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CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Nagar Parishad Joura, Morena District


Final Report

Submitted to:
Urban Administration &
Development
Department
(UADD),
Bhopal, Government of Madhya Pradesh
(GoMP)

Project Co-ordination:
City Managers Association, Bhopal
Government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP)

Submitted by:
MSV International Inc.
D-7, South City-1 Gurgaon 122002,
Haryana, India
Email : info@msvgroup.com
Tel : +91-124-4002603, 04
Fax : +91-124-4002605

City Profile
MSV International Inc
Joura

CompanyName
ULB Name
Whether the Sectoral Analysis report is as per UADD requisites

Town Brief

Geographical location (Town)


Average rainfall (annual)
Height above mean sea level
Municipal area (1991)
Municipal area (2001)
Municipal area (2011)
Date of Constitution of ULB

Population

Historic importance

Population Year 1981 (under


Municipal boundary only)
Population Year 1991 (under
Municipal boundary only)
Population Year 2001 (under
Municipal boundary only)
Population Year 2011 (under
Municipal boundary only)
Name of Population projection
Method
Projected population adopted Year
2015
Projected population adopted Year
2025
Projected population adopted Year
2035

Land Use

Land Use
Residential
Commercial
Public - semi public
Parks and open spaces
Roads
Developed area
Undeveloped area
Total

Latitude
Longitude
MM
Mts
Sq kms
Sq kms
Sq kms
Date
In one or two
sentences

Yes
262040 North latitude
774841 East longitudes
567
185
NA
NA
3
1914
Known for Sorvadaya Andolan by
Sobbarao a famous Gandhian
ideologiest
15,691
19,579
25,547
42,149

Town level
Average of all methods
48,702
65,461
88,079
% Standard (as
per UDPFI)
45-50
2 to 3
6 to 8
10 to 12

Land use
(Tentative in Sq
kms )
1.8
0.42
0.15
0.03
0.3
2.7
0.3
3

Land use
(Tentative in
percentage)
60%
14%
5%
1%
10%
90%
10%
100.00

City Profile (Ward Wise)


Ward #
Name of ward
Ward Population (2011)

Ward 1

Ward 2

Ward 3

Ward 4

Ward 5

Ward 6

Ward 7

Ward 8

Ward 9

Ward 10

Ward 11

Ward 12

Ward 13

Ward 14

Ward 15

Ward 16

Ward 17

Ward 18

3888

2954

3032

3064

1513

1276

1175

1589

1936

1756

2229

1523

2035

1916

1746

4034

3276

3197

Area (sq kms)


Density (PPSqkm)
Male
Female
SC
ST
BPL
Sex ratio
Literacy rate (%)

Seconday occupation
Tertiary occupation
No. of SS/LS industrial
units
No. of Commercial
establishments
No. of Slum pockets

31632
3
14046

22,676
19,468
3,231
194
8656

808
62.47

No. of Primary schools


No. of Primary Health
Centre
No. of Households
Primary occupation
(Majority)

Total

15
1
778

591

606

613

303

255

235

318

387

351

446

305

407

383

349

807

655

639

6716
Agriculture
Industrial/C
ommercial
shops

375
800
6

Slum population
No. of Slum
Households
No. of Individual water
connections in the
ward
No. of Community
water connections
No. of Commercial
water connections
No. of Tubewells
No. of Handpumps
No. of OHTs
% Coverage of piped
water supply

3960

No. of Individual Toilets

2292

No. of Individual Septic


tanks
No. of Community
Septic tanks
No. of Community
toilets
% of population - Open
defecation
No. of Dust bins
Wardwise Waste
generated (Kgs)
Road sweeping (1 time
or 2 times)
Total no. of sanitary
workers in the ward
Length of Pucca road
(km)
Length of Kuccha road
(km)
Length of State
Highway
Length of National
Highway

639

12
279
4
75%

5372
0
3
25
25
10.54
1
40
27.8
8
3.5

City Profile (Ward Wise)


Ward #
Name of ward
Length of Road side
drains Pucca (km)
Length of Natural
drains (Nallah)
Pucca/Channelized
(Mts)
Length of Natural
drains (Nallah) Kuttcha
(Mts)
No. of Streetlights
No. of Electricity
connections
Name of Tourist site if
any
Name of Heritage site if
any
Bus stop (No.)
Bus stand(No.)
Parks (No.)
Playground(No.)
No. of Residential
properties
No. of Commercial
properties
Total Property tax
collection (in Rs.)
Property tax
coverage(in %)
Available Government
land (Sq kms)
Remarks

Ward 1

Ward 2

Ward 3

Ward 4

Ward 5

Ward 6

Ward 7

Ward 8

Ward 9

Ward 10

Ward 11

Ward 12

Ward 13

Ward 14

Ward 15

Ward 16

Ward 17

Ward 18

Total

15

682

6716
800

Sectoral Analysis
Source

Water Supply

No. of Tubewell / River /


Well

Existing Source
Handpum
Tubewell
p
12

279

Sewerage
Drainage
SWM

NIL

Water Supplied by Tubewell


/ River / Well in MLD
Total water supply in the town (MLD)
Existing Supply rate (LPCD) considering
distribution losses
Water Charges per household per month (Rs.)
Flat/Metered
% Coverage under paid water supply
Whether any treatment plant exists (Y/N),If yes
mention capacity (MLD)
Proposed source (Surface)

Physical Infrastructure

River/Lake

Total sewage generation (MLD)


Whether any treatment plant exists (Y/N),If yes
mention capacity
Total no. of individual septic tanks
Total no. of community septic tanks
Total no. of Sewage/Mud pumps available with the
Frequency of Cleaning Individual Septic tanks
Frequency of Cleaning Community Septic tanks
Name of natural nallah (Storm water drain)
Length of natural nallah (Storm water drain) Kms
Ultimate disposal point of nallah
Length of road side drain (Kms)
Coverage of road side drainage w.r.t roads (%)
Ultimate disposal point of Road side drains
Any treatment plant/procedure adopted
Per capita Solid waste generation (Considering
Standards) (in gms)
Total SW generation (in Tons)
Frequency of SW collection by the ULB (1 time per
day/2 times per day)
Collection efficiency of the ULB (%)
Any initiative for DTDC (Yes /No)
Any initiative for scientific disposal of waste
Name of dumping/ landfill site
Is the existing site Dumping site or allotted site for
Scientific disposal
Area of allotted landfill site for Scientific disposal
Distance of the Dumping site/landfill site from
main settlement area (Kms)
No. of Tractor trolleys/vehicles available with the
ULB for carrying Solid waste to the LF site
If site for Scientific disposal is not allotted then
whether formally requested by the ULB
Name of National Highway passing from or nearby
from the town (NH-XYZ)

4.01
65
30
60
No
(Asan River, Pagara Dam & Chambal
canal)
4.55
NO
5372

0
0
Asan River
16
80%

Asan River
No
250
10.54
1
40%

No
No
0.972 ha area in ward no. 14
Dumping site

1.5
2

No
NH-3

Sectoral Analysis

Roads

Distance of National Highway if nearby from the


town (NH-XYZ) in Kms
Name of State Highway passing from or nearby
from the town (SH-XYZ)
Distance of State Highway if nearby from the
town (SH-XYZ) in Kms

Traffic & transportation

27.8

Total length of Kuccha roads (kms)

(kms)

Gap w.r.t Standards

(kms)

Total no. of vehicles in the town

385
Yes

Bus stand (yes/No)


Any intracity mass transport mode
(yes/no)

Yes

No

1
2
3

Pachbigha Bazaar,
Sadar bazaar
Near Bus Stand and railway Station

Name of locations facing major traffic


issues

None

Name of the street beautified as per


the instructions of UADD

682

No. of Streetlights under working condition


Street lighting

Total (kms)

Total no. of street lights

No. of Streetlights having Sodium lamps

0
514

No. of Streetlights having CFL

No. of Streetlights having Incandescent bulbs

No. of Streetlights having LED

No. of Streetlights having LPS

168

Location of Substation
http://www.mptransco.nic.in
Power

SH-2

CC
WBM

Total length of Pucca roads (Kms)

Physical Infrastructure

25

400 KV
220KV
132KV

Total no. of residential connections

Gwalior
Sabhalgarh
Sabhalgarh
-

Total no. of Commercial connections

Any subsidy for BPL (Y/N)

Duration of Electricity supply per day (in Hrs)

16

Environmen
Heritage & tourism
t

Heritage & tourism

Sectoral Analysis
Name of Heritage site/s
Ownership/agency
Prevailing Heritage Act/s
Name of Tourist site/s
Ownership/agency

Name of River/Lake/Forest range/Any specific


species

No. of Primary Health centres/Dispensary

Health

Governme
nt
Beds
Private
Beds

1
20
-

Yes
Name of
town
Distance
(Kms)
3

Morena

No. of Secondary/High schools

No. of Colleges
No. of ITI

1
0

Name of Nearby town reffered for


Treatment
No. of Primary schools

No. of Beneficiaries under SJSRY (Street Vendor)

Social security schemes

Asan River

Prevailing Environmental Act/s


Areas facing threats

Multispeciality hospital if any (Y/N)

Education

Fort near Main Market, Bawli


-

Total no. of Pilgrims/ Tourists visiting town per day

No. of Hospitals

Social Infrastructure

Fort near Main Market, Bawli


-

No. of Beneficiaries under Haath thela/Rickshaw


chalak yojna
No. of Rain Basera/Night Shelter
Ownership of Rain Basera (with ULB/Rental)
No. of Beneficiaries under Gharelu Kamkaji Mahila
Yojana
Name of
Scheme
Rashtriya
Parivar
Sahayta
Widow
Name of other Social
pension
security schemes
Janashree
Bima Yojna

27 Km
15

0
0
0
0
0

Sectoral Analysis
Slums & Urban Poor

Ward Name of Slum pocket/


No
reference name

Notified/
Unnotified

Ward
populatio
n

Nonnotified

4034

Individual
Slum
No. of
No. of
No. of
No. of
water
populatio
Communit Handpum Individual Communit
connectio
n
y taps
ps
toilets
y toilets
ns

No. of
Pucca
houses

No. of
Semi
pucca
houses

No. of
Kuccha
houses

No. of
No. of
Permanen Temporar
t pattas
y pattas
distribute distribute
d
d

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Total

3960

630

13

660

No. of
No. of
Beneficiar
Any
Primary
Primary
ies under interventi
Health
school in
social
ons under
centres in
the slum
security
IHSDP
the slum
pocket
schemes
(Y/N)
pocket

Reforms Action Plan


Reforms

Achieved (Y/N)

Timeline to achieve reforms till 2015

2012-13 2013-14
Full migration of double accounting
System
Property tax reforms, 85% coverage
ratio and 90% collection ratio

Levy of user charges : full recovery


of O & M charges for sewerage,
water supply and SWM
Internal earmarking of basic services
to urban poor
E-governance
Provision of basic services to urban
poor including security of tenure at
affordable prices, improved housing,
water supply, sanitation

2014-15

Any City
specific
Strategies
adopted

Preliminary
estimate (if any) Implementing
for
agency
implementation

2015-16

ULB

N
ULB

ULB
N
N
N

ULB
ULB

ULB

Capital Expenditures

Revenue Expenditure

Capital
Receipts

Revenue Income

Municipal Finance
Year
Rates and Tax Revenue
Assigned Revenues & Compensation
Rental Income from Municipal Properties
Fees & User Charges
Sale & Hire Charges
Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies
Income from Investments
Interest Earned
Other Income
Total - Revenue Income
Grants, Contribution for specific purposes
Secured Loans
Unsecured Loans
Deposits
Deposit works
Total Capital Receipts
Total Income
Establishment Expenses

200910
201,58,513
0
0
99,45,729
0
32,68,325
0
0
26,84,820
360,57,387

201011
233,00,000
0
0
185,50,000
0
137,00,000
0
0
77,08,000
632,58,000

201112
328,50,000
0
0
227,00,000
0
138,75,000
0
0
91,08,000
785,33,000

40,480
0
0
0
0
40,480

1,07,000
0
0
0
0
1,07,000

7,000
0
0
0
0
7,000

Administrative Expenses

66,79,664

11,19,000

34,48,416

Operations & Maintenance

37,87,525

50,40,000

60,45,000

Interest & Finance Charges


Programme Expenses
Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies
Miscellaneous Expenses
Transfer to Fund
Total - Revenue Expenditure
Fixed Assets
Capital Work-in-Progress
Investments -General Fund
Investments-Other Funds
Stocks/Inventory
Loans, Advances and Deposits
Other Assets
Miscellaneous Expenditure
Total Capital Expenditure
Total Expenditure

0
0
0
0
0
104,67,189

0
0
0
0
0
61,59,000

0
0
0
0
0
94,93,416

360,97,867 633,65,000 785,40,000


0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
185,01,126 248,89,500 361,60,244
185,01,126 248,89,500 361,60,244
289,68,315 310,48,500 456,53,660

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

LIST OF CONTENTS
1.

2.

Project Background
1.1 Introduction

1.2 Aim and Objectives of the study

1.3 Coverage of the Study area

1.4 Detailed Project Tasks

1.5 Project Focus and Benefits

1.6 Approach

1.7 Methodology

Physical Features of The Town

4.

12

2.1 Historical Importance

12

2.2 Profile of District Morena

12

2.3 Geography

12

2.4 Administrative Divisions

13

2.5 Regional Setting and linkages

13

2.6 Physiography and Landform

14

2.6.1

3.

Topography

14

2.7 Drainage

15

2.8 Geology

15

2.9 Ground water

16

2.10 Climate

17

2.10.1 Rainfall

17

2.10.2 Temperature

17

2.10.3 Wind direction

18

2.10.4 Soil Type

18

1.8 About Joura Town

18

1.9 Planning Area

19

1.10 Issues and Development Strategies

19

Demographic Profile of Joura

20

3.1 Regional Population Growth

20

3.2 Population Growth trend in Joura NP

20

3.3 Population Projection

21

3.4 Ward wise Population distribution

23

Socio-Economic Profile

24

4.1 Sex Ratio

24

4.2 Literacy Rate

25

4.3 Average Household Size

26
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

5.

6.

4.4 Social Composition

26

4.5 Work Force Participation Rate

27

4.6 Trade & Commerce

28

4.6.1

Retail business

28

4.6.2

Industrial activities

30

4.6.3

Tourism & heritage

30

4.6.4

SWOT Analysis

30

4.6.5

Issues, Potentials and Strategies

31

4.6.6

Conclusion

31

Physical Planning & Growth Management

32

5.1 Spatial Growth Trends

32

5.2 Spatial distribution of population

33

5.3 Landuse Analysis

33

5.3.1

Residential

34

5.3.2

Commercial

34

5.3.3

Industrial

34

5.3.4

Public and Semi Public

34

5.3.5

Transportation

34

5.3.6

Recreational

34

5.4 Housing Scenario

34

5.4.1

Present and Future Housing Demand

36

5.4.2

SWOT Analysis

36

5.4.3

Issues

37

5.4.4

Strategies

37

Physical Infrastructure
6.1 Water Supply

38
38

6.1.1

Source of Water and supply

38

6.1.2

Groundwater Quantity and Quality

39

6.1.3

Treatment & Transmission of Water

40

6.1.4

Quality of Water

41

6.1.5

Present and future demand and supply gaps

41

6.1.6

Comparative analysis with UDPFI and CPHEEO Guidelines

42

6.1.7

SWOT Analysis

42

6.1.8

Issues and Strategies

42

6.2 Sewage and Sanitation

42

6.2.1

Existing sewerage system and means of sewage disposal

42

6.2.2

Household toilets

43

6.2.3

Present and future demand and supply gaps

44

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.2.4

Comparative analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO guidelines

44

6.2.5

SWOT Analysis

44

6.2.6

Issues & Strategies

44

6.3 Solid Waste Management


6.3.1

Quantity of waste generated

45

6.3.2

Constituents of Nagar Parishad waste

45

6.3.3

Collection & Storage

46

6.3.4

Transportation of Solid Waste

46

6.3.5

Processing and disposal

47

6.3.6

Reuse and Recycling

47

6.3.7

Vehicles for solid waste collection and transportation of waste

47

6.3.8

SWOT Analysis

49

6.3.9

Issues & Strategies

49

6.4 Drainage

49

6.4.1

Existing drainage system

49

6.4.2

Primary, secondary and tertiary drains

50

6.4.3

Major Water bodies

50

6.4.4

Water Logged areas

50

6.4.5

SWOT Analysis

52

6.4.6

Issues & Strategies

52

6.5 Traffic and Transporation

52

6.5.1

Existing traffic and transportation scenario

52

6.5.2

Agencies in traffic and transportation

53

6.5.3

Public transport

53

6.5.4

Traffic Management and Circulation

53

6.5.5

Parking Requirements for Joura Town

54

6.5.6

Vehicle population

55

6.5.7

Present and future demand and supply gaps

55

6.5.8

Comparative analysis with the UDPFI guidelines

55

6.5.9

SWOT Analysis

55

6.5.10 Issues & Strategies

7.

44

56

6.6 Street Lighting

56

6.7 Fire fighting

57

Social infrastructure
7.1 Health

58
58

7.1.1

Basic Health Indicators

58

7.1.2

Existing Medical facilities

58

7.1.3

Future demand forecast

59
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

7.1.4

Issues

7.2 Education

9.

60

7.2.1

Basic Education indicators

60

7.2.2

Existing Education facilities

60

7.2.3

Recreation Facilities

61

7.3 Other community facilities

61

7.3.1

Community Halls

61

7.3.2

Banks

61

7.3.3

Khadi sale outlet

61

7.3.4

Cremation Ground

61

7.3.5

Issues and Strategies

62

7.4 Conclusion
8.

59

URBAN POOR & THEIR ACCESSIBILITY TO BASIC SERVICES

63
64

8.1 Introduction

64

8.2 Various Definitions on Slums

64

8.3 Reflection on Consultation with slum dwellers

65

8.4 Land ownership and Tenure status

65

8.5 Poverty in Town

66

8.6 General characteristics in slum

66

8.7 7 Point Charter: Assessment of Services and Infrastructure

67

8.8 Schemes for Slum Improvement

68

8.9 SWOT Analysis

68

8.10 Issues and development strategies

69

8.11 Suggestions

69

8.12 Urban Basic Services in Slums

69

8.13 Social Security Schemes and Beneficiaries

69

ENVIRONMENT
9.1 Pollution Level

71
71

9.1.1

Water Pollution

71

9.1.2

Air Pollution

71

9.1.3

Town green spaces

71

9.1.4

Noise

72

9.1.5

Water bodies

72

9.1.6

Environmental Regulations

72

9.1.7

SWOT Analysis

73

9.1.8

Issues and Strategies

73

10. Urban Finance


10.1 Joura Nagar Parishad
Page 4

74
74

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

10.1.1 Analysis of Municipal Finances

75

10.1.1.1

Income

75

10.1.1.2

Expenditure

77

10.1.1.3

Deficit/Surplus

78

10.2 Issues & Potentials

79

10.3 Summary of Findings

80

10.4 Strategies

80

11. Institutional Profile

81

11.1 Legal Framework

81

11.2 Institutional Arrangement of Joura

81

11.3 Functions of the Nagar Parishad

83

11.3.1Discretionary functions of the Nagar Parishad

84

11.4 Institutions Involved in Governance

85

11.4.1 Urban Administration and Development Department

85

11.4.2 Public Health Engineering Department (PHED)

86

11.4.3 M.P Housing Board

86

11.4.4 M.P Pollution Control Board

86

11.4.5 Madhya Pradesh Road Development Corporation (MPRDC)

86

11.5 Role of Nagar Parishad

87

11.6 Private Sector Participation

87

11.7 Status of Municipal E-Governance

87

11.8 Status of Reforms Undertaken

88

11.9 SWOT Analysis

89

11.10Issues and Strategies

89

12. Stakeholder Consultation

90

12.1 Introduction

90

12.2 I Stage: Kick-Off Workshop

90

12.2.1 List of Workshop Participants

91

12.2.2 City Level Steering Group

91

12.2.3 Issues and Suggestions

91

12.3 II Stage: Stage Workshop: City Vision and Goals

92

12.3.1 Issues

92

12.3.2 Suggestions

93

12.3.3 Thrust areas

93

12.3.4 Prioritisation of sectors

93

12.4 III Stage: Workshop: Draft City Development Plan: CIP, FoP

93

12.5 Thrust areas and major issues of the Stakeholder consultation

94

12.6 Feed back towards City Development Plan

95
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

13. City Investment Plan

97

13.1 Basis of Prioritization

97

13.2 Consolidation of Issues

97

13.3 Sector Prioritization

98

13.4 Project Prioritisation

99

13.5 Objective

99

13.6 Investment Estimates

99

13.6.1 Water Supply

99

13.6.2 Sewerage & Storm Water Drainage

100

13.6.3 Solid Waste Management

101

13.6.4 Traffic & Transportation

101

13.6.5 Social Infrastructure

102

13.6.6 Fire Fighting

103

13.6.7 Affordable Housing

103

13.6.8 Environment

103

13.6.9 Institutional Strengthening

104

13.6.10

104

Economic development

14. Financial operating plan

106

14.1 Introduction

106

14.2 FOP Assumptions for Baseline Projections

106

14.2.1 Forecast of income

106

14.2.2 Forecast of Revenue Expenditure

107

14.3 Investment Requirements

108

14.4 Project Sustainability Analysis

109

14.4.1 Scenario I: No revenue reforms, capital commitment to be financed by loan 109


14.4.2 Scenario II: Joura Nagar Parishad; Financial sustainability with fiscal reform 110
14.5 Funding Sources
15. Vision & Development Strategies

111
112

15.1 City Vision

112

15.2 Sectoral Vision

113

15.3 Goals and Strategies

114

15.3.1 Water Supply

114

15.3.2 Sewerage

115

15.3.3 Solid Waste Management

116

15.3.4 Traffic and Transportation

116

15.3.5 Social Infrastructure

117

15.3.6 Environment

117

15.3.7 Urban Poor and Basic Services

117

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

16. Urban Reforms


16.1 Governance Framework

120
120

16.1.1 Role of State Government - Reforms to be undertaken

120

16.1.2 Role of Urban Local Body - Reforms to be Undertaken

120

16.1.3 Role of Private Sector - Proposed Areas of Involvement

120

16.2 Mandatory Reforms

121

16.2.1 State Level

121

16.2.2 ULB Level

121

16.2.3 Optional Reforms

122

17. Conclusion

124

17.1 Advantage: Madhya Pradesh

124

17.2 Advantage: Joura City

124

17.2.1 Opportunity Assessment of Joura City


Annexures

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127

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

LIST OF TABLES
Table No. 1.
Table No. 2.
Table No. 3.
Table No. 4.
Table No. 5.
Table No. 6.
Table No. 7.
Table No. 8.
Table No. 9.
Table No. 10.
Table No. 11.
Table No. 12.
Table No. 13.
Table No. 14.
Table No. 15.
Table No. 16.
Table No. 17.
Table No. 18.
Table No. 19.
Table No. 20.
Table No. 21.
Table No. 22.
Table No. 23.
Table No. 24.
Table No. 25.
Table No. 26.
Table No. 27.
Table No. 28.
Table No. 29.
Table No. 30.
Table No. 31.
Table No. 32.
Table No. 33.
Table No. 34.
Table No. 35.
Table No. 36.
Table No. 37.
Table No. 38.
Table No. 39.
Table No. 40.
Table No. 41.
Table No. 42.
Table No. 43.
Table No. 44.
Table No. 45.
Table No. 46.
Page 8

Profile of District Morena


Location of urban centers near the town
Yearly Rainfall in Joura
Mean monthly temperatures (From year 2006-10) of Joura
Population Comparison at National, State, District and Town Level
Population trend in Joura Nagar Parishad
Population Projection through four different methods
Future Population Forecast
Ward wise Population distribution in Joura-2011
Comparative Sex Ratio
Literacy rate of the town
Average Household Size in the town
SC & ST Population
Work Force Participation Rate
Working population of Joura
Sector wise population of workers of Joura
Landuse distribution of Nagar Parishad, 2011
Housing condition
Housing Scenario
Housing Demand
Sources of drinking water
Water Quality in the town
Future Demand requirement
Present and Future demand and supply gap of sewage
Future Solid Waste Generation
Waste composition
Garbage dumped in periphery wards and in the park
Facility for Waste Transportation
Waste management infrastructure gap assessment
Drains characteristics
Length of main roads in the town
Road characteristics
Number of Vehicles
Street Lighting in Joura Nagar Parishad
Demand Projection for Medical facilities
Demand projection for education facilties
Future demand for open spaces/ recreational facilities
Future demand for other community facilities
Population in slums
General characteristics of slums
Projected housing demand of Urban Poor
Future requirement of area for green spaces
Structure of JNP Finances
Summary of Revenue and Expenditure Sources
Income of Nagar Parishad
Expenditure of Nagar Parishad

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14
17
17
20
20
21
22
23
25
25
26
26
27
27
28
33
35
35
36
38
41
41
44
45
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50
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53
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56
59
61
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62
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68
68
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Table No. 47.


Table No. 48.
Table No. 49.
Table No. 50.
Table No. 51.
Table No. 52.
Table No. 53.
Table No. 54.
Table No. 55.
Table No. 56.
Table No. 57.
Table No. 58.
Table No. 59.
Table No. 60.
Table No. 61.
Table No. 62.
Table No. 63.
Table No. 64.
Table No. 65.
Table No. 66.
Table No. 67.
Table No. 68.
Table No. 69.

Income Expenditure and Surplus/Deficit Trends


Sector wise responsibilities
Priority Matrix
Project cost estimate for Water Supply
Project cost estimate for Sewerage and Storm Water Drainage
Project cost estimate for Solid Waste Management
Project cost estimate for Transportation
Project cost estimate for social infrastructure
Project cost estimate for fire fighting
Project Cost estimate for Affordable housing scheme
Project cost estimate for Environment
Project Cost estimate for Institutional Strengthening
Project Cost estimate for Economic development
Summary of Total Investment
Forecast of Income of Nagar Parishad (in lakhs)
Forecast of Expenditure of Nagar Parishad (in lakhs)
Estimated investment requirements for Joura under various sectors
Sector wise investment distribution
Trend in municipal finance without reforms: Scenario 1
Financial Reforms
Sector Vision
Sector-wise Summary of goals to be achieved
ULB level reforms

78
88
98
100
100
101
101
102
103
103
103
104
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
110
113
117
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure No.1.
Figure No.1.
Figure No.2.
Figure No.3.
Figure No.4.
Figure No.5.
Figure No.6.
Figure No.7.
Figure No.8.
Figure No.9.
Figure No.10.
Figure No.11.
Figure No.12.
Figure No.13.
Figure No.14.
Figure No.15.
Figure No.16.
Figure No.17.
Figure No.18.
Figure No.19.
Figure No.20.
Figure No.21.
Figure No.22.
Figure No.23.
Figure No.24.
Figure No.25.
Figure No.26.
Figure No.27.
Figure No.28.
Figure No.29.
Figure No.30.
Figure No.31.
Figure No.32.
Figure No.33.
Figure No.34.
Figure No.35.
Figure No.36.
Figure No.37.
Figure No.38.
Figure No.39.
Figure No.40.
Figure No.41.

Page
10

Methodology Adopted
Regional linkages
Topography of the region
Drainage Pattern in the Region
Geological Map of the district
Water Level of Madhya Pradesh District
Soil Types of Madhya Pradesh
Decadal Population trend in Joura Town
Future Population Trend
Ward wise Population Distribution in the town
Sex ratio at National, State, District and Town Level
Literacy Rate at National, State, District and Town Level
Social Composition structure
Sectorwise distribution of workforce population
Commercial Activities in the town
Location of town and nearby centers
Landuse distribution in the town
Housing Condition
Ownership status in the town & Type of Census Houses
Sources of drinking water
Depth to water level Map in Morena District
Presence of OHTs & water container for transportation of water
Water Supply practices in the town
Presence of toilet facilities within in the town
Garbage dumped along the road, in open and near the bus stand
Open drainage system & condition of drains
Bus stand in the town
Railway Line passing through the town
Traffic & transportation paractices in the town
Community Health center in the town
Education facilities in the town
Community facilities in the town
Town green spaces and water bodies
Total Income of the Nagar Parishad
Contribution of various aspects in the Income
Total Expenditure of the Nagar Parishad
Income-Expenditure relation
Surplus trend
Town Administration
Organisational structure of the Nagar Parishad
Stakeholder Consultation Workshops
Sectorwise investment

6
14
15
15
16
16
18
21
22
23
24
26
27
28
29
32
33
35
36
38
39
40
41
43
46
51
54
54
54
59
60
62
72
76
76
77
78
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81
82
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

1. PROJECT BACKGROUND
1.1

INT ROD UC TIO N

The aim of this exercise is to support various Cities/Urban Local Bodies of Madhya
Pradesh in preparing the City Development Plan (CDP) for their respective cities. The CDP
should provide a comprehensive medium term strategy (Vision 2035) as well as a City
Investment Plan (CIP), based on which the concerned ULB will be able to access funds
under GoI/GoMP schemes as well as from own and other sources based on priority actions
and projects identified in the CDP. The document should also provide Financial Operating
Plan (FOP) to direct the ULBs for mobilizing various financial resources to implement the
identified projects.
As one of the initiatives of Inclusive Urban Planning, the State Government of Madhya
Pradesh had started the programme of Preparation of City Development Plans (CDPs). After
the successful completion of the 1st Phase, 259 new cities have been taken up for the 2nd
phase of CDPs. The CDPs will indicate policies, programmes, strategies and financing plans
thereby helping the cities to achieve sustainable development path. This project titled City
Development Plan for Joura City, Madhya Pradesh has been awarded to MSV International
Inc as consultant.

1.2

AI M AN D O BJEC TI VES OF T HE ST UDY

As outlined in the ToR, the aim of the study is to prepare a City Development Plan, which will
generate and provide a strategic framework for city development actions in the medium term,
guided by a shared and collective vision, and aimed at delivering sustainable economic
growth and poverty reduction.
Following are the basic steps in preparation of a CDP:

In-depth Analysis of Existing Situation


Development of Vision and Goals for the City
Formulation of City Development Strategies including city governance and required
reforms
Preparation of Action Plan with identified projects under each sector of infrastructure
Preparation of City Investment Plan and Financial operating plan.

The CDP will also include a Financial Operating Plan (FOP), to direct the ULBs for mobilizing
various financial resources to implement the identified projects. Clearly, the CDP is a blueprint of an informed exercise, owned by the citizens and the city government, i.e., ULB,
supported by the consultants engaged.
Within the framework of CDP the following objectives will be addressed:

The CDP will scale up existing urban development and poverty alleviation
schemes within a comprehensive and coherent strategic planning framework in order
to ensure optimal benefit from available resources for the citizens of the ULBs.
The CDP should aim to catalyse new thinking and provoke debate through a
consultative stakeholder driven process. The vision and strategic thrusts of the
CDP will be built around the lessons and findings of a comprehensive and
rigorous stakeholder consultation and documentation process.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

1.3

It is expected that the CDP will serve the requirements of the UIDSSMT and
IHSDP programmes as well as JNNURM and other development schemes.
The CDP will generate specific priority actions and projects that can be the basis for
mobilizing funding from diverse sources

COVER AG E O F T H E STUD Y ARE A

CDP is prepared as per the JNNURM toolkit, UADD and CMAMP guidelines keeping in view
the mission objectives and output. The JNNURM has provided the opportunity to the citizens
of Joura town to achieve a better urban life style, better environment, physical and social
infrastructure, basic services for urban poor. Initiatives under JNNURM will provide a
platform for the city to achieve the long term mission.The City Development Plan will be
formulated for the area of about 3.00 sq. Km. The area comprises of Joura Nagar Parishad
(JNP) divided into 15 Wards.

1.4

DET AI LE D PR OJE CT T AS KS

The study would involve following initiatives:

1.1

Kick Off Workshop to sensitize the stakeholders about the CDP initiative
Familiarization with the city and its status in terms of growth, economic development,
institutional framework, infrastructure, urban basic services etc.
Identification of data required for the study
Mapping of data sources and collection of data
Identification of stakeholder agencies & their financial assessment
Understanding the perception and priorities for city development through rigorous
discussions with stakeholder agencies
In-depth analysis of secondary data collected
Formulation of strategies and vision for city development in consultation with various
stakeholder agencies
Preparation of CDP along with preliminary financial operating plan and project cash
flows for various projects identified
Preparation of CDP will not only follow the guidelines of JNNURM but will also take into
account the requirement of other urban development initiatives like Swarna Jayanti
Shehri Vikas Yojna,

UADD KICK-OFF WORKSHOP INSTRUCTIONS TO CONSULTANTS

The Urban Administration and Development Department had conducted a state level
Orientation Workshop for selected consultants for preparation of City Development Plans.
In the workshop, the consultants were apprised of the process and key thrust areas for the
towns of Madhya Pradesh. Keeping in view the learnings from the workshop, the consultant
has drafted an approach and detailed methodology for preparation of the City Development
Plan. The same has been elaborated in the following sections.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

State Level Orientation Workshop Proceedings 1

State Level Orientation Workshop Proceedings 2

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

1.5

PROJEC T FO CU S AN D BE NEF I TS

The city is expected


to
achieve
the
modern transparent
budgeting
and
accounting.
All
residents should have access to a basic level of urban services including the urban poor. Egovernance applications should have been introduced in core functions of ULBs. The city
should also promote social development and improve systems of governance and
empowerment in poor urban communities.

1.6

AP PRO AC H

The entire plan development will adopt decentralized planning process.


The city development plan here is basically to provide facilities and create a systematic
urban growth, which is essentially a public domain. It is perceived that involvement of both

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

public and private agencies including the local people for decision making and responsibility
allotment would bring about a more pragmatic plan.
The CDP is in adherence to the guidelines framed by the JNNURM toolkit, UADD and
CMAMP guidelines. This analysis of the existing situation, covering the demographic,
economic, financial, infrastructure, physical, environmental and institutional aspects has
been done to develop and frame a vision of the city. The sector strategies, goal, and project
proposals incorporate and compliment existing plans and policies of both State and National
that are in line with the CDP framework.
During the plan preparation process, participation of stakeholders (both primary and
secondary) and interest groups will also be incorporated. The purpose is to generate new
thinking and provoke debate over issues that are in line with CDP and are worth considering.
Involving responsible agencies and government bodies during planning process also would
facilitate active participation by the groups/ stakeholders bringing specific solutions and
effective development plan. The lessons learnt and findings of the comprehensive and
rigorous stakeholder consultations would provide base for further formulation of the projects
and proposals. The CDP envisages being a comprehensive plan which is expected to serve
as a strategic framework for other plans and development programs. It engenders specific
priority actions for fulfilling the intended objectives. It is intended to use periodic review
sessions to guide the development of CDP to achieve a fair and logical development plan.
The approach for the assignment is:
To use participatory approach, where in stakeholder consultations and workshops
would be carried out across a wide section of society. Participatory approach is taking
the perspective of the local people and other stakeholders into consideration and giving them
a greater say in planning and decision making of the citys development process. Local
people, community organizations, NGOs, Government departments and other stakeholders
shall prioritize the citys requirements sector wise. Stakeholders shall provide feedback on
the problems & issues faced by them at local level. Their views shall also be sought on the
citys present development scenario. Further, they shall give their sector wise priorities for
social and physical infrastructure requirements.
Following methods shall be used to ensure participation of all sections of society:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Group discussions
Individual interviews
Workshops
Sample Questionnaire surveys

For sample surveys, socio-economic and land use characteristics shall be carefully
considered while doing sample questionnaire survey in residential, commercial, institutional,
cantonment and industrial areas.
Residents shall be covered using group discussions and questionnaire survey techniques.
Entrepreneurs, shopkeepers, artisans, NGOs, media shall be covered by group discussions.
Hoteliers, travel agents and tourist guides shall be covered by group discussion or individual
interviews.
Politicians and community leaders shall be consulted individually or in groups. Government
officials shall be consulted individually as well as in Workshops.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Tourism and presence of the Cantonment Area can play an important role in strengthening
citys economic base. Hence travel agents, tourist guides, hotels and the cantonment board
have been specifically selected for consultations.
Considering the goal of achieving environmental & economic sustainability and CDPs
special focus on slum poverty, large sample size has been considered for the slum pockets.

1.7

To counter the problems and issues faced as well as keeping in mind the current state of
development of the city, strategies shall be derived and an action plan shall be
presented to the key stakeholder agencies through consultation workshops, further their
consent and ownership for the plan would be sought. Their comments would be
incorporated to finalize the vision document and plan.
To design the city development plan for the horizon period of 25 years.
To identify interventions to eliminate or mitigate the impacts of the critical/ problem areas
of the city. The focus will be pivoted to slum up-gradation, environmental sustainability,
urban transport, heritage, tourism and economy.
To up-scale the existing urban development projects in the city.
To maximize utilization of inherent potential and develop infrastructure and economy to
attract private investment. This will be achieved through detailed sector analysis.
To develop initiatives in line with the urban development policies of the Centre and the
State Government.
To achieve the underlining principle of the 74th Constitutional Amendment Act and the
functions outlined in the 12th Schedule.
To identify intervention areas to build up the financial strength of the Citys institutional
arrangement.

MET HODO LOG Y

Preparation of CDP is divided into six phases. The detailed step wise methodology has been
highlighted in the following section:

PHASE I: INCEPTION STAGE


The purpose of this stage is to review and analyze the current status and unique features of
the city with regard to the state of its development, systems and procedures, as equally as its
institutional and financial context. This stage involved the following activities:

Activity 1: Preliminary Meeting, Data Collection and Review


Task 1: Preliminary Meeting
The purpose of this meeting with the officials of Nagar Parishad is to understand their
requirements from this assignment for developing the CDP. Following activities will be
undertaken:

Introductory meeting with the Municipal Commissioner/Chief Municipal Officer, Heads of


Departments, Councillors, representatives of ongoing urban programmes, etc.
Identification of line departments and key stakeholders for urban service delivery and
development such as PHED, DA, local Chamber of Commerce, NGOs, CBOs, etc.
Preparation of preliminary list of key stakeholders that need to be involved in the
planning process, etc.
Procurement of Base Maps and other related Secondary data.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Task 2: Reconnaissance Survey and data collection


Introductory meeting with the key stakeholders and procurement of base maps will be done
followed by reconnaissance survey and initial data collection process. Data collection was
carried out using the data checklist and survey format attached in Annexure-1. Following
activities will be taken up:

Field reconnaissance will be conducted to determine growth patterns of the city,


characteristics of the slums and environmentally sensitive areas etc.
Obtaining base maps and available secondary data on the citys demographics, master
plan, reports prepared under past and current urban development programs, Nagar
Parishad annual budget reports, other reports giving status of service delivery and other
relevant documents on heritage listing, data on slums and urban poor, government
policy documents, etc.

Activity 2: Stakeholder consultation and Kick off Workshop


Task 3: Pre-workshop stakeholder consultation and formation of CLSG
At this stage, a comprehensive list of stakeholders will be prepared. Sample of stakeholders
will be selected for preliminary consultation. Discussions will be carried out through
structured questionnaires. On the basis of the stakeholder list and preliminary consultation,
the members of City Level Steering Group (CLSG) will be identified.The CLSG will be
finalized after discussions with JNP.
Task 4: Kick-off workshop
MSV with JNP support will organize a one day kick-off workshop to familiarize the
stakeholders with the purpose, process and expected outcomes of the CDP and strive to
generate enthusiasm, understanding and commitment to the CDP. In the workshop the
CLSG will be launched. The method which will be used include the following

Invitation to different stakeholders identified in the preceding section. Invitations will be


sent from the office of the Commissioners and the Mayor. The invitation defined the
CDPs objectives and also included a questionnaire and workshop schedule.
MSV representatives personally will invite the key dignitaries to ensure their participation
One day prior to the workshop, a press-note on the City Development Plan will be
released informing the citizen of Joura about the initiative.
On the workshop date, the following activities will be carried out:
MSV representatives will distribute leaflets discussing the concept, focus areas and
benefits of the CDP.
Presentation will be given about the CDP.
Issues will be identified by the Stakeholders
Group discussions will be conducted to identify present scenario, issues and possible
solutions by the participants
On the basis of pre work shop consultation and workshop discussion, key areas will be listed
and focus areas will be identified for the preparation of the special papers.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.1. Methodology Adopted

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Activity 3: Preliminary Situational Analysis


Task 3: Preliminary Situational Analysis
Preliminary analysis will be done based on secondary data collection, stakeholder
consultations and kick-off workshop. The analysis and assessment includes:

Regional Setting, Administrative Boundary, Demography, Economy, Urban Growth,


Land use change, Bio-physical environment etc.
Urban Basic Services: water supply, sanitation, municipal solid waste, drainage,
roads/urban transport, urban environment, health and education, fire services, etc.
Institutional Arrangements of key stakeholders and their roles & responsibilities in city
planning with reference to delivery and management of urban basic services.
Financial framework of key stakeholder agencies involved in service delivery and
O&M.

Deliverables: Submission of Inception Report: Base Map, Workshop Proceedings, Inception


Report, Key area for Special Paper

PHASE II: ASSESSMENT OF EXISTING SITUATION (OPPORTUNITIES,


STRENGTHS, RISKS, WEAKNESS AND GAPS).
Activity 4: Sector Assessment and City Profile
In this stage a detailed analysis will be carried out for key sectors - infrastructure, housing,
environment, economy, governance, finance etc. Besides, special focus will be given to the
following five sectors:

Study of economic opportunity and potential for regional economic development, with
special reference to the poor.
Transport study with emphasis on low cost public transport and livelihoods
Heritage conservation and tourism
Environmental sustainability
Access to housing, employment and social and environmental services by the poor

To undertake the study, MSV will interact with various stakeholder groups (meetings,
workshops, focus group discussions, etc.) and review relevant publications, reports, GOs,
resolutions, procedures, laws etc. to analyse the current situation in each of the key sectors.
Urban Development
The study and analysis would be divided into three sections. The first section would involve
status assessment of demography, social base, economic base and trade & commerce. The
second section would identify the problems and issues through SWOT analysis. The third
section would aim at projection exercise.
Heritage and Tourism
The study and analysis would be divided into 3 stages. First stage would involve a Tourism
Resource Inventory and tourist infrastructure assessment. The second stage shall assess
Tourist Demand and character through various analysis tools including a SWOT analysis to
derive at projects, followed by the third stage of formulation of Strategy to derive at a Tourism
Plan.
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Physical Planning and Growth Management


The study and analysis would be divided into three sections. The First section would assess
the status of Physical Growth, Landuse Trends, Planning Efforts, Land Values & Trends,
Planning Guidelines and Development Control Regulations. The Second Section would aim
to highlight the direction of Growth. The third section would aim at the problems and issues
related to Land Development
Urban Environment
The study and analysis would be divided into three sections. With the help of environmental
parameters, environmental status and its components would be assessed. The Second
Section would involve the use of environmental indicators to assess ecologically sensitive
zones and protected zones. Followed by problems and issues identification related to these
sensitive zones in the third section.
Disaster Management
The study and analysis would be divided into 3 parts. First section would aim to find out the
vulnerability of the city for types of Disaster i.e. Natural and Man-made. The second section
shall analyse the parameters for each type of disaster the city would be vulnerable to and
further zoning shall be done. Third section shall aim at the Legal framework and dos and
dont during a Disaster.
Slum Poverty
The study and analysis shall be divided into five sections. First section would aim to present
slum poverty estimations for the city as per international, national, state level and local
standards. Second section would entail poverty mapping based on income criteria and non
income based criteria. Third section would aim to review various poverty reduction
programmes and measure the success of the programmes. Fourth section would identify the
strengths, weakness, opportunities and threats. Followed by the problems and issues related
to poverty in the city.
Housing and Slums
The study will be divided into two parts, housing and slums. First part, would aim to assess
the housing conditions and existing housing stock to identify demand- supply gap. Housing
characteristics and access to urban services shall also be assessed. Second part would aim
to analyse existing status of slums in the city which include existing slum population and
growth trends and access to basic urban services. Next section would attempt to analyse
various slum improvement programmes going on in the city. Last section would discuss
SWOT and conclude with problems and issues.
Institutional Setup and Urban Governance
The study and analysis shall be divided into 3 parts.First section would aim to find Roles and
Functions of Institutions, Identification of Institutions involved in Service Delivery. Second
section shall analyse the parameters for urban Governance which are Participation, Rule of
Law, Transparency, Equity, Efficiency and Responsiveness. Third section shall aim at
Problems, Issues and Strategies.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Urban Infrastructure and Services


The study and analysis shall be divided into 2 parts. First section would aim at Physical
Infrastructure:

Water Supply
Sewerage & Sanitation
Solid Waste Managament
Street Lights
Storm Water Drains
Fire Services

Second section would aim at Social Infrastructure:

Education
Health
Parks
Recreational area
Market
Burial Ground and Crematorim
Slaughter House
Road and Transport Infrastructure

Transport infrastructure forms the backbone of any economy and plays an important role in
the development of a region. The objective of studying the transport sector is to analyse and
understand the role of transportation in the present scenario of the city and its surrounding as
well as to understand the existing potentials, strengths, weaknesses and constraints of the
Transport sector. Finally to arrive at strategies and projects that would form an integral part
of the City Development Plan.
Finance JNP
The study and analysis shall be divided into 2 parts. First section would aim at the
Assessment of Financial Statements of JNP i.e. Revenue and Capital Account. Second
section shall aim at the analysis of the current systems performance followed by Issues and
Problems.
The findings from the sector analysis would be useful to prepare the City Profile consisting of
the assessment of the existing situation in all the sectors identified, emerging issues, SWOT
analysis and projections of the present gaps and future requirements.

PHASE III: DEVELOPMENT OF CITY VISION AND SECTOR GOALS AND


STRATEGIES
Activity 5: Benchmark study
At this stage benchmark study will be done to list best practices for urban development. Best
practice study will be prepared for all the sectors i.e. infrastructure development, urban
reform, environment improvement etc. The study will help in strategy building process.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Activity 6: Pre-workshop Stakeholder Consultation


Sector assessment completed in the last stage will be discussed with different stakeholders
at individual level or in groups. Stakeholder consultations will be carried out with following
groups:
Stakeholders

Technique

Residents of NP
People residing in Slums
Community Leaders (Councillors)
Government Departments
Gram Panchayats
Hotel/ Restaurants owners
Educational Institute
1
Academicians
2
Students
Doctors

Group discussion representing each zones


Group discussion in sample pockets
Discussion with Parshads
Individual Meeting (structured questionnaire pattern)
Individual Meeting (structured questionnaire pattern)
Interview (structured questionnaire pattern)

NGOs

Group discussion
Individual meeting or Group discussion with CMO of
major hospitals in the city
Group discussion

Discussion for stakeholders consultations will be initiated on strategies, priorities and major
actions that may be required to move towards the vision. Findings from the consultation
process will further substantiate the Sector assessment and analysis. The Consultants will
continue to work in consultation with the local counterparts to develop sector strategies in
consonance with the city vision and sector goals.
The data derived from the survey and stakeholder consultations especially in the case of
Slum pockets and Residential areas shall be analyzed using appropriate statistical
techniques. The data collected would vary as per location and similarly priorities would also
vary thus keeping this in consideration the Weighted Index method would be adopted. To
obtain priority based output in a logical manner the data obtained shall be scaled at a level
which is comparable or scaling would be done to eliminate the bias in the data derived.
Further weightages shall be assigned to the indicators wherein the output of the data
analyzed would give location wise priority issues that would further help to identify projects
location wise.

Activity 7: Identification and detailing of projects


On the basis of the consultants understanding of the best practices, issues identified,
prospective growth scenario and strategies suggested; projects will be identified.

PHASE IV: DEVELOPMENT OF STRATEGIES AND PRIORITY ACTIONS


Activity 8: Evaluation of strategies/ projects
The strategies will be evaluated from the perspective of their contribution to achieving the
vision and sector goals. Criteria will be developed for prioritizing the strategies, programs and
projects in consultation with the Steering Group.

Activity 9: 2nd ULB Level Workshop


A 1st district level workshop will be organised to monitor the progress of the project.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

A 1st Stage discussion at the State Level would be organized at the UADD to monitor the
progresses of the project.
Deliverable: City Profile, Sector Analysis, City Vision, Strategy and Priority Project
Report (Report on 2nd Workshop).

PHASE V: PREPARING A CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN (CIP), FINANCING


STRATEGY AND CDP
Activity 10: Preparation of Draft CDP
Last stage of the CDP is to formulate the Capital Investment Plan (CIP) and Financial
Operating Plan (FOP). CIP would lay out the cost and revenue estimates of all the priority
projects in the next five years. The preparation of the CIP is a reiterative process requiring
adjustments to individual projects as well as changes in scheduling to make the whole
package work financially. Financial operating plan and project cash flows have been worked
out for each project on the basis of sustainable financial situation up to 2035. This also
determine types and sources of financing for priority projects from internal resources, state
and central governments, local financial institutions, donors, and through public-private
partnerships. The implications of each of these will be considered.

Activity 11: 3rd Workshop on Draft CDP


A 2nd stage district level workshop will be organised.
A 2nd Stage discussion at the State Level would be organized at the UADD to monitor the
progresses of the project.
Deliverable: Submission of Draft CDP and 3rd Workshop on Draft CDP Report.

PHASE VI: FINAL CDP REPORT


The suggestions and comments shall be incorporated in the draft CDP which shall be
finalized and submitted to the JNP.
Deliverable: 3rd Stage Presentation at district level & Submission of Final CDP Report.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

2. PHYSICAL FEATURES OF THE TOWN


2.1 HISTO RIC AL IMP O RT ANC E
Joura is one of the fast growing towns in Joura Mandal in Morena District of Madhya Pradesh
State. Joura Nagar Parishads history dates back to time of independence and is known for
Sorvadaya Andolan by Sobbarao a famous Gandhian ideologiest. From 14th to the 16th April
1972, a total of 511 dacoits surrendered before the government.
Most of the territory of the present-day Morena district formed Tonwarghar District of the
erstwhile princely state of Gwalior. After India's independence in 1947, the princely states
acceded to the Government of India, and Morena District acquired its present boundaries
with the addition of the princely state of Pahargarh in the south of the district. Morena District
became part of the newly formed state of Madhya Bharat, which was merged into Madhya
Pradesh on 1 November 1956.

2.2 PROFI LE OF DIS T RIC T MORE N A


Morena district is one of the
50 districts of the central
Indian state of Madhya
Pradesh. The
name,
Morena is derived from the
word Mor+raina means the
place where peacock is
enormously found. Morena,
which has an identity of
being home to perhaps the
largest number of peacocks
in India. The district is part
of Chambal Division. The
town of Morena is the
district
and
divisional
headquarters.
Location of Morena
The district has a widely dispersed population of 1,965,137 as of 2011. Morena is fifth district
in the state in density of population after Bhopal, Indore, Jabalpur, and Gwalior. The district
is mostly farmland, and trains are a popular form of transportation, although they
connect only about 15% of the villages within Morena. Morena is famous for its mustard
production. Paan Singh Tomar and other famous dacoits who operated in and around
Morena have etched Robin Hood-esque romanticism on Indian psyche about this remote
region.

2.3 GEOGR AP H Y
Morena is located at 26.30North latitude & 78.00East longitude. Geographically, Morena is
an interesting place as Madhya Pradesh touches two neighbouring states i.e. Rajasthan and
Uttar Pradesh here. Morena touches Dholpur (Rajasthan) in North-West and Pinahat (Agra,
Uttar Pradesh) in North-East. The neighbouring districts are Bhind, Gwalior, Shivpuri and
Sheopur.
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

2.4 ADMIN IST R AT IVE DIVISIO NS


Morena district comprises four sub-divisions: Morena, Ambah, Joura and Sabalgarh. Morena
sub-division comprises a lone tehsil and a lone block: Morena. Ambah sub-division
comprises two tehsils and blocks: Ambah and Porsa. Joura sub-division comprises Joura
tehsil, which is further divided into two blocks: Joura and Pahargarh. Sabalgarh sub-division
has two tehsils and blocks: Sabalgarh and Joura. Significant towns of this district are:
Morena, Bamor, Ambah, Porsa, Joura, Sabalgarh, Joura and Jhundpura. The district has six
Vidhan Sabha constituencies: Sabalgarh, Joura, Sumawali, Morena, Dimani and Ambah. All
of these are part of Morena Lok Sabha constituency.
Table No. 1.

Profile of District Morena

Particulars

2011

2001

Population

1,965,137

1,592,714

Male Population

1,068,364

874,089

896,773

718,625

4,989

4,989

23.38%

24.50%

Female Population
Total Area (persons per sq. km.)
Growth Rate (2001-2011 & 1991-2001)
Rural Population

1,494,734 (76.06 %)

Urban Population
Population Density (persons/Sq.km)

470,403 (23.94 %)
394

319

Sex ratio (females per 1000 males)

839

822

Sex ratio (0-6 years)

825

837

Literacy Rate

72.07

64.74

Male Literacy rate

84.22

79.89

Female Literacy rate

57.64

46.24

Household size (per household)

Source: Census of India 2011

2.5 REGIO N AL SET TI NG AND LI NK AG E S


Joura Nagar Parishad is located in Morena block in south-western part of District Morena
near Chambal region. The Morena District is bounded by District Dholpur in Rajasthan and
Agra in Uttar Pradesh to the North, District Karauli and Sheopur in the West and Gwalior and
Bhind districts in south and eastern side. Geographically, the town is located at 262040
North latitude and 774841 East longitudes & at an altitude of 185 m above mean sea level.
Joura is the located near the boundary of Rajasthan State and is well connected to major
towns and cities within 200 Km radius by road and railways.
The distance from Joura to Morena City is 26.6 km and 345 km far from the state capital
Bhopal. The nearby towns that are located near the Joura Nagar Parishad are Kailaras (20.1
Km), & Pahadgarh (23.8 Km). Nearby villages of the town are Alapur (1.7 Km), Mai (3.1 Km),
Thara (3.6 Km), Narhela (3.8 Km) & Nidhan (4.2 Km).

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Roadways: Roads play a significant role in linking Joura to other towns and cities in the
country. The State Highway No. 2 connects the town with Kailaras and Morena city. Morena
City is further connected with Gwalior-Dholpur in Rajasthan State via NH-3. The town is well
connected by road with Kota, Rajasthan and Chambal region of Madhya Pradesh via NH-3.
Railway Linkage: The town is connected with Gwalior and Sheopur by Gwalior-Sheopur
narrow gauge rail line. The nearest broad gauge railway station to the town is Morena
Railway Station.
Air Linkage: Nearest Airport is in Gwalior located at 60 kms from town.
Table No. 2.

S.No.
1
2
3
4
5

Location of urban centers near the town

Town Cities
Morena
Sabalgarh
Gwalior
Shivpuri
Sheopur

Distance from Joura (in Kms)


25.7 kms
44.9 kms
62.3 kms
180 kms
186 kms
Source: Primary Survey, 2012

2.6

PHYSIOG R AP H Y AND L ANDFORM

2.6.1 Topography
The town is situated on a flat terrain having flat slope. Storm water easily percolates into
ground due to good permeability of soil. The figure below shows that Joura and its hinterland
is located at an elevation of 150-300m above mean sea level.
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.2. Topography of the region

Source: www.mpgis.co.nr/

2.7 DR AI N AG E
Town naturally drains toward the canals in northern side of town in the fields however there
is no proper drainage system in town. Storm water is drained naturally towards north
direction. Due to flat topography flooding of some land pockets is a common phenomenon in
rainy season. The town lacks efficient drainage system hence flooding in some parts of town
is common. Flooding of grey water along the narrow gauge line passing through the town is
common phenomenon.
Figure No.3. Drainage Pattern in the Region

Source: www.mpgis.co.nr/

2.8 GEOLOG Y
Joura and its hinterland is situated on Vindhyan Geological formations.
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.4. Geological Map of the district

Source: www.mpgis.co.nr/

2.9 GROU ND W ATE R


Ground water levels normally vary from 20 ft. to 40 ft. in the town. Presently ground water is
the only source of drinking water in the town. Quality of ground water was reported to be
satisfactory by local residents however the water quality tests conducted by JNP showed
mild hardness in water. The regional ground water depth map given below shows that Joura
and its hinterlands ground water levels vary from 10m to 20m.
Figure No.5. Water Level of Madhya Pradesh District

Source: www.mpgis.co.nr/
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

2.10

CLI M AT E

2.10.1 Rainfall
Based on the available data in table below average rainfall in Joura was 567 mm during
years 2005-10. June to September is
considered rainy season for the town.
Table No. 3. Yearly Rainfall in Joura
Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

Rainfall (In mm)


582
295
303
854
805

Source: Statistical Department, Govt. of M.P., Morena.

Source: www.mpgis.co.nr/

2.10.2 Temperature
May was the hottest month of Joura during period 2006-10. Mean Maximum Temperature
during this month was 41.020C. Coldest month was January during 2006-10, mean minimum
temperature in this month during the period was 3.810C.
Table No. 4.
Month
January
February
March

Mean monthly temperatures (From year 2006-10) of Joura


Mean Monthly Maximum
Temperature (In 0C)
19.76
26.39
32.48

Mean monthly minimum


temperature(In 0C)
3.81
7.36
14.12
Page 17

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

38.54
41.02
38.58
32.92
32.59
33.75
33.03
28.67
26.66

21.06
26.58
27.08
24.48
23.354
23.7
17
11.28
7.64

Source: Statistical Department, Govt. of M.P, Morena

2.10.3 Wind direction


Predominant wind direction in the region is towards South-West. Average wind speed is 14
kms/hr.

2.10.4 Soil Type


The soil type of the state is divided into five types namely: Alluvial soils, Shallow and medium
black soils, medium and deep black soils, mixed read and black soils and red & yellow soils.
From the figure, it can be seen that the soil type in the region is alluvial soil.
Figure No.6. Soil Types of Madhya Pradesh

Source: www.mpkrishi.org

1.8

ABO UT JO U R A TO WN

Joura is one of the fast developing towns and is the tehsil head quarter in District Morena.
Joura was declared as Nagar Panchayat in 1914. Joura is an important commercial centre
and an administrative town. Its retail market is popular in the region as it is an important
market for sale and purchase of agricultural products in the region. It is a tehsil headquarter
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

(HQ) having offices of Sub-Divisional Magistrate (SDM), Block Development Officer (BDO),
Nagar Parishad (NP), Janpad Panchayat (JP), Forest Department, Water Resources
Department & Police Department. Joura also has potential in the region due to presence of
better schooling facilities and college level education. Moreover, Joura is famous for
production of Gudh (a by-product of sugarcane) and manufacturing of carpets. Carpets are
also exported from this town in the region extending upto nearby states as well. Carpet
production is done in households especially present in ward no. 15. Mostly women are
working in Carpet industries.
Jouras hinterland has developed rich agriculture productivity due to availability of Chambal
Canal fed irrigation. Approximately 70% land of the tehsil is canal irrigated. Main crops grown
in Joura are wheat, mustard, maize, pulses, sugarcane, vegetables and tobacco. Joura is
also known for the production of Guava fruit. Further, the town falls in the region declared as
Old Dacoit area by the State Government.

1.9

PL AN NI NG AR E A

The Planning area of the town includes Nagar Parishad area. The Nagar Parishad which
covers an area of 3.00 sq. km. has been taken as planning area for preparation of City
development Plan 2035. Joura Nagar Parishad area includes agriculture area, water bodies,
built up areas etc. The Nagar Parishad area is dominated by agricultural fields.
Administratively, the town is divided into 18 wards. Ward nos. 4,5,6,7,8,10,11,12,13,14,15
are a part of older city however ward nos. 1,2,3,9,16,17,18 are the areas developed after
2002. Rapid urbanization have taken place due to high inmigration in the last decade.
The planning has been done based on the land requirement for future development and
consultations with Nagar Parishad which shall be responsible for development of town. It is
expected that future expansion of city will take place in vacant land pockets in existing wards
only.

1.10 ISSUES AN D DEV ELOPME NT S TR ATEGIES


Sector

Issues

Development Strategies

Connectivity
and linkages

Widening and improvement of SH-2.


Provision of broad gauge rail connection
till Rajasthan via Morena.

Physical
features
natural
resources

Support and incentives to farmers for


growing high value cash crops like
cotton, rice, sugarcane, fruits, flowers
etc.
Have good potential for creating
employment opportunities for women in
handloom sector and Agriculture based
small scale industries.
Presently such industries are operating
from residential areas of town.
Women are still in majority working in
carpet
industry
operating
from
households.

&

Condition of SH-2 is
not
good
causing
hinderance in smooth
flow of traffic.
Excessive exploitation
of agriculture as a
resource.
Water logging problem
in the town due to flat
topography
and
absence of proper
drainage system.
Presence
of
mild
hardness
in
groundwater.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

3. DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF JOURA


Summary: This chapter provides the glimpses of the district and the towns existing condition and its
regional connectivity with the surrounding towns and metros.

3.1 REGIO N AL POPU L AT IO N G ROWTH


The decadal population growth rate at national level is 25.77% for the period 20012011 based on census of India with an estimated population of 1.2 billion in 2011.
India has emerged as the second largest populated country in the world. During the
same period (2001-2011) Madhya Pradesh has registered a growth rate of 20.30% lower
than the growth rate of Morena district (23.38%). Madhya Pradesh contributes about 6% of
population to the country.
Table No. 5. Population Comparison at National, State, District and Town Level
Region

2001

2011

Growth Rate (2001-2011)

1 billion

1.2 billion

17.6 %

Madhya Pradesh

60,348,023

72,597,565

20.30%

Morena District

1,592,714

1,965,137

23.38%

25,547

42,149

65.00%

India

*Joura Nagar Parishad

Source: Census of India 2011, *Data from Nagar Parishad

3.2 POPUL AT IO N G R OWTH T RE ND I N J OUR A NP


Joura is one of the important developing centers in District Morena of Madhya Pradesh
State. Being an important commercial and administrative town with better infrastructure
facilities, Joura attracted inmigration from surrounding towns and villages during the last
decade. As per 2011 population census, the Joura Nagar Parishad (JNP) had a total
population of 42,149 thereby registering a remarkable increase by 65.00% since 2001 which
is almost triple than the districts decadal growth rate of 23.66%. The total number of
households in the town is 6716 and having average household size of 6.28 persons which is
quite lesser than the district HH size of 7. The population of Joura town was 15,691 in 1981
which almost tripled during the period of 1981-2011. This has been due to attainment of
administrative town in the form of Tehsil headquarter and establishment of Joura Nagar
Parishad as an important town. The average decadal growth rate during last four decades
(1981-2011) was 43.09%.
Table No. 6. Population trend in Joura Nagar Parishad
Year
1971
1981
1991
2001
2011*

Population
10,314
15,691
19,579
33,512
42,149
Average

Increase

Decadal Growth Rate


5,377
3,888
13,933
8.637
7,959

52.13%
24.78%
71.67%
25.77%
43.09%

Source: Census of India 2001* Joura Nagar Parishad

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.7. Decadal Population trend in Joura Town

The growth rate of the town declined from 1981 to 1991 due to outmigration of people from
the town to nearby urban centers such as Morena and Gwalior. The town showed a gradual
increase in growth rate from 1991 to 2001 due to establishment of better infrastructure
facilities and industrial development in the region. There has been drastic increase from 2001
to 2011 this has been due to provision of higher level infrastructure in the town and few new
wards were introduced in the jurisdiction of Nagar Parishad Joura.

3.3 POPUL AT IO N P RO JEC TIO N


Population projection is a scientific attempt to glance
into the future population scenario, conditioned by
making certain assumptions, using data relating to
the past available at that point of time. The
assumptions used and their probability of adhering in
future, forms a critical input in this mathematical
effort. Thus, the projections are based on the
assumption that the past trends will continue in the
future.
Table No. 7.

Population Projection through four different methods

Year
Population as
per census
1971
1981
1991
2001
2011
2015
2021

The need for population projection in


India at various levels and by
different components like age, sex,
rural-urban etc., for the use by the
official agencies uniformly, both at
the center and the states was keenly
felt in 1958 on the eve of the
formulation of the third five year
plan.

Population Projections
Arithmetic
Geometric
Incremental
Progression
Progression
Increase
method(A)
method(B)
method (C)

AdoptedAverage

10,314
15,691
19,579
25,547
42,149
46,130
50,110

49,871
59,007

47,532
53,850

48,702
56,429
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

2025
2031
2035

54,090
58,070
62,050

69,817
82,607
97,740

61,104
69,293
78,418

65,461
75,950
88,079

Source: Census of India 2001,* Population Projections, Growth Rate in parenthesis

Table No. 8.

Future Population Forecast

Year
2001
2011
2015
2021
2025
2031
2035

Projected Population
25,547
42,149
48,702
56,429
65,461
75,950
88,079

Increase
5,968
16,602
6,553
7,727
9,032
10,489
12,129

Growth rate (in %)


30.48
64.99
15.55
15.87
16.01
16.02
15.97

Source: *Population Projections

Figure No.8. Future Population Trend

Based on the projections the growth rate is declining trend from 2001 to 2011 drastically from
30% to 65%. So, we have taken the average of all the methods.The population has been
projected up to the year 2035 using the average of following three methods:

Arithmetic Increase Method(Pn = P0+ni)


Geometric Increase Method (Pn=P0+(1+r/100)n)
Incremental Growth Method (Pn= P0+(I+I.I.)n)

The population projection difference from different methods is very large that is why the
population projections for the town has been taken based on average of all methods.
According to the population projections, the population is expected to increase at the rate of
16.5% from 2011 to 2035. The population is expected to reach a size of around 56,429 by
2021 and by 2035 the town is expected to grow to a size of 88,079 persons. According to the
population of 2001, Joura falls under the category of a Class III Town, as of 2035 it would
come under Class II Town.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

3.4 W AR D WISE POPU L AT ION DIST RI BUTION


The density of Joura town is 14,046 persons per sq.km. (140.46 persons per hectare) in the
year 2011 which is quite high. As per the UDPFI guidelines, the developed area density for a
small town is 75-125 persons per hectare. As compared with the guidelines the town is
experiencing very low density.
Table No. 9. Ward wise Population distribution in Joura-2011
Ward No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Total

Population

Population % w.r.t. ward

3888
2954
3032
3064
1513
1276
1175
1589
1936
1756
2229
1523
2035
1916
1746
4034
3276
3197
42,139

9.23%
7.01%
7.20%
7.27%
3.59%
3.03%
2.79%
3.77%
4.59%
4.17%
5.29%
3.61%
4.83%
4.55%
4.14%
9.57%
7.77%
7.59%
100.00%
Source: Joura Nagar Parishad

The spatial distribution of population can be examined based on the ward wise population.
From the above table it can be seen that the highest population percentage is found in ward
no.16 i.e. 9.57% of the total population. The ward No.7 is having lowest population of just
1175 persons. The lesser density wards are located on the periphery of the town with
inadequate road network and lack of basic facilities and away from SH-2. Thus, the
transportation corridors and facilities play an important role in spatial growth of the town. It is
necessary to develop the outer areas in order to decongest the core area of the town which
will thereby reduce the stress on infrastructure.
Figure No.9. Ward wise Population Distribution in the town

Source: Joura Nagar Parishad


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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

4. SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILE
Summary: This chapter focuses on the sex ratio, literacy rates, work force participation rate,
growth of trade & commerce, industrial activities and economic opportunities and
industrialization in the Town.

4.1

SEX R AT IO

Sex ratio, defined as the number of women per 1000 men, is one of the indicators of the
status of women in a society. Women have been observed to enjoy longer survival rate than
men and therefore sex ratio should normally exceed 1000. On an average, the life
expectancy of women is five years more than men. Therefore, sex ratios lower than 1000
indicates in general discrimination against women. It reflects roots of patriarchy, which is
usually defined as a structural system of male domination. Most countries, except China
and those of South Asia have a sex ratio higher than 1000. The reasons for adverse sex ratio
in any region include high mortality rates among women, high maternal mortality ratio,
practice of female foeticide (sex selective abortion) and female infanticide and neglect of the
health of the girl child, especially on nutrition front, resulting in higher mortality; besides
immigration of single male population to a region.
To overcome the impact of immigration of single males to a region, which is the case
particularly in urbanized and industrialized regions and states of the country, the juvenile sex
ratio is considered in analyzing the status of women. Juvenile sex ratio is the sex ratio of
population in age-group 0-6 years.
Figure No.10. Sex ratio at National, State, District and Town Level

Source: Census of India, 2011


The sex ratio of Joura is 808 which is comparatively lesser than that of the district (822)
however, it is comparatively lower than the state and national statistics. The sex-ratio
between the age group of 0-6 yrs in the town is 850. A low child sex ratio indicates higher
occurances of female foeticide and higher infant mortality rates owing to poor child care
facilities. One reason behind this could be that marriages take place at a very young age and
this causes health related issues which becomes the cause of high death rate of female
Page 24

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

population. Incidentally, if the spatial variation of sex ratio across all wards is seen, on an
average child sex ratio is higher than adult sex ratio.
Table No. 10. Comparative Sex Ratio
AREA
Morena District
Joura Nagar
Parishad

SEX RATIO

SEX RATIO 0-6

SEX RATIO SC

SEX RATIO ST

822
808

837
850

817
790

894
930

Source: Census of India, 2001

Credit can perhaps be given to the initiatives taken by the Government of MP for improving
the skewed sex ratio in the state. A skewed sex ratio that the 2011 Census threw up in the
case of Madhya Pradesh, particularly among its elite social strata, has prompted the state
government to implement a three-pronged strategy to remedy the grave socio-demographic:
create awareness through social and religious organisations, eradicate sex determination
tests and introduce strict laws to counter the menace in its totality.
Initiatives by the State Government
A Statewide Save the Girl Child (Beti Bachao Andolan) Campaign was launched by Chief
Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan. It was stated that to remove the stigma attached to a girl
child, not only girls who have excelled in their field would be honoured, but also their parents
who have encouraged the girl child to move ahead.
The salient features of the budget estimates of 2012-13 are as follows:
Women and Child Development
Provision of Rs. 4036 crores for all-round development of women and child.
Initiation of BetiBachaoAbhiyan to balance sex ratio and foster sensitivity and awareness in
society.
Provision of Rs. 48.75 crores in a new scheme to make available better health and nutrition
facilities for women and child.
Provision of Rs. 650 crores for LadliLaxmiYojana.
Provision of Rs. 100 crores for construction of anganwadi buildings.

4.2

LITE R AC Y R AT E

As per Census definition, Literacy Rate is the total percentage of the population of an area at
a particular time aged seven years or above who can read and write with understanding. As
of 2011 provisional Census data, Joura has a literacy rate of 62.47% which is lower when
compared with district (72%).The reason for low literacy rate is due to social taboos
prevailing in the town and lack of awareness among females striving for better life.
Table No. 11. Literacy rate of the town
S.No.

Data item

Persons

Males

Females

1
3

Total Population
Literates
Illiterates

22,676 (53.80%)
16232 (61.55%)
6444 (40.85%)

19,468 (46.19%)
10139 (38.45%)

42,149
26371
15778

9329 (59.13%)

Source: Nagar Parishad Joura


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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.11.

Literacy Rate at National, State, District and Town Level

Source: Census of India, 2011

4.3

AV ER AG E HOUSE HOL D SI ZE

Joura has a total of 6716 households with an average household size of 6.28 persons in the
year 2011 and 3781 households with a household size of 6.76 persons in 2001 which means
the household size of the town has reduced, this has been due to movement of males
outside their homes in search of better opportunities in the nearby towns.
Table No. 12. Average Household Size in the town
Year
Total Population
Households
Average Household size

2011
42,149
6716
6.28

2001
25,547
3781
6.76

Source: Census of India 2001 and Nagar Parishad

4.4

SOCI AL C OMPOS I TION

The social composition in the town is heterogenous with respect to the religion and caste.
Hindus, Muslims, Kolis, Kumbhars, Harijans form the social fabric of the town. The
percentage of Schedule Caste population in JNP was 9.60% as per the 2001 population
census which is higher than the national average. Around 0.57% of the total population
accounts for Schedule tribe population in the city.
Table No. 13. SC & ST Population
AREA
Morena District
Joura Nagar
Parishad

TOTAL SC
POPULATION
69,689

TOTAL ST
POPULATION
1377

% SC
POPULATION
20.29

% ST
POPULATION
0.40

3,231

194

9.60

0.57

Source: Census of India, 2001

Page 26

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.12. Social Composition structure

Source: Census of India, 2001

4.5

WORK FOR CE P ARTI CIP AT IO N R AT E

The work force participation rate in the town is 27.64% which comprises main and marginal
workers. Further, the percentage of main and marginal workers of the total workers is
92.90% and 7.10% respectively. While the female literacy rate is very low in the town, as a
consequence the female work force participation rate is very low.
This socio-economic profile purely indicates that most of the working population has involved
in the primary and tertiary activities. This is a good sign for the development and the
improvement of small scale industries in which helps in generating internal economy for the
town. This re-instates the importance of agriculture in the economy of Joura. The agricultural
labourers work as seasonal labourers from August-April, i.e. during the harvest season. It
can also be observed that the maximum involvement of female population is as agricultural
labourers and cultivators.
During the stakeholder consultations, it was found that the females also are willing to
undergo tarining and are ready to work. This is one of the positive responses for improving
the economy, female work force participation in the town and making them aware about their
rights and duties. Also there is no other major town in the vicinity, thus the town will have a
major impact in terms of economy, spatial growth and development.
Table No. 14. Work Force Participation Rate
AREA
Morena District
Joura Nagar Parishad

TOTAL
POPULATION
3,43,305
25,547

WORKERS
Total
Male
91,469
80,277
7,061
6249

Female
11192
812

WFPR
(%)
26.60
27.64

Source: Census of India, 2001

Table No. 15. Working population of Joura


S.NO
1
2

DETAILS
Main Workers
Marginal Workers

POPULATION
6560
501

% TO THE TOTAL WORKING


POPULATION
92.90%
7.10%
Source: Census of India, 2001
Page 27

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Table No. 16. Sector wise population of workers of Joura


S.NO

SECTOR

POPULATION

Agricultural labourers

218

Cultivators

933

Household industry workers

165

Other workers (Retail business, service sector etc.)

5244

Source: Census of India, 2001

Figure No.13. Sectorwise distribution of workforce population

Source: Census of India, 2001

4.6

TR AD E & C OMME RCE

4.6.1 Retail business


Joura is a popular town in the region famous for its market area or bazaar. People from
surrounding areas come to Joura for shopping for daily needs household and other items.
The town is also famous for production of Gudh (extract from sugarcane) and Kaleen/Carpet
making which makes the town unique in the region. There are around 200 household
industries in ward no. 15 that are engaged in production of carpets. Local brokers purchase
carpets from them and sell it in Gwalior, Delhi and Jaipur. There needs to be a strategy to
eliminate the middle men and the manufacturers are able to directly communicate in the
market. This will encourage good business and also remove the mid- corruption.
The Pachbigha Road Bazaar is main Bazaar of Joura. Retails shops also existed in MorenaSabhalgarh Road in large number but demolished recently due to widening of the road.
Krishi market (Anaj Mandi) is also available in town. Vegetable Market (Sabzi Mandi) is
temporarily located inside Grain market premises. There are a total of 800 commercial
properties in town, out of which 400 belong to JNP property. Retail business is largest source
of employment for people in town after agriculture. Traffic congestion in the commercial
areas is a major concern due to absence of parking, encroachment can been from the
highlights of the commercial areas in the town above.
Page 28

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.14. Commercial Activities in the town

Page 29

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

4.6.2 Industrial activities


Only small scale industries exist in the town. Most of these industries are household in
nature. Details of the industries are given below:
S.NO.
1
2

TYPE OF INDUSTRY

NO.

Flour mills
Welding shops

20
20

Agriculture implements fabricators/sellers

Ice factory

PVC shops

10

Warehouses

Tiles, Cement and Stone

30

Paints sellers

Simvic pipes shops

10

Automobile servicing workshops

11

Automobile dealers

10

12

Furniture

13

Submersible pumps shop

14

Printing press

10

15

Drinking water packaging

16

Electronic items servicing & repair

17

Cable T.V network operator

18

Cream, butter, Ghee Dairy

30

19

Khadi weaving

Total

375
Source: Nagar Parishad Joura, 2011

4.6.3 Tourism & heritage


Their no place of tourist interest in the town however there are two spots which can be
considered as heritage structures due to their historical character and old age. One of them
is a small fort near main market. Presently this building is used for girls school and BDO
office. Another site is an old Bawli near Police ground which is in dilapidated condition.

4.6.4 SWOT Analysis


Strength
Joura is popular
regional market
hence good
consumer base is
available.
Availability of
Cheap labor.
Dominated by
Primary sector
Page 30

Weakness
Lack of
infrastructure
facilities
Absence of
marketing
committee for
agro products.
Work
participation rate

Opportunity
Development of SSI
in Gudh production
and carpet making.
Improve skilled
labor.
Improve agroproducts and
marketing by
providing Agriculture

Threat
Condition of
infrastructure facilities
will degrade.
High density in the
core areas will further
degrade the quality of
life of the people.
In absence of the
training programmes

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

because of strong
agro base
background.
Gudh production
and Carpet
making is an
important
economic activity.

of female
population is less

Products Marketing
Committee (APMC).
Willingness of the
females to work and
get training.

for the female, the


work force
participation will
further reduce.

4.6.5 Issues, Potentials and Strategies


The potential areas for local economic development include:

Provision of better infrastructure even in poor community areas so as to facilitate


development of household industries.

Promoting urban agriculture as the potential of the town.

Promoting the socio-economic development through implementation of pro-poor


strategies.

4.6.6 Conclusion

Joura has an added advantage because of the road connectivity via SH-2 and other
major roads through the surrounding cities like Morena, Gwalior.

The Primary and Tertiary sectors help in improving the services and economy in the
town.

The literacy level in the town is less than the district and the state.

The town has a potential to grow it as an industrial belt because of nearby industries
in the surrounding regions.

There is scope of development of household industries operated especially by female


workers in the town.

5.6.7 Projects Identified


Sr.
Project
No. list/Sector

1
2

Mandi & Godown


Development of
HH industries for
300 HH (Bidhi
making
from
tendu leaves)
Total

Estimated
Cost in lakhs

Phase A
2011-15
investment
Rs.in lakh)
540
324
300
180

840

504

Phase B
2015-25
(investment
Rs.in lakh)
216
120

Phase C
2025-35
(investment
Rs. in lakh)

336.00

Page 31

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

5. PHYSICAL PLANNING & GROWTH


MANAGEMENT
Summary: This chapter describes about the spatial growth of the town, land use analysis of the
municipal area & developed area of the town and its comparison with the UDPFI guidelines, housing
scenario, future growth possibilities and environment. At the end the SWOT and issues & strategies
have been discussed.

5.1

SP ATI AL G ROWT H T REND S

The factors which govern the spatial growth of the town include road accessibility, land price,
economic activities, social facilities, migration, community service facilities etc. The growth of
the town is taking place along the State Highway-2 towards Morena (25.7 km) and Gwalior
(62.3 km) in the north-east and south-east direction respectively. It is connected to these
towns via NH-3 which connects SH-2 passing from the town. The growth of the town is
towards the direction of NH-3. The figure below shows the location of town and its nearby
urban centers.
Figure No.15. Location of town and nearby centers

Source: Primary Survey, 2011


Administratively the town is divided into 18 wards. Wards nos. 4,5,6,7,8,10,11,12,13,14,15
are part of old city and newly developed wards include 1,2,3,9,16,17,18 which came into
existence after 2002. The town has grown rapidly in past decades due to high inmigration
from surrounding region due to presence of commercial base and better infrastructural
Page 32

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

faciltiies. Pachbigha Bazaar and Sadar Bazaar are part old city. New areas have developed
mostly along the Morena-Sabalpur Road (SH-2).

5.2

SP ATI AL DIST RI B UTIO N OF POPUL AT IO N

The population of the town is not distributed evenly; the population concentration is high in
ward nos. 1, 2,3,4,16,17 & 18. The town has flourished along the SH-2 and the core areas.
The total area of the town is 3.00 sq.km. The town is divided in to 18 wards with a population
of 42,149 in 2011. The town is likely to grow towards NH-3 i.e. Morena-Sabalpur road via
SH-2.

5.3

L AN D USE AN AL Y SIS

For planned development of an area, an in-depth analysis of the existing landuse is


necessary. The areas under different landuse categories are provided in the table below as
per the categories. Within the JNP area residential use of land is highest in town i.e. 66.67%
which is higher than the UDPFI guidelines area of 45-50%, this is due to the higher density
over smaller area in the town followed by commercial use (15.56%). Pachbigha Bazaar,
Sadar Bazaar and Morena-Sabalpur Road are main commercial areas of town. The parks
and open spaces comprise only 1.1% of the total area which is quite negligible when
compared to standards of 18-24%. The area under circulation is also quite low while the
public/semipublic areas including community hall, Nagar Parishad building area, school etc.
is comparable with the standards.
Table No. 17. Landuse distribution of Nagar Parishad, 2011
Landuse
Residential
Commercial
Public Semi Public
Park and Entertainment
Roads
Developed area
Undeveloped area

Developed Area
in Hectares
180
42
15
3
30
270
30

Percentage of total
developed area
66.67%
15.56%
5.56%
1.11%
11.11%
100%

% as per UDPFI
guidelines
45-50
3-4
10-12
18-20
12-14

Source: Primary survey by CDP team


Figure No.16. Landuse distribution in the town

Page 33

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

5.3.1 Residential
Residential occupies 66.67% of the total developed land which is quite high due to higher
density on lesser land. This envisaged approximately 180 hectares of land for residential
development. The town has a net residential density of 140.46 persons/hectare. This shows
that the town faces high density because of inmigration.

5.3.2 Commercial
Around 42 hectares of land in the town is occupied by commercial activities which is about
15.5% of the total developed area. Commercial landuse includes shops, trading units (Mandi)
and markets, hotels and restaurants. The town does not have an organized commercial
centre. They are mostly scattered along major corridors which is SH-2 and towards Morena
and Gwalior (NH-3). Some of the commercial activities are concentrated in the core area with
less road widths which might interrupt movement of traffic.

5.3.3 Industrial
Only small scale industries exist in the town. Most of these industries are household in nature
including carpet manufacturing, beedhi making, flour mills and repair industries. However
based on agrarian economy, there is an absence of marketing committee for agricultural
products. Town has a potential to grow it as an industrial area because of available industrial
belt which is at a radius of 150 Km from the town.

5.3.4 Public and Semi Public


As per town statistics the percentage of public and semi public uses is 5.56% of developed
area which is more as compared to UDPFI guidelines it should be 10-12% for this kind of
town. This area includes health facilities, schools and colleges, administrative/office buildings
and public amenities and facilities.

5.3.5 Transportation
The area under roads is 30 Ha which is about 11.11% of the total developed area, I.e.
percentage of land under roads is very less. This area comprises of SH-2, minor roads, bus
stops and bus stand. When compared with UDPFI area under roads should be 12% for a
town like this.

5.3.6 Recreational
The area under recreational comprisesof play grounds, parks and open areas is only 3
hectares, about 1.11% of the total developed area. The town lacks proper and adequate
recreation facilities. All religious gatherings and fairs are arranged outside the municipal
limits. As per UDPFI guidelines the percentage of recreational spaces should be 18-20%.

5.4

HOUSI NG S CEN ARIO

As per the provisional population figures provided by the Nagar Parishad, the population as
per the 2011 census was 42,149 with 6716 as the total number of households. As per the
primary survey by the consultants, it was found that out of the total
20% houses are
in dilapidated condition, 70% are livable and 10% are in good condition.

Page 34

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Table No. 18. Housing condition


S.No.
1
2
3

Housing condition
Good
Livable
Dilapidated
Figure No.17.

Total Housholds
%age
671
10%
4700
70%
1345
20%
Source: Primary survey by CDP team
Housing Condition

As per census 2001, about 89% of the population lived in permanent houses while only 11%
of the population lives in semi-permanent and kuccha houses. Most of the semi pucca and
kutcha houses are located in the slums. This depicts the urban character of the Nagar
Parishad having potential for further attraction of population from nearby under-developed
areas. As far as the ownership status is concerned, majority of population live in personally
owned properties. About 85% of the population lives in owned houses and only 14% in
rented houses.
Table No. 19. Housing Scenario
Type of Houses
Ownership Status
Censu
s
Permanent Semi-permanent Temporary Owned Rented
Any other
House
s 4969
4561
255
306
4245
685
61
Source: Census 2001

Page 35

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.18. Ownership status in the town & Type of Census Houses

Source: Census 2001


5.4.1 Present and Future Housing Demand
As per census 2001 and 2011, the total number of residential HH in the town is 3781 and
6716 respectively. Future demand for housing in the town would increase to 17616 houses
for the 2035, when compared with base year 2011 taking the average household size of 5 as
the national standard for housing computation.
Table No. 20. Housing Demand
Year
2001
2011
2015
2021
2025
2031
2035

Existing Housing
Average Houshold Size
Housing Required (in units)
3781
6.8
6716
6.3
5
9740
5
11286
5
13092
5
15190
5
17616
Source: Census of India 2001, 2011 and Computed values.

5.4.2 SWOT Anal ysis


Strength

Weakness

Opportunities

Threat

Availability of
land for future
development.

Absence of open spaces


and parks in the Town.
Absence of formal
industries in the town.
Out of the total developed
area, percentage of roads
is very less as compared
with UDPFI Guidelines.

Potential to develop
industries in the town.
Potential for
developing recreation
zones in the town.
Potential of
development of buffer
zones near water
bodies.

Conservation of
water bodies.
Lack of policies
to control
haphazard
development.
Lack of policies
for planned
development.

Page 36

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

5.4.3 Issues
As per the analysis the following issues have been evolved:

Area under recreation and roads is only about 1.1% and 11.1% respectively. This
indicates that the town needs more open spaces and parks and movement for
circulation.
The town does not have any industrial development except few industrial
establishments as Household industries even though it lies in the industrial belt.

5.4.4 Strategies
The development strategies for the land use will help in the regulated and planned
development of the town.

Develop guidelines for the conversion of agricultural land into non-agricultural use.
This will help in keeping a check on the area under agricultural uses and misuse of
rich fertile agricultural land.
Enforce development restrictions in some areas.
Awareness among stakeholders on development regulations and planned
development of the town.
Delineate buffer zones and green belts to restrict development towards forest and
water bodies
Taking measures for the development of small and medium scale industries in the
town to support the agro products and for other local resources.
Regulations for mixed land use i.e. in case the number of Land Uses in one property
is of more than one type.
Development of low density residential areas with the traditional construction
materials for the buildings.
Strict measures should be adopted for conservation and development of water
bodies, as the town has a large number of water bodies.
Development of commercial, educational, recreational spaces and public facilities to
fulfill the future requirement.
Improvement of circulation spaces and major junctions (i.e. bus stand junction, Ghadi
road) in the town for the smooth flow of traffic.
Rain Water Harvesting (RWH) should also be included while framing
the
development regulations of the town. The proposal of RWH has been discussed in
the later chapters.

These issues and strategies mentioned above supports proper management of urban growth
in the town which includes development of landscapes, conservation of water bodies,
improvement of roads and junctions, provide strict measures for the land conversion
activities. This will help in restricting the haphazard development within the Nagar Parishad
area.

Page 37

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6. PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE
Summary: This chapter presents the existing status of urban services in Joura. It covers
water supply, sewerage, sanitation, drainage, solid waste management, traffic &
transportation and social infrastructure. The chapter also estimates the present and future
gaps by the year 2035. The issues & strategies and SWOT analysis is done for each sector.

6.1

W AT ER S UPP L Y

6.1.1 Source of Water and supply


Although there is plenty of surface water resources like Asan River, Pagara Dam & Chambal
canal available in the region but ground water is the preferred source of water in Joura due to
its good quality and availability in abundance at a depth of 20 to 40 ft. So far, JNP has not
formulated any proposal for surface water based scheme due to high investment
requirements in surface water based scheme as ongoing ground water based supply system
is far more economical. Presently, JNP is supplying water from a number of borewells. This
is due to the fact that ground water quality is reasonably good and easily available at depth
of 20 to 40 ft. All the wards are covered by piped water supply except ward nos. 16, 17 and
18.
About 66% of the consumed drinking water is through taps followed by handpumps and
tubewells. This indicates that ground water is the efficient source of drinking water facility in
the town.
Table No. 21. Sources of drinking water

Tap
2,105

Source of drinking water


Handpump
Tubewell
459
151

Well
1,066
Source: Census, 2001

Figure No.19. Sources of drinking water

Source: Census, 2001


Page 38

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.1.2 Groundwater Quantity and Quality


In general the depth to water level ranged between 0 and 10 m bgl in entire Madhya
Pradesh, except in patches and northern Madhya Pradesh. Very shallow groundwater levels
ranging between 0 and 2 m bgl were observed in 41.4% of monitoring wells. Water levels
between 10 and 20 m. bgl were noted in pockets in small pockets and northern Madhya
Pradesh (Neemuch, Khargone, Burhanpur, Shajapur, Shivpuri, Gwalior, Sheopur, Datia,
Bhind, Morena and Sheopur districts) and observed in 7.34% of monitoring wells. Very deep
water levels more than 20 m.bgl were seen in pockets spread in parts of Bhind, Morena and
Sheopur districts and observed in 1.72% of monitoring wells.
Figure No.20. Depth to water level Map in Morena District

Source: Central Ground water board


A perusal of this map shows that in general rise in water levels is observed in entire State
and noted in 92.06% of monitoring wells. In Malwa Region, rise more 4 m in groundwater
levels is seen in major part of the regional area while in eastern part of Madhya Pradesh, rise
between 0 and 4 m in groundwater levels is seen. Rise up to 2 m in water level is observed
in 27.47% of monitoring wells. Rise between 2 and 4 m in groundwater levels is seen in
pockets spread in entire State area and observed in 28.57% of monitoring wells. Rise more 4
m in groundwater levels is observed in 36.02% of monitoring wells. Fall between 2 and 4 m
in groundwater levels is seen in pockets Datia, Morena and Shivpuri districts and observed in
1.59% of monitoring wells. Fall more than 4 m was noticed in some isolated wells of Gwalior,
Morena, Guna, Chhatarpur and Rewa districts observed in 0.85% of monitoring wells.

Page 39

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.1.3 Treatment & Transmission o f Water


The water in the Nagar Parishad is supplied from 2 OHTs, 12 tubewells using 3 to 6 inch
diameter supply pipelines. Total length of pipelines is 6 kms. Out of which 3 kms is CC mains
of 6 inch dia and 3 kms is PVC line of 3 to 4 inch dia. All these pipelines are in old and
dilapidated condition and needs to be replaced. The water is supplied as pergravity based
system. In most of the areas water is supplied through 2 OHTs of 60,000 gallon capacity
each. These OHTs are filled up using 6 tubewells. In some areas water is directly supplied to
colonies through tubewells. JNP is presently using total 12 tubewells for supply of water in
entire town (refer water supply map). Normally supply time is 1 hour daily. JNP have also
installed 279 handpumps in town. 2 more OHTs of 3 lac gallon capacity are under
construction. So after construction of these OHTs total storage capacity will be 4.2 lac
gallons. JNP needs to invest minimum in present ground based supply system as they
neither have to treat the water nor they have to maintain a complex system. Joura Nagar
Parishad is only doing chlorination treatment at present; this treatment is done only for the
water supplied through OHTs.
JNP charges Rs. 30 per connection per month. JNP also supply water for special occasions
through 7 water-tankers. Capacity of a tanker is 2000 litres. JNP charges Rs. 100 per tanker
for public purposes and Rs. 200 per tanker for private demand such as construction and
other purposes.
Figure No.21. Presence of OHTs & water container for transportation of water

OHTs in the town for water storage

Page 40

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.22. Water Supply practices in the town

6.1.4 Quality of Water


As per the survey by the consultants, mild hardness was reported by local people in the
ground water although they informed that they are satisfied by the overall water quality. The
sample test results of water quality are given below. The results below show that hardness is
above the permissible limits for drinking water.
Table No. 22. Water Quality in the town
S.No

Test
parameters

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Color
Odour
Turbidity
pH value
Total alkalinity
Total chlorides
Total hardness

Tubewell
near Tubewell near townhall Permissible
Pachbigha OHT
OHT
near
Police limits
ground
Colorless
Colorless
5 on Cobalt scale
Odourless
Odourless
Unobjectionable
0.2
0.2
5 ppm
7.5
7.5
7.0 to 8.0
660 ppm
680 ppm
320 ppm
390 ppm
200 ppm
690 ppm
700 ppm
200 ppm
Source: Joura Nagar Parishad

6.1.5 Present and future demand and supply gaps


JNP is supplying water @65 lpcd per person per day, considering 135 lpcd demand present
supply gap is 4.01 MLD. This gap is expected to be overcome after construction of 2 new
OHTs.
Table No. 23. Future Demand requirement
2011
2015
2021
2025
2031
2035
Future Water Demand (MLD)
5.69
6.57
7.62
8.84
10.25
11.89
Existing Supply (MLD)
1.68
T & D Losses @ 20%
0.34
Net Supply (MLD)
1.34
Deficit
4.35
5.23
6.28
7.5
8.91
10.55
Source: Analysis, *(In case capacity not augmented and supply remains same; no
projects implemented)

Page 41

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.1.6 Comparative analysis with UDPFI and CPHEEO Guidelines


As per UDPFI guidelines, 135 lpcd is the desirable water requirement for this size of
settlement. It also suggests the involvement of NGOs for awareness programme for optimal
utilization and saving water, equitable distribution of water supply including the squatter
settlements, efforts to reduce the water losses in transmission and distribution. 80-90 lpcd is
the minimum requirement as per CPHEEO guidelines.

6.1.7 SWOT Anal ysis


Strength
Rich in natural
resources like
ground water.
Availability of
water source for
future needs in
the region (Asan
River, Pagara
Dam & Chambal
canal).

Weakness
Inadequate supply of
water

Opportunity
Maintenance of
water bodies will
help in developing
sustainable water
resource.

Lack of maintenance of
hand pumps.
Lack of water treatment
plant.

JNNURM mission
will play a major role
for implementation
of water supply
projects.

Dilapidated condition of
water supply pipes
Lack of technical
manpower and funds
for operation and
maintenance

Rain water
harvesting methods.

Threat
Inadequate
supply will lead
be a threat to
health
Increase in
water losses in
transmission
and distribution
Rusting of
pipes can lead
to
contamination
of water

6.1.8 Issues and Strategies

Issues
Ward nos. 16, 17 and 18 do not have
piped water supply
Water test results show hardness above
permissible limits
Development of surface water based
scheme may not be feasible for this small
town as water source is more than 14 kms
from town.
Pipelines are worn out and needs
replacement
Storage and treatment facilities to be
provided
Absence of leak detection system

Page 42

Strategies
Provision of Water Treatment Plant
Feasibility assessment for surface water
based scheme from Pagara Dam by
increasing supply area to surrounding
region also should be done
Replacement of old pipelines
Enhancement of storage capacity
Provision of leak detection system
Increase in water charges
Water supply through Mukhyamantri Pay
Jal Yojna in rural areas.

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.1.9 Identified Projects


Sr.
No.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

6.2

Project list/Sector

Expansion of network (20*2)


300 mm diameter of DI PIPE
150 mm diameter of DI PIPE
Renovation of existing pipe
line
Community tap: Stand Posts
Installation of meters
WTP (2)
Rain Water Harvesting
Structures (10)
Total

Estimated
Cost in
lakhs

Phase A
2011-15
investment
Rs.in lakh)

274

54.8

55
1
40.00
646.15

55.00
0.50
20.00
258.46

0.5
12.0
387.7

388.76

1.5
566.09

1.5
1017.65

Phase B
Phase C
2015-25
2025-35
(investmen (investmen
t Rs.in
t Rs. in
lakh)
lakh)
54.8
164.4

8.0

62.80

SEW AG E AN D S ANIT AT IO N

6.2.1 Existing sewerage system and means of sew age disposal


At present there is no sewage system in the town. The untreated or semi treated sewage is
disposed into the storm water drains especially in the core area of the town. Most of the
houses in town have their own flush type latrines with septic tank system. Approximately
5372 families use flush type latrine with septic tank system remaining 1343 families practice
open defecation. About 225 latrines were constructed under Sulabh for people with the
intervention by the state government.There are no treatment for grey water discharged from

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

kitchens. This water is disposed in open fields or road and rail lines side. A W aste Treatment
Plant and proper disposal system is required for treatment and hygienic disposal of grey
water. Due to absence of sewage system, city is facing various problems such as open
defecation, unhygienic conditions, etc.
Observations
Survey

during

Reconnaissance

There is no sewage system in the city.


In the absence of sewerage, residents
drain the effluents into open grounds or
streets.

In slum areas, the sanitation conditions


are worst.

Open defecation is
problem in the city.

Septic tank system is in vogue in the


city for personal lavatories.

the

common

6.2.2 Household toilets


As per 2001 Census, 2292 out of the total 3781 households had toilet facililities within the
premises. However, this comprised largely of pit latrines (45%) and only 1% of the
households had water closets with 43% of the population having no latrine facility.

Table 2: Toilet facilities in houses


No. of households having toilet
within premises
2,292

Type of Latrine within house


Pit
Water closet
Other
2,286
1
604

No latrine
2,139

Source: Census of India, 2001

Figure No.23. Presence of toilet facilities within in the town

Source: Census, 2001


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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.2.3 Present and future demand and supply gaps


Based on the assumption that the total sewerage load in a Town is 80% of the total water
supply, the Town would generate a total sewerage of 4.55 MLD in 2011. By 2035, the
sewerage load would be doubled more than that of the amount with 9.51 MLD in 2011.
Table No. 24. Present and Future demand and supply gap of sewage
Year
Sewage (MLD)
Treatment Gap (MLD)

2011
2015
2025
2035
4.55
5.26
7.07
9.51
At present there is no treatment facility available in the town

6.2.4 Comparative analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO guidelines


As per both the guidelines, the sewerage generation in a town is 80 % of the total water
supply.

6.2.5 SWOT Anal ysis

Strength
Natural
slope of
the town
conduciv
e to
water
moveme
nt.

Weakness
Absence of sewerage
disposal system.
Excessive
degradation of the
water bodies due to
drainage of sewage
Open defecation
Inadequate number of
public toilet

Opportunities
Natural slope
has provisions
for a streamlined
sewerage
network.
Innovative
techniques
should consider
in developing
new networks.

Threat
Contamination of
ground water due to
infiltration of waste
water
Drainage of
sewerage affecting
the health of water
bodies and the
people

6.2.6 Issues & Strategies

Issues
Absence of sewerage system.
Disposal to surface water bodies
without treatment causing pollution of
water body
20% population still practice open
defecation
Grey water is disposed in unhygienic
manner Untreated waste water used
for irrigation.

Strategies
Low cost sanitation proposals for the town
Provision of wetlands or low cost technique
for the treatment of waste water for reuse.
Ensure household septic tank connections
Provision of sanitary toilets for all
Provision of proper drainage system and
WTP for grey water

The above issues and strategies suggest that sewerage and sanitation facilities in the town
are to have to be safe and clean systems for the inhabitants. Provision of public toilets like
sulabh complex with pay & use, community participation should involve for the operation and
maintenance of these public toilets.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.2.7 Identified Projects


Sr.
No.

1
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
3

Project list/Sector

Septic Tanks:
Sewerage network
300 mm dia RCC pipe
200 mm dia RCC pipe
150 mm dia RCC pipe
Community Toilets

6.3

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
Cost in
2011-15
2015-25
2025-35
investment (investment (investment
lakhs
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh) Rs. in lakh)
80.10
801
400.50
320.40
260.18
520.35
520.35
1300.88

160

64.00

48.00

48.00

SO LI D W AS TE M AN AG EM E NT

The per capita waste generation in Indian towns varies from 100g in small towns to 500g in
large towns. The amount of waste generation is estimated to increase by 1 percent to 1.33
percent annually. Thus the total waste generation in India by the year 2047 would be
approximately 260 MT, which is five times the present generation. The solid waste

Page 46

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

management system is one of the critical and neglected areas which need immediate
attention.
Following are the major physical components of the Municipal Solid Waste Management
system in the town.

Generation

Composition

Storage at the source of generation

Primary collection

Street cleansing

Temporary storage

Transportation

Treatment & Disposal


It is very important to understand each of the above components to
address the issues and problems of the solid waste management system.

comprehensively

6.3.1 Quantity of w aste generated


Total waste generation in the town is approximate 10.5 tonnes per day, however only 6
tonnes per day is collected by nagar parishad officials. Approximately 4.5 tonnes of waste
remains uncollected.
Table No. 25. Future Solid Waste Generation
Year
Solid Waste Generated
(MT/day)
2011
10.54
2015
12.18
2021
14.11
2025
16.37
2031
18.99
2035
22.02

Per capita waste generation


(gms/capita/day)
250
250
250
250
250
250

Source: Analysis
6.3.2 Constituents of Nagar Parishad w aste
The municipal waste constitutes both degradable and non-biodegradable waste. The
biodegradable waste includes kitchen food scrap, garden waste, human and animal waste.
The non-biodegradable waste includes metal cans, plastic products, bottles etc. Animal
waste is an important area of concern for the town.
Maximum contents in the waste is plastic and paper. Stone, metals, cloth and vegetables are
major constituent of the waste. The waste composition shows that the waste has good
amount of calorific value and recyclable constituents. Metals, glass, cloth and plastic is
segregated by 35 rage pickers operating in town.
Table No. 26. Waste composition
Particulars
Metals
Cloth
Paper

Percentage
11.11%
5.56%
17.78%
Page 47

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Stone
Glass
Others
Total

25.33%
0.22%
40.00%
100
Source: Nagar Parishad

6.3.3 Collection & Storage


Door to door collection is done by private sweepers. They dispose the waste at fixed points
or in dustbins of JNP. The waste collected is usually stored in the dustbins provided in the
Nagar Parishad. The total no of dustbins provided in the city are 25. Waste is collected by 50
hand trolleys by sweepers from colonies and disposed in dustbins or at fixed points on road
side. There are 35-40 rag pickers in the town operating for Nagar Prishad. JNP staff collects
waste from these points and dispose it off to trenching ground. Storage facilities are
inadequate and waste is usually seen accumulated and not cleared regularly.
Figure No.24. Garbage dumped along the road, in open and near the bus stand

6.3.4 Transportation of Solid Waste


Loading and unloading is done manually and waste is transported through open tractors
trolleys. JNP has 2 tractors for transportation of Solid Waste. The details of waste
transportation infrastructure available with JNP are as follows:

Page 48

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Table No. 27. Garbage dumped in periphery wards and in the park

Table No. 28. Facility for Waste Transportation


Sl. No.
1
2
3

Facility for waste transportation


Tractors
Dumper Placer Bins
Hydraulic trolley

Number
2
25
50
Source: Nagar Parishad

6.3.5 Processing and disposal


The main objective of processing and disposal is to clear the waste from the disposal site in
an Eco-friendly manner. It is the responsibility of the Nagar Parishad to ensure safe disposal
of the wastes generated within municipal limits. In Joura, open dumping is adopted as the
main disposal method for solid waste. The solid waste from the town is transported to the
dumping site through tractors. Nagar Parishad tractors collect waste from the fixed points
from road side or the bins provided by municipality. Waste is disposed on trenching ground
of JNP with an area of 0.972 ha area in ward no. 14. The waste is also disposed off on
various sites illegally by local residents which create nuisance in the city and creates
unhygienic condition creating health hazards in rainy season.

6.3.6 Reuse and Recycling


There are no separate bins placed for collection of recyclable and hazardous wastes. The
waste collectors buy household recyclable waste but recycling activity is associated with low
efficiency.

6.3.7 Vehicles for solid waste collection and transportation of w aste


Nagar Parishad is responsible for transportation of solid waste disposal site. The tractor and
hand carts are used for transportation of waste. Open transportation system is adopted for
carrying solid waste from the storage points to the disposal site. Waste is collected from
various temporary storage points and open yards and loaded to the transport vehicle
manually. The workers use shovel, broom and hard card board to lift the waste to the hand
carts. Manual loading is time consuming and thus reduces the efficiency of the vehicles and
manpower deployed for the purpose. Further, manual handling of wastes poses threat to the
health of sanitary workers, as the waste is highly contaminated. Nagar Parishadhas
inadequate number of vehicular fleet for transportation of waste.
Page 49

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Mukhyamantri Haath-thela Kalyan Yojna


In Madhya Pradesh under Mukhyamantri Haath-thela Kalyan Yojna-2009 is being
implemented by the State Government for the welfare of handcart pullers. It may be
mentioned that under Mukhyamantri Haath-thela Kalyan Yojna, financial assistance is
provided under Swarn Jayanti Shahri Rozgar Yojna to handcart pullers for becoming
owner of handcart. Each handcart costs Rs. six thousand. Besides 25 percent subsidy,
the State Government also makes available Rs. 2,500 to each beneficiary. In addition, if a
family member of a registered handcart puller passes away, Rs. two thousand assistance
is provided to perform last rites. Under maternity assistance, an amount equal to six
weeks wages at collector rate is provided. In the case of paternity leave, an amount
equal to 15 days wages is provided to father.
Staffing Norms:

The work norms for street sweepers are:


High density area & Markets = 250 to 350 running meter (RMT) (Population
above 50000 per sq.km.)
Medium density area = 400 to 600 RMT (Population from 10000 to 50000 per
sq.km.)
Low Density area = 650 to 750 RMT
For the town of Joura with a population of less than 1 lakhs the SWM staff should
includes:
1 qualified sanitation diploma holder as Sanitary officer (S.O.) if the population is
more than 50000
1 qualified Sanitary Inspector (S.I.) @ 50000 population
1 qualified Sanitary Sub-Inspector (S.S.I) @ 25000 population
1 Sanitary Supervisor (S.S.) @ 12,500 population.

Table No. 29. Waste management infrastructure gap assessment


S.NO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

Page 48

Waste management
infrastructure/equipments
Containerised handcarts
Containerised tricycles
Community bins
Closed trailers for waste storage depot
Containers for domestic hazardous
waste
Tractors
Small van for hospital waste collection
Incineration plant
Concrete flooring for waste storage depot
Waste Composting facility
Landfill facility

Available
50
0
25
0
0
2
0
0
0
Nil
Ward no. 14

Required as per Gap


CPHEEO norms
75
45
10
10
25
10
20
20
3
3
2
0
1
1
1
1
20
20
1
1
1
1
Source: Nagar Parishad

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.3.8 SWOT Analysis

Strength
Collection,
treatment
and disposal
of waste is
under
process.
Disposal
site at ward
no. 14.

Weakness
Absence
of
any
SWM system.
Lack of segregation
of waste.
Lack of sufficient
vehicles for collection
& transportation of
waste.
Absence of dustbins
and
temporary
storage
points
Clogging of drains
due to dumping of
garbage in them.
Inadequate vehicles
for transportation of
waste

Opportunities
Re-use
and
recycling of wastes
Improvement
of
sanitary workers for
better management
of SW.
Providing
more
vehicles for waste
collection.
Door
to
door

collection
will
improves
the
efficiency
in
collection of waste.

Threat
Open dumping
of waste near
hospital
could
lead to adverse
health
conditions.
Spill over the
waste will leads
to environmental
degradation.
Manual handling
of
waste
posing
threat
to
Sanitary
workers

6.3.9 Issues & Strategies


On the basis of the analysis, the issues and strategies have been framed. The strategies
have also been formulated keeping in mind the Municipal Solid Waste (Management &
Handling) Rules-2000 (MSW) notified by Ministry of Environment & Forests (MoEF).
Issues

Lack of state of art infrastructure with


JNP for waste management
Absence of waste segregation at source
Absence of waste treatment facilities
No facility for hazardous and biomedical
waste disposal.
Manual handling of waste which poses
threat of health hazards to the workers
No separate bins placed for collection of
recyclable and hazardous wastes
Open transportation of waste.
In sufficient vehicles for collection &
transportation of waste.
Open dumping of degradable and nondegradable waste in environmental
sensitive areas.

Strategies

Provision of state of art infrastructure for


efficient waste management
Provision of bins at household level for
waste segregation at source
Provision of waste treatment facility.
Local bodies should follow the Municipal
Solid Waste (Management & Handling)
Rules-2000 notified by MoEF.
Door to door collection of waste through
community participation.
Providing adequate primary, secondary
collection bins, vehicles for transportation
of waste.
Innovative technologies to treat the waste,
like compost plants, landfill sites,
recyclable plants.
PPP for solid waste management system.
Creating public awareness about the SWM

Page 49

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.3.10 Identified Projects


Sr.
No
.

1
2
3
4

5
6

Project list/Sector

Estimated
Cost in
lakhs

Phase A
2011-15
investme
nt Rs.in
lakh)

2.66
0.59
0.89
3.78

1.06
0.59
0.89
1.89

6.00
275
288.91

6.00
55.00
65.43

Waste Collection & Disposal


Containerised Handcarts
Containerised Tricycles
Community Bins
Closed Dumper placer
container for secondary
collection
1 small vehicle
Composting of Waste
Total

6.4

Phase B
Phase C
2015-25
2025-35
(investmen (investmen
t Rs.in
t Rs. in
lakh)
lakh)
1.59

1.89

220.00
223.48

0.00

DR AI N AG E

6.4.1 Existing drainage system


As far as the drainage system of the city is concerned, there are number of small water
channels that discharge run-off from the surrounding areas. The town does not have an
effective drainage system. Joura storm water naturally drains towards drain flowing MorenaSabalpur road. Natural drainage is very efficient due to more than gental slope. Some of the

Page 50

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

drains are choked due to dumping of solid waste. The situation is further aggravated due to
lack of underground sewage system causing unhygenic conditions in the town. In addition to
deteriorated primary drains, secondary and tertiary system is also inadequate in terms of
quantity and quality. Major Primary drains in the town are as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Morena-Sabalpur road main drain = 2+2 km.


Ward no. 17 = 1 km
Ward no 1 drain with canal = 500m
Islampura drain = 500m
Ward no 13 drain = 500m
Drain along Panah Bridge = 1km

6.4.2 Primary, secondary and tertiary drains


The existing drainage system depends on nallahs as primary drainage source; secondary
drains which discharge to water bodies, the drain along road sides are the tertiary drains
which are open drains. The drains are clogged with solid waste which in turn reduces the
carrying capacity of the drains. The length primary drains in city is 6 kms and length of
secondary and tertiary drains is 10 Km out of which length of Kuchha type tertiary drains is
only 1 Km. This shows that almost 90% of the town is covered by pucca drainage networks,
which means existing network is not quiet sufficient and majority of the drains are in filthy
conditions due to open network. The maintainence of the drains is the responsibility of Nagar
Parishad. The cleaning of the drains is done manually and the waste from the drains is piled
along the roads which creates foul smell and inconvenience to the people. In some areas,
the drains are filled with silt, brick bats, which lead to the overflow of the drains. Thus, there
is a need to create awareness among the people about the disposal of waste and
development of the pucca drains.
Table No. 30. Drains characteristics
Indicator
Percentage of pucca road length to total road length
Length of open drains- Pucca (km)
Length of open drains Kutcha (km)

Units
95%
15 Km
1 Km
Source: Primary Survey

6.4.3 Major Water bodies


There are 3 small ponds in ward no. 16, 9 and 4. Sanjay Talab in ward 16 needs renovation.
Refer map no. 7 for location of Talabs. Canals network is available in north and south parts
of the town.

6.4.4 Water Logged areas


Ward no. 16 is only flood prone ward due to poor drainage system. Local people suggested
that the drainage system of Joura should be connected with Sankra River to avoid flooding of
town. Networking of entire drainage system with primary drains is required to drain the storm
water efficiently from the town. Apart from this, the bus stand area also becomes water
logged. This is mainly due lack of storm water drainage mechanism.

Page 51

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.25. Open drainage system & condition of drains

Page 52

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.4.5 SWOT Anal ysis


Strength

Slope of town is
towards south &
north which is
conducive to water
movement.

Weakness

Choking of
sewage and
garbage in
drains which
creates filthy
environment.

Opportunities

Utilizing the
advantage of
natural slopes
to stream line
the drains.

Construction of
proper drainage
network in the
town.

Threat

Open drains create


filthy environment,
unhygienic
conditions and
contaminate water
due to throwing of
sewage in to
drainage.

6.4.6 Issues & Strategies


Issues

Strategies

Most of the existing drains in


the north-eastern part of the
town are choked with solid
waste.

The existing drains need to be aligned and developed


by widening and provided with retain walls.

The natural system to be streamlined for effective


disposal.

Open drains create


unhygienic conditions and
contaminate of the water
sources.

Construction of proper drainage networks in the town.

Improving community participation techniques for the


operation and maintenance of waste.

Inadequate coverage of
drains.

Preparation of drainage master plan and provision of


efficient drainage system.

Dirty water to be drained properly to prevent


unhygienic conditions.

6.4.7 Identified Projects


Sr.
No.

1
2
2.1
2.2

Project list/Sector

Renovation of drains
Construction of Drains-40
kms
20 for combined system
20 km for construction of
secondary drains

Page 52

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
Cost in
2011-15
2015-25
2025-35
investment (investment (investment
lakhs
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh) Rs. in lakh)
24
24.00
72.00
360
108.00
180.00
200
160

6.5

TR AF F IC AN D T R AN SPO R AT IO N

Transport infrastructure forms the backbone of an economy. It plays a very significant role in
the growth and development of the towns. It is also responsible for the spatial growth of the
town by increasing the accessibility of sites on the periphery of the town. This section has
been divided into the following sections: existing traffic and transportation, vehicle population
& travel characteristics, parking, public transport system and finally SWOT and issues &
strategies.

6.5.1 Existing traffic and transportation scenario


Major transportation network in the town comprises of Morena-Sabhalgarh Road (SH-2)
which is passing through the town carrying regional traffic. Traffic congestion was observed
on Morena-Sabhalgarh Road during day time. This is due to onstreet parking and presence
of encroachment along the commercial activities on the road. Traffic on internal roads is very
low due to small size of the town. Pachbigha road, Pagara road, Purana Joura road,
Islampura road and Dakkhana are the main arterial roads of the town. Major areas of traffic
congestion in the town are Pachbigha Bazaar and Sadar Bazaar, Bus Stand, Railway station,
Schools, Colleges and Government offices.

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.5.2 Agencies in traffic and transportation


Madhya Pradesh Road Development Corporation Limited & PWD manages the State
Highway-2 and internal roads are the property of Nagar Parishad.
Table No. 31. Length of main roads in the town
Main Roads
MS Road (SH 2)
Pachbigha Road
Pagara Road
Total

Length of roads
3.50 km
1.50 km
0.80 km
5.80 km

The total length of the main roads in the town is 5.80 Km. There are no pedestrian facilities
like footpaths, walkways, bus shelters, overbridge on main roads in town.
Table No. 32. Road characteristics
Main Roads
Major roads
Internal Street roads
Kuchha type roads
Total

Length of roads
5.80 km
22 km
8 km
35.80 km

Avg. Width
10m
4m
4m

Source: Primary survey

6.5.3 Public transport


Public transport should meet the requirements of the commuters. It should be affordable,
accessible, safe and reliable. For passenger traffic the main modes of transportation are
auto-rickshaws, carts, scooters, motor cycles and bicycles. Buses are favourite mode of
travel for regional trips. About, 115 standard buses and 20 mini buses daily operate via
Joura. The town is having a railway station with narrow gauge rail line passing through the
town, around 3 trains are available to Gwalior per day. Most of the people use privately
owned two- wheelers for local conveyance. Rickshaws and cycles are also used as public
transport mode. Outsiders and local people also prefer to complete local trips by walk due to
small trip lengths. Some private taxis are also used for regional trips by local people.
Presently, the town has one bus stand. This is the main source of traffic attraction/production
zones. However, the bus stand is in a poor condition, as shown in the picture above, owing
to lack of maintenance. Deplorable road surface conditions within the bus stand coupled with
lack of drainage facilities give rise to filthy conditions around. There are no proper bus bays
and passenger waiting areas in the bus stand. The commercial areas near the town face
congestion due to improper management.

6.5.4 Traffic Management and Circulation


There is no proper traffic management in the town; some of the roads are highly congested.
As the SH-2 and other major roads (bus stand road) passing through the town, it leads to the
increasing volume of traffic. All major public and semi public institutions and commercial
establishments are located in these areas, which increase day traffic.

Page 54

Page 53

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.26. Bus stand in the town

Figure No.27. Railway Line passing through the town

Figure No.28. Traffic & transportation paractices in the town

6.5.5 Parking Requirements for Joura Tow n


There is no designated parking in the town. Due to lack of adequate parking in the prime
commercial areas, vehicles are parked on the roads, further leading to traffic problems. Most
of the parking is experienced near the railway station. Transportation of all goods is done
mainly by trucks and these trucks are all parked along the major roads which interrupts traffic
movement. Off street parking is also a common sight. The footpaths are also missing in all
the roads, lack of street furniture like signage boards, road markings, street name boards etc.
Page 54

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Parking will be mainly required in Pachbigha Bazaar, sadar bazaar and near Bus Stand and
railway Station.

6.5.6 Vehicle population


There are a total of 385 vehicles in the town. The break up of main vehicles is as follows:
Table No. 33. Number of Vehicles
Type of Vehicle
Medium Heavy goods
Mini Bus
Taxi
Cars

Number of vehicles
115
20
50
200
Source: Joura Nagar Parishad

6.5.7 Present and future demand a nd supply gaps


The town does not have a freight junction or any transport nagar. Trucks load and unload
cargo in different parts of the town which create chaos. Effective transportation would form
the foundation for further development. The capacity of the existing roads needs to be
upgraded by increasing the width and strengthening the network which will in turn improve
the accessibility.

6.5.8 Comparative analysis with the UDPFI guidelines


The parking space requirements, components of bus terminal and transport nagar are
designed as per the UDPFI guidelines which are given in the projects identification chapter.
The planning norms and requirement, road design elements are also considered as per the
guidelines.

6.5.9 SWOT Anal ysis


Strength
State Highway 2
passes through
the town,
connecting it to
Morena and
Gwalior and
other cities.
Pre dominance of
public
transportation.

Weakness
The roads in old city and
Bazaar areas are
narrow
Commercial activity on
roads causing
congestion
Informal establishment
along roads reduces the
effective width of the
carriageway for vehicular
movement hence adding
to further congestion
MS Road needs
widening
Improper geometrics of
some intersections.
Total absence of
pedestrian facilities in
town.

Opportunities
Development of
road network in
peripheral areas
based on sector
concept
Preparation of
Master Plan with
immediate effect
Widening of MS
road
Development of
Transport nagar
Development of
rotaries at important
junctions
Development of
pedestrian facilities
Development of
parkings in

Threat
Vehicular
traffic out
growing the
capacity of
roads.
Lack of
signalized
junctions in
the town.
Increasing
private
modes.

Page 55

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

No parking space
provisions in commercial
areas.

commercial areas

6.5.10 Issues & Strategies


It is required to design effective traffic and transportation management plans and regulations
to combat with this. Moreover, for Joura, transportation appears to be a prime thrust area.
Vehicular movements exceeding the capacity of roads, parking on the streets, encroachment
of street space by commercial activities lead to traffic congestions. The main issues in this
sector are: Street lighting, Fire fighting and Power generation and distribution.
Issues

The roads in old city and Bazaar areas are


narrow.

Encroachment on roads causing congestion.

Informal establishment along roads reduces


the effective width of the carriageway for
vehicular movement hence adding to further
congestion

Absence of designated parking.

Improper geometrics of some intersections.

Total absence of pedestrian facilities in


town.

No parking space provisions in commercial


areas.

Development Strategies
Development of road network in
peripheral areas based on sector
concept.
Preparation of Traffic and
transporation plan with immediate
effect.
Development of Transport nagar.
Development of rotaries at important
junctions
Development of parking
Development of pedestrian facilities
Development of parkings in
commercial areas

6.5.11 Projects Identified


Sr.
No.

2
3
4
5

Project list/Sector

Widening of roads
MS Road, Panchbhiga road,
Pagara Road
Improvement of Junctions:
Bus Stand, Bazaar area
Parking space : (2.5*5 sq
m=15 approx) space for 50
cars/jeeps/3
Road Signage & Traffic lights
wheeler(50*15=750)+15%
Dedicated
Public
circulation
transport/Mini
Truck terminalbuses
Upgradation of Bus Stand:
bus
Totalbays, waiting areas,
computerized ticket counters
and information centres and
kiosks

Page 56

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
2011-15
2015-25
2025-35
Cost in
lakhs
investment (investment (investment
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)
Rs. in lakh)
360
240
600.0
600.0
30.0
100

30
100

4.80 4.80
375.
200 187.50
00

187.50 200

138 657.30
4.8

527.50 200.00

75.0
75.00
0

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.6

STREE T LIG HTI N G

Street lighting is a significant aspect of security in the town. Nagar Parishad of Joura is
responsible for providing all the street lights in the town. Joura has 150 tube light fittings, 18
halogens and 514 Sodium fittings accounting to 682 as the total number of street lights.
Accurate data of total length illuminated was not available with JNP, although an estimated
value was informed to CDP team by JNP staff. JNP staff informed that approximately 90% of
road length i.e 32.22 kms is illuminated, remaining 10% is yet to illuminate. Till date, 884
poles have been erected by JNP for street lighting. The areas in outer periphery lack street
lighting. The details of street light fittings is given below. JNP pays Rs.1.20 lac bill of
electricity for street lighting and Rs. 75,000 to MPEB for electricity consumption in water
supply pumping and other operations.The details of street light fittings are given below.
Table No. 34. Street Lighting in Joura Nagar Parishad
Sl. No.
1
2
3

Equipment
Tube light
Halogen
Sodium fitting 70, 150, 250, 400 w
Total

Units
150
18
514
682

Source: Joura Nagar Parishad

Page 57

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

6.7

FIRE FIGH TI NG

Fire fighting is one of the disasters included in the Madhya Pradesh State Disaster
Management Policy. A professionally trained and equipped cadre needs to be maintained by
the Nagar Parishad for impromptu response to such disasters. JNP has one fire-fighting
vehicle TATA 407 and it has 2500 litres capacity. The Fire fighting operations are carried by
JNP but fire calls are taken by Police department. There is no proper fire station in the town,
and the vehicle is parked outside the Nagar Parishad Office. Most of the equipments used
here are not functional, i.e. 50% of the equipment is good. Moreover, this vehicle also caters
to the surrounding villages.
As per the UDPFI guidelines, 1 fire station or sub-fire station within 1-3 km is to be provided
for 2 lakhs population. There is also a recommendation that the fire services of small and
lower group of cities shall be provided by taking the demand of surrounding villages. For
setting up a Fire Station having skilled personnel (about 3-4 including driver) and modern
equipments.

6.7.1 Projects Identified


Sr.
No.

1
2
3

Project list/Sector

1sub fire station


Vehicles & Equipments
Rescue Van
Small Fire Water Tenders
Total

Page 58

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
2011-15
2015-25
Cost in
lakhs
investment (investment
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)
200.0
200.00
50.0
200.0
450.00

50.00
200.00
450.00

0.00

Phase C
2025-35
(investment
Rs. in lakh)

0.00

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

7. SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE
Summary: Health and education is not the admissible component of JNNURM, but as they
also play an important role in the quality of life hence the broad analysis is done. While doing
the project costing in the subsequent chapters, these are not included in the Town
investment plan.

7.1

HE AL TH

7.1.1 Basic Health Indicators


The health indicators are used to measure the health status of an area. There are some
standards given by the World Health Organization as the following basic health indicators:

Prevalence of underweight children (under-five years of age)

Proportion (%) of population below minimum level of dietary energy consumption

Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying between birth and age 5)

Infant mortality rate

Proportion (%) of 1 year-old children immunized for measles

Maternal mortality ratio

Proportion (%) of births attended by skilled health personnel

HIV prevalence 15-49 years (per 100,000 population)

Malaria death and prevalence rate per 100,000

Tuberculosis death and prevalence rate per 100,000

Proportion (%) of Smear-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis cases (detected and


cured) and put under directly observed treatment short course (DOTS)

Proportion (%) of population using biomass fuels)

Proportion (%) of population with sustainable access to an improved water source,


rural & urban

Proportion (%) of urban population with access to improved sanitation

Proportion (%) of population with access to affordable essential drugs on a


sustainable basis (Source: http://www.searo.who.int).

7.1.2 Existing Medical facilities


The clinics and hospitals in Joura Nagar Parishad are inadequate in terms of the need of the
town. There is only one Community Health Center (CHC) available in the town. The hospital
has 20 beds, 5 male doctors and 2 female doctors. The residents have to depend on the
health care facilities in Sabalpur, Morena & Gwalior. Primary health is poorer in the slums
and the lack of awareness of family planning is evident.
The Nagar Parishad doesnot provide special care for maternity and emergency child birth
derives through the Janani Express. This is a mobile van that not only serve as ambulances
for carrying women to maternity centres but also provides with all the equipments for
emergency delivery in the van itself.
Page 59

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.29.

Community Health center in the town

7.1.3 Future demand forecast


The existing health facilities in the town are not conversant with the UDPFI standards neither
they are fullfiling the needs of the Nagar Parishad. The table below shows the future
requirement of health facilities in the town.
Table No. 35. Demand Projection for Medical facilities
Level

Standards
(as
per
UDPFI)

2011

2015

2025

2035

Existing

Required

Dispensary 1 for 15000


people

Hospital

1 Intermediate Hospital recommended

1 for 1 lakh
people

Required
3

Source: Computed Values


7.1.4 Issues

Inadequate health facilities including insufficient beds in the hospitals.

Inadequate ambulance services including Janani Express.

Lack of proper maternity and child care facilities.

Absence of treatment facilities for contagious diseases.

Unscientific treatment of bio-medical waste generated from hospitals.

Page 60

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

7.2

EDU C AT ION

7.2.1 Basic Education indicators


To achieve universal primary education is one of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG).
The indicators given for education are:

Net enrolment ratio in primary education

Proportion of pupils starting grade 1 who reach last grade of primary

Literacy rate of 15-24 year-olds, women and men.

7.2.2 Existing Education facilities


There are a total of 15 primary/middle schools, and 5 higher secondary schools in the town.
There is one degree college in the town. Navodaya vidalaya and Govt. Girls College are
popular institutes in the town located on Pagara Road. Thus, the town is an educationl hub in
the region.
Figure No.30. Education facilities in the town

Page 61

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Table No. 36. Demand projection for education facilties


Level

Standards (as per


UDPFI)

2011

2015

Existing

Required

2025

2035

Required

Primary
Senior
Secondary

1per 2500 people


1per 7500 people

15

8
6

Colleges

1 for 1.25 lakh people

1 new College
Source: Computed values

10
6

13
9

18
12

7.2.3 Recreation Facilities


The town lacks the lung spaces. As per the UDPFI guidelines the norms for parks,
play fields and other open spaces at the town level is 10-12 sqmts.per person. Thus,
it can be seen that the recreational facilities are far below the standards.
Table No. 37. Future demand for open spaces/ recreational facilities
Level

Standards (as
per UDPFI)

2011

2015

2025

2035

Housing
Cluster park
Neighbourhood
Park

1 for 5000
people
1 per 15000
people

12

14

16

7.3

OTHE R CO MMU NI TY F ACI LIT IES

7.3.1 Community Halls


There are two main community halls in town, they are normally used for marriages and other
community functions. These halls are owned by JNP. JNP charges Rs. 5100 per day for
usage of halls.

7.3.2 Banks
There are 5 banks available in the town. Out of which two are State banks of India, one
Central Bank, one Chambal Bank and one Cooperative bank. There is one ATM of SBI is
available in town.

7.3.3 Khadi sale outlet


Mahatma Gandhi Sewashram for khadi cloths by Dr. Subbarao 200 people works here it has
1.5 km distance from the town.

7.3.4 Cremation Ground


There is one cremation ground in the town.
The presence of community facilities can be depicted from the pictorial representation below.

Page 62

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Figure No.31. Community facilities in the town

The forecast for other community facilities in the town is provided as below:
Table No. 38. Future demand for other community facilities
Year

Standards
(as per
UDPFI)
2015
2025
2035

Community
Hall and
Public
Library
1 for 15000

Cluster
Center

Sector
Center

Recreational
Club

Electric
Substati
on

Post
office

1 for 2000

1 for
10000

1 for 15000,
2000 Sq.m.

1 for
15000

1 for
15000

3
4
6

21
33
44

4
7
9

2
2
1
4
4
1
6
6
2
Source: Computed values

7.3.5 Issues and Strategies


Issues

Strategies

Lack of maternity & child care facilities

Absence of treatment facilities for

contagious diseases.

Shortage of specialized treatment

facilities and beds in Joura hospital


Absence of facilities for biomedical
waste treatment and disposal.

Joura is short of college and

School for handicapped children.

Joura lacks recreational facilities like


community
club,
cultural
centre/auditorium and sports stadium.

Page 62

General Hospital with separate beds for


child health care & maternity
24 hrs ambulance
janani express.

service

including

Technical & Industrial Training Institutes


for skill up gradation of the local people.
Enhancement of bed capacity of civil
hospital
Provision of technical college and school
for handicapped children.
Provision of community facilities like
community clubs, cultural auditorium,
stadium. Space is available for playground.
Revenue should be made available to the
Nagar Parishad.

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

7.4

CON CL USIO N

The overall infrastructure system has numerous loopholes. An optimum development of the
town is possible with the support of efficient infrastructure. Adding to the above issues, the
existing water capacity is not commensurate with the future population demand. Apart from
sole dependence on ground water, other sources need to be identified. A centrally controlled
infrastructure planning and monitoring system that would assess the need, implement,
monitor and maintain could aptly fill in the gaps in the towns infra-management system.
Owing to the absence of waste management and indiscriminate dumping of wastes,
environmental degradation is a prime issue in the Town. For environmentally sustainable
management of the town, environmental conservation including, separating waste dumping
pits from the water bodies, re-use and recycling of waste water etc., should be given a
significant focus.

7.5 Projects Identified


Sr.
No.

2
3
4

Project list/Sector

Intermediate Hospital with an


additional capacity of 100
beds (0.6 ha) including 30
beds for Maternity and child
care
Primary
and
Senior
Secondary School
Construction of new college
with playground
Industrial Training Institute
Total

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
2011-15
2015-25
2025-35
Cost in
lakhs
investment (investment (investment
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)
Rs. in lakh)
1500.00
900
600

750.00

750

400.00

400

700.00
3350.00

2050.00

700.00
1300.00

Page 63

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

8. URBAN POOR & THEIR ACCESSIBILITY


TO BASIC SERVICES
This chapter focusses on the condition of urban poor and livability conditions in the slum.

8.1

INT ROD UC TIO N

Slums and squatter settlements are the results of urban poverty. The population living in
slums lacks access to basic infrastructure services like safe water, sewerage & sanitation,
solid waste collection and disposal, drainage, access roads, street lights, neighborhood
amenities like safe play areas for children and community facilities and electricity
connections.
M.P Gandi Basti Kshetra (Sudhar Tatha Nirmulan) Act, 1976 (M.P Slum Area - Improvement
& Relocation Act) defines slums by taking housing conditions and access to services as the
basic criteria for defining an area as a slum. It also specifies that where the competent
authority is satisfied in respect of buildings in an area that the buildings in that area are in
any respect unfit for human habitation; or are by reason of dilapidation, overcrowding, faulty
arrangement of streets, lack of ventilation, light or sanitation facilities, or any combination of
these factors, are detrimental to safety, health or morals - it may, by notification, declare such
area to be a slum area. Further, to specify that a building is unfit for human habitation, the
criteria to be considered are repair, stability, freedom from damp, natural light and air, water
supply, drainage and sanitary conveniences, facilities for storage, preparation and cooking of
food and for the disposal of waste water.

8.2

V ARIO US DEFI NIT IONS O N SL UMS

Definition of Slum by Census of India, 2011, the slum areas broadly constitute of :a) All specified areas in a town or city notified as Slum by State/Local Government and
UT Administration under any Act including a Slum Act to be considered as Notified
Slums
b) All areas recognized as Slum by State/Local Government and UT Administration,
Housing and Slum Boards, which may have not been formally notified as slum under
any act to be considered as Recognised Slums
c) A compact area of at least 300 population or about 60-70 households of poorly built
congested tenements, in unhygienic environment usually with inadequate
infrastructure and lacking in proper sanitary and drinking water facilities. Such areas
may be considered as Identified Slums
UN Habitat defines slum as as a group of individuals living under the same roof thatlack
one or more (in some cities, two or more) of the following conditions:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)

security of tenure,
structural quality and
durability of dwellings,
access to safe water,
access to sanitation facilities and
sufficient living area

Page 64

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

National Sample Survey Organization (58th Round)


A compact settlement with a collection of poorly built tenements, mostly of temporary nature,
crowdedtogether usually with inadequate sanitary and drinking water facilities in unhygienic
conditions. Such anarea, for the purpose of this survey, was considered as non-notified
slum if at least 20 households livedin that area. Areas notified as slums by the respective
municipalities, corporations, local bodies ordevelopment authorities are treated as notified
slums.
In India, Under Section-3 of the Slum Area Improvement and Clearance Act,1956, Slums
have been defined as mainly those residential areas where dwellings are inany respect unfit
for human habitation by reasons of dilapidation, overcrowding, faultydesigns of buildings,
narrowness or faulty arrangement of streets, lack of ventilation,light or sanitation facilities or
any combination of these factors which are detrimental tosafety, health and morals. Thus,
conceptually Slums are perceived as compactovercrowded residential areas (and not
isolated or scattered dwellings) unfit forhabitation due to lack of one or more of the basic
infrastructure like drinking water, sanitation, electricity, sewerage, streets etc. In addition to
this Central Legislation, several States have independent Acts where Slums are defined.
In M.P., slum declaration is done by the Municipality under the M.P Slum Area- Improvement
& Relocation Act-1976. The amendment was proposed in Directions for declaring an areas
as slum under sub-section 418-A of the M.P. Municipal Corporation Act, 1956 DUDA has
issued directions to ULBs in 2009 for declaring an area as slum.

8.3

REFLE CT ION O N CONS UL T AT ION WITH SL UM DWE L LERS

As a part of the CDP process, a series of consultations were held with the slum population in
Joura. A total of 400 people were met from a random sample of slums although care
was taken to ensure that all categories of slums according to tenure were covered in the
exercise. While the process of selection of people for the consultations was not fully
scientific, it provides a fair cross sectional perspective. Any action to address services in
slum areas would need to involve further consultations as part of the planning and
implementation of interventions.

8.4

L AN D OW NERS HI P AN D T EN URE S T AT US

Most of the slums in Joura are located on government and private lands. Government is
providing legal ownership to slum dwellers time to time as part of its policy to ensure tenure
security to the poor and landless. According to the IHSDP, most of the slum dwellers have
legal Land Ownership. The land has been given to all the slum dwellers on pattas under
Madhya Pradesh Patta Adhiniyam.
Madhya Pradesh (MP) has granted pattas under a legislative provision (MP Patta
Adhiniyam) to all slum dwellers residing in cities prior to a certain date. A special scheme
called Rajiv Gandhi Ashray Yojna has been launched (in 2002) for the urban poor. Under
this scheme plots are distributed to the urban poor for carrying-out economic activities and,
thus, bringing them above the poverty line. A special fund has been created for the
development of Jhuggi Basties. Under Rajiv Gandhi Awas Yojna 114 pattas were granted
initially. However, after two years, 56 more were awarded under Chief Ministers Ashray
Scheme.

Page 65

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

In order to build slum free cities and for sustainable poverty reduction, local governments
must provide security of tenure to slums. This implies granting permission/license to
residents to occupy public land.
Land tenure can also be of a more permanent nature, in the form of patta or legal
ownership of land, which allows people to legally build and own houses on the site. With
patta/secure land tenure the urban poor begin to make investments in house upgrading and
show greater readiness to pay for individual basic services. The slum dwellers/household
that have not been given the pattas, the Town may choose one or a combination of the
following options for granting tenure, depending upon the local context. This policy must be
in synergy with the state policy.

GROWTH IS NECESSARY TO REMOVE POVERTY, AND INTERVENTIONS


LIKE NREGA HELP.
Madhya Pradesh, one of the best performers in poverty reduction, grew below the
national average at 7.1% through these five years. Its success is attributable to effective
intervention: an impressive 9% of all NREGA beneficiaries belong to MP. Growth is
necessary to lift people out of poverty, but states like Madhya Pradesh show that even
when growth lags, schemes like NREGA, implemented well, can do a wonderful job. The
growth versus intervention debate is pointless; growth with intervention makes sense.
Source: March 2012 Economic Times, NREGA: Implementation, Poverty, And Growth

8.5

POVERT Y I N TOWN

Total population below poverty line in the town is around 8,656. Urban poor of Joura are
basically either laborers, agriculture field workers and workers in service sector. There are a
total of 6 slum pockets in Joura. All these slum pockets are located in ward no. 16. Nagar
Parishad doesnot not have information on profile of slum pockets. The area under these
slum pockets is approximately 1 sq.km. Total population of these pockets is 3,960.
Considering that all the slums are located in same ward all the data for all slum pockets were
clubbed together. A total of 27% population is BPL population in these pockets.
Table No. 39. Population in slums
Particulars
No. of slum pockets
Legal status
Area of slum pockets
No. of houses in all pockets
Total population of slum pockets

8.6

Information
6
Non-notified
1 Sq. km
660
3,960
Source: Nagar Parishad

GENER AL C H AR ACTE RIST I CS I N SL UM

Most of the houses are pucca type. All the houses are built on own land. The condition of
internal roads in these slum pockets are similar to other parts of town. Only 2% houses in the
slums are Kuchha type. Around 5% houses do not have toilets in slums. And none of the
houeholds do not have piped water connections. All houses are dependent on handpumps
and water from ground. There is shortage of waste bins for solid waste disposal.

Page 66

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

8.7

7 POINT C H AR TE R: ASS ESS MENT OF SERVI CES AN D


INF R AS TR UC TU R E

1. Land Tenure: All of the slum dwellings are occupied by private lands. Some have
been provided with legal pattas by the government while some have gained
possession of the land owing to having inhabited it for generations.

2. Housing: Out of the total slum population only 2% of the slum dwellers live in kutcha
houses which is made by the local materials. The surroundings of some of the
houses is very clean. Some of the slum HHs have enclosed the open spaces with a
temporary boundary typically known as angan where the washing and cleaning
activities are carried out. In some HHs this space is also utilised for growing local
vegetables for their daily use.

3. Water Supply: Handpumps are present in the slums and are prominent source of
water consumption in the town.

4. Sanitation: None of the slum pockets has proper sanitation facilities, open defecation
is quite common.

5. Drainage: Open drainage, mainly kutcha drains in almost all the slum wards.
6. Solid Waste Management: Garbage is dumped on streets, open areas.
7. Health: Primary health conditions are poor
8. Education: Children have access to primary education in government schools.
9. Social Security: Social security pension scheme, Samajik Sureksha/Vradhawastha
Pension Yojna, have not taken up for BPL families.
Analysis:
1. Water Supply: Drinking water facilities are available in almost all the Slum areas. It is
provided in three alternate ways:
i. Piped Water supply
ii. Bore Well
iii. Hand pump
2. Public Toilets: There is no public toilet facility available in all these slums.
3. Housing: The houses are divided in 2 categories :
i. Kutcha house: House with tiled roof is considered as Kutcha
ii. Pucca house: House with concrete slab is considered as Pucca
4. Drainage: It has been seen that out of the total slum areas listed above, most of slum
settlements have open drainage system and only few have semi covered drains.
5. Solid Waste Management: There is no proper way of solid waste disposal which
exists at the slum level. In 40% of the slum pockets solid waste is collected by govt.
or private persons but disposal sites are either non-existent or are poorly managed. In
many slums solid waste can be seen flowing in the drains leading to chocked drains
and health hazardous situation.
6. Health facilities: There are no health care facilities available in all these slum
settlements.
7. Educational facilities: Some of the Slum areas have primary school facilities.
Page 67

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

8. Land tenure: In Joura the land is provided to these slum dwellers on several basis
a. On Patta
b. On per month house tax to Nagar Parishad
c. And, some have bought the land
Table No. 40. General characteristics of slums
Sector of basic services
Housing
No. of Kuchha type houses in all slum pockets

Availability
13

Sanitation
No. of community toilets
No. of houses having sanitary toilets
No. of houses practicing open defecation

1
630
30

Water Supply
No. of houses having piped water supply

Roads
Pucca Roads in slum pockets
Kuchha roads

40%
70%

Table No. 41. Projected housing demand of Urban Poor


Present population of slums
Projected housing demand of Urban Poor

8.8

3960
120

SCHE MES F OR S L UM I MP ROVE MENT

Till date, there are no schemes taken up so far for the improvement of these slums.

8.9

SWOT AN AL YSIS
Strength

A survey of
BPL
population
has been
done.

Page 68

Weakness

Opportunities

Lack of awareness
and poor access to
information on
government
schemes.
Inadequate physical
and social facilities
in the town.

CDP is an
opportunity for
improvement of
basic facilities and
amenities in the
town. Through
various programmes
like SJSRY, the
SHGs, NGOs can be
promoted.

Threat
Unhygienic living
conditions can
cause diseases.
In absence of the
improvement of the
basic services the
quality of life will
further go down.

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

8.10 ISSUES AN D DEV ELOPME NT S TR ATEGIES


Sector
Housing

Basic Services

Issues

No land available in existing


slums for new housing

Development Strategies

Construction cheap housing for


future demand.

Slum
improvement
and
rehabilitation programmes to cover
the urban poor

Families have to fetch water


from hand pumps as there
is no water supply provided

by the ULB.

5% houses do not have


sanitary toilets in their
houses

Provision water
every house

connection

in

Provision of sanitary toilets for all.


Ensure proper implementation of
slum upgradation and poverty
alleviation programmes.

8.11 SUGGESTI ONS


It is suggested that the inventory of required basic services in the slum pockets should be
made. The awareness and mobilisation of slum communities for participation in slum
development schemes should also be envisioned. It is also envisaged to link the slum
dwellere with the employment generation schmes or poverty alleviation schmes.

8.12 URB AN B AS I C SE RVICES IN S LUMS


The UBSP scheme was launched in some of the slums with the objective of bringing in
improvement in the standard of living of the Urban poor specially women and children of the
lower strata of the society and other weaker sections and tofulfill the basic needs of urban
poor through designing their own programmeswith the help of government and nongovernment organisations. The main target groups were people living below the poverty level
and special emphasishas been laid on women, children and other backward classes such as
schedulecaste, schedule tribe, handicapped, old etc. The basic principle of UBSP scheme
was community participation and to utilize the money provided underplans and schemes of
different government departments. In the existing situation most of the slum dwellers get their
water supply from tube wells and bore and some of the households are covered under piped
supply. The existing system sewage and sanitation facilities in these entire slums are lacking.

8.13 SOCI AL SE CU RIT Y S CHE MES AND BENE FICI ARIE S


The town has an opportunity to improve the condition of the city under the Integrated
Housing and Slum Development Programme (IHSDP). Under the IHSDP, total of 100
beneficiaries for housing have been identified. Old age pension scheme and social security
pension scheme, Samajik Sureksha/Vradhawastha Pension Yojna, are going on for BPL
families. The other schemes that are currently going on are Swarn Jayanti Swarojgar Yojana,
Schmes for female household workers, Indira Gandhi Old Age Pension Scheme, Janashri
Bima Yojna, etc.
In future there might be implementation of IHSDP programme for poor people who are
residing in the low income areas provision of social services under the scheme. Urban poor
residing contiguous to low income areas/slums would also be able to avail social services
provided under the Scheme. Along with employment generation, providing sanitation and
Page 69

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

water supply services, introducing saving schemes, self help groups, extending credit for
income generating opportunities, are significant initiatives.
Samajik Suraksha Pension Scheme
Samajik Suraksha Pension Scheme (SSPS) is a scheme for vulnerable groups within the
BPL including the old, handicapped and orphans. A financial assistance of Rs.150/- per
month is given to the identified beneficiary under this scheme.
Indira gandhi National Old Age Pension Scheme
The programme has been launched in November 2007. It covers all senior citizens with more
than 65 years of age and belonging to BPL families. The pension amount will be credited
wherever poosible into a post office or bank account of the beneficiary. Under this scheme a
pension of Rs.275 per month has been distributed.
Rashtriya Pariwar Sahatya Scheme
Under this scheme a financial assistance of Rs.1000/- is given on the death of the earning
member of the beneficiary family. This scheme sheilds the dependents from undue hardship.
Indira Gandhi National Widow Pension Scheme
This scheme was launched in February 2009 by the Government of India. The scheme
provides pension of Rs.200 per month to widows between the age group of 40-64 years.

8.14 Projects Identified


Sr.
No.

Project list/Sector

Affordable Housing (1300 HH


of existing BPL and 10% of
HH to be taken up for total
housing shortage)-10 % of
total amount to be bear by NP
EWS Housing
Total

Page 70

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
2011-15
2015-25
2025-35
Cost in
lakhs
investment (investment (investment
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)
Rs. in lakh)
337.5
262.5
150

750
750.00

337.50

262.5

150

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

9. ENVIRONMENT
Summary: The chapter aims at developing a comprehensive environmental management strategy for
the Joura based on baseline information with regard to urban environment quality and services. It also
takes a closer look at the existing framework of the states policy on various components of
environment; identify the processes and causes, which are leading to deterioration and decline of the
environment in and around the town.

9.1

PO LLU TI O N LE VE L

9.1.1 Water Pollution


A major environmental issue for the Town relates to the pollution of water bodies. Lacking a
proper waste management mechanism, in Joura collected garbage and sewerage being
dumped along the water bodies. This not only leads to severe pollution of water bodies but
also leads to contamination of ground water in long run. As per the information available from
various sources and discussions with the concerned officials the water quality is as per the
standards.
9.1.2 Air Pollution
Emissions from industrial areas in and around the town is considered as primary source for
air pollution, while secondary sources include smoke from burning of firewood, charcoalmaking and domestic heating, and vehicular pollution..
In JNP the main source of pollution is the emission from the vehicles. Due to use of lowgrade fuel, low maintenance of vehicles, and poor conditions of the roads. The
concentrations of SPM, SO2, NOx and CO in the ambient air are well within the National
Ambient Air Quality (NAAQ) standards for Residential and Rural areas.
Air quality standards
Parameters
SPM
SO2
NOx

AAQ Standards for residential/rural areas (mg/m3)


200
80
80
Source: Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board, Madhya Pradesh

9.1.3 Tow n green spaces


Town green spaces are considered as the lung or breathing spaces of the town. Currently
about 3 hectares of land is under recreational activities which is about 1.11% of the total
developed area. This is negligible in comparison to the requirement of the town of this size.
As per UDPFI guidelines, 12-14% is required for this kind of town, 1.0 to 1.2 ha per 1000
persons for town level recreational facilities is required, excluding open spaces in Residential
pockets. The recreational facilities can be distributed in the residential pockets with a
population size of 8000-10000.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Table No. 42. Future requirement of area for green spaces


Projected year

Area required (in Ha)


(As per UDPFI standards - 1.2 Ha per 1000 persons)

2011
2015
2021
2025
2031
2035

50.58
58.44
67.71
78.55
91.14
105.69
Source: Computed Values

9.1.4 Noise
The major traffic flow is towards NH-3 through SH-2, both inter town and intra town. The
noise levels were comparatively higher along these transport corridors than the other roads
and various commercial locations in the town. Daytime and night time noise levels in the
town were found varying but are within the permissible limits; however the levels are reported
well within the permissible limits by MPPCB for all categories in the areas.

9.1.5 Water bodies


There are 3 small ponds in ward no. 16, 9 and 4. Sanjay Talab in ward 16 needs renovation.
Refer map no. 7 for location of Talabs. Canals network is available in north and south parts
of the town. These water bodies/nallahs can be developed as walking trails with tree
plantation on both the sides. The ponds which are also one of the landscaping elements in
the town can be conserved as converted as the town recreational spaces. Thus there is a
scope of beautification and development of water bodies.
Figure No.32. Town green spaces and water bodies

9.1.6 Environmental Regulations


M.P. State Environment Policy 1999 seeks to lay down guidelines that will facilitate
development while ensuring environmental conservation yet without hampering the present
and future development imperatives. The goal of the policy is integrated conservation and
improvement of environment to ensure sustainable development.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

9.1.7 SWOT Anal ysis


Strength

Weakness

Opportunities

Presence of water
bodies in the town.

Absence of solid
waste disposal site.

People
are
concerned
about
the
quality
of
environment in the
Town.

Waste water flows in


the water bodies
which
lead
to
contamination.
Flooding of parts of
the
Town
during
monsoons, due to
lack of drainage.

Threat

Conservation of
ponds
and
creating them as
recreation
spaces for the
public.

Development of
green spaces in
the town.

Dumping
of
waste
near
water bodies will
deteriorate the
quality of water.
Environmental
degradation

9.1.8 Issues and Strategies


Issues
Absence of drainage system creates unhygienic
conditions in the Town
Dumping of solid waste and open defecation
along the water bodies

Strategies
Strict Pollution control norms
Efficient solid waste management
system for the town.
Preservation and conservation of water
bodies and parks and natural resources

Mixing of untreated sewage in water bodies.

9.1.9 Projects Identified


Sr.
No.

1
2
3

Project list/Sector

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
2011-15
2015-25
Cost in
investment (investment
lakhs
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)

Phase C
2025-35
(investment
Rs. in lakh)

Conservation of water bodies


@10,000 Rs. For 5000 sq m
Development of parks - 2
parks
Beautification along roads

61.25

30.63

18.375

12.25

Total

76.25

37.68

25.73

12.85

1.05

1.35

12.00

6.00

0.6

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

10. URBAN FINANCE


Summary: This section assesses the financial profile of the Urban Local bodies to
understand their capacity as an institution to mobilize resources for maintaining
infrastructural services at prescribed norms and standards.

10.1

JOUR A N AG AR P AR IS H AD

JNP has been assigned a range of functions related to the provision of public services. They
strive to meet the costs of constructing and maintaining these services and facilities. The
revenue receipts comprise of own sources (taxes and non-taxes) of the NP as well as grants.
Capital receipts comprise revenues earned from sale of land, general grants from state and
central governments and various loans. Revenues are raised to cover capital investments
and recurrent revenue expenditures. The raised revenues must be utilized to attain the
needs of the public as well as to enhance the development of the city as a whole. The
expenditure comprises infrastructure works, slum upgradation, salaries, wages,
establishment, operations & maintenance, interest, debt servicing, loan repayments and
refunds.
Table No. 43. Structure of JNP Finances

Revenues are raised to cover capital investments and recurrent revenue expenditures. The
raised revenues must be utilized to attain the needs of the public as well as enhance the
development of the city as a whole. The expenditure comprises infrastructure works, slum
upgradation, salaries, wages, establishment, operations & maintenance, interest, debt
servicing, loan repayments and refunds. The table below summarizes the revenue and
expenditure sources:

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Table No. 44. Summary of Revenue and Expenditure Sources


Revenue
Income from Govt. Grant
Moolbhoot Suvidha
Stamp Duty
Waterworks Maintenance
Road repair
Scarcity
Slum Development
Income from Tax Revenue
Property Tax (Inc. CD Tax, Edu. Cess & Con. T,)
Water Tax
Passenger Tax Compensation
Advertisement Tax
Drain Tax
Sewage Tax
Income from Non Tax Revenue
Fees from Hawkers Temporary Shop
Compounding
Rent from Municipal Building/ Market Shop etc.
Tower Permission Fees
Building Permission Fees
Encroachment Fees

Expenditure
Capital Expenditure
Matching Share for Project
Drilling Tube well and Laying New
Pipelines
Construction of New Road
Construction of New Building
Municipal Vehicle
Beautification of City
Road and Building Maintenance
Advertisement Expenditure
Nallah & other drainage system
Maintenance
Sports Activities
Others

Revenue expenditure comprising of salaries and wages, establishment, operation and


maintenance and interest payments, has a major share in the total KMC expenditure.
10.1.1

Analysis of Municipal Finances

10.1.1.1

INCOME

Major sources of income of ULB are rates and tax revenue which contribute 55.84 % of the
total income of Nagar Parishad. The income from rates and tax revenue has increased
during the last three financial years. Fees and user charges include water charges and
electricity usage charges. Refer Table below for shares of income under various heads.

Revenue Income

Table No. 45. Income of Nagar Parishad


Year
Rates and Tax Revenue
Assigned Revenues & Compensation
Rental Income from Municipal Properties

2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2,01,58,513 2,33,00,000 3,28,50,000
0
0
0
0
0
0

Fees & User Charges


Sale & Hire Charges

99,45,729 1,85,50,000 2,27,00,000


0
0
0

Revenue Grants, Contribution and


Subsidies

32,68,325 1,37,00,000 1,38,75,000

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Income from Investments

0
0
26,84,820

Capital
Receipts

Interest Earned
Other Income
Total - Revenue Income
Grants, Contribution for specific purposes
Secured Loans
Unsecured Loans
Deposits
Deposit works
Total Capital Receipts
Total Income
Figure No.33.

Figure No.34.

0
0
77,08,000

0
0
91,08,000

3,60,57,387 6,32,58,000 7,85,33,000


40,480
1,07,000
7,000
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
40,480
1,07,000
7,000
3,60,97,867 6,33,65,000 7,85,40,000

Total Income of the Nagar Parishad

Contribution of various aspects in the Income

Source: Nagar Parishad Budget reports


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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

10.1.1.2

EXPENDITURE

ULB spends maximum on administrative expenses, and operations and maintainence. Nagar
Parishad spent 36% on administration expenses and 64% on operations and Maintaince out
of the total revenue expenditure. Other expenses include money spent on public health and
public education.

Capital Expenditures

Revenue Expenditure

Table No. 46. Expenditure of Nagar Parishad


Year
Establishment Expenses
Administrative Expenses
Operations & Maintenance
Interest & Finance Charges
Programme Expenses
Revenue Grants, Contribution and
Subsidies
Miscellaneous Expenses
Transfer to Fund
Total - Revenue Expenditure
Fixed Assets
Capital Work-in-Progress
Investments -General Fund
Investments-Other Funds
Stocks/Inventory
Loans, Advances and Deposits
Other Assets
Miscellaneous Expenditure
Total Capital Expenditure
Total Expenditure

Figure No.35.

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

0
66,79,664
37,87,525
0
0
0

0
11,19,000
50,40,000
0
0
0

0
34,48,416
60,45,000
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
1,04,67,189 61,59,000
94,93,416
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,85,01,126 2,48,89,500 3,61,60,244
1,85,01,126 2,48,89,500 3,61,60,244
2,89,68,315 3,10,48,500 4,56,53,660
Source: Nagar Parishad Budget reports

Total Expenditure of the Nagar Parishad

Source: Nagar Parishad Budget reports


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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

10.1.1.3

DEFICIT/SURPLUS

The table below shows surplus of JNP. The Parishad has earned more income than the
expenditure, yet the money has not been used judicially to cope up with the existing needs of
the people. However, the surplus amount in all the financial years shows a positive sign in
relation to development.
Table No. 47. Income Expenditure and Surplus/Deficit Trends
Particulars
Total Income
Total Expenditure
Deficit/ Surplus

2009-10
3,60,97,867
2,89,68,315
71,29,552

2010-11
6,33,65,000
3,10,48,500
3,23,16,500

2011-12
7,85,40,000
4,56,53,660
3,28,86,340
Source: Analysis

The figure below shows that surplus amount was more than 3.28 crores during financial
years 2011-12. However, during financial year 2009-10 it was 71.29 lakhs.
Figure No.36.

Income-Expenditure relation

Figure No.37.

Page 78

Surplus trend

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

10.2 ISSUES & POTE N TI AL S


S.
No
1

Aspects

Issues
JNP
is
the
core
organization governing
the
planning
and
management of the city
and its planning area.
There
are
other
numerous departments
that
facilitates
the
service
delivery
mechanism such as
PHED, PWD, Police
etc. Thus the presence
of multiple departments
has created the issue
of multiplicity.
Overlapping
of
functions of various
departments
Rates and tax revenue
are the major revenue
sources
for
JNP.
However, the
local
body are unable to
utilize these sources to
their optimum level

Functions

Revenue
Sources

Initiatives
Reforms

Strategy & Potential

&

More focus is required


to enhance
The revenue source
and
Capacity
of
the
human resource to
sustain the ongoing
programmes

Encourage
Coordination
and
Cooperation
among
various
departments within the city
Encourage proper management of
rural areas
Encourage
e-governance
Development of database to hasten
decision making and speed up
projects
Increase transparency by visibility of
micro and macro level data, functions
and decision in all departments

Billing of services can provide


revenue sources
Regular Payment of Property Tax
Payment for Water supplyMetering option for various uses
Payment for Electricity supply
Payment for Garbage Disposal
Payment for other Services
provided by JNP
Revenues for the JNP can be further
utilized for O & M to enhance
services.
Regulation of activities by enforcing
byelaws can add to revenue
Regulate the activities by enforcing
byelaws like
Slaughter houses/ meat market
bylaws
Registration of Pet Animal and
control of stray animal Byelaws
Marriage Hall/ Garden Byelaws
Maintenance,
improvement,
construction and cleaning of
existing drain
Latrines and Washing places
Maintenance and improvement of
public street
Lodging Houses
Camping on public ground
Management of municipal market
Private Market
Establishment and construction
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Dairies and cattle pens within or


out of the city
For hoardings and signage in the
city
4

Non
Government
Organizations

The NGOs are not that


active in the urban
development sector.

Greater involvement of NGOs in


development activities
Organizing Slum Communities that
have the authority to resolve local
problems
Environment and conservation.

10.3 SUMM AR Y O F FI N DINGS


JNP is the core organizations governing the planning and management of the city and its
planning area. However, there are other departments that facilitates the service delivery
mechanism such as PHED, PWD, Police etc. Presence of multiple departments has created
the issue of multiplicity.
Number of reforms has been undertaken in JNP such as double entry accounting,
decentralization of governance, etc. However, more focus is required to enhance the
revenue sources and capacity of the human resource to sustain the ongoing programs.

10.4 STR AT EGIES


Introduce e-governance set up in the Nagar Parishad in the core functions to reduce
the cost and timely delivery.
Presently the budget system is cash based single entry system, this needs to be
changed to accrual based double accounting system so as to realign it to widely
prevalent standards of accounting.
Particular emphasis on service delivery.
Participation of local religious trust can be an excellent idea for mopping revenue.

Also, introduction of computerized process of land and property is one of the


suggested initiatives for improving the finances of the Nagar Parishad.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

11. INSTITUTIONAL PROFILE


Summary: This chapter discuss about the duties of the local bodies, functions, strengths of
the various institutions involved in the development of Town.

11.1 LEG AL F R AMEWO RK


The urban local bodies in the state of Madhya Pradesh are governed by two important
legislations:

The Madhya Pradesh Municipalities Act, 1961


The Madhya Pradesh Municipal Corporation Act, 1956

To bring uniformity in the structure and working of municipalities in the state, the M.P.
Government appointed the Local Self-government (Urban) Committee, to suggest
modifications in existing legislations in July 1957. The Committee submitted its report in 1959
and on the basis of the recommendations of this committee, the State Government, enacted
the above legislation replacing the diverse legislations in operation in different parts of the
state. These acts specify the governance framework, spatial jurisdiction and the functional
domain of the urban local bodies.
Figure No.38.

Town Administration

11.2 INSTI TU TION AL ARR ANG E ME NT O F JOUR A


Besides JNP, there is plethora of government agencies involved in city governance. The
following are the list of departments who looks after development of the town in the state:
The government stakeholders include:

Joura Nagar Parishad (JNP)


Public Health and Engineering Department (PHED)
Town & Country Planning Department (TCPD)
Madhya Pradesh Housing Board (MPHB)
Public Works Department (PWD)
Madhya Pradesh State Pollution Control Board (MPSPCB)
Madhya Pradesh State Tourism Corporation Ltd (MPSTCL)
District Industrial Centre (DIC)
Regional Transport Organization (RTO)
Police
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Mela Vikas Pradhikaran


Madhya Pradesh Electricity Board (MPEB).

The Joura Nagar Parishad is a representative body with a list of functions delegated by the
state government under the municipal legislation. The functions are mainly related to the
public health, safety, welfare, and public infrastructure and development activities as given in
the Twelfth Schedule (Article 243 W) of the Constitution. The 18 functions that the urban
local bodies have to perform as per the 12th Schedule of the Constitution added by the 74th
Constitution Amendment Act of 1992 are:
Urban planning including Town planning
Regulation of land-use and construction of buildings
Planning for economic and social development
Roads and bridges
Water supply for domestic, industrial and commercial purposes
Public health, sanitation, conservancy and solid waste management
Fire services
Urban forestry, protection of environment and promotion of ecological aspects
Safeguarding the interests of weaker sections of society, including the handicapped
and mentally retarded
Slum improvement and up gradation
Urban poverty alleviation
Provision of urban amenities and facilities such as parks , gardens, playgrounds
Promotion of cultural, educational and aesthetic aspects
Burials and burial grounds, cremations, cremation grounds and electric crematoriums
Cattle pounds, prevention of cruelty to animals
Vital statistics including registration of births and deaths
Public amenities including street lighting, parking lots, bus stops and public
conveniences
Regulation of slaughter houses and tanneries
Figure No.39. Organisational structure of the Nagar Parisha d

All the above functions are carried by the municipal bodies of Madhya Pradesh.
The section 66 of chapter V of the Municipal Corporation Act, 1956, as amended from time to
time and section 123 chapter VI of the M.P. Municipalities Act, 1961, make provision for
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

obligatory and discretionary functions of Town corporations and municipalities respectively.


In addition to such functions, municipal bodies will perform such functions which are
entrusted to them by the state government as the agent of the state government. The
functions of municipal authorities include public health, public safety and convenience, public
education and recreation, welfare activities, upliftment of weaker sections, poverty alleviation
and planning for economic development and social justice.

11.3 FUN C TI O N S O F TH E N AG AR P AR I SH AD
The state municipal act has categorized the function to be carried out by the Nagar Parishad
as mandatory and discretionary function. The duty of the Nagar Parishad is to undertake and
make reasonable adequate provision for the following matters with in the limits of the
Municipality.
Lighting public streets, places and buildings.
Cleansing public streets, place and sewers, and all places, not being private property,
which are open to the enjoyment of the public whether such places are vested in the
Council or not
Removing noxious vegetation, and abating all public nuisances.
Disposing of night-soil and rubbish and preparation of compost manure from night-soil
and rubbish.
Extinguishing fire and protecting life and property when fire occurs.
Regulating or abating offensive or dangerous trades or practices.
Removing obstructing and projection public streets or places and in spaces not being
private property,
Acquiring, maintaining, changing and regulating places for the disposal of the dead.
Taking special measures as may be required by the prescribed authority or any other
authority empowered to issue a direction in this behalf under any law for the time
being in force for disposal of dead bodies during epidemics and other unforeseen
emergences.
Securing or removing dangerous building or places, and redeeming unhealthy
localities.
Constructing, altering and maintaining public streets, culverts, Municipal boundary
marks, markets, hats, slaughter- houses, latrines, privies, urinals, drains, sewers,
drainage works, sewerage works, baths, washing places drinking fountains, tanks,
wells, and dams.
Establishing and managing cattle pounds, including, where the Cattle Trespass Act,
1871, is in operation, all the functions of the State Government and the Magistrate of
the district under sections 2,5,6,7,12,14,17, and 19 of the Act.
Obtaining a supply or an additional supply of water, proper and sufficient, for
preventing danger to the
Obtaining a supply or an additional supply of water, proper and sufficient, for
preventing danger to the health of the inhabitants and domestic cattle on account of
insufficiency or unwholesomeness, of the current supply when such supply or
additional supply can be obtained at a reasonable cost and having such water
analyzed periodically.
Naming streets and parks and numbering houses.
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Registering birth, marriages and deaths.


Public vaccination.
Providing suitable accommodation for any calves, cows and buffaloes required within
the Municipal limits for the supply of animal lymph.
Registration of cattle and carrying out the census of agricultural cattle at such
intervals as may be prescribed.
Taking such measures as may be required to prevent the outbreak or spread or
recurrence of infectious disease.
Preparing such annual reports on the Municipal administration as the State
Government may, by general or special orders, require the Council to submit.
Erecting substantial boundary marks of such description and in such position as shall
be approved by the Collector, defining the limits or any alteration in the limits of the
Municipality.
Constructing and maintaining residential quarters for the conservancy staff of the
Council.
Establishing and maintaining primary schools.
Out of the 18 function listed in the 12th Schedule of 74th CAA, 17 have been transferred to
municipalities. The function of urban planning including town planning is not transferred to
municipality. It lies with town and Country Planning Organization (TCPO).
11.3.1 DISC RETI ON AR Y FU NCTI ONS OF T HE N AG AR P AR IS H AD
The Nagar Parishad may, at its discretion provide, either wholly or party out of the Municipal
property and fund, for all or any of the following matters.
Reclaiming unhealthy localities, laying out, whether in areas previously built upon or
not, new public streets, and acquiring land for the purpose, including plots of land for
building to about on such streets.
Constructing, establishing, or maintaining public parks, gardens play-grounds and
open spaces, libraries, museums, lunatic asylums, hails, offices, dharamshalas, resthouse and other public buildings.
Furthering education.
Planting and maintaining roadside and other trees.
Watering public streets and places.
Playing of music in squares, gardens or other places of public resort.
Taking a census, for local purposes and granting rewards for information which may
tend to secure the correct registration of vital statistics.
Making a survey.
Paying the salaries and allowances, rent and other charges incidental to the
maintenance of the Court of any stipendiary of honorary Magistrate, or any portion of
any such charges.
Destruction or the detention of dogs and pigs which may be destroyed or detained
under the provision of this Act or under any other enactment for the time being in
force in the State.
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Securing or assisting to secure suitable places for the carrying on of the dangerous
and offensive trades specified by or under this Act.
Supplying constructing and maintaining receptacles, fittings, pipes and other
appliances whatsoever, on or for the use of private premises for receiving and
conducting the sewage there of into sewers under control of the Council.
Establishing and maintaining a farm or factory for the disposal of sewage.
Promoting the well-being of Municipal employees or class of employees and of their
dependents. Staff.
The construction of sanitary dwelling houses for the poorer classes.
Making contribution towards the construction establishment or maintenance of
educational institutions including libraries and musesums, hospitals, dispensaries or
similar institutions providing public medical relief or engages in social work or other
institutions of a charitable nature.
The acquisition and maintenance of pasture lands or grazing grounds and the
establishment and maintenance of dairy fams and breeding stud.
The setting up of dairies or farms for the supply, distribution and processing of milk or
milk products for the benefits of the inhabitants of the Municipal area.
Securing and distributing either free or at reduced price, particularly for the use of
expectant and nursing mothers, children and invalids, full-cream or skimmed milk,
condensed milk, evaporated milk, milk powder and synthetic and so.
Establishing and running lodging and boarding houses.
Establishing and running eating houses such as refreshment rooms tea shops,
sweetmeat shops, restaurants, cafes, canteens, hotels and any such place where
food and drinks are served.
Providing and maintaining public bathing places or swimming pools with
booths and other conveniences.

sheds,

Undertaking any commercial enterprises.


Undertaking nay commercial enterprises.
Constructing and maintaining such roads, buildings and other Govemment works
other than irrigation works, as the State Governmment may, in accordance with made
under this Act, transfer to the Council.

11.4 INSTI TU TIONS INV OLVE D I N GOVE RN ANCE


The main organization which is responsible for urban governance and civic management is
Joura Nagar Parishad. Here they have elected leader from the constituencies within its
jurisdiction will takes care of development in the town. The other agencies involved in the
urban management and development in Joura are mentioned below:

11.4.1 Urban Administration and Development Depa rtment


With the enactment of the 74th Constitution Amendment Act, major urban related tasks have
been transferred to Local Bodies. The Government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP) through its
Urban Administration & Development Department (UADD) is responsible for overseeing
urban sector reforms, in terms of capital investment in basic infrastructure for the Urban
Local Bodies (ULBs). The UADD is also responsible for implementation of various public
welfare schemes sponsored by the Central and State Governments. Some such schemes
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

include Conversion of Dry Latrine Program, SwarnaJayanti Urban Employment Scheme,


National Slum Development Program, Social Security Group Insurance Scheme, Janashri
Insurance Scheme etc. These schemes are implemented through the District Urban
Development Agency. Being the parent organization of Municipal Corporations, UADD
monitors the functioning of all municipal corporations in the state.

11.4.2 Public Health Engineering Department (PHED)


PHED is responsible for water supply and safe disposal of sewerage in the Town. The
functions of the department are:
Survey, investigation, preparation and execution of water supply schemes for the
Town
Survey, investigation, preparation and execution of sewerage and sewage disposal
schemes for Town
Execution of rural sanitation schemes
Supply of safe drinking water at places during Fair
Coordination in prevention of pollution of water bodies due to discharge of industrial
wastes
Giving technical advice to various Government departments and local bodies on
Public Health Engineering topics

11.4.3 M.P Housing Board


The Madhya Pradesh Housing Board (MPHB) was established as a corporate body under
the Madhya Pradesh GrihaNirmanMandalAdhiniyam, 1972. The objective of MPHB is
satisfying the need of housing accommodation and other issues related with it. The
organizational set-up consists of Head Office at Bhopal and Regional offices (circle/division).
There are 8 circle head offices headed by Deputy Housing Commissioners (Superintending
Engineer) which are located at Bhopal (3 offices), Ujjain, Gwalior, Indore, Jabalpur and
Rewa.

11.4.4 M.P Pollution Control Board


M.P. Pollution Control Body (MPPCB) is the apex body at the state level. The main objective
of the Board is to maintain water, air and soil in healthy condition. MPPCB ha 10 Regional
Offices, 4 Sub Regional offices, 3 Single Window System and 2 Monitoring Centres in
different parts of the state. The board comprises of the Heads from various organizations of
Housing & Environment, Industry Health and Safety Services, Forest Department, Town&
Country Planning, M.P. Housing Board, Mayors of Municipal Corporations and Nagar
Parishads.

11.4.5 Madhya Pradesh Road Development Corporation (MPRDC)


The MPRDC is responsible for the implementation of 15 State Highway and Major District
road projects in Madhya Pradesh. The MPRDC policy objectives in line with Govermments
policy objectives in line with Governments policy framework are:
a) In partnership with the Private Sector continue construction, maintenance and
upgrading of the State Highway & Major District road network, with emphasis on
maintenance and upgrading.
b) To protect the high level of investment in the State Highway & Major District Road
Network through effective controls on vehicle overloading and ensuring adequate
maintenance through road cost recovery.
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

c) To promote efficiency and safety through application of commercial and best


practice principles to ensure access to safe, reliable, affordable and effective
service.
d) To improve efficiency in the provision of transportation services and infrastructure
through corporatisation, commercialization and outsourcing of maintenance and
construction activities.
e) To ensure access to affordable transportation services, infrastructure and supporting
public amenities for the public.

11.5 ROLE O F N AG AR P AR IS H AD
The local body does not play a major role for its maintenance and preservation. Presently,
there is a lack of co-ordination between the different departments. The role and
responsibilities are not clear.
It is necessary to set up a nodal agency like Heritage Cell in the Nagar Parishad that should
comprise of members from various departments. The role of the cell should be:
Management of database of unprotected heritage structures and all projects related
to heritage conservation
Co-ordination among different departments
Increase awareness among the people about heritage conservation
Capacity building
Strict regulations and restriction for the heritage structures, to maintain its heritage
value

Manage a programme of repair and maintenance


11.6 PRIV AT E SE CTO R P ARTICI P AT ION
Private sector participation can be initiated in the maintenance of the infrastructure and
facilities. Maintenance of the parking areas, toilets, waste collection, ticket booths etc. are
some of the areas where private sector can play a major role.

11.7 ST AT US O F MU NI CIP AL E-GOVERNANCE


There is no system of e- governance in the Nagar Parishad. The e-governance can be
achieved through the following steps:
1. Government offices should be computerized using online workflow procedure. That
means all the paper based registers have to be given up and all government works
have to be carried out only through computers.
2. All Government employees working in the areas where e-governance is proposed
have to be computer trained and each one should be given user ID and password to
operate the system.
3. All these government employees have to be trained in their area of operation in the
software.
4. The Government servers should be connected to the internet so that the citizens
and business houses are enabled to access the Government information at any time
and also enabled to file all their requests/applications online. The scope for meeting
government officials should be reduced to the extent that only where statutorily such
physical presence is required they should be asked to meet the government officials.
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

5. All applications or requests from citizens/business houses should be received only


through online procedure using internet as medium.
6. STD booths or similar public kiosks should be authorized to intermediate between the
citizens and the government. This includes online remittance facility too.

11.8 ST AT US O F RE FO RMS UN DE RT AKE N


The municipal reforms constitute broadly the following:
Introduction of double entry accounting system
Full computerization of all accounting operations
E- governance operations for a variety of service delivery activities
Database development of all municipal owned/ rented properties
GIS mapping
There are no municipal reforms being undertaken by the Joura Nagar Parishad. The details
of the above reforms are discussed later.
Table No. 48. Sector wise responsibilities
SECTOR
Landuse & Master
Plan
City Planning
Water Supply
Sewage
Roads,
Bridges,
Flyovers/
RoB
/Multilevel Parking
Traffic
Control
&
Management System
Public
Transport
System

PLANNING &
DESIGN
TCPD

IMPLEMENTATION

O&M

TCPD

TCPD

TCPD
PHED
PHED& JNP
PWD, NH, NHAI,
JNP

TCPD
PHED
PHED
PWD, NH, NHAI, JNP

TCPD
PHED & JNP
PHED
PWD, NH, NHAI,
JNP

Traffic Police

Traffic Police

Traffic Police

JNP

Private operators

Street Lighting
Storm
Water
Drainage
Solid
Waste
Management
Parks/ Playgrounds
Slum Development

JNP
PWD & JNP

RTOs Autos &


Vikrams (Licensing &
Routes nos), Taxi
Services
JNP
PWD

HO & JNP

HO & JNP

JNP

JNP
JNP

JNP
JNP, NGOs & CBOs

Housing
Air, water & noise
pollution Control
Heritage Building and
Conservation
Tourism

Housing Board
MPSPCB

Housing Board
MPSPCB

JNP
JNP, NGOs &
CBOs
Housing Board
MPSPCB

JNP, ASI, SASI

JNP, ASI, SASI

JNP, ASI, SASI

MPSTDC, Hoteliers

MPSTDC, Hoteliers

Primary- DEO

JNP (HO)
Primary- JNP & DEO

MPSTCL,
Hoteliers
JNP (HO)
Primary- JNP &

Public Health
Education
Page 88

JNP
PWD

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Higher- Private

Higher- Private

JNP

JNP

Development of city
areas

DEO
Higher- Private
JNP

11.9 SWOT AN AL YSIS


Strength

Weakness

Opportunities

Elected body in Lack of awareness Capacity building


place as per the
of the political wing
at
local
levels
provisions of the
towards their role
through
training
and responsibility.
programs
74th
Constitutional
the
amendment Act. Lack of technical Streamline
skill among the
administrative
Statutory local
staff.
procedures
body in place
Manual
single Computerization of
Nagar
Parishad
entry system
functions
and
Lack of
public
introduction
of
participation
in
citizen centres
decision making

Threat
Delays
making

in

decision

Poor staff maintenance


leading to delays in
project management.
Inefficient
management

data

Lack of enforcement of
reforms would lead to
non-utilisation of grants
by central and state
govt.

11.10 ISSUES AN D ST R AT EGIE S


Issues

Strategies

Inadequate number and technical capacity of


staff with respect to duties and functions.
There is no system of e- governance
No municipal reforms undertaken by the Nagar
Parishad.
The Nagar Parishad is responsible for huge
number of activities.
Lack of co-ordination between the local
authority and the district authorities.
The staff is not well equipped with the facilities
and systems for implementing reforms and
improving efficiency.
The public faces a lot of problems but there is
no grievance redressal system for addressing
their problems.

Computer accounting system (egovernance).


Training and capacity building of
technical, non-technical and political
wing of Nagar Parishad.
Involve public participation in decision
making process.
Establishing E-grievance system
Reforms and delegation of functions
as per 74th CAA
Streamlining
of
functions
and
implementation mechanism and esure
accountable, transparent and efficient
local governance system.

The above issues and strategies are to improve the service delivery mechanism in the local
bodies and to improve the performance by providing to build their capacities in operation and
maintenance of their finances. On the other hand implementation of double entry accounting
systems for maintaining records. It is suggested to procure computers for Nagar Parishad,
conduct training needs assessment for capacity building, GIS development, conduct inter
departmental meetings for better coordination.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

11.11 Projects Identified


Sr.
No.

1
2

Project list/Sector

Computer training & Capacity


building
Property Tax Mapping
Water Utility Asset Mapping
Sewerage
Utility
Asset
Mapping
Route
Optimisation
&
Collection points for Solid
Waste Management
Total

Page 90

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
2011-15
2015-25
Cost in
investment (investment
lakhs
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)

Phase C
2025-35
(investment
Rs. in lakh)

200.00
45.00

200.00
9.00

27.00

9.00

245.00

209.00

27.00

9.00

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

12. STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION


Summary: This chapter discusses about the stakeholder consultations held during the
various stage of CDP, issues & suggestions given by the stakeholders in each workshop and
finally the prioritisation of the sectors.

12.1 INT ROD UC TIO N


Various stakeholder groups were identified for preparation of the City Development Plan
during the various stages of the project. Stakeholders were involved through interviews and
focus group discussions to gauge situation assessment in terms of levels of services, and
infrastructure needs for improvement. Two core groups of stakeholders were identified.

Primary stakeholders: They are beneficiaries of a development intervention or those


directly affected by it. They include local populations and organizations such as
Residential welfare organizations, traders organizations, hoteliers and other
associations.

Secondary stakeholders: They include those who influence development


interventions, such as, local governments, implementing agencies, civil society
organisations, private sector firms and other development agencies. Nagar Parishad
members, staffs of PWD, etc. were amongst the stakeholders consulted.

The aim of conducting consultation programs is to articulate stakeholder expectations so as


to be able to formulate city development vision, prioritise city development issues, develop
strategies and integrate their opinions in decision making. Opinions were sought from
stakeholders during consultation. The participants were asked for views on the baseline
situation related to urban infrastructure followed by their priorities for development. The
consultation program and findings from them have been mentioned below.
The workshops were organized by MSV International Inc in the presence of Mr. Bansal,
Chief Municipal Officer and other elected representative of the wards, line departments, and
Senior citizens of the city.

12.2 I ST AG E: KI CK - O FF WORKSHO P
The Kick-Off Workshop marked the initiation of the planning process for Town Development
Plan. Its purpose is to familiarize the stakeholders with the purpose, process, and expected
outcomes of the CDP, and build enthusiasm, understanding and commitment to the CDP.
As per the TOR for preparation of the City Development Plan of Joura, the Kick-Off
Workshop was organized on 20th December 2011.
The stakeholders included the Chairman of the Nagar Parishad, CMO - Mr. Amjad Gani
officers of various government departments, ward councillors and local people of the town.
While the local people were mainly concerned about their day to day problems of inadequate
water supply and lack of treatment facilities, the ward councilors were more concerned about
facilities for their individual wards.
The C.M.O. gave the welcome speech and introduces the entire members one by one. He
explained about CDP, their requirements, future planning for upcoming 25 years and

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

purpose of the meeting. The MSV international Inc gave power point presentation about City
Development Plan, their advantage, dreams, and major thrust issue in the Joura.
12.2.1

List of Workshop Participants

A list of key people who attended the workshop are as follows:


Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
12.2.2

Name of the person


Mr. Amjad Gani
Mr. Rajesh Verma
Mr. Sunil Singhal
Mr. M K Jain
Mr. S K Jain
Mr. R S Aimil
Mrs. Shobha Ram Sharma
Mr. Rakesh Jain
Mr. Manoj Upadhyay
Mr. Sanjay Sharma
Mr. Rajesh Goyal
Mr. Pankaj Gupta

Designation
Chief Municipal Officer Joura
Chairman Nagar Parishad Joura
Vice Chairman Nagar Parishad Joura
Anudanit Adhikari Rajasva Vibhag, Joura
Public Health and Engineering Division, Joura
Block Medical Officer, Joura
Vice chairman office, Gwalior
MP Police, Joura
Upmantri, Nagar Parishad Joura
Public Works Department
Ward Member
Ward Member

City Level Steering Group

A city level steering group committee was formed by MSV Internation Inc for better
structuring of CDP process:
Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

12.2.3

Name of the person


Mr. Amjad Gani
Mr. Rajesh Verma
Mr. Sunil Singhal
Mr. M K Jain
Mr. S K Jain
Mr. R S Aimil
Mrs. Shobha Ram Sharma
Mr. Rakesh Jain
Mr. Manoj Upadhyay
Mr. Sanjay Sharma
Mr. Rajesh Goyal
Mr. Pankaj Gupta

Issues and Suggestions

Sector
Water Supply

Drainage
Sewerage and
Sanitation

Page 92

Designation
Chief Municipal Officer Joura
Chairman Nagar Parishad Joura
Vice Chairman Nagar Parishad Joura
Anudanit Adhikari Rajasva Vibhag, Joura
Public Health and Engineering Division, Joura
Block Medical Officer, Joura
Vice chairman office, Gwalior
MP Police, Joura
Upmantri, Nagar Parishad Joura
Public Works Department
Ward Member
Ward Member

Issues

Suggestions

Water supply available for the entire

Expansion of pipe network


Improvement in the quality of

Town is largely in sufficient in terms


of the demand
water
Open drains; water logging in low Covering and widening of
lying areas during monsoon
drains
Absence of sewerage disposable Construction
of community
toilets
system
leads
to
unhygienic
condition, development of an

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Solid
Waste
Management
Transportation

Social
Infrastructure

efficient sewerage network has to be


done in parallel to augmentation of
water supply
Open defecation
Lack of solid waste management
system and disposal sites. Waste is
dumped in open areas.
Poor maintenance of roads
Insufficient road width in comparison
to volume
Lack of traffic signals
Lack of treatment facilities to cure
major diseases.
Lack of doctors, nurses.
Lack

Economy

Environment

of organized market for


agricultural products
Lack of alternative employment
opportunities
Dumping of waste near water bodies

Solid waste disposal site


Door to door collection of waste
A permanent Bus Stand with

proper facilities
Institutions for higher education
Development
of
medical

facilities
Development of stadium
Strenghting
of
vegetable

market
Conservation of water bodies
Development of parks and

recreational areas
In a nut shell, the main issues raised which need to be addressed through planning process
are:

Inadequate water supply- water conservation techniques


Bad condition of sewerage system and absence of wastewater treatment scheme.
Necessity of a Bus Stand
Conservation and beautification of Talabs.
Development of park around water body
Requirement of a shopping complex/mandi
These issues and the possible pragmatic solutions will be analysed and discussed in the
proceeding stages of CDP preparation.

12.3

II ST AG E: S T AG E W O RKS HO P: CI TY VI SI O N AN D G O ALS

The second workshop and presentation on city vision and sector goals was organized on 16th
of February, 2012 at the Joura Nagar Parishad Office. Our understanding of the towns
existing condition was presented to the stakeholders followed by a discussion on towns
perspectives and priorities.
12.3.1

Issues

Based on our study and discussion with the stakeholders the main issues that were identified
are as follows:
The town requires an efficient sewerage network not only for improving quality of

life but also from the interest of conservation of the water bodies, as according to
the current situation, sewerage from the city drains directly into the rivers.
Lack of proper solid waste management system. All the waste is dumped in open

areas.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

One significant problem in Joura is its lack of parking space and congestion on

roads. The need for parking spaces especially in the market place and the need to
construct dividers on the roads for managing traffic were major issues highlighted.
Mixing of regional traffic and local traffic.
The impact of industrial developments around the town would have a significant

impact on the economic development of the town.


12.3.2

Suggestions

Certain suggestions put forward by the participants were as follows:


Widening of roads and major junctions in the town.
Improvement of the water supply distribution system and waste management.
Restoration of water bodies and development of recreation zones
Beautification of all water bodies and providing buffer areas along these water

bodies for their protection.


Fulfilling the future demand of social infrastructure in the town.

12.3.3

Thrust areas

The thrust areas identified, therefore, are as follows:


Infrastructure development including sewerage, drainage, water supply and

roadnetworks.
Need for parking spaces and a transport nagar.
Restoration of water bodies in the town and provided with buffer areas.

12.3.4

Prioritisation of sectors

Projects have been identified in each sector focusing on the aspects that are integral for the
development of the town, guided by the discussions emanating from stakeholder
consultations. Water supply and sewage has been assigned equal priority as management
and maintenance of both is required to be undertaken simultaneously. To summarise, the
priority sectors for Joura are:

12.4

Water Supply
Sewerage & Storm Water Drainage
Solid waste Management& Urban Environment
Traffic & Transportation
Economic Development of industries
III ST AG E: W O RKS HO P: DR AF T CI TY DEV ELO PM EN T PL AN : CI P,
FO P

The III workshop and presentation on Draft CDP was organized on 21st August, 2012 at the
Nagar Parishad Office, presided by CMO, Joura Nagar Parishad. This phase focuses on an
analysis of the projects identified for the city, scheduling of its implementation and providing
an estimate of the investment requirement for each project.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Apart from the proposed projects, the City investment plan was also discussed. This included
the approximate costs of the projects proposed, total funding required for each sector and
phasing of the investment. Urban reforms for improving the efficiency and services of the
local body were also deliberated, which would in turn increase the generation of revenues.
Figure No.40. Stakeholder Consultation Workshops

12.5

THR US T AR E AS AN D M AJ O R I S SU ES O F THE S T AK E HO L D ER
CO NS UL T ATI O N

The meeting covered broad discussion about major issue in the city is as follows:1. Lack of Awareness level in ward members/Elected representative
2. Lack of political will and Deficiency of Nagar parishad fund
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

3. Vision of future city development plan


4. Sources of income of Nagar Parishad like
Property/ housing tax
Nominal water tax
Water tax
Market tax or other taxes
5. Developing source of water along River near city and Storage for water with water
distribution infrastructure as water is most critical problem in city
6. Sanitation problem including drainage network and lack of solid waste
Management facility
7. No trenching ground for municipal solid waste
8. Lack of basic infrastructure like CC roads, sanitation, drainage, sewer line, light,
Marrige hall, toilet & shopping complex, weekly market, school, Hospital etc.
9. Required proper transport station, Bus stand & community centre
10. Construction of play ground, parks and rain water harvesting structure
11. Finding out new employment opportunity in the region
12. Housing scheme for poor people in city
13. Developing lord Shiva temple on Alopy Shankar hill near bus stand as tourist
attraction
14. Required traffic management and parking problem
15. Expansion of boundary of Nagar Parishad and land management

12.6 FEED B AC K TOW AR D S CI T Y DEVE LOPME NT P L AN


Mr. Amjad Gani, Chief Municipal Officer Joura
Construction and maintenance of roads in wards
Providing sustainable source for water and storage of water including distribution
network
Construction of underground sewerage/ drainage network and installation of electric
poles in wards
Laying of pipeline for water from Chambal or pagara river
Required traffic management and solution for parking problem
Mr. Rajesh Verma, Chairman Nagar Parishad Joura
Construction of underground sewerage/ drainage network in city
Improvement in quality of drinking water
Construction of divider on main roads and bypass around city for traffic management
Development and beautification of Pagara Dam as a tourist attraction
Mr. Brijmohan Bansal, Ex Chairman Nagar Parishad Joura
Problem of drinking water, solid waste management and drainage mainly in city
Construction of Drainage and sewerage line in wards
Construction of public toilets in wards
Construction of cultural hall, parks and stadium in city
Mr. Jagdish Shukla, Reporter and social worker
Problem of drinking water quality and source of water
Construction f drainage network in city mainly
Conservation of cultural heritage and construction of cultural hall in city
Development of solid waste management facility in city
Development in tax paying facility in Nagar parishad
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Mrs. Pushpa Negi, ward member no. 7


Construction of Nallah around city for drainage outflow
Construction of market place, sabji mandi and hawkers zone in the city
Installation of solar lights and construction parks in city
Mr. Pankaj Gupta, ward member no. 9
Problem of water quality in city mainly
Construction of parks and stadium in city
Laying of underground electric wires in city
Development of governmental housing schemes for poor
Mr. Avdhesh Singh Sikarwar
Construction of stadium and public toilets in city
Construction of drainage network in city
Drinking water quality is not good
Mr. Manoj Sharma, Ward Member no.1
Construction of underground drainage and sewerage in city mainly
Improvement in electricity supply system in city
Broadening of roads and construction of dividers on road.
Mr. Dinesh Bhardwaj, Varishtha Abhibhavak
Supply of drinking water from Pagara Dam and development of Pagara dam as
tourist attraction
Construction of housing scheme for poor people and underground drainage network
in city
Development of social infrastructure in city like hospital and colleges for professional
education
Mr. Mahesh, Ward Member no .16
Construction of public toilets in wards
Construction of Sewer line and drinking water supply network in ward

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

13. CITY INVESTMENT PLAN


Summary: This chapter discusses about prioritization of proposed projects and their
investment requirements and phasing.

13.1 B ASIS OF P RIOR I TIZ AT IO N


The issues with respect to towns development have been arrived at after extensive analysis
of the status of each sector. These sectors include landuse, economic development,
environment, housing, slum development, urban services including water supply, sewerage,
solid waste management and transportation, heritage, municipal finance and institutional
framework. It is necessary to prioritize these issues in order to address them effectively. The
prioritisation has been based on two criteria:

Stakeholder perception; and


Analysis of status of existing and future requirements; &
Sectoral assessment by the project team

The priorities for the Town have been analysed taking account two very important aspects of
development:

Livability and Competitiveness.


Livability includes the sectors that determine a decent quality of life including
environment, access to infrastructure and basic services, housing and slums.
Competitiveness measures the ability to attract economic forces, namely, level of
economic development, locational advantage, heritage, etc.

13.2 CONSO LID AT I ON OF ISS UES


Sectors
Water Supply

Sewerage & Storm water


drainage

Solid Waste Management

Environment

Traffic and Transportation


Page 98

Issues
Inadequate water supply
All hand pumps are not functional
In-equitable water supply distribution.
Non availability of Water treatment.
Absence of sewerage & drainage system.
Most of the waster goes in to water bodies in downstream
areas.
Existing drains are mostly choked with solid waste
Water logging at various places during monsoons.
No segregation of waste.
In sufficient workers in the Nagar Parishad, shortage of
vehicles, collection & transportation of waste.
Manual handling of waste.
In the absence of a dumping site, waste is dumped in
unscientific manner posing environmental hazards
Protection of water bodies.
Poor condition of ponds
Solid waste lying on the roads in absence of dumping site
Mixing of regional & local traffic

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Inadequate width of roads


Lack of organized parking in the town
Street furniture, road & tourism signage boards are also
insufficient in the town
Lack of access to urban basic services
Lack of adequate housing
Legal ownership & tenure security
Economic depredation
Inadequate beds in hospitals
Lack of maternity & child care facilities
Absence of treatment facilities.
Absence of technical education centers.

Urban Poor & Slums

Social Infrastructure

13.3 SECTO R PR IORI TI Z AT IO N


On the basis of the discussions that transpired in the stakeholder consultations and the
sectoral analysis, the sectors have been ranked in order of priority. The stakeholders
expressed concern about the situation of urban services and the need to enhance the
heritage potential of the Town. The major issues highlighted by them are:

Exploring methods to augment the water supply of the Town and simultaneously
manage the sewage generated
Poor solid waste management in the Town. More importantly, utilization of the funds
allocated for this purpose.
Promotion of heritage conservation and tourism in the Town
Creation of open spaces and stadiums in the Town
Diversion of traffic through bypasses for reduction and management of traffic flow in
the Town
Resolving the parking issues in the Town
Poor co-ordination between the various agencies
The ranks assigned to the sectors conform to the needs of the Town.

Table No. 49. Priority Matrix


Sectors
Water Supply
Sewerage & Storm Water Drainage
Solid Waste Management
Traffic & Transportation
Economic Development: Industries & Markets
Social Infrastructure
Urban Poor & Basic Services
Fire fighting
Urban Environment
Street Lighting

Rank
1
1
2
2
3
4
4
5
6
6

Rank 1 has been awarded to the sector of highest importance and vice versa. Water supply
and sewage has been assigned equal priority as management and maintenance of both is
required to be undertaken simultaneously. To summaries, the priority sectors for Joura are:
Page 99

Water Supply

Sewerage & Storm Water Drainage

Solid waste Management& Urban Environment

Traffic & Transportation

Economic Development of industries

13.4 PROJEC T PR IORI TIS AT I ON


Projects have been identified in each sector focusing on the aspects that are integral for the
development of the town, guided by the discussions emanating from stakeholder
consultations. The basis of identification is two fold:

Priorities as identified by various stakeholders during the CDP preparation process;

Current and future demand and supply gaps estimated by the project team

13.5

OBJEC TIVE

Based on the status of infrastructure and priorities, projects have been identified for the
development of the City. On the basis of previous analysis, the quantum of investment
required to attain sustainable growth and the project goals, over a specified time frame, have
been calculated. In brief, City Investment Plan (CIP) provides an estimate of investment that
will be needed to implement the CDP. The costing provided for the projects given below is a
rough cost estimate based on mainly Madhya Pradesh Schedule of rates 2012, CPWD
Schedule of Rates, 2012; Report on Indian Urban Infrastructure and Services, 2011; National
Capital Regional Planning Board, Ministry of Urban Development, Govt. of India and the
discussions with the local PWD/PHED officials in the towns. The costing is based on
Departmental estimates and lump sum amounts with suitable escalation factors in each
sector for the implementing period.

13.6

INVEST MEN T EST I M AT ES

13.6.1 Water Supply


The total estimated cost of the proposed projects for water supply is Rs.1017.65 lakhs which
includes internal distribution systems, installation of meters, contruction of Water treatment
plants and also water conservation techniques such as rain water harvesting. The expansion
of the network is approximately for a length of 40 km (both sides of the road). The installation
of meters is also one of the projects which will help in monitoring the water usage and cost
recovery. Rain Water Harvesting method will be adopted to increase the ground water table
through artificial recharge and improve the quality of ground water, Rain water harvesting
method will be initiated. It will be used in the government buildings before and then in public
institutions, residences etc. At present, 10 rainwater harvesting structures are being
proposed in the following government buildings: Nagar parishad office, Tehsil Office,
Community Health Centre, Police Station, College and Girls high School. In future, making
rainwater harvesting provisions would be made mandatory for approving site plans.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

The State Govt. vide Gazette notification dated 26.8.2006, has made roof top RWH
mandatory for all types of buildings having plot size of more than 140 sq.m. The government
has also announced 6% rebate in property tax to individuals for the year in which the
individual will go for installation of roof top RWH structures.
Table No. 50. Project cost estimate for Water Supply
Sr.
No.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Project list/Sector

Expansion of network (20*2)


300 mm diameter of DI PIPE
150 mm diameter of DI PIPE
Renovation of existing pipe
line
Community tap: Stand Posts
Installation of meters
WTP (2)
Rain Water Harvesting
Structures (10)
Total

Estimated
Cost in
lakhs

Phase A
2011-15
investment
Rs.in lakh)

274

54.8

55
1
40.00
646.15

55.00
0.50
20.00
258.46

0.5
12.0
387.7

388.76

1.5
566.09

1.5
1017.65

Phase B
Phase C
2015-25
2025-35
(investmen (investmen
t Rs.in
t Rs. in
lakh)
lakh)
54.8
164.4

8.0

62.80

13.6.2 Sewerage & Storm Water Drainage


The estimated project cost for sewerage and storm water drainage is Rs.2645 lakhs. The aim
of projects in this sector is to ensure effective treatment and disposal of waste water, thereby
helping in conservation of the water bodies. Sewage and sanitation facilities are to be
especially extended to the newer colonies and slums which get flooded during the monsoons
owing to overflowing of drains. The existing drains in Joura would be widened and also
covered to avoid being clogged up by solid wastes.
Table No. 51. Project cost estimate for Sewerage and Storm Water Drainage
Sr.
No.

Project list/Sector

1
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
3
4

Septic Tanks:
Sewerage network
300 mm dia RCC pipe
200 mm dia RCC pipe
150 mm dia RCC pipe
Renovation of drains
Construction of Drains-40
kms
20 for combined system
20 km for construction of
secondary drains
Community Toilets

4.1
4.2
5

Page 100

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
Cost in
2011-15
2015-25
2025-35
investment (investment (investment
lakhs
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh) Rs. in lakh)
80.10
801
400.50
320.40
260.18
520.35
520.35
1300.88

24
360

24.00
108.00

180.00

72.00

64.00

48.00

48.00

200
160
160

Total

2645.88

1116.85

1068.75

460.28

13.6.3 Solid Waste Management


In absence of solid waste management the drains are blocked due to waste disposal leading
to unhygienic conditions and water contamination. As per Manual on Solid Waste
Management (SWM), Ministry of Urban Development and Poverty Alleviation, Government of
India 2000, the solid waste management is the responsibility of the urban local body. The
objective of SWM is to collect, store, treat and dispose the solid waste generated in the town
in an environmental friendly and socially satisfactory manner and using the most economical
means available. The estimated cost for SWM system is Rs. 288.91 lakhs which will involve
purchase of litter bins, containers for collection and storage of waste, equipments for lifting
the waste, vehicles for transportation of waste etc.
Table No. 52. Project cost estimate for Solid Waste Management
Sr.
No
.

1
2
3
4

5
6

Project list/Sector

Waste Collection & Disposal


Containerised Handcarts
Containerised Tricycles
Community Bins
Closed Dumper placer
container for secondary
collection
1 small vehicle
Composting of Waste
Total

Estimated
Cost in
lakhs

Phase A
2011-15
investme
nt Rs.in
lakh)

2.66
0.59
0.89
3.78

1.06
0.59
0.89
1.89

6.00
275
288.91

6.00
55.00
65.43

Phase B
Phase C
2015-25
2025-35
(investmen (investmen
t Rs.in
t Rs. in
lakh)
lakh)
1.59

1.89

220.00
223.48

0.00

13.6.4 Traffic & Transportation


The total estimated project cost for traffic and transportation is Rs. 1384.8 lakhs which
includes road widening, development of parking spaces, bus stand, transport nagar etc.
Dedicated public transport system has been proposed on important routes to improve
transport facilities.
Table No. 53. Project cost estimate for Transportation
Sr.
No.

Project list/Sector

Widening of roads
MS Road, Panchbhiga road,
Pagara Road
Improvement of Junctions:
Bus Stand, Bazaar area
Parking space : (2.5*5 sq

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
2011-15
2015-25
2025-35
Cost in
lakhs
investment (investment (investment
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)
Rs. in lakh)
360
240
600.0
600.0
30.0
100

30
100
Page 101

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

3
4
5

m=15 approx) space for 50


cars/jeeps/3
wheeler(50*15=750)+15%
circulation
Road Signage & Traffic lights
Dedicated
Public
transport/Mini buses
Truck terminal
Upgradation of Bus Stand:
bus bays, waiting areas,
computerized ticket counters
and information centres and
kiosks
Total

4.80

4.80

375.00
200

187.50

75.00

75.00
657.30

1384.8

187.50
200

527.50

200.00

The main funding source identified for development of trasport sector is public private
partnership, especially for development of public transport services, parking lots and truck
terminal, etc. For junction improvements and development of parking lots, Central, State govt
and ULB share in the ratio of 80:10:10.

13.6.5 Social Infrastructure


Social infrastructure is one of the major sectors of investment. Presently the town lacks
health facilities so there is a requirement of 100 bed hospital, maternity & child care centre
and education facilities. The costing has been done on the basis of Madhya Pradesh
Schedule of Rates, 2012. Since health and education infrastructure are not a part of
JNNURM components, the investment after excluding these costs is Rs. 3350 lakhs.
However, they have been shown in the table above just to reinstate their importance in
improving the living quality of the people of the town.
Table No. 54. Project cost estimate for social infrastructure
Sr.
No.

2
3
4

Project list/Sector

Intermediate Hospital with an


additional capacity of 100
beds (0.6 ha) including 30
beds for Maternity and child
care
Primary
and
Senior
Secondary School
Construction of new college
with playground
Industrial Training Institute
Total

Page 102

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
2011-15
2015-25
2025-35
Cost in
lakhs
investment (investment (investment
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)
Rs. in lakh)
1500.00
900
600

750.00

750

400.00

400

700.00
3350.00

2050.00

700.00
1300.00

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

13.6.6 Fire Fighting


The total investment requirement under this sector is Rs. 450 lakhs. The cost estimates of
firefighting services has been based on the National Building Code. The funds for these
projects can be obtained as grants front he State govt. Relief fund and the concerned
department.
Table No. 55. Project cost estimate for fire fighting
Sr.
No.

1
2
3

Project list/Sector

1sub fire station


Vehicles & Equipments
Rescue Van
Small Fire Water Tenders
Total

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
2011-15
2015-25
Cost in
lakhs
investment (investment
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)
200.0
200.00
50.0
200.0
450.00

50.00
200.00
450.00

0.00

Phase C
2025-35
(investment
Rs. in lakh)

0.00

13.6.7 Affordable Housing


To cater to the demand of housing, resulting from population growth, group housing is being
proposed below.
Table No. 56. Project Cost estimate for Affordable housing scheme
Sr.
No.

Project list/Sector

Affordable Housing (1300 HH


of existing BPL and 10% of
HH to be taken up for total
housing shortage)-10 % of
total amount to be bear by NP
EWS Housing
Total

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
2011-15
2015-25
2025-35
Cost in
lakhs
investment (investment (investment
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)
Rs. in lakh)
337.5
262.5
150

750
750.00

337.50

262.5

150

13.6.8 Environment
Environment is one of the important components for the development of the town, the
estimated project cost is Rs.76.25 lakhs. The project components include development of
lung spaces i.e. parks and open spaces, beautification along roads and nallahs.
Table No. 57. Project cost estimate for Environment
Sr.
No.

1
2

Project list/Sector

Conservation of water bodies


@10,000 Rs. For 5000 sq m
Development of parks - 2
parks

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
2011-15
2015-25
Cost in
investment (investment
lakhs
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)
3

1.05

1.35

12.00

6.00

Phase C
2025-35
(investment
Rs. in lakh)
0.6

Page 103

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Beautification along roads


Total

61.25
76.25

30.63
37.68

18.375
25.73

12.25
12.85

13.6.9 Institutional Strengthening


The institutional strengthening involves the project cost of Rs. 260 lakhs which will involve
the computer training & capacity building and property tax mapping. Property tax is the tax
imposed by the Nagar Parishad on the owners of the property within their jurisdiction. This is
one of the sources of revenue for the local body.
Table No. 58. Project Cost estimate for Institutional Strengthening
Sr.
No.

1
2

Project list/Sector

Estimated
Phase A
Phase B
2011-15
2015-25
Cost in
lakhs
investment (investment
Rs.in lakh) Rs.in lakh)

Computer training & Capacity


building
Property Tax Mapping
Water Utility Asset Mapping
Sewerage
Utility
Asset
Mapping
Route
Optimisation
&
Collection points for Solid
Waste Management
Total

Phase C
2025-35
(investment
Rs. in lakh)

200.00
45.00

200.00
9.00

27.00

9.00

245.00

209.00

27.00

9.00

The total investment for development of Joura is estimated to be Rs. 245 lakhs. It is
important to mention here that land costs are not included in these estimates and are merely
component costs. Highest funds are required for projects related to housing schemes, traffic
and transportation followed by social infrastructure.

13.6.10

Economic development

Table No. 59. Project Cost estimate for Economic development


Sr.
Project
No. list/Sector

1
2

Mandi & Godown


Development of
HH industries for
300 HH (Bidhi
making
from
tendu leaves)
Total

Estimated
Cost in lakhs

Phase A
2011-15
investment
Rs.in lakh)
540
324
300
180

840

504

Phase B
2015-25
(investment
Rs.in lakh)
216
120

Phase C
2025-35
(investment
Rs. in lakh)

336.00

The total investment in the Nagar Parishad for the year 2035 will be 11214.32 lakhs. The
highest investment would be required in social infrastructure will be 3350 Lakhs followed by
sewerage and sanitation sector.

Page 104

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Table No. 60. Summary of Total Investment


Sr. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

Sector

Total Investment ( in lakhs)

% Share

Economic Development
Water Supply
Sewerage & Sanitation
Solid Waste Management
Traffic & Transportation
Street Lighting
Fire Fighting
Social Infrastructure

840.00
1017.65
2645.88
288.91
1384.80
165.83
450.00
3350.00

7.49
9.07
23.59
2.58
12.35
1.48
4.01
29.87

Environment
Affordable Housing
Institutional Strengthening
Total Investment

76.25
750.00
245.00
11214.32

0.68
6.69
2.18
100.00

Figure No.41. Sectorwise investment

Source: Analysis

Page 105

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

14. FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN


14.1 INT ROD UC TIO N
This chapter presents the Financial and Operating Plan (FOP) in respect of Nagar Parishad
Joura. The FoP will examine the financial feasibility and sustainability aspect in the context of
the fiscal management at the urban local bodies (ULB) level. The FOP is essentially a multiyear forecast of finances of the ULBs for a medium term of 7 to 10 years with a view to
examine the sustainable of the identified new investments under the JNNURM. It deals with
the pattern of financing the new investment that considers alternative sources of financing
the vision and the accompanying strategy and programmes. It needs mention that the
identified investment is phased from 2009-10 to 2011-2012 and the FOP has also been
generated from the same period. The financial data of the Nagar Parishad is used for the
purpose and a baseline scenario where the past trends are assumed to continue is the basis
for projections.

14.2 FOP ASS U MPTIO N S FOR B AS ELI NE PROJECTIONS


The financial operating plan gives the multi year forecast of the urban local body by
examining the financial feasibility and sustainability. For Nagar Parishad Joura, the revenues
basically comprise tax, non-tax revenues, funds for special schemes and grants for special
projects. The forecast of revenue is assumed to grow at past trends. Public works and health
facilities incur the maximum expenditure as already discussed in the chapter Urban finance;
the trend for expenditure is also expected to grow at past trends.

14.2.1

Forecast of income

In the case of Joura Nagar Parishad, the income basically comprises tax, grants from the
state and central governments. In Joura, tax revenue comprises the revenues from property/
house tax, toll tax, passenger tax, road improvement tax, market tax and parking fee. The
main contribution to income is in the form of grants and contributions. Revenue income
shows an increasing trend owing to increasing revenue in forms of compensation and return
received. Capital receipts although has declined owing to decrease in capital grants
received. In a nut shell, income shows an increasing trend over the years.

Revenue Income

Table No. 61. Forecast of Income of Nagar Parishad (in lakhs)


Year
Rates and
Tax Revenue
Assigned
Revenues &
Compensation
Rental Income
from
Municipal
Properties
Fees & User
Charges
Sale & Hire
Charges

Page 106

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2011-15

2015-25

2025-36

201.58

233.00

328.50

365.66

469.09

601.78

99.45

185.50

227.00

276.43

426.92

659.35

Capital Receipts

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Revenue
Grants,
Contribution
and Subsidies
Income from
Investments
Interest
Earned
Other Income
Total Revenue
Income
Grants,
Contribution
for specific
purposes
Secured
Loans
Unsecured
Loans
Deposits
Deposit works
Total Capital
Receipts
Total Income

32.68

137.00

138.75

0
26.84

0
77.08

0
91.08

360.57

632.58

785.33

0.40

1.07

0..07

0
0
0

0
0
0

0.40
360.97

1.07
633.65

227.67

592.47

1541.76

0
128.46

0
260.31

0
527.47

941.74

1410.65

2113.05

0..07

0.10

0.14

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0.07
941.67

0.10
1410.08

0.14
2111.48

0..07
785.40

Source: Analysis

14.2.2

Forecast of Revenue Expenditure

For the purpose of the forecasting the main items are expected to grow at their past rates for
the forecast purposes. However, for the forecasts with the new investments, additional
liabilities due to increase in the labor, repairs and maintenance etc are built in. The baseline
forecasts for the two ULB components are summarized as follows.

Revenue Expenditure

Table No. 62. Forecast of Expenditure of Nagar Parishad (in lakhs)


Year
Establishment
Expenses
Administrative
Expenses
Operations &
Maintenance
Interest &
Finance
Charges
Programme
Expenses
Revenue
Grants,
Contribution and
Subsidies
Miscellaneous

2010-11
0

2011-12
0

2011-15
0

2015-25
0

2025-36
0

66.80

11.19

34.48

43.10

70.02

37.88
0

50.40
0

60.45
0

66.86
0

84.58
0

0
Page 107

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Capital Expenditures

Expenses
Transfer to Fund
Total - Revenue
Expenditure
Fixed Assets
Capital Work-inProgress
Investments General Fund
InvestmentsOther Funds
Stocks/Inventory
Loans,
Advances and
Deposits
Other Assets
Miscellaneous
Expenditure
Total Capital
Expenditure
Total Expenditure

104.67
0
0

61.59
0
0

94.93
0
0

97.40
0
0

103.72
0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

185.01

248.90

361.60

419.32

586.66

185.01
289.68

248.90
310.49

361.60
456.54

419.32
506.04

586.66
643.23

Source: Analysis

14.3 INVEST MEN T REQ UIRE ME NTS


By 2035 the population is expected to reach 88 thousand in 2035 from 42 thousand in 2011.
Naturally the demand for the infrastructure has also grown several-fold.. Therefore the
existing infrastructure needs considerable expansion.
In the above sections of this report, priority investment projects for the city of Joura to be
covered under JNNURM are identified and cost estimates are given for each of the core
service sectors. The infrastructure requirement has been identified for catering to the
population level of the year 2035. The current gap has been taken into account for projecting
the future investment level. The summary of sector-wise investment requirements are given
in table below showing that the total investment required would be Rs. 112.14 crores.
The infrastructure requirement has been identified for catering to the population level of the
year 2035. Current gap has been taken into account for projecting the future investment
level. The investment requirement for various sectors is tabulated below which shows the
maximum investment is required in traffic & transