore, Jaipur and Baroda. Dhavra gond
(tree) grown in the NP area fetches upto Rs. 500/kg and is in good demand but since the number of such trees
in on a decline, an intervention to revive the same is needed. Historically, the mangoes of Mandav were
acclaimed for their taste and flavour. Orchards of taimbru, mango, guava, amla and khirni trees may be
developed that would also help the economy.

Tribals grow fruits and vegetables including jadi bootis (herbs), salam misri, lal churan and dhuli musli which
fetch them good prices and have a good demand but due to poor condition of farmers, these crops are on a
decline. Incentives are needed to revive these crops. A number of the herbs have medicinal value such as
kuradia that is used for treating wounds and leaves of bekul that are a remedy for treating cough and cold.
There are individuals in the tribal community who have the knowledge system of how to use these. Hence, the
local herbs can form a base for small scale industry. Drip irrigation can be used for enhancing the cultivation of
herbs in the region.

Mahua is a significant produce of the town. It is a seasonal forest produce that sheds its corollas during MarchApril. Though it is classified as a forest produce, most of the production comes from non-forest land in the
agricultural fields and uplands. It is a food item for the forest dwelling population and is also used for brewing
alcohol. Each household is permitted to manufacture a maximum of 5 litres of the liquor that is also known as

27

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Mahua. There are many other uses of Mahua products, such as Mahua seed cake is used in manufacturing
soap. Mahua seed is also used as source of edible oil in certain parts of Chhattisgarh. The flowers and seeds
from the tree have economic value in the form of sales proceeds. Liquor is made out of the flowers and soap
out of the seeds of Mahua. At the regional levels, Ranchi is the most important market for Mahua flowers.
International trading companies such as Messrs Ferrero Trading of Luxemburg, Italy purchase Mahua flowers
in bulk from MP and Chhattisgarh through a Raipur based trading company. Messrs Ferrero Trading Company
produces mainly chocolates and other confectionary with consumers in several countries and has established
their first unit in Asia at Baramati, Maharashtra. The company is considering setting up a unit in MP.

Drying corn on the roofs

Animal husbandry as a commercial prospect

Livestock and animal rearing


Livestock ownership in the town is prominent, especially
in the peripheral wards and villages. Animal rearing is a
traditional occupation with the slum dwellers and needs
to be revived. Since the villagers are primarily involved in
agriculture, ownership of cattle and poultry is common.
SSIs related to animal rearing can hence, be set up in the
town. It was also noticed that many shepherds from
Rajasthan migrate to MP, including Mandav with their
livestock due to scarcity of grazing land in Rajasthan.

4.6 Trade and Commerce


The export of agricultural produce constitutes the commercial activity in the town. The town also has a weekly
haat which is set up every Saturday where people from neighbouring areas come to the town for the haat. The
town people and the villagers are also primarily dependent on this haat for their daily needs. The shops in the
town provide for basic daily utilities (100 shops), eateries (20) and bicycles on rent. There are about 50 mobile
vendors selling fruits, vegetables, tea etc. Most of the city population comprises of people who work in
unorganized sectors like hawkers, labourers etc.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Commercial activities about the town

4.7 Labour
In the Dhar Tehsil, of the 29% working population that is in to agricultural labour, 93% are in the rural areas
while about 7% are in the urban areas, as per the 2001 Census. In comparison, the proportion of agricultural
labour in Mandav was at 19% of the towns working population. Presently, about 2000 people are estimated to
be working as agricultural labour. People go from Mandav to Indore, Ujjain, Dhamnod, Dharampuri and Dhar
for trade or to work as agricultural labour during cropping season.

4.8 Tourism
Tourism is the biggest industry in the town and a significant part of the main town population is dependent on
tourism for livelihood. Three groups of monuments under the Archaeological Survey of India are ticketed. The
revenue from the tickets goes directly to ASI. The only earning that the NP gets from tourism is revenue from a
parking operated by NP (@10 lakh/annum) and 2 low cost rest houses which are run by the NP.

Most of the tourists coming to Mandav dont spend more than 3 or 4 hours in the town. Maximum tourist
traffic to the town is in August. During peak season, all the accommodation in the town is full and tourists stay
in the nearby towns of Dhar or Dhamnod and visit Mandav for a few hours. People visiting Mandav visit the
monuments in core city and the front part of the monument and return. They should be encouraged to
explore more monuments in and around the city. This would increase the time tourists spend in Mandav and
would help increase the towns earnings from tourism. Details such as visitor numbers, trends, issues and
potentials for developing tourism in the town are discussed under Chapter 16.

Potential industries
There are no agro based industries in the town. There is potential for setting up small scale industries and
household industries such as manufacturing of incense sticks, candles, jute products, bamboo based products
such as baskets, lac udyog, wooden or earthen sculpture and stitching. Since the sex ratio in the town is good,
it is important that the women are involved in these activities. Bee farming also has potential in the town. The
town has a high potential for Pisciculture due to the presence of numerous ponds and traditional fishermen
who used to survive off fishing in these ponds. But due to desiltation, the ponds dry fast and the fishing period
has reduced to 2 months a year. The cattle and chicken population in the town is relatively high and hence, a

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City Development Plan for Mandav

dairy and poultry farms can be set up in the town. Animal rearing also needs to be revived in the region. The
traditional handloom work in Mandav needs to be revived as a HH industry, especially for women. But since
the tribals are poor and donot have any training, loans and initial training need to be provided with by the
implementing agency. During the second stakeholder workshop, the stakeholders expressed interest in
training to make cotton cloth, Maheshwari saree, bagh printing work, etc. Bagh printing artisans can hardly be
found now but tribals can be trained in Bagh printing.

4.9 SWOT Analysis


Strengths
Healthy sex ratio.
Availability of local (tribal) skills and crafts
Agriculture and tourism based economy with
high seasonal inflow of tourists
Presence of local knowledge systems in the
tribal population based on medicinal plants
and production of other flora based products
Close link of the local population with their
environment such as flora (herbs and trees)
and local water bodies (for pisciculture) that
help in the sustenance of these resources
High cattle population in peripheral areas
Opportunities
Development of Mahua based and other agro
based industries
Plantation of indigenous flora trees and
herbs, products of which have been and can
be used as livelihood generators
Revival of existing orchards
Setting up SSI and HHI with special focus
towards women using traditional knowledge,
skills, crafts and based on local raw materials
Training and capacity building of the local
population to enable them to set up their own
businesses
Revival of Bagh printing, handlooms etc
Animal rearing can be revived as economic
activity and dairies can be set up
Enhancement of tourism as livelihood
generator
Bee farming, Pisciculture, solar and wind farms

Weaknesses
Low work participation rate, even lower in
female population
Low literacy levels, even lower in female
population
Low contribution of house hold or small scale
industries based on indigenous materials, skills
and crafts towards the economy
Lack of agro based industries
Shortage of tourist infrastructure
Poor market channels for raw materials and
products from the town
Threats
Depletion of forests and flora that is potential
base of a number of industries
Outmigration and socio-economic stagnation of
remaining population due to poor literacy levels
and lack of livelihood opportunities

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City Development Plan for Mandav

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4.10 Issues

Tourism is the main income generator in the town but only a specific segment currently benefits from
tourism. A large segment on the town population and almost the entire village population does not
benefit at all from tourism

Literacy rates are very low, need to be improved.

Low work participation rate. Female work participation rate is very low.

There are no small scale industries and agro based industries in the town.

Tourists come for day trips mostly, do not spend the night in the town. The earning from tourism is also
limited.

Poor market access (due to location) of the town makes it difficult for the produce from the town to be
traded.

Pisciculture is on a decline due to siltation of ponds. Animal rearing is also on a decline. Local trees like
Khurasani imli which are a source of income for the tribals are also decreasing.

Low employment opportunities in the town. People have to commute to neighbouring towns in search of
work.

Lack of irrigation facilities; hence only one crop a year.

4.11 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan

There is a strong need for literacy drives especially for female population - that may be based on
incentives.

Scope for setting up HH industries and SSIs. Poultry and dairy can be set up.

Drip irrigation can be promoted to increase crop production

Loans for setting up small scale businesses need to be provided.

Better educational facilities need to be provided, especially for tribals. Focus on computer education and
vocational courses also needed.

The town needs a sustainable economy that is not just based on tourism but other economic drivers as
well. There is a need to integrate tourism, heritage conservation, environmental protection and livelihood
generation.

It is important to establish industries in the town for providing livelihoods to the local population. There is
a strong need to generate livelihood opportunities using local skills and crafts such as production of herbal
medicines, consumer products and tribal craft based products. Initial support may be required through
involvement of specialised organisations for research and development that can help in viable product
development. NGOs for capacity building of the local population need to be promoted. The female
population needs to be encouraged and trained to set up household industries such as production of
agarbattis (incense sticks), lac products and stitching. Handloom work can be revived as a HH industry for
females. Workers can be provided with training to make cotton cloth, Maheshwari saree, bagh printing
work, etc. Market channels need to be opened up for the products.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Tourism based economy to be enhanced by increasing night stay of tourists, increasing tourist season and
increasing income generation of locals from tourism. More activities can be promoted to increase the
tourist season and generate more livelihood opportunities based on tourism. More affordable tourist
accommodation, Community halls and dormitories can also be provided. There is a need to develop
models of participation where the local population can have a stake in the initiative through direct
ownership and management of a particular segment of tourist accommodation. Training and regulation
will be important components for such models to be successful. Such models can ensure that the local
population does not get marginalised but becomes an active participant in the process. A detailed
market/visitor study would be required to derive the actual need across various segments. Also, since
Dhamnod is being proposed as an accommodation hub for the regional tourist circuit, it must be ensured
that any additional accommodation being provided in Mandav is not incoherent and does not have any
negative impact on the ecology and social fabric of the town.

There is a need for research and development in the area of agriculture. Since nearly half the population
is dependent on agriculture, it is important to address issues such as the soil depth and scarcity of water
and devise innovative means to counter these. Any plantations (reviving orchards, planting Mahua 201112 having been declared as the Mahua plantation year by the Forest Division, Dhar) must be carried out
with the knowledge and understanding of the indigenous species and their suitability to the context. Drip
irrigation and sprinkler systems were not successful for other crops in the areas but may be tried for
cultivation of herbs, with appropriate and consistent training of the local population.

Setting up of agro based industries, production of bio gas etc can also help in sustainable development of
the people in social and economic terms.

Better market access needs to be provided, as a number of indigenous raw materials (such as mahua
flowers) perish before reaching the market and industry is also unable to flourish. It is important that as
far as possible, indigenous materials be used in the industries, to reduce dependence on external factors
in the production process.

Bee farming, pisciculture (after reviving the ponds), reviving cattle rearing and setting up dairies.

Setting up solar and wind farming are to be encouraged as these are activities that do not have any
negative impact on the ecological balance of the area.

Training is an important requirement for any initiative to be successful in the town. Be it regarding
provision of skills based on tourism industry or other indigenous material based HHIs and SSIs, there is a
need for involvement of NGOs and specialised organisations that can conduct programmes (workshops or
research) for capacity building, product development and socio-economic strengthening of the local
population.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

CHAPTER 5: PHYSICAL PLANNING AND GROWTH MANAGEMENT


5.1 Spatial Growth Trends

Figure 5.1: Satellite image of Mandav in October 2000

Since the NP boundary is spread over 42.2 sq kms, of which a large percentage is forest land; the population
concentration in the town is low. The core town spreads over nearly 2 sq kms and a large percentage of the
built form in this area falls under monuments. In terms of settlements, there are scattered pockets of
hutments/slums across the core area. A key consideration for development in this area is that due to the
presence of listed monuments, most of the land in the core town falls under the 100 or 300m radius
(prohibited and restricted developments) under ASI. A large part of the built mass is mostly only monumental
and unauthorized encroachments in restricted areas. There is a little bit of institutional and commercial
activity along the main road.

Mandav was historically a very important place and at present, due to tourism, ribbon development has taken
place along the main road and the roads connecting to various monuments.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Figure 5.2: Figure ground map of core area of Mandav Town

The Master Plan for the town was prepared for target year 2011 but has not been implemented yet. It is said
that nearly 9 lakh people inhabited Mandav during Mughal era and the remains of their houses are still found
in the town. Most excavations for new foundations in the town are stopped when remains of old houses are
found during construction work. Most of the houses in the town are kuccha and are not permitted to be made
pukka because they fall within the 100m or 300m periphery of monuments. Hence, most of the existing houses
in the town are kuccha and hardly any new constructions are coming up; hence, the built form of the town is
nearing stagnation.

5.2 Spatial Distribution of Population


Inside the main city, population is distributed along main streets and access roads. However, a major part of
the population (tribal population) is spread all over the NP area in their fields, near ponds and in forests.
However, due to lack of commercial activity, limited tourist season and various restrictions imposed by ASI,

34

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

most of the people chose to stay in the outskirts and village area, near their farms and ponds where they could
do fishing. Hence, the density in the whole town is very low.

5.3 Municipal Level Mapping and Ward Delineation Map

Figure 5.3: Map of NP Area, Mandav showing Municipal and Ward boundaries. Source: NP, Mandav.

The town comprises of 15 wards. Of these only wards 1 to 5 comprise the main town, accounting for 3679
persons living in the main town. The remaining population is spread over the Municipal area, largely in forests
and villages; where they live in near isolation. Most of these villages dont have any infrastructural provision
and dont even have a proper access road. These villages are located amidst forests or scrubland and are
entirely based on agriculture.

35

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Figure 5.4: Ward Map of Mandav, Source: IDFC; based on NP map and satellite imagery

5.4 Landuse Analysis


The land use map for Dhar district shows that Mandav is located in the south eastern part of the Reserve
Forest belt that runs across the centre of the District. To the south of the town lies Wetland double crop
area.

36

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

In the town, mostly mixed


land-use is seen along the
streets near main junctions
with shops in the front and
residences at the back.
Along Jahaz Mahal road, the
land use largely comprises
of

institutional

and

residential

uses,

interspersed

with

monuments.

Along

Roopmati road, the land


use

comprises

of

commercial and PSP uses


close to the Jama Masjid
intersection due to the
presence of shops, bus
stand

and

Dharamshala.

This gives way to residential


land use along the main
road

which

gradually

transcends into the villages.


The settlement is largely
Figure 5.5: Landuse map for District Dhar. Source: Geological Survey of India

single storied with only

Hotels and Dharamshalas being G+1. The settlement is a low rise low density settlement. There is a very dense
slum housing just next to Jami Masjid. However, due to ASI restrictions, this slum is being shifted and the slum
dwellers are now encroaching on the right of way. There is one government guest house, student hostels and
4 main private hotels in the town. Religious structures include 2 Jain temples and 1 Hindu temple, besides the
Jami Mosque and small community level temples. The Proposed Master Plan for Mandav (prepared by TCPO)
is attached as annexure.

5. 5 Master Plan Provisions


The town has a Master Plan prepared by the TCPD. The Master Plan was not implemented due to the
intervention of the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) that owns 61 properties in the NP boundary and
regulates an area of 300 metres around each of the monuments. A heritage resource management plan needs
to be prepared for the town that can address physical and heritage tourism development for the town.

The Master plan proposed development of 234ha of area, accounting for 19.5%

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Table 5.1: Land use existing and proposed (Mandav Master Plan, 2011)

S.No.

Land Use

Present (1999)

1
2
3
4

Residential
Commercial
Industrial
PSP

10.08
5.12
1.12
14.85

18.33
9.31
2.03
27.00

5
6
7

Public uses
Recreational
Toursim
related
premises
Transportation
and others

1.00
2.00
0

1.82
3.64
0

0.14
0.29
0

2.0
57.5
38.0

0.9
24.6
16.2

0.17
4.79
3.17

20.83

37.87

2.98

45.0

19.2

3.75

55

100

7.86

234

100

19.5

Total

Proposed (2011)

Land
Use/Utilization
%
1.44
0.73
0.16
2.12

Area

Area

55.0
10.0
0.5
26.0

23.5
4.3
0.2
11.1

Land Use/
Utilization
%
4.58
0.83
0.04
2.17

UDPFI Standards
(%)

50 to 55
2 to 3
3 to 4
8 to 10
15 to 18

5 to 6 for trans; 8
to 10 for
ecological uses

The Master Plan proposes that the developed area in the town should be increased by nearly 4 times from
55ha in 1999 to 234ha in 2011. Compared to standards, residential land use under the 1999 land use and
proposed land use for 2011, both were lower than standards (although the area under proposed residential
use is proposed to increase from 10ha to 55ha under proposed Master plan). It is recommended under the
CDP that area under residential land use in the town be increased and the existing housing stock be upgraded.
Area under commercial land use is higher than standards; even this can be considered justified as Mandav is a
tourist destination. The proposed land use for 2011 suggested that the land use under commercial be
increased from 5ha to 10ha. This is recommended as the area catering to tourists in Mandav is low. Area under
industries is extremely low (@2.03% in 1999 and proposed to reduce to 0.02% under Master plan, 2011). This
is also not recommended. It is proposed that the area under industrial should be retained at around 4% but it
should be made sure that the industries set up in Mandav are only HH indusitres/ Laghu udyog/ SSIs. No large
scale industries should be permitted, except tourism. Area under PSP and public uses is high (@27% in 1999
and 11.1% in 2011). It is proposed that atleast 11% area (12 ha; as proposed under Master plan) should be
retained under this use. Area under Traffic and others is high in Mandav (@20.83ha in 1999 and proposed to
be increased to 45ha under Master Plan). This could be due to the high percentage of land under ponds and
other uses. Since Mandav is a hilly region, it is proposed that the area under greens, forests and ponds should
be marked separately and should be conserved and increased. Area under monuments has been clearly
demarcated under the proposed Master plan and should continue to be considered as a separate category.
The proposed Master Plan also suggests that nearly 16ha area be brought under tourism related activities. This
is recommended under the CDP.

38

City Development Plan for Mandav


M
Figure 5.6: Land use break up (Mandav Master Plan, 2011)

Transportati
on and
others
19%
Toursim
related
premises
16%

Residential
24%

Recreational
25%

PSP
11%

Commerccial
4%
Industrial
0%

Public uses
1%

ng Municipal wards, Municipal Boundary and /investment area bo


oundary
Figure 5.7: Map showin
(as identified under Proposed Master Plan)

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2013

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Figure 5.8: Existing Land use Map of Mandav


Source: Based on Preliminary surveys, Nov. 2011 and Master Plan Mandav

5.6 Housing Scenario


Most of the houses lie within the 100/300m circle around monuments and hence, are Kuchcha houses and are
not permitted to be made pukka. There are no Housing Board colonies or colonies made by private developers.
Houses near and along the road are often mostly semi pukka houses but DUs in the interiors and in villages are
entirely kuccha houses. Houses close to the town core are made of bamboo or stone structure with mud.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Houses in villages are made of bamboo and thatch. According to the NP, there are a total of about 1500
houses in the town out of which about 100 are pukka and 1400 are kuccha. It is important that the character
of these traditional houses be understood and in any in-situ upgradation schemes it is ensured that the
character is not lost. Consultations with villagers suggested that they want to continue living at the same spot
and only want the structure of the house to be made pukka.

The number of properties on which property tax is levied are 58 in number, while properties on which Samekit
Kar or Integrated Tax is levied are 403 in number, as per a survey undertaken in 1997-98. The ward wise
distribution of these properties is listed in Table 5.1.
Table 5.2: Ward wise distribution of properties on which tax is levied

Ward
No
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
Total

No. of properties on
which Property Tax is
levied
20
2
3
18
11
1
3
58

No. of properties on
which Integrated Tax is
levied
96
30
71
88
115
1
3
404

Source: NP, Mandav

The above table reflects that the properties on which property or integrated taxes are levied are essentially
within Ward 1 to 5 as only these wards are largely urban in character and are provided services by NP. Other
wards have scattered population which is largely in the form of villages and NP does not provide any service to
these areas, except water supply.

5.7 Present and Future Housing Demand


The current population of 10,659 is divided into 1821 households. The current number of DUs in the NP
boundary is 1500, reflecting a clear shortage of 321 DUs. Also, since the number of pucca houses is only 100,
the actual housing shortage at present is 1721. The shortage can be attributed to the fact that getting
permission for new housing construction within the NP boundary is an issue. Also, any new construction work
is stopped by ASI as soon as red soil is found during excavation. The future demand as per the projected
population is stated in Table 5.8.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Table 5.3: Housing demand for Mandav till 2035

Year
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035

Population
11689
13106
14682
16439
18400

HHs
1997
2239
2508
2809
3144

Actual Housing Shortage


1897
2139
2408
2709
3044

As can be seen from the table above, the absolute housing shortage in Mandav would be 3044 DUs by 2035. In
terms of meeting this housing shortage, a few considerations have to be made

Most residents want insitu redevelopment and infrastructure provision for their DUs
The DUs should be only G/G+1
The DUs for villagers should also be based on insitu redevelopment
Since construction of fresh DUs is suspended by ASI when excavation for foundations hits red soil;
alternate construction technologies should be used to ensure that the foundations donot require
much excavation and alternate means of construction like high plinth, etc should be promoted.

5.8 Illegal Colonies


The slum near Jami Masjid is unauthorized and needs to be removed as per ASI regulations. Encroachments on
forest land are also increasing and should be removed. Forest land is being cleared for construction of houses
and farms, a practice that needs to be stopped.

5.9 Future growth Possibilities


If local tourism in the town can be promoted, there is a possibility of influx of population to Mandav in search
of livelihood opportunities. Besides this, in order to develop the tourism potential of the town, more hotels,
recreational, commercial areas and gardens need to be developed. In terms of growth corridors, the Jahaz
Mahal road culminates at Jahaz Mahal and not much development can take place along this road. Only a few
vacant plots along this road can be developed as hotels or recreational areas. Roopmati road offers some
potential for development and Neelkanth road provides connectivity to Maharashtra. Some development is
already taking place along the Roopmati road; but owing to the difficult terrain, presence of Sagar pond and
presence of Roopmati Mahal and Baaz Bahadur Mahal along this road, only limited development can take
place along this road. Residential development can take place in Kalakot.

The town is on the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List and has the potential of being declared a World
Heritage Site, though the nomination can go through only if there is a strong management plan in place. As the
current NP boundary is the same as the limit of the historical hill fort of Mandavgarh, there is a need for a
cautious approach for any further development across the NP area. Any initiatives towards the growth of the
town must address the fact that the town has layers of history under it that may be a rich source of
archaeological evidence for the country and the region.

Hence, it is proposed that in case of Mandav, instead of developing new lands, the focus should be on
potential upgradation of existing fabric, where possible (where the fabric is outside the 100/300m circle). Any

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

new constructions should be made such that they donot disturb the layers of history which lay embedded in
the soil.

5.10 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan

Upgradation of existing structures

Insitu upgradation of dwellings

Decentralized development whereby, the villagers are provided DUs within the village, instead of
developing group housing clusters for all villagers

Alternate construction tech technologies should be adopted that can reduce excavation for foundations.

Master plan for the town could not be implemented. Hence, during first phase, emphasis should be laid on
reviving the existing properties and utilizing them to their full potential and during 2

nd

phase, new

constructions can be considered.

Topographic survey of the town is needed on an urgent basis

Action Plan

Land use to be compatible with guidelines in the Integrated Heritage Resource Management Plan (IHRMP)
for Mandav.

Planning area/Investment Area to be revised as per proposal in CDP.

Removal of encroachments that are negatively affecting the cultural and natural resources.

Clear demarcation of forest land.

Land ownership and use to be mapped and integrated with GIS database.

Master Plan to demarkate zones (Core area, Modular development Zone, NP area, Heritage zone, Tourist
zones).

Development of Dharamshala.

Redevelopment of NP Raen Basera as Hotel based on decentralized / distributed hotel concept.

NP and MP Tourism to be given permission to extend activities in Revenue Land.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

CHAPTER 6: WATER SUPPLY


6.1 Existing water supply system
Water supply to the town is from Sagar Talab located on the Roopmati Road. Water from Sagar Talab is
pumped to a WTP that has a capacity of 2.5 lakh litres (0.25 MLD). From the WTP, water is pumped to a 3 lakh
litre capacity OHT that is 30 years old and from here, water is supplied to the town through a municipal piped
supply system. When Sagar Talab dries out in March, water is drawn from the Mallipura Talab (a man made
pond at the foothills of Mandav) through a 20 year old water pipeline or through water tankers. Mallipura
pond is used for supply only during summers.

During second stakeholder consultation, it was pointed out by the stakeholders that the OHT is becoming
structurally weak and needs replacement. Even the WTP is not functional now and the water quality supplied
by the NP is poor. Water is supplied to the villages by water tankers but the villagers in some cases even resort
to sending the tanker back as the water is insufficient to cater to their demands.

6.2 Quality and quantity of water at source


2.5 lakh litres water is abstracted from Sagar Talab on a daily basis for distribution. From here, water is
pumped to the OHT (3 lakh litre; WTP not functional). Water is supplied only to the core city through pipelines.
Water to tribal areas is supplied through tankers on alternate days. Apart from this, 26 tubewells have also
been provided by the NP but owing to the terrain, most hand pumps dry out during summers. Some wells are
also located in the town.

There are a number of small ponds, water from which is used directly by the residents around for irrigation
and other purposes. Some tribal residents, also have private bores. Due to a drop in rainfall and siltation, the
ponds do not hold as much water as before. The ponds have undergone siltation over a period of time.
Another key concern is that for the winter crop, water from Sagar talab is used for irrigation and hence, the
talab dries out around February/March. Siltation of Sagar Talab, deforestation in its catchment area and
construction on drainage channels to the talab is leading to reduced retention capacity of the pond.

6.3 Quality and quantity of water in distribution system


As per the information provided by NP, the water supplied is 100 lpcd. But according to calculations, since 2.5
lakh litre water is supplied to 10659 persons, the per capita supply comes out to be 23.45 lpcd. Nearly half of
the tribal population (3490 @50% of 6980) is supplied water on alternate days; the NP is only able to supply
water to 67% of the total population on a daily basis. This is much lower than the per capita supply as per
standards.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

It was also reported that the quality of water supplied is poor because the WTP is not functional and hence,
better storage and treatment facilities need to be provided for the town. For the tribal areas, water tankers.
The tribal areas are supplied water through tankers which are filled from Sagar Talab.

6.4 Water supply connections


There are about 306 individual water supply connections in Mandav. This indicates a coverage of only 16.8%.
This is extremely low. It should also be noted that the nearly 65% of the town population lives in the forests
and villages and is not provided with any water supply connections at all. Apart from this, the town also has 26

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City Development Plan for Mandav

hand pumps. The villages and slum areas are not provided with water supply connections but handpumps in
and near these villages have been provided.

6.5 Other sources and Water Resources in and around the town
Bore wells are not viable because of the hilly terrain but in remote tribal areas within the NP boundary, people
are dependent on natural waterfalls, ponds and bore wells for water requirements. The main source of water
in the town is ponds: Sagar Talab and Malipura pond. There are 17 ponds that are under the NP, Mandav.
Ponds in the town, including Sagar talab and Mallipura are also used for irrigation and pisciculture. All the
ponds are presently suffering from siltation, deforestation in the catchment area and blockage of drainage
channels which lead to the ponds. Hence the water retention capacity of these ponds has gone down
significantly.

There are a number of ponds in and around the town. Some of the main ones are Sagar Talab, Lamba Talab,
Munj Talab, Kapoor Talab, Ek Khamba Talab, Samad Talab, Suraj Talab and Singori Talab, while there are many
more small ones within the NP boundary. The town also has historic stepwells and kunds such as Champa
Baori, Andhera and Ujala Baori and Rewa Kund (with water lift to supply water to the palace of Baz Bahadur).

During second stakeholder consultation and interviews with villagers, it was emphasized by the citizens that
there is a strong need for Desiltation of ponds. At the same time, it was also pointed out that funding for
desiltation of ponds has been sanctioned several times but the work has still not been started. The
stakeholders also emphasized the need to revive the catchment area of the ponds and revive drainage
channels to the ponds. The fishermen community pointed out that due to siltation, the ponds only retain
water for 5 to 6 months. The fishermen introduce fish eggs in the ponds which take upto 4 months to mature
and hence, the fishermen can only earn through fishing for 2 months a year; fishing used to be their main
occupation earlier. Now, they have to go to neighbouring towns to work as daily wage workers. The
stakeholders also pointed out that since rainfall in the region is on a decline, water supply to the town can be
sourced from Narmada and all the ponds can be used for irrigation. The Mandav Master Plan lists 22 water
bodies in the Planning Area, covering an area of 87 hectares (3.38% of the Planning Area), of which 7 are
manmade while the remaining are natural.

6.6 Water Distribution Arrangements


Water is supplied to the core town through piped supply but is supplied to the 7 villages in the peripheral area
through tankers on alternate days. Water from Sagar Talab (and Malipura talab during summers) is pumped to
the OHT on Neelkanth road through the water supply mains. From here, water is supplied to the town under
gravity. But this supply is largely confined to Ward 1 to 5. Other wards are supplied by tanker on alternated
days. The tankers are filled with water from the Sagar Talab via OHT. The NP has 1 tanker with a capacity of
5000 litres each that undertakes 3 to 4 rounds per day. The OHT is very old and is becoming structurally weak,
hence a new OHT is required. Additionally, more OHTs need to be provided for the tribal areas. One OHT can

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

be provided near Jahaz Mahal; more OHTs can be


provided for peripheral areas. Water supply lines
were laid in the villages around 20 yrs ago but
were never connected to the mains. These
pipelines need to be connected to the source and
repaired.

6.7 Internal Distribution Networks


The internal distribution network of the town is
characterized by the mains which lead to the
distributors. The main line is 1800 metres long with

Some peripheral settlements within the NP area are dependent


on hand-pumps for water

varying dia of around 150mm. It can be said that


the internal network in the streets is haphazardly laid and indicates incremental addition.

Table 6.1: Distribution System across the town

S.No.
1
2

Line
Water supply Mains
Jahaz Mahal, Dhar road, Neel,
Lal bangla road

Road/Area Name
Roopmati road

Length (m)
1800m

Diameter (mm)
150mm
4,3,2 inch

6.8 Water treatment facilities


The town has a WTP with capacity of 3 lakh litres (0.3 MLD). But this WTP is very old and is not functional now.
A proposal report for repair and expansion of the tank has been sent to Dhar. The water is only bleached and
supplied and does not undergo appropriate treatment, resulting in poor quality of water supplied.

Water Quality Testing


Water quality testing report for Mandav shows that ground nd surface water before filtration showed
presence of Calcium and Magnesium Hardness (higher in groundwater), high turbidity, high TDS, high alkalinity
and very high amount of Faecal and Total Coliform Count (above standards). Hence, it is proposed that small
filtration plants be distributed to all HHs. Since hardness is lower in surface water, ponds to capture rain water
and collect surface water should be constructed and should be used as a source of water for the town.

6.9 Comparative analysis with UDPFI, CPHEEO guidelines and Present and Future Demand and
Supply Gaps
As per UDPFI guidelines, the minimum supply for small towns in 70 lpcd and desirable supply is 100 lpcd for
domestic purposes (with additional supply for other uses). The current supply to the town is inadequate at
23.45 lpcd and is lower than the absolute minimum standards. Hence, it is proposed that the town should be
supplied water @135 lpcd (including supply for other uses) for future demand. The town is presently supplied

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2.5 lakh litre of water but the present demand @70 lpcd (absolute minimum) is 7.5 lakh litre or 0.75 MLD
(@70 lpcd for 10,659 population) and the desirable value is 1.07 (@100 lpcd for 10,659 population) on basis of
the UDPFI guidelines.

For future projections, the water supply for Mandav has been projected @135lpcd till 2035. Since Mandav is a
prominent tourist destination, an additional 25% supply has been considered for water supply to tourists.

According to ASI data, nearly 7 lakh tourists visit Mandav each year. Assuming that nearly 70% of these visit
Mandav during the tourist season in Monsoons (July to September), nearly 4.9 lakh tourists visit Mandav over
3 months or 1.6 lakh/month. This can be interpreted as an additional 5444 or 5,500 persons per day in
addition to the town population. Hence, an additional 25% supply has been considered to meet the tourist
demand. Since most of these tourists wont be staying in Mandav for the entire day (as the carrying capacity
of Mandav in terms of tourist accommodation is limited and cannot be increased drastically due to
ecological and heritage constraints), a minimum of 60 lpcd can be considered for nearly 60% of the tourist
population. Based on these assumptions, an additional supply of 25% has been added to the total water
supply requirement for the town (provision of 135 lpcd for an additional 3000 persons in 2015 and so on).
Since it is being proposed that the tourist season be extended to attract more tourists to Mandav, although
the total tourist traffic to Mandav is proposed to increase in future, the per day tourist traffic is proposed to
remain stable in order to promote sustainable tourism without impacting the ecology of Mandav.
Table 6.2: Projected demand as per standards

2015

Projected
Population
11689

2020

13106

1.77

2.21

2025

14682

1.98

2.48

2030

16439

2.22

2.77

2035

18400

2.48

3.11

Year

Water requirement
@135 lpcd (MLD)
1.58

Additional 25% for tourists


(MLD)
1.97

Hence the town needs to be provided with 3.11 MLD water by 2035.

6.10 Water tariff


Water tariff in the town is charged at a flat rate of Rs. 30/month. Commercial users are charged at
approximately Rs.120/month. It is proposed that this charge be increased to Rs. 60/month for domestic users
but this hike is pending subject to NP Parishad approval.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

6.11 Status of Ground Water in the Region


As per the geohydrology map of Dhar
District from GSI, Mandav lies in the
area with depth of water table at 6
metre below surface. But owing to
the rocky terrain, the availability of
ground water is constrained. Hence,
ponds are the most feasible option at
present. But owing to the reducing
rainfall and high siltation levels, even
these ponds are drying out. According
to the NP Mandav, the water level of
Mandav is 100 metres/300 feet.

6.12 Water Supply Projects


A Water augmentation scheme for
water abstraction from Narmada has
been prepared and submitted by the
NP (not under UIDSSMT). Under the
scheme, water is to be taken from
Narmada River at Dharampuri (25km

Figure 6.1: Geohydrology map of Dhar District, Source: Geological Survey of


India

away). The scheme proposed by PHED


has an estimated cost of Rs 3 crores. The cost is high because there is a 1200 ft elevational difference between
Dharampuri and Mandav so the water would need to be pumped that high.

A scheme to supply water to Dhar from Narmada has been sanctioned recently at a cost of 25 Crores. During
the Second Stakeholder Consultation, the stakeholders proposed that provision of water supply to the town
through this network can also be considered.

6.13 Water supply scenario in peripheral villages


Site visits to some of the peripheral villages were undertaken
during February, 2012. The situation in these villages is
extremely poor w.r.t. infrastructural provision and needs
immediate attention
Tarapur village
The village does not have any water supply provisions. The

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City Development Plan for Mandav

only sources of water for the village are a hand pump in the
primary school, a pond and a well made in the pond bed. All of
these sources dry up around summers. The pond is presently
dry (Feb, 2012) and is being used for cultivation. A water
supply line from Sagar Talab to the village was laid around 20
years ago. This supply line needs to be repaired and revived
and immediate supply from Sagar talab needs to be initiated.
For

irrigation

purposes

desiltation

of

Tarapur

pond,

afforestation of its catchment and diverting the catchment runoff into the pond are required.

Sagar Village
The residents of this village are
primarily dependent on agriculture for
their livelihood and owing to lack of
irrigation facilities, these people are
only able to grow one crop a year and
have to migrate to neighbouring towns
in search of work. These people mostly migrate to Rajasthan, Pithampura and Indore after summers to work as
construction labour. During summers, they work within Mandav as agricultural labour. The village is not
connected to the water supply network and has to rely on ponds and handpumps in nearby areas for drinking
water. The pond in Sagar village needs to be desilted and another pond can be constructed on the drainage
channels in the area

Songarh Village
Residents of Songarh village have to commute approximately 2 km to get water from the school handpump at
Tarapur gate. During summers, they have to commute
uphill even further, upto NP to get water from baories and
other sources. Songarh village pond needs to be revived

Jhabri village
This village suffers from extreme water scarcity. The
village used to have a pond which does not retain much
water now owing to siltation and diversion of drainage
channel to the pond. The catchment area of the pond has

Village kund, Tipkiya talab being used for cultivation


and Tipkiya Gufa

also been deforested. Hence, the villagers now have to


depend on Tipkiya gufa, where water seepage water from the rocks collects and is used by the villagers. The
gufa is located along a valley and is accessible through a kuccha and dangerous pathway which overlooks a
valley. The area around Jahbri village has only 1 kund which has been specifically kept out of bounds for

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

irrigation to ensure availability of drinking water during summers. But water in this kund is also polluted and
people also use this kund for bathing and washing. A nallah from the middle of pond in Jhabri village drains
into the valley near Tipkiya talab. The village does not have a pukka access road

6.14 SWOT Analysis


Strengths
There are a number of existing ponds
in the town that are a source of water
for drinking, irrigation, pisciculture
and other uses.
Topography results in high runoff
generation
The town has a number of historic
baoris (stepwells ) and some kunds
Existing Sagar talab and Malipura
talab

Opportunities
Appropriate watershed management
is required with conservation of
catchment areas of the ponds
Desiltation and revival of ponds
including Sagar Talab
More ponds can be constructed in the
valley area
Afforestation,
incl.
afforestation
around ponds
Sourcing water from Narmada River
Provision of new OHTs, WTP and
distribution lines

Weaknesses
The forest cover is depleting, leading to siltation of ponds
Water levels in baoris and kunds need to be revived
Peripheral wards are not connected to the water supply
network. These areas are supplied by water tankers that
lead to high fuel consumption and air pollution
Land availability for pond construction is limited in and
around the main town. Valleys have scope for
development of ponds.
High pumping costs for water supply from Narmada
WTP and OHT are old and defunct. More OHTs are
required to supply water to the entire NP area
Poor quality of water being supplied
Extremely poor condition of water supply in peripheral
areas
Threats
Deforestation causing siltation and drying of ponds
Climate change low rainfall causing scarcity of water

6.15 Issues

Sagar Talab is the main source of water supply to the town and continued abstraction for water supply
and irrigation has led to drying of the pond. Hence, an alternate supply for future is required.

Extremely low per capita supply @23.45 lpcd. Water supplied only to 67% of the town population on a
daily basis.

The peripheral villages live in extreme water scarcity and have to resort to drinking water from extremely
unhygienic kunds, dig wells or travel to Tipkiya gufa to get water. Ponds and wells in the peripheral
villages need to be revived on priority basis

Only 16.8% of the town population is connected to the piped supply network.

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2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Peripheral areas with predominant rural character are served by tankers, which in turn, leads to heavy
expenditure on transportation, fuel consumption and air pollution. The villagers emphasized provision of
water through direct supply from Sagar talab on a priority basis.

Existing WTP and OHT are old and in poor condition.

Ground water abstraction is not viable environmentally and economically.

Existing ponds, kunds and baories are suffering from issues such as siltation, eutrophication and pollution.
Desiltation of ponds has been approved several times but no work has been undertaken.

WTP not functional; hence, quality of water supplied by NP is poor. Presently water is being supplied after
bleaching only.

Desiltation of ponds has been proposed many times but no action has been taken so far.

6.16 City specific strategies and action plan

New WTP and new OHT needed on priority basis

Existing ponds might not be able to provide ample water to meet future requirements, especially due to
reduction in rainfall. Direct supply from Narmada can be considered.

A scheme to supply water to Dhar from Narmada has been sanctioned at a cost of 25 Crores. Mandav can
be linked to this scheme.

Ponds need to be revived through desiltation, conservation of catchment area and reviving drainage
channels to the pond.

Ponds in the town can be reserved for irrigational purposes, water supply to villages and for tourism
purposes.

Village areas should be provided with water supply lines from Sagar talab on priority basis.

More OHTs need to be provided for the town. One OHT can be provided near Jahaz Mahal and one near
Chisti complex (close to Mallipura dam) on Dhar road; more OHTs can be provided for tribal areas

Revival and desiltation of ponds is needed, including Sagar Talab. The silt can be used in agricultural fields
to improve soil depth.

More Ponds can be developed in the valley areas like Jamia Phata from where water can be pumped to
Sagar Talab. Potential for pond construction can also be explored near Neelkanth Mandir and Jamnia
nallah. Another pond can be constructed at Maratha Nallah on Jahangirpuri road (big pond can be made
at this site; can serve at least 5 villages). Forest land in Mandav has many nallahs on which ponds can be
constructed. Construction of check dams needs to be avoided.

Drip irrigation to be introduced to reduce irrigation demand and hence, reduce pressure on water
resources.

Revival of Tarapur pond, pond in Sagar village, Jhabri village pond, Songarh pond and Kaldipura pond. A
pond can be constructed near the Jamnia nallah.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Action Plan

Water supply from multiple sources

Water supply from Narmada (Directly or to be included under Dhar water supply scheme)

Prohibition of use of water from Sagar and Mallipura Talab for irrigation

WTP

Feasibility study with focus on Environment to study potential for drawing water from Reva Kund near
Jamnia and from Sakalda Pond

OHT based water supply

Existing mains to be relaid or expanded

Mapping of all existing and proposed supply pipelines and linking to GIS database

Catchment conservation and revival of Karam River

Catchment conservation of all lakes and ponds

Provision of drinking water points in public areas and peripheral hamlets/clusters

Large scale propagation of Rain Water Harvesting

DPR for rain water harvesting, recharging ground water through infiltration ponds and revival of wells and
baories

Wells and baories to be revived

Feasibility study for construction of small check dam at Jhabri

Provision of hand pumps with overhead storage in all villages @ 3 handpumps per village

Provision of handpumos with overhead storage tanks in all Schools, PHC and institutional buildings

Development of identified existing ponds infiltration ponds/ recharge basins

DPR for water supply network and topography based supply zones

Awareness generation for water conservation, rain water harvesting, prevention of water pollution

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2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

CHAPTER 7: SEWERAGE
7.1 Existing sewerage system
There is no underground sewerage system in Mandav. The
town has 2000 mts of open drains. Since the town population
is low, the drains dry out by the time they reach the forests.
Hence, wastewater percolates into the ground. Only during
monsoons, wastewater from houses finds its way into the
forests.

Wastewater in the town flows through a network of open


drains and these drains are atleast 3 to 5ft deep at some places. These drains are around 20cm to 1ft wide and
the network is entirely open. The ULB and stakeholder consultations revealed that there is a need to cover
these drains on priority basis. Cases of vehicles getting stuck in teh drains and people getting hurt by falling

into these drains were common. Most houses in the town donot have HH toilets and the ones with toilets
generally have septic tanks.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

7.2 Means of sewage disposal


Wastewater from households is drained into the road side drains which empty into the open drains, from
where wastewater flows into nallahs and ultimately into forest areas. For cleaning of septic tanks in the town,
the Nagar Parishad Mandav takes vaccum emptying tank on hire from M. C. Dhar as and when required. The
Nagar Parishad charges Rs 500 per tank cleaning. It is reported that there are 5 to 10 calls every month on an
average, pointing to the cleaning of less than 100 septic tanks in one year. Information of manual cleaning of
septic tanks by the households themselves is not available. The sullage collected from the tanks is disposed
without any treatment (Integrated Low Cost Sanitation Scheme for Mandav, UADD; 2010/11).

The villages have not even been provided with a drainage network. The villages are characterized by a small
cluster of kuccha houses with no toilet facilities. Most of the villagers resort to open defecation and
wastewater from these households drains along natural flow paths in the forest and farmlands.

7.3 Comparative analysis with UDPFI, CPHEEO guidelines and Present and Future Demand and
Supply Gaps
UDPFI and CPHEEO guidelines propose sewage generation @75-80% of the water supply to the town. Since
there is no measure of actual sewage generation in the city, these standards have been used for estimating
sewage generation in Mandav. The demand has been calculated for the projected population up to 2035,
including tourist population that is taken as 25% of the resident population.

The total water requirement for the town has been estimated at 3.11 MLD by 2035 (including additional 25%
requirement for tourists). Considering that wastewater generation is nearly 75% of the total water
consumption, the total wastewater generation for the town till 2035 can be estimated at 2.33 MLD.
Table 7.1: Wastewater generation for the town by 2035

Year
2015

Population
11689

Water requirement
@135lpcd (MLD)
1.58

Additional 25% for


tourists (MLD)
1.97

Sewage generation (MLD)


@75%
1.48

2020

13106

1.77

2.21

1.66

2025

14682

1.98

2.48

1.86

2030

16439

2.22

2.77

2.08

18400
2.48
3.11
2.33
2035
Since wastewater generation in the core town would be around 1 MLD only and the remaining would be
confined to villages spread across the forests, it is proposed that decentralized wastewater treatment facilities
should also be considered because of the decentralized nature of settlement as well as low wastewater
generation (STPs require 8 to 10 MLD wastewater generation for efficient working).

7.4 SWOT Analysis


Strengths
Low wastewater generation
Scheme for Integrated Low Cost

Weaknesses
Combined network for sewage and storm water
No sewerage network and treatment plant

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2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Sanitation has been approved

Opportunities
Scope for decentralised waste water
Treatment
Open drains to be covered
Provision of public toilets

Open drains are large enough to carry storm water


runoff from the mountains but lead to injuries and
problem for vehicular traffic
Sewage emptying into forests
Clogging of drains as they are open
Threats
Contamination of runoff flowing through open drains
Can cause pollution in the forest areas
Shortage of toilet facilities would impact sanitation
levels in forest areas

7.5 Issues

Large open drains which are a hazard for the public and also a source of foul odour.
No sewage network
Decentralized nature of settlement, especially in villages
No wastewater treatment facility

7.6 City specific strategies and Action Plan

The town requires a system of decentralized waste water treatment.

Decentralized wastewater treatment facility needed for core town on immediate basis

Diverting existing nallahs into the treatment plant in the short term and provision of sewerage network in
the long run.

Reuse of treated waste water must be carried out.

There is a need for provision of separate storm water and waste water network.

Action Plan

Diverting sewage to decentralised sewage treatment System

Provision of grating over the drains

Decentralized wastewater treatment

Reuse of treated wastewater

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

CHAPTER 8: SANITATION
8.1 Existing sanitation system
Most of the houses in the town are kuccha and donot have a toilet facility. The houses which have toilet
facilities are connected to the road side drains and wastewater empties into open drains which flow across the
town and empty into the forest area. Data from Nagriya Swacchta Sarvekshan, 2008 shows that only 16% of
the HHs have toilets and only 12% of the population has access to public toilets. Hence, nearly 88% of the town
population resorts to open defecation in farms and forests. Toilet facilities for tourists are also a key concern
and need to be provided on an immediate basis.

8.2 Household toilets (Dry Latrines and Flush latrines)


Most of the HHs in the town donot have toilets and people have to resort to open defecation. Toilet facilities
for tourists are extremely limited considering the fact that the town is visited by nearly 7 lakh tourists per year.
Data based on Nagriya Swacchta Sarvekshan, 2008 shows that nearly 16% of HHs have HH toilets and only 12%
have access to public toilet. The willingness to pay for toilet facilities was only 5% but the willingness to
maintain post construction was relatively higher at 42%. For more than 1500 HHs in 2008, the town only had
170 septic tanks (68%) and nearly 31% resort to open defecation. Nearly 58.5% showed preference for a HH
toilet whereas 41% showed preference for a public toilet facility.

The current sanitation alternatives in Mandav slum area essentially comprise of individual pour-flush latrines
and to a much lesser extent, public latrine blocks. Most houses do not have toilets. Residents who do not have
access to individual or community/public toilets, resort to open defecation (Source: Integrated Low Cost
Sanitation Scheme for Mandav).

8.3 Public toilets


There is only 1 public latrine block but the present condition suggests that public toilets are not successful in
the town due to lack of maintenance and ownership. There is a lack of adequate toilet facilities at public places
like bus stand, due to which people are forced to defecate or urinate in the open. Mandav being a heritage
tourist destination, the number of visitors is roughly estimated to be 1000-2500 per day during peak season.
Hence, it is imperative that hygienic and adequate public conveniences be provided for maintaining overall
sanitation levels in the town.

Besides public toilets, NP has also installed around 2 to 3 mobile toilet units across the main town. These are
used at present but lack proper drainage facilities, lighting and water provision. Wastewater from these toilets
also empties in the open areas. Community toilets for villages are also needed on priority basis.

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8.4 Present Shortage and Projected Demand


The town presently has around 175 HH toilets (NP, 2012). Considering that currently the town has 1821 HHs,
the current shortage is of 1646 HH toilets. By 2035, the total HHs in the town would be around 3144, leading
to an absolute shortage of nearly 2969 HH toilets.
Table 8.1: Projected shortage of HH toilets

Year
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035

Population
11689
13106
14682
16439
18400

HHs
1997
2239
2508
2809
3144

HH toilets
175

HH toilet shortage
1822
2064
2333
2634
2969

Special emphasis should be laid on provision of HH toilets and community toilets in village areas. Provision of
HH toilets in public places is also needed on priority basis.

Septage Management
Septage management is needed on an urgent basis in the town. A considerable proportion of households
depend on on-site sanitation facilities and their construction, regular cleaning, and safe disposal of septage
remain haphazard. The septage is let out untreated which harms the health and environment of the town. It is
most likely for the number of septic tanks to increase in the town , hence a separate policy or regulation for
septage management is required for the town.

For effective Septage Management Plan, data on septage arrangements, their quantity and locations of its
generation etc. are required. The ULBs would need to make arrangements to collect baseline data type of
latrine disposal, effluent disposal arrangement, size, age, when it was last cleaned, availability of access,
arrangement for disposal of effluent if any) of existing installations, to plan for workable desludging schedules.
It is advisable to divide the town into different sanitary zones and carry out the baseline survey in one or a few
of these zones, pilot desludging schedules by area to learn operational issues and devise solutions, before
upscaling to the entire ULB. The selection of zone could be based on availability of septage disposal sites
existing STPs could be potential septage disposal/application sites or trenches provided in solid waste landfill
sites or suitable urban forestry sites where the septage trenches would serve to fertilize the plants. In order to
be economical and financially competitive, it is suggested that households in demarcated septage
management zone should be within 5 kms travel distance from identified treatment and disposal sites.

8.5 Sanitation projects


An Integrated Low Cost Sanitation Scheme (ILCS) has been proposed for the town. The proposal has been
sanctioned by the government but is yet to be implemented. The project construction period is one year from
the date of sanction. The project proposes provision of community toilets, 4 public toilets for tourists, 994
household toilets with twin pit pour flush disposal technique across the 15 wards of the town and
construction of drains (4500 mts across 5 slum wards) in the project area.

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The name of the scheme is Achieving Open Defecation Free status in Mandav Municipal Area. The nodal
agency for the project is Urban Administration and Development Department (UADD), Govt. of Madhya
Pradesh and the implementing agency is Nagar Parishad, Mandav. The project cost is Rs. 114.31 lakhs, for the
994 units proposed. The funding pattern for the project is:

Central Grants: Rs 86.975 lakhs

State Grants: Rs. 17.395 lakhs

Beneficiary contribution: Rs 9.94 lakhs

Considering a total demand for 2969HH toilets by 2035, the town needs to be provided with an additional
1975 HH toilets, over and above those proposed under Integrated Low Cost Sanitation Scheme.

8.6 SWOT Analysis


Strengths
Low population concentration, hence low
waste and wastewater generation in core area

Opportunities
Provision of public toilets for tourists
Provision of community toilets in villages to be
taken up on priority basis
Provision of adequate sanitation infrastructure
to cater to the demands of tourists
Provision of HH toilets
Short term measures to control the flow of
sewage into the drainage network
Using successful models for maintenance and
management of community and public toilets

Weaknesses
Defecation along open drains
Shortage of community toilets
Existing public toilets are poorly maintained
Toilet facilities for tourists are needed
Only 9.6% HHs have toilets
Villages dont even have community toilets and
have to resort to open defecation
Threats
Pollution of soil and water from septic tank
overflow and open defecation
Failure to develop the town as a tourist
destination due to poor sanitation

8.7 Issues

Unlined drains and nallahs lead to percolation of sewage and hence, cause groundwater contamination.

Open drains are prone to clogging due to garbage dumping.

Shortage of public toilet facilities for tourists

Mobile toilets not used properly due to lack of proper drainage, water and electricity

No community toilets available for villagers

No public toilets at bus stands and important tourist places

Public and community toilets are poorly maintained.

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8.8 City specific strategies and Action Plan

Provision of community toilets in villages on a priority basis

Provision of public toilets for tourists on priority basis. These public toilets should be operated on pay and
use basis to ensure maintenance

Existing public toilet needs to be maintained and managed properly using successful models.

Sewage discharge into open drains needs to be diverted in the short term.

Proposed project for sanitation needs to be implemented to eliminate open defecation.

Action Plan

Provision of HH toilets

Provision of Community toilets (Can be provided along the lines of Deluxe Toilets: Build, Operate and
Transfer basis). Mobile toilets can also be provided

Provision of Modular deluxe toilets / Mobile Toilets

Decentralized wastewater treatment facility

DPR for Decentralized wastewater treatment facility

Development and implementation of a Septage Management Plan

Generation of awareness towards sanitation

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CHAPTER 9: SOLID WA STE MANAGEMENT


9.1 Quantity of Waste Generated
According to the sanitation department of Nagar Parishad Mandav, 2 MT domestic solid waste is generated
daily. According to the NP, of this, around 3 quintals or 0.15 MT of waste is collected from the drains and taken
to the trenching ground. This gives a per capita waste generation of 188 g/capita/day. Considering the fact that
presently waste is collected only from 10 wards and the villagers in the remaining wards dispose their waste
themselves in nearby areas, 2 MT waste is being generated by 7093 persons (66% of total population). Hence,
the per capita waste generation comes out to be approximately 282/capita/day which is reasonable. According
to estimates, the per capita waste generation can more than double during tourist season.

The collection efficiency according to the NP was 100% but this collection is confined only to the urban wards.
Hence, the overall collection efficiency of the NP can be estimated at 66% @2 MT collection from 10 wards. As
per 2001 data available from the Report on Integrated Low Cost Sanitation Scheme for Mandav, (UADD) only
0.5 MT of solid waste was collected per day; which indicates a collection efficiency of 16.66%. Hence, the
collection efficiency of the NP has increased over the decade.

Waste is usually collected via the door to door service along the main spines. In internal areas, some open
dumping is also practiced. Villagers dispose off their waste in the forest areas.

9.2 Constituents of municipal waste


No surveys or studies have been undertaken to assess the actual waste composition of the city. But it is likely
that the waste would be rich in compostable material and recyclable material.

9.3 Current practices of Solid waste management and Vehicles for solid waste collection and
Transportation
Free door to door collection facility was started in the town two years ago across Ward 1 to 10 and has
improved the sanitation levels along the core areas. Door to door collection is carried out through 6 hand carts
and 1 door to door collection vehicle (door to door collection vehicle is used for collection along main road)
from properties along main roads and in the evening through 2 cycle rickshaws collect waste from properties
along internal roads. A total of 15 sanitary staff members are employed with the NP. The remaining 5 wards
are not covered under the collection system. Two tractor trolleys with a total capacity of 1000 Kg carry the
collected waste to the trenching ground. No attempts have been made towards composting of waste.
As per the Report on Integrated Low Cost Sanitation Scheme for Mandav (2001), a household survey
presented a bleak picture of the solid waste management chain, at the primary collection and transfer end.
Analysis of responses from 2100 households (across the 15 wards) indicated that a bulk (91%) of the
households disposed garbage in the open or in drains. Only a small proportion of households practiced proper
disposal in solid waste bins (a little over 8%) or door to door pickup (less than 10%). Ward wise data analysis

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indicated that the use of solid waste bins for garbage disposal was well practiced only in 2 municipal wards
where more than 2/3

rd

households reportedly used municipal solid waste bin. In contrast, nearly 22%

households in two wards disposed garbage in drains (Source: Report for Integrated Low Cost Sanitation
Scheme for Mandav, 2001). According to Nagriya Swacchta Sarvekshan, 2008; nearly 84% of the total
population resorted to open dumping whereas only 15% resorted to waste disposal in bins. In most of the
cases, the distance of dumping ground was 50 to 100 ft from the HH. Nearly 73% residents reported that waste
is not collected from their premises by the NP. Hence, it can be said that the SWM scenario in the town has
improved considerably since 2001 and 2008, as presently waste is being collected from nearly 66% HHs.
Waste dumping near water bodies was not significant. But waste disposal in the open and in forest areas is a
common practice for the villagers.

9.4 Waste storage & segregation


Waste is not usually stored since door to door collection started. The waste is handed over to the Municipal
van in wards 1 to 10 from where the vehicles/handcarts carry it to the tractor/trolley and this tractor/trolley
carries the waste to the dumping ground near Lohani caves, located 1km from the town.

9.5 Primary and secondary collection


Free door to door collection of solid waste is practiced in 10 wards of the town. Other than this Nagar Parishad
Mandav has 24 designated collection points from where waste is collected and transported. The waste is
collected by handcarts and door to door collection vehicle from where it is transferred to the tractors and
trolleys which carry the waste to the dumping ground.

9.6 Processing and disposal


No processing of the solid waste is undertaken currently. The garbage is dumped at designated trenching
ground in Ward no. 3, ahead of Dhoop Baodi near Lohani Caves. Presently the waste is spread over a large area
and mars the scenic beauty of the area, which is located close to Lohani caves, a tourist attraction. The
location of the trenching ground close to the baodi and the historic caves is an issue because it can cause
water pollution and is a deterrent for tourists who come to see the caves.
A new trenching ground is proposed to be developed close to this dumping ground, near Lohani caves. Land
for this has been transferred to NP by the State government. But since this proposed trenching ground is also
close to an area of tourist importance, the site needs to be relocated or provided an alternate location. The
new trenching ground should be developed as a sanitary landfill site with vermin composting facility.

9.7 Reuse and recycling


No reuse and recycling of solid waste is undertaken currently. Since the tourist traffic to Mandav is high, a
recycling plant should be set up in the town, especially for plastics.

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9.8 Estimation of waste collection


Though according to the NP, 100% waste collection is undertaken but since waste collection is presently being
undertaken only for 10 wards, the remaining villages are presently not covered. Hence, the collection
efficiency of the NP can be placed at approximately 66%.

9.9 Staff strength


As discussed, the NP has 15 sweepers who undertake waste collection and disposal for the town.

9.10 Comparative analysis with UDPFI, CPHEEO guidelines and Present and Future Demand and
Supply Gaps
As per UDPFI guidelines, waste generation in small towns is approximately 250g/capita/day and that for
medium towns is between 250 to 500g/cap/day. CPHEEO guidelines state waste generation for a small town
@250g/capita/day. According to this, the waste generation in Mandav is slightly higher than standards
@282g/capita/day. Waste generation for the town has been projected till 2035 based on the consideration
that waste generation would increase @1% years 5 years. Since Mandav is a predominant tourist town, an
additional 25% waste generation has been estimated for tourists. Since the waste composition for Mandav is
not known, it has been assumed that nearly 50% of the waste would comprise of organic waste which can be
composted and nearly 10% of the waste would comprise of recyclable material, especially plastics. Hence,
compost and recycling plant can be established in or around the town to reduce the waste to landfill. It is also
proposed that the trenching ground should be developed as a sanitary landfill site.

The town has already received a total of Rs 12.12 lakhs from the Govt. of India for solid waste management.
Table 9.1 : Projection of waste generated up to 2035

Per Capita Waste


Total waste
Total
Recyclable
generation
generation incl. Compostable
Waste to
waste
waste
Year Population (g/capita)@1%
waste generation waste (MT)
Landfill
generation
(MT)
increase in 5
due to tourist
@50%
(MT)
(MT)
@10%
years
traffic (@25%)
2015
11689
284.79
3.33
4.16
2.08
0.42
1.66
2020
13106
287.64
3.77
4.71
2.36
0.47
1.88
2025
14682
290.51
4.27
5.33
2.67
0.53
2.13
2030
16439
293.42
4.82
6.03
3.01
0.60
2.41
2035
18400
296.35
5.45
6.82
3.41
0.68
2.73
Hence, the town would generate nearly 6.82 MT of waste by 2035 (including 25% waste generation by tourists)
of which nearly 3.41 MT would be compostable waste, 0.68MT would be recyclable waste and 2.73MT waste
would go to the landfill.

9.11 SWOT Analysis


Strength
Free door to door collection in the core part of the
town

63

Weaknesses
There is no collection of solid waste in the
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City Development Plan for Mandav

Land has been acquired for trenching ground

Trenching ground is located near Lohani


caves, which is a tourist attraction
Possibility of contamination of run off
from trenching ground due to the terrain.
Threats
Uncontrolled dumping can mar the
natural, scenic and architectural beauty of
the town

Opportunities
Waste segregation
Composting
Recycling
Decentralised treatment of waste
Biogas generation
Awareness generation

9.12 Issues

Despite mandatory provisions under the Municipal Solid Waste Management (Handling and Disposal)
Rules, 2000, hardly any urban local body in Madhya Pradesh is in a position to claim 100% compliance of
the said rules. The lack of segregation of bio-degradable and non-degradable waste at source, lack of
proper collection, transportation and scientific disposal lead to compounded problems of garbage piling at
all public spaces.
Dumping site needs to be shifted from its present location near Lohani Caves as this is a tourist destination
with waterfalls.
Sanitary landfill site required.
Only 66% coverage
Presently, waste is spread over a large area which looks unsightly and needs to be compacted.

9.13 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan

Decentralized waste treatment facilities


Composting to be initiated to reduce waste to landfill
Recycling of waste, especially plastics; assuming that high plastic rich waste would be generated by the
tourists
Biogas generation
Villages areas to be encouraged to engage in composting and decentralized treatment and disposal of
waste.
Proposed trenching ground located close to Lohani caves (tourist spot) and Doob Baori and should be
relocated in the long term

Action Plan

Composting plant
Sale/reuse of Recyclable waste and inert waste
Awareness generation through media
Proposed Trenching ground near Doob Baori (near Lohani Caves) to be banned
Training of local population in decentralised solid waste management
Placing of gps/gprs vehicle tracking system on door to door collection vehicle for monitoring
Collection from bins at tourist nodes and from common collection bins in ward
Waste collection bins;
DPR for SWM

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CHAPTER 10: DRAINAGE


10.1 Existing Drainage System
The existing drainage system is a network of open drains running along streets that drain along the natural
slopes. The town currently has a combined network for wastewater and storm water. The main drains are
wide and deep and run along both sides of the road along the central spine of the town. These drains donot
have a proper outfall and empty into the forests. The general slope is from Dhar road towards Sagar Talab.

The town has many ponds, including Sagar Talab which are located within the NP boundary and the
Investment area boundary. Most of these ponds are the only source of water for the villagers and are used for
irrigation, drinking and other purposes. Most of these ponds are silted and dry out around January end when
water is used for irrigation of winter crops. Revival of ponds, kunds and baolies in the town is needed.

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10.2 Major water bodies


The Sagar Talab a manmade pond, is the main water body for the town. A number of local ponds were
created as a result of stone quarrying for construction of buildings. The Karam, a tributary of Narmada runs
close to Mandav. Another man made pond, Mallipura is located close to the foothills. Jahaz Mahal also has 2
ponds; of which one pond is dry and the other one has water.

10.3 Primary, secondary and tertiary drains


There is one major drain in the town known as Rampura. The secondary drains are the nallahs along natural
slopes and the tertiary drains are ones that run along internal streets. The road side drains in the town are U
and V shaped. The total length of pucca U and V shaped drains is 2900 metres while the total length of
kuchcha U and V shaped drains is 700 metres (Source: NP, Mandav). The NP is taking up a project of converting
all U shaped drains to V shaped drains to enable easy cleaning.

10.4 Flood prone areas and flooding in catchment area of major nallah
During monsoons, Dharampuri Mandav road which links the town to NH, gets water logged in Monsoons and
runoff from the surrounding hills flows through this road. Owing to the topography, flooding within or around
the town is not a major problem. The road side drains are also wide enough to carry the runoff.

10.5 Comparative analysis with UDPFI, CPHEEO guidelines and Present and Future Demand and
Supply Gaps
As discussed earlier, the total road length in the town is approximately 28km implying a need for provision of
56km of drainage network (both sides of the road). But the existing length of drains in Mandav is 3.6km
implying a shortage of 52.4km. Hence, at present the town only has 6.4% coverage of drainage network and
needs to be provided with 52.4km of drains to meet the existing demand. With provision of more roads in
future, the extent of the drainage network would have to be increased.

10.6 Proposed Projects


The NP is taking up a project to convert all the U shaped drains in the town to V shaped drains. This will make
it easier to clean the drains as silt gets clogged at the base of U shaped drains whereas, V shaped drains can be
washed off easily.

10.7 SWOT Analysis


Strengths

Weaknesses

Natural topography aids in flow of storm

Same network for storm water and wastewater

water

Due to deforestation run off increases

Ponds have been built for capturing run

Siltation of ponds

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City Development Plan for Mandav


off

2013

Eutrophication of ponds

Opportunities

Threats

More ponds can be constructed

Construction along natural drainage channels

Afforestation

Topography insensitive to Development

Dedicated storm water drains

10.8 Issues

Drainage network needs to be designed according to topography.

Drainage needs be addressed for Dharampuri Mandav road that links to NH gets water logged in
Monsoons

10.9 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan

Desiltation of ponds and spreading fertile silt on farms

Afforestation

Dedicated storm water network

Conservation of ponds

Conservation of natural drainage channels, especially through Master Plan

Action Plan

Natural drainage channels to be conserved

Diverting the drainage channels to existing surface water bodies or recharge basins

Desiltation of existing ponds

Catchment conservation for catchment areas of all ponds

Development of Recharge Basins

Kund in Ward 15 to be maintained

Construction of new ponds

Covering large open drains with grating

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City Development Plan for Mandav

CHAPTER 11: TRAFFIC AND


D TRANSPORTATION
11.1 Existing traffic & transportation scenario
Mandav is approximately 1 hr from
m the National Highway 3 but despite this geographicaal proximity to NH, the
connectivity to Mandav is extremeely poor. Mandav is 2 hrs from Indore (85 kms apprrox) and close to State
Highway 22 and State Highway 31.. Because of its elevation and topography, access to
o the town is from two
roads one from Dhar/Dhamnod an
nd one from Dharampuri. But both these roads are in poor condition. The
road connecting the town to Dharaampuri is in particularly bad condition because this ro
oad passes through the
hilly tracts of Mandav and River Khu
uj also runs along the edge of this road. The heavy mo
onsoon runoff from the
hills of Mandav is carried down thee road and the road is also impacted by flooding in River Khuj. As a result,
this road is worn out and repairs on
o this road dont last for long. The other road from
m Dhamnod is better in
condition but the route via Manpu
ura is not marked with signage and the condition off Manpura road is also
poor. Within the town, network is limited to four main roads, one being the road from
m Dhar, another being
m Dhar to Dharrampuri
Roopmati road, Neelkanth road leading to Dharmpuri road. N-S link in district from
goes though Mandav

Condition of main roads

nd Dharampuri are also


The internal roads of the town are double lane and the main access roads from Dhar an
ominent tourist destination in the district and a pro
oposed World Heritage
double lane. Since Mandav is a pro
Site, better road connectivity to the town is required, especially from NH3. A rail link iss proposed from Chota
Udaipur to Dhar and this link is prop
posed to pass through Manav.

11.2 Vehicle population


In Dhar District, the vehicular popu
ulation based on
registrations from 2000 to present day reflect

Figure 11.1: Distribution of vehicular pop


pulation of Dhar District

6.44 0.55 0.12

0.02

t
vehicular
that 2 wheelers dominate the total

2 wheelers
4 wheelers

population at 92.87% while the seccond dominant

Truck

category is of tractors at 6.44%. Thee proportion of


92.87

4 wheelers, trucks and buses is much


m
lower at

Source: RTO, Dhar

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Buses

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

0.55%, 0.12% and 0.02% respectively.


The total number of 2 wheelers registered in the Dhar District from 2000 till date are 90,256 while the total
number of 4 wheelers registered across the same time period are 530. This reflects that 4 wheelers form only
0.6% of the total 2 and 4 wheeler population while 2 wheelers constitute 99.4%. The same pattern is reflected
in the towns of the District.

Figure 11.2: Road Map of Mandav. Source: Primary survey, Nov. 2011

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Vehicular Population in Mandav


The total 2 and 4 wheeler population in Mandav is estimated at 709, considering that the town forms 1.95% of
the total urban population of the District and the proportion can be applied in calculating the vehicle
population (@ 1.95% of the urban 2 and 4 wheeler vehicle population of Dhar District). Of these, at a rate of
0.6% of the 2 and 4 wheeler populations, the number of 4 wheelers in Mandav comes to about 4, but this
number is actually higher for Mandav due to the local 4 wheeler taxi operators in the town to cater to tourists.
During Stakeholder consultations, it was found that only around 10 to 12 taxis are registered from Mandav.
Other vehicles that come to Mandav during peak season are registered in other parts of the district, especially
in Indore.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

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11.3 Details of Roads


The total length of kuchcha roads in NP area is 14 kms as per information provided by the NP while, the total
length of pucca roads is 14 kms as well. This includes 10 km of cement roads, 1 km of Kharanja farsi road and 3
kms of Damar or coal tar road exist in the town. Hence, the total length of roads under the NP comes to 28
kms. The Dhar Mandav Road is under the PWD, Dhar Division (according to map of roads provided by PWD,
Dhar Division). The road condition is ok and needs improvement. The road linking Mandav to Dharampuri is
also a double land road but in poor condition. Within the town, the roads are double land but and in
reasonable condition upto Neelkanth. It can be said that the main arterial roads in the town are in decent
condition but sub arterial roads leading to the villages are in poor condition. The road from Tarapur gate to
Tarapur village is a kuccha road in poor condition. Similarly, the subarterial road to Jahangirpura gate is in poor
condition and beyond Kaldipura, this road becomes non motorable and access to villages like Jhabri can only
be through 2 wheelers. There is an urgent need to improve connectivity to villages in NP boundary.

The town needs another link to NH3 to enhance connectivity. A road linking the south eastern part of Mandav
near Gujri to the SH-31 that further meets at a short distance with the NH-3 already exists. The road from
Jahangir pura gate is pukka to some distance and there is a road which was made under PM gram Sadak yojna
which is nearly from Jhabri village. A kuccha road exists which connects the Jahangir pura gate to Jhabri
village and connects Jhabri village to PMGSY road. Hence, this link needs to be strengthened and made pukka
as an alternate access road to the town. This will not only provide direct connectivity to Mandav from NH3 but
will also improve the quality of life in Jhabri village.

Road under PM
Gram Sadak Yojna

Jhabri
Slope

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Kuccha road to Jhabri village

View of SH 31 and NH3 from Jhabri village

While it is true that historically Mandav only had a strategic road linkage with Dhar, as it was a military
stronghold for the rulers of Dhar up to the early medieval period. The opening up of the linkage towards SH-31
and hence NH-3, would help in encouraging heritage tourism and providing market access that can be the
means of enabling economic vitality for the town in the current context.

11.4 Agencies in traffic & transportation.


Presently all junctions in Mandav are unmanned and there is no presence of Traffic Police. During peak season,
traffic police constables man important junctions.

11.5 Travel characteristics


Most of the resident population walks from one place to the other within the town, while some use bicycles.
There are very few motorised vehicles in the town and hardly any intra town public transport. The tourists
come in buses, hired or private cars and use the same to travel to the main tourist attractions. About 10 to 12
operators provide taxis (ranging from small cars to SUVs) on rent for tourists to visit the various tourist
attractions in the town. Most of the tourists stay in Dhar or Nalcha and commute to Mandav on a daily basis.

The villages are located at a significant distance from the main town and students have to commute daily for
upto 2 hrs (one way) to reach the school located in town. There are no vehicular services (public or private) to
provide connectivity between main town and the village areas and the same is needed on priority basis.

11.6 Public transport/mass transit and Inter - city bus transport


Within the town, there is no public or mass transit option, while only private buses provide intercity
connectivity. There are no state run buses. Private buses ply to Indore, Mhow, Ratlam, Ujjain, Dhamnod,
Dharampuri and Dhar. Most people commute from Mandav to these areas for trade or to work as agricultural
labour during cropping season or as manual/construction work labour after cropping season.

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Connectivity with Dhar is good and buses ply almost every half an hour from Dhar to Mandav from 8 am to 7
pm on a daily basis. 17 buses go from Mandav to Dhar while there are 4 buses to Indore, 1 to Ujjain, 1 to
Petlawad and 1 to Umarvan. There are no bus services suitable for tourists and bus services linking Mandav to
Dharampuri and Dhamnod (general and tourist special buses) need to be started.

11.7 Traffic management and circulation


Attempts at traffic management are only made during peak tourist season. The circulation pattern in the town
is confined to the 4 main spines: Jahaz Mahal road, Dhar road, Nilkanth road and Roop Mati road. Jama Masjid
junction is the main junction in the town. The town does not have a Mandi but there is a bus stand near Jama
Masjid. This junction hence, is a crucial junction in terms of traffic management. The weekly haat (Saturday
haat) is also held in this area. Hence, traffic congestion is a key issue here.

11.8 Intermediate public transport


There are no IPTs (Intermediate Public Transport) in the town. Cycles are given on rent to tourists. IPTs are
needed on immediate basis to link the peripheral villages to the main town, especially during school timings.

11.9 Parking requirements


Parking spaces have been provided near Jahaz Mahal, Roopmati Mahal, Neelkanth and Jama Masjid. There is
strong need for increasing the parking areas and arrangement for parking management during peak tourist
season. It is proposed that this problem be solved at a regional level taking Mandav as a part of the regional
tourist circuit.

11.10 Comparative analysis with UDPFI, CPHEEO guidelines and Present and Future Demand and
Supply Gaps
More parking areas, traffic management plan, widening of roads and provision of pedestrian facilities are
needed for future development of the city. At present the town lacks access roads to a number of villages such
as Lal Bangla (700 seerhi; tourist spot), Lamba talab, Tipkiya road, Tarapur gate to Neelkanth Phata, 1000 bigha
population in Lalbagh; Kalakot plantation and Sakharam Bhai Gali in Ward 9. The present road length in
Mandav is around 28kms. Considering the standards for an environment friendly town, nearly 10 to 12% land
should be under transportation (4.2 sqkm @10% of 42.4sqkm). in case of Mandav, around 100sqm to 150 sqm
land is under transportation, which is much below standards is one considers the entire NP area. The main
town is spread over approximately 5sqkm, even for this the area under transportation is much below
standards and can be increased further, especially for provision of parking spaces.

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11.11 Issues

Transportation problem due to elevation and low demand. Trucks are not interested in carrying
commodities to Mandav as the demand is low and the fuel consumption is high due to the elevation. The
truck drivers ask for triple the rates and hence, cost of commodities to the tourists increases.

Road from Mandav to Maharashtra via Dharampuri is in poor condition. Dharmapuri road that links
Mandav to NH3 is kuchcha in parts and gets water logged during monsoons.

Resurfacing of internal city roads needed.

Lack of tourist bus facility.

No road and transport connectivity for villages

During peak season, the main Dhar road becomes congested and there is a pressing demand for parking
spaces.

11.12 SWOT Analysis


Strengths
Strategic location as a part of N-S link across
district
Proximity to Dhar and NH3
Double lane main city roads
Internal roads are CC roads in good condition

Opportunities
Widening of regional roads
Improving connectivity to NH3 through Jhabri
village. This will not only improve quality of life
in the village but will also provide direct
connectivity to NH3
Rail Link needed
IPTs to connect villages to main town
More parking spaces should be created

Weaknesses
Hilly terrain
Poor condition of regional roads, especially
Dharampuri road
Some of the regional roads get damaged due to
high run off.
Parking spaces and management is an issue
No parking management plan
Better connectivity to NH3 needed
No road and transportation to link the villages
to the main town
Threats
Poor condition of regional roads and poor
parking provisions can impact the tourist inflow
to the town

11.13 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan

Widening and resurfacing of regional roads

Traffic management plan

Rail Link to the town can solve the traffic issues to a great extent

Madav to be developed as a part of the tourist link between Omkareshwar, Maheshwar, Dharampuri,
Mandav, Kukshi and CSA Nagar. Hence, regional level parking provisions and tourist buses can be
organized to reduce load on the town

Rope way connecting Lohani gufa to Songarh can be developed

Parking areas within the town and at regional level

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Tourist buses and luxury buses to be started

Link to NH3 via Jhabri village needs to be strengthened

IPTs for villages to be initiated

2013

Action Plan

Traffic and Transport Management Plan for Mandav Planning Area (to be coordinated with other plans
and as per vision and policies outlines in IHRMP)

Tourist shuttle service and non motorised rickshaws

Parking for tourists and sheltered stops for shuttle bus

Construction of Road connectiong Jali Mahal, Jhabri Village, Jahangirpur Gate of Mandav with NH 3 and
SH 31, following a strategic impact assessment (Via Masidpura village)

IPT (Tata Magic/Jeep) licences to local people to be easier and subsidized)

Access roads to be provided for some areas

IPT Service (like Tata Magic) or City Bus Service to be started to cater to villages

Resurfacing of existing roads

Improving road from Mandav to Kakarda with appropriate drainage

Safety along regional roads to be ensured

Tree plantation along roads

Development of IPT hub cum taxi stand and Bus stand

Improvement of road between Mandav and Dharampuri : Increased tree cover, Resurfacing and drainage
provision

Access walkway to Boorhi Mandav and Songarh Fort to be provided parallel to the valley (near NP Raen
Basera)

Provision of parking areas on PPP basis

Access road to Brahmanpuri can be developed

Road from Jahaz Mahal to NP to be made 4 lane

4 laning of road to Reva Kund

Pedestrianisation of 1 km of road stretch starting from Jami Masjid crossing and extending to the south of
the crossing

Redesigning of Jami Masjid Crossing

Development of organised areas for informal sector - mobile vendors near proposed Visitor Centre for
tourists

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City Development Plan for Mandav

CHAPTER 12: ELECTRICITY, STREET LIGHTING AND FIRE FIGHTING


12.1 Existing situation of Street lights
Nearly 50% of the core town is covered by street lights with
the number of electric poles being 527. The peripheral
settlements that are rural in character have not been provided
with streetlights.

12.2 Fire service, vehicles and equipment for fire


fighting and Rescue operations
The town is not equipped with a fire station or fire fighter.
There are no appropriate vehicles and equipment for fire fighting and rescue operations. In case of fire, tractor
tanker is fitted with engine and used for extinguishing fire. Owing to the distance from nearest town and the
elevation, any outside help would take time to reach the town and since Mandav is a tourist town, provision of
a well equipped fire fighting system is needed.

12.3 Power generation and distribution


There is a 33 KV Substation at Mandav that gets supply from 132 KV EHV Substation at Bagdi through a 33 KV
line. According to information from the NP, there are about 600 electricity connections in the town but
according to data from MPEB, there are a total of 1828 connections in the town. There is a plan to provide 24
hr electricity supply to Mandav, in order to encourage it as a tourist destination but this has not been
implemented properly as yet. While the core town benefits from this provision to some extent, as the tourist
activity is focused there, the peripheral settlements within the NP have not been provided with adequate
electricity provisions yet. Presently, these areas are being supplied through low voltage supply lines which are
not even sufficient for domestic uses during night. Hence, during stakeholder interviews and first and second
stakeholder workshops, the villagers emphasized the need for provision of a 3 phase electricity provision to
enable running of pumps for irrigation.
The cables in Mandav are old and need replacement. Hence, an APDRP for Mandav is also needed.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Figure 12.1: Map of Electricity distribution


within Dhar District

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Table 12.1: Category wise consumers and co


onnections

Name of Village
No. of Transformers
Flour Water
(within Mandav Domestic Comm
mercial
Irrigation St/Lt SLP Total
(XMer 25/
Mill Works
NP)
63/100/200 KV)
Mandav
205
94
4
9
4
7
2 253 574
9
Rampur
1
0
0
0
0
0
75
76
0
Lal Bangla
0
0
0
0
0
0 101 101
0
Ranglav
0
0
0
0
0
0
51
51
0
Neelkanth Sagar
0
0
0
0
0
0 150 150
0
Sagar
0
0
0
0
0
0 215 215
0
Nandlalpura
0
0
0
0
0
0
72
72
2
Jamania
0
0
0
0
0
0 107 107
1
Kanedipura
0
0
2
0
0
1 223 226
3
Jhabri
2
0
0
0
0
1 110 113
2
Kalighati
0
0
0
0
3
0
80
83
1
Singodi
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Lamba Talab
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Ambapura
0
0
1
0
0
0
53
54
2
Malipura
9
0
1
0
0
0
36
46
2
152
Total
217
94
4
13
4
10
4
1868
22
6
Figure 12.2: Category wise consumers of ele
ectricity in Mandav NP

12

Domestic
Commercial
Flour Mill
Water Works

82

Irrigation
St/Lt
SLP

Figure 12.3: Distribution of consumers of electricity across Mandav NP

Malipura
Lamba Talab
Kalighati
Kanedipura
Total consumer
connections

Nandlalpura
Neelkanth Sagar
Lal Bangla
Mandav
0

200 400 600 800

78

The analysiss of category wise


of
consumer
distribution
connections in
i Mandav NP reflects
that 82% of the connections are for
SLP, while 12% are domestic and
commercial.
Other
5%
are
categories (flour mill, water works,
irrigation and
d St/Lt) have a very low
number of co
onnections.

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

The distribution of connections across the 15 villages within the NP boundary clearly reflect that the core town
has the largest share of consumer connections while settlements such as Lamba Talab, Singodi have no
connections at all. Hence, there is a lot of inequity in terms of coverage in the core town and peripheral
settlements.

12.4 Comparative analysis with UDPFI, other guidelines and Present and Future Demand and
Supply Gaps
The UDPFI guidelines quote the standard demand for electricity as 2 KW per household for Delhi. Considering
the context of the Mandav, the demand is assumed at 0.3 KW per household. On this basis, the present
demand for 1821 HHs comes to 3198 KW. The current min and max peak load is 1 MW an

d 3 MW, that

is 1000 KW and 3000 KW respectively for Mandav (including Nalcha). Therefore, the maximum peak load at
present is comparable to the calculated present requirement. Future demand is calculated and listed in Table
12.4.
Table 12.2: Projected electricity requirement up to 2035

Year

Projected
Population

Projected no. of HHs

Projected electricity requirement (in KW


@0.3 KW per HH)

2015

11921

2038

611

2020

13700

2342

703

2025

15739

2690

807

2030

18080

3091

927

2035
20771
3551
1065
The demand for electricity is projected as 1065 KW by 2035. Additional demand for electricity will be
generated due to the development of the town as a tourist destination, increasing the tourist season and
tourist stay in the town. According to the UDPFI Guidelines, there must be provision of 1 electric sub station
for 11 KV per 15,000 population as per UDPFI Guidelines. Hence, for the population of Mandav (10,659) the
one 11 KV sub station is sufficient as per standards.
UDPFI guidelines suggest 1 fire station or sub fire station within 1 to 3km for 2 lakh population. Currently the
town does not have any fire engine. Since the area of the NP is about 42 sq kms, more than one fire vehicles
are needed in the town, especially to cater to peripheral areas. As all the areas do not have access roads that
would permit fire engines to reach, alternative systems need to be devised such as longer hoses. Hence, it is
proposed that Mandav be provided with atelast 3 fire vehicles: one for the rural areas and 2 for the core town
and the tourist areas.
Presently, the town has 527 streetlights. Considering a total road length of 28km, the town should have 924
steetlights (@33SLs/km). The present coverage can hence, be placed at 57%.

12.5 SWOT Analysis


Strengths
Scope for wind and solar energy generation
24 hr electricity provision for the town has been

Weaknesses
Poor coverage of town in terms of street
lighting

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City Development Plan for Mandav


No fire fighting mechanism
Village areas only have 2 phase connections
Poor coverage of electricity
Threats
Poor electricity provision can mar the tourism
potential of the town, especially w.r.t. night
lighting of monuments and cultural evenings

sanctioned

Opportunities
Tapping wind and sun for energy
Biogas energy production
Three phase electricity connections in the
villages

12.6 Issues

Electricity theft is an issue with 30-40%of the electricity being stolen. This can go upto 70% in rural areas

Neelkanth temple area has not been provided with a 3 Phase electricity connection as yet. The area is still
served by a single phase (v. low voltage) electricity connection.

The villagers require a 3 phase connection to run pumps and motors for irrigation.

Lack of fire fighting and rescue infrastructure; needs to be addressed urgently.

12.7 City specific strategies and action plan

Increased use of renewables by developing wind farms, solar farms and biogas plants

Decentralisation of distribution of electricity and street lighting for peripheral settlement areas and core
area.

Need for provision of 3 phase electricity connection for villages on immediate basis

Need for provision of 3 fire fighting vehicles: one for the villages and 2 for the core town and tourist areas.

Use of LED based fixtures and automated switches.

Provision of solar street lights in public places (secured) to ensure safety during night time.

Provision of additional electricity supply to address demand due to tourist infrastructure needs and
activities such as sound and light shows in the evening.

APDRP needed for Mandav as cables in the town are very old (nearly 50 yrs old) and need replacement

Action Plan
Electricity & Street Lighting
Solar haat within or near Mandi complex
Solar Farms
Annual energy audit
Streetlighting: SLs to meet current shortage & SLs for proposed roads
Wind and solar hybrid water pumps for irrigation
Establishment of 1to 10 MW Wind Mills or Wind Solar Hybrid to generate 3 Phase Electricity for
supply to Heritage areas and farmers in Mandav. 3 Phase electricity to be supplied to all village
clusters and all wards of Mandav
APDRP to be prepared for Mandav
Provision of electricity in all villages till the wind farms are set up
Solar street lighting along regional roads (CAN BE COMBINED FOR DHAR AND ALIRAJPUR DISTRICTS
TO CLAIM CARBON CREDITS)
Provision of streetlighting in peripheral settlements/hamlets

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Energy efficiency programme


Increase in electricity supply

Fire Fighting
Provision of Fire vehicles
Provision of Fire Fighting Personnel
Fire equipment and training to staff

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City Development Plan for Mandav

CHAPTER 13: URBAN POOR AND THEIR ACCESSIBILITY TO BASIC SERVICES


13.1 Poverty in Town
Mandav Nagar Parishad conducted a survey of the
Below Poverty Level (BPL) population in Mandav in
2003-2004, according to which 1570 families and 6000
persons, that is 56.3% of the total population lives
below the poverty line (ILCSS Report and NP data).
Considering a growth of 20% over years, the present
BPL population can be placed at 1884 or 7197 persons
(approximately) accounting for 67% of the current population. During the second stakeholder consultation, it
was pointed out by the participants that the current BPL population of the town is around 60 to 75%. The
stakeholders also pointed out that only around 30% of the town population has been issued BPL cards.

The slum population of the town is 3,898. As per the NP, Ward no. 2, 13 and 14 are defined as slum wards.
Based on observations, it can be said that these wards are primarily rural wards with agriculture as the
economic base. The settlements in these areas are characteristic of village settlements and need to be
upgraded. It might not be appropriate to call these areas as slums and these areas can be termed as special
areas which need immediate attention in terms of infrastructural provision and housing upgradation. All
peripheral villages are more or less, similar in character and need immediate attention.

13.2 Separate information on BPL Population and Slum Population


As discussed above, the BPL population of the town stands at approximately 7197 persons (67% of total
population) whereas, the slum population stands at 3898 (@36% of the town population).

13.3 Slums in the Town and General Characteristics of Slums/Areas with urban poor
The slum areas in the town are in a poor condition and hardly have access to housing and infrastructure. There
are 2 categories of slum areas/ areas with urban poor in the town

Slum housing within core area

Villages in peripheral areas (special areas).

As discussed earlier, the peripheral villages cannot be termed as slums and need to be termed as special areas
and treated accordingly. Details of condition of some of the peripheral villages are listed below

Sagar Village
The village population comprises largely of people of Rajasthani origin who have migrated to Mandav in search
of livelihood. These people are primarily dependent on agriculture for livelihood. But since the area only has
one pond which dries out due to siltation, the villagers cannot grow more than one crop a year and hence,
males have to commute to neighbouring towns (like Pithampur, Indore and even to Rajasthan) to work as

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

construction or agricultural labour on a daily basis. Those


living close to the pond can grow 2 crops a year. The
villagers dont have a source of drinking water and are
entirely dependent on the pond. The villagers have
pattas for the land on which their houses are made and
also own some livestock (cow, bull and chicken). Based
on consultations, the following provisions can be made
for the village:

In order to improve their quality of life,


desiltation of pond and development of more ponds needs to be undertaken so that these farmers
can grown 2 crops a year.

Need for provision of an Anganwadi closer to their village as they have to commute for 3 to 4 km to
get their children to the Anganwadi.

Rampura Gaon, Ward 5


This village comprises of around 30 families and owing to its location (close to the core town), the villagers
donot own agricultural land and are largely working as construction or manual labour or agricultural labour
(during monsoons @Rs. 100 to 150/day) in or around the town. Men commute to neighbouring towns (mainly
Gujri, Dhamnod, Sundrail and Dhar) for work and women work as agricultural labour in the town. Very few of
the villagers won agricultural land and all the villagers have pattas for their houses. Despite the high tourist
activity in the town, the villagers donot benefit from tourism. The women in the village work as agricultural
labour.

The villagers donot have water connections or handpump and are dependent on Kali Baori, a monument; but
during summers when this Baori dries out, the villagers have to commute long distances to get water. All
houses in the village cluster are kuccha and cannot be made pukka due to proximity to kali Baori (within 100m
radius). The villagers also expressed a need for provision of community or public toilets as they presently have
to resort to open defecation.

Many of the villagers are educated and still have to work as labour due to lack of opportunities. Villagers gave
preference to computer based education for their children which
Jhabri village
Jahbri village is one of the most remotely located villages in Mandav. It is located along the southern edge of
the town and does not even have an access road. The present access is through a kuccha rasta which is full of
large and small boulders and is not even walkable. The villagers are largely involved in agricultural and own
some livestock. The village had a pond which has dried out and is now used for agriculture after monsoons.
The water supply situation in the village is so poor that the villagers have to travel along the edge of a steep
ridge to Tipkiya Gufa to access water. There is no provision of sewage management, waste management or

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City Development Plan for Mandav

drainage. The waste is thrown in the open and open defecation is the only option available for the villagers.
The area needs to be provided with a road and water supply provision on immediate basis. The condition of
houses is also kuccha and these need to be upgraded. There is no electricity provision in the village.
Urban poor in core area
Most of the urban poor in core town work as daily wage labour and dont benefit from tourism in any way. The
core town also has a significant percentage of fishermen who have been dependent on the ponds for their
livelihood but with the drying up of ponds, are now having to resort to other means of livelihood like working
as manual labour in Dhar and Bagedi. The Majhis emphasized the need to revive all ponds in the town so that
pisciculture can be revived. At present, the fishing season is only limited to 4 months as the fishermen
introduce fish eggs (buy from Sundrail) in the ponds when the ponds fill up during monsoons and these fish
take upto 4 months to mature. Fish are sold in Dhar, Nimad, Dhamnod, Dharampuri and Kukshi and are in high
demand. The only pond in the region that retains water for most part of the year is the Malipura pond but this
pond has been reserved for fishing by Adivasis. The fishermen expressed concern over the need to revive Sagar
Talab and other ponds in the region. Excavation of ponds approved many times but no work has been
undertaken yet.

The urban poor in core area donot own agricultural land but have pattas for their houses. Most of these
houses are semi pukka and are typical of the housing stock in the town.
Tarapur village
The village is accessible by a kuccha road from Tarapur gate, on Dharampuri road. The village comprises of
clusters of kuccha houses and is served by the Tarapur pond and well. Owing to siltation, the pond and well dry
out during summers and the villagers have to commute 2km to the school to get water and sometimes, even
to the main town. NP tanker comes to the village to supply water but the quantity of water is so low that at
times the villagers send the tanker back. The villagers were also supposed to be provided with gas connections
but no work has been done in this regard. Krishi vibhag Gram sevaks dont give seeds now to the villagers as
there is no source of irrigation in the village.

The pond needs to be desilted and revived and the well needs to be deepened. A pipeline has already been
laid on Tarapur road and needs to be repaired and restarted after providing connection from Sagar
talab/Narmada. Catchment area of the pond and drainage channels to the pond need to be conserved. Farm
and village tourism would help increase the villagers income. Doodh talai talab on Dharampuri road also
needs Desiltation.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

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13.4 Location of Slums on Town Map

13.5 Status of Slums


There are 3 slum wards in the town and all these are notified slums. Most of the DUs in the town are kuccha /
semi pukka and have been allocated pattas

13.6 Land Ownership and Tenure Status


Most slum dwellers have pattas for their land.

13.7 Unidentified slums and homeless population/pavement dwellers


There are no unidentified slums or pavement dwellers in the town, except for a few near the bus stand. But
the condition of villages in Mandav is the worst and requires immediate attention.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

13.8 Urban basic services in slums (in line with JNNURMs 7 point charter)
Details of provision of basic services in slum clusters, villages and area with urban poor have been given in the
sections above. Slum wards in the town are not slums, except in ward 2. These are villages which have come
under NP boundary but still have hutments, characteristic of rural lifestyle. The condition of infrastructure
provision in these areas is poor and they donot even have access to water supply and are dependent largely on
local ponds and wells for irrigation and water. After these sources dry up in summers, villagers have to
commute upto 6km to get water. The waste from these areas is not collected and they donot have any
drainage. The houses are kuccha hutments made of bamboo and thatch and dont have any HH toilets. Most
slum dwellers have ownership documents.
Table 13.1: JNNURMs 7 pointer charter for all wards (based on observation)

Slum
ward
no.
2
13
14

Tenure
security

Improved
housing

Water
supply

Sanitation

Education

Health

Social
security

90%
70%
70%

25%
15%
10%

70%
40%
20%

70%
50%
40%

80%
60%
50%

50%
20%
15%

50%
20%
20%

13.9 Social security schemes and beneficiaries


The ongoing schemes for social security and number of beneficiaries are listed in Table 13.2. The total number
of beneficiaries from the schemes comes to 951, which is only about 13% of the total BPL population of
Mandav.
Table 13.2: Social Security Schemes and no. of beneficiaries

Social Security Scheme


Social Security Pension (Samajik Suraksha Pension)
Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Vriddhavastha Pension Yojana
Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Vidhwa Pension Yojana
Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Nihshakt Pension Yojana
Rashtriya Parivar Sahayta
Jan Shri Beema Yojana
Chief Ministers Gharelu Kamkaji Mahilaon ki Yojana
Chief Ministers Hath Thela Chalak Yojana
Swarn Jayanti Shehri Rozgar Yojana - Training
Swarn Jayanti Shehri Rozgar Yojana - Loan
Bachat Evam Sakh Samiti
Total

No. of beneficiaries
56
87
79
17
0
651
6
8
40
5
2
951

13.10 Comparative Analysis with UDPFI, CPHEEO guidelines and Present and future housing
demand
According to the NP, there are a total of about 1500 houses in the town out of which about 100 are pucca and
1400 are kuccha. Hence, the present housing shortage is 1400 DUs and that for 2035 is 3044 DUs. The town
has 7197 BPL persons accounting for 67% of the town population. It has been assumed that the % of BPL in the
town would decrease and the town would become slum free by 2035. Based on this assumption, the town
would need around 1373 DUs for urban poor by 2035.

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City Development Plan for Mandav


Year

Projected
Population

2015

11689

1897

60

1138

2020

13106

2139

45

109

2025

14682

2408

30

81

2030

16439

2709

15

45

2035

18400

3044

DU Demand

2013

Housing demand for


urban poor

% BPL

Total

1373

13.11 SWOT Analysis


Strengths
Villages have been included in PN boundary and
can claim benefits

Opportunities
Promoting farm and village tourism as a
potential source of earning for the villagers
Promoting decentralized tourism with stake of
tribals
Employment generation
Better access and infrastructure provision

Weaknesses
Poor condition of housing and infrastructure in
peripheral villages
Have to travel long distances for water
Kuccha houses in all villages
No employment opportunity within town
No income for urban poor from tourism
Threats
So far, tourism development of Mandav and
poverty alleviation of inhabitants of Mandav
have been considered as 2 different topics. If
this trend continues, Mandav town would
continue to ignore its urban poor

13.12 Issues

Villages are secluded due to poor connectivity

Based on NP data, the BPL population for the town was nearly 57% (based on 2003/04 survey) but the
participants pointed out that the BPL population of the town at present is nearly 60 to 75%. Only around
30% of the town population has been issued BPL cards

Some of the villages have also been considered as slums. These should be treated as special areas with
immediate need for housing and infrastructure

A large % of BPL population does not have BPL cards

Poor access to Jhabri village and immediate need to revive pond in the village

13.13 City specific strategies and action plan

All villages to be provided connectivity on priority basis

Ponds near villages to be revived

Water supply connection to villages from Sagar talab

Insitu redevelopment in slums

Increasing income generation of villagers from tourism

Provision of basic infrastructure in all villages and slums

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City Development Plan for Mandav

Based on consultation with stakeholders, the following options can be considered:


Economic activities

Infrastructure

Social
Infrastructure
Housing

Women can be trained in stitching, tailoring, papad making, etc. Women would
have to be formed into SHGs, provided adequate training and loans for this
purpose.
Increase income from tourism; Farm tourism and village tourism to be promoted
Green house farming can be initiated to increase earning
Need job opportunities for their children who are educated
Loan for small businesses needed: Sabzi thela, fruit thela, etc
Revival of pisciculture and animal rearing
Drip irrigation equipment manufacturing plant. Will facilitate distribution of
drip irrigation equipment. Sprinklers can also be promoted
The villagers only have access to 2 phase electricity and need to be provided with
3 phase electricity on an immediate basis.
Desiltation of ponds
Water supply provision from Sagar Talab through piped supply
Public toilets and community toilets
IPTs for transportation to village areas
Provision of wells/handpumps in each village cluster
Computer based education
Decentralized health facilities
Insitu redevelopment with provision of pukka houses and infrastructure

Action Plan

Demographic and socio economic survey of slum dwellers

Upgradation of housing through grant/loan/subsidy conditional to construction of HH toilets and retention


of tenure for 20 years.

Drains and roads for village wards

Provision of decentralised infrastructure in the peripheral hamlets (Sagar, Rampura, Nandlalpur, Jamanya
and Jhabri villages)

MFIs (Micro Finance Institutions for Urban Poor)

Employment generation for tribals and Urban Poor

HHIs for women

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City Development Plan for Mandav

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CHAPTER14: SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE


14.1 Education
As per information from the NP, currently there are 15 primary schools, 1 middle school, 1 higher secondary
school and two tribal student hostels in the town. There is one Sanskrit school in the town. The nearest college
is located in Dhar. Consultations during kick off workshop
revealed that students have to commute 6km on a daily basis to
go to school from areas such as Tarapur village, which is a long
distance to be covered on foot. Consultations with villagers also
brought forth the need for computer based education and
technical education which can help their children get better jobs.
There are no vocational colleges in the town and there is scope
for tourism based vocational courses like guide training, hotel
management, etc. Though the villagers in the town are predominantly dependent on agriculture and livestock,
there is no provision for agricultural education and animal rearing education. The villages need to be provided
with decentralized educational facilities.

14.2 Health
As per the 2001 Census data, Mandav had 5 beds in medical
institutions per 10,000 population. This is the lowest number,
compared to other towns of the district (in comparison, Dhar city,
the number is 75 per 10,000 population). The town has a Primary
Health Care Centre with 6 beds. The closest hospital is in Nalcha
that is 10 kms away and since Mandav is located atop a plateau, the
route is through hilly terrain. Patients from Mandav are usually
referred to Dhar (20 km) for further treatment. The present PHC serves only as a preliminary first aid centre
and faces a shortage of doctors and staff. Since Mandav is a prominent tourist destination, the town should be
provided with adequate health facilities. The village areas have not been provided with any health facility and
need to commute to the core town (at least 2 hrs walking) to avail health facilities. Hence, decentralized
treatment facilities for villages are also needed. There are no veterinary facilities in the town although life
stock ownership in the town is high.

14.3 Sports and Recreation


There are 15 hotels and 1 dhaba in the town as per a statement from
the Nagar Parishad but as per the reconnaissance survey, there are
many eateries in the town. There is a need for additional
accommodation facilities to cater to various segments of travellers. The
town needs to be provided with more dormitories and dharamshalas

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for low end tourists. The town has no parks or cinema halls. There is no petrol pump in Mandav and hence,
black marketing of petrol is common. There are no greens and playgrounds for the town population and for
the villagers.

14.4 Comparison with UDPFI guidelines and CPHEEO Guidelines


Education
According to standards, the town has adequate educational facilities but considering the need for provision of
facilities for villagers and the needs for an educated population, the town needs to be provided with another
senior secondary school in village areas. In future, 2 more of these schools should be provided. The town also
needs to be provided with more vocational institutes, especially based on computer education.

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Category

Senior Secondary
School
Integrated school
with hostel facility
School for
handicapped

Norm

1 for 7500
1 for 90,000
to 1 lakh

Present
Requirement

2013

Existing
stock

Requirement
by 2035

Additional
requirement
2035
1

by

1
0

1 for 45,000
0
1 for 1.25
lakh
Colleges
population
0
Technical College
1 for 7500
0
In terms of health facilities, though the town has adequate facilities as per standards, the town population has
expressed an immediate need for a bigger hospital and health facilities for tourists and villagers.
Category

Intermediate
Hospital (200 bed)
Polyclinic with
observation beds
(0.2 ha)
Nursing home, child
welfare and
maternity centre

Norm

Present
Requirement

Existing
stock

Requirement
by 2035

Additional
requirement by
2035

1 for 1 lakh

1 for 1 lakh

1 for 0.45
lakh
1
1
0
0
1 for 0.15
Dispensary
lakh
1
1
1
As per standards, the town has adequate health and education facilities but based on consultations with
town population, the town needs to be provided with better facilities owing to its large area and its
significance as a tourist centre. The town should be provided with 1 senior secondary school for the villagers
and a vocational college for the town (esp. computer courses). By 2035, the town needs to be provided with
another senior secondary school for main town and one for the villages. Another vocational college can also
be set up. In terms of health facilities, the existing PHC needs to be upgraded to a 30 bed CHC with provision
for emergency facilities. A CHC needs to be provided in the village areas. By 2035, another PHC should be
provided in the villages.

14.5 SWOT Analysis


Strengths
Existing hostel facility for tribal students
Monuments and their greens act as recreational
areas at present

Opportunities
Provision of decentralized health and education
facilities
Provision of computer based education and
agricultural diploma courses

Weaknesses
Poor health facilities
All facilities located at 1 to 2 hr walking distance
from villages
No recreational areas for town population
No petrol pump
Threats
Tourism related development of the town can
ignore the needs of the town people
completely

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14.6 Issues

Better health and education facilities are required for the town. The town had a PHC (Primary health
centre) but now there is a severe shortage of doctors.

The need for enhanced tourism infrastructure and entertainment avenues.

Vocational courses related to tourism needed.

There is a need for a play ground and a public garden in the town.

14.7 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan

The guides in Mandav donot have licences and hence, their earning is low. NP can provide licences to
these guides. This would increase the earnings for NP and the guides

Need for development of low cost accommodation

Gardens and playgrounds for resident population

Greens need to be developed for tourists

Agriculture and computer based education needed

Need for provision of petrol pump

Decentralized health and education facilities need to be provided for the villagers

One CHC needs to be developed in the town

Better educational facilities need to be provided, especially for tribals. Focus on computer education and
vocational courses also needed

Only 1 bank in the town. Works only for 2 days a week. Nationalized bank needed

The town used to have a Grameen bank but this was shifted to Nalcha due to lack of business. This bank
needs to be revived along with SHG formation and awareness generation amongst tribals.

Community centre needed

Action Plan
Education
Women oriented Literacy Programmes
Training programmes for tribal population (Certificate courses)
Senior Secondary School
Development of Library
Upgradation of existing Schools by provision of additional floor
English Medium School
Provision of High School
Provision of Anganwadi for Sagar Village and Jhabri Village
Agricultural education to be promoted through NGOs, agriculture and horticulture department
Upgradation of existing schools to incorporate more students
Need to hire Contract staff to fill vacant posts for Teachers
Health
Upgradation of existing PHC to 30 bed CHC
Provision of Emergency services in upgraded PHC

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Others

CHC
PHC
Provision of Dispensaries (0.08 to 0.12 ha)
Provision of small Vet Facility
Nursing home, Child welfare and Maternity Centre (25 to 30 beds)
Police Posts along regional roads
Additional greens @14% of Municipal Area
Provision of Petrol Pump in or near Mandav
Provision of Grameen Bank in or close to Mandav
Provision of gas agency to reduce dependence on fuel wood
Provision of Cyber Cafes and Photocopy shops

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CHAPTER 15: ENVIRONMENT


15.1 Flora and Fauna
Mango, khirni, tamarind and banyan trees grow along the banks of natural lakes and ponds. The baobab
(Adansoni digitata) tree is unique to this area. It has a swollen trunk and leafless branches from which fruits
hang like pendants. The tree bears leaves only during the
rains. Locally it is called Khurasani Imli and is supposed to
have been introduced into Mandav from Africa, during
the reign of Mahmud Khalji (1436-69), when Malwa had
close trade relations with the continent (Yazdani, 2000,
p.2). The fauna used to consist of tigers, panthers, bear,
deer, monkeys and numerous birds but depleting forest
cover has led to near disappearance of many of these
species. A poisonous species of lizard known as Guhaira
and the black cobra are frequently spotted in the area.

15.2 Environmental Concerns


Environment is a key factor in Mandav as environment is directly related to tourism and other economic
activities in the town. The town is located atop a plateau and overlooks a lush green valley, which is drained by
a small river. Along the South, the land is surrounded by rolling hillocks and also overlooks Narmada River.
Most local tourists visit the town during Monsoons to enjoy the lush greenery of the plateau and the hillocks.
The flora in the region also provides a source of income to the residents.

But in the past few years, forest land is being cleared illegally due to lack of initiative by related government
departments. Illegal felling in the forest lands of the region for agriculture and settlements (reportedly, pattas
have been allocated to villagers on forest land which has further aggravated the problem) has led to
environmental implications which include high erosion levels, siltation of ponds, increased runoff and lower
water retention capacity. Existing ponds are getting choked due to deforestation and related siltation. The
green cover in the valley is also reducing due to afforestation and this can adversely impact tourism to the
town. In order to restore the balance, afforestation and construction of more ponds can be undertaken in the
region. All felling in the NP limits and surrounding area needs to be stopped immediately and completely.
Plantation of fruit bearing trees and flowering trees can also increase tourism and livelihood opportunities in
the region and afforestation can provide the following employment opportunities:

Tribals grow fruits/vegetables like jadibootis, salam misri and Dhuli Musli which fetch good prices and
have a good demand but due to poor condition of farmers, these crops are on a decline. Incentives are
needed to revive these crops.

Plantation of Dhavra gond can be promoted in the region.

Mahua, Charoli, Tendu and Bamboo trees can be planted to initiate SSIs in the region.

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Seetaphal, Khirni and Khurasani Imli are fruits for which Mandav is known and plantation of these
trees/ plants needs to be promoted

The khirni trees are reducing due to deforestation and need to be planted and conserved as these take a
long time to grow.

A biodiversity park can also be set up in the valley areas to attract tourists and to conserve the environment.
Wildlife can also be introduced in this biodiversity park to increase the tourism potential.

15.3 Pollution Levels

Air: Air pollution is not a concern due to very low motorised vehicle ownership in the town. Air quality
may be measured during peak tourist season when there is an influx of motorised tourist vehicles is high.
SPM content is slightly high near the bus stop.

Water: There is threat of pollution of water bodies due to garbage dumping and open defecation. Existing
ponds in the area are getting choked due to deforestation and related siltation. The silt at the base of
ponds is very fertile and hence, ponds should be desilted and the silt should be spread over agricultural
fields.

Soil: As regular maintenance of the septic tanks is not undertaken, leachette from the ttank can cause soil
and groundwater pollution.

15.4 City Green Spaces


There are no organised green spaces in the town.

15.5 Water Front Development and Conservation


The town has a number of natural water bodies in the form of lakes and ponds. Some of the water bodies are
used by local population for fishery and as source of water for various purposes. Any development of the
water fronts must be done carefully with the understanding of the relationship that the communities share
with the water bodies and after study of the activity pattern.

Sagar talab is the main pond in the town and Malipura pond is located along the foothills. Sagar talab is
presently being used as a tourist attraction, though on a small scale. Some boating facility has been provided
here. Waterfront development along Sagar talab is possible but would have to be undertaken with due
consideration to environment. This is also important because this pond acts as a source of water supply to the
town.

15.6 Existing environmental regulations


There is an existing Forestry Act known as the Madhya Pradesh Public Forestry Act 2001, under which the
forest management plan for forested and plantation areas will be made, approved, implemented and
monitored. The M P Public Forestry Rule 2002 under this act will guide the proposed management plan and

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will enable landowners and gram panchayats/sabhas to take responsibility for certain forested areas. Other
guidelines applicable to Mandav are:

Wild Life (Protection) Act 1972: For effectively protecting the wild life and to control poaching,
smuggling and illegal trade in wildlife and its derivatives. The objective is to provide protection to the
listed endangered flora and fauna and ecologically important protected areas.

The Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974: For maintaining or restoring
wholesomeness of water bodies. Environmental Protection Act, 1984: Umbrella Act for all
environmental parameters

Municipal solid waste rules, 2000 for safe management and disposal of Municipal waste

15.7 SWOT analysis


Strengths
Nearly 70% forest land
Indigenous species of trees and herbs
A number of natural and manmade water
bodies
Opportunities
Afforestation with indigenous species
Revival of waterbodies desilting and cleaning
Removal of encroachment on forest land
Catchment conservation of water bodies

Weakness
Encroachment and distribution of pattas on on
forest land
Depletion of forests due to illegal felling of
trees
Threats
Environmental degradation as the carrying
capacity of the town is exceeded

15.8 Issues

Distribution of pattas in forest areas is a major issue resulting in deterioration of forest cover.

Forest land is being cleared illegally due to lack of initiative by related government departments and is
leading to depletion of forest cover.

15.9 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan

There is an urgent need to stop deforestation and plant more trees.

Desilting of ponds needs to be undertaken.

Water bodies suffering from siltation and eutrophication need desiltation, catchment conservation and
conservation of drainage channels

Lamba talab, lal bangla road


Singodi, lal bangla road
Lal bangla talab
Saman talab, lal bangla road
Ralgaon, hathni paga/roopmati road
Dooth talai, neel kanth road
Badi doodh talai, neel kanth road
Tarapur talab, neelkanth road
Ek khamba talab, near chappan mahal
Lendiya talab, main road, ward 5
Pipliya talab, near ram mandir

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City Development Plan for Mandav

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Maan singh ji, kandlipura road


Moon talab, jahaz mahal
Gardens should be developed in the town. These gardens should be handed over to the community or
official agencies for maintenance.

Baories need to be revived and handpumps need to be provided in tribal areas

Ponds are needed to restore water balance in the region.

Encroachments on forest land should be removed. Forest land being cleared for construction of houses
and farms.

Large scale afforestation needs to be undertaken on forest land

New trees for Khurasani imli need to be planted and since this tree takes around 20 to 25 years to mature
and needs a lot of care till maturity, the planters need to be secured by providing tree guards around
them

Fuel and fodder trees need to be planted so that tribals dont have to rely on the forests for fuel and
fodder. Grazing grounds should also be created to reduce encroachment on forest land.

Action Plan

Integrated Environment management Plan

Formation of Environment Cell within NP

Large scale afforestation on forest land and non forest land- Joint Forest Management.

Fuel and fodder tree plantation for tribals - social forestry

Road side green buffer - urban forestry

Conservation of lakes and ponds and their catchment area within NP boundary and at foot hill (including
SAGAR TALAB AND Mallipura Talab)

Plantation of Khurasani Imli trees: unique to Mandav

Allocation of pattas to villagers on forest land to be regulated

Catchment Conservation of Tarapur Pond

Afforestation and promotion of Ecotourism

Use of Polyethene to be banned in Mandav

Catchment Conservation and large scale afforestation in Mandav Planning Area

Parks and Playgrounds

Revivial of Garden around Sagar Talab

Strict enforcement to stop illegal felling of trees

Green buffer along regional roads

Strategic EIA for water supply, industries and other environmental parameters

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CHAPTER 16: HERITAGE AND CONSERVATION


16.1 Identification of Heritage Structures/Areas
Mandav is home to India's finest examples of Islamic architecture, clinging to the edges of a ravine-riddled 20sq-km plateau overlooking the hazy plains. With-in this well-defended plateau is a wealth of palaces, pleasure
pavilions, mansions, tombs and mosques. The hill range is endowed with very attractive natural scenery, which
is at its best during the rainy season, when on all sides, it is clothed in green with a number of brooks and
torrents, rushing down into the ravine winding about its sides below; the beauty of which is further enhanced
by about a dozen lakes and ponds interspersed on its top.
There are a lot of un-identified and un-restored structures in Mandav. If they could be properly identified and
catalogued, and the water bodies inside the structures could be cleaned, these structures have a good tourism
potential.
The ancient hill fort of Mandav has inscriptional evidence dating back to AD 555. The rock cut caves, namely,
Lohani and Sat Kothari, are the earliest and rarer type of architecture amongst the over 60 structural
monuments. The important ones are located in three groups, known as:
1) Royal Complex
2) Hoshangh Shahs Tomb
3) Roopmatis Pavilion

Roopmati pavilion

Jahaz Mahal

While numerous monuments from various periods in history spread over the hill top, some of the significant
ones are listed as follows:

Gateways: The 45 km parapet of walls that encircles Mandu is punctuated by 12 gateways. Most notable
of these is the Delhi Darwaza, the main entrance to the fortress city, for which the approach is through a
series of gateways well fortified with walled enclosures and strengthened by bastions such as the Alamgir
and Bhangi Darwaza, through which the present road passes. Rampol Darwaza, Jehangir Gate and Tarapur
Gate are some of the other main gateways.

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Jahaz Mahal: This 120 mt long "Ship Palace" built between the two artificial lakes, Munj Talab and Kapur
Talab is an elegant two storeyed palace. With its open pavilions, balconies overhanging the water and
open terrace, Jahaz Mahal is an imaginative recreation in stone of a royal pleasure craft. Viewed on
moonlit nights from the adjoining Taveli Mahal, the silhouette of the building, with the tiny domes and
turrets of the pavilion gracefully perched on the terrace, presents an unforgettable spectacle. There are
some historians who believe the Jahaz Mahal was built by Sultan Giasuddin as his Harem Mahal. Whereas
there are some who believe it was the summer resort of Malwa King Munjdeb.

Hindola Mahal: Sultan Ghiyasud-din Khilji built the Hindola Mahal, or the Swinging Palace. It got this name
from its sloping walls which looked like the trestle supports of a swing. It was a great audience hall of the
King of Mandu. There are several unidentified buildings to the west of the Hindola Mahal which still bear
traces of their past grandeur. Amidst these is an elaborately constructed well called Champa Baoli which
is connected with underground vaulted rooms where arrangements for cold and hot water were made.
Other places of interest in this enclave are Dilawar Khan's Mosque, the Nahar Jharokha (tiger balcony),
the two large wells the Ujali (bright) and Andheri (dark) Baolis and Gada Shah's Shop and House, all worth
a visit.

Tomb of Hoshang Shah: Retains the masculinity and majesty of the Afgan ruler. The white marble tomb is
a product of mixed architectural and cultural blend of Hindu, Muslim, Afghan styles. It has a beautiful
dome, marble lattice work, porticos, courts and towers. Hoshang Shah started constructing his own tomb
but it was completed by his son five years after his death in 1440. In 1659, Shajahan visited the tomb and
was amazed by its beauty. He had sent his architects to study the design of and draw inspiration from the
Tomb. Among them was Ustad Hamid, who was also associated with the construction of Taj Mahal.

Jami Masjid: Inspired by the great mosque of Damascus, the Jami Masjid was conceived on a grand scale,
with a high plinth and a huge domedporch projecting in the centre, the background dominated by similar
imposing domes with the intervening space filled up by innumerable domes. One is struck by the huge
proportions and the stern simplicity of its construction. Its construction was started by Hoshang and
completed by Mahmud Khalji in 1454 A.D. The great court of the mosque is enclosed on all sides by huge
colonnades with a rich and pleasing variety in the arrangement of arches, pillars, number of bays, and in
the rows of domes above.

Roopmati's Pavillion: Roopmati Pavilion was built by Baj Bahadur. The pavilion has an Afghan style of
architecture. It has two Chabutara, or high tombs. They were built in order to watch and observe
movements of the enemy. However Roopmati, the beloved wife of baj Bahadur used the pavillion to
worship and perform her rituals the Narmada (Mokshoda) river, flowing far away (26 km) at Nimar valley,
from the 365 metre high mahal. The ambience at the pavillion is soothing. The sunset and the moonlit
night add more to the beauty.

There are many agencies involved in the heritage and tourism development of Mandav and few Conservation
and restoration works are also ongoing; but due to lack of funds and coordination between various agencies,

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Mandav is still an under developed city in terms of heritage and tourism Infrastructure. The agencies related
to heritage conservation, management and promotion are as follows:

Archaeological Survey of India (ASI): ASI provides protection to cultural heritage all over the country. There
are 61 ASI protected monuments in Mandav including gates, palaces, baodis, tanks, tombs, mosques, caves
and others, as listed in Table 16.1.
Table 16.1: Centrally protected monuments in Mandav

Typology

Name of Monuments under ASI

Gates

Alamgir Gate, Bhagwania Gate, Bhangi Gate, Delhi Gate, Gadi Darwaza,
Lohani Gate, Jahangirpur Gate, Hathi Pole Gate, Rampol Gate, Songadh
Gate, Tarapur Gate, Tripolia Gate

Baodis, Tanks and other

Ancient Hindu Baodi, Andheri Baodi, Ujali Baodi, Champa Baodi, Hammam,

water structures

Kapoor Talao and the ruins on its bank, Hammam, Somavati Kund

Tombs and Mosques

Hoshang Shah's Tomb, Chor Kot Mosque, Darya Khans Tomb, Dilawar
Khan's Mosque, Jama Masjid, Mahmud Khilji's Tomb, Malik Mughith's
Mosque, Mosque near Sopi Tank, Mosque north-west of Darya Khan's
Tomb, Mosque near Tarapur Gate, Nameless Tomb west of Shila Tank,
Mosque opposite Rampol Gate, Tomb & Mosque between Chor Kot
mosque & Chhappan Mahal, Tomb north of Darya Khan's Tomb, Tomb
north of Alamgir Gate

Palaces

Ashrafi Mahal, Baz Bahadurs Palace, Chisti Khans Mahal, Dai ka Mahal, Dai
ki Chhoti Bahan ka Mahal, Ek Khamba Mahal, Gada Shah's Palace, Hathi
Mahal, Hindola Mahal, Jahaz Mahal, Jali Mahal, Nahar Jharokha, Royal
Palace in the west of Champa Baodi, Roopmati's Pavalion, Taveli Mahal,
Water Palace

Caves and temples

Lohani Caves, Neelkantha (Nilkantheswar), Sat Kothari Caves

Others

Nahar Jharokha compound, Chor Kot, Dharmashala in the compound of


Hoshang's Tomb, Gada Shah's Shop, Lal Bagh, Lal Bungalow, Caravan Sarai,
Ruins on the west of Rewa Kund, Tower of Victory

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Figure 16.1: Lists the status of chemical conservation works for which funds have been sanctioned by the Central Government. Some
other works of chemical conservation have been completed recently by the ASI.
Table 16.2: Chemical Conservation by ASI

Name of monument
Jami Masjid
Baz Bahadur palace
Entrance & exterior of
Baz Bahadur Palace
Tomb north of Dariya
Khan

Sanctioned amount
1,700,000
951,000
130,000
(for current year)
100,000
(for current year)

Amount spent
1,500,000
863,782

Status
Work stopped
Total 10 Lakh estimate
Total 7.5 Lakh estimate

Directorate of Archaeology, archives and Museums, Madhya Pradesh: The main objective of this department
is to safeguard and protect those monuments which have cultural and historical importance in Madhya
Pradesh. At present there are 13 monuments under this department, as listed in Table 16.3.
Table 16.3: State protected monuments in Mandav

Name of Monument under MP Department


of Archaeology
Chappan Mahal
Kothri Sarai
Madankui Sarai
Phuta Mandir
Roja Ka Maqbara
Roshan Bagh Mahal
Adar Gumbad Mahal, Sagar
Jamnya Mahal
Bodhiya Mahal
Sumrawala Mahal
Nagariawala Mahal & Masjid, Sagar
Dkania Mahal, Jamania

Period
th

16 century
th
16 century
th
16 century
th
16 century
th
16 century
th
16 century
th
th
15 -16 century
th
16 century
th
16 century
th
16 century
th
th
16 -17 century
th
16 century

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Monument Category
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
B
B
B
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City Development Plan for Mandav


th

Under the 12

Finance Commission, funding has been made available for physical conservation of two

monuments in Mandav. The summary of the estimate for these is tabulated below.
Table 16.4: Estimate for works in Mandav for which funding is available under the 12th Finance Commission

Monument

No. of DPRs
1

Amount (Rs in
Lacs)
5.00

Total estimate for


works (Rs in Lacs)
20

No. of employees that


need to be deputed
3

Andhi Ka Mahal
Andha ka Mahal

5.00

10

Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India: Under the Capacity Building for Service Providers Scheme (CBSP), the
Ministry of Tourism gives financial assistance for the training of SC/ST people in the field of hospitality, to
encourage tourism (3-6 month training programmes).
Department of Tourism: The tourism policy of MP Tourism Department provides exemption in commercial
taxes and entertainment tax; and availability of government land for tourism projects. In this endeavour, the
main aim is to promote tourism as an industry to ensure employment generation along with tourism
development, with stress laid on encouraging private investment. Through the Department the state
government has sanctioned Rs. 5 Crore as a part of Destination Development Fund for the town.
Other organisations active in the field are the District Archaeological Association, Dhar and Indian National
Trust for Nature, Arts and Heritage (INTACH). The Group of Monuments of Mandu are also a part of the
UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List of India since 1998. While the nomination process for Mandav is not
active as of now, it is imperative that any development decisions are taken keeping in mind the potential of
the town in being declared a world heritage site.

16.2 Existing Status of Heritage Buildings


The Hoshang Shah Tomb, Rani Roopmati Pavilion and Royal Complex at Mandu are protected by the
Archaeological Survey of India (ASI). These are ticketed monuments managed by the ASI. Besides the
protected monuments, a number of structures are lying in a state of neglect. Although the monuments are
well maintained, the context around it has not been preserved. The Chappan Mahal that is under the State
Archaeology has been converted to museum.

16.3 Existing Regulations/ Heritage Guidelines


The Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 (No 24 of 1958), established by the
Archaeological Survey of India, is responsible for the protection of all national level heritage sites in India. The
Amendment to the Act i.e. The Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and
Validation) Act, 2010 further ensures the protection of surroundings of the property. According to rule 32 of
the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Rules 1959 and the 1992 Notification, every
area, beginning at the limit of the protected area or the protected monument, as the case may be, and
extending to a distance of one hundred metres in all directions shall be the prohibited area, in which no

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construction activity of any kind is permitted. Every area, beginning at the limit of prohibited area in respect of
every ancient monument and archaeological sites and remains, declared as of national importance under
sections 3 and 4 and extending to a distance of two hundred metres in all directions shall be the regulated
area, where repair of structures, modifications and new construction can be undertaken only with permission
from the competent authority i.e. the National Monuments Authority as per amendment of the Act in 2010.
This single Central Level Act with its Amendment in 2010 ensures complete protection of the properties and
their surroundings up to 300 metres from the property boundary.

The MP Department of Archaeology was established in 1956 with the objective to safeguard and protect the
heritage monuments in Madhya Pradesh. For the preservation of Ancient and Historical Monuments and
Archaeological Sites and Remains; and for the regulation of excavation of archaeological sites, Government of
India passed the Madhya Pradesh Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act, 1964. The
Act was further amended in 1970. Under the Act, the Madhya Pradesh Ancient Monuments and
Archaeological Sites and Remains Rules, 1975 were formulated. The Act

gives protection to ancient

monuments that are defined as being of historical, archaeological or artistic interest and has been in existence
for not less than 100 years (as per the the 1970 amendment, prior to which it was not less than 50 years). The
protection can include the remains of such a monument, the site of such a monument, such proportion of
land as may be required for fencing or covering in or otherwise preserving the monument, and the means of
access to, and convenient inspection of such monument. For the preservation of amenities of protected
monuments, the State Government is enabled to notify the area comprising or adjacent to the site of the
monuments as the controlled area. The State Government can prohibit or restrict any construction, erection
or execution of buildings, structures and other works within the controlled area or the alteration or extension
of any such buildings, structures or works that may materially affect their external appearance. The
Government can also regulate the external appearance of buildings, structures and other works in the
controlled area.

MP also has a State Eco and Adventure Tourism Policy, 2001; and a heritage policy which was formulated in
2002. A Comprehensive Heritage Policy is also being prepared (presently in draft stage).

16.4 Heritage Issues


th

With associations from the 6 century AD, the site can also be explored as a
source of archaeological evidence. It is imperative that the built heritage is
documented and listed and addressed at the local body level. The culture and
built heritage of the local population also needs to be studied so that the values
imbibed in these may not be wiped out in the name of development of the
town.

Traditional rural character of settlements and the medieval period


architecture it is important to deal with the issue of if and how
these should coexist.

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It is said that the fortified town was inhabited by a population of 9 lakh historically. While not all listed
monuments are in a good state of preservation, with their adjacent areas encroached upon, there are a
number of un listed historic structures above as well as below the ground lying neglected and unidentified.
Excavations for new construction undertaken in the past have resulted in finding of red soil that is indicative of
a layer of historic structures below the ground. In such an event, construction work is stopped by the ASI.
Hence, it is important that the local population is made aware of the wealth of heritage and involved in the
heritage management process so that they identify with the heritage as a resource and not a liability that is
hindering the growth of the town.

16.5 Tourism Potential of the Town


Mandav is a popular heritage tourism destination at the regional and national level. According to the NP,
nearly 5 lakh tourists visit Mandav each year, out of which about 15,000 are foreign tourists from Britain,
Holland, Turkey, United States of America, Canada and some others. On the other hand, data for 2007-2010
from the MP Tourism Department, states that the total number of tourists visiting Mandav have ranged from
around 4.1 lakh in 2007 to 7.6 lakh in 2010, with a decreasing %age of international tourists from 1.8 % in 2007
to 0.9% in 2010. The dropping number of international tourists may be attributed to the lack of appropriate
tourist facilities, good quality accommodation, physical infrastructure and interpretation of the heritage
resources. There are only three registered tourist guides in the town. It is important to ensure that the guides
are trained to communicate authentic information to the visitors. Special guides or audio guide systems may
be required in different languages for the international tourists.
Table 16.5: Tourist data from 2007-2010

Year

Total Tourists

Domestic Tourists

International Tourists

2007
2008
2009
2010

411,181
522,139
628,745
760,683

403,874
514,892
621,863
753,712

7,307
7,247
6,882
6,971

% of international
tourists
1.8
1.4
1.1
0.9

Source: MP Tourism
Figure 16.2: Proportion of total, domestic and international tourists from 2007-2010

800,000

No. of Tourists

700,000
600,000
500,000
400,000

Total Tourists

300,000

Domestic Tourists

200,000

International Tourists

100,000
0
2007

2008

2009

Years

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Table 16.6: Tourist data for Mandav for 10 years


Name of the
monument

2003-04

2004-05

India Forei India


n
gn
n
visito visito visito
rs
rs
rs
Hoshangs Tomb, 1686
2121
1314
Mandu
1
8
Royal Palaces, 1780
1170
2330
Mandu
66
00
Rupmati Pavilion, 1116
1135
1909
Mandu
40
51
3065
2517
Grand Total
5553
67
69
Source: Archaeological Survey of India

2005-06

Forei India Forei


gn
n
gn
visito visito visito
rs
rs
rs
2316
1801
1559
2
1274
3122
2677
24
1345
2350
2439
31
2851
7273
6675
17

2006-07
India
n
visito
rs
6127
9
1337
33
1318
34
3268
46

2007-08

Forei India Forei


gn
n
gn
visito visito visito
rs
rs
rs
8967
2254
2137
2
1639
2907
327
11
1654
2161
2008
10
4189
7322
4472
93

2008-09
India
n
visito
rs
1206
03
2040
88
2128
75
5375
66

2009-10

Forei India Forei


gn
n
gn
visito visito visito
rs
rs
rs
1476
2266
2523
68
2509
2803
2806
53
2647
2336
2376
58
6633
7405
7705
79

2010-11
India
n
visito
rs
1673
18
2692
26
3002
78
7368
22

2011-12

Forei India Forei


gn
n
gn
visito visito visito
rs
rs
rs
1644
2069
2488
77
2640
2379
2812
27
2837
2074
2234
31
7122
6522
7534
35

Tourist season in Mandav spreads over 4 months from Monsoons to Jan/Feb. Maximum tourist traffic to the
town is in August. During Monsoons (from July to September), mostly Gujarati and local tourists visit Mandav
to enjoy the lush green view of the valley and rolling hills. During winters (October to Jan/Feb), mostly
International tourists visit the town. Most of the tourists coming to Mandav dont spend more than 3 or 4
hours in the town. It is important to extend the tourist season from 4 to 8 months and also increase the stay of
the tourists in the town.

An annual music and dance festival is organised in Mandav during the winter period, to attract visitors. The
festival is clubbed with activities such as adventure sports. Such initiatives need encouragement and may be
expanded, though these need to be supported by appropriate infrastructure and facilities for the visitors. The
town has a dominant tribal population (81%) residing here through generations. The tribal population has a
distinct living heritage music, dance, arts, crafts and traditional knowledge systems about the indigenous
fauna. There is an attempt to link the tribal performing arts to tourism by including their performances in the
upcoming annual music and dance festival. Such opportunities can be extended to integrate other tribal arts
and crafts. The natural heritage and unique topography of the town presents opportunities for ecotourism and
adventure sports. This potential can be developed further.

The accommodation facilities in the town include 2 MP Tourism hotels, 2 NP rest houses, 2 dharamshalas (1
Jain, 1 Hindu) and 5 small private hotels. The Jain Dharamshala attached to the Jain temple is at a prime
location but is available only to Jain visitors.

District

Archaeology

Association

and

State

Archaeology Department took the initiative of setting


up a museum for archaeological antiquities as well as
tribal cultural artifacts at Chhappan Mahal (16

th

century mausoleum). Before the setting up of this


museum, this monument was restored to its original
form. In the four galleries of the museum, Drishyika,
Mandapika, Aranyika and Poorvika, an attempt has

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been made to represent the invaluable historical heritage of Dhar district dating from Stone Age to the 20

th

century. This heritage includes the one and a half millennium old Bagh cave frescos, stone age relics, Bhil
culture, the glory of King Bhoj and Dharanagari, the acme of the Sultans of Malwa, the immortal love of
Roopmati and Baz Bahadur and the martyrdom of Rana Bakhtawar Singh.

A fossil museum Ashmadha (Literally Seated in stone) has also very shortly been thrown open. A showroom
Roopayan has been started to cater to demand of the tourists for exclusive and exotic art and craft indigenous
to the region. Spardha, an adventure point providing the entire range from trekking, rappelling, skating, gear
biking to TT, Pool or Badminton is also proposed. There is a mobilization of funds of over Rs. 150 million from
the District administration.

Mandav is on the UNESCO Tentative World Heritage List of India, since 1998. It appears as a prominent
destination on the World Tourism map and measures to preserve its beauty, restore its monuments and
increase its tourism potential are needed. There is a need to devise a tourism plan for the city and highlight the
tourism potential of the town that may include the provision of extra accommodation, parking, signage,
training of guides, appropriate interpretation and information facilities for the visitors, encroachment removal
and development of picnic sites. The town lacks an information/orientation and interpretation centre. The
potential of the town is presently not being explored to its full extent. But at the same time it is important that
the heritage resources of the town do not suffer a negative impact as a result of the increase in visitor
numbers. Innovative models such as the dispersed hotel concept can be use in Mandav where the temporary
(tents) or hutments can act as dispersed accommodation with the front of the house, back of the house and
hotel facilities centralized. This can be applied on a public private partnership model with active participation
of the local population, hence enable them to benefit from the tourism industry.

16.6 Possibility of Tourism Circuits at the Regional Level


Mandav is already a part of tourism circuits in the state of Madhya Pradesh. How and to what extent the
circuits need to be strengthened and promoted further must be analysed to ensure that heritage tourism is
sustainable in the long term, without any damage to the physical and cultural heritage of the place.

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Figure 16.3: Tourist circuits in MP, Source: MP State Tourism Development Corporation Ltd.

The development of regional tourist circuits requires strengthening of the regional linkages in terms condition
of roads, transportation (tourist buses), better tourist accommodation and interpretation at these
destinations. The current circuit links Mandav with Ujjain, Indore, Omkareshwar and Maheshwar. Circuits can
be developed in the immediate vicinity of Mandav linking Nalcha that has heritage significance (group of state
protected structures), Budhi Mandav (archaeological site) and other such tribal and rural settlements. This can
help increase length of stay of the tourists with in the town. At a regional level, Mandav has strong potential to
be linked with Dharampuri (to south), Dhar and Bagh Caves along with Ujjain, Indore, Omkareshwar and
Maheshwar. This can take place through improved connectivity to the NH3 and better roads all across with
Dhamnod as a tourist accommodation hub.

16.7 Comparative analysis with UDPFI guidelines


Physical infrastructure provision for tourists will need to be provided as per the UDPFI guidelines. The
constraint on land utilisation due to presence of historic fabric above and below the ground and 70% forest
land pose the need for innovative model for tourist accommodation provision that may not be as per usual
standards.

16.8 SWOT analysis


Strengths
Rich natural, built and living heritage resources
Protection of a number of structures under ASI and State
Department of Archaeology

107

Weaknesses
Encroachments on historic built fabric
and natural heritage
Lack of representation of indigenous

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Established as a destination for heritage tourism at the


State and also national level
Funding of Rs 5 crores for destination development of
Mandav
Curent initiative of annual music and dance festival to
draw tourists
Favourable MP Tourism Policy, 2010

Opportunities
Public-private partnerships in a variety of areas in
addition to hotels and accommodation for tourists
Practice of ecological tourism and heritage sensitive
tourism
Models such as dispersed hotel with temporary
structures to be introduced
Increasing tourist season and tourist stay in Mandav
Strengthening regional tourist circuit through better
road connectivity, transport, accommodation and
interpretation
Enabling the active participation and benefit of local
population from tourism
Heritage awareness generation of local population
and training of local population

tribal culture
Poor involvement and benefit of local
population from tourism industry
Built heritage above and below the
ground and the 300 mts regulation
around ASI protected monuments
poses limitation for tourist
infrastructure development
Number of tourists showing drop due
to poor infrastructure
Threats
Negative impact on the historical built
fabric
Socio-cultural impact of excessive
tourist influx on the local population
Further drop in tourist numbers due to
inability to provide appropriate tourist
facilities and infrastructure

16.9 Issues

Locals dont benefit much from the tourists coming to town

inadequate facilities for the tourists

Tourists just visit Mandav for 2 to 3 hrs and return. They either stay in Dhar or Nalcha

Lack of tourist bus services

Lack of recreational facilities and activities for tourists

16.10 City specific strategies and Action Plan

Developing a tourist circuit connecting Omakreshwar, Mandav, Maheshwar, Dharampuri, Kukshi (Dinosaur
National Park) and Ujjain. Tourist accommodation and parking to cater to Mandav can be provided in
Dhamnod and tourist buses and luxury buses can ply from Dhamnod to Mandav

Connectivity from Mandav to NH3 via Jhabri village needs to be developed on priority basis

To increase tourist season from 4 months to 8 months by introducing


o

Adventure sports like paragliding. Paragliding was initiated around 2 years ago as a part of
Mandav Utsav but was not a part of the festival this year

Camping

Nature trails

Cultural events

Sound and light show and night lighting of monuments to be taken up

Ropeway can be developed from Lohani caves to Songarh

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City Development Plan for Mandav

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Parkota is in poor condition and needs to be conserved

Gardens should be developed in the town. These gardens should be handed over to the community or
official agencies for maintenance.

Better access roads and information centres to be provided in monuments

Propagation for World Heritage Listing should be taken up on a proactive basis.

Public-private partnerships to take place in a variety of areas in addition to hotels and accommodation for
tourists such as:

The design and manufacturing of heritage craft products

Setting up and running of gift and souvenir shops

Setting up and running heritage centres for Music and dance

Yoga, Ayurveda, and meditation centers

Vegetarian, organic, and health food centers

Restaurants

Boating and bicycling rentals and services

Shops that cater to tourists

Cleaning and renewing existing lakes and lake beds and possibly, historic water channels.

There is a need to set up a cultural heritage interpretation center with multimedia presentations and
prepare and disseminate heritage information on history, architecture, and culture to local people and
tourists.

Guides in Mandav donot have licences. NP can issue licences to these guides. This will increase the income
of guides and can also be a source of earning for the NP

Awareness generation and propagation of heritage of Mandav

Orientation and heritage information centre needs to be developed to attract tourists.

Regulations required to ensure heritage structures are conserved

Action Plan

Formulation of Mandav Heritage Resource Management Authority

Formation of Heritage Cell in NP

Integrated Heritage Resource Management Plan for Mandav Planning Area (IHRMP) - dymanic document

Periodic review and updation of the IHRMP for Mandav Planning Area

Landscape Plan

Preparation of Dossier for Nomination as World Heritage Site - to be prepared through consultative
process. The IHRMP to act as support document/documentation base for the Dossier

Conservation of heritage structures and landscapes

Generation of tourist survey database - data linked to website

Interpretation and Use Plan (IUP) preparation and possible projects

Possible projects that may be proposed under the IUP

Risk Management Plan

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Implementing proposals of Risk Management Plan

Traffic and Transport Management Plan for Mandav Planning Area

Introduction of IPT for Tourists - connecting all visitor attractions within Mandav

Integrated Environment Management Plan

Development of Small Scale Herbal Park to attract Tourists

Propagation of farm Tourism with AC and non AC tents

Development of Distributed Tourist Accommodation by big hotel groups like Taj

Ecoforest development along Lamba Talab

Ghoda buggy can be started as tourist vehicle

Ropeway connecting Lohani caves to Songarh Fort can be provided, if approved by Mandav Heritage
Resource Management Authority

Development of Biodiversity Park in the valley along Western side of Mandav

Access walkway to Boorhi Mandav and Songarh Fort to be provided parallel to the valley (near NP Raen
Basera)

Extending tourist season from 3 months to 8 months

Souverneirs for Mandav

Provision of Information centres in Monuments

Training and licences to guides

Conservation of Water bodies in Jahaz Mahal

Homestays can be promoted as an alternate means of accommodation

Dinosaur nesting sites to be promoted

Parking and viewpoint to be developed at Neelkanth

State Department of Archaeology to play a more active role

ASI can provide for public toilets and other amenities within the ASI listed Monuments' premises

Resource Centre, Design innovation and training centre and Haat (for continuity of traditional knowledge
systems and promoting these as means of livelihood)

Signage on all internal roads and regional roads to indicate directions to Mandav and directions to
Monuments

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CHAPTER 17 INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK


17.1 Introduction
The institutional setup in a city involves various stakeholders viz; urban local bodies, cooperatives, private
sector, etc. These institutions perform their role in specific areas defined by the government. The municipal
bodies (urban local bodies) are vested with a long list of functions delegated to them by the state governments
under the municipal legislation. These functions broadly relate to public health, welfare, regulatory functions,
public safety, public works, development activities and ULBs are also responsible for the provision and
maintenance of basic infrastructure and services in cities and towns. Apart from the Nagar Parishad there are
Parastatal and State Level Agencies which work towards the development of the town. With the incorporation
th

of the 74 amendment, the role of parastatals such as Public Health Engineering Department (PHED) has been
reduced substantially. Responsibility for planning, extension and day to day service provision within municipal
limits now rests with the municipal staff.

17.2 Institutions and Organisations


Nagar Parishad, Mandav
The Nagar Parishad, Mandav was established on August 14, 1996 and Mandav has been classified as a Class II
town. Earlier it was functioning as Special Area Development Authority (SADA) formulated on May 27, 1978.
The 15 member municipal council is led by a Chairman, earlier directly elected by the people. Day to day
business administration is led by the Chief Municipal Officer (CMO), an officer from the State Municipal
Services (Executive cadre). The CMO is responsible for implementation of municipal councils decisions. The
key municipal departments include: Health, PHE and Revenue and Accounts. But owing to the High Court
ruling for want of more tribal representation in NP, the town till recently, did not have a Municipal President
or Councilors and the town was jointly governed by SDM/Tehsildar and CMO. This limited the involvement of
public in the functioning of the town. Elections to the Council were recently conducted and the NP council has
been constituted in Feb, 2012.

Mandav Nagar Parishad has a sanctioned strength of 27 employees and all the staff positions are filled. The
Municipality is responsible for provision of basic services, namely water supply, sanitation, street lighting and
maintenance of roads, parks and recreational facilities. The municipality is also responsible for planning and
sanctioning housing plans and layouts. The NP Mandav owns the following properties, vehicles and
equipment:

Vishranti Bhawan (Rest House) on Main Chauraha 8 rooms

Rain Basera Bhawan (Guest House) in Ward No. 3 4 rooms

Staff Quarters 10 rooms in Ward No. 3

1 Store Room in Ward No. 3

1 Office in Ward No. 3

1 Water Supply Tank in Ward No. 5

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Malipura Pump House

Sumpwell House

Pump House Sagar Talab

17 Ponds

1 Door to Door solid waste collection vehicle (Force)

2 tractors, 1 trolley, 4 large tankers and 5 small tankers.

Public Works Department


The Main activities of the department are Construction and Maintenance of Buildings, Roads, flood control
works etc. The department is headed by the Engineer in chief as head of department with 9 Zonal Chief
Engineers. PWD is responsible for maintenance and construction of State level roads. All the roads that
connect Mandav, that is the SH 31, road from SH31 at Lunehra to Mandav via Nalcha and Kalibaodi, going on
to Dharampuri further south, Manawar to the west and Dhamnod to the east come under the Dhar Division of
PWD. Another road that connects Mandav directly to the SH 31 at Gujri and hence the NH3 also comes under
the PWD. The town does not have a PWD office but is managed by the Dhar office.

Directorate of Town & Country Planning


The Directorate of Town & Country planning is governed by MP Nagar Tatha Gram Nivesh Adhiniyam 1973 and
rules prepared thereunder, e.g. MP Nagar Tatha Gram Nivesh Niyam 1975 and MP Bhumi Vikas Niyam 1984.
The main functions are: preparation of Town Development Plan, Review, Evaluation and Modification of
existing Development Plan, Preparation of Regional Development Plan, Monitoring and Enforcement of
various schemes such as Integrated Development Plan of Small and Medium Towns (IDSMT) and Urban
Infrastructure Development scheme for Small & Medium Towns (UIDSSMT), Control on unauthorized
development in towns and functions of State Nodal Agency for National Urban Information System Scheme.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

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The activities of the department include preparation of development plan for investment areas of towns,
preparation of regional plans for investment regions, control and inspection of planning for uniform
development of small and medium-sized cities, development of infrastructure of towns, guidance in execution
of development plans, check on unauthorized development of cities, guidance in policy making to
development authorities/ special zone development authorities/ housing board and other institutions,
guidance and assistance to state government and other institutions for management/ land planning/ selection
of place and state nodal agency for nation urban information.

The town does not have a TCP department but a Master Plan for the town for the target year 2011 was
prepared by the TCP Department, Indore.

Madhya Pradesh Housing board (MPHB)


Madhya Pradesh Housing Board was established as a body corporate under the Madhya Pradesh Griha Nirman
Mandal Adhiniyam, 1972 which replaced the earlier similar Act of 1950. The objective of Madhya Pradesh
Housing Board is to deal with and satisfy the needs of housing accommodation and for matters connected
there-with. MPHB is engaged in business of development & construction of housing colonies and commercial
complexes for various sections of the society. Its main aim is to provide houses/ plots/ commercial spaces as
per specifications, within delivery period & at reasonable cost with transparent & ethical dealing with users
satisfaction. It is governed by a Board of Directors consisting of a Chairman appointed by the Government,
officials of concerned departments/ agencies of the State and Central Governments, as also two MLAs and two
other non-officials appointed by the State Government.
The organization structure comprises of:

Eight Circle Offices headed by Deputy Housing Commissioners (Superintending Engineer) located three at
Bhopal, one each at Ujjian, Gwalior, Indore, Jabalpur and Rewa, of which Dhamnod comes under the
Indore Circle.

One Electrical Circle Office headed by Deputy Housing Commissioner (Electrical) located at Bhopal.

Twenty-Nine Divisional Offices headed by Executive Engineers and Seventy-Three Sub Divisional Offices
headed by Assistant Engineers.

Three Electrical Division Offices headed by Executive Engineer (Electrical) located at Bhopal, Indore,
Jabalpur and Eight Electrical Sub-Division Offices located at each Circle headquarters headed by Assistant
Engineers.

Four Estate Management Offices headed by Estate Officers located at Four Rajbhogi towns and TwentyNine Estate Managers located in all Divisions.

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Figure 17.1: Organisational flowchart of MPHB Head Office

Mandav does not have a housing board office and no initiatives have been taken up thus far by the Housing
board to improve the housing situation in the town.

Madhya Pradesh State Electricity Board


MPSEB is responsible for electricity generation, transmission and distribution of power in the State of Madhya
Pradesh. Total MPSEB network is divided in to three zones: east zone, central zone and west zone. Mandav
comes under the MP Pashchim Kshetra Vidyut Vitaran Company Ltd (MPPKVVCL) that is the west zone
distribution company that has its head office at Indore. An SE and three EEs of the Dhar O&M Circle from
MPPKVVCL are deputed in Dhar city.

Madhya Pradesh Forest Department


Madhya Pradesh has immense forest resources covering an area of 95.2 thousand square kilometers which is
approximately 31 percent of the total geographical area. Madhya Pradesh Forest Department is engaged in
management of the largest forest area in the country. Under the MP Forest Department, there are district
level Van Mandals. Mandav has a Forest Department Office located in the town; and check posts spread across
the forest area.

Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board


The main objective of M.P. Pollution Control Board is to maintain water, air and soil in healthy and usable
condition for various purposes. The MP Pollution Control Board has been vested with considerable authority
and responsibility under various environmental legislations to monitor and prevent pollution. Mandav does
not have any office of MPPCB or any monitoring stations.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

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Public Health and Engineering Department


PHE department in Mandav only looks after the groundwater level monitoring, provision and maintenance of
wells, tubewells and handpumps and groundwater quality testing in rural areas of Dhar Tehsil. Water supply to
the city is being managed by NP and being provided by Irrigation Department. PHED is led by staff from the
respective health and engineering cadre of the State Municipal Services. The department faces problems of
staff shortage and maintenance of equipment in rural areas.

ASI and State Archaeology Department


Since many monuments in the town are under ASI, the town has an ASI office. Three of the monuments in the
town also have a ticketing office being managed by the ASI. An Archaeological officer in charge has also been
deputed by ASI in Mandav. State Archaeology Department also maintains a few monuments in Mandav but the
nodal office is in Dhar.

Tourism Department
MP tourism department is a key stakeholder in case of Mandav and undertakes several development activities
around the monuments but the department does not have an office in Mandav

17.3 Issues

Lack of interaction between various Government departments.

Data availability in digital form in limited but is in progress.

Single window system absent in all departments All departments including Nagar Parishad should publish
annual reports.

Need for effective monitoring mechanisms.

17.4 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


The following suggested reforms need to be taken up:
Nagar Parishad

Nagar Parishad should conduct training programmes for Nagar Parishad officials

E Governance

The Nagar Palika and/or TCPO should undertake a detailed exercise for topographic surveys of Municipal
area

A dedicated Development authority office, housing board office, an Architect and designated Town
Planning officer need to be provided in the town to ensure planned development and implementation in
accordance with the plans.

Computerization of data

Mapping of services (water distribution network and proposed sewerage distribution network maps to be
prepared and regularly updated through digital media)

NP to maintain regular photographic records of the NP properties.

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Other departments

Single web portal to ensure coordination between Government Departments

Staff shortage is a major problem in most other Government departments. Hence, computerization would
help reduce the load on these departments.

Enforcement Authority and staff to be provided to various departments to ensure stricter enforcement.
E.g.: Forest Department, Nagar Parishad.

Action Plan

Single window system in Nagar Palika

Interdepartmental Coordination to be ensured by Mandav Heritage Resource Management Authority

Architect and planner in Nagar Palika

Formation of Heritage Cell under NP

Formation of Environment Cell under NP

Infrastructure mapping with annual updation in digital form - to be linked with GIS database being
generated and maintained for heritage mapping under Mandav Heritage Resource Management Authority
(HRMA)

Post for Public Awareness Officer in Nagar Palika

Service centre to be constituted for complaint redressal

Restructuring of Municipal Cadre

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CHAPTER 18: MUNICIPAL FINANCE


18.1 Introduction
The Nagar Palika Parishad of Mandav has been successful in securing financial resources to meet the growing
needs of the city. In spite of the increasing pressure of population and increased demand for the basic civic
services, the available income is able to meet its requirement and hence the financial position is quite stable.
The NP receives most of its income through transfers from higher level of governments in the form of either
Grants or Centrally Sponsored Schemes. The own revenue (tax and non-tax) generates lesser income than
transfers from higher level of governments (Centre and State). This decreases the autonomy, functional and
financial, of Mandav Nagar Palika. This chapter endeavors to examine the present status of finances of Mandav
NPP. A detailed analysis is given in the following sections.

18.2 Revenue Account / Financial Position


For the period of five years under consideration, there has been a surplus for all the years indicating the
stability of the financial position of the Nagar Palika of Mandav (See Table 18.1 and Figure18.1). The surplus
available can be used for various much needed development measures. The increase in recent years is largely
due to increase in government transfers.
Table 18. 1: Financial Position of Mandav Nagar Palika (Rs lakhs)

Financial Position
Revenue
Expenditure
Surplus/Deficit

2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07


203.16 106.66 109.51
77.54
101.19
104.06
83.78
81.62
73.88
93.27
99.1
22.88
27.89
3.66
7.92

Source: Computation based on data obtained from Budget documents of Mandav NP

250
200
Revenue

150

Expenditure

100

Surplus/Deficit
50
0
2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07

18.3 Revenue Composition


The Nagar Palika Parishad of Mandav draws its income from two sources. One is its own revenue and other is
transfers from higher level of governments (centre and state). The own revenue comprises of tax and non-tax
sources where as transfers consist of revenue transferred from centre, in the form of devolution of funds from
Central Finance Commission (12th FC) and Centrally Sponsored Schemes (CSS). The devolution from State
Finance Commission and state schemes also form a part of transfers. The details of revenue composition are
presented in table 18.2 and graphical presentation in Figure 18.2 below.
During the study period, the contribution from tax revenue has increased significantly from 35.57 lakhs to
80.43 lakhs. But the percentage contribution has changed from 35% to just 39.5%. This is due to the sharp
increase in income from transfers from 31 lakhs to 117.48 lakhs over the 5 years. In Madhya Pradesh, the

117

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

compensation in lieu of Octroi is treated


t
as part of own revenue. This is true for all the ULBs in the state,
including Mandav. Contribution of non-tax
n
revenue has declined from 34% to 2.5%.
The contribution of transfers in tottal revenue remains the highest and the percentagee is increasing over the
years. The details of revenue compo
osition and related trends are indicated in table 18.2 and
a figure 18.2 below.
Table 18.2: Revenue Composition of Man
ndav (Rs lakhs)

Revenue Composition
Tax
%
Non tax
%
Transfers
%
TOTAL REVENUE

201
10-11
80
0.43
39
9.59
5..25
2..58
117
7.48
57
7.83
203
3.16

2009-10
59.06
55.37
4.47
4.19
43.13
40.44
106.66

2008-09
37.85
34.39
13.4
12.18
58.26
52.93
109.51

2007-08
40.14
51.77
3.34
4.31
34.06
43.93
77.54

2006-07
35.57
35.15
34.52
34.11
31.1
30.73
101.19

140
120
100

Tax

80

Non tax

60

Transfers

40
20
0
2010-11

2009-10

2008-09

2007-08

2006-07

43%

45%

Tax
Non tax

12%

Transfers

(a) Tax Composition


Amongst the taxes, Octroi compenssation is a major source of revenue, which has contributed to more than 50
percent of the tax yield over the 5 years. Next important tax is the Heritage Depossit followed by tax on
Vehicles. The percentage contribution of these taxes has been decreasing over the years.
y
The other taxes
cumulative share was less than 5 peercent. The details of tax composition are indicated in table 18.3 and figure
18.3).
Table 18.3:Tax Composition of Mandav (Rs lakhs)

Category
Tax On Vehicles
Drinking water Vehicle Tax

%
Rs(Lakhs)
2010- 2009- 2008- 2007- 20061
11
10
09
08
07 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07
8.09

7.02
2

7.2
1.2

4.8
1

118

4.7
2.75

10.06
0.00

11.89
3.39

19.02
3.17

11.96
2.49

13.21
7.73

City Development Plan for Mandav


Octroi Compensation
Property Tax
Samekit Kar
Passenger Tax
Development Sub Tax
Education Sub Tax
Passenger Tax Katotra
Loan+Surcharge
Water Tax
Heritage Deposit
Income Tax
Commercial tax

56.23
0.55
0.34
1.08
0.15
0.13
0.33
0.01
0.61
12.45
0.17
0.29
80.43

43.63
1.21
0.17
1.18
0.04
0.01
0.3

24.58 25.91 20.56


0.29 0.6 0.18
0.23 0.15 0.12
1.29 1.19 0.24

2.09
0.73 0.2 1.11
1.77 0.87 2.4
0.44 0.9 0.37
0.56 1.09 0.52
59.06 37.85 40.14

2.35
1.01
1.12
1.26
1.28
35.57

2013

69.91 73.87 64.94 64.55 57.80


0.68
2.05
0.77
1.49
0.51
0.42
0.29
0.61
0.37
0.34
1.34
2.00
3.41
2.96
0.67
0.19
0.07
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.16
0.02
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.41
0.51
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.01
0.00
0.00
5.21
6.61
0.76
1.24
0.53
2.77
2.84
15.48
3.00
2.30
5.98
3.15
0.21
0.75
2.38
0.92
3.54
0.36
0.95
2.88
1.30
3.60
100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

60
50
2010-11

40

2009-10

30

2008-09
2007-08

20

2006-07

10
0

(b) Non-tax revenue


The main non-tax source of income for Mandav NPP is income from Building rent & night shelters due to the
tourist attraction of the town. The next major contributor is market Fee & lake lease. The details of non-tax
revenue are presented in table 18.4 and figure 18.4.
Table 18.4: Non-Tax Composition of Mandav (Rs lakhs)

Rs(Lakhs)
Category
Shulabh Complex
Market Fee
From Slaughter House
Food License Fee
Audit Objection
Night Shelter
Building, Inn Rent
Miscellenous
Compromise Fee

2010-11
0.34
0.01
0.05
0.09
0.65
0.61
2.67
0.01

20062009-10 2008-09 2007-08 07


0.01 20.01
0.38
0.02
0.33 0.33
0.01
0.31
0.01 0.02
0.89
0.01
0.01 0.01
0.19
0.03
0.14
0.7
0.63
0.45 0.2
0.66
0.86
0.52 0.54
0.98
0.31
0.58 2.6
0.06
0.02

119

201011
0.00
6.69
0.20
0.98
1.77
12.80
12.01
52.56
0.20

200910
0.00
9.13
0.24
21.39
4.57
16.83
15.87
23.56
1.44

%
200809
0.00
0.16
2.40
0.08
0.23
4.88
6.67
2.40
0.16

200708 2006-07
0.29 57.97
9.43 0.96
0.29 0.06
0.29 0.03
4.00 0.00
12.86 0.58
14.86 1.56
16.57 7.53
0.00 0.00

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Water Tanker Fee


Public Participation
Lake Lease
Coupon Form fee
Construction &
Mutation Fee
Special Component

0.06
0.2
0.42
0.13

0.04

0.02

0.08

0.08 1.18 0.96 0.16


3.94 0.00 0.00
0.34 8.27 11.30 2.87
0.11 2.56 1.20 2.71

2.29
0.00
15.43
5.71

0.23
0.00
0.98
0.32

0.47
0.05

0.37
0.35

0.54
0.2

0.01

0.04

5.25

4.47

0.21
0.47 0.27 0.20 0.96 1.63 13.43 0.78
10.26
10.01 0.00 0.00 79.53 0.00 29.00
13.4
3.34 34.52 103.35 107.45 103.88 95.43 100.00

25
20

2010-11
2009-10

15

2008-09

10

2007-08
2006-07

5
0

(c) Transfers (Grants and Contribution)


The major contribution in terms of transfers for the latest year comes from the Basic Facilities. The devolution
of grants for basic facilities is a regular source of income for the Mandav NPP. Grants from State Finance
th
Commission & 12 Finance Commission are also major contributors but their percentage has been decreasing
over the past five years. These transfers are made under the constitutional provisions from these statutory
bodies, i.e., Central Finance Commission and State Finance Commission. BRGF Plan & Pension Plans are other
major heads for transfers. Table 18.5 and Figure 18.5 indicate the details of transfers (grants and contribution)
received by Mandav Nagar Palika Parishad from higher level of governments.
Table 18.5: Transfers Composition of Mandav (Rs lakhs)

Rs(Lakhs)
Category
2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07 2010-11
BRGF Plan
13.04
11.10
Basic Fac.
46.98
12.41
19.06
12.11
8.66
39.98
CC Road
11.16
9.50
Literacy Drive
3.26
2.77
Road Upkeep
3.35
3.68
2.65
2.25
4.64
2.85
Fin. Comm.
14.44
7.72
14.61
8.3
10.54
12.29
MP/Leg. fund
2.14
0.00
Dev.Grant
5
3.48
0.00
Mid day meal
11.8
6.04
2.5
1.67
1.51
10.04
Family Help
1.5
2.2
2.05
2.5
2.4
1.28
Pen. Plans
11.95
6.08
4.27
5.9
3.35
10.17
Water Sys.
7.5
1.33
0.00
117.5
43.13
58.26
34.06
31.1
100.00

120

2009-10
0.00
28.77
0.00
0.00
8.53
17.90
0.00
11.59
14.00
5.10
14.10
0.00
100.00

%
2008-09
0.00
32.72
0.00
0.00
4.55
25.08
3.67
5.97
4.29
3.52
7.33
12.87
100.00

2007-08
0.00
35.55
0.00
0.00
6.61
24.37
0.00
0.00
4.90
7.34
17.32
3.90
100.00

2006-07
0.00
27.85
0.00
0.00
14.92
33.89
0.00
0.00
4.86
7.72
10.77
0.00
100.00

City Development Plan for Mandav


50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

2013

2010-11
2009-10
2008-09
2007-08
2006-07

18.4 Expenditure Pattern


The head wise expenditure pattern of Mandav Nagar Palika Parishad is presented in table 18.6 and figure 18.6
below. Amongst the major heads, 40.87% expenditure was incurred Public Construction in 2010-11. General
Administration accounted for the 2nd highest expenditure amounting to 30.99 lakhs. Expenditure on Public
Health & Facilities is 14.29% and has been increasing over the past five years but it is still low. It should be
noted that expenditure on public education is nil. Hence, the expenditure under these heads needs to be
increased.
Table 18.6: Expenditure Composition of Mandav (Rs lakhs)

Rs(Lakhs)
Category
Ordinary Government
Revenue Collection
Public Security
Public Health & Facilities
Public Construction
Miscellenous
Special Loan & Expenditure

201011
30.99
11.22
1.16
14.87
42.53
1.45
1.84
104.1

200910
29.81
5.93
8.72
6.99
28.98
1.91
1.44
83.78

200809
21.45
10.84
0
2.68
42.07
2.18
2.4
81.62

200708
18.87
13.32
0.62
5.92
32.1
1.39
1.66
73.88

121

%
200607 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08
23.04 29.78 35.58 26.28 25.54
13.3 10.78
7.08
13.28 18.03
13.24 1.11
10.41
0.00
0.84
6.25 14.29
8.34
3.28
8.01
32.25 40.87 34.59 51.54 43.45
2.3
1.39
2.28
2.67
1.88
2.89
1.77
1.72
2.94
2.25
93.27 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

200607
24.70
14.26
14.20
6.70
34.58
2.47
3.10
100.00

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

45
40
35
2010-11

30

2009-10

25

2008-09

20

2007-08

15

2006-07

10
5

Special Loan
& Expenditure

Miscellenous

Puplic
Construction

Public Health
& Facilities

Public
Security

Revenue
Collection

Ordinary
Government

18.5 Key Financial Indicators


The key financial indicators for finance are:

Surplus/ deficit account


Revenue generation from tax and non tax sources
Revenue generation from Transfers: This is a critical indicator as the SFC and CFC transfers can follow
variable patterns after the first phase. This indicator also suggests the extent of financial autonomy of
the NP.

18.6 Major Observations

Financial position of Mandav NPP is quite stable and it has enough surplus to promote development
in required fields. Increase in income from own revenue has been lower than revenue under
transfers, indicating a decline in fiscal autonomy of NPP.
Income from tax source is more than non-tax sources, which is a positive trend.
In terms of tax sources, Octroi compensation, Heritage Deposit & Tax on Vehicles are major
contributors.
The major non-tax contributors are the real estate related sources Building rent & Night Shelters. The
next major contributor is market Fee & lake lease.
Under transfers, major contributors are grant for basic facilities followed by grants from State Finance
th
Commission & 12 Finance Commission.
In terms of expenditure, a major share of expenditure is incurred on Public Construction & General
Administration. Expenditure on Grants and Public Education accounts is nil & therefore the
expenditure under these heads needs to be increased.
It was found that in some cases, the total under certain heads of the Municipal budget was not
accurate. Hence, in such cases, the sum of components was considered as final.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

CHAPTER 19: VISION, SECTORAL GOALS AND STRATEGIES


19.1 Vision
During the second Stakeholder workshop held in February, 2012; the vision for the town was framed. The key
points emphasized by the participants for inclusion in the vision are:
Enhanced income generation for locals from tourism
Environment conservation
Employment generation; and
Provision of housing and infrastructural facilities in the peripheral villages
The vision for the town was formulated as given below:
To develop the town as a destination for international tourism, which is based on heritage conservation,
heritage awareness amongst locals, environmental friendly development, optimizing use of renewable
energy and generation of employment opportunities; a town based on equal employment
opportunities, service provision and infrastructure provision for the tribal villages and the main town
population.

19.2 Sectoral Goals and Strategies


Economic Base
Goal: Equitable Employment generation for all
Sectoral strategies
To provide for employment opportunities in peripheral villages
To increase the span of tourist season from 4 to 8 months
To increase income generation of locals and NP from tourism
To provide a non grain based Mandi
To set up SSIs and HHis related to handicrafts and agro based products
Pisciculture to be promoted
Animal rearing to be revived and related revenue generation opportunities to be developed
Computer related employment opportunities for educated unemployed
Water supply
Goal: Adequate water supply to all
Sectoral strategies
To provide water supply to town from Narmada
To revive all ponds in the town by desiltation, afforestation and revival of drainage channels to the
ponds
To construct more ponds in valleys
To construct a new WTP and OHT
More OHTs to be developed for supply to peripheral villages
Direct supply lines to peripheral villages
To revive baories and ponds
Sewerage
Goal: 100% coverage by sewerage network
Sectoral strategies
Provision of sewer lines
Decentralized waste water treatment facilities

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2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Wastewater in Existing nallahs to be treated


Drainage
Goal: Dedicated drainage network
Sectoral strategies
Dedicated drainage network for the town
Existing open drains to be covered
Drainage channels to the ponds to be revived
Solid waste management
Goal: 100% waste collection and treatment
Sectoral strategies
Composting facility to be developed
Recycling plant to be established for tourist related waste
Decentralized SW treatment to be promoted
100% waste collection
Transportation
Goal: Good regional and local connectivity
Sectoral strategies
Regional linkages to Mandav to be improved
Alternate link to NH 3 to be developed
Access roads to all monuments
Access roads to all villages
Roads to be maintained regularly
IPTs to be started to connect peripheral villages to the main town.
Social Infrastructure
Goal: Provision of adequate health and educational facilities
Sectoral strategies
Provision of computer related training institutes
To develop CHC with good health facilities for the town
To develop institutions for technical education
To develop institutions for training in handicrafts and HHI trades like stitching, agarbatti making,
souvenir making, etc.
Environment
Goal: To protect and revive the environment of Mandav
Sectoral strategies
Afforestation
To reduce encroachment on forest land
To revive all ponds
To create more green areas in the town, especially for tourists
To explore energy generation from renewable sources like wind and solar energy
To plant orchards and road side trees
To revive Khurasani Imli
Heritage and tourism
Goals: To promote Mandav as a destination for international tourism and to conserve the heritage of the town

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City Development Plan for Mandav


Sectoral strategies
To conserve existing monuments
To revive traditional baolies and wells
To provide access roads, information centres at all monuments
To extend tourist season to 8 months
To promote cultural events at night
To increase tourist stay at Mandav
Awareness generation and heritage awareness
To initiate organized tours
Urban Poor
Goal: To eradicate poverty in Mandav
Sectoral strategies
Inclusive development of main town and peripheral villages
Employment generation opportunities for urban poor related to existing skill set
Provision of pukka housing and infrastructure in slum pockets and peripheral villages
Insitu redevelopment of kuccha houses

125

2013

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

CHAPTER 20: MUNICIPAL REFORMS


This section of the report gives the status of reforms: Optional and Mandatory; which are required to be
implemented by the NP. The ULBs must comply with these reforms in order to access funding under IHSDP and
UIDSSMT.
th

1. Implementation of the 74 Constitutional Amendment Act


For effective decentralization of governance, implementation of 74

th

Constitutional Amendment Act is

required. The table below shows the status of implementation of the Act. Until recently, due to a High Court
ruling, Mandav was being governed jointly by the CMO and SDM; and the Municipal Council had been
suspended. But elections to the Council were held in January 2011 and a new Council, headed by a Municipal
President is now in place.
th

Status of implementation of 74 Constitutional Amendment Act


1

Constitution of municipalities

Yes

Composition of municipal council

Yes

Reservation of seats for women, SC & ST

Yes

Constitution of District planning committees (Zila Yojna Samiti)

NA

Constitution of Metropolitan planning committees

NA

Incorporation of Schedule 12 into the State Municipal Act

Yes

2. City Planning Functions


States/ULBs are required to undertake certain reforms in the area of city planning, with an objective of
assigning city planning functions to the elected ULBs. Mandav NP is only involved in the formulation of City
Development Plan and provision of building permissions. The ULB is responsible for implementation of town
planning proposals within the Municipal limits but owing to slow pace of development and interventions by
ASI and other departments, Master Plan for the town has not been implemented yet. The ULB has been
actively involved in City planning through the CDP
3. Public Disclosure Law
The NP Budget is formally passed every year by President in council (a 5 member committee headed by the
Municipal President). After approval from this council, the budget is then put in front of the Parishad (Council)
for approval. The NP budget is not published but an official press note for the budget is passed/published.
There is no provision for a formal public scrutiny of the Municipal Budget except for annual approval by
Parishad. Apart from this, Municipal budget can be produced on demand under Right to Information (RTI). The
Nagar Parishad also produces explanations related to budget, as and when asked for, by other Government
Departments.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

4. Community Participation Law


States/cities are required to undertake reforms in Community Participation, with the objective of
institutionalizing citizen participation as well as introducing the concept of the Area Sabha in urban areas. The
larger objective is to involve citizens in municipal functions, e.g. setting priorities, budgeting provisions, etc.
Community Participation Law refers to appropriate provisions that need to be made in the state-level
municipal statute(s) for the establishment of such a 3- or 4-tiered structure. These enactments will also need
to ensure clear definition of functions, duties and powers of each of these tiers, and provide for the
appropriate devolution of funds, functions and functionaries, as may be decided by the State Government.
Under the purview of Community Participation Law, a hearing is conducted every Tuesday in the NP where
th

citizens can come with their complaints and grievances. Ward Councilors elected under the 74 CAA are the
elected representatives for each ward and are responsible for voicing citizen concerns. Other than this, citizens
are free to visit the NP to register complaints or give suggestions.
4. E-governance
For transparent administration, quick services, effective MIS and general improvement in service delivery,
reforms in e-governance are required to be undertaken by the states/cities. The types of services covered by Egovernance applications are:
1.

Registration of Births and Deaths

2.

Public Grievance Redressal

3.

Property Tax Management, including records mgmt

4.

Municipal Accounting System

5.

Works Management System

6.

E--procurement

7.

Personnel Management, i.e. personnel information system

8.

Payment of Property Tax, Utility Bills and Management of Utilities that come under the ULBs.

9.

Building plan approval

NP is in the process of undertaking the E governance reform and has 1 Computer. Around 2 to 3 of the staff
members in the NP are computer literate, including a computer operator. Some of the NP data is available in
digital form. The digitization of spatial data is yet to be undertaken. Accounts related information is not
available in digital format yet. None of the above functions are being undertaken through E governance yet.
Only the recent lok sewa guarantee scheme is being operated online. Under this scheme registration for a few
schemes like provision of water supply connections, ration cards, Samajik suraksha pension and Rashtriya
Pariwar Sahayata pension, kshramik nijoyan yojna are being managed through online entries.
5. Municipal Accounting
UIDSSMT requires the municipalities funded by them to adopt double-entry accrual principles for accounting
on the basis of National Municipal Accounting Manual (NMAM). This system has been introduced as the
single entry system suffers from the following flaws:

127

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

1.

Full picture of Assets & Liabilities are readily not available in one statement.

2.

Inadequate managerial attention, e.g. on speedier collection of receivables due to lack of information
or delayed information.

3.

Inadequate cash management. (several inoperative bank accounts)

4.

Expenses did not match revenues for the period making determination of surplus/deficit for the
period a difficult task.

5.

Certain capital expenditures treated as revenue items e.g. roads, bridges, drainage etc.

6.

Did not present a proper picture of the financial health of the ULB.

7.

Inadequate managerial attention, e.g., on movement of payables/liabilities

8.

Inadequate information on to what extent, the assets of the ULB have been used up

Mandav NP is still working on the basis of Single entry system. The Accountant has been trained twice in
Double entry system at Bhopal and Lekha Niyam Sanshodhan booklet is also available with the NP but NP has
not yet been able to quantify its assets and liabilities. Hence, the NP has not yet been able to prepare a
balance sheet. Post elections, the NP has requisite staff trained in double entry system and hence, can soon
start with double entry accounting.
6. Basic Services for Urban Poor
Presently, the NP does not have a separate allocation for Urban Poor in the budget but since one of the slum
ward lies within core town, development works are also undertaken in this ward. No works are undertaken by
NP in peripheral slums (villages).
7. Property Tax Reforms
Property tax surveys have not been undertaken by NP and the data from last surveys (conducted around 2004)
is being used after annual updation. Adoption of unit area method and transfer of information on GIS platform
has not been initiated yet. Since the NP does not provide services to the villages, no taxes are being imposed in
these areas as yet. Since the number of taxable properties in the town is extremely low, progress on this
reform is slow.
Table20.1: Tax collection information (2011/12). Source: Mandav NP

Tax Category

Collection for current year

Collection of outstanding payments

% collection

INR

% collection

INR

Property tax

80.70%

60932

24.65%

45471

Consolidated Tax

70.66%

33930

49.64%

30336

Water Tax

65.10%

71616

62.74%

16572

128

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Other Reforms1
Status of Mandatory and Optional Reforms in Mandav Nagar Parishad
Reforms

Components of reforms

Existing situation

Mandatory Reforms
At Urban local body level
1 Reform
for Introduction of Double-entry accrual
Municipal
system
accounting
system
2 E-governance
Listed services and NP data to be made
available in digital format

Levy
of
reasonable
user charges.
Property tax
reform based
on GIS

Internal
earmarking for
urban poor

Provision
of
basic services
to urban poor

Full cost of operation and maintenance or


recurring cost is to be collected within
next seven years
1. Proper mapping of properties using a
GIS
system
2. Making the system capable of selfassessment
3. Improving collections to achieve at least
85% of demand.
1. Undertaking reforms in budgeting and
accounting systems to enable internal
earmarking of funds for the urban poor.
2. Setting targets for expenditure incurred
on delivery of services to the poor.
Provide basic services (including water
supply and sanitation) to all poor including
security of tenure, and improved housing
at affordable prices and ensure delivery of
social services like education, health and
social security to the poor

Optional Reform
1
Revision of byelaws
and
simplification of
procedures.

Introduction
of
Property
Title
Certification
System in ULBs.

No. Training has been given but NP has


not been able to make a list of assets
and liabilities as yet
No. Only digitization of some data has
been done. NP has 1 computer and a
computer operator.
No.

No. Updation of

25% separate account: spent on slums


basic services.

Not in villages

Reform includes:
1. To make rain water harvesting
mandatory in all buildings and adoption of
water
conservation
measures.
2. Streamlining, building approval process
to establish a simple, transparent and
lesser time consuming process that
encourages development.
The objective of the reform is to create a
public record of titles which describe the
property as well as the title and has a
system for reflecting any transaction in real
time.

The NPN gets 1% of Stamp duty collection.

129

No

no

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Simplification of
legal
and
procedural
frameworks for
conversion
of
agricultural land
for
non
agricultural
purposes

Earmarking
at
least 20-25% of
developed land in
all
housing
projects
(both
Public and Private
Agencies)
for
EWS/LIG
category with a
system of cross
subsidization.
Introduction
of
computerized
process
of
registration
of
land
and property.
Administrative
reforms

Structural
reforms.

Encouraging
Public
Private
Partnership.
Revision
of
byelaws to make
Rain
Water
Harvesting
mandatory for all
buildings

10

No

The reform aims at equitable distribution of


resources and providing housing to the
economically and socially weaker section

Introduce a transparent system of


valuation of properties, easily accessible to
citizens; Bring in speed, efficiency,
consistency and reliability;

No

The reform includes


Bringing out voluntary retirement schemes,
filling up of posts falling vacant due to
retirement etc., and achieving specified
milestones in this regard.
Structural reforms include the following:
1. Reforms in the institutional structure of
urban management at the State level
2. Creation of cadre of municipal staff for
different
disciplines
3.
Decentralisation
of
municipal
administration, and synchronisation of
internal
jurisdictions
4. Organisation structure review and
optimisation of staffing patterns
PPP would bring in the expertise and
capital investment of private company.

No

Byelaws for reuse


of recycled water

130

Talab gehrikaran. Money given


Dustbin given under jan
bhagidari
Rwh: no

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

CHAPTER 21: INVESTMENT PRIORITIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS


Summary of CIP
S. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Sector of Investment
Water Supply
Sewerage
Storm Water Drainage
Solid Waste Management
Sanitation
Traffic & Transportation
Electricity & Street Lighting
Fire Fighting
Basic Services for Urban Poor
Environment
Urban Governance
Heritage and Tourism
Education
Health
Social Infrastructure & Other Projects
Total

Investment by 2015 (In Crore)


21.65
0.73
6.07
0.55
2.88
30.55
12.29
0.58
5.88
30.63
1.27
34.50
3.94
2.12
1.13
154.8

S. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

Sector of Investment
Water Supply
Sewerage
Storm Water Drainage
Solid Waste Management
Sanitation
Traffic & Transportation
Electricity & Street Lighting
Fire Fighting
Basic Services for Urban Poor
Environment
Urban Governance

Total Investment (In Crore)


29.47
0.79
9.51
0.55
4.43
40.48
57.25
0.79
12.60
92.16
14.62

12

Heritage

106.07

13
Education
14
Health
15 Social Infrastructure & Other Projects

8.45
3.97
1.52

Investment by 2025 (In Crore)


7.74
0.02
3.11
0.00
1.07
9.93
21.17
0.08
6.72
24.76
5.08
38.90
2.92
1.85
0.39
123.73

Investment by 2035 (In Crore) Total Investment (In Crore)


0.08
29.47
0.03
0.79
0.32
9.51
0.00
0.55
0.48
4.43
0.00
40.48
23.78
57.25
0.13
0.79
0.00
12.60
36.78
92.16
8.28
14.62
32.66
106.07
1.59
8.45
0.00
3.97
0.00
1.52
104.11
382.65

Responsible agency/ deptt.


NP
NP
NP
Private Contractor
NP
State PWD + Private Contractor + MP Tourism
MPEB + Private Party
NP
Beneficiaries + NP
Forest Department + NP + MNREGA Nodal Agency + MP Tourism
NP + Private Party
MP Tourism + Mandav Heritage Resource Management Authority + Private Party
+ ASI + State Department of Archaeology
State Education Dept
State Health Dept
Misc

133

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

21.1 Project Quantification and Phasing


Based on secondary data collected, identification of demand and supply gaps and on site knowledge; quantification of identified projects was undertaken. For Project Phasing,
the entire study period was divided into 3 parts:

Phase 1: First 5 years (Till 2017). This was further subdivided into first 2 years and Projects to be taken up till 2015. This was done to identify the projects that need
to be started on an immediate basis

Phase 2: Projects to be undertaken till 2027.

Phase 3: Projects to be undertaken till 2037.

Phasing of projects was done such that projects for upgradation of existing infrastructure are taken up in the first phase, those for provision of new infrastructural
facilities are taken up in the second phase and those for infrastructural provision for additional population are taken up in the third phase.

21.2 Key Considerations


The following key parameters need to be considered for projects in all sectors:

Citizen Group: Though not mandatory, but the town can elect and form a Citizens group to oversee implementation and DPR preparation of all projects. This Group
can comprise of Senior Citizens, Intelligentsia, Representatives of Urban Poor, industrialists, etc. The NP would be the nodal agency for this Citizen Group. The main
aim of the group would be to ensure that the DPRs prepared and implementation of projects is in the interests of the town and does not overlook the common
interests of the town. At the same time, this Committee has to ensure that the Projects are not biased towards any individual or group.

Integrated Sectoral projects for Government Funding: Instead of seeking government funding for individual projects under each sector, the NP should combine the
projects which need to be implemented together, e.g. all projects under transportation sector can be clubbed together to seek funding. This should be especially
done for projects for which funding is being sought from the same source. This will (a) Reduce procedural work for each project (b) Funding for correlated projects
can be taken up simultaneously so that interrelated projects can be implemented simultaneously.

Monitoring: NP should undertake construction phase and post construction phase monitoring of projects through citizens participation.

CDP to be reviewed and revised every 5 years

134

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Since paucity of land is a key constraint for all ULBs, it is advised that acquisition of land against will should be avoided in all cases. A 3 way methodology should be
adopted for this
1.
2.
3.

Integrated administrative complex should be set up in each town by vacating all government plots and centring all government buildings in 1 or 2 large
complexes. The land so vacated, should be used for development projects in the town.
Revenue land in and around the town should be taken up before private land
In case private land is to be taken up for development projects, a PPP based approach should be adopted. For eg: If a bus stand is proposed to be
constructed on Private land, then the ULB can enter into a contract with the owner of the land. The plot should be developed such that apart from bus
stand, a commercial complex should also be constructed on the site. The land owner should be given a percentage of the constructed shops and a mutually
agreeable percentage share in the bus fee collected from all buses using the bus stand. Similarly, in order to create parking areas for town, a PPP based
approach can be adopted whereby, the private party would given their land for parking and in return, collect parking fee from all vehicles. The NP would be
the regulatory and supervising authority for all such PPP projects.

Some Best Practices that can be emulated in the towns (Source: Childfund Action Report on Fluoride, www.unicef.org)
Solar Powered Handpumps

Double Drum
Fluoride Filter

This UNICEF Funded project undertaken


in Shivpuri District of MP and ha
successfully provided water to 480HHs. A
solar power driven electric pump, drives
water from a handpump and stores it in
a 1500 litre tank where water is stored at
a height and made to reach 4 taps at the
ground level. This provides for water
storage, water pressure and can work
without external electricity.

135

Double drum filter


units for
deflorination of
Fluoride content in
groundwater have
been distributed in
Jhabua district by
an NGO (Childfund)

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

21.3 Economic Base


The following projects have been identified to provide economic impetus to the town
Phasing
Project

Promotion of urban
agriculture

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Priority

Promotion of
Large scale plantation of Khurasani Imli, Mahua,
cultivation of
indigenous and Dhavra Gond, Khirni, Tendu, Bekul and Charoli trees
as source of livelihood through NWFP for tribal
other
population
horticulture
produce to
cater to local Mango and custard apple orchards using drip and
sprinkler irrigation
and
tourist/commer
Cultivation of vegetables using drip and sprinkler
cial demand
irrigation (typical land holding size is 0.03 sq kms)
(raw and
cooked forms)
Local
Setting up small nursery propagation of
knowledge
indigenous species of herbs
system about
medicinal
Cultivation of herbs through organic farming
herbs such as
(SHGs/cooperatives) using drip and sprinkler
dhuli musli,
irrigation cost is per annum indicative only as
salam misri, lal
varies per species
churan, bekul
and kuradia
Existing ponds
and practice of
pisciculture and Composite Fish Culture cum waterchestnut faming
water chestnut
cultivation
High ownership
Setting up Poultry Farms
of poultry
High cattle
Setting up dairy farm
ownership

Phase 1
First 2 years
Till 2017

Phase 2
2027

Phase 3
2037

Total

Unit

Covered under environment

0.1

0.1

0.2

sq kms

0.25

0.25

0.5

sq kms

No.s

1
Very High

Preparation of Biodiesel
Mahua Oil Biodiesel can be used as substitute in diesel engines used
from Mahua seed oil
in transportation and agriculture sectors

136

Hectares

No.s

No.s

No.s

At State Level

City Development Plan for Mandav


Processing for herbs and
indigenous produce
Setting up of Self Help
Groups to start small
businesses (Women
based) + Training and loan
to be given to SHGs

Drying of herbs, mahua


flowers etc
Storage after drying

Drying platforms
Storage godown/warehousing

Very High

To be specifically formed in
Sagar village, Jhabri village, Can help SHGs start small businesses
Rampura village, Tarapur like Papad making, herb collection and
village and Songarh Village
supply, wool supply, etc
in Phase 1

Establishment of
Can specifically train
Handloom training and
women in villages to
HHI centre for making provide additional income
Maheshwari Sarees
to HH
Loans to villagers to start
small businesses like Haath
thela, Fruit and vegetable
thela
Villagers should be given
subsidies in taxes for the
next 25 years + More
incentives should be given
to Villagers as they can not
avail benefits and
subsidies from GPs
Value addition and market
linkage for herbs and other
For AYUSH system of medicine or extraction of commercially viable
plant based products of
products such as oil from khirni seeds
medicinal or commercial
value
Propagation of Organic
Farming
Propagation of Green
House Farming

Propagation of drip and


sprinkler irrigation

Very High

Very High

Very High

No.s

1
Stakeholder
selection,
identification
of activity and
formation of
2 SHGs

No.s

33

SHGs

70

nos

10

20

Training and HHI for


handlooms and Maheshwari
saree

20

50

Very High

Administrative Measure. To be integrated in NP


budget and to subsidies to be given by District
Collectorate

Very High

To be undertaken at District Level (through Govt


and/or private industry support)

Medium

Incentives to promote organic farming practices


through Organic certification

Fruit and flower farming for


Profits from Green house farming to
sale to areas within and
Punjab farmers have increased from
outside MP @7 lakh for 840
7000 to 7 lakhs in a couple of years
sqm

Medium

Drip irrigation plant to subsidise cost of


For conservation of water
equipment. Equipment to be given on 3
resource and better yield
installment basis instead of 1

137

2013

Sagar Village

Jhabri village,
Rampura
Village

Sprinkler and drip irrigation plant is proposed to be


developed in the Proposed Dhamnod/Dharampuri
SEZ

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Apiculture related to
forests in Mandav

Training in Apiculture

MP State Agro Department: The


superior bee colonies (Apis mellifera)
produced by selected bee breeders is
being distributed to small / marginal /
S.C. / S.T. / Women / farmers /
beekeepers.
5000kg Capacity Farm, Sale Price: Rs.
32/kg

Bee Farming
Promoting Prawn Culture
to increase revenue
Implemented in Bhadbhada Can be promoted in existing and new
generation for tribals and Farm, Madhya Pradesh
ponds
Majhi Samaj
Basket and other innovative products
Bamboo based
from bamboo
papad, badi, pickles, jams etc from local
Agro produce based
Establishment of women
produce
based SHGs for
Local herb and NWFP based products
HHIs/cottage
Herb based/ NWFP based
such as churan, mouth fresheners,
industry/cooperatives with
confectionary etc
NGO support
candle making, incence sticks, paper
Other
plates, jewellery making, embroidery,
stiching, sewing etc
Through NGOs and
Microfinance Institutes at
District Level
Women SHGs for Micro
MFIs
to
provide easy loans
Credit and Micro finance
Combined for the entire District
on quarterly installments
systems

High

10

12

Very High

Bee Fams

High

Very High

NGOs to help women start


small businesses
Resource and design innovation centre for continuity of traditional knowledge systems and
promoting these as means of livelihood (documentation, training, design innovations and
dissemination)
Flour Mill
Internet caf
Medical store
Organised space for
Demarcated space
mobile vendors
Tourism related projects

Combined for Entire District

Covered under Heritage and Tourism


High
High
High
High

1
1

1
1
Covered under transport

Covered under Heritage and Tourism

138

1.0
2.0
1.0

No.s
No.s
No.s

City Development Plan for Mandav


Cattle breeding to increase
cattle productivity
Strategic EIA for town
including industries

High

Centre to be established at District Level by State


Vet Dept

High

Covered under Environment

2013

Pisciculture
Urban agricultural techniques and practices such as organic farming,
drip and sprinkler irrigation
Training programmes for
tribal population
Repair of agricultural equipment
Travel, tourism and hospitality related
Food processing

Covered under Social Infrastructure'

21.4 Water Supply

Project

Derivation

Water supply from


multiple sources

Current intake from Sagar


Talab = 0.25 MLD. Current
shortage = 2 MLD.
Requirement upto 2035 =
3.16 MLD

Project Details and Sub Projects

Priority

Desiltation and conservation of


Mallipura and Sagar Talab
Additional intake from Sagar Talab upgrading intake

Phasing
Phase 1
Phase 2
First 2 years
Till 2017
2027

Total

Units

Kms

12 Kms

12

Kms

MLD

3.16

MLD

MLD

Phase 3
2037

Covered under 'Environment'

Relaying of pipeline (20 yr old) from


Mallipura Talab to WTP
Pipeline from Reva Kund near Jamnia or
Supply from Sakalda Talab (
from Sakalda pond
for summer backup)
Intake and pumping system

Water supply from


Narmada (Directly or to be
included under Dhar water
supply scheme)

Very High

Very High

Prohibition of use of water


from Sagar and Mallipura
Talab for irrigation

5 Kms

3.16

To be enforced by NP through legal framework

WTP

3.2 MLD (excluding for


ground water)

Existing WTP to be redeveloped

Very High

3.2

3.2

Feasibility study with focus on


Environment to study
potential for drawing water
from Reva Kund near Jamnia
and from Sakalda Pond

Environmentally
sustainable option to be
chosen

Any small check dam construction required


at Reva Kund should only be permitted after
suitable environmental analysis

Very High

139

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Repair /reconstruction of existing OHT


(0.3 MLD) + expansion of sump to
capacity of ) 0.6 MLD
3 OHTs of 1 Lakh litre each + Each OHT
to have a staging height of 10m : One
near Dhar Road, 1 near Tarapur gate, 1
near Jhabri
Each OHT to have 2 Lakh litre capacity
underground sump + Pump room +
Locations, design and
OHT based water supply
Pump
heights to be approved by
the MHRMA to ensure
Redevelopment of existing OHT
there is no negative impact Treated water from OHTs to be supplied
on the heritage resources to tanks at ground/under ground level
(as per gradient) for each rural
cluster/hamlet from which
decentralized distribution can be
carried out through wind energy based
water pumps
5 km along main spine
Conditional to permission
2 km towards Sagar Village
Existing mains to be relaid from the Mandav Heritage
2 km towards Tarapur Village
or expanded
Resource Management
1 km towards Songarh Village
Authority (MHRMA)
5 Kms towards Jhabri Village
Mapping of all existing and
proposed supply pipelines To enable efficient maintenance and management and prevent
and linking to GIS
negative impact on archeological heritage
database
Catchment conservation
and revival of Karam River
Catchment conservation of
all lakes and ponds
Provision of drinking water
points in public areas and
peripheral
hamlets/clusters
Institutional buildings, tourist
infrastructure, recreational areas and
Large scale propagation of
residential areas
Rain Water Harvesting
Historic structures and complexes

nos

nos

nos

nos

15

km

nos

57

nos

High

5
2
2
1
5

Very High

Very High

140

existing

proposed

Covered under 'Environment'


Covered under 'Environment'
6 in
hamlets/clust
ers

3 in public
areas

25

25

25

25

City Development Plan for Mandav


DPR for rain water
harvesting, recharging
ground water through
infiltration ponds and
revival of wells and
baories
Wells and baories to be
20 nos
revived
Feasibility study for
construction of small
check dam at Jhabri
Provision of hand pumps
with overhead storage in Provision of 3 handpumps
all villages @ 3
per ward / village cluster
handpumps per village
Provision of handpumps
with overhead storage
tanks in all Schools, PHC
and institutional buildings
Development of identified
existing ponds infiltration
ponds/recharge basins
DPR for water supply
network and topography
based supply zones
Awareness generation for
water conservation, rain
water harvesting,
prevention of water
pollution

nos

20

nos

nos

Very High

High

Highest

15

30

45

nos

Highest

Songarh
village school,
Tarapur
Village School

nos

nos

15 wards

Very High

15

2013

Covered under Drainage

Covered under 'IEC'

141

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

21.5 Sewerage
Phasing
Projects

Diverting sewage to
decentralised sewage
treatment System

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Priority

To divert wastewater from


open drains into the
treatment plantbefore it Construction of interceptor drains with
reaches water bodies.
grating
Treated wastewater to be
used in agriculture

Very High

Provision of grating over


the drains

First 2 years

Till 2017

Phase 2

Phase 3

2027

2037

Unit
Total

km

Covered under 'Drainage'

Decentralized wastewater
Constructed Wetland
treatment
system / Reed bed system
Reuse of treated
wastewater

Phase 1

High

For horticulture, agriculture


and other secondary uses

Construction and maintenance of


diversion canals (mud)

High

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Priority

Covered under 'Sanitation'

21.6 Sanitation
Phasing
Projects
Provision of HH toilets

Very High

Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
First 2 years
Till 2017
2027
2037
Covered under 'Urban Poor'

Total

Design to be developed by Design Innovation Centre (specifying


construction materials and techniques) to ensure the building
character is in line with the context

Provision of Community
toilets (Can be provided
along the lines of Deluxe
Toilets: Build, Operate and
1 community toilet (6
Transfer basis). Mobile seater + 2 bath) for each of
toilets can also be
the 8 rural
provided
clusters/hamlets) -

Contractor to be paid by community


respresentative. In case of non
maintenance, community can hold
payment and cancel contract

Very High
5

142

Unit

City Development Plan for Mandav

Provision of Modular
deluxe toilets / Mobile
Toilets

Communtiy Toilets to be
particularly provided in
Rampura Village, Jahangir
Pura Gate and Jhabri
Village
One public toilet for
tourists (Deluxe Toilet on
BOT basis or Sulabh
Shauchalaya) with
proposed visitor and
interpretation centre near
Chappan Mahal, portable
toilets at other locations

Decentralized wastewater
Constructed wetland
treatment facility
system/ Reed bed system

3 nos

Very High

Modular construction

High

Interceptor drain to carry wastewater


to the treatment plant. Treated
wastewater from here should be reused

Very High

DPR for Decentralized


wastewater treatment
facility

2
1
Portable
toilets 4
Deluxe
seater near
Toilets /
Roopmati
Sulabh Toilets
pavilion,
(10 seater)
Jahaz mahal
Complex
1.5

2013

Annual
Annual
Maintena Maintenan
nce
ce

2.5

MLD

Development and
implementation of a
Septage Management Plan

Implemen Implement
Preparation Implementati
tation of ation of
of Septage on of Septage
Septage Septage
Management Management
Managem Manageme
Plan
Plan
ent Plan
nt Plan

Generation of awareness
towards sanitation

Covered under 'IEC'

21.7 Drainage

Projects
Natural drainage channels
to be conserved
Diverting the drainage
channels to existing
surface water bodies or
recharge basins
Desiltation of existing

Derivation

Project Details and


Sub Projects

Phasing
Priority
High

Delineation of natural drainage channels

Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
First 2 years
Till 2017
2027
2037
To be included in Master Plan/ Covered under
'Environment'

Very High
Desiltation of Sagar Talab

Highest

143

Total

Unit

Km

nos

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


ponds

Desiltation of Jhabri and Kaldipura talab

nos

Desiltation of Tarapur Talab on Neelkanth Road

nos

Small pond in Sagar Village


1 Lamba talab on Lal bagh road
2 Singodi talab on Lal Bagh road
3 Lal bangle talab
4 Saman talab on Lal Bagh road
5 Raglav talab on Hathi paga/ Roopmati Road
6 Doodh Talai on Neel Kanth Road
7 Badi Doodh Talai on Neel Kanth Road
8 Ek Khamba near Chappan Mahal
9 Lendiya Talab on Main Road (Ward 5)
10 Pipliya pond near Ram Mandi
11 Maan Singh Ji Talab near Kaldipura road
12 Moon Talab near Jahaz Mahal
13 Songarh pond
14 Kaldipura pond
15. Jamnia Pond

nos

15

nos

No's

15

Catchment conservation
for catchment areas of all
ponds

Development of Recharge
Basins

Covered under Environment

To enable recharge of ground water aquifer

Each recharge basin


to be provided with
recharge shafts to
facilitate recharge

Kund in Ward 15 to be
maintained

Very High

High
Sagar Village

Jamia phata, Neelkanth Mandir, Jamnia nallah

3 nos

Construction of new ponds Small pond to be made on Khacha Khoderia


Maratha Nallah on Jahangir pura road (big
pond; can serve 5 villages)
Pond needed in Songarh Village

4 Recharge
basins with
recharge
shafts to be
developed
Annual
Annual
Annual
Annual
Maintena Maintenanc
Maintenance Maintenance
nce
e
1

High

144

City Development Plan for Mandav


Pond can be constructed near existing weir to
store water by diverting it to the pond in
Jamnia
Jhanbri village, Kaldipura
Pond can be constructed in Ward 15
Pond can be constructed on Marghat Nallah
near Jamnia
5 additional ponds on nallahs in the forests

1
1
Estimate has been
prepared,
construction work
needs to be started
5

1
1

1
1

Covering large open drains


with grating

5
Very High

2013

km

Total

Unit

21.8 Solid Waste Management


Phasing
Project

Composting plant

Sale/reuse of Recyclable
waste and inert waste

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Priority

2 decentralized vermi composting


sites to be developed. The area under
pits shall be increased in a phase wise
Current compostable waste =
manner with increase in waste
2.1 MT; projected as 3.41 MT
generation
by 2035
Decentralized composting pits at
community level in Ward 10 to 15
2 small (5mx5m) storage dhalaos to be made for recyclable waste
and inert waste for Ward 1-7 and 8-15
Recyclable waste to be sent to Recycling Plants in Indore/Ratlam
once or twice a month; Networking with Recycling units to be
established by Private Party
Inert waste to be stored in Dhalaos and used for making roads

Awareness generation
For segregation at source, and to reduce, recycle and reuse waste
through media
Proposed Trenching
ground near Doob Baori Located close to water source
Zero landfill based waste
(near Lohani Caves) to be
and tourist attraction
management proposed
banned

145

Phase 1
First 2 years
Till 2017

Phase 2
2027

Phase 3
2037

2.1

1.4

3.5

MT

0.5

0.5

MT

nos

Very High

Very High

Networking with Recycling units in Indore to be


established. Recyclable waste (Paper, Metal, Plastics and
Glass) to be transported to Indore twice /month

Very High

Covered under 'IEC'

Highest

Immediate
administrati
ve measure

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Training of local
population in
decentralized solid waste
management
Placing of gps/gprs vehicle
tracking system on door to
door collection vehicle for
monitoring
Collection from bins at
tourist nodes and from
1 more Van to be introduced
common collection bins in
ward
Waste collection bins

DPR for SWM

Very High

Covered under 'IEC'

High

Very High

Well designed bins at tourist nodes as


part of tourist facility
Provision of separate waste bins for
organic and inorganic waste
To include cleaning processes of equipment, monitoring of
collection of waste, gps vehicle tracking system, waste collection
routes for tourist and residential areas, special provisions for
pedestrialnised heritage zones/areas etc

no.s

Covered under 'Tourism'


Very High

10

10

nos

High

nos

21.9 Urban Poor

Project

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Priority

Demographic and socio


economic survey of slum
dwellers

Phase 3
2037

Total
Units

Very High
funding under IHSDP to upgrade their
DUs on their own (for the most
marginalized segment - 10% of the
eligible HHs)
Interest Subsidy to be given on loans

Upgradation of housing
through grant/loan/subsidy
conditional to construction of
HH toilets and retention of
tenure for 20 years.

Drains and roads for


village wards

Phasing
Phase 1
Phase 2
First 2 years Till 2017
2027

10 village wards; Assuming


Provision of 2 km of roads
and 4km of drains per village
ward

Very High

Roads
Very High
Drains

146

30

60

50

140

HHs

270
2 km CC
roads

540
8 km CC
roads

450
10 km CC
roads

1260
20 km
roads

HHs

20 km
drains
covered
with
grating

40 km
drains

4km drains 16 km drains


covered covered with
with grating
grating

City Development Plan for Mandav


Provision of decentralised
infrastructure in the
peripheral hamlets (Sagar,
Rampura, Nandlalpur,
Jamanya and Jhabri
villages)
MFIs (Micro Finance
Institutions for Urban
Poor)
Employment generation
for tribals and Urban Poor
HHIs for women

Clearing of RoW, laying roads, regular


csweeping and waste collection,
provision of water supply points,
garbage bins, provision of drains for
wastewater

Very High

Jhabri,
Jamanya,
Nandlalpur

Sagar,
Rampura

Very High

Covered under 'Industries'

Very High

Covered under 'Industries'

Very High

Covered under 'Industries'

2013

rural
clusters/ha
mlets

21.10 Transportation
Phasing
Project

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Priority

Traffic and Transport


To ensure provision of tourist transport as well as local community
Management Plan for
connectivity through roads, IPTs, Public transport etc. Linkages with
Mandav Planning Area (to
tourist circuits, promotion and regulation of tour buses, safe and
be coordinated with other
comfortable transport facilities to accomodation hubs at Dhamnod,
plans and as per vision and
Dhar and Nalcha.
policies outlines in IHRMP)
Tourist shuttle service and
non motorised rickshaws
Parking for tourists and
sheltered stops for shuttle
bus
Construction of Road
connecting Jali Mahal,
Jhabri Village, Jahangirpur
Will provide link to NH 3. Road under
Gate of Mandav with NH This link will provide alternate
PMGSY already in place along most
3 and SH 31, following a
access to Mandav
part of the route
strategic impact
assessment (Via
Masidpura village)
IPT (Tata Magic/Jeep)
licenses to local people to
be easier and subsidized)

147

Phase 1
First 2 years
Till 2017

Phase 2
2027

Phase 3
2037

Very High

Total
Units

Covered under 'Heritage and Tourism'

Very High

High

10

Administrative Measure

10

Kms

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Jain mandir
Lal Bangla area
Singhodi
Access roads to be
Narsinghpura
provided for some areas
Piplia
Ram Mandir to Piplia
Jamnia to Jahangirpura gate
Farashpura
Especially needed during
IPT Service (like Tata
school timing. To ply along
Magic) or City Bus Service
Dhar road, Jhabri road,
to be started to cater to
Tarapur road and Sagar
villages
Village road
Main spine
Resurfacing of existing
Neelkanth Tarapur Road
roads
Jhabri Road
Improving road from
Mandav to Kakarda with
appropriate drainage
Safety along regional
roads to be ensured

Can be redulated during tourist


season
3km
2km
2km

High

Very High

3
2
2

Very High

3
2
2

Very High
Particularly along roads connecting
Mandav with Dhar, Indore and
Dhamnod

Very High

Highway Patrol and Police Posts


Tree plantation along
roads

2 along
2 along Dhar
proposed
Road, 1
road
along road
connecting to
to Kakarda
SH31

High

To be paved with pavers and


Development of IPT hub
provided with waiting room, drinking
To be relocated from current
cum taxi stand and Bus
water points, tickting window, public
location near Jami Masjid
stand
toilets and green buffer along
periphery
Resurfacing
26km
Increased Tree cover, grasses
Improvement of road
and shrub cover to stop
26 km
between Mandav and
erosion and control runoff
Dharampuri : Increased
tree cover, Resurfacing
Drainage Provision: Deep
and drainage provision
drains along both sides of
26km x 2
road

148

Very High

Km

nos

26

km

Covered under 'Environment'


Paving, green
Land
buffer, other
acquisition
amenities
26
10

16

26

km

26

26

52

km

Very High

City Development Plan for Mandav


Access walkway to Boorhi
Mandav and Songarh Fort
to be provided parallel to
the valley (near NP Raen
Basera)

2013

Covered under 'Heritage and Tourism'

Provision of parking areas


on PPP basis

Very High

Access road to
Brahmanpuri can be
Development of Tarapur Gate
developed
Road from Jahaz Mahal to
NP to be made 4 lane
4 laning of road to Reva
Kund
Pedestrianization of 1 km
of road stretch starting
To relieve congestion at Jami
from Jami Masjid crossing
Masjid and Jain Dharamshala
and extending to the south
of the crossing
Redesigning of Jami Masjid
Design and implementation as per Traffic and Transport
Crossing
Management Plan for Mandav Planning Area
Development of organised
areas for informal sector As per Interpretation and Use
mobile vendors near
plan
proposed Visitor Centre
for tourists

12 bigha
land near
Roopmati
Palace has
been
secured. Can
be used for
parking and
landscaping

Medium

10

10

Project already proposed by NP


Project already proposed by NP

Very High

Very High

Medium

149

1 near
proposed
visitor centre

km

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

21.11 Environment
Phasing
Project

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Phase 1

Priority

First 2 years
Integrated Environment DPR for integrated planning for forest and non forest land that are
management Plan
within and outside NP
Formation of Environment
Cell within NP

Very High

81% tribal population


dependent on forest for fuel 100 mts buffer at edge of forest land Very High
and fodder
Plantation of air purifying species
Road side green buffer such as Neem on both sides of roads Very High
urban forestry
- 100 trees per kilometres
Integrated lakes and ponds
management plan
Afforestation in catchment area
Afforestation around the lakes/ponds
Desiltation of lakes and ponds
Undergrowth plantation
Conservation of lakes and
22 lakes/ponds suffering from Conservation of drainage channels
ponds and their catchment
siltation and/or
Erosion control measures
area within NP boundary
eutrophication - area of water Plantation of leguminous plants to Very High
and at foot hill (including
bodies within NP limit=12 sq reduce fertilizer consumption such as
SAGAR TALAB AND
kms
Gliricidia sepium
Mallipura Talab)

Phase 3

2027

2037

Very High

Tree plantation over 10 sq kms area Large scale afforestation


Mahua, Dhavra Gond, Charoli, Tendu,
on forest land and non Deforested forest land =about
Very High
Bekul, Khirni, Sitaphal (tribal
forest land- Joint Forest
10 sq kms
population to have access to Non
Management.
Wood Forest Produce (NWFP)

Till 2017

Phase 2

Total
Units
1

No.s

10

sq Kms

40

Kms

12

sqkm

Covered under 'Institutional'

Fuel and fodder tree


plantation for tribals social forestry

Catchment Conservation of Tipkiya


Gufa and Maintenance of Tipkiya
Gufa

150

40
Sagar Talab 0.4 sqkm of
afforestation

Afforestation and silt control


along hill slopes for catchment
Conservation + Maintenance of
Tipkiya Gufa (1 sqkm). Farmlands
to be retained as farm lands and
existing structures to be retained
as it is

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

45

500

nos

sqkm

1000

acre

350

sq Kms

60

km

Plantation of trees along farm


boundaries - farm forestry promoting plantation of nitrogen
fixing species such as Gliricidia
sepium
Plantation of Khurasani
Imli trees: unique to
Mandav
Allocation of pattas to
villagers on forest land to
be regulated
Catchment Conservation
of Tarapur Pond
Afforestation and
promotion of Ecotourism

Since this tree is susceptible


to falling before maturity, the
trees should be provided with
otla along periphery

Plantation of Khurasani Imli trees


with 3 to 4ft otla around the tree

Very High

240

200

Very High

1000 acre land on Lamba


Talab

Tourism, plantation and grazing

High

1 sqkm

High

200

Use of Polyethene to be
banned in Mandav

High

Catchment Conservation
and large scale
afforestation in Mandav
Planning Area

Very High

Gardens can be handed over


to the community for
maintenance
Garden can be handed over
Revivial of Garden around
to the Community for
Sagar Talab
maintenance
Strict enforcement to stop
Through participation of
illegal felling of trees
tribals
Parks and Playgrounds

Green buffer along


regional roads

15

40 Kms to Dhar

High

800

Administrative and
Promotional Measure
through awareness
generation and regulation

Covered under 'Social Infrastructure'


Annual
Annual
Maintena Maintenan
nce
ce

High
High
10 Kms proposed road from Mandu
to Gujri; 10 Kms road from Mandu to
road from Manawar to NH3

Strategic EIA for water


supply, industries and
other environmental
parameters

Through JFM and NGOs


40

151

20

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

21.12 Land Use, Electricity and Streetlighting


Phasing
Project

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Land use to be compatible


with guidelines in the
Integrated Heritage
Resource Management
Plan (IHRMP) for Mandav
Planning area/Investment
Area to be revised as per
proposal in CDP
Removal of
encroachments that are
negatively affecting the
cultural and natural
resources
Clear demarcation of
forest land

Priority

Phase 1
First 2 years
Till 2017

Phase 2
2027

High

As per proposed IHRMP

High

To be undertaken by TCPD

High

Regulated by Mandav Heritage Resource


Management Authority

Very High

Forest Department and NP Environment Cell

Proper documentation of
Land ownership and use to
government land to be
be mapped and integrated undertaken to identify areas
with GIS database
where pattas have been
alloted

Supervision by NGO to ensure that


land documents are made properly
and no forgery cases of transferring
tribal land to non tribals take place

High

Master Plan to demarkate


To be made in consultation
zones (Core area, Modular
with Mandav Heritage
development Zone, NP
Resource Management
area, Heritage zone,
Authority
Tourist zones)

Can be decided on the basis of GPR


survey

High

Integratio
Survey and documentation at
n with GIS
District Level
database

As part of Master Plan

Espansion

Development of
Dharamshala

Ganga Jamuna Rest House


Office has large chunk of land
which can be redeveloped to
provide accommodation

Phase 3
2037

Can be undertaken on PPP basis

High

152

Part of the Development


of
land can be
of
Dharamsha
given on lease Dharamshala la by giving
to a private
for low end more land
on lease (if
party
tourists
required)

Total

Units

City Development Plan for Mandav


Can be developed as a single
3 floor hotel or a series of
Redevelopment of NP
small tent like decentralized/
Raen Basera as Hotel
distributed accomodations
based on decentralized /
along the lines of those
distributed hotel concept
developed by Taj Group of
Hotels
NP and MP Tourism to be
Should obtain prior
given permission to
permission from Mandav
extend activities in
Heritage Resource
Revenue Land
Management Authority

2013

High

High

Administrative Measure

Priority

Phase 1
First 2 years
Till 2017

Electricity and Street Lighting


Phasing
Project

Solar haat within or near


Mandi complex

Solar Farms

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Solar lanterns to be given on rent and for sale


Solar lanterns, water heaters, solar operated pumps and other
equipment to be provided
Subsidized rent on lanterns to urban poor on presenting BPL or
Antoday cards
Solar power to form % of grid electricity and to be traded for
Carbon credits

Annual energy audit


Streetlighting

Phase 2
2027

Phase 3
2037

High

To be established in Dhar District

Medium

To be developed jointly for Alirajpur and Dhar


District

Total

Units

Very High
SLs to meet current shortage

397 SLs

SLs for proposed roads

5km x 33 SLs/km = 165 SLs

High

Wind and solar hybrid


water pumps for irrigation

397

397
165

165
10

Nos

3 or more

MW

High

Highest

Feasibility
Study

1 MW

1 MW or
more

Can be developed as a Wind Farm or as a

Establishment of 1 to 10 Can be located along Jhabri


wind solar hybrid farm. Combination of
MW Wind Mills or Wind road. Energy generated to be Solar PVs of 10KW each are being used to
Solar Hybrid to generate 3 used for town, monuments, generate 12.5HP to run a 3 phase motor
Phase Electricity for supply farmers and excess can be all day for farmers in S.India. Wind mills
supplied to Pithampur.
to Heritage areas and
that can generate 3 phase electricity are
LOCATION OF WIND MILLS also used in India and can supply power
farmers in Mandav. 3
to farmers for pumping and other uses.
TO BE APPROVED BY
Phase electricity to be
Any surplus energy can also be sold in the
MANDAV HERITAGE
supplied to all village
market but the key use would be to meet
clusters and all wards of RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
local requirements for heritage and
Mandav
AUTHORITY
villagers

153

1 MW or
more

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Existing electricity
APDRP to be prepared for
infrastructure is nearly 50 yrs
Mandav
old

High

Provision of electricity in
all villages till the wind
farms are set up

Through provision of
solar/wind powered small
setups

Solar street lighting along


regional roads (CAN BE
COMBINED FOR DHAR
AND ALIRAJPUR
DISTRICTS TO CLAIM
CARBON CREDITS)
Provision of streetlighting
in peripheral
settlements/hamlets

30 km to Dhar

Provision @20 SLs/km

20 km to Dhamnod

Provision @20 SLs/km

Energy efficiency
programme
Increase in electricity
supply

Highest

Preparation of APDRP
20 (Sagar
Village,
Tarapur
Village, Jhabri
village)

50

Medium

High
Propagation of use of automated switches
Propagation of LED lighting
Lights with
automated sensors
Use of energy efficient
fixtures
2016 KW supply required by
2035

Implemen
tation of
APDRP

300

370

900

900

SLs

640

640

SLs

25

SLs

Total

Units

25

High

High

Increase in supply to be funded by MPEB

Fire Fighting
Phasing
Project

Derivation

Provision of Fire vehicles

2 for core town, 1 for


peripheral
settlements/hamlets

Provision of Fire Fighting


Personnel
Fire equipment and
training to staff

2 per vehicle; salary


@10,000/month
Training in Fire Fighting and
Disaster Management

Project Details and Sub Projects

Priority

High

High

2 for existing vehicle

High

154

Phase 1
Phase 2
First 2 years
Till 2017
2027
1 for
2 for core town
peripheral
and heritage
settlements/c
structures
lusters
4

Phase 3
2037

City Development Plan for Mandav


21.13 Social Infrastructure
Phasing
Project

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Priority

Phase 1
First 2 years
Till 2017

Phase 2
2027

Phase 3
2037

Total

Education
Women oriented Literacy
Programmes

High

Pisciculture
Urban agricultural techniques and practices such as organic farming,
drip irrigation
Training programmes for
Very High
Repair
of
agricultural equipment
tribal population
(Certificate courses)
Food processing
Computer Education
Travel, tourism and hospitality related
High
Senior Secondary School
High
Development of Library
Medium
Additional floor can be
Upgradation of existing constructed using light weight
Schools by provision of or temporary material like Tin
additional floor
sheets, PVC boards or
wooden boards, et c

High

English Medium School

Very High

Provision of High School

Very High

Provision of Anganwadi for


Sagar Village and Jhabri
Village

High

Agricultural education to
be promoted through
NGOs, agriculture and
horticulture department

High

Upgradation of existing
schools to incorporate
more students

High

155

Through Evening/Afternoon classes: To be


undertaken in collaboration with Schools and
Colleges

1
1

Through
Agricultural
Through NGOs
and
Horticultural
department
5

3
1

2013

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Need to hire Contract staff


to fill vacant posts for
Teachers
Health

Very High

To be undertaken by State Education Department

Phasing
Project

Derivation

Upgradation of existing
PHC to 30 bed CHC
Provision of Emergency
services in upgraded PHC

Priority

with emergency facilities

Very High

Phase 1
First 2 years
Till 2017

Phase 2
2027

Phase 3
2037

Total

Very High
For peripheral settlements/rural
clusters

CHC
PHC

Project Details and Sub Projects

Can be provided in Jhabri


Village

Provision of Dispensaries 1 needed for Projected town


(0.08 to 0.12 ha)
population
Provision of small Vet
To cater to the large cattle
Facility
and livestock population
Nursing home, Child welfare
and Maternity Centre (25 to
30 beds)

High
Medium

To cater to block level population

Medium

1
1

High
For Block Level Tribal Population

Medium

1
1

Others
Phasing
Project

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Phase 1

Priority

First 2 years
Police Posts along regional
roads
Additional greens @14%
of Municipal Area
Provision of Petrol Pump
in or near Mandav

Phase 3

2025

2035

Very High

Covered under 'Transportation'

High

To be developed as part of Proposed Land Use

Provision of Grameen Bank in


Presently located in Nalcha
or close to Mandav
Provision of gas agency to
reduce dependence on fuel
wood

Provision of Cyber Cafes


and Photocopy shops

Till 2015

Phase 2

High

High

High

Very High

156

Total

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

21.14 Heritage and Tourism


Phasing
Project

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Priority

To include experts from environment,


cultural heritage (tangible and
intangible), representatives from district
Need for strong Management
and state level administration, State
and monitoring mechanism to
Department of Archaeology, ASI, Forest Very High
safeguard heritage resources
Department, Tribal development
in the Mandav Planning Area
department, Tourism department,
MoEF, NGOs, NP (environment and
Formulation of Mandav
heritage cell) and local community.
Heritage Resource
Management Authority
Special Building byelaws can
be framed for Mandav to
All Plans and projects in Mandav to be
ensure that all constructions
approved by MHRMA before
adhere to the character of the
implementation
Monuments and the town
Formation of Heritage Cell
in NP

Very High

Integrated Heritage
Resource Management
Plan for Mandav Planning
Area (IHRMP) - dymanic
document

LIDAR Survey of Mandav Planning Area


to identify above and below ground
natural and cultural heritage resources output to be linked in the form of GIS
database: TO BE UNDERTAKEN ONLY IN
Documentation/listing of CONSULTATION WITH STAKEHOLDERS
AND CITIZENS. AREAS FOR WHICH
heritage assets (natural,
Very High
LIDAR SURVEY SHOULD BE
intangible, built - including
UNDERTAKEN
NEEDS
TO
BE
DECIDED
IN
vernacular architecture)
CONSULTATION WITH CIITZENS
Comprehensive physical and social
surveys for documenting intangible
heritage - arts, crafts, traditional
knowledge systems

157

Phase 1
First 2 years
Till 2017

Phase 2
2027

Phase 3
2037

Total

Unit

Consultancy
Project for
Finalization of
formulation of
guidelines as
guidelines (Can
part of
be
Building
subcontracted
byelaws
or done by
MHRMA)
Covered under 'Institutional'

Year 1

350 sq
kms

sq kms

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


Physical survey of all tangible heritage
resources (natural and built)
Comprehensive secondary research
Condition Assessment
Grading of heritage values - consultative process -on the basis s of
secondary and primary research and analysis
Identification of heritage zones
Developing legal and statutory framework
Identifying the institutional set up for implementation, management
and monitoring
Developing incentives for private participation
Defining the importance of heritage: outlining vision and policies
Identification and proritization of projects
Outlining Limits of Acceptable Change for the Mandav Planning Area
LIDAR Survey output to be linked to GIS
Database with the property lines and
ownership, land use, all heritage
GIS database
(natural and cultural) resources and
their description, delineated zones for
intervention
Website - Derivations of
IHRMP for Mandav Planning
Mandav Heritage Resource
Area to be disseminated
Management website linked to GIS
through website along with
database - to be update and managed
access to research and
consistently - to be made financially self
publications, visitor
sustaining
information, and tourism
promotion

Periodic review and


Every 2 years after completion of IHRMP - including impact assessment
updation of the IHRMP for of all initiatives on the heritage resources and review and redefining of
Mandav Planning Area
limits of acceptable change

High

Based on historic research and analysis using secondary and primary


data. To be to be coordinated with all other plans and as per vision and
policies outlines in IHRMP

High

Landscape Plan

158

In year
2016,
Iin year
2018, 2026, 2028,
2020, 2030, 2032
2022 and and 2034
2024

City Development Plan for Mandav


Preparation of Dossier for
Through Consultative Process: MHRMA
Nomination as World
Heritage Site - to be
and NP cell will need to be involved as
prepared through
To be made after IHRMP has
implementing agencies along with
Very High
consultative process. The
been made
State Department of Archeology. The
IHRMP to act as support
dossier may be prepared through
document/documentation
Consultants.
base for the Dossier
Archaeological excavation and scientific
clearance of sites
As per vision, policies and Revival of historic water structures and
prioritization in IHRMP and as
systems
per NARA Document on
Landscaping of sites around heritage
Authenticity, 1994 and
structures/ enclosures (flora to be
Conservation of heritage
national and international introduced should be part of landscape Very High
structures and landscapes
charters for conservation.
plan)
Prioritization in IHRMP to be
Physical conservation of heritage
on the basis of significance
and condition assessment. structures - including the Parkota (Fort
Wall) and adaptive reuse
Revival of historic gardens

Generation of tourist
survey database - data
linked to website

For domestic as well as


international tourists -

Essential objective data - Tourist visit


data in terms of age groups, gender,
location

Multilingual (English, Hindi Optional subjective data - expectations, Very High


and others) survey formats to level of satisfaction, suggestions, mode
be designed - on site at exit of transport to the site, reason for visit
and post visit online options
etc

Interpretation and Use Plan preparation as per vision and policies of


Interpretation and Use IHRMP for Mandav Planning Area - including landscape and circulation
Plan (IUP) preparation and plan ensuring that continuity of historic landscape and circulation is
possible projects
maintained and provision of universal access (especially for the
physically challenged)
Setting up of a Heritage House* for
capacity building of local community
Adaptive reuse of heritage
structures, sites or zones and and NP towards heritage awareness and
Possible projects that may
construction of new
safeguarding, interpretation, traditional
be proposed under the IUP
structures for interpretation
knowledge systems, ecotourism,
and visitor facilties
sustainable development, maintenance
and repair of historic structures etc

159

2013

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


Interpretation Centre: Already Proposed
at Tabeli Mahal by NTPC
Light and sound show
Visitor facilties centre (with cloak room,
wash rooms, rest areas, vending
machines, snack counters or cafe, ATM,
internet access, drinking water for day
visitors) and Orientation centre
A small shopping area can be developed
on PPP basis. Can be made by putting an
existing heritage structure to reuse
Information, RFID and ticket counters at
entry and exit points
Upgradation and / or relocation of
existing museums and galleries (Taveli
Mahal, Chappan Mahal and
Dharamshala in compound of Hoshang
Shah's Tomb) as per proposal of IUP
Developing integrated multilingual
audio guide as per proposed ciculation
plan through Radio Frequency
Identification (RFID) system
Signage (orientation, interpretive,
directional, locational) and street
furniture (IPT stands, benches, lamp
posts, railings etc) in planning area

Other interpretive and visitor


Design and introduction of multiple or
oriented projects as per
proposals in IUP (for entire single day passes, combined tickets to
the multiple natural and cultural
proposed planning area)
heritage sites , interpretation centre etc
(including Nalchha)
Development of thematic nature trails
and heritage walks
Development of Haat / Crafts Bazaar use of low cost construction techniques
(developed in Nirmiti Kendra, Dhar
District)

160

10

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Restaurant to be developed along Sagar


Lake
Development of visitor accomodation
and facilties at Nalchha - promotion of
rural tourism
Upgradation/expansion of existing
tourist accomodation managed by NP
Organising cultural events, Exhibitions,
workshops and publications for cultural
and natural heritage awareness
generation and promotion
NIGHT LIGHTING OF
MONUMENTS:
To be provided electricity
from the Proposed
Wind/Solar Farm or from
MPEB

Cost of electricity to be subsidized and


to be borne by MP Tourism department Very High
and ASI

ORGANIZING CULTURAL
EVENTS AT NIGHT TO EXTEND
Establishing
TOURIST STAY:
the
Organization
Can be organized along the lines of
Events like Classical Music
institutional of Cultutural
'Jahan E Khusrao' organized annually in
Very High
Concerts or Dance Festivals or
and
events at
Delhi. Can also attract tourists to
Plays can be organized during
infrastructural
night
Mandav during Winters
tourist season + can be
framework
organized once a month
round the year
Risk Management Plan

Preparation of Plan

Security devices/equipment and


measure
to prevent theft or damage of
All plans to be coordinated
cultural
property
(CCTV system, Control
amongst each other and as
room,
sprinkler
system, sensors, fire
per vision and policies
Implementing proposals of
alarms
and
extinguishers)
outlines in IHRMP
Risk Management Plan
Capacity building of site managers and
staff for evacuation of movable cultural
property and people, safety drills etc

161

20

43

64

Monuments

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Traffic and Transport


Management Plan for
Mandav Planning Area

Covered under 'Traffic and Transport'

Introduction of IPT for


Tourists - connecting all
visitor attractions within
Mandav

Integrated Environment
Management Plan
Development of Small
Scale Herbal Park to
attract Tourists

Can be located between


Kaladipura and Jamnia

Farmers can clear a part of


their farms during non crop
season to tourists. Tourists
Propagation of farm
can set up camps in these
Tourism with AC and non
areas. Farmers can provide
AC tents
food to these tourists. Mobile
toilets can be provided for
such selected farm sites
Development of
Provision of luxury Air
Distributed Tourist
Conditioned tents in scattered
Accommodation by big
accommodation
hotel groups like Taj
Ecoforest development
Afforestation
along Lamba Talab
Ghoda buggy can be
started as tourist vehicle

Tourist shuttle buses - 8 seater

No.s

Tourist shuttle buses - 14 seater


Stop points for sight seeing trolleys to
enable physical access to natural and
cultural heritage resources - shed +
visitor facilities
Parking for the sight seeing trolleys,
buses and taxis/cars
Introduction of non motorised or solar
power assisted rickshaws
Ensuring protection and revival of
natural resources and control over
environmental parametres

No.s

10

No.s

12

No.s

10

No.s

nos

10

nos

km

Covered under 'Environment'

Can act as an extension of Indore Herbal


Medium
Park

Tourists would have to pay for this to


the farmers. Societies of local farmers
can be formed to facilitate booking of
farms and coordination with tourists
through MP Tourism or other agencies

High

Fo high end and international tourists

High

Area reserved for forest land

Medium
Medium

Ropeway connecting Lohani


caves to Songarh Fort can be
To promote tourism round the
provided, if approved by
year
Mandav Heritage Resource
Management Authority

Medium

162

1
Other
villages/fa
Tarapur
rmers who
Village,
Sagar village,
want to
Rampura
Jahangir Pura
earn
Village, Jhabri gate village,
through
Village
farm
tourism

Designing of
Buggies

10

City Development Plan for Mandav


Development of
Biodiversity Park in the
Can attract Foreign Tourists
valley along Western side
of Mandav
Permeable pavers with railing
Access walkway to Boorhi
on either side.
Mandav and Songarh Fort
Adequate provision for
to be provided parallel to
pedestrian safety; Pathway to
the valley (near NP Raen
be made 100m away from the
Basera)
ridge
Ecotrails / Nature Trails
Temporary Camping sites (AC
and non AC)
Extending tourist season Paragliding and Adventure
from 3 months to 8
Sports
months
Trolley/Ropeway between
Lohani Caves and Songarh
Farm Tourism
Cultural events at night

Souvenirs for Mandav

T shirts, Souvenirs of
Monuments, Curios,
Miniature Monument
Replicas, etc

Provision of Information
centres in Monuments

6 nos

Training and licences to


guides

Training programmes for


Guides
Issue of Licences

Conservation of Water
bodies in Jahaz Mahal

The ponds have started


drying out. Need for
catchment conservation and
conservation of drainage
channels to the ponds

2013

Medium

Access road to Boorhi Mandav

2.5

2.5

km

km

High
Access walkway to Songarh Fort

600 ha government land


available near Royal Palace

In forest areas
To be identified by MP Tourism
Very High

Discussed above
Discussed above
Discussed above
To be sold at
Separate
ASI and MP
TRIBAL ART AND WOODWORK TO BE
To be sold at
temp
Tourism
PROMOTED THROUGH THE SOUVENIR Very High the ASI shop at
kiosks for
Ticket
SALE
Jahaz Mahal
sale of
Counters and
souvenirs
at Sagar Talab
Very High

Very High
Can also be undertaken by NP
Revival of all ponds in Jahaz Mahal
including the one at the entrance

Very High

163

Catchment Conservation and


conservation of draiange
channels to revive the ponds

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Villagers can accommodate


Homestays can be
tourists within their houses
promoted as an alternate and provide them with food,
means of accommodation etc. In turn, tourists pay rent
to villagers

Societies of local entrepreneurs /


villagers can be formed to coordinate
homestays

High

Dholia and Padlia Dinosaur


nesting sites to be promoted +
Dinosaur nesting sites to
High
To be integrated with
be promoted
Proposed Dinosaur park at
Kukshi
Parking and viewpoint to
Medium
be developed at Neelkanth
State Department of
Monuments under State
High
Archaeology to play a
Archaeology Department to
more active role
be conserved and maintained
ASI can provide for public
toilets and other
amenities within the ASI
High
listed Monuments'
premises
Resource Centre for
Maintaining database in continuty with
traditional knowledge systems that generated as part of IHRMP - linked
- Medicinal properties of
to Mandav heritage resource website
herbs and other plant
resources; Agicultural
Very High
practices; Local food
Library and Research cell to encourage
Resource Centre, Design processing techniques and research for sustaining these resources innovation and training
cuisine; Art and craft
grants and scholarships
centre and Haat (for
traditions (including building
continuity of traditional crafts and performing arts)
knowledge systems and
Training programmes in traditional arts,
promoting these as means
crafts and design
of livelihood)
Organising workshops for local and
Design Innovation and
Training Centre

regional artists and crafts persons


Organising workshops for visitors various target grioups - general visitor,
children, designers etc

Very High

Organising dance and music troupes

164

Payment basis

Promotion

Already Proposed
State Level Initiative

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Local production of souvenirs typical to


Mandu - integrating tribal techniques
and innovation in design to meet
market demand as SSI/Cooperative
(linked to design centre)
Link of locally produced
souvenirs/merchandise with Mandav
heritage resource website
Haat/ Crafts' Bazaar - to
provide platform for design
centre output and processes

Through use of low cost materials


(developed in Nirmiti Kendra, Dhar
District) or traditional/vernacular
construction techniques

Signage on all internal


roads and regional roads
Particularly between Mandav
to indicate directions to
and Manpura
Mandav and directions to
Monuments

Very High

Signages
between
Very High Mandav and
Manpura (5
nos)

Potential solution for PPP for light and sound show (based on approximate calculations)
Total cost of sound and light show: Capital cost approx 3 Cr
Running cost of sound and light show: 30 lakh/ annum
Cost per ticket: 400
Number of tickets: 200 to 500 (assuming 200 tickets sale on average)
Shows per year (during peak season) = 30 x 3 = 90 shows
Total earning per year = 90 shows x 200 tickets x Rs. 400/ticket = INR 72 Lakh/yr
Recovery period for capital cost: 4.16 yrs
O&M Cost for 4.16 yrs = 124.8 Lakh or 1.24 Cr

165

Along other
regional
roads: Dhar
road,
Dharampuri
road (20 nos)

25

nos

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Total recovery period = 6 yrs approx excl profit


Hence, PPP based sound and light show can be sublet to private party for 7 to 8 years

21.15 IEC Reforms

Project
Awareness generation regarding the skewed sex
ratio, especially amongst tribals
Awareness generation for heritage and traditional
knowledge systems of tribal population
Awareness generation regarding built heritage
and Do's and dont's of its management
Promotion of Mandav Planning Area as
ecotourism and rural tourism destination
Awareness generation on use of renewable
sources of energy
Awareness generation on population growth

Awareness generation Programmes - through


Media, Schools, Colleges

Initiate Formation of NGOs and MFIs

Farmer awareness programmes

Derivation

Project Details
and Sub Projects

From phase 2

Phasing
Priority

Phase 1
First 2 years
Till 2017

Units
Phase 2
2027

Phase 3
2037

Very High

Through State or District Level NGOs and Media

Very High

Through State or District Level NGOs and Media

Very High

Through State or District Level NGOs and Media

High

Through State or District


Level NGOs and Media
Through State or District Level NGOs and Media

Water Supply - rain water harvesting,


recharging of ground water and water
conservation
Sewerage
Solid Waste Management
Environment
Transport
Same NGOs, MFIs
Through District Level
can be given
Support
work in all 8
towns
IEC for farmers to use
sprinklers, drip
irrigation
Tools, techniques and
technologies to
improve agricultural
produce

Very High

Through State or District Level NGOs and Media

Very High

Through State or District Level NGOs and Media

Very High

Very High

166

Through State or District Level NGOs and Agricultural


Department + PPP (Industry involvement)

Total

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Better agricultural
practices
Promoting cultivation
of herbs based on the
exisitng knowledge
system of the local
community and
technological
innovations
Organic Farming
Green house farming

21.16 Institutional Reforms


Phasing
Project

Derivation

Priority

Phase 1
First 2 years

Single computerized
Single window system in Nagar
counter for all enquiries,
Palika
submitting forms, etc

D isplay board with name and


responsibility of each staff in
Nagar Palika

All proposals to be
The Authority to have experts
mplemented in Mandav
Interdepartmental Coordination
from all sectors to ensure
(by any department) to
comprehensive development of
to be ensured by Mandav
get approval from
Mandav. Proposals not approved
Heritage Resource Management
Mandav Heritage
Authority
by MHRMA should not be
Resource Management
implemented
Authority

Phase 3

2027

2037

High

Highest

Can be empaneled by NP on contract basis. Cost of approval


of plan by Architect to be borne by Building Owner
Architect and planner in Nagar
Very High
Palika
Planner for Mandav Planning Area as proposed in CDP
Formation of Heritage Cell under
NP
Formation of Environment Cell
under NP

Till 2017

Units
Phase 2

Very High
Very High

167

Formation of
MHRMA

nterdepartm nterdepartm nterdepartm


ental
ental
ental
Coordination Coordination Coordination

Total

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Infrastructure mapping with


annual updation in digital form Proper topographic survey including contour demarcation
to be linked with GIS database
and municipal boundary delineation. Infrastructure
being generated and maintained
mapping for water supply, sewerage, drainage, roads and
for heritage mapping under
SWM
Mandav Heritage Resource
Management Authority (HRMA)

Very High

To be appointed @5,000 per month for part time job


(Annual Increase in salary would be accounted for under
Post for Public Awareness Officer
contingency/inflation costs)
High
in Nagar Palika
To be responsible for public awareness and undertaking IEC
activities
Citizens can call to register complaints, complaint number
to be given and all complaints to be addressed within a
Service centre to be constituted
maximum of 1 week
for complaint
Very High
Can be linked with GIS data base of the city to spatially
redressal
ocate problem areas through a computerized user friendly
interface
Restructuring of Municipal Cadre
as per new guidelines

In accordance with details given in Annexure

Very High

Restructuring of institutional and fee structure of NP employees shall be undertaken in accordance with the new Municipal Cadre (given in Annexure). Since the NP would not
be able to bear the additional costs of the NP restructuring, these costs would have to be directly borne by the State Government and are hence, not included in the CIP.

168

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

CHAPTER 22: CITY INVESTMENT PLAN


This chapter has been divided into 2 sections: (1) Project Costing and Sources of Funding where phase wise and sector wise costing for the identified projects has been given
and the potential sources of funding have been identified; and (2) City Investment Plan which gives a summary of the total phase wise and sector wise investment required in
sectors under NP and State Government to meet the Capital Expenditure (CapEx) and O&M costs of the projects.

22.1 Project Costing and Sources of Funding


Costing of projects for the CDP has been done using MP Schedule of Rates, estimates from other MP CDPs and standard costing thumb rules. Since the base cost of projects is
based on the current costs, and the target year is 2035, an inflation and contingency value has also been taken into account. Base costs for 2012/13 have been projected
while taking 5% inflation cost and 5% contingency cost. Under sources of funding, potential National and International sources of funding, NGO fundings and Innovations in
funding have been identified. Since projects in the first phase are targeted towards improvement of existing infrastructure, the costs for this phase are likely to be the lowest.
Since, most of the infrastructural development in the town would take place in the second phase, the costs for this phase are the likely to be the highest. High emphasis has
been given on funding of Projects under PPP mode in order to make the projects sustainable. It is also proposed that a combination of projects with economic benefits
(profitable projects) and projects with high social benefits (not very profitable projects; under Corporate Social Responsibility) be clubbed together as a package for the
Private sector.

22.2 Economic Base

Project

Derivation

Project Details and Sub


Projects

Large scale plantation of


Promotion of Khurasani Imli, Mahua, Dhavra
cultivation of Gond, Khirni, Tendu, Bekul and
Charoli trees as source of
indigenous and
livelihood through NWFP for
other
tribal population
Promotion of horticulture
urban
produce to cater Mango and custard apple
agriculture
to local and
orchards using drip and
tourist/commerc
sprinkler irrigation
ial demand (raw Cultivation of vegetables using
and cooked
drip and sprinkler irrigation
forms)
(typical land holding size is 0.03
sq kms)

Funding (Lakhs)
Estimated
Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Total
cost/unit
(Lakhs)
(Lakh) First 2 Till
2027
2037
years 2017

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

Covered under environment

35

3.5

3.5

15

3.75 3.75

First 2 Till
2027
years 2017

Total
(Lakhs)

2037

Covered under environment

7.5

169

Cost with Inflation and


Contingency (Lakhs)
Phase 1
Phase 2 Phase 3

State Forest/
State Forest/
Horticulture
Horticulture
department +
department; local community +
MNREGA
local
entrepreneur

4.0

4.5

0.0

0.0

8.5

4.2

4.8

0.0

0.0

9.1

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Setting up small nursery propagation of indigenous


species of herbs
Local knowledge
system about
medicinal herbs
such as dhuli
musli, salam
misri, lal churan, Cultivation of herbs through
bekul and
organic farming
kuradia
(SHGs/cooperatives) using drip
and sprinkler irrigation - cost is
per annum - indicative only as
varies per species

1.5

Existing ponds
and practice of
pisciculture and
water chestnut
cultivation

Composite Fish Culture cum


waterchestnut faming

2.2

4.4

8.8

High ownership
of poultry

Setting up Poultry Farms

High cattle
ownership

Setting up dairy farm

State Govt
State Govt forest/
forest/
agriculture/
agriculture/
horticulture
horticulture
4
department;
department;
National
National
Medicianal Plants
Medicianal
Board
Plants Board
AYUSH Scheme
of National
Bhopal
Medicinal Facilitation centre
Plants Board;
of National
Contract
Medicinal Plants
6
Farming
Board + State
through
forest/
industry linkup; agriculture/
govt subsidy on horticulture
drip irrigation
department
equipment
Rani Durgawati
Anusuchti
Jati/Anusuchit
MP Department
Jan Jati
of Fisheries +
13.2
Swarojgar
Private
Yojana (RDSY)
Entrepreneur
for SC/ST +
SC/ST
entrepreneurs
RDSY for SC/ST;
Subsidy under
poultry Farm Industries Dept +
10 scheme of MP
Private
Cooperative,
Entrepreneur
esp for SC/ST
entrepreneurs

10

170

Subsidy under
dairy farm
scheme of MP Industries Dept +
Cooperative, esp
Private
for SC/ST
Entrepreneur
entrepreneurs;
DRDSY for SC/ST

4.5

0.0

0.0

0.0

4.5

3.4

3.9

0.0

0.0

7.3

5.0

11.4

0.0

0.0

16.3

5.7

6.5

0.0

0.0

12.1

5.7

6.5

0.0

0.0

12.1

City Development Plan for Mandav


Preparation
Mahua Oil Biodiesel can be used as substitute in
of Biodiesel
diesel engines used in transportation and
from Mahua
agriculture sectors
seed oil

Processing
for herbs and
indigenous
produce

At State Level

At State Level

Drying of herbs,
mahua flowers
etc

Drying platforms

10

10

10

Storage after
drying

Storage godown/warehousing

10

10

10

Setting up of
To be
Self Help
sepcifically
Groups to
formed in Sagar
start small
village, Jhabri
Can help SHGs start small
businesses
village,
businesses like Papad making,
(Women
Rampura
herb collection and supply, wool
based) +
village, Tarapur
supply, etc
Training and
village and
loan to be
Songarh Village
given to
in Phase 1
SHGs
Establishmen
t of
Can specifically
Handloom train women in
training and
villages to
HHI centre
provide
for making
additional
Maheshwari income to HH
Sarees

20

40

50

68

50

171

2013

Subsidy by
National
Private
Medicinal
entrepreneur/
Plants Board;
State Govt
PPP
Central
Warehousing
Corporation
Funding;
CWC + Private
Subsidy by
Entrepreneur
National
Medicinal
Plants Board;
PPP
Funding under
Swarna Jayanti
Shehri Rozgar
Yojna (SJSRY)
based on 75:25
funding pattern Through SHG
/ Urban Self
formation
employment
Program
(UNEP) based
on loan and
subsidy
Cluster
development
Scheme (IICS)
or NGO
Funding

Through SHG
formation and
Scheme / NGO
Funding

11.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

11.3

11.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

11.3

2.3

7.8

38.9

126.8

175.8

0.0

0.0

56.5

56.5

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Loans to
villagers to
start small
businesses
like Haath
thela, Fruit
and
vegetable
thela
Villagers
should be
given
subsidies in
taxes for the
next 25 years
+ More
incentives
should be
given to
Villagers as
they can not
avail benefits
and subsidies
from GPs
Value
addition and
market
linkage for
herbs and For AYUSH system of medicine or extraction of
other plant commercially viable products - such as oil from
based
khirni seeds
products of
medicinal or
commercial
value

40

Funding under
Swarna Jayanti
Shehri Rozgar
Yojna (SJSRY)
based on 75:25 Through SHG
funding pattern Formation or
140
/ Urban Self
through
employment Collectorate/ NP
Program
(UNEP) based
on loan and
subsidy

100

45.2

129.3

0.0

0.0

Administrative Measure. To be
integrated in NP budget and to
subsidies to be given by
District Collectorate

Administrative Measure. To be
integrated in NP budget and to
subsidies to be given by District
Collectorate

To be undertaken at District
Level (through Govt and/or
private industry support)

To be undertaken at District
Level (through Govt and/or
private industry support)

172

174.5

City Development Plan for Mandav


Propagation
of Organic
Farming

Propagation
of Green
House
Farming

Incentives to promote organic


farming practices through
Organic certification
Fruit and flower
farming for sale
Profits from Green house
to areas within farming to Punjab farmers have
7
and outside MP increased from 7000 to 7 lakhs lakh/unit
in a couple of years
@7 lakh for 840
sqm

Propagation
For
Drip irrigation plant to subsidise
of drip and conservation of cost of equipment. Equipment
sprinkler water resource to be given on 3 installment
irrigation and better yield
basis instead of 1

Apiculture
related to
forests in
Mandav

Training in
Apiculture

MP State Agro Department: The


superior bee colonies (Apis
mellifera) produced by selected
bee breeders is being
Cost @ 7
distributed to small / marginal /
lakh/unit
S.C. / S.T. / Women / farmers /
beekeepers.
5000kg Capacity Farm, Sale
Price: Rs. 32/kg

14

49

70

Sprinkler and drip irrigation


plant is proposed to be
developed in the Proposed
Dhamnod/Dharampuri SEZ

70

84

173

State
Incentives to promote organic
Agriculture State Agriculture farming practices by Agriculture
department + department + PPP
Department and Organic
PPP
Certification
Horticulture
Department
Funding, PPP to Horticulture
develop green Department +
7.9
18.1 95.4
0.0
house farming
Farmers
practices for
exotic varieties
Sprinkler and drip irrigation
plant is proposed to be
developed in the Proposed
Dhamnod/Dharampuri SEZ
MP State Agro
Department: To
encourage
purchase of
superior bee
colonies,
subsidy support
is being
provided at the
rate of 25% of
the cost subject
to maximum MP State Agro
Rs. 2.50 & to
Department +
7.9
9.0 136.3
0.0
encourage
Entrepreneur
purchase of
standard bee
hives with
related
beekeeping
equipment
subsidy support
at the rate of
25% of the
subject to Rs.
350.

2013

121.4

153.2

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Bee Farming

Promoting
Prawn
Culture to
Implemented in
increase
Bhadbhada Can be promoted in existing and
revenue
Farm, Madhya
new ponds
generation
Pradesh
for tribals
and Majhi
Samaj

Establishment
of women
based SHGs for
HHIs/cottage Bamboo based
industry/coop
eratives with
NGO support

Basket and other innovative


products from bamboo

18

18

36

72

174

Beekeeping
Orientation
Training
Courses
conducted by
MP State Agro
Department
MP Rural
Livelihoods
Programme
Funding for
Prawn
Cultivation OR
Prawn-cumFish Seed
Production
Project by
Ministry of
Fisheries OR
MPRDP or
Marine Product
Fisheries Dept OR
Export
MPEDA
Development
Authority
(MPEDA) will
provide Rs 5
lakh for
hatchery
development,
Rs 1 lakh for
construction of
ponds and a 30
per cent
subsidy.
RDSY for SC/ST;
NGOs like
State Govt.
AVINASH in
Bamboo artisan partnership with
Yojana of MP
its allied
Cooperative, institution, the
esp for SC/ST National Centre
entrepreneurs
for Human
or SGSY
Settlements and

20.3

23.3

70.1

0.0

113.7

0.0

1.3

1.9

0.0

3.2

City Development Plan for Mandav


Agro produce
based

papad, badi, pickles, jams etc


from local produce

Local herb and NWFP based


Herb based/
products such as churan, mouth
NWFP based
fresheners, confectionary etc

candle making, incence sticks,


paper plates, jewellery making,
embroidery, stiching, sewing etc

15

Other

Through NGOs
and
Microfinance
Institutes at
Women
District Level
SHGs for
MFIs to provide
Micro Credit
easy loans on Combined for the entire District
and Micro
quarterly
finance
installments
systems
NGOs to help
women start
small
businesses

NGO and MFI Funding at


District Level / NGO funding +
Funding under Shahri
Swarozgar Yojna

Resource and design innovation centre for continuity of traditional


knowledge systems and promoting these as means of livelihood
(documentation, training, design innovations and dissemination)

Covered under Heritage and


Tourism

Flour Mill

10

Internet caf

Medical
store

20

NGO and MFI


Funding; Can
be
subcontracted
for entire Dhar
and Alirajpur
district to 1
NGO

175

MFIs + NGOs

2.3

2.6

3.9

0.0

8.7

2.3

2.6

3.9

0.0

8.7

5.7

6.5

9.7

0.0

21.8

NGO and MFI Funding at District


Level / NGO funding + Funding
under Shahri Swarozgar Yojna

Covered under Heritage and


Tourism

20

Environment
(NCHSE), has been
PMEGY+RDY;
working in Dhar
Can be
District; Training
subcontracted
and SHG
for entire Dhar
formation for all
and Alirajpur
these activities is
District to 1
needed; to be
NGO
facilitated by local
NGOs

2013

Flour Mill Scheme


of MP
Cooperative, esp
for SC/ST
entrepreneurs;
PMEGY/RDSY/DD
Y
Internet caf
scheme of MP
Cooperative, esp
for SC/ST
entrepreneurs

Medical store
scheme of MP
Cooperative,
esp for SC/ST
entrepreneurs

Private
entrepreneur

0.0

25.9

0.0

0.0

25.9

Private
entrepreneur

5.7

0.0

0.0

0.0

5.7

Private
entrepreneur

5.7

0.0

0.0

0.0

5.7

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Organised
space for
mobile
vendors
Tourism
related
projects
Cattle
breeding to
increase
cattle
productivity
Strategic EIA
for town
including
industries

Demarcated space

Covered under transport

Covered under transport

Covered under 'Heritage and


Tourism'

Covered under 'Heritage and


Tourism'
State
Veterinary
Department

Centre to be established by
State Vet Dept

Centre to be established by
State Vet Dept

Covered under 'Environment'

Covered under 'Environment'

Covered under 'Social


Infrastructure'

Covered under 'Social


Infrastructure'

Pisciculture
Training Urban agricultural techniques and practices such
programmes as organic farming, drip and sprinkler irrigation
for tribal
Repair of agricultural equipment
population
Travel, tourism and hospitality related
Food processing
Total

480.37

360.12 126.83

967.33

22.3 Water Supply


Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Derivation

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh)

Desiltation and
Current intake from
conservation of Mallipura
Water supply
Sagar Talab = 0.25
and Sagar Talab
from
MLD. Current shortage
multiple
Additional intake from
= 2 MLD. Requirement
sources
Sagar Talab - upgrading
upto 2035 = 3.16 MLD
intake

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

2037

Covered under 'Environment'

Phase 2 Phase 3
2027

Total
(Lakhs)

2037

Covered under 'Environment'


UIDSSMT like Subcontracted by
Modality
NP

25

25

176

0.0

32.3

0.0

0.0

32.3

City Development Plan for Mandav


Relaying of pipeline (20
yr old) from Mallipura
Talab to WTP
Pipeline from Reva Kund
near Jamnia or from
Supply from Sakalda
Sakalda Talab
Talab (3 MLD)
Intake and pumping
system
Water supply
from
Narmada
(Directly or
to be
included
under Dhar
water supply
scheme)
Prohibition
of use of
water from
Sagar and
Mallipura
Talab for
irrigation
WTP

25

25

2.5
Cr/MLD

3.16 MLD

125

125

0.0

161.6

0.0

0.0

161.6

300

300

0.0

0.0

584.0

0.0

584.0

20

20

0.0

0.0

38.9

0.0

38.9

CM
Infrastructure/
Subcontracted by
7900 Water supply
NP
Scheme
Provision

790

To be enforced by NP through
legal framework

3.2 MLD (excluding for


ground water)

Existing WTP to be
redeveloped

37

Feasibility
study with
focus on
Environment
Any small check dam
to study
Environmentally
construction required at
potential for
sustainable option to Reva Kund should only be
drawing water
be chosen
permitted after suitable
from Reva
environmental analysis
Kund near
Jamnia and
from Sakalda
Pond

10

10

Repair /reconstruction of
existing OHT (0.3 MLD) +
expansion of sump to
capacity of ) 0.6 MLD

15

185

177

892.7

892.7

To be enforced by NP through
legal framework

37

OHT based
water supply

2013

UIDSSMT like Subcontracted by


Modality
NP

State PHED

PHED Engineers

UIDSSMT like Subcontracted by


Modality
NP

0.0

47.8

0.0

0.0

47.8

0.0

12.9

0.0

0.0

12.9

0.0

19.4

0.0

0.0

19.4

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


3 OHTs of 1 Lakh litre
each + Each OHT to have
a staging height of 10m :
One near Dhar Road, 1
near Tarapur gate, 1
near Jhabri

Each OHT to have 2 Lakh


litre capacity
Locations, design and underground sump +
heights to be approved Pump room + Pump
by the MHRMA to
Redevelopment of
ensure there is no
existing OHT
negative impact on the Treated water from OHTs
heritage resources to be supplied to tanks at
ground/under ground
level (as per gradient) for
each rural cluster/hamlet
from which decentralised
distribution can be
carried out through wind
energy based water
pumps
5 km along main spine
2 km towards Sagar
Village
Conditional to
Existing
permission from the 2 km towards Tarapur
mains to be
Village
Mandav Heritage
relaid or
Resource Management 1 km towards Songarh
expanded
Authority (MHRMA)
Village
5 Kms towards Jhabri
Village
Mapping of
all existing
and
To enable efficient maintenance and
proposed
supply
management and prevent negative impact on
pipelines
archeological heritage
and linking
to GIS
database

30

90

90

30

30

30

10

50

25

50

MNRE
/UIDSSMT like
Modality

0.0

116.4

0.0

0.0

116.4

Subcontracted by
NP

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

38.8

NP

0.0

0.0

97.3

0.0

97.3

125

125

0.0

161.6

0.0

0.0

161.6

50

50

0.0

64.6

0.0

0.0

64.6

50

50

0.0

64.6

0.0

0.0

64.6

25

25

0.0

32.3

0.0

0.0

32.3

125

125

0.0

161.6

0.0

0.0

161.6

5.7

6.5

0.0

0.0

12.1

UIDSSMT like Subcontracted by


Modality
NP

NP

178

NP

City Development Plan for Mandav


Catchment
conservation
and revival
of Karam
River
Catchment
conservation
of all lakes
and ponds
Provision of
drinking
water points
in public
areas and
peripheral
hamlets/clus
ters
Institutional buildings,
tourist infrastructure,
recreational areas and
residential areas

Large scale
propagation
of Rain
Water
Harvesting

DPR for rain


water
harvesting,
recharging
ground
water
through
infiltration
ponds and
revival of
wells and
baories
Wells and
baories to be
revived

Covered under 'Environment'

Covered under 'Environment'

Covered under 'Environment'

Covered under 'Environment'

0.3

1.8

0.9

10,000/
structure

0.2

0.5

Historic stuctures and


complexes

25

2.5

25

10

20 nos

15

45

179

2.5

2.7

PPP (Public
contributions/
NP)

5.7

50

2.0

1.2

0.0

0.0

3.2

State Govt Subcontracted by


RWH initiative
NP

0.2

0.6

4.9

7.9

13.7

Ministry of
MHRMA and
Culture/State
State Department
Department of
of Archeology
Archaeology

0.0

32.3

48.7

0.0

81.0

Subcontracted by
11.3
NP

0.0

0.0

0.0

11.3

58.2

0.0

0.0

75.1

10

NP funding

60

MNREGA
Funding/ MLA
Fund

NP

2013

MLA/NP

17.0

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Feasibility
study for
construction of
small check
dam at Jhabri

Provision of
hand pumps
with
Provision of 3
overhead
handpumps per ward /
storage in all
village cluster
villages @ 3
handpumps
per village

Provision of
handpumos
with
overhead
storage tanks
in all Schools,
PHC and
institutional
buildings

Development
of identified
existing ponds
infiltration
ponds/
recharge
basins
DPR for water
supply
network and
topography
based supply
zones

10

15 wards

10

3
lakh/hand
mpump
with
Overhead
storage

45

90

3
lakh/hand
mpump
with
Overhead
storage

21

NP funding

Consultants hired
11.3
by NP

Solar Powered
Handpumps: This
UNICEF Funded
project
undertaken in
Shivpuri District
135
of MP and ha
successfully
provided water
to 480HHs. A
solar power
driven electric
pump, drives
water from a UNICEF and other
handpump and
NGOs
stores it in a 1500
litre tank where
water is stored at
a height and
made to reach 4
27
taps at the
ground level. This
provides for
water storage,
water pressure
and can work
without external
electricity.

0.0

0.0

0.0

11.3

50.9

116.4

0.0

0.0

167.2

6.8

27.1

0.0

0.0

33.9

Covered under Drainage


Covered under Drianage

10

10

180

NP Funding

NP

11.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

11.3

City Development Plan for Mandav


Awareness
generation
for water
conservation
, rain water
harvesting,
prevention
of water
pollution

Covered under 'IEC'

2013

Covered under 'IEC'

2165.4

774

2947

22.4 Sewerage
Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Projects

Diverting
sewage to
decentralise
d sewage
treatment
System

Derivation

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh)

To divert wastewater
from open drains into
the treatment
Construction of
plantbefore it reaches interceptor drains with
water bodies. Treated
grating
wastewater to be used
in agriculture

Provision of
grating over
the drains
Decentralize
Constructed Wetland
d
system / Reed bed
wastewater
system
treatment
Reuse of
For horticulture,
Construction and
treated
agriculture and other maintenance of diversion
wastewater
secondary uses
canals (mud)

20
lakh/km

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

40

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

Phase 2 Phase 3

First 2 Till
2027
years 2017

2037

20

Phase 1

60

PPP with
Farmers
(Farmers can
be given
Subcontracted by
treated
NP or PPP
wastewater for
irrigation) or
UIDSSMT Like
Modality

45.2

25.9

0.0

2037

0.0

Covered under 'Drainage'

Covered under 'Drainage'

Covered under 'Sanitation'

Covered under 'Sanitation'

NP + PPP with
Farmers

NP + Farmers
Total

181

1.1
73.5

1.3

Total
(Lakhs)

71.1

1.9

3.2

7.5

1.9

3.2

78.6

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

22.5 Sanitation
Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Projects

Derivation

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh)

Provision of
HH toilets

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

Provision of
Community
Contractor to be paid by
toilets (Can
community
be provided
1 community toilet (6
respresentative. In case
along the
20 lakh
seater + 2 bath) for
of non maintenance,
lines of
each of the 8 rural
per block
community can hold
Deluxe
clusters/hamlets) payment and cancel
Toilets: Build,
contract
Operate and
Transfer
basis).
Mobile
toilets can
also be
provided
Communtiy Toilets to
be particularly
provided in Rampura
Village, Jahangir Pura
Gate and Jhabri Village

3 nos

NP Funding

NP + Mandav
Heritage
Resource
Management
Authority
(MHRMA)

Deluxe toilets
are being made
in several parts
of MP. Some of
the companies
undertaking
this work are
140
Arya Bhatt
Seva Sansthan,
Akhil Bhartiya
Prayavaran aur
Private
Gramin Vikas
contractor under
Sansthan, and
NP supervision
Vasundhara
(on BOT Basis)
Sanrakshan
Smajik Sastha.
OR
PPP basis with
Contractors
like Sulabh;
60
The Contractor
can earn
through
advertisements
on walls of

40

60

182

Total
(Lakhs)

2037

Covered under 'Urban Poor'

100

Phase 2 Phase 3

First 2 Till
2027
years 2017

2037

Covered under 'Urban Poor'


Design to be developed by Design Innovation
Centre (specifying construction materials and
techniques) to ensure the building character is in
line with the context

Phase 1

5.7

0.0

0.0

0.0

5.7

0.0

129.3 77.9

0.0

207.1

0.0

77.6

0.0

77.6

0.0

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

community
toilets or
through
monthly
collection of 10
to 30Rs/family
One public toilet for

Provision of tourists (Deluxe Toilet on


BOT basis or Sulabh
Modular
Shauchalaya) with
deluxe toilets
Modular construction
proposed visitor and
/ Mobile interpretation centre near
Toilets
Chappan Mahal, portable

7.5 lakh
for 10
seater

PPP basis with


contractors like
Private
13.5
deluxe or
contractor under
Sulabh on pay NP supervision
and use basis

7.5

6.8

9.7

0.0

0.0

16.5

toilets at other locations

Decentralize
Interceptor drain to carry
1 lakh/0.1
d
Constructed wetland
wastewater to the
wastewater system/ Reed bed treatment plant. Treated MLD or 10
treatment
system
wastewater from here lakh/MLD
facility
should be reused
DPR for
Decentralize
d
wastewater
treatment
facility
Developmen
t and
implementati
on of a
Septage
Management
Plan
Generation
of awareness
towards
sanitation

15

10

10

10

10

10

35

Integrated
Urban
Sanitation
Programme

Private
contractor under
NP supervision

17.0

12.9

9.7

15.9

55.5

10

NP Funding

Subcontracted by
NP

11.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

11.3

35

Integrated
Urban
Sanitation
Programme

Private
contractor under
NP supervision

11.3

6.5

19.5

31.7

68.9

48

443

Covered under 'IEC'

Covered under 'IEC'


298.5

183

Total

287.9

107

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

22.6 Drainage
Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Projects

Derivation

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
Phase 1
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh) First
Till
2
2017
years

Natural
drainage Delineation of natural
channels to drainage channels
be conserved
Diverting the
drainage
channels to
existing
surface
water bodies
or recharge
basins

bagh road
2 Singodi talab on Lal
Bagh road
3 Lal bangle talab
4 Saman talab on Lal
Bagh road
5 Raglav talab on Hathi
paga/ Roopmati Road
6 Doodh Talai on Neel

2027

Phase
Total
3
(Lakhs)

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

15

Phase 1

Phase 2 Phase 3

First 2 Till
2027
years 2017

2037

To be included in Master Plan/


Covered under 'Environment'

20

Desiltation of Sagar
Talab
Desiltation of Jhabri
and Kaldipura talab
Desiltation of Tarapur
Talab on Neelkanth
Road
Small pond in Sagar
Desiltation of
Village
existing
15 ponds
ponds
1 Lamba talab on Lal

Phase 2

Total
(Lakhs)

2037

To be included in Master Plan/


Covered under 'Environment'

20

MNREGA
Funding, CGWB
funding under
Ground water
Contractor under
management
NP supervision
and regulation
funding/ Govt
of MP Subsidy
for RWH

17.0

6.5

0.0

0.0

23.4

6.8

0.0

0.0

0.0

6.8

6.8

0.0

0.0

0.0

6.8

6.8

0.0

0.0

0.0

6.8

6.8

0.0

0.0

0.0

6.8

0.0

108.6

0.0

0.0

108.6

84

84

184

MNREGA
Funding, CGWB
funding under
Subcontracted by
Ground water
NP under
management
superivison of
and regulation
Collectorate
funding/
Collectorate
Funding

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Kanth Road
7 Badi Doodh Talai on
Neel Kanth Road
8 Ek Khamba near
Chappan Mahal
9 Lendiya Talab on Main
Road (Ward 5)
10 Pipliya pond near
Ram Mandi
11 Maan Singh Ji Talab
near Kaldipura road
12 Moon Talab near
Jahaz Mahal
13 Songarh pond
14 Kaldipura pond
15. Jamnia Pond

Catchment
conservation
for
catchment
areas of all
ponds

Covered under Environment

Each recharge basin to be


Developmen
To enable recharge of provided with recharge
t of Recharge
ground water aquifer
shafts to facilitate
Basins
recharge

Kund in
Ward 15 to
be
maintained
Construction
of new
ponds

12

2
Sagar Village
Jamia phata,
Neelkanth Mandir,
Jamnia nallah
Small pond to be made
on Khacha Khoderia

Covered under Environment

12

10

10

30

25

MNREGA
Funding, CGWB
funding under
Contractor under
Ground water
NP supervision
management
(Environment
and regulation
Cell)
funding/ Govt
of MP Subsidy
for RWH
NP Funding

NP

30

3 nos

90

90

30

30

185

MNREGA
Funding,
Subcontracted by
Collectorate
NP
Funding, BRGF

13.6

0.0

0.0

0.0

13.6

2.3

3.9

19.5

31.7

57.3

33.9

0.0

0.0

0.0

33.9

0.0

116.4

0.0

0.0

116.4

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

38.8

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


Maratha Nallah on
Jahangir pura road (big
1
pond; can serve 5
villages)
Pond needed in
1
Songarh Village
Pond can be
constructed near
existing weir to store
1
water by diverting it to
the pond in Jamnia
Jhanbri village,
1
Kaldipura
Pond can be
constructed in Ward
1
15
Pond can be
Estimate has been
constructed on
prepared, construction
Marghat Nallah near
work needs to be started
Jamnia
5 additional ponds on
5
nallahs in the forests

Covering
large open
drains with
grating

30

30

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

38.8

30

30

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

38.8

30

30

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

38.8

30

30

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

38.8

30

30

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

38.8

30

30

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

38.8

150

0.0

0.0

292.0

0.0

292.0

6.8

0.0

0.0

0.0

6.8

311

32

950.5

150

UIDSSMT like Contractor under


Modality
NP supervision
Total

186

607.4

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

22.7 Solid Waste Management


Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Derivation

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh)

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

Phase 2 Phase 3

First 2 Till
2027
years 2017

2037

2 decentalised vermi
composting sites to be
developed. The area
Current
under pits shall be
25000/MT 0.53 0.35
1.13
compostable
waste = 2.1 increased in a phase wise
Composting plant
MT; projected manner with increase in
waste generation
as 3.41 MT by
Private sector
2035
Decentralised composting
can sell the
pits at community level in 25000/MT 0.13 0.13
0.25
manure
Ward 10 to 15
generated.
2 small (5mx5m) storage dhalaos to be
made for recyclable waste and inert
15
15
30 Private sector
would also
waste for Ward 1-7 and 8-15
earn
from door
Networking with Recycling units
to
door
waste
Recyclable waste to be sent to Recycling
in Indore to be established.
Sale/reuse of
collection
fee
Recyclable waste (Paper, Metal,
Recyclable waste and Plants in Indore/Ratlam once or twice a
after first
Plastics
and
Glass)
to
be
month;
Networking
with
Recycling
units
inert waste
Phase.
transported to Indore twice
to be established by Private Party
/month

Phase 1

Private party
under NP
supervision

2037

0.6

0.5

0.0

0.0

1.3

0.1

0.2

0.0

0.0

0.3

17.0

19.4

0.0

0.0

36.3

Networking with Recycling units


in Indore to be established.
Recyclable waste (Paper, Metal,
Plastics and Glass) to be
transported to Indore twice
/month

Inert waste to be stored in Dhalaos and


used for making roads
Awareness
generation through
media

For segregation at source, and to


reduce, recycle and reuse waste

Located close
Proposed Trenching
to water
ground near Doob
Zero landfill based waste
source and
Baori (near Lohani
management proposed
tourist
Caves) to be banned
attraction

Covered under 'IEC'


Imme
diate
admi
nistra
tive
meas
ure

Covered under 'IEC'

Immediat
e
administr
ative
measure

187

Total
(Lakhs)

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Training of local
population in
decentralised solid
waste management
Placing of gps/gprs
vehicle tracking
system on door to
door collection
vehicle for
monitoring
Collection from bins
at tourist nodes and
1 more Van to
from common
be introduced
collection bins in
ward

Waste collection bins

Covered under 'IEC'

0.3

Well designed bins at


tourist nodes as part of
tourist facility
Provision of separate
waste bins for organic
and inorganic waste

DPR for SWM

Covered under 'IEC'

To include cleaning processes of


equipment, monitoring of collection of
waste, gps vehicle tracking system,
waste collection routes for tourist and
residential areas, special provisions for
pedestrialnised heritage zones/areas etc

5.7

Covered under 'Tourism'

0.0

0.0

5.7

Covered under 'Tourism'

5000/bin 0.5

0.5

10

10

NP Funding

NP through
consultant

Total

188

0.0

0.6

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.6

11.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

11.3

55.5

55.2

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

22.8 Urban Poor


Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Derivation

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh)

Demographic and socio


economic survey of slum
dwellers

Upgradation of
housing through
grant/loan/subsidy
conditional to
construction of HH
toilets and retention
of tenure for 20
years.

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Interest Subsidy to be
given on loans

33

55

Interest subsidy at 5% p. a.

189

Phase 1

Phase 2 Phase 3

First 2 Till
2027
years 2017
10

66

Implementing
Agency

2037

10

State and
funding under IHSDP to Central
Govt
upgrade their DUs on
their own (for the most funding
marginalised segment - @90,000
10% of the eligible HHs) to 1.1
lakh/DU

Source of
funding

NP Funding,
Subcontracted by
UIDSSMT like
NP
modality

Funding under
ISHUP/along the
lines of ISHUP:
Subsidized loan
@5% interest of
1 lakh given to
slum dwellers for
payback over 15
to 20 years. Has
been successful
in Ratlam
OR
154
Along IHSDP
pattern/RAY
State and Central
Govt grant of
Slum dwellers
upto 1.1 lakh
under NP
INR/DU can be
supervision
given to the Slum
HHs for
upgradation of
DU on their own

Central Govt
Interest
subsidy on
loans - ISHUP
model through
National
Housing
Board/HUDCO

11.3

0.0

0.0

37.3

85.3 107.1

Total
(Lakhs)

2037
0.0

11.3

0.0

229.7

Interest subsidy at 5% p. a.

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

10 village
wards;
Assuming
Drains and roads for Provision of 2
village wards
km of roads
and 4km of
drains per
village ward
Provision of
decentralised
infrastructure in the
peripheral hamlets
(Sagar, Rampura,
Nandlalpur, Jamanya
and Jhabri villages)
MFIs (Micro Finance
Institutions for Urban
Poor)
Employment
generation for tribals
and Urban Poor
HHIs for women

Roads

25
lakh/km

50

200

Drains

2 lakh/km

32

Clearing of RoW, laying


roads, regular csweeping
and waste collection,
provision of water supply
points, garbage bins,
provision of drains for
wastewater

50

25

250

40

500

80

UIDSSMT like
Subcontracted by
modality / IHSDP
NP
Funding

75

MLA Fund + NP

Subcontracted by
NP

56.5

258.6 486.7

0.0

801.7

9.0

41.4

77.9

0.0

128.3

56.5

32.3

0.0

0.0

88.8

Covered under 'Economic


Base'

Covered under 'Economic Base'

Covered under 'Economic


Base'

Covered under 'Economic Base'

Covered under 'Economic


Base'

Covered under 'Economic Base'


Total

190

588.2

672

1260

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

22.9 Transportation
Total
(Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Derivation

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh)

Traffic and Transport To ensure provision of tourist transport


Management Plan for as well as local community connectivity
Mandav Planning
through roads, IPTs, Public transport
Area (to be
etc. Linkages with tourist circuits,
coordinated with promotion and regulation of tour buses,
other plans and as safe and comfortable transport facilities
per vision and policies to accomodation hubs at Dhamnod,
outlines in IHRMP)
Dhar and Nalcha.
Tourist shuttle service
and non motorised
rickshaws
Parking for tourists
and sheltered stops
for shuttle bus
Construction of Road
connectiong Jali
Mahal, Jhabri Village, This link will
Will provide link to NH 3.
Jahangirpur Gate of
provide
Road under PMGSY
Mandav with NH 3
alternate
already in place along
and SH 31, following access to
most part of the route
a strategic impact
Mandav
assessment (Via
Masidpura village)
IPT (Tata Magic/Jeep)
licences to local
people to be easier
and subsidized)

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase
3

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

2037

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

Phase 1

Covered under 'Heritage and


Tourism'

19.4

Administrativ
e Measure

RTO

191

2027

2037

0.0

0.0

Total
(Lakhs)

19.4

Covered under 'Heritage and


Tourism'

MNREGA
Funding/
UIDSSMT like
Subcontracted by
Modality/
282.5
NP
PMGSY/
Collectorate
Funding

250

Phase 2 Phase 3

First 2 Till
years 2017

District
Administration
Distict
/State Tourism Administration
Department

15

25

Cost with Inflation and


Contingency (Lakhs

RTO

0.0

Administrative
Measure

0.0

0.0

282.5

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Jain mandir
Lal Bangla
area
Singhodi

Access roads to be Narsinghpura


provided for some
Piplia
areas
Ram Mandir
to Piplia
Jamnia to
Jahangirpura
gate
Farashpura

IPT Service (like Tata


Magic) or City Bus
Service to be started
to cater to villages

Resurfacing of
existing roads

25
lakh/km

Especially
needed during
school timing.
To ply along
Can be redulated during
Dhar road,
tourist season
Jhabri road,
Tarapur road
and Sagar
Village road
Main spine

3km

Neelkanth
Tarapur Road

2km

Jhabri Road

2km

Improving road from


Mandav to Kakarda
with appropriate
drainage

Safety along regional


roads to be ensured

125

14

50
lakh/km
50
lakh/km

200

14

100
100

25

UIDSSMT like
Subcontracted by
Modality or
84.8
NP
IHSDP Funding

161.6

Private Pliers.
Private
entrepreneurs
from Mandav /
farmers can
28
Private party
15.8 18.1
run vehicles on
Pay and use
basis. Can
charge Rs. 2
per trip
UIDSSMT Like
150
169.5
Modality / MP
Tourism
Subcontracted by
100
113.0
Funding / CM
NP
Infrastructure
Scheme
100
113.0
Funding
MNREGA
Funding/ Subcontracted by
25
28.3
0.0
UIDSSMT like
NP
Modality

150

50
lakh/km

25
Particularly along roads
connecting Mandav with
Dhar, Indore and
Dhamnod

75

Highway Patrol and


Police Posts

192

Police
Department
Funding

Police
Department

3.4

2.6

0.0

0.0

246.4

0.0

0.0

33.9

0.0

0.0

169.5

0.0

0.0

113.0

0.0

0.0

113.0

0.0

0.0

28.3

0.0

0.0

6.0

City Development Plan for Mandav


Tree plantation along
roads

Covered under 'Environment'

To be paved with pavers and


To be relocated provided with waiting room,
Development of IPT
from current
drinking water points,
hub cum taxi stand
location near
tickting window, public
and Bus stand
Jami Masjid
toilets and green buffer
along periphery

Resurfacing

50

2013

Covered under 'Environment'

50

26km

50
lakh/km

1300

26 km

10
lakh/km

100

160

260

26km x 2

2 lakh/km

52

52

104

UIDSSMT like Subcontracted by


Modality
NP

1300

0.0

64.6

0.0

0.0

64.6

1469.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

1469.1

113.0 206.8

0.0

0.0

319.9

58.8

0.0

0.0

126.0

Increased Tree

Improvement of road cover, grasses


between Mandav and and shrub cover
to stop erosion
Dharampuri :
and control
Increased tree cover,
runoff
Resurfacing and
Drainage
drainage provision Provision: Deep
drains along
both sides of
road
Access walkway to
Boorhi Mandav and
Songarh Fort to be
provided parallel to the
valley (near NP Raen
Basera)

Provision of parking
areas on PPP basis

UIDSSMT like Subcontracted by


Modality
NP

Covered under 'Heritage and


Tourism'

10

10

193

67.2

Covered under 'Heritage and


Tourism'

25

Development of
Roopmati
Parking can be
done by MP
Tourism to
generate
revenue. Other
parkings: PPP
basis: Land
owner can open
land parcel for
parking and
charge a
minimum
parking fee. Land
still remains with
the owner.

Private party

5.7

12.9

19.5

0.0

38.0

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Access road to
Development
Brahmanpuri can be of Tarapur
developed
Gate

50
lakh/km

Road from Jahaz


Mahal to NP to be
made 4 lane
4 laning of road to
Reva Kund
Pedestrianisation of 1
To relieve
km of road stretch
congestion at
starting from Jami
Jami Masjid
Masjid crossing and
and Jain
extending to the
Dharamshala
south of the crossing
Design and implementation as per
Redesigning of Jami
Traffic and Transport Management Plan
Masjid Crossing
for Mandav Planning Area
Development of
organised areas for
As per
informal sector Interpretation
mobile vendors near
and Use plan
proposed Visitor
Centre for tourists
Capital expenditure

UIDSSMT like
Modality / CM Subcontracted by
500
Infrastructure
NP
Fund

500

0.0

0.0

973.3

0.0

Project already proposed by


NP

Project already proposed by NP

Project already proposed by


NP

Project already proposed by NP

10

District
State Tourism
Administration Department /
/State Tourism
District
Department Administration

15

10

10

UIDSSMT like Subcontracted by


Modality
NP

Total

973.3

0.0

12.9

0.0

0.0

12.9

0.0

19.4

0.0

0.0

19.4

0.0

12.9

0.0

0.0

12.9

993

4048.1

3055.3

22.10 Environment
Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Integrated
Environment
management Plan

Derivation

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh)

DPR for integrated planning for forest


and non forest land that are within and
outside NP

10

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

10

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Implementing
Agency

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

2037

10

194

Source of
funding

State Govt
Funding/
Ministry of NP - Environment
Environment
Cell
and Forests
(MoEF)

11.3

0.0

Phase 2 Phase 3 Total (Lakhs)


2027

2037

0.0

0.0

11.3

City Development Plan for Mandav


Formation of
Environment Cell
within NP

Covered under 'Institutional'

Tree plantation over 10


sq kms area - Mahua,
Large scale
Deforested
Dhavra Gond, Charoli,
afforestation on
forest land
Tendu, Bekul, Khirni,
forest land and non
=about 10 sq
Sitaphal (tribal
forest land- Joint
kms
population to have
Forest Management.
access to Non Wood
Forest Produce (NWFP)
81% tribal
Fuel and fodder tree population
100 mts buffer at edge of
plantation for tribals - dependent on
forest land
forest for fuel
social forestry
and fodder
Road side green
buffer - urban
forestry

Plantation of air purifying


species such as Neem on
both sides of roads - 100
trees per kilometres

12

0.32

60

60

12.8

Integrated lakes and


ponds management plan
22
lakes/ponds
Afforestation in
Conservation of lakes
suffering from
catchment area
and ponds and their
siltation
Afforestation around the
catchment area
and/or
lakes/ponds
within NP boundary
eutrophicatio Desiltation of lakes and
and at foot hill
n - area of
ponds
(including SAGAR
water bodies
TALAB AND
Undergrowth plantation
within NP
Mallipura Talab)
limit=12 sq Conservation of drainage
channels
kms
Erosion control measures

15

122

Covered under 'Institutional'

120

158

Plantation of leguminous
plants to reduce fertilizer
consumption such as
Gliricidia sepium

195

2013

State CAMPA +
State CAMPA
Forest
(State
department and
Compensatory
Local tribal
Afforestation
communities
Fund
(Joint Forest
Management
Management) and Planning
Access of NWFP
Authority)
to the tribal
Funding + CSR
population

As part of
proposed Land NP- Environment
24.8
Use + MLA
Cell+ Forest
Fund + Forest
Department
department
MoEF National Lake
State Forest
Conservation Department + GP
Plan (70% GOI
+ NP + 30% NP/CSR)/ Environment Cell
np funding

280

67.8

77.6

0.0

0.0

145.4

14.5

2.6

9.7

15.9

42.6

178.5

0.0

316.4

137.9

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Catchment Conservaton
of Tipkiya Gufa and
Maintenance of Tipkiya
Gufa

Integrated
Watershed
Management
Programme +
Annual
Forest
Maintenance of Department + NP
Tipkiya Gufa to
be undertaken
by NP/Forest
Department

Plantation of trees along


farm boundaries - farm
forestry - promoting
plantation of nitrogen
fixing species such as
Gliricidia sepium

MoEF State Forest


National Lake
Department + GP
Conservation
+ NP Plan (70% GOI
Environment Cell
+ 30% NP/CSR)

Since this tree


is susceptible
to falling
before
Plantation of
Plantation of Khurasani
maturity, the
Khurasani Imli trees:
Imli trees with 3 to 4ft
trees should
unique to Mandav
otla around the tree
be provided
with otla
along
periphery

7.5

Allocation of pattas
to villagers on forest
land to be regulated

Administrative Measure and


strict enforcement

Catchment
Conservation of
Tarapur Pond
Afforestation and 1000 acre land
Tourism, plantation and
promotion of
on Lamba
grazing
Ecotourism
Talab

22.5

120

50

24

100

250

50

96

120

196

MP Tourism
Department's
Destination
Development
Fund /
Integrated
Watershed
Management
Programme /
MNREGA
Funding

Tourism
Department /
Irrigation
Department /
Horticulture
Department

Forest
Department

Forest
Department

Administrative Measure and


strict enforcement

Forest
Department

56.5

0.0

0.0

0.0

56.5

Forest
Department

27.1

124.1

0.0

0.0

151.2

Integrated
Watershed
Management
Programme
Integrated
Watershed
Management
Programme

8.5

29.1

233.6

317.1

588.2

City Development Plan for Mandav


Administrativ
e and
Promotional
Measure
through
awareness
generation
and
regulation

Use of Polyethene to
be banned in Mandav

Catchment
Conservation and
large scale
afforestation in
Mandav Planning
Area

12

Gardens can
be handed
Parks and
over to the
Playgrounds
community
for
maintenance
Garden can be
handed over
Revivial of Garden
to the
around Sagar Talab Community
for
maintenance
Strict enforcement to Through
stop illegal felling of participation
trees
of tribals

Green buffer along


regional roads

40 Kms to
Dhar

1680

420

1050

1050

NP + ASI + MP
Tourism

Administrative
and
Promotional
NP + ASI + MP
Measure
Tourism
through
awareness
generation and
regulation

State CAMPA
(State
Compensatory
Afforestation
Fund
Management
and Planning
Authority)
Funding + CSR

State CAMPA

Covered under 'Social


Infrastructure'

10

10

10 Kms proposed road


from Mandu to Gujri; 10
0.32
12.80 6.40
Kms road from Mandu to
lakh/km
road from Manawar to
NH3

20

MP Tourism +
Annual
NP + Community
maintenance + MP Tourism
by community

11.3

Annual Annual
12.9 Mainte Mainte
nance nance

24.2

15

NGO and State


Forest
State Forest Dept
Department
Funding

2.3

3.9

9.7

15.9

31.7

14.5

8.3

0.0

0.0

22.7

19.20

197

7814.8

Covered under 'Social


Infrastructure'

Annual Annual
Mainten Maint
ance enance

1898.5 543.0 2043.9 3329.4

2013

MLA Fund/
State PWD
Fund

MLA/ PWD

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Strategic EIA for


water supply,
industries and other
environmental
parameters

10

10.00

State Govt
Funding

Subcontracted by
NP

11.3

0.0

3062.8

0.0

0.0

2475.5 3678.1

11.3

9216.5

22.11 Land Use , Electricity and Street Lighting


Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Derivation

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh)

Land use to be
compatible with
guidelines in the
Integrated Heritage
Resource Management
Plan (IHRMP) for
Mandav
Planning
area/Investment Area
to be revised as per
proposal in CDP

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

2037

Phase 2 Phase 3 Total (Lakhs)


2027

2037

As per proposed IHRMP

As per proposed IHRMP

To be undertaken by TCPD

To be undertaken by TCPD

Removal of
encroachments that are
negatively affecting the
cultural and natural
resources

Regulated by Mandav Heritage


Resource Management
Authority

Regulated by Mandav Heritage


Resource Management
Authority

Clear demarcation of
forest land

Forest Department and NP


Environment Cell

Forest Department and NP


Environment Cell

Proper
documentation Supervision by NGO to
ensure that land
Land ownership and of government
documents are made
land to be
use to be mapped
undertaken to properly and no forgery
and integrated with identify areas
cases of transferring
GIS database
where pattas tribal land to non tribals
have been
take place
alloted

30

20

198

50

Under Collectorate
District
Administration Supervision +
External monitoring
Funding or
to be ensured by
State Level
NGO to ensure
Funding or NP
accurate
Funding
documentation

33.9

38.9

0.0

72.8

City Development Plan for Mandav


To be made in
Master Plan to
consultation
demarkate zones
with Mandav
(Core area, Modular
Heritage
development Zone,
Resource
NP area, Heritage Management
zone, Tourist zones)
Authority

Development of
Dharamshala

Can be decided on the


basis of GPR survey

Ganga Jamuna
Rest House
Office has
large chunk of
land which Can be undertaken on
can be
PPP basis
redeveloped
to provide
accommodati
on

Can be
developed as
a single 3 floor
hotel or a
Redevelopment of NP series of small
Raen Basera as Hotel
tent like
based on
decentralized/
decentralized /
distributed
distributed hotel accomodation
s along the
concept
lines of those
developed by
Taj Group of
Hotels

High

As part of Master Plan

PPP
basis
(Privat
e
develo
per to
pay
land
owner
a
certain
fee on
annual
basis)

50

50

PPP basis by a
Private Hotel
Group.
Approx. cost
10 to 50 Cr
based on the
scale of
development

199

TCPO

TCP + ASI + MP
Tourism + NP

2013

As part of Master Plan

PPP basis.
Private
developer can be
given a small
part of the land
on lease basis by
the land owner. Private developer
In lieu, the
+ Owner of Ganga
100 develoepr pays a
64.6
Jamuna Rest
certain fee
House
annually to the
land owner. The
developer
recovers the
capital cost of
construction
from user fee
PPP basis.
Private Hotel
developer like
Taj group of
hotels or other
international
Hotel chains can
take land from
PPP basis by a
NP on lease and
Private Hotel
can develop a
distributed Private Developer Group. Approx.
development
under NP
cost 10 to 50 Cr
hotel. The hotel
supervision
based on the
can recover
scale of
capital and O&M
development
costs through
providing
charged
accomodation to
high end
National and
International
Tourists

97.3

0.0

162.0

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Should obtain
prior
NP and MP Tourism
permission
to be given
from Mandav
permission to extend
Heritage
activities in Revenue
Resource
Land
Management
Authority

District
Collectorate in
collaboration
with farmers.
Administrative
Collectorate
Farmers
Measure
permission to be
mandatory
before transfer of
land
98.5

Administrativ
e Measure

136

235

Electricity and Street Lighting


Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Derivation

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh)

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Solar Farms

35

Annual energy audit

Streetlighting

35

70

5km x 33 SLs/km = 165


SLs

MNRE + State
Urja Vikas
Vibhag +
Private
Developers

MNRE + Private
sector through
advertisements
on lanterns

0.1

39.7

16.5

200

39.6

45.2

Phase 2 Phase 3 Total (Lakhs)


2027

2037

0.0

0.0

84.8

To be set up by private
developers along the model of
WBREDA which has set up solar
farms to sell electricity to the
grid
ESCO based
funding

ESCO based funding


397 SLs

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

To be set up by private
developers along the model of
WBREDA which has set up
solar farms to sell electricity to
the grid

Solar power to form % of grid electricity


and to be traded for Carbon credits

SLs to meet
current
shortage
SLs for
proposed
roads

Implementing
Agency

2037

Solar lanterns to be given on rent and


for sale
Solar lanterns, water heaters, solar
Solar haat within or operated pumps and other equipment
near Mandi complex
to be provided
Subsidized rent on lanterns to urban
poor on presenting BPL or Antoday
cards

Source of
funding

ESCo + NP

ESCO based funding

39.7

44.9

0.0

0.0

0.0

44.9

16.5

0.0

0.0

32.1

0.0

32.1

City Development Plan for Mandav


Wind and solar hybrid
water pumps for
irrigation

Can be
Can be developed as a
located along
Wind Farm or as a wind
Jhabri road.
solar hybrid farm.
Energy
Combination of Solar PVs
generated to
of 10KW each are being
Establishment of 1to be used for
used to generate 12.5HP
town,
10 MW Wind Mills or
to run a 3 phase motor all
Wind Solar Hybrid to monuments,
day for farmers in S.India.
farmers and
generate 3 Phase
Wind mills that can
Electricity for supply excess can be
0.75/Kw
generate 3 phase
or
to Heritage areas and supplied to
electricity are also used
farmers in Mandav. 3 Pithampur.
750/MW
in India and can supply
Phase electricity to be LOCATION OF
power to farmers for
supplied to all village WIND MILLS
pumping and other uses.
clusters and all wards
TO BE
Any surplus energy can
of Mandav
APPROVED BY
also be sold in the market
MANDAV
but the key use would be
HERITAGE
to meet local
RESOURCE
requirements for
MANAGEMEN
heritage and villagers
T AUTHORITY
Existing
electricity
APDRP to be
infrastructure
prepared for Mandav
is nearly 50
yrs old
Through
Provision of
provision of
electricity in all
solar/wind
villages till the wind
powered small
farms are set up
setups
Solar street lighting 30 km to Dhar Provision @20 SLs/km 8,000/fixt
along regional roads
ure after
20 km to
(CAN BE COMBINED
MNRE
Provision @20 SLs/km
Dhamnod
FOR DHAR AND
subsidy

16

16

10

750

20

MNRE + State
Urja Vikas
MNRE + Private
Vibhag +
sector
Private
Developers

18.1

20.7

15.6

0.0

54.3

750

MNRE Subsidy
+ PPP for
Carbon Credits
+ Investment
by NGOs. Can
be taken up as
a Multi party
MNRE + Private
Investment.
Sector like
2260
Energy
11.3
Schneider Electric
generated to
or Suzlon
be used for
town,
monuments,
farmers and
excess can be
supplied to
Pithampur

969.6

1460

2378.1

4819.

194.7

0.0

217.3

100

10

2013

60

72
51.2

201

750

Actual amount
subject to
120 APDRP: To be
funded by
MPEB
TERI's lighting a
billion lives
initiative or
74
Solar powered
lamps under
MNRE subsidy
72 MNRE Subsidy +
51.2

PPP for Carbon


Credits (along
Nainital Model
where NP has

MPEB

NGOs

MNRE + Private
sector

22.6

4.5

12.9

116.8

0.0

134.2

0.0

0.0

140.2

0.0

140.2

0.0

0.0

99.7

0.0

99.7

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


entered into an
agreement to set
up solar SLs with
a private
developer.
Private developer
bears the capital
costs and repays
NP after claiming
Carbon Credits)

ALIRAJPUR DISTRICTS
TO CLAIM CARBON
CREDITS)

Provision of
streetlighting in
peripheral
settlements/hamlets

10,000/fix
2.5
ture

Propagation of use of automated


switches
Energy efficiency
Propagation of LED lighting
programme
Lights with automated sensors
Use of energy efficient fixtures
2016 KW
Increase in electricity
supply
supply
required by
2035

10

20

30

60

Increase in supply to be
funded by MPEB

ESCOs + NP

ESCO basis

MPEB Funding

MPEB

2.8

0.0

0.0

0.0

2.8

11.3

25.9

58.4

0.0

95.56

Increase in supply to be funded


by MPEB
1229.4

2117.3 2378.1

5724.8

Fire Fighting
Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Derivation

2 for core
town, 1 for
Provision of Fire
peripheral
vehicles
settlements/h
amlets
2 per vehicle;
Provision of Fire
salary
Fighting Personnel @10,000/mon
th

Estimated
Project Details and Sub
cost/unit
Projects
(Lakh)

12

2 for existing vehicle

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

2037

Phase 2 Phase 3 Total (Lakhs)


2027

2037

24

12

36

Municipal
Budget/State State Govt + NP
Govt Funding

27.1

15.5

0.0

0.0

42.6

4.8

2.4

7.2

Municipal
Budget/State State Govt + NP
Govt Funding

5.4

3.1

0.0

0.0

8.5

202

City Development Plan for Mandav


Training in
Fire equipment and Fire Fighting
and Disaster
training to staff
Management

14

Municipal
Budget/State State Govt + NP
Govt Funding

3.4

3.9

58.4

2013

7.8

12.7

27.7

13

78.9

22.12 Social Infrastructure


Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

2037

Phase 2 Phase 3 Total (Lakhs)


2027

2037

Education
District Level NGO Funding /
Through Evening/Afternoon
classes: To be undertaken in
colaboration with Schools and
Colleges

Women oriented
Literacy Programmes
Pisciculture
Urban agricultural techniques and practices such as
organic farming, drip irrigation
Training programmes
Repair of agricultural equipment
for tribal population
Food processing
(Certificate courses)
Computer
Education
Travel, tourism and hospitality related
Senior Secondary School

with Schools and Colleges


NGOs like AVINASH

40

20

60

20

20

40

10

50

10

20
50

Development of Library
Additional floor
can be
constructed
Upgradation of
using light
existing Schools by
weight or
provision of
temporary
additional floor material like Tin
sheets, PVC
boards or

District Level NGO Funding /

NGOs, Schools, Through Evening/Afternoon classes:


To be undertaken in colaboration
Colleges

10

35
50

150

40

40

10

30

203

PMEGY+RDY; in partnership with


its allied institution,
Can be
45.2
subcontracted the National Centre
for Human
for entire Dhar
Settlements and
and Alirajpur
Environment
District to 1 (NCHSE), has been 22.6
NGO
working in Dhar
11.3
District
State Education
Dept
MP Tourism
Department

22.6

0.0

0.0

67.8

25.9

0.0

0.0

48.5

6.5

38.9

0.0

56.7

State Edu Dept

56.5

0.0

97.3

158.5

312.4

MP Tourism

0.0

0.0

77.9

0.0

77.9

11.3

12.9

19.5

0.0

43.7

State
State Education
Education Dept Department

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


wooden boards,
et c

English Medium
School

30

Provision of High
School
Provision of
Anganwadi for Sagar
Village and Jhabri
Village

30

5 Cr already
sanctioned
25

Agricultural
education to be
promoted through
NGOs, agriculture and
horticulture
department

15

Upgradation of
existing schools to
incorporate more
students
Need to hire Contract
staff to fill vacant
posts for Teachers

PPP Basis
through
Private
Entrepreneurs
on Payment
Basis

Private
Developers

State Education Department

25

50

35

50

50

50

To be undertaken by State
Education Department

State
State Education
Education Dept Department

0.0

0.0

58.4

5 Cr already
sanctioned
32.3

0.0

0.0

60.6

NGO Funding,
State
Agricultural NGO, Agricultural
and
and Horticultural 17.0
Horticulture
department
Department
Funding

45.2

0.0

0.0

62.2

0.0

0.0

0.0

56.5

State
State Edu Dept
Education Dept
State
State Edu Dept
Education Dept

56.5

To be undertaken by State
Education Department
394.0

292

159

844.6

394.0
Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)

Upgradation of
existing PHC to 30
bed CHC

0.0

28.3

Health

Project

58.4

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

with emergency facilities

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

15

30

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Implementing
Agency

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

2037
45

204

Source of
funding

State Health
Department
Funding

State Health
Department +
BMO

17.0

38.8

Phase 2 Phase 3 Total (Lakhs)


2027

2037

0.0

0.0

55.7

City Development Plan for Mandav


Provision of
Emergency services in
upgraded PHC

15
For peripheral settlements/rural
clusters

CHC

Can be
provided in
Jhabri Village
1 needed for
Provision of
Projected
To cater to block level population
Dispensaries (0.08 to
town
0.12 ha)
population
To cater to the
Provision of small Vet large cattle
Facility
and livestock
population
Nursing home, Child
welfare and
For Block Level Tribal Population
Maternity Centre (25
to 30 beds)

2013

15

30

17.0

19.4

0.0

0.0

36.3

30

30

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

38.8

15

15

0.0

0.0

29.2

0.0

29.2

30

45

17.0

0.0

58.4

0.0

75.3

50

0.0

64.6

0.0

0.0

64.6

50

0.0

0.0

97.3

0.0

97.3

185

397.4

PHC

15

50

50

212.5
Others

Cost with Inflation and


Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Derivation

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

First 2
2015 2025 2035
years
Covered under
'Transportation'

Police Posts along


regional roads
Additional greens
@14% of Municipal
Area

TCPO

Private
Developer

50

50

205

Phase 2 Phase 3 Total (Lakhs)


2027

2037

Covered under 'Transportation'

PPP
basis
Presently
located in
Nalcha

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

To be developed as part of
Proposed Land Use

Provision of Petrol
Pump in or near
Mandav
Provision of Grameen
Bank in or close to
Mandav

Project Details and Sub Projects

To be developed as part of
Proposed Land Use
PPP
basis

Private Developer

Grameen Bank
Grameen Bank
Funding

0.0

64.6

0.0

0.0

64.6

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Provision of gas
agency to reduce
dependence on fuel
wood

State Govt Funding

Provision of Cyber
Cafes and Photocopy
shops

20

20

20

60

State Govt
Funding / PPP
(Entrpreneurs
from town can
come forward
to set up a gas
agency in
town)
MP Tourism
Department or
Private Party

State Govt

MP Tourism /
Private Party

State Govt Funding

22.6

25.9

113.1

38.9

0.0

87.4

38.9

0.0

152.0

22.13 Heritage and Tourism

Project

Derivation

Project Details and Sub


Projects

To include experts from


environment, cultural
heritage (tangible and
Need for strong
intangible), representatives
Management
from district and state level
Formulation of and monitoring
administration, State
Mandav Heritage mechanism to
Department of Archaeology,
Resource
safeguard
ASI, Forest Department,
Management
heritage
Tribal development
Authority
resources in the
department, Tourism
Mandav Planning
department, MoEF, NGOs,
Area
NP (environment and
heritage cell) and local
community.

Funding (Lakhs)
Estima
ted
Phase Total
Phase 1
Phase 2
cost/u
3 (Lakhs)
nit
First 2 Till
(Lakh)
2027 2037
years 2017

20

206

20

47

Cost with Inflation and


Contingency (Lakhs)
Source of
funding

Implementing
Agency

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

Ministry of
Culture + State State Department
Department of of Archaeology
Archaeology

5.7

2.6

Phase 2 Phase 3
2027

2037

38.9

63.4

Total
(Lakhs)

110.6

City Development Plan for Mandav


Special Building
byelaws can be
framed for
Mandav to
All Plans and projects in
ensure that all Mandav to be approved by
constructions
MHRMA before
adhere to the
implementation
character of the
Monuments and
the town
Formation of
Heritage Cell in NP
LIDAR Survey of Mandav
Planning Area to identify
above and below ground
natural and cultural heritage
resources - output to be
linked in the form of GIS
database: TO BE
0.2
UNDERTAKEN ONLY IN
CONSULTATION WITH
STAKEHOLDERS AND
Documentation/l
CITIZENS. AREAS FOR WHICH
Integrated
isting of heritage
Heritage Resource assets (natural, LIDAR SURVEY SHOULD BE
Management Plan intangible, built - UNDERTAKEN NEEDS TO BE
DECIDED IN CONSULTATION
for Mandav
including
WITH CIITZENS
Planning Area
vernacular
(IHRMP) - dymanic architecture) Comprehensive physical and
social surveys for
document
documenting intangible
heritage - arts, crafts,
traditional knowledge
systems
Physical survey of all tangible
heritage resources (natural
and built)
Comprehensive secondary
research
Condition Assessment

Admini
strativ
20
e
Measu
re

20

ASI / MP
Tourism
Funding

Admini
strativ
Subcontracted by
22.6
e
ASI / MP Tourism
Measu
re

Covered under 'Institutional'

70

0.0

0.0

2013

22.6

Covered under 'Institutional'

70

79.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

79.1

56.5

25.9

0.0

0.0

82.4

Ministry of Mandav Heritage


Culture/State
Resource
Tourism
Authority + NP
Department
Heritage Cell

50

20

70

207

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


Grading of heritage values - consultative
process -on the basis s of secondary and
primary research and analysis
Identification of heritage zones
Developing legal and statutory framework
Identifying the institutional set up for
implementation, management and monitoring
Developing incentives for private participation

Defining the importance of heritage: outlining


vision and policies
Identification and proritization of projects
Outlining Limits of Acceptable Change for the
Mandav Planning Area
LIDAR Survey output to be
linked to GIS Database with
the property lines and
ownership, land use, all
GIS database
heritage (natural and
cultural) resources and their
description, delineated zones
for intervention
Website Derivations of
IHRMP for
Mandav Planning
Area to be
Mandav Heritage Resource
disseminated
Management website linked
through website
to GIS database - to be
along with
update and managed
access to
consistently - to be made
research and
financially self sustaining
publications,
visitor
information, and
tourism
promotion
Periodic review
Every 2 years after completion of IHRMP and updation of including impact assessment of all initiatives
the IHRMP for
on the heritage resources and review and
Mandav Planning
redefining of limits of acceptable change

15

10

25

208

25

15

17.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

17.0

10

11.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

11.3

50

0.0

0.0

48.7

79.3

127.9

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Area

Landscape Plan

Based on historic research and analysis using


secondary and primary data. To be to be
coordinated with all other plans and as per
vision and policies outlines in IHRMP

Preparation of
Dossier for
Nomination as
Through Consultative
World Heritage
Process: MHRMA and NP
Site - to be
cell will need to be involved
prepared through To be made after as implementing agencies
consultative
IHRMP has been
along with State
process. The
made
Department of Archeology.
IHRMP to act as
The dossier may be
support
prepared through
document/docume
Consultants.
ntation base for
the Dossier
As per vision,
Archaeological excavation
policies and
and scientific clearance of
prioritization in
sites
IHRMP and as
per NARA
Revival of historic water
Document on
structures and systems
Authenticity,
1994 and
Landscaping of sites around
Conservation of
national and
heritage structures/
heritage structures
international
enclosures (flora to be
and landscapes
charters for introduced should be part of
conservation.
landscape plan)
Prioritization in Physical conservation of
IHRMP to be on
heritage structures the basis of
including the Parkota (Fort
significance and Wall) and adaptive reuse
condition
Revival of historic gardens
assessment.

10

10

35

35

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

209

0.0

ASI/Ministry of
Culture + State
Department of
Archeology

State
Department
of
200
Archaeology/
Ministry of
Culture
200
(National
Culture Fund)
State
Department of
200
Archaeology/
Ministry of
Culture
(National
200 Culture Fund) +
PPP (Adopt a
Monument
Scheme)
200

12.9

0.0

0.0

45.2

12.9

45.2

0.0

0.0

194.7

317.1

511.7

0.0

0.0

194.7

317.1

511.7

0.0

0.0

194.7

317.1

511.7

0.0

0.0

194.7

317.1

511.7

0.0

0.0

194.7

317.1

511.7

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

For domestic as
Essential objective data well as
Tourist visit data in terms of
international
age groups, gender, location
tourists Generation of
Multilingual
tourist survey
(English, Hindi
Optional subjective data database - data
and others)
expectations, level of
linked to website survey formats
satisfaction, suggestions,
to be designed mode of transport to the
on site at exit
site, reason for visit etc
and post visit
online options
Interpretation and Use Plan preparation as per
vision and policies of IHRMP for Mandav
Interpretation and
Planning Area - including landscape and
Use Plan (IUP)
circulation plan ensuring that continuity of
preparation and
historic landscape and circulation is
possible projects
maintained and provision of universal access
(especially for the physically challenged)
Setting up of a Heritage
House* for capacity building
of local community and NP
towards heritage awareness
and safeguarding,
interpretation, traditional
knowledge systems,
Adaptive reuse
ecotourism, sustainable
of heritage
structures, sites development, maintenance
and repair of historic
Possible projects
or zones and
structures etc
that may be
construction of
proposed under new structures
Interpretation Centre:
the IUP
for
Already Proposed at Tabeli
interpretation
Mahal by NTPC
and visitor
facilties

Light and sound show

10

10

10

10

23

Ministry of
Culture/State
Tourism
Department

2.3

1.3

19.5

31.7

54.7

10

Mandav Heritage
ASI /National
Resource
Culture Fund+ Authority + NP
State
Heritage Cell
Department of
through
Archeology Consultants/Tech
nical cell

0.0

12.9

0.0

0.0

12.9

10

Ministry of
Culture + State
Tourism
Department

0.0

12.9

0.0

0.0

12.9

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

38.8

0.0

0.0

Mandav Heritage
Resource
Authority + NP
State Tourism
Heritage Cell +
Department +
30
ASI + MP Tourism
PPP + ASI and
MP Tourism
PPP BASIS. For
sound and
Light show,
250 ticketing @400
INR/ticlet.Base
d on ASI data 7
lakh visitors

30

250

210

0.0

323.2

323.2

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

visit Mandav
annually,
assuming 10%
viits to Sound
and Light
show, 70000
visitors per
year @400 rs
per ticket = 70
lakh. Assuming
a return of
50%, 35 lakh
profit per year
can be
assumed. At
this rate,
payback period
for
investments in
Sound and
Light show
would be 8 to
10 years.
Visitor facilties centre (with
cloak room, wash rooms, rest
areas, vending machines,
snack counters or cafe, ATM,
internet access, drinking
water for day visitors) and
Orientation centre
A small shopping area can be
developed on PPP basis. Can
be made by putting an
existing heritage structure to
reuse
Information, RFID and ticket
counters at entry and exit
points

20

20

15

40

80

15

80

211

200

State Tourism
Department +
PPP + ASI and
MP Tourism

0.0

25.9

0.0

0.0

25.9

0.0

19.4

0.0

0.0

19.4

45.2

103.4 155.7

0.0

304.4

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav


Upgradation and / or
relocation of existing
museums and galleries
(Taveli Mahal, Chappan
Mahal and Dharamshala in
compound of Hoshang
Shah's Tomb) as per proposal
of IUP
Developing integrated
multilingual audio guide as
per proposed ciculation plan
through Radio Frequency
Identification (RFID) system
Signage (orientation,
interpretive, directional,
locational) and street
furniture (IPT stands,
benches, lamp posts, railings
etc) in planning area
Design and introduction of
multiple or single day passes,
Other
interpretive and combined tickets to the
visitor oriented multiple natural and cultural
projects as per heritage sites , interpretation
centre etc (including
proposals in IUP
Nalchha)
(for entire
Development of thematic
proposed
planning area) nature trails and heritage
walks
Development of Haat / Crafts
Bazaar - use of low cost
construction techniques
(developed in Nirmiti Kendra,
Dhar District)
Restaurant to be developed
along Sagar Lake
Development of visitor
accomodation and facilties
at Nalchha - promotion of
rural tourism

25

75

100

0.0

32.3

146.0

0.0

178.3

50

50

0.0

0.0

97.3

0.0

97.3

20

20

0.0

25.9

0.0

0.0

25.9

0.0

6.5

0.0

0.0

6.5

10

10

0.0

12.9

0.0

0.0

12.9

75

75

0.0

97.0

0.0

0.0

97.0

50

50

0.0

64.6

0.0

0.0

64.6

0.0

64.6

0.0

0.0

64.6

50

50

212

State Tourism
Department +
GP Nalchha +
PPP

GP Nalchha

City Development Plan for Mandav


Upgradation/expansion of
existing tourist
accomodation managed by
NP
Organising cultural events,
Exhibitions, workshops and
publications for cultural and
natural heritage awareness
generation and promotion
NIGHT LIGHTING
OF
MONUMENTS:
To be provided
electricity from
the Proposed
Wind/Solar Farm
or from MPEB
ORGANIZING
CULTURAL
EVENTS AT
NIGHT TO
EXTEND
TOURIST STAY:
Events like
Classical Music
Concerts or
Dance Festivals
or Plays can be
organized during
tourist season +
can be organized
once a month
round the year
All plans to be
Risk Management
coordinated
Plan
amongst each

Cost of electricity to be
subsidized and to be borne
by MP Tourism department
and ASI

Can be organized along the


lines of 'Jahan E Khusrao'
organized annually in Delhi.
Can also attract tourists to
Mandav during Winters

Preparation of Plan

10

30

20

60

NP

NP

0.0

12.9

58.4

63.4

134.7

10

20

20

50

State Tourism
Department +
PPP

NP

0.0

12.9

38.9

63.4

115.3

640

Subsidized by
MPEB + To be
shared
MPEB + MP
between MP
Tourism
Tourism
Department + ASI
Department
and ASI

0.0

12.9

389.3 1363.5

500

530

District Level
Funding +
Tourism
Department
Funding

MP Tourism +
Collectorate

33.9

646.4

0.0

0.0

680.3

10

10

Ministry of
Culture+
Ministry of

Mandav Heritage
Resource
Authority + NP

0.0

12.9

0.0

0.0

12.9

10

30

2013

200

213

430

1765.7

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

other and as per Security devices/equipment


vision and
and measure to prevent
policies outlines theft or damage of cultural
in IHRMP
property (CCTV system,
Control room, sprinkler
Implementing
system, sensors, fire alarms
proposals of Risk
and extinguishers)
Management Plan
Capacity building of site
managers and staff for
evacuation of movable
cultural property and people,
safety drills etc
Traffic and
Transport
Management Plan
for Mandav
Planning Area
Tourist shuttle buses - 8
6.5
seater
Tourist shuttle buses - 14
8
seater
Stop points for sight seeing
Introduction of IPT
trolleys to enable physical
for Tourists access to natural and cultural 4
connecting all
heritage resources - shed +
visitor attractions
visitor facilities
within Mandav
Parking for the sight seeing
5
trolleys, buses and taxis/cars
Introduction of non
motorised or solar power
5
assisted rickshaws
Integrated
Ensuring protection and revival
of natural resources and control
Environment
over environmental parametres
Management Plan
Development of Can be located
Small Scale Herbal
between
Park to attract
Kaladipura and
Tourists
Jamnia

Can act as an extension of


Indore Herbal Park

Tourism+ State
Tourism
Department
100

10

100

Mandav Heritage
Resource
Authority + NP
Heritage Cell +
NGOs

20

Covered under 'Traffic and


Transport'

26

13
16

20

20

39

25

35

25

25

50

0.0

194.7

0.0

6.5

19.5

15.9

41.8

0.0

33.6

25.3

0.0

58.9

0.0

20.7

31.1

0.0

51.8

0.0

25.9

38.9

0.0

64.8

0.0

32.3

68.1

0.0

100.5

0.0

32.3

48.7

0.0

81.0

NP

PPP

Covered under 'Environment'

214

194.7

Private Players

32
Ministry of
40 Tourism + State
Tourism
Department +
PPP
60

50

0.0

Covered under 'Traffic and


Transport'

PPP
16

0.0

Covered under 'Environment'

50

MP Tourism in
MP Tourism +
collaboration
Small Industries
with Indore
Herbal Park. Can Service Institute +
be developed as Indore Herbal
an extension of
Park
Indore Herbal

0.0

0.0

97.3

0.0

97.3

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Park

Farmers can
clear a part of
their farms
during non crop
Tourists would have to pay
season to
for this to the farmers.
tourists. Tourists
Propagation of
Societies of local farmers can
can set up camps
farm Tourism with
be formed to facilitate
in these areas.
AC and non AC
booking of farms and
Farmers can
tents
coordination with tourists
provide food to
through MP Tourism or other
these tourists.
agencies
Mobile toilets
can be provided
for such selected
farm sites
Provision of
Development of
luxury Air
Distributed Tourist
Conditioned Fo high end and international
Accommodation by
tourists
tents in
big hotel groups
scattered
like Taj
accommodation
Ecoforest
development along Afforestation Area reserved for forest land
Lamba Talab
Ghoda buggy can
be started as
tourist vehicle
Ropeway
connecting Lohani
caves to Songarh
Fort can be
To promote
provided, if
tourism round
approved by
the year
Mandav Heritage
Resource
Management
Authority

30

30

30

90

10

100

300

215

33.9

38.8

58.4

0.0

131.1

Private Sector
Investment like
Taj group or
other Hotel
Groups

Large hotel
groups

50

Forest
Department

Forest
Department

97.3

97.3

110

MP Tourism

MP Tourism

11.3

129.3

0.0

0.0

140.6

0.0

0.0

584.0

0.0

584.0

Private
Sector

50

Funding
needing for
propagation of
farm tourism
and training of MP Tourism and
farmers to host
Farmers
foreign
tourists: MP
Tourism
Department

PPP basis along


the lines of Private Players on
300
Raigarh/Gwalio
fee basis
r fort

Private
Sector

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Development of
Biodiversity Park in
Can attract
the valley along
Foreign Tourists
Western side of
Mandav

200

Permeable
pavers with
Access road to Boorhi
Mandav
Access walkway to railing on either
side.
Boorhi Mandav
and Songarh Fort
35
Adequate
lakh/k
to be provided
provision for
parallel to the
m
pedestrian
valley (near NP safety; Pathway Access walkway to Songarh
Fort
Raen Basera)
to be made
100m away from
the ridge
Ecotrails /
Nature Trails
Temporary
Camping sites
(AC and non AC
tents)
Extending tourist Paragliding and
season from 3
Adventure
months to 8
Sports
months
Trolley/Ropeway
between Lohani
Caves and
Songarh
Farm Tourism
Cultural events
at night

200

87.5

87.5

70

70

MP Tourism

MP Tourism

MP Tourism +
ASI (Can be
included for
funding under MP Tourism + ASI
Destination
Development
Fund)

0.0

0.0

389.3

0.0

389.3

0.0

113.1

0.0

0.0

113.1

0.0

90.5

0.0

0.0

90.5

In forest areas

20

30

50

MP Tpurism +
Private Party

MP Tpurism +
Private Party

22.6

38.8

0.0

0.0

61.4

To be identified by MP
Tourism

30

30

60

MP Tpurism +
Private Party

MP Tpurism +
Private Party

33.9

38.8

0.0

0.0

72.7

50

50

100

MP Tpurism +
Private Party

MP Tpurism +
Private Party

56.5

64.6

0.0

0.0

121.1

T shirts,
Souveneirs of
TRIBAL ART AND
Souverneirs for
Monuments,
WOODWORK TO BE
Curios, Miniature PROMOTED THROUGH THE
Mandav
Monument
SOUVENEIR SALE
Replicas, etc

25

Discussed above

Discussed above

Discussed above

Discussed above

Discussed above

Discussed above

25

75

216

PPP Basis.
Private Sector
to be involved
through display MP Tourism +
125
of
PPP + ASI
advertisements
on T shirts, etc
and can earn

206.6
28.3

32.3

146.0

City Development Plan for Mandav

Provision of
Information
centres in
Monuments

Training and
licences to guides

6 nos

40

Training
programmes for
Guides
Issue of Licences

through sale of
souveneirs +
MP Tourism
MP Tourism +
ASI (Can be
included for
120 funding under MP Tourism + ASI 45.2 103.4
Destination
Development
Fund)
Ministry of
50 Culture, State
113.0
Torism
Heritage Cell in
Department
NP or ASI
and District
20
33.9
Govt./ ASI

80

100
Can also be undertaken by
NP

The ponds have


started drying
out. Need for
Revival of all ponds in Jahaz
Conservation of
catchment
Water bodies in conservation and Mahal including the one at
conservation of
the entrance
Jahaz Mahal
drainage
channels to the
ponds
Villagers can
accommodate
Societies of local
Homestays can be tourists within
promoted as an their houses and entrepreneurs / villagers can
alternate means of provide them
be formed to coordinate
accommodation with food, etc. In
homestays
turn, tourists pay
rent to villagers
Dholia and Padlia
Dinosaur nesting
sites to be
Dinosaur nesting
promoted + To
sites to be
be integrated
promoted
with Proposed
Dinosaur park at
Kukshi

30

50

50

100

Payment basis
+ Promotion
by MP
Tourism
Department

10

ASI Funding

MP Tourism

10

20

217

MP Tourism +
State Geology
Department

ASI + Forest
Department

56.5

64.6

2013

0.0

0.0

148.6

0.0

0.0

113.0

0.0

0.0

33.9

0.0

0.0

121.1

0.0

0.0

24.2

Payment basis
MP Tourism + + Promotion by
Villagers
MP Tourism
Department

MP Tourism +
State Geology
Department

11.3

12.9

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Parking and
viewpoint to be
developed at
Neelkanth
Monuments
State Department under State
of Archaeology to Archaeology
play a more active Department to
role
be conserved
and maintained
ASI can provide for
public toilets and
other amenities
within the ASI
listed Monuments'
premises
Resource Centre Maintaining database in
for traditional
continuity with that
knowledge generated as part of IHRMP systems linked to Mandav heritage
Medicinal
resource website
properties of
herbs and other
Resource Centre,
plant resources;
Design innovation
Agricultural
and training centre
practices; Local
Library and Research cell to
and Haat (for
food processing
encourage research for
continuity of
techniques and
sustaining these resources traditional
cuisine; Art and
grants and scholarships
knowledge
craft traditions
systems and
(including
promoting these as
building crafts
means of
and performing
livelihood)
arts)
Training programmes in
traditional arts, crafts and
Design
design
Innovation and
Organising workshops for
Training Centre
local and regional artists and
crafts persons

Already Proposed

Already Proposed

State
State Department State Level
Department of
of Archaeology
Initiative
Archaeology

State Level
Initiative

10

10

20

ASI

SDA+ MHRMA+
NP Heritage Cell

50

25

75

MP Tribal
Development Tribal Research
Department + and Development
Ministry of Institute, Bhopal
Tourism + MP (Govt of MP) +
State Tourism
NP
Department

50

25

75

Crafts Council Design Institutes


of India + PPP
+ NGOs + NP

218

11.3

12.9

0.0

0.0

24.2

0.0

56.5

28.3

0.0

84.8

0.0

64.6

48.7

0.0

113.3

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Organising workshops for


visitors - various target
groups - general visitor,
children, designers etc
Organising dance and music
troupes
Local production of souvenirs
typical to Mandu integrating tribal techniques
and innovation in design to
meet market demand as
SSI/Cooperative (linked to
design centre)
Link of locally produced
souvenirs/merchandise with
Mandav heritage resource
website
Haat/ Crafts'
Through use of low cost
Bazaar - to
materials (developed in
provide platform
Nirmiti Kendra, Dhar District)
for design centre
or traditional/vernacular
output and
construction techniques
processes
Signage on all
internal roads and
regional roads to
indicate directions
to Mandav and
directions to
Monuments

Particularly
between
Mandav and
Manpura

50

0.5
lakh/si 2.5
gnage

25

10

75

Crafts Council
of India + State
Tourism
Department +
PPP

NP

0.0

64.6

48.7

0.0

113.3

12.5

MP Tourism
Department

Tourism
Department

2.8

12.9

0.0

0.0

15.8

3890

3266

10607

Total

219

3450

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

22.14 IEC
Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Awareness
generation
regarding the
skewed sex ratio,
especially amongst
tribals
Awareness
generation for
heritage and
traditional
knowledge systems
of tribal population
Awareness
generation
regarding built
heritage and Do's
and dont's of its
management
Promotion of
Mandav Planning
Area as ecotourism
and rural tourism
destination
Awareness
generation on use
of renewable
sources of energy
Awareness
generation on
population growth

Derivation

Project Details and Sub Projects

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

2037

2.5

2.5

1.5

1.5

From phase 2

2.5

2.5

10

7.5

Tribal Welfare
Department
Funding

7.5

1.5

2.5

2.5

7.5

1.5

2.5

2.5

7.5

220

Implementing
Agency

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

10

Source of
funding

Tribal Welfare
Department

Phase 2 Phase 3
2027

2037

Total
(Lakhs)

1.1

1.9

4.9

7.9

15.9

Ministry of
Culture/Touris NP Heritage Cell
m + State
and Mandav
Tribal Welfare
HRMA
Department

1.1

1.9

4.9

7.9

15.9

Ministry of
NP Heritage Cell
Culture+ State
and Mandav
Department of
HRMA
Archaeology

2.3

3.9

9.7

15.9

31.7

0.0

0.0

19.5

31.7

51.2

1.1

1.9

4.9

7.9

15.9

1.1

1.9

4.9

7.9

15.9

State
Department of
State Tourism
Tourism +
Department
Ministry of
Culture
Ministry of
New and
Subcontracted by
Renewable
NP
Energy
NP Funding

Subcontracted by
NP

City Development Plan for Mandav

Awareness
generation
Programmes through Media,
Schools, Colleges

Water Supply - rain water harvesting, recharging of


ground water and water conservation
Sewerage

10

10

30

Awareness
Generation
funding under
Subcontracted by
IHSDP/Grant
NP
based on
UIDSSMT
Pattern

District Level
Funding,
Collectorate,
Government
Subcontracted by
Schemes for
NP to NGOs
Awareness
generation

30

District Level
Funding, Mandi
Funding/Indust
Collectorate,
ry CSR,
Subcontracted by
Government
NP to NGOs
Schemes for
Awareness
generation

Solid Waste Management


Environment

5.7

6.5

19.5

2013

31.7

63.3

31.7

63.29

Transport

Initiate Formation
of NGOs and MFIs

Through District Level


Support

Same NGOs, MFIs can be


given work in all 8 towns

NGO / MFI Funding

NGO / MFI Funding

IEC for farmers to use


sprinklers, drip irrigation
Tools, techniques and
technologies to improve
agricultural produce
Better agricultural
practices
Farmer awareness
Promoting
cultivation of
programmes
herbs based on the
exisitng knowledge
system of the local
community and
technological innovations
Organic Farming

10

10

5.7

6.5

19.5

Green house farming


Total

221

42.64

87.60 142.69

272.93

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

22.15 Institutional Reforms


Cost with Inflation and
Contingency (Lakhs)

Funding (Lakhs)
Project

Derivation

Single window
Single computerized
D isplay board with name
system in Nagar counter for all enquiries, and responsibility of each
Palika
submitting forms, etc
staff in Nagar Palika
Interdepartmental All proposals to be
The Authority to have
Coordination to be implemented in Mandav experts from all sectors to
ensured by
(by any department) to
ensure comprehensive
get approval from
development of Mandav.
Mandav Heritage
Resource
Mandav Heritage
Proposals not approved by
Management
Resource Management
MHRMA should not be
Authority
Authority
implemented
Can be empaneled by NP on contract basis. Cost of
approval of plan by Architect to be borne by Building
Architect and
Owner
planner in Nagar
Palika

Phase 1

Phase 2

First 2 Till
years 2017

2027

Phase Total
3 (Lakhs)

Implementing
Agency

Phase 1
First 2 Till
years 2017

2037
2

NP Funding

NP

2.3

0.0

Phase 2 Phase 3
2027

2037

0.0

0.0

Covere Admini
Admini
d strativ Administr
strative
under
e
ative
Measu
'Herita Measu Measure
re
ge'
re

Admini
Covered
Adminis Adminis
strativ
under
trative trative
e
'Heritag
Measur Measur
Measu
e'
e
e
re

Cost to be included in Project


Cost

Cost to be included in Project


Cost

Total
(Lakhs)

2.3

NP

Jointly appointed for all towns


Planner for Mandav Planning Area as proposed in CDP
in the District
24

12

120

120

276

Formation of
Environment Cell
under NP

24

12

120

120

276

10

10

222

10

Jointly appointed for all towns in


the District

TCP Funding

Formation of
Heritage Cell under
NP

Infrastructure
mapping with
annual updation in
Proper topographic survey including contour
digital form - to be
demarcation and municipal boundary delineation.
linked with GIS
Infrastructure mapping for water supply, sewerage,
database being
drainage, roads and SWM
generated and
maintained for
heritage mapping

Source of
funding

35

Ministry of
Culture
Funding
Ministry of
Environment
and Forest
Funding

NP

27.1

15.5

233.6

380.5

656.7

NP

27.1

15.5

233.6

380.5

656.7

11.3

6.5

19.5

31.7

68.9

State Govt
Funding (50% Subcontracted by
in phase 1)/ NP
NP
Funding

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

under Mandav
Heritage Resource
Management
Authority (HRMA)

Post for Public


Awareness Officer
in Nagar Palika

Service centre to
be constituted for
complaint
redressal

Restructuring of
Municipal Cadre

To be appointed @5,000 per month for part time job


(Annual Increase in salary would be accounted for
under contingency/inflation costs)

1.2

1.8

15

NP Funding

NP

1.4

2.3

11.7

19.0

34.4

10

25

PPP (Pay and


Use Basis)

Private Party

11.3

6.5

9.7

15.9

43.4

To be borne by
State
Government

NP

To be responsible for public awareness and


undertaking IEC activities
Citizens can call to register complaints, complaint
number to be given and all complaints to be
addressed within a maximum of 1 week
Can be linked with GIS data base of the city to
spatially locate problem areas through a
computerized user friendly interface
In accordance with new guidelines

To be borne by State
Government

Total

To be borne by State
Government
126.7

508

828

1462.4

Restructuring of institutional and fee structure of NP employees shall be undertaken in accordance with the new Municipal Cadre (given in Annexure). Since the NP would not
be able to bear the additional costs of the NP restructuring, these costs would have to be directly borne by the State Government and are hence, not included in the CIP.

223

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

22.16 City Investment Plan Summary


Based on the sector wise costing given above, a sectoral summary for each phase has been prepared and tabulated below. A total of 446.83 Crore is required for the city over
the three phases. In terms of sectors, Heritage and Tourism, Environment and Electricity/ Street Lighting account for the highest investment.
With Inflation
INDUSTRY
WATER
SEWERAGE
SANITATION
DRAINAGE
SWM
SLUMS
TRANSPORT
HERITAGE AND TOURISM
ENVIRONMENT
ELECTRICITY + ST. LIGHT
FIRE FIGHTING
IEC

Phase 1
480.37
2165.43

Phase 2
360.12

Phase 3
126.83

73.48
287.92
607.36
55.21
588.22
3055.33
3450.43

773.78
1.95
107.06
311.46
0.00
671.58
992.77
3890.32

7.93
3.17
47.56
31.71
0.00
0.00
0.00

3062.78
1229.37
58.43

2475.55
2117.32
7.79

42.64
15156.98

87.60
11797.29

TOTAL

With Inflation
INSTITUTIONAL

3265.94
3678.15
2378.11
12.68
142.69

Total (Lakhs)]
967.33
2947.14
78.60
442.55
950.52
55.21
1259.80
4048.10
10606.70
9216.48
5724.81
78.90
272.93
36649.04.

9694.77

Phase 1
126.74

Phase 2
508.06

Phase 3
827.58

Total (Lakhs)
1462.39

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Total (Lakhs)

Other Factors
With Inflation
EDUCATION
HEALTH
OTHER SOCIAL INFRA

394.03
212.45
113.10

291.99
184.93
38.93

158.54
0.00
0.00

844.56
397.38
152.03

224

City Development Plan for Mandav

ELECTRICITY + ST.
LIGHT
16%

FIRE FIGHTING
0%

IECINDU
USTRY
SEWERAGE SANITATION DRAINAGE
1% 3%
%
0%
SWM 3%
1%
WATER
%
8%

0%
SLUMS
3%

TRANSPORT
11%

ENVIRONMENT
25%

HERITTAGE AND
TO
OURISM
29%

Out of these, the NP contribution under various sectors (@10% approximately) is listed below:
With Inflation
INDUSTRY
WATER
SEWERAGE
SANITATION
DRAINAGE
SWM
SLUMS
TRANSPORT
HERITAGE AND TOURISM
ENVIRONMENT
ELECTRICITY
FIRE FIGHTING
IEC
TOTAL

Phase 1

Phase 2

P
Phase 3

Total (Lakhs)

139.32
7.35
19.94
6.82
11.30
46.56
294.51
12.93
13.79

72.02
0.19
0.97
19.47
0.00
56.45
97.33
58.40
17.85

0.00
0.32
1.59
31.71
0.00
0.00
0.00
63.42
0.00

211.35
7.86
22.50
57.99
11.30
103.01
391.84
134.74
31.64

58.43

7.79

12.68

78.90

4.28

6.81

11.10

22.19

615.23

337.29

120.81

1073.33

225

2013

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

With Inflation
INSTITUTIONAL

Phase 1
23.71

Phase 2
31.15

Phase 3
50.73

Total (Lakhs)]
105.59

With Inflation

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Total (Lakhs)]

EDUCATION
HEALTH
OTHER SOCIAL INFRA

Hence, the NP needs to generate 6.38 Crore in Phase 1 to meet the cost of implementation of projects and undertake institutional reforms. Apart from this, the NP would also
need an amount of 13.35 Cr to meet the O&M expenses of projects created under CDP. Hence, the NP is required to generate a total amount of 19.73 Cr in Phase 1 to meet the
CapEx, Institutional reforms and O&M of projects.

226

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

Summary of CIP
S. No.

Sector of Investment

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Water Supply
Sewerage
Storm Water Drainage
Solid Waste Management
Sanitation
Traffic & Transportation
Electricity & Street Lighting
Fire Fighting
Basic Services for Urban Poor
Environment
Urban Governance
Heritage and Tourism
Education
Health
Social Infrastructure & Other Projects
Total

Investment by 2015
(In Crore)
21.65
0.73
6.07
0.55
2.88
30.55
12.29
0.58
5.88
30.63
1.27
34.50
3.94
2.12
1.13
154.80

S.
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

Water Supply
Sewerage
Storm Water Drainage
Solid Waste Management
Sanitation
Traffic & Transportation
Electricity & Street Lighting
Fire Fighting
Basic Services for Urban Poor
Environment
Urban Governance

Total Investment
(In Crore)
29.47
0.79
9.51
0.55
4.43
40.48
57.25
0.79
12.60
92.16
14.62

12

Heritage

106.07

13
14
15

Education
Health
Social Infrastructure & Other Projects

8.45
3.97
1.52

Sector of Investment

Investment by 2025
(In Crore)
7.74
0.02
3.11
0.00
1.07
9.93
21.17
0.08
6.72
24.76
5.08
38.90
2.92
1.85
0.39
123.73

Investment by 2035
(In Crore)
0.08
0.03
0.32
0.00
0.48
0.00
23.78
0.13
0.00
36.78
8.28
32.66
1.59
0.00
0.00
104.11

Responsible agency/deptt.
NP
NP
NP
Private Contractor
NP
State PWD + Private Contractor + MP Tourism
MPEB + Private Party
NP
Beneficiaries + NP
Forest Department + NP + MNREGA Nodal Agency + MP Tourism
NP + Private Party
MP Tourism + Mandav Heritage Resource Management Authority +
Private Party + ASI + State Department of Archaeology
State Education Dept
State Health Dept
Misc

227

Total Investment
(In Crore)
29.47
0.79
9.51
0.55
4.43
40.48
57.25
0.79
12.60
92.16
14.62
106.07
8.45
3.97
1.52
382.65

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

CHAPTER 23: FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN


This Chapter discusses the Financial Operating Plan which assesses Nagar Parishads capability to generate the required revenue and also proposes alternate means to
generate this revenue.
In order to construct and maintain the projects proposed under CDP, the Nagar Parishad has to contribute INR 6.15 Crores to meet Costs of projects over the first 5 years. In
addition to this, the NP also needs to generate 0.2 Crores to meet the cost of Institutional Projects during Phase 1 and an additional 13.35 Cr to meet the O&M Costs of
Infrastructure created under CDP. Hence, a total of 19.73 Crores is required to be generated by NP in the first 5 years of the Project period.
The present earnings of Mandav Nagar Parishad largely come from Transfers or grants (46%) from higher levels of Government. The rest of the income is from tax (43%) and
non tax resources (11%). This indicates low financial autonomy of the Nagar Parishad. Under the Financial Operating Plan, the finances of the Nagar Parishad have been
projected using CAGR (Compound Annual Growth Rate) for the next 6 years to analyze whether or not the Nagar Parishad would be able to meet these expenses on the basis
of its own revenue generation. NP budget data from 2006/07 to 2010/11 has been used to make these projections. Alternate strategies (PPP based) have also been suggested
which can be used to generate additional revenue.

Base Case Scenario


Under Base case scenario, it has been assumed that the Nagar Parishad income and expenditure would continue at the current rate. No reforms or measures would be taken
up by NP to increase income or curtail expenses under this scenario.
Key Assumptions
The following key assumptions have been made while projecting the NP finance data:

CAGR has been used to project the data till 2017 in order to attain a uniform value for growth rates.
In terms of NP income and expenditure, in cases where unrealistic growth rates were attained due to irregularities in collection/expenditure, etc.; the growth rates in
such cases, were normalized to realistic values. Growth rates of more than 10% have been normalized for income as well as expenditure
Income
Octroi compensation has been assumed to increase at 10% as against 21% (as per CAGR). This has been done to avoid unrealistic projections and since Octroi
compensation forms a large part of Municipal income, projections on higher side can lead to over prediction of Municipal Income.
Grants for provision of basic services have been assumed to grow at 5%
Over the study period, income and expenditure under Other Transfers Return have been nearly equal. Since growth rates for income and expenditure under
Other Transfers Return are more than 40% as per CAGR, the growth rates have been adjusted such that income from this source becomes equivalent to
expenditure under this head.
th
Installments for pension under 6 Pay Commission have been assumed to discontinue in the first phase.

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Expenditure
One time project based expenditures like construction of water tank have been discontinued under phase 1
Expenditure on public construction would increase at 10%
Expenditure under BRGF has been assumed to increase at the same rate as income from this source.
Growth rates for expenditure under Other Transfers Return have been rationalized, as stated above.
Tax Revenue
If the Nagar Parishad does not introduce any reforms and continues to collect taxes at the present rate, then the NP earnings in 2017 from tax sources would reach
approximately 1.42 Crores. But a critical point here is that more than 70% of this earning would come from Octroi compensation.
Non Tax Revenue
The NP earnings from Non tax revenue under base case scenario would reach approximately 17.7 lakhs by 2017.
Transfers/Capital Income
Transfers would account for approximately 1.26 Crore by 2017 of the total revenue as against their present contribution of 92.23 lakhs. Grant under MP Legislator Fund
would contribute to nearly 35% of this amount.
Other income
Income under extraordinary and loans would account for approximately 32.25 lakhs by 2017.
Expenditure including Capital Expenditure
The expenditure of NP without any curtailment in costs (but assuming that growth rate under none of the major heads exceeds 10%) is likely to stand at 2.19 Crores by 2017.

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Table 23.1: Nagar Parishad Revenue and Expenditure account under base case/no reform scenario

BASE CASE
Revenue
Expenditure
Surplus/Deficit
Cumulative Surplus/Deficit

2012

2013

248.61
152.88
95.74

259.80
163.61
96.18

2014

2015

271.98
285.23
175.56
188.81
96.42
96.42
578.45

2016

2017

299.64
203.50
96.14

317.30
219.74
97.56

615.23

Cumulative expenditure on CDP


Projects

1335.01
Cumulative Expenditure on O&M

Cumulative expenditure on
Institutional Projects

23.71
1973.94

Total NP Contribution

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Tax
97.33
104.77
112.99
122.04
132.01
142.97
Non-Tax
15.96
16.06
16.19
16.34
16.51
17.71
Transfers
109.67
112.65
115.81
119.14
122.66
126.37
Miscellaneous
25.66
26.31
26.99
27.71
28.46
30.25
Total Income
248.61
259.80
271.98
285.23
299.64
317.30
Expenditure
152.88
163.61
175.56
188.81
203.50
219.74
Surplus/Deficit
95.74
96.18
96.42
96.42
96.14
97.56
Cumulative Surplus/Deficit
578.45
Hence, if the NP continues its earnings and expenses under the base case scenario, the NP would be able to generate a cumulative profit (from 2011 to 2017) of 5.78 Crores
by 2017 as against the required 19.73 Cr.

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Some Reforms Scenario


Under the some reforms scenario, it has been assumed that the NP would introduce property tax reforms, reforms for rationalization of water charges and reforms for
rationalization of Consolidated tax/ Samekit kar to increase revenue generation. Apart from this, it has also been assumed that the Nagar Parishad would take measures to
curtail expenses, especially administrative expenses.
Key Assumptions
The following key assumptions have been made while projecting the NP finance data:

CAGR has been used to project the data till 2017 in order to attain a uniform value for growth rates.

In terms of NP income and expenditure, in cases where unrealistic growth rates were attained due to irregularities in collection/expenditure, etc.; growth rates in such
cases, were normalized to realistic values.
Income
Income from property tax and water tax has been assumed to increase as follows:

Property Tax

Water Tax

Samekit Kar

Present
collection
efficiency
(2008/09)

Properties
paying property
tax

Properties paying
property tax by 2017

Annual increase in properties


paying property tax by 2017

Percentage increase in property tax rate

80.01%

1211
out of 1500

3125 approx

Proposed to increase at 4% per


annum

Number of connections at
present (2008/09)

Present Coverage
(%)

% increase in coverage

1200

91%

10% per year

Number of houses paying tax


(2008/09)

Present Coverage
(%)

% increase in coverage by 2017

Increase in tax rate

Increase in
number of
connections by
2017

2500

80.7%

7% per annum

3728 by 2017

Increase in tax rate

231

Rs./year/HH by 2017

124 for 1 year (Total tax/ total no. of


properties paying tax)
Increase in
number of
connections by
2017

4258 by 2017

Rs./ HH by 2017

116 per year (Total tax/ total no. of


connections)
Rs./month/HH by 2017

74 per year (Total tax/ total number


properties paying tax)

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An important point to be noted here is that at present, property tax collection rate is extremely low. The average property tax collection at present is even lower
than water tax collection. Hence, property tax rates and collection efficiency need to be increased significantly.
Octroi compensation has been assumed to increase at 10% as against 21% (as per CAGR). This has been done to avoid unrealistic projections and since Octroi
compensation forms a major part of Municipal income, projections on higher side can lead to over prediction of Municipal Income.
Grants for provision of basic services have been assumed to grow at 5%
Over the study period, income and expenditure under Other Transfers Return have been nearly equal. Since growth rates for income and expenditure under
Other Transfers Return are more than 40% as per CAGR, the growth rates have been adjusted such that income from this source becomes equivalent to
expenditure under this head.
th
Installments for pension under 6 Pay Commission have been assumed to discontinue in the first phase.

Expenditure
It has been assumed that the rate of growth for administrative expenses (salary, allowances, contingency, incidental expenses, etc.) under all heads would not
exceed 9%
Expenditure on public construction would increase at 9%
Expenditure under BRGF has been assumed to increase at the same rate as income from this source.
Growth rates for expenditure under Other Transfers Return have been rationalized, as stated above.
Based on the above assumptions, the data for NP finances was projected for 6 years using CAGR.
Tax Revenue
If the NP introduces property tax, consolidated tax and water tax reforms, the earnings from Tax sources are likely to increase to 1.52 Cr by 2017 as against a cumulative of
1.42 Cr under Base Case Scenario. Octroi would contribute to more than 70 % of these earnings.
Non Tax Revenue
Income from non tax revenue would remain the same, 16.78 lakhs by 2017.
Capital Income/ Transfers
Income under transfers would also remain same at 1.26 Cr.
Other income
Income under miscellaneous is likely to remain the same at 30.03 lakhs.

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Expenditure including capital expenditure


Expenditure under Some Reforms Scenario is likely to reduce to 2.08 Cr by 2017 as against 2.18 Cr.

SOME REFORMS SCENARIO


Some Reform
Revenue
Expenditure
Surplus/Deficit

2012
250.21
150.98
99.23

2013
261.41
160.46
100.95

Cumulative Surplus/Deficit

2014

2015

273.62
170.92
102.71

2016

2017

286.93
182.42
104.52

301.42
195.04
106.38

325.74
208.89
116.84

2015

2016

2017

630.62
615.23

Cumulative expenditure on CDP


Projects

1335.01

Cumulative expenditure on
O&M of projects

Cumulative expenditure
on Institutional Projects

23.71
1973.94

Total NP Contribution

2012
Tax
Non-Tax
Transfers
Miscellenous
Total Income
Expenditure
Surplus/Deficit
Cumulative Surplus/Deficit

97.55
16.09
109.67
26.90
250.21
150.98
99.23

2013
105.13
16.18
112.65
27.44
261.41
160.46
100.95

2014
113.50
16.29
115.81
28.02
273.62
170.92
102.71
630.62

122.71
16.43
119.14
28.65
286.93
182.42
104.52

132.85
16.59
122.66
29.32
301.42
195.04
106.38

152.56
16.78
126.37
30.03
325.74
208.89
116.84

Hence, under Some Reforms Scenario, the Nagar Parishad can generate 6.30 Cr. Hence, a surplus of 52.17 lakhs can be generated by the NP by introducing water, property
tax, consolidated tax reforms and measures to reduce expenditure.

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23.1 Conclusion
In order to meet the costs of CDP projects, the NP would be required to generate an amount of 19.73 Crores over the first 5 years. It was found that under the base case
scenario (where no reforms are implemented to increase income and reduce expenditure), the NP would be able to generate only 5.78 Crores. It is proposed that to further
increase the revenues, the NP should implement the Some Reforms Scenario, whereby reforms to increase property tax, consolidated tax and water tax & measures to
decrease expenditure would be implemented. The NP would be able to generate upto 6.30 Crores (an additional revenue of 52.17 lakhs) through implementation of these
reforms.
Despite this, the NP would still be short of nearly 14 Cr (total required is 19.73 Cr). Hence, it is proposed that the NP should undertake PPP Projects like redevelopment of
NP complex hotel or Dharamshala or commercial complex on lower 2 floors and NP office can be made on top floor. This can help NP generate a revenue of upto 4 Cr.
Other PPP projects like advertisements, organizing guided tours or parking tax can also be collected by NP to generate more revenue from tourism. The remaining amount
of nearly 10 Cr needs to be given by State Government as a Grant or a loan to the ULB.

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ANNEXURE I: LIST OF ATTENDEES IN KICK OF WOR KSHOP

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ANNEXURE II: MINUTES OF KICK OFF WOR KSHOP

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City Development Plan for Mandav

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ANNEXURE III: PHOTOGRAPHS OF KICK OFF WORKSHOP

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ANNEXURE IV: MINUTES OF DHAR COLLECT ORATE MEETING

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ANNEXURE V: LIST OF ATTENDEES: SEC OND STAKEHOLDER WOR KSHOP

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ANNEXURE VI: PHOTOGRAPHS: SECOND STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOP

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ANNEXURE VII: MINUTES OF MEETING: SEC OND STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOP

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ANNEXURE VIII: STEERING COMMITTEE

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ANNEXURE IX: CITIZEN FORUM

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ANNEXURE X: MINUTES OF MEETING: DISTRI CT LEVEL MEETING

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ANNEXURE XI: LIST OF ATTENDEES: DISTRICT LEVEL MEETING

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ANNEXURE XII: PICTURES: THIRD STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOP

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ANNEXURE XIII: MINUTES OF MEETING: THIRD STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOP

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ANNEXURE XIV: LIST OF ATTENDEES: THIRD STAKEHOLDER WOR KSHOP

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ANNEXURE XV: DETAILS OF MUNICIPAL CADRE

Revised Municipal Cadre for Rajya Nagriya Swacchta Sewa

Revised Municipal Cadre for Revenue and Finance Departments under MP Rajya Nagriya Vitt Sewa

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Revised Municipal Cadre for Administrative Services

Revised Municipal Cadre for Engineering Services

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Revised structure for Rajya Nagar Palika Sewa (Engineering)

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ANNEXURE XVI: MINUTES OF MEETING: SEC OND DISTRICT LEVEL PRESENTATION

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SPECIAL PAPER: TRAN SPORTATION


DHAR DISTRICT: LOCATION AND CONNECTIVITY
Dhar district, with a geographical area of 8153 square kilometres,is spread over three physiographic divisions
the Malwa plateau in the north, the Vindhyachal range in the central zone and the Narmada Valley along the
southern boundary. The district has an undulating topography and a large area of forest, with very little
industrial development and an average level of urbanization. These factors impart a scenic quality to travel
throughout the district. The district is primarily connected by road to its regional context, with almost no rail
connectivity except on its northern most extreme and through Indore on the East.
Dhar district is adjacent to Jhabua and Alirajpur districts on the North-West and South-West, Ratlam in the
North, Ujjain to the North-East, Indore to the East, West Nimar to the South-East and Barwani district to the
South. It has three main urban centres: Dhar, Manawar and Pithampur. Dhar city is 50 kms from Pithampur,
which is a further 22 kms from Indore, making these district cities fall within the larger metropolitan region of
Indore, one of Indians fastest growing cities, with an increase in population of over 32% over the last decade.
As such, Dhar district is surrounded by areas of vibrant economic activity and growth, and is thus impacted by
the pressures of traffic and transportation created by its regional context. Being in the immediate vicinity of
Indore district, Dhar district is impacted in ways by the growth of Indore city, the commercial capital of
Madhya Pradesh.
Three national highways (NH) connect Dhar district to the rest of India. NH 59 originates in Indore and cuts
across the district in an East-West direction, connecting Indore with Ahmedabad in Gujarat. NH 79 links the

SH1

SH3
SH3
SH3

SH3
SH

SH3
SH2

SH

district to Ajmer in Rajasthan. NH 3, which connects Agra to Mumbai, touches the South-East corner of Dhar
district, between Indore and Dhule in Maharashtra. .A number of state highways (SH) also cross the district. SH
18 connects Bhopal to Ahmedabad, via Sehore, Ashta, Dewas, Ujjain,Badnawar and Petlawad. SH26 connects
Badwani on the South with Alirajpur in the neighbouring district and Vadodara in Gujarat. SH 31 connects Dhar
with Bhusawal in Maharashtra and onwards to Nayagaon. SH 39 runs Northwards from Badwani through
Kukshi and Jobat to Kushalgarh in Rajasthan.
Madhya Pradesh has a high dependence on road transport. However, the road density in the state is 47
1
th
(km/100sqkm area), which is much below the national average of 98. The state is ranked 16 in comparison
with other Indian states in this regard. At the same time, the number of registered motor vehicles per
thousand population in the state is 80, which is considerably higher than the national average of 68. This puts

http://www.infrawindow.com/reports-survey/road-density-in-india-disparity-persist_15/

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a lot of pressure on its roads, perhaps indicated by the fact that more than 10% of all accidents in India happen
in Madhya Pradesh. While detailed data regarding Dhar district is not available at present, it can be observed
that the intensity of road usage is high, and would probably reflect the overall situation in the state.
In 2005, the ILO (International Labour Organization)
conducted a situation analysisassessing the quality of
the road surface and its maintainabilityof 116
roads/tracks, including national highways, state highways
and major district roads (MDR), village roads, other district
2
roads and tracks in Dharblock of Dhardistrict. While the
state of NHs, SHs and MDRs, which are 19.8 percent of the
road network, is largely good and it was found that the
other roads are in poor condition. About 31 percent of the
network provides full access (i.e. the road is fully
maintainable). The study noted that the allocation of funds
for road maintenance has reduced drastically, dropping to
less than 50% from 1997-98to 2002-03, with an increase in
the shortfall in expenditure, compared to funds required
as per norms, from a level of 50 percent in 1997-98 to 75
percent in 2002-03. Poor condition of roads is particularly harmful to rural inhabitants, because it impacts their
access to health care facilities and increases the time spent on daily chores, thereby affecting agricultural
output. One of the key issues that has emerged during the planning and initial implementation of the PMGSY is
the need to preserve the infrastructure through effective maintenance. While contractors are responsible for
maintenance for 5 years after the construction, the responsibility for maintenance reverts to the implementing
agencies thereafter. This places a lot of financial pressure on the ULBs in the district and requires proper
financial planning, otherwise the economic activities in the cities of the district would be adversely affected.
Observations of the state of roads in all the cities support this conclusion, as the ULBs are able to maintain a
very small percentage of the roads within their jurisdiction.
PROVISIONING OF TRANSPORT SERVICES
Dhar district has easy access to air travel through the Devi Ahilyabai Holkar Airport in Indore, which is served
by most of the major domestic airlines of the country, such as Jet Airways, Jet Lite, Indian Airlines and
Kingfisher. These connect Indore with the main Metros and with all parts of the country. The district is
deprived of rail connectivity, for which it has to depend once again on Indore to the East and Ratlam on the
North. While Ratlam is 107 kms to the North of Dhar city, it provides access to four major railway routes, which
connect Ratlam to Mumbai, Delhi, Ajmer and Khandwa. Similarly, Indore also provides rail connectivity to
Mumbai, Pune, Nagpur, Delhi, Jaipur, Ahmedabad, Vadodara, Howrah, Bhopal, Ujjain, Gwalior, Bhind,
Jabalpur, Bilaspur, Khandwa, Lucknow, Varanasi, Patna, Ambala, Jammu, Dehradun and Trivandrum. Regional
transport is road-based and buses ply between Dhar, Indore, Mandu, Mhow, Ratlam, Ujjain, and Bhopal.
Rented cars and taxis are freely available within the district, and provide convenient access to Indore, Mhow,
Ratlam, Ujjain and Bhopal.
It can be said that Dhar district is well connected even though it depends on adjoining districts for air and rail
connectivity. However, it is significant that in 2000, 70.5% of the villages in the district were still not connected
3
with pucca roads. At 25.3 kilometres road length per 100 square kilometres (in 1999), the road density in the
district is even lower than the states average. With the pressures of development on all sides, the district will

2
3

International Labour Organization, Situation Analysis of Rural Road Maintenance in Madhya Pradesh, 2005
th
From the webiste of Pradhan Mantri Gram Sadak Yojana, http://pmgsy.nic.in/pmg1218.asp, retrieved on 19 Feb 2012

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be faced with the challenge of upgrading its infrastructure as well as planning the intercity transportation
within the district such that development pressures do not have a detrimental effect.
PRESSURES OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
The upcoming Delhi Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC)
and the concomitant Dedicated Freight Corridor (DFC)
will have a profound impact on Dhar district and all the
cities within the district. While the DMIC itself does not
contain Dhar district and the DFC does not enter the
district, the impacts are inevitable. The DMIC and DFC
strategy envisages a network of regional transport
linkages and a network of investment regions that will
feed the corridors. No. 24 in the series of investment
nodes is the Dhar- Pithampur-Mhow Investment
Region, which is located to the east of the DMIC
alignment. It leverages the air and rail connectivity
provided by Indore and the presence of NH-3, which
passes close to all three cities. It will also enjoy the
proximity to steel plants at Bhilai and Nagpur and the
close proximity to ports in South Gujarat, such as
Hazira, Dahej and Maroli.
Through the Audhyogic Kendra Vikas Nigam (AKVN),
Indore, a specialized corporation dedicated to
integrated industrial development, the state
government has been developing a Special Economic
Zone at Indore since 2000one of the first in the countrywhich is expected to be a major hub for vehicle
and components manufacturing. This region already has the presence of companies like Hindustan Motors,
Kinetic Honda, Eicher Motors, Bajaj Tempo, and other industries such as Kores India, Crompton Greaves,
Bridge Stone Tyres and Pratap Steel. The state government also plans to develop a Pharma Cluster, Apparel
Park, Gems & Jewellery Park, Software Technology Park, Herbal Park and Bio-technology Park within the new
investment region. Other related developments will be a Knowledge City and Skills Development Center to
cater to the training needs of the industries, Integrated Township/s, and an integrated logistics hub with
container depot, truck terminal and warehousing facilities.
The CDP for Indore envisages an investment of INR 2746 Crore for the upgradation of infrastructure (transport,
water supply, environment management) in the urban agglomeration around Indore. Indore Airport is being
augmented to become an international airport. The Dhar-Pithampur-Mhow Investment Node will also need to
connect with the DMIC through feeder roads connecting with national highways and the Golden Quadrilateral.
Feeder rail linkages will also be developed. There is a plan to construct a 196km long Broad Gauge line
connecting Dahod, Sardarpur, Dhar and Indore. Other developments include guage conversion for the Chhota
Udepur- Pratapnagar (100km) and the Indore-Khandwa (138.76km) lines. There is also a proposal to connect
Dhar and Chhota Udepur (100kms).

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FACTORS INFLUENCING TRANSPORTATION IN DHAR

The DMIC is expected to profoundly impact the patterns and nature of traffic flowing through Dhar district and
its constituent cities, especially the cities of Badnawar, Dhamnod, Dharampuri, Kukshi and Sardarpur-Rajgarh,
in addition to Dhar itself. All these cities can gain from being in the catchment of the DMIC investment region.
Within a 200 kms radius, these cities can develop live links with other cities like Vadodara and Dahod in
Gujarat, and other hubs in Madhya Pradesh, such as Ratlam, Neemuch-Nayagaon, Shajapur and Dewas.
A definite impact will also be felt through the setting up of Ujjain as a knowledge city and RatlamNagda as an
investment region, which would directly influence growth in Badnawar, as it is 66 kms from Ujjain and about
45 kms from Ratlam. Ujjain may also supply domestic tourists to the district, whose tourism infrastructure is
still being developed. The state Tourism Policy mentions a Transport Departments notification exempting
tourist buses from payment of Motor Vehicle Tax if they ply on designated tourist routes for 2 years. A large
number of tourist circuits include the ancient capital of Mandu, and a new inclusion is a tourism circuit around
Badnawar, connecting Indore, Ujjain, Badnawar and Ratlam with Mandsaur and Neemach. The rich cultural
heritage and tourism destinations in and around the district promises great potential to attract domestic and
international tourists, and this will further enhance the pressure on the transportation networks of the district.
Dharampuri can be developed as an important transit point on the tourism circuits in the district, as well as
provide a vital link in the rail and industrial freight corridors being proposed.
The policy framework for mobility and transport is also changing in the state and will have its impact on the
district. The Madhya Pradesh Transport Policy 2010 is a timely response, in the spirit of the National Urban
Transport Policy (NUTP),to the rapidly increasing vehicle numbers and chronic problems of lack of planning
and effective management of traffic and transportation, which can become impediments to growth and
destroy the quality of life of all cities. Notes that there has been rapid increase in numbers of motor vehicles in
the state. In the previous decade (2000-2010) there has been 12.81% increase in gross numbers. The Policy is
directed towards better provision of services and better management of operations.
The thrust is on provision of public transport and buses in all regions, especially rural and remote areas, by
following a liberal policy in terms of providing bus permits, while ensuring healthy competition between
private operators. While the Madhya Pradesh State Road Transport Corporation was disbanded in 2005 and
presently only operates a few inter-state routes, it is only a matter of time before most bus operations are
privatised. The policy also intends to improve Bus Stands in all locations, under the PPP mode of financing and
development. Goods carriers will be handled carefully to ensure safety.

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To improve management and to elicit greater participation from the Public in fixing appropriate fares and
monitoring the performance of the bus operators, the Policy envisages the setting up of various bodies. A
Disrict Transport Authority is envisaged under the command of the District Collector. The policy also
recommends the formation of City-level Unified Metropolitan Transport Councils (C-UMTC) and Dedicated
Urban Transport Funds (DUTF) in all cities. The policy further recommends the setting up of a Traffic
Information Management & Control Centre (TIMCC) in all cities and aligning the preparation of mandatory City
Mobility Plans (CMP) with the provisions of the City Development Plans (CDP) to ensure proper coordination
between them.
A significant initiative of the State Government is the Draft Parking Policy, which highlights both the lack of
awareness among all parties about the importance of parking. It identifies the multiplicity of parking rules and
regulations in different cities, the shortage of appropriate sites for parking and no comprehensive appraisal of
existing parking sites, lack of proper transport plans, lack of capacity within the ULBs to deal with parking
issues, multiple uncoordinated agencies dealing with parking, lack of successful PPP models in parking
provision, irrational parking rates, encroachments on public lands and limited application of advanced
technology as key challenges facing the ULBs. The proposed policy includes provisions for the following
reforms and actions by the ULBs:
1. Parking rates to be calibrated as per the value of land in different areas of the city
2. Vehicle registration to be conditional on the availability of parking space
3. Comprehensive Mobility Plans (CMPs) and Comprehensive Traffic and Transportation Master Plans
(CTTMP)for each city, after proper appraisal of existing and future requirements for parking
4. Provision of adequate temporary parking and handicapped parking
5. Multi-storey parking at designated locations, with park and ride provisions, video security, etc.
6. Truck terminals and by-passes to be constructed in all cities
7. Application of ITS (Intelligent Transport System)
8. IEC activities to be undertaken to increase public awareness
9. Building construction permissions to be linked with parking provision
10. Private vehicles to pay for night-parking on city roads
11. Freeing carriageways of parked vehicles, and limiting the off-street parking as per available right-ofway (minimum 12m)
12. Promotion of park-and ride principle.
URGENTISSUES FOR TRANSPORTATION IN DHAR DISTRICT
Quality of roads
It has been noted earlier that the overall quality of the highways, district roads and especially the internal
roads in the cities is poor, thus access to many parts of the city is seriously hampered throughout the year but
especially in the monsoon. Most internal roads are in need of repair and resurfacing and currently unable to
cater to motorized traffic. Many are not able to support non-motorized modes even. As most people travel by
foot and use bicycles and motorized 2 wheelers, this puts pressure on ULBs to improve the provisioning and
maintenance.
Lack of public transport
Dhar district has the registration for 345 cars, 254 jeeps, 86 taxi cabs, 531 three wheelers, 109 passenger
vehicles, 1037 goods vehicle, 90591 two wheelers, 11518 tractors, 8658 trailers, 698 other vehicles and a total
4
of 113827 motorized vehicles. These figures might be lower than the actual motorized vehicle figure as
residents of the district also go to nearby districts to register their vehicles. Residents of the towns under
contract generally rely on non-motorized modes like walking and bicycling and two wheelers for intercity
travel or travel to areas in the vicinity of towns. For distant places, they rely on private buses and hired cabs as
4

Motor Transport Statistics of Madhya Pradesh, 2008-2009.

xl

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

do tourists who visit these towns. In the absence of public transit and intermediate public transit options like
shared autos in most towns, people are often restricted to these modes.
It is significant that out of the total of 1966 temporary permits issued to private transporters in Dhar district in
2008-09, almost 60% (1170 nos.) were issued to operators of contract carriages, who operate buses between
cities and villages of the district. Only 7 permits were sought for operating auto rickshaws, which indicates the
low feasibility of such local modes, explained by the high number of private two-wheelers.
Public transit is absent in all these towns and as such travel options are limited to non motorized modes that
can span for about 1-2 km, creating a problem of accessibility and limiting mobility of the citizens, preventing
them from undertaking economic activities in other parts of their city or the district. The dependence on
privately owned vehicles is too high, and there is great need for public transport for local and intercity travel.
Lack of parking
One of the most prominent issues is the lack of designated parking areas. Even in towns that have demarcated
some parking, it is clearly inadequate. The cities in Dhar district are developing at a rapid rate, putting them on
a trajectory where motorized modes of travel will become essential for commuting for work and tourism and
the parking needs will only increase in the future. As per the Parking Policy described earlier, this problem
requires a comprehensive and holistic planning.
Bus stands that serve the intercity buses are inadequate and often placed at inconvenient locations. In the
case of Rajgarh and Sardarpur, which are in close proximity, there is a bus stand only in Rajgarh, forcing the
citizens of Sardarpur to find their own last mile linkage to their town.
Removal of encroachments
Encroachments on road space are commonplace in all the cities. This adds to congestion by restricting the right
of way of the streets, worsening the already chaotic and constrained conditions of these streets. Truck and bus
traffic also need to be regulated. Dharampuri and Dahi have a lot of trucks that carry sand from quarries to
major cities in the region and this along with the private buses adds to congestion and chaos on the main
roads. As traffic management in towns is meant to be handled by the traffic police, and there are few or no
personnel who perform this duty, the regulation of bus and truck traffic is almost non existential and prone to
the operation of local mafias.
Construction of by-pass roads
While it is observed that some towns like Dahi may need a bypass, others like Sardarpur may actually lose out
on trade opportunities from passengers in buses and cars that would bypass the business areas and site-seeing
hotspots if there is a by-pass. The provision of a by-pass must be carefully considered, and its precise location
and length should be designed to enhance rather than reduce the economic activity in the areas that it
circumvents.
Road safety and awareness
The data on road accidents in Dhar reveals neglected aspects of planning and governance that easily get
overlooked. Of the total 43852 accidents that occurred in 2008-09, there were 5861 fatalities. Of these, more
than 50% accidents happened at T and Y junctions in roads. 90% happened at intersections without any lights
or traffic control provisions. 67% accidents happened on single lane roads without dividers. 70% were during
perfectly fine weather. Of the fatal accidents (5861) and grievous injuries (5422), in both cases around 60% of
the accidents were caused due to over-speeding, which probably explains why 30% of overall accidents were
due to head-on collisions. Of the total 43852 accidents, almost 35% were due to overloading or improper
loading of the vehicles. If we examine the locations of accidents, this reveals that Almost 50% are in locations
in or around residences, markets and institutions.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

S.No.
Location type
% of accidents
1
OPEN AREA
21.9
2
Near or Inside a Village
19.9
3
Residential Area
15.1
4
Bazar
9.5
5
Near School or College
5.7
6
Other locations
27.9
In evaluating the overall scenario, it would not be wrong to say that the roads are actually unsafe by design,
and most of the accidents are happening as a result of normal circumstances. Better planning of the road
network can enhance the safety of the citizens, who suffer most. Road dividers, properly marked intersections
with appropriate signaling, and a strict control on speeding and overloading of vehicles is called for.
The State Transport Policy of 2007, noted that close to 95% of the accidents are due to the drivers human
error, and most of the remaining were due to vehicle faults. It was found that general awareness and proper
training of drivers is a must, Fitness certificates need to be made mandatory, and the testing of vehicles should
be done through PPP. However, in 2009, there was only one registered driver training school in the whole of
Dhar district, and not even a single pollution-checking centre.
PROPOSAL FOR SETTING UP A DISTRICT LEVEL TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY
An assessment of the ground conditions and the issues and potentials related to transportation in Dhar district
indicates that improvements can be brought about by focusing on specific areas of intervention. Broadly
speaking, these include the devising of PPP models for investment, enhancing the technical and financial
capacity of ULBs to manage the development and operations & maintenance of transportation, strict
enforcement, parking policies, removal of encroachments, proper planning of the road network (arteries, bypasses, neighbourhood roads), etc.
City Development Plan for 8 towns in Dhar district is being prepared, namely Mandav, Dhamnod, Dharampuri,
Kukshi, Dahi, Badnawar, Sardarpur and Rajgarh. All these are small towns with populations ranging between
7000 to 20000. All these towns suffer from typical transportation related problems like encroachment, lack of
parking spaces, poor regional connectivity, lack of public transportation and transportation facilities for
existing and potential tourists. At the town level, the Urban Local Bodies and to some extent Police
department are the only agencies responsible for traffic management and none of these are equipped to
handle the transportation related problems: technically, financially or administratively . Hence, it is proposed
that a District Level Authority be set up to regulate transportation Management at the district level. The key
advantages of constitution of such an agency would be:
Coordinated transportation planning, implementation and management at the district level
Ease of channelizing PPP based funding through development of multiple projects, i.e., PPP based
funding for development of 8 major parking sites in the district would be more sustainable and
economically feasible as compared to development of parking spaces in individual towns by individual
investors
Management of transportation infrastructure at District level
Integrated planning for freight corridors at district level

xlii

City Development Plan for Mandav


M

2013

Badnawar

Sardarpur

Rajgarh

Mandav

Dhamnod

Proposed Transporrt Interchange under CDPs


Proposed Highwayy Corridors to be developed under CDPs

Dahi

Kukshi
Dharampuri

Tentative Railway corridors


c
proposed at State Level
Proposed Industriaal Hubs under CDPs
Proposed Tourist Destinations
D
under CDPs
Proposed Parking sites
s
under CDPs (PPP basis)

T
Agency
Figure: Proposed Projects at District Level to be developed by the District Level Transport

PORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PROVISION IN MANDA


AV
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TRANSP
Mandav is a prime tourist destinatio
on which features on the National and International tourist
t
map. Mandav is
also proposed to be listed as a Worrld Heritage Site. The town presently has only 2 accesss roads: from Dhar and
Dharampuri and both are in a poo
or condition. The town has only one parking area and
a suffers from acute
parking shortage during tourist seaason. The town, despite being a prominent tourist tow
wn, does not have any
provision for tourist buses or luxuryy buses (except a few operated by private pliers). Hen
nce, in order to further
promote development of Mandav as
a a tourist destination, it is proposed that Mandav bee provided connectivity
through NH3. A kuccha road and road under PM Gram Sadak Yojna linking NH3 to the town already exists close
to Jhabri village. District Level Transportation Agency (DLTA) can attract PPP based
b
investment for
development of this road from NH3
3 via Jhabri village to Mandav town. This will not only improve connectivity
for tourists but will also improve th
he quality of life of the villagers who have to commute for at least 2 hrs on
foot to reach the town. Provision off tourist buses and luxury buses to Mandav can also be
b undertaken by DLTA.
Mandav, owing to the hilly terrain and ASI listed monuments, does not have any space availability for
development of parking areas for buses, cars and taxis, it is proposed that Dhamno
od (located hr from
Mandav) be developed as a tourist accommodation base for tourists to Mandav and other destinations like
Maheshwar. Parking areas, tourist accommodation
a
and tourist bus facilities can be provided at Dhamnod from
where buses can ply to Mandav on a daily basis. DLTA can play an important role in attrracting investments for
development of road connectivity to
t NH3, improvement of connecting roads from Dhaar and Dharampuri; for
development of parking areas in Dhamnod
D
and for operating bus tours from Dhamno
od along the proposed
tourist circuit connecting Omkaresh
hwar, Maheshwar, Mandav and Kukshi (via Dhamnod and Dharampuri).

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City Development Plan for Mandav

REFERENCES

Government of Madhya Pradesh, Motor Transport Statistics of Madhya Pradesh 2008-2009, Gwalior: Office Of The
Transport Commissioner, GoMP

Government of Madhya Pradesh, Transport Policy (Parivahan Neeti) 2010, Bhopal: Transport Department, GoMP

Government of Madhya Pradesh, Draft Urban Parking Policy, retrieved from Slideshare on 19thFeb 2012

Government of Madhya Pradesh, Draft Policy on UMTA and DUTF, retrieved from Slideshare on 19th Feb 2012

http://www.infrawindow.com/reports-survey/road-density-in-india-disparity-persist_15/

International Labour Organization, Situation Analysis of Rural Road Maintenance in Madhya Pradesh, 2005

Pradhan Mantri Gram Sadak Yojana, http://pmgsy.nic.in/pmg1218.asp, retrieved on 19th Feb 2012

Lea Associates South Asia, DPR for Pithampur-Dhar-Mhow Investment Region of Madhya Pradesh sub-region of
DMIC, retrieved on 19th Feb 2012

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City Development Plan for Mandav


M

2013

SPECIAL PAPER: SOCI O-ECO


ONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF SCHEDULED TRIBES
BACKGROUND
The scheduled tribes of India consttitute 8.14% of the total population of the country, The population of the
scheduled tribes as per the 2001 Census was 84.51 million,
and their inhabitation covered about 15% of the countrys
area.

DISTRICT-WISE PERCENTAGE OF TRIBAL


POPULATION IN INDIA

Central Indian Tribal Belt: The centtral Indian tribal belt,


stretching from Purulia Bankura in West Bengal to
Banswara - Dungarpur in South Rajassthan is the home for
about 80% tribal communities. This beelt is the typical rainfed
area, w ith the maximum issues and problems
p
pertaining to
subsistence agriculture, very poor irrrigation infrastructure,
dismal extension services and awaren
ness among the tribal
communities. Though the region is rich in natural resources,
the geography, fragile environment and the low awareness
levels of the tribal community has allways pushed them in
issues of food insecurity, malnutrition, migration, etc.
Rainfed areas and central Indian tribal belt are synonymous
to each other, as the main concentration and maximum area
of rainfeddryland agriculture fall in thee central Indian region,

known as the poverty belt of Indiaa.


The state of Madhya Pradesh has a high concentration of tribal population. It is ranked
d highest among all the
th
States/UTs in terms of ST population, and is ranked 12 with respect to the proportio
on of ST population to
total population.
As we can see in the map givven above, the tribal
districts of Madhya Pradesh form a clearly identifiable
belt on the southern border of the
t state, where these
districts are adjacent to similarly tribal dominated
districts in the states of Gujarat, Maharashtra, Andhra
Pradesh and Orissa (from Weest to East along the
border). As per the 2001 Censuss, the scheduled tribes
accounted for 20.27% of the sttates population, and
numbered 12.23 million perso
ons. Since 1950, the
geographical areas occupied byy the scheduled tribes
have been referred to as the Schedule V areas. Such
areas occupy a total of 68,000 square kilometres, forming 22.07% of the states geographical area. The total
population living in such scheduled areas is 11.26 millions, of which 6.68 millionss, around half of the
population, belongs to the scheduleed tribes.
Most towns in Dhar and Alirajpur districts
d
of Madhya Pradesh have high tribal populatio
on. Many of the towns
are also administrative blocks. Thee following are the 6 tribal blocks in Alirajpur Disttrict: Alirajpur, Bhavra,
Jobat, Katthiwara, Sondwa, Udaigaarh. The 12 tribal blocks in Dhar District areBagh, Daahi, Dhar, Dharampuri,
Gandhwani, Kukshi, Manawar, Nalcccha, Nisarpur, Sardarpur, Tirlaand Umarban.
As per the 2001 Census, Dhar district
d
had 54.5%tribal population, while Jhabua districtfrom which
Alirajpurdistrict was carved out in 2008had 86.8% tribal population. Furthermore, 17
7.5% of the total urban
population of Dhardistrict and 31%
% of the urban population of Jhabua was constituted by scheduled tribes.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

These proportions vary across the district, with Mandav Nagar Palika having as much as 81.6% tribal
population and Dharampuri NP having the lowest, at 6.5%.Sardarpur, Jobat and Bhavra had over 25% tribal
population. It is expected that this number would have changed drastically with the 2011 census. The city of
Dahi, in Dhar district, has become a Nagar Panchayat now, but it was a village as per the 2001 Census, and was
grouped with villages with 51-75% of ST population.
The percentages of ST population in different cities in these two districts are tabulated below:
Name of District

Name of UA/Town

Dhar

Badnawar (NP)

Alirajpur

Percentage of ST population to total


population
13.2

Bagh (CT)

23.8

Dhamnod (NP)

18.3

Dhar (M)

13.5

Dharampuri (NP)

6.5

Kukshi (NP)

23.4

Manawar (M)

18.0

Mandav (NP)

81.6

Pithampur (NP)

12.6

Rajgarh (NP)

18.2

Sardarpur (NP)

28.5

Alirajpur (M)

27.8

Bhavra (NP)

52.0

Jobat (NP)

25.9

Source: Census of India, 2001


The overall literacy rate of the STs has increased from 18.4% in 1991 to 41.2% in 2001; however, the literacy
rate among the scheduled tribes of Madhya Pradesh is lower than the national rate of 47.1%. The literacy
figures are misleading, as they conceal the fact that of all the literates in the scheduled tribes, 57.3% have
attained education below primary level. The proportion of the ST population that has attained primary and
middle levels of education is merely 24.8% and 9.7% respectively. Further, only 6.6 % are educated up to
matriculation/secondary/higher secondary levels, and a miniscule 1.4% has obtained graduate or higher
qualifications.
The Bhil tribe is predominant in Alirajpur and Dhar districts. This is the most populous of the 46 scheduled
tribes, numbering over 4.6 million in 2011 and constituting 37.7% of the total ST population. The Bhils are
primarily involved in agriculture. Amongst the MP tribes, the Bhils have achieved lower literacy rates than
other tribes. Only about 35% of the children of age 5-14 years attend school.
The Work Participation Rate (WPR) of the ST population in Madhya Pradesh is 50.5%, slightly higher than the
national average. Among the major tribes, Bhil, Gond, Korku and Baiga have higher WPR than the national
average. Cultivators constitute the highest proportion (46.8%) among the total workers, higher than the
national average of 44.7%. Agricultural Labourers account for another 42.1% of the workforce.The cultivators
and agricultural labourers together account for 89% of the total workers.
KEY SOCIO-ECONOMIC ISSUES IN TRIBAL AREAS
The tribal communities of MP lag behind the general population in a number of key measures, including
maternal and child mortality, size of agricultural holdings, and access to drinking water and electricity. 52% of
the scheduled tribes live below the poverty line and 54% do not have access to communication and

xlvi

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

transport. While poverty, social differences and low literacy levels keep the tribes isolated, they are
nevertheless directly impacted by all the processes that have become associated with urbanization in India,
especially the decline in crop production due to scarcity of water, the depletion of forests due to illegal felling
of trees, and the low level of effectiveness of government schemes due to poor implementation and
monitoring mechanisms.
The scheduled tribes are highly susceptible to the vagaries of development, climate change and socioeconomic changes in the mainstream of Indian society because of a number of key reasons. Firstly, while their
assimilation into the mainstream has been a national mission since Independence, due to a mismatch between
value systems, social mores and lifestyles, and the lower level of urbanization of tribal areas, these societies
have experienced certain isolation from the larger political system and social discourse. Development
pressures have further marginalized them, as they tend to be the victims of large industrial and infrastructural
projects, which affect their natural habitat and deprive them of the organic links with the land that they have
enjoyed for centuries. This also creates a resentment that has surfaced in recent decades in the form of violent
protest and subversion. Therefore, it has become imperative that the tribes are incorporated into the national
framework in ways that are sensitive to their unique and ancient cultures, and that they are not displaced from
their habitat due to development pressures.
During the 1970s, the impacts of industrialization on the ecology and environment of the country became hot
issues for public involvement. The protection of the environment also coincided as a concern with the
protection of native societies that were experts at maintaining a sustainable equilibrium between their life
needs and the environment. Thus, over the last few decades, the central and state governments have
concentrated on protecting the rights of the tribes to the forests that they inhabit, and to maintain a less
intrusive and welfare role in the areas dominated by the tribes. Education, healthcare, agricultural support,
communications and employment have been the main tools for the assimilation of tribes into the mainstream
of Indian society, with mixed results.
Close dependence on the ecosystem
Tribal communities live in forest areas with a very close relationship to their ecological landscape. They are
dependent on the natural resources and their biodiversity for their sustenance at various levels such as
religious, social and economic. As the tribal communities have sacred associations with the natural landscape,
they have traditionally maintained a sustainable balance with their environs and do not engage in the overexploitation of resources that has become a hallmark of modern development in India. The illegal felling of
trees in the forest areas is resulting in depletion of the forest cover and disturbs the balance.For any
development decisions that concern natural landscapes and their biodiversity, it is important to assess the
eco-cultural context and analyse the possible pathways, to come up with sustainable means that benefit the
6
traditional societies and ecosystem in a broader way.
Erosion of Traditional Knowledge Systems
The tribal population is dependent on the natural resources as raw material for the practice of their arts and
crafts traditions. The forest areas are rich in biodiversity and the tribals have inherent knowledge systems with
regards to medicinal and other properties of the flora of the region. The traditional knowledge systems are an
integral part of the tribal culture and need to be documented and promoted with a cautious approach to avoid
over exploitation. There is potential for encouragement of traditional arts and crafts produced by the tribal
population, which are based on the use of non-timber forest produce, by-products of agricultural processes,
and other activities. Also, their knowledge systems could be researched and mainstreamed for the production
of herbal medicinal and consumer products.

5
6

TRIFED 2010
Quoting Ramakrishnan (2011)

xlvii

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City Development Plan for Mandav

The key challenge is to prevent the erosion of traditional knowledge with the advent and promotion of modern
education. School curricula need to be devised for harmonious integration with such knowledge, without
losing the values of either system.
Means of Livelihood Generation
While it is clear that the developmental needs of tribal communities encompass basic needs like education,
drinking water, health, employment generation, communication and infrastructure development which are
linked with the most critical area for intervention: food security this in turn depends on means of sustainable
agriculture through irrigation, and promotion of animal husbandry and horticulture.
The livelihoods of the tribal communities have undergone a sea change since the 1990s, with shifts in
agriculture patterns, the seasonal nature and reduced availability of agri-based livelihoods, and the lifestyle
changes that accompany the exposure of the scheduled tribes to the modernization of the economy. We
discuss the transformed livelihoods scenario in greater detail in a later section on urbanization of tribal areas.
First, we would draw attention to the various successful projects under the MPRLP project, which show that
the livelihoods for the tribes in MP can achieve a bottom-up and sustainable dimension if handled with care.
LESSONS FROM THE MADHYA PRADESH RURAL LIVELIHOODS PROJECT
In order to gain a better understanding of the models and success stories that have been achieved in the area
of development for the tribal communities, we briefly discuss the experiences of the Madhya Pradesh Rural
Livelihoods Project (MPRLP), supported by the GoMP and DFID, which concluded in 2011. The MPRLP focused
on nine districts (Dhar, Jhabua, Barwani, Alirajpur, Anuppur, Shahdol, Mandla, Dindori and Sheopur) where
there is a high proportion of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes and where female literacy is poor.In Phase
1, MPRLP reached around 50,000 households in 815 villages. Phase 2 of MPRLP, which started in July 2007,
reached nearly 4,000 villages, including the villages covered in Phase 1.
MPRLP identified the main problem in tribal areas to be their vulnerability. The rural poor in the tribal districts
are farming on marginal and under-productive landholdings. They suffer periodic droughts, do not have
secure land tenure, and rely on seasonal work in agriculture and forests. In some districts, low population
density, relative isolation and inadequate infrastructure mean higher prices for agricultural inputs, poor
extension services, credit and markets, and a dearth of information. These difficulties limit their
opportunities.
Rural poverty is pervasive and fiscal resources at national and state levels are inadequate. Eliminating rural
poverty is thus extremely challenging and can only be a sustainable endeavor if the stakeholders are fully
involved and empowered to give direction to the changes in their lives. The project routed funds through the
Gram Sabhas and emphasized the importance of the Gram Kosh (village fund) as the primary organ through
which change can be affected. It strengthened the capacity of Gram Sabha to plan and manage resources, to
ensure equity in distribution of funds, and to protect the interests of the poor and vulnerable. The project
cultivated an ethos of accessibility and informed participation among the stakeholders.

xlviii

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

An audit team of DFID, on a visit to Dhar,inquired about the organization of Gram Sabha meetings, the
decision-making process in the Gram Sabha, participation of women, and access to information. Most villagers
shared the liberation they experienced through the knowledge that they are all members of the Gram Sabha
and can fully participate in its activities. The team was impressed by the financial transparency that had been
achieved in the MPRLP villages. In one village, the fund available in the Gram Kosh and the balance of accounts
are written on the exterior wall of the school building to inform all the villagers. On the subject of repayment
of money borrowed from the Gram Kosh. A floriculture project in the Sahariya community in Sheopur has
demonstrated the ability and willingness of the tribalsto make responsible use of the gram kosh. They have
become aware of the advantages of maintaining a robust fund, and because of transparent practices and
proper management by the stakeholders themselves, the idea of tribals being irresponsible with loans has
7
been completely demolished.
The MPRLP demonstrates a variety of different ways in which empowerment can happen through literacy,
information and participation. It reveals the profound change in attitude that comes from financial security at
a community level, which empowers the villagers to take risks and to be enterprising with their futures. For
example, poor farmers having small land holdings have shed conventional farming to take up cash crops like
8
cumin and ginger. Three farmers of Dhehri village of Jhabua district grew grown cumin and earned hefty
profits. Other successful examples include cultivation of ginger in the Tirla cluster in Dhar, cumin cultivation in
the Kaththivada cluster in Alirajpur, and cultivation of fennel seeds (saunf) using organic manure, which
fetched a good price at the Van Melain Bhopal.
The empowerment of women to participate and lead the gram panchayats was a key success of the MPRLP. At
a meeting in Badnawar with the District Collector of Dhar, Smt. Lilabai of Padunia village asked the district
9
collector why her village had no stop dam. The Collector praised her for raising the issue and instructed the
relevant officers to transfer Rs. Two lakhs into the Gram Kosh. Encouraged by Lilabai, other Panchas and
Sarpanchas have also started speaking out. They convene special meetings of women, have motivated 30
illiterate women to learn reading and writing between 7 to 8 pm, and attend every Gram Sabha meeting. They
also handle finances and raise much-neglected gender issues in their villages. The women claim now that the
Gram Sabha cannot take any decision without seeking their opinion.

st

Culture of Floriculture Grains Ground, http://www.mprlp.in/, retrieved on 21 Feb 2012


st
Traditional farmers switching over to new crops, http://www.mprlp.in/, retrieved on 21 Feb 2012
9
st
Why No Stop Dam In My Village? http://www.mprlp.in/, retrieved on 21 Feb 2012
8

xlix

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City Development Plan for Mandav

The last example from MPRLP shows the potential for


livelihood generation when the village communities
collaborate with the private sector industries. The districts of
western Madhya Pradesh report high rate of migration due
to absence of off-farm livelihoods. This effects the youth,
who are usually not willing to sit idle, and choose to migrate,
thereby breaking their bonds with the community and
reducing its capacity for development. Through dialogues
with industries in Dhar, the project identified several
industries like Eicher Tractor and Anant Spinning Mill,
whichshowed interest in tapping young rural manpower from poverty-affected areas by providing skill-based
training. The most spectacular success was achieved by the Pithampur unit of the company Rosy Blue
International, which selected over 100 tribal boys from Badwani, Dhar and Jhabua districts for training in
10
diamond cutting. These boys were absorbed into the industry but were able to maintain their live links with
their villages, while also being able to reject the migration that many of their peers had to experience.
URBANIZATIONOFTHE SCHEDULED TRIBES
The most significant changes in the lives and livelihoods of the scheduled tribes are due to the effect of
urbanization. While this is usually seen as a result of the impact of city-centric industrial economy, we need to
acknowledge the significance of another, more recent, phenomenon that is affecting the districts for which the
present CDPs are being prepared. These cities have become Class IV cities as a result of numerical growth in
population over the last decade. The two cities of Alirajpur district, Jobat and Bhavra, have barely crossed the
10,000 mark that qualifies them as cities. Jobat was 9991 in 2001 and preliminary estimates of population are
at 11535, while the population of Bhavra was 9263 in 2001 and is 12997 today. Similarly, in Dhar district, the
population of Dahi was 7037 and has now risen to 11128 and Mandav has increased from 8544 to 10373.
It has been observed that in all the cities with a dominant tribal population, there is a great deal of resistance
to the new phenomenon to which the tribal citizens are being exposed. The creation of Nagar Panchayats from
what used to be gram sabhasearlier has created resentment in some quarters, while in general there is
confusion about the implications of the new urban status.This is most probably due to the lack of clarity on the
part of all concerned. However, specific reference has been made on several occasions to the fact that the
th
implementation of the 74 Amendment to the Constitution of India to these newly formed citieswhich are
still below the 30,000 population that is technically the threshold for formation of Nagar Panchayat, the lowest
level of urban governance as per the Amendmenthas been kept in abeyance till the settlement of a writ
petition in the Jabalpur High Court, which raises the issue of the applicability of the Panchayat (Extension to
th
Scheduled Areas) Act, 1996 (PESA) and the 74 Amendment.In September 2009, the Jabalpur High Court held
that the PESA did not apply to scheduled areas, and thereby stayed the elections in 52 district panchayats and
municipalities in such areas, and asked the Indian parliament to devise a law for urbanization of Scheduled
11
areas.
A brief background to the legislation is required to better understand the issues involved. Article 243 ZC of Part
IX A of the Seventy-Fourth Amendmentprovided that nothing in Part IXA shall apply to the Scheduled Areas
(tribal areas). It was mentioned that the Parliament may extend the provisions of Part IXA to Scheduled areas
with exceptions and modifications. A Parliamentary Committee was constituted under the Chairmanship of
ShriDilip Singh Bhuria to examine the issue. Based on the Bhuria Committees Report (1995) and comments
from Central Ministries and concerned State Governments, The Provisions of the Municipalities (Extension to

10
11

st

Achieving The Symmetry Of Life, http://www.mprlp.in/, retrieved on 21 Feb 2012


Aman Sethi, If villagers won't go to town, town will come to villagers, The Hindu, January 17, 2011

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

the Scheduled Areas) Bill, 2001 was introduced in RajyaSabha on 30 July 2001. It was thereafter referred to
the Standing Committee on Urban and Rural Development.
The Statement of Objects and Reasons appended to the Bill mentions the following modifications (the most
significant items have been highlighted in bold):
(i)
Urban Local Bodies under Scheduled Areas may be designated as Nagar Panchayats, Municipal
Councils, Municipal Corporations and Industrial or Mining Townships;
(ii)
Seats may be reserved for Scheduled Tribes in proportion to their population or one-third
whichever is higher;
(iii)
In all programmes of developments like housing colonies, trading centres, etc., and also in
educational institutions, industrial training institutions, reservations shall be made for the tribal
people in proportion to their population;
(iv)
There shall be constituted a Standing Committee for Tribal Affairs and a Standing Committee for Rural
Development in each Municipality;
(v)
Municipality in a Scheduled Area shall be endowed with powers and responsibilities of preparing five
year development plan and annual plan for development of human resources and socio-economic
advancement of the community;
(vi)
No land may be acquired except for specific purpose. Where land is acquired, reasonable and
adequate compensation shall be paid and alternative means of livelihood to an affected person
shall be made available, so, however, that no Scheduled Tribe is rendered landless on such
acquisition;
(vii)
No urban tax shall be leviable on a tribal who continues to live in his traditional style as per the
norms as prescribed in the Bill; and
(viii)
Functional power as mentioned in clause 4 of the above Bill would also be devolved on Urban Local
Bodies in the Scheduled Areas.
The Fiftieth report of the standing committee on Urban and Rural development of the Thirteenth LokSabha
(2003) noted that, after the notification of Scheduled Areas in 1950, there had been too long a gap between
the first review of Scheduled Areasas mandated by Article 339 of the Constitutiondone by the Dhebar
Commission of 1960, and the second review by the Commission constituted in July 2002. During this gap of
four decades, it was observed that there would have been a sea change in the standards of life and the socioecnomic conditions of the Scheduled Areas. The Committee recommended a review of the Scheduled Areas.
Thereafter, there has been a Third report of the Standing Committee on Urban and Rural Development of the
Fourteenth LokSabha (2004-2005) and the Tenth report, which has the Action Taken report by the
12
Government of India. The issue is still pending resolution.
It is clear that the issue of acceptability of the urban system in the scheduled areas will remain contentious for
some time to come. However, a display of commitment from the government towards the possible benefits,
and an understanding by the tribes can create an atmosphere of communication and debate, which alone can
bring positive outcomes. According to a study of the impact of the PESA conducted by Society for Resource
Integration and Development Action (SRIDA), Jabalpur, in two tribal districts, there is a critical need for
13
awareness generation among the tribal community and the larger public. The study concludes that, among
other things, the Act needs to be implemented in all respects, in spirit and word. The current system of
governance, still largely colonial in nature, has been unable to accept this radical change. Significantly, it
states: there is a need that Gram Sabha institutions should be developed as institutions of self-governance
12

The description of the legislative history of the PESA issue has been taken from: Joy Elamon, Urban Local Bodies in Fifth
th
Schedule Areas Experiences, http://www.nird.org.in/brgf/Community%20Exchange4.html, Retrieved on 18 Feb 2012
13
Planning Commission (Socio-Economic Research Division): Study on the impacts of the Provisions of the Panchayats
(Extension to the Scheduled Areas) Act, 1996 towards Tribal Development in Mandla and Dindori districts of Madhya
Pradesh

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and not treated merely as institutions of local governance [emphasis added].


The brief discussion of the issue of institutional urbanization in tribal districts is only an introduction to the
larger political background to the creation of city development plans in the cities of Dhar and Alirajpur
districts. The municipal framework will need to deal with the complexity of the situation, given that the tribes
that have become newly urbanonly as a statistical fact would need time to adopt urban citizenship as an
ethos.
The MP Human Development Report has been acknowledging, albeit tentatively, a new aspect of urbanization
that is not driven by either the pull or the push factors traditionally used to explain urbanization. Thus, the
2002 report mentions that along with the usual process, which refers to the growth in populations residing in
urban areas both due to natural growth and net migration into urban areas, there is another urbanization,
which results from
a transformation of the erstwhile rural areas into urban areas through changes in population
density and the employment profile from a primarily agrarian and agro-based employment to nonagriculture based employment. In terms of all the basic human development parameters, urban areas
stand out as significantly different from rural belts, both in the provisioning of services essential for
human development, and in the basic capabilities that citizens can, and do, acquire while living and
14
growing in an urban area as compared to that in a rural area.
What is described above is what can be described as in-situ urbanization whereby settlements that were
earlier rural, grow beyond a certain demographic limit and are re-classified as urban settlements. This is a
relatively new form of urbanization, unlike either the form of historical urban centres becoming larger due to
migration, or the form of creation of urban centres through industrial development. The peculiarity of this
form of urbanization is noted as such in the MP Human Development Report of 2007.
The MPHDR 2007 notes: the percentage of urban population in 2001 at the district level shows positive and
15
significant correlation with rural population growth, which is a positive phenomenon. The phenomenon is
positive because it displays the natural and corresponding growth of both urban and rural areas, such as in
the districts with over 30% populations living in urban areas (in 2001) Gwalior, Indore, Bhopal, Jabalpur,
Ujjain, Ratlam and Hoshangabad which report the growth of rural populations at a rate equal to the national
average or higher. The urbanization is positive also because it might demonstrate that the rural areas in
urbanized districts have been able to benefit from the trickle-down effects and thereby stall out-migration.
The report goes on further to note a peculiar phenomenon during the 1990s which bears no correlation with
the base level of urbanization.Four districtsDhar, Sidhi, Raisen, and Balaghatexperience urban growth of
over 50% during the nineties, but without significant urban economies ordevelopment dynamism. This is
found to be true of all the districts that have shown between 30 and 50% urban growth. The report states that
such data reveals that
the pace and pattern of urbanization in recent years cannot be explained in terms of the pattern of
economic or industrial development The riddle of urban growth during the nineties becomes
complex when one notices that it has no relation with the indicators of infrastructure development
(except road mileage) or incidence of employment in industry or other relatively more productive
tertiary activities, at the district level This could also be due to population mobility being caused
by push factors, which is responsible for bringing underprivileged people with little or no education
into urban settlements. [emphasis added]

14

Madhya Pradesh Human Development Report, 2002, p.69

15

Madhya Pradesh Human Development Report, 2007, p.77-8

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The peculiarity of the urbanization may also be explained by a few clues in addition to the in-situ urbanization
that we have tried to explain as a result of changes in classification. For this, we again refer to the MPHDR of
2002, where we find a detailed discussion of livelihoods in the state after a decade of economic liberalization.
In the section entitled Livelihood challenge, the MPHDR 2002points out that, while the GDP of the state has
increased after liberalization, there was a slowdown in employment growthtouching as low as 0.9% per
annum in the late-1990smainly because of a slowdown in public sector employment. Higher growth rates in
the private sector could not compensate for the loss of workforce in the public sector. The report highlights
16
the crucial differences between the organized and unorganized sectors of employment. Around the mid1990s, 22 lakh workers in the state, around 6% of the total workforce, were in the organized sector, whereas
the overwhelming majority (94%) were in the unorganized sector, which includes agricultural labour,
construction labour, workers in traditional industries like leather-tanning, forestry, fishing, bidi-rolling,
household workers and village artisans. Agriculture and allied activities,which account for 35% of the states
GDP,have to support 75% of the rural workers. Although the remuneration received from most livelihoods in
MP is low,the incomes are require to sustain more members of the households. The National Sample Survey
(NSS) estimates indicated that an approximate 17% of rural children in MP in the age-group 10-14 years are
working to supplement the household incomes.
The MPHDR 2002 concludes that the development challenge in MP is not just creating new jobs, but
generating new livelihoods in the rural areas and making existing livelihoods stronger and more
sustainable.The most critical implication of such a focus would be the change in approach to forest-based
livelihoods. Nearly 40% of the states villages are either forest villages or are situated close to forests;
however, it is difficult to estimate the exact number of people dependent on forests. What needs highlighting
is the fact that in the case of persons collecting Non Timber Forest Produce (NTFP), the period of direct
person-days of employment may be as little as 10-15 days to a month in a year. While there has been some
change in this scenario with the granting of nistari rights and the promotion of Joint Forest Management
(JFM), the conflict between villagers and the authorities still exists and has been witnessed in a large number
of cases throughout the state and the country. The report concludes that a more people-friendly forest
management regime needs to be evolved between the local people, forest management and government
regulations.
It can be suggested that, with the application of municipal governance in new urban areas, which were rural till
the recent past, a new approach would need to be formulated to the balancing of peoples rights and
opportunities with the exigencies of urban development. There is a crisis of interpretation in this context, as
tribals are assumed to be rural, and all policies for socio-economic development for them are centered on
their agricultural and forest-based economy. The urban tribal is a category that has yet to be fully understood
and provided for in policy.
POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPMENT IN TRIBAL AREAS
The policy environment for tribes is focused on their relationship with the agriculture and forest produce.
There are a large number of policy provisions for tribes that focus on their dependence on, and their access
and privileges regarding the non-timber forest produce and other activities that are unique to the tribes. The
MP Public Forestry Act 2001gives provision for preparation of management plans for the
vrikshachchaditkshetras and MP Public Forestry Rules 2002under the 2001 Act enable the local bodies or
land-owners to manage such areas. The other acts that apply to this area are the Biological Diversity Act
2002, the MP Agro Processing Policy 2006 and the MP Herbal Products Policy.

16

Madhya Pradesh Human Development Report, 2007, p.85-6

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th

While there are a host of policies to cater to the rural development of tribals, it is the 74 Amendment that
provides the key policy and legislative framework for the development of scheduled tribes within the urban
areas of Dhar and Alirajpur. The strengthening of the municipal governance model in communities that have to
adopt an urban outlook while being essentially rooted in the agri- and forest-based economy needs to be the
thrust of the policy framework. There is an inherent conflict between the urban and rural policies, and this
needs to be dealt with appropriately. An illustration of this conflict can clarify this aspect further. A significant
example is the MP State Plan, which identifies a number of key issues that form the basis of the proposed
development schemes and programs. One of these key issues is identified as Forestry and Wild Life, under
which the Plan document highlights that fact that MP is rightly famed for its rich forest wealth, its wildlife and
biodiversity. 30.8% of the land area in the stateis under forests, and this is the highest amongst all the States.
It is significant that the Plan identifies this as a problem rather than an asset: there is little recognition of the
huge opportunity cost of maintaining this wealth for the environmental health of the country and, indeed, the
global community.Going further, the document states the following:
States like Madhya Pradesh are required to retain a large area under forests and also bear the cost of
maintenance of this forest cover. There is however no return on such investment as "conservation"
and not the "exploitation" is the objective as well as legal imperative. The people of the country share
the benefits but the state and its people often suffer as a result of its rich forest wealth. In fact major
developmental projects pertaining to roads, irrigation, and electricity are hampered, delayed and
become very expensive for the state as a result of involvement of forest land in these projects. An
equitable arrangement would be to calculate the cost of forest assets by capitalising the stock,
attributing it a value and making incremental return available to the state as a rate of return. The
judgement of the Supreme Court regarding compensation to States having above national average
forest cover is a significant step towards maintaining the ecological balance and the costs thereof. On
the basis of suggestion of Supreme Court of estimating Net Present Value (NPV), the excess forest of
33036 square kilometers above the national average @ Rs. 5.80 lac per hectare would be equal to Rs.
1,65,172 crore of capital stock. Even at 5% rate of interest, this capital stock would yield an annual
return of Rs. 8,285 crores. The Hon'ble President of India also has recently mooted the idea of "forest
credit" which needs to be followed through. The Government of India has also regularly used this
argument at all international forum in national interest.
Forest fringe people living in and around protected areas suffer huge costs in terms of crop loss,
denial of access to the forest resources and injuries and loss of human life and livestock. To mitigate
man-animal conflicts, there should be a national policy providing for adequate financial support to the
State Governments for payment of compensation.
The Plan document further mentions the problem with wildlife protection legislations, and ends on an
ominous note:
There is also a need to rationalise the legal provisions of the Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972 in order to
provide respite to the local people who are mostly tribals. The Act prohibits people, living within the
limits of PA, to sell or purchase their private land; recent judicial pronouncement ban even small
development works on private land as well as revenue land contained within the limits of the
sanctuary. This has generated a lot of public resentment against wildlife and protected areas, which
doesnt augur well for the conservation of wildlife. Suitable amendments in the Act need to be made
urgently else it will become increasingly difficult to contain Naxalism in these areas.
The City Development Plan is a means to balance the conflict between the developmental thrust of urban
development, and the seemingly resistive thrust of natural resource management. It is possible to do this only
with a concerted effort to synergize both types of development, by viewing the city as essentially a special
condition that can be harmonious with rural development. Thus, the agricultural activities and forest-based
activities can be incorporated into the city development, defining an approach of reconciliation rather than
conflict.

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City Development Plan for Mandav

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INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPMENT IN TRIBAL AREAS


The Ministry of Tribal Affairs, Govt. of India has undertaken certain initiatives for the socio-economic
development of the tribal population through the National Scheduled Tribes Finance and Development
Corporation (NSTDFC). These are implemented at state level through therespective State Channelizing
Agencies (SCA). The SCA for MP is MP AdivasiVittaAivamVikas Nigam (MP Tribal Finance and Development
Corporation (MPTFDC).
The functions of NSTDFC are:
To finance viable income generating Scheme(s)/ Project(s) costing upto Rs.10.00 Lakhs through the SCAs
for the economic development of eligible Scheduled Tribes.
To provide grants through the SCAs for undertaking training programmes for the skill and entrepreneurial
development of eligible Scheduled Tribes.
To upgrade skills of officials of the SCAs through periodic training.
The various schemes under the NSTFDC are term loan, bridge loan, scheme for women, self help groups, micro
credit, marketing support and training. The MPTFDC set a target in 1999-2000 to provide employment to 850
tribal beneficiaries and training to 200 tribal beneficiaries under the self-employment schemes funded by the
NSTDFC,and to provide employment to 10000 beneficiaries under schemes sanctioned by NABARD. However,
there seems to be no activity since 2000.
Directorate of Tribal Area Development and Planning is involved with the preparation of the Tribal Sub-Plan,
for which funding is generated from the State Plan resources, the SCA to TSP, grant funds under Article 275 (1)
and institutional finance.
Recognizing the need for initiating livelihood generating activities in a sustained and focused manner, the
Ministry of Tribal Affairs also established an organization to take up marketing development activities for Non
Timber Forest Produce (NTFP), which is a key source of livelihoods for tribals. The Tribal Cooperative
Marketing Development Federation of India Limited (TRIFED) was set up in 1987to serve the interest of the
tribal community and work for their socio-economic development by undertaking marketing of tribal
products.TRIFED has set up exclusive outlets all over India under the brand TRIBES INDIAfor the sale of tribal
art and crafts objects artifacts.
The MP Minor Forest Produce (Trading & Development) Co-operative Federation Ltd. is a state level body
that was formed in 1984 to give benefits to forest dwellers in collection and trade of forest produce. This
Federation co-ordinates collection and processing of Tendu leaves, Sal Seed, &Kullu Gum through Primary
Forest Produce Co-operative Societies in the districts of the State which are forest produce areas and
organisesthe sale of such produce. In addition, other non-nationalised Non Wood Forest products (NWFP) are
also being collected and traded by the Primary Forest Produce Co-operative Societies.
The Tribal Research and Development Institute, Bhopal (GoMP), under the administrative control of the Tribal
Welfare Department of the State Govt, receives financial assistance from the Ministry of Tribal Affairs,
Government of India. The Institute is the premier organization in the state engaged in tribal research. It
implements the schemes for Documentation of Tribal Culture, Survey, evaluation and impact assessment,
Organizing fairs and festivals that showcase tribal culture, and Training of officials of development
departments posted in Tribal areas. It also maintains a museum of tribal artifacts and offers Research
Fellowships.
Forest Department, District Van Mandal, Dhar undertook large scale plantation of Bamboo in 2010-11 and
plans to undertake large scale Mahua plantation in year 2011-12. While the plantation of Bamboo raises the
issue of it being a water intensive species that draws water from the ground water table which poses a
problem in the water scarce areas, the plantations open increased avenues for bamboo and Mahua based

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City Development Plan for Mandav

industries in the short and long term respectively as bamboo is a fast growing plant while Mahua takes time to
grow into a tree.
DEVELOPMENT SCHEMES
While there is clear potential for the tribal communities to fit within the ambits of eco-tourism, which has
been accepted at Central and State levels as a fast-emerging sector of the tourism economy, it is important to
focus on the need to build capacity within the communities to be able to make tourism as a non-intrusive
activity that does not come at the cost of losing the integrity and vitality of such communities, in which the
crafts and performing arts are embedded within a fragile socio-cultural context.
The Ministry of Tourism, GoI, has recently brought out the Revised Guidelines of Tourism Development (rev.
09/12/2011) containing a Scheme of Capacity Building for Service Providers for Rural Tourism. The scheme
provides for a range of capacity building activities, with the strict provision that the activities should be
initiated with local community Participation initiated through stakeholder meetings. The activities covered
are as follows:
1. Baseline survey of the site local community.
2. Enhancing local community awareness of the tourism process.
3. Gender sensitization
4. Capacity building/design inputs related to art & craft skills, cultural & natural heritage
5. Gurukul process
6. Capacity building for various aspects of visitor handling
7. Convergence with other yojanas/schemes in the site
8. Environment care and access to cleaner technology with local material, local skills and local
traditional styles
9. Marketing convergence including the travel trade for domestic and international visitors.
The scheme also attaches an indicative list of various software items that can be undertaken under the broad
ambits of the above. The software falls within three main groups:
TRAINING OF TRIBAL STAKEHOLDERS

Workshops for preparatory activities at site: sensitization, awareness-building, social mobilization


and interpretation.
Training for visitor handling skills/local hospitality-guides, reception, lodging, cuisine
Building capacity of village groups for entertainment-culture, festivals, history, literature, and
special strengths including nature and heritage.
Imparting of skills for targeted disadvantaged groups.

CREATION OF TOURISM FACILITIES

Facilitation of creation of common facilities (gram jharokas) on village/community common


property resources and facilitation of construction of vishramsthals using traditional skills,
knowledge, local material and in accordance with regional/zonal/local norms.
Facilitating setting up of gram kalakendras-craft museums, centers for local music, song, dance &
drama, street theatre etc and in accordance with regional/zonal/local norms.

SECTORAL CAPACITY-BUILDING

Environment safeguards and assessment of destination life-cycle.


Establishing operational norms for visitor satisfaction
Tourism product development and integration of target groups with tourism supply chain
Setting up marketing model support-brochures, postcards, websites, developing material in local
language, imaginative use of media etc (domestic and international).

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Packaging of culture and craft-based tourism products.


The schemes are to be implemented by the State Tourism Development Corporation and the District Project
Implementation Committee consisting of at least five members, including the District Collector/ Deputy
Commissioner, selected NGO/Implementing Partner, State Tourism Department/Tourism Development
Corporation representative, DRDA and local community stakeholders. The NGO/Implementing Partner would
be consensually identified by the District Collector with the local community. The scheme allocates a
maximum amount of Rs. 20 lakhs as Central Financial Assistance.
A number of other schemes are contained in the State Five-Year Plan. The Five Year Plans prepared by the
GoMP are a document of the overall policies of the state in all the sectors of the economy. 2012 is the horizon
year for the 11th Five Year Plan of MP, and the 12th Plan is yet to be prepared. It can be expected that the
12th Plan will carry forward many of the key aspects of the current plan, such as the promotion of tourism,
handicrafts development through SHGs (self help groups) and SMEs (small and medium enterprises), and the
strengthening of panchayats.
RURAL DEVELOPMENT
th

The 11 Plan emphasizes fiscal provisioning for the development of rural areas, with a number of existing
schemesmainly schemes initiated by the GoIsuch as the National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme
(NREGS), the Indira Gandhi Garibi Hatao Yojana (DPIP), the Pradhan Mantri Gram Sadak Yojana (PMGSY), and
the Backward Regional Grant Fund (BRGF). In addition, it proposes New Schemes for rural connectivity, the
Mukhya Mantri Awas Yojna, the state governments own SGSY for roads, and a Working Plan for Water
Storage.
INDUSTRY AND EMPLOYMENT
In the sector of Industry and Employment, the 11th Plan had a number of provisions that can have a direct and
profound impact on the livelihoods of tribal communities.
Under Khadi and village industries, the Plan provided for subsidy to spinners, subsidy on khadi production,
assistance to family-oriented units, marketing assistance and assistance for raw material. In the area of
Handicrafts, the Plan provided for training to artisans, tools subsidy to craftsmen, subsidy for work sheds, the
organization of workshops for technical and design guidance, support for sample production to train artisans
in new designs, and the provision for procurement of job-work performed by the artisans as per market
demand. The Plan also provided for study tours of successful craft clusters and metro markets, and instituted a
state award for artistic creations. There is insufficient data about how many individuals/communities availed
of these schemes; however, they can provide guidance to future provisioning.
In the area of Sericulture, the Plan supports the development of sericulture as an industry that supports other
subsidiary cottage and village industries, providing supplementary employment in the rural areas during the
lean agriculture period. The two activities under sericulture included forest base Tussar cocoon production
from Saja and Arjuna trees and agro-based Mulberry.
The ways in which subsidies may work in the sector of industry is illustrated by the Industrial Promotion Policy
2004 and Action Plan (including the Provisions as Amended in 2007) framed by the Department of Commerce,
Industry and Employment, GoMP. There were special provisions for entrepreneurs who belong to a scheduled
caste or scheduled tribe, andfor women:
Interest subsidy to SC/ST and Women Entrepreneurs would be provided at the rate of 5% for a
period of 5 years without any maximum limit and irrespective of the category of the district.
Small Scale Industries set up by SC/ST and Women Entrepreneurs in advanced districts would be
given investment subsidy at the rate of 15% of Fixed Capital Investment to a maximum of Rs. 5
lacs.

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Maximum limit of Investment subsidy on fixed capital investment for Small Scale industries set up
by SC/ST and Women Entrepreneurs would be Rs.6 lacs, Rs. 12 lacs and Rs. 17.50 lacs in backward
'A', 'B', and 'C' category of districts respectively.

ART & CULTURE


th

17

In the area of art & culture, the 11 Plan made provision for Grants-In-Aid to Tribal Welfare Institutions. If
the citizens of the CDP cities in Dhar and Alirajpur can create institutions for the purpose, then such grants can
assist them in bringing out the special potential for the promotion of tribal art and culture.
HEALTH AND FAMILY WELFARE
th

The broad targets for the 11 Plan in the sector of health were to reduce growth of population while also
reducing infant mortality and offering maternity care. The focus was on implementing the schemes covered
under National Rural Health Mission, such as the Janani Suraksha Yojana (for maternity health), the Prasav
Hetu Parivahan Evam Uphar Yojana (mobility for pregnant mothers), the Vijay Raje Janani Beema Kalyan
18
Yojana (maternity insurance), and the Deen dayal Chalit Aspathal Yojna (mobile hospitals). The Deendayal
th
scheme for mobile hospitals has been discontinued, and the fate of other schemes in the 12 Plan is not
known. However, this is a vital component of the welfare activities that need to be undertaken in the tribal
districts like Dhar and Alirajpur.
WELFARE OF SCHEDULED TRIBES
The vision for the welfare of scheduled tribes has as its goal to bridge gap between tribes and non-tribes
having considering Human Development Indices. The specific objectives in pursuance of this goal all
th
emphasize education as a means for development. Specifically, the 11 Plan provided for promotion of literacy
in tribal communities in general and ST girls in particular with special attention to low female literacy pockets,
striving for 100% enrolment of all children in the elementary level between the age group 5 to 14 years,
converting 150 elementary Schools into Ashram Schools, and, since drop-out rates is a major intriguing
problem, arresting drop-out tendencies through various support schemes like Mid Day Meal, Free Uniform,
19
Sweater, Shoes, Socks, Scholarship, Distribution of bicycles and Free Text Books etc.
URBAN DEVELOPMENT
th

In the area of urban development, the 11 Plan had concentrated on the JNNURM and HSDP programs of
th
Government of India, which were started in the last year of the 10 Plan. The schemes did not have provision
specifically for towns in underdeveloped and developing areas of the state. As has been discussed in this
paper, specific schemes are needed to address the problems of emerging urban areas in tribal districts.
EDUCATION
The Tribal Development Department of the GoMP has defined the development agenda for tribes in the state
through the following action points:
1. to make tribals come up to the same education and economic status as rest of society
2. to make the most backward of the tribals communities upto the level of more developed tribes
3. to emphasize educational schemes for tribals

17

Government of Madhya Pradesh, Planning, Economics and Statistics Department, Draft Eleventh Five Year Plan (20072012), p.186
18
Government of Madhya Pradesh, Planning, Economics and Statistics Department, Draft Eleventh Five Year Plan (20072012), p.192
19

Government of Madhya Pradesh, Planning, Economics and Statistics Department, Draft Eleventh Five Year Plan (20072012), p.224

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4.

to give importance to the culture of tribes in the school curriculum, and to encourage the women
workers through cooperatives through Antyoday self-employment schemes and other schemes
under the schemes financed by state departments, to create employment opportunities
5. to increase number of residential schools for the tribals
6. to create grain banks in tribals areas and to improve food security
7. to improve human development indicators for tribals
8. to bring about qualitative improvement in the education of tribals
As can be seen from the above, most of the points are concerning education, which is seen as a necessary
condition for the advancement of the tribal communities, intrinsically connected with their human
development and livelihoods based on self-help groups (SHGs) and cooperatives.
The Eklavya Model Residential Schools (EMRS) for ST students take their place among the Jawahar Navodaya
Vidyalayas, the Kasturba Gandhi Balika Vidyalayas and the Kendriya Vidyalayas. These are set up in States/UTs
with grants under Article 275(1) of the Constitution of India. The education is provided entirely free of cost.
The objective of EMRS is to provide quality middle and high level education to Scheduled Tribe (ST) students in
remote areas, not only to enable them to avail of reservation in high and professional educational courses and
as jobs in government and public and private sectors but also to have access to the best opportunities in
education at par with the non ST population. The means of achieving this are described as comprehensive
physical, mental and socially relevant development of all students enrolled in each and every EMRS Students
will be empowered to be change agent, beginning in their school, in their homes, in their village and finally in a
larger context.Admission to these schools will be through selection/competition with suitable provision for
preference to children belonging to Primitive Tribal Groups, first generation students, etc.The number of seats
for boys and girls are equal in number.
In Dhar district, there is only a single EMRS school, located in Kukshi, called the Kanya Shiksha Parisar. The
present (2012) enrolments are as follows: 1 boy in Class 6, 60 girls in Class 6, 57 girls in Class 7 and 59 girls in
Class 8.
Under the GoMPs Kanya Saksharta Protsahan Yojna (KSPY), the state government provides financial
assistance to encourage girls into schools to reduce the girls fallout rate from schools. After clearing the board
th
th
th
exams of 5 , 9 and 10 standards, the girls are given 500, 1000 and 3000 rupees, in two installments, in April
and December. In order to ensure that the scheme benefits the poor, the daughters of those
parents/guardians who are tax-payersare not eligible. Present enrolments in Dhar district are 56 girls in Class
6and 59 girls in Class 9. There have been no enrollments in Alirajpur district.
RECOMMENDED STRATEGY
The Central and state governments have initiated a number of schemes and policies under various
departments specially formulated for tribal development. It is important to see how these schemes and
initiatives can be accessed by the tribal population. The low literacy levels in tribal population result in low
awareness levels towards accessing these benefits. It is important that the capacity of local bodies be
increased for them to assist the tribal population in realising the potential opportunities that they can avail for
socio-economic development.
At the same time, it must be highlighted that, given the sustained backward linkages that urban tribal
communities will share with their rural and forest-based counterparts, there is tremendous potential for
planned and structured utilization of such supply chains for enhanced economic activities that benefit the
tribes.
A variety of schemes are available for the development of tribal areas. However, the key initiatives can be
grouped under the following:

lix

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

Relationship between the urban and immediate rural context


Incorporating NTFP into the urban economy.
Watershed development
Devising mechanisms for efficient irrigation to stop decline in agricultural production and linking the
urban and rural consumption of water. This can be done through provision of groundwater recharge
structures; check dams; weirs; Bori Bandhs; SWC measures; BAIF style Wadis; revival of medium
20
and minor irrigation canals through PIM; and Promoting water saving micro irrigation technologies.
Provision of space for urban agriculture and forestry
Urban agriculture
Urban forestry: encouraging plantation of indigenous species within ULB areas, to create a renewable
and sustainable resource for the city.
Ensuring food security within the ULB planning area by assessing the consumption pattern and
productive capacity of the ULB and its rural catchment.
Provision of zoning and space for SME industrial activity
Appropriate linkages between the city and the forest areas in its catchment
Appropriate land use regulations to permit and promote and house hold industries
Support for secondary and tertiary occupations related to NTFP, like processing and warehousing and
distribution
a. Setting up honey Processing units, manufacturing of cosmetics and food supplements,
preparation of squashes and herbal colas.
b. Distillation of aromatic plants, manufacturing of Ayurvedic, Unaani and Homeopathic medicines.
c. Exploring development of products from Mahua.
d. Manufacturing of bamboo products.
e. Oil expeller units.
Trading of indigenous raw materials in a regulated manner. Private players such as Messrs Ferrero
Trading of Luxemburg, Italy purchase the states small forest produces like Sal seeds, Mahua flowers,
mango stones in large quantities.An analysis of the socio-economic impact of setting up of such units
needs to be conducted and the possibility of addition of units for processing of agro and forest based
21
products through participation of private players may be explored.
Tourism services based in ULB areas and providing non-intrusive access to the rural and forest areas.
Encouragement to indigenous crafts, with the ULB providing market link ups and space for production
and trading in crafted goods.
Capacity building in the ULB
The reduction of middlemen and strengthening of urban local body and state regulation should be
explored as opportunities.
Microfinance.
Enable the regulation of the Mahua based trade and industry.
Preparation of a Tribal Development Plan for the towns that have high tribal population, establishing
linkages at the district and regional levels.
Information, Education and Communication (IEC) activities
Literacy and education among ST communities
Improving literacy levels by provision of better educational infrastructure in a decentralised fashion so
20

Sanjiv J Phansalkar and Shilp Verma, Improved Water Control as Strategy for Enhancing Tribal Livelihoods, Economic
and Political Weekly, July 31, 2004, pp 3469-76.
21
Central Chronicle 2011

lx

City Development Plan for Mandav

2013

that easy access is enabled across the NP boundary.


Communication through such means as community radio
Urban Services for the Poor
Healthcare, especially maternity care and eye care
Socio-economic development of workers who need to shift from rural to urban economy
SPECIAL PROVISIONS FOR INDIVIDUAL TOWNS: MANDAV
Mandav presents a peculiar case in terms of tribal development. Due to inclusion of peripheral villages and
forest dwellers within the NP boundary, the town had 81.6% tribal population. This trend has not changed as
yet and a very high tribal representation was evident in the Stakeholder consultations for the CDP. The
villagers and forest dwellers within the NP area; and to some extent even the residents of the urban core are
still leading a predominantly tribal lifestyle. The tribals in villages and forest areas are mostly dependent on
agriculture and harvest two crops in areas with irrigation facilities and one crop in areas without irrigation
facilities. The tourism base of the town does not benefit the tribals in any way. Most of the tribals have to
resort to working as manual labour and commute to neighbouring towns. Womenfolk work as agricultural
labour to make a living after the cropping season. Tribals have high livestock ownership but no means of
revenue generation from these. Tribals in Mandav dont have access even to basic services like water supply
and education and have to commute for several hours on foot to access facilities available in core town.
In order to promote tribal development in Mandav, the following aspects need focus:
Enhancing agricultural produce and trading opportunities through provision of irrigation facities like
ponds across the NP area. Nearly all villages in Mandav have ponds for irrigation which are getting
silted. These ponds need to be restored for agricultural uses. Mahua, custard apple and Khurasani imli
are some products that are exported out of Mandav and the tribal population is engaged in their
collection. Tribals grow crops such as wheat, chana, maize and soya along with fruits, vegetables and
herbs. Hence, setting up of a local Mandi for non grain related produce is proposed.
Agro based industries in the region need to be set up to increase profit margin for the farmers. Since
land for the same cannot be made available within the town, such industries can be set up in Nalcha.
Livestock related economic activities like dairy and poultry farms can be established under funding
from BRGF and other schemes.
Promoting tribal culture and related festivals is imperative to promoting tribal development in
Mandav. The traditional festivals of Bhil tribals, their traditional costumes, jewellery and marriage
ceremonies which are celebrated together by villagers from various villages need to be conserved
through funding from Grants-In-Aid to Tribal Welfare Institutions.
Promoting opportunities to increase income generation opportunities from tourism by increasing
interaction of tribals and tourists. It is proposed that activities like farm tourism, village tourism and
decentralized hotel facilities with ownership of tribals can be initiated.
Promoting herb trading through the Mandi
Provision of physical and social infrastructure like laying of water supply lines, roads, provision of
schools and health centres is proposed to be taken up on a decentralized basis.
Since tribals in NP area are extremely poor, it is proposed that the NP should increase its revenue
earning from tourism and should impose lower taxes on tribals and undertake more development
work in tribal villager areas.
The above mentioned proposals will aid tribal development and should be aimed at improving the quality of
life of tribals without them having to compromise on their traditional habits or lifestyle.

lxi

2013

City Development Plan for Mandav

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

Forest Governance Learning Group, Mahua: NTFP Enterprise and Forest Governance, Centre for Peoples
Forestry, viewed December 2011, <http://pubs.iied.org/pdfs/G02279.pdf>.
National Scheduled Tribes Finance and Development Corporation 2009, Ministry of Tribal Affairs, Govt. of
India, viewed December 2011, <www.nstfdc.nic.in>.
Ramakrishnan, P S 2011, Eco-Cultural Issues and Sustainability, Context: Built, Living and Natural, Vol.
VIII, No. 1, pp. 35-40.
TRIFED 2010, Ministry of Tribal Affairs, Govt. of India, viewed, December 2011, <http://tribesindia.com/>.
MP Trade and Investment Facilitation Corporation Ltd 2010, Govt. of Madhya Pradesh, Sector Profile:
Forest and Herbal, viewed December 2011,<http://www.mptrifac.org/PotSector/Forest&Herbal.pdf>.
2011, Welfare of Tribals through Small Forest Produce, Central Chronicle, September 14, Bhopal, viewed
December 2011, <http://www.centralchronicle.com/welfare-of-tribals-through-small-forestproduce.html>.

lxii

Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary

N
Km
0

.25

.5

CONSERVATION ZONE-100 mts


CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Main Road
Other Road
ASI Monuments
ASI monument Buffer -100 mts
ASI monument Buffer -300 mts
Fort Wall Buffer -100 mts
Fort Wall Buffer -300 mts
Water Body
Building Footprints
Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP
Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

D:\10 Towns\Kukshi maps\idfc-media-logo.jpg

Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary

N
Km
0

.25

.5

CONSERVATION ZONE-300 mts


CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Main Road
Other Road
ASI Monuments
Fort Wall Buffer -100 mts
Fort Wall Buffer -300 mts
Water Body
Building Footprints
300 mts Natural and Cultural
Heritage Conservation Zone
Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP
Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

D:\10 Towns\Kukshi maps\idfc-media-logo.jpg

Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary

N
Km
0

.25

.5

CONSERVATION ZONE-100 mts


CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Main Road
Other Road
ASI Monuments
Fort Wall Buffer -100 mts
Fort Wall Buffer -300 mts
Water Body
Building Footprints
100 mts Natural and Cultural
Heritage Conservation Zone
Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP
Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

D:\10 Towns\Kukshi maps\idfc-media-logo.jpg

1.Tomb North of Aalamgir


Gate
2.Tripolia Gate
3.Aalamgir Gate
4.Bhangi Gate
5.Delhi Gate
6.Gadi Darwaza
7.Gada Shah Shop
8.Chisti Khan Palace
9.Ujala Baodi
10.Andheri Baodi
11.Hathi Pol Gate
12.Dilawar Khan Tomb
13.Hindola Mahal
14.Hammam
15.Gada Shah Palace

Aalamgir Gate
1.
3. 4. 5.
6.
Bhangi Gate
11.
12. 9.10.
14. 13.
15. 7.
17. 16.
56.
18. 19.
20.
21.
2.
Lohani
28.29.
Gate
23. 24.
25. 26. 27.
22.

8.

30.

31.
32.
33.
34.

55.35.
36.
37. 38.

57.
54.

Songarh
Gate

Jhangirpur
Gate
43.
44.45.
46. 47.

40.
39.

41.

48.
42. Tarapur

Gate
49. 51.
50. 52.

Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary
Main Road
Other Road
Water Body

53.

N
Km
0

.25

.5

ASI MOUNMENTS
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Bhagwania Gate

Heritage Monuments

16.Royal Palace
17.Water Palace
18.Jahaj Mahal
19.Kapoor Talao
20.Taweli Mahal
21.Champa Baodi
22.Lohani Gate
23.Lohani Caves
24.Husang's Tomb
25.Dharmashala
26.Jama Masjid
27.Ashrafi Mahal
28.Tower of Victory
29.Mahmud Khilji Tomb
30.Tomb north west of
Darya Khan
31.Chhappan Mahal
32.Tomb Near Chor Kot
33.Ek Khamba
34.Chor Kot
35.Somvati Kund
36.Darya Khan Tomb
37.Lal Sarai
38.Hathi Mahal
39.Neelkantha
40.Songadh Gate
41.Mosque Near Tarapur Gate
42.Tarapur Gate
43.Caravan Sarai
44.Dai Ki Chothi Behen Ka
Mahal
45.Lal Bagh
46.Malik Muglith Mosque
47.Dai Ka Mahal
48.Jali Mahal
49.Rewa Kund
50.Ruins on Rewa Kund
51.Baz Bahudar Palace
52.Rupmati Palace
53.Bhagwania Gate
54.Jahangirpur Gate
55.Mosque Near Darya Khan
56.Nahar Jahroka
57.Lal Bungalow

Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP


Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

D:\10 Towns\Mandav MAps\FOR PRINT\idfc-media-logo.jpg

1.

Kapur
Talab

Marg

Jahaz Mahal Marg

mati
Rani Rup

Munj
Talab

2
Pipilya
Talab

430.

Ek Khamba
Talab

P
Doodhai
Talab

Tarapur
Talab

Km
.25

Ranglav
Talab

Lal bangla
Singori Talab
Talab

13

15
14

12

N
0

Somvati
kund

Marg

Doodh Talai
Talab

Sagar
Talab

Samad
Talab

mati
Rani Rup

10

Lamba
Talab

.5

BASE MAP
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

11
Rewa
Kund

Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary
WardNumber
Main Road
Other Road
Water Body
Building Footprints
Heritage Monuments

Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP


Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

D:\10 Towns\Mandav MAps\FOR PRINT\idfc-media-logo.jpg

13.

2
4
6

5
7

13

10

14

12
9
N
Km
0

.25

.5

EXISTING LANDUSE
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

11

Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary
WardNumber
Residential
Public
Mixed Use
Heritage Monuments
Agriculture Land
Park/Green spaces
Uncultivated Land/Forest
Water Body
Transport
Tourist infrastructure

Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP


Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

D:\10 Towns\Kukshi maps\idfc-media-logo.jpg

Munj
Talab
Kapur
Talab

2
Pipilya
Talab

4
Ek Khamba
Talab

Doodhai
Talab

Lamba
Talab
Samad
Talab

Somvati
kund
Ranglav
Talab

Singori
Talab

Lal bangla
Talab

13

10

Doodh Talai
Talab

15

14

Sagar
Talab

12

Tarapur
Talab

11
6

Rewa
Kund

Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary
WardNumber
Residential
Water Body
Catchment Area

Km
0

.25

.5

CATCHMENT AREA OF WATERBODIES


CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP


Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

D:\10 Towns\Mandav MAps\FOR PRINT\idfc-media-logo.jpg

Munj
Talab
Kapur
Talab

2
Pipilya
Talab

4
Ek Khamba
Talab

Doodhai
Talab

Lamba
Talab

Samad
Talab
Somvati
kund
Ranglav
Talab

Singori
Talab

Lal bangla
Talab

13

10

Doodh Talai
Talab

15
14

Sagar
Talab

12

Tarapur
Talab

11
6

Rewa
Kund

Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary
WardNumber
Residential
Water Body

Km
0

.25

.5

WATERBODIES
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP


Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

D:\10 Towns\Mandav MAps\FOR PRINT\idfc-media-logo.jpg

Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary
Main Road
Other Road
Water Body
Building Footprints
Proposed Cafe and Garden
Proposed Poultry and Dairy
Farm

Zone 1-Royal
Enclave

Proposed Warehouse and


Drying Shed
Proposed Warehouse and
Drying Shed

Zone 2

Transport
Hub

Proposed Extended
Road till SH-31

Zone 3

Proposed
Poultry Farm

Zone 4

Proposed
Warehouse
and Drying shed

Proposed Transport Hub


Proposed Tourist Trolley
Routes
Halting Points for Tourist
Trolley
Proposed Pedestrian way
Parking Area
Proposed Tourist zones

Proposed
Parking area
Zone 5

N
Km
0

.25

.5

PROPOSALS
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Proposed Haat
Proposed Interpretation and
Resource Centre
Proposed Green Buffer/
Afforestation
Proposed Camping Ground

Proposed Constructed
Wetlands
Proposed Dhalao
Proposed Community
Toilets

Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP


Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

Proposed Pedestrian
Route to Boorhi Mandav

Zone 1-Royal
Enclave
Zone 2

Transport
Hub

Proposed Road
Connectivity to NH3

Zone 3

Proposed Pedestrian
Route to Songarh Fort

Zone 4

Proposed
Parking area

Zone 5

Km
0

.25

Municipal Boundary
Main Road
Other Road
Heritage Monuments
Proposed Transport Hub
Proposed Tourist Trolley
Routes
Halting Points for Tourist
Trolley
Parking Area Near Tourist Trolley
Proposed Pedestrian way
Parking Area
Proposed Tourist zones

.5

TRANSPORT-PROPOSAL
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP


Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

Proposed WTP
Proposed Water Supply
line from Mallipura Talab

Existing OHT
Proposed OHT

Proposed Water Supply Lines

Zone 1-Royal
Enclave

Supply lines from


Proposed Water Suply Sources

Zone 2

Proposed Water Supply Zones

Proposed Extended
Road till SH-31

Zone 3

Zone 4

Proposed Water Supply


line from Sakalda Talab

.25

Zone 5

Km

Municipal Boundary

.5

Heritage Monuments

WATER SUPPLY-PROPOSAL
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP


Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

Planning Boundary
Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary

PRLANNING BOUNDARY
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP


Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

c
s

c
c

c
c
c

Proposed Drainage
along Road
S

Km
0

.25

Proposed Sulabh
suchalaya

Municipal Boundary
Ward Boundary
Main Road
Other Road
Water Body
Building Footprints
Proposed Community
Toilets
Proposed Composting Sites
Proposed Dhalao
Proposed Grating
alongside Road

.5

DRAINAGE,SEWARAGE,SANITATION-PROPOSAL
CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MANDAV, MADHYA PRADESH

Submitted to: URBAN ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, GoMP


Project Coordination: CITY MANAGER'S ASSOCIATION MADHYA PRADESH
Prepared by: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCE CORPORATION

D:\10 Towns\Mandav MAps\idfc-media-logo.jpg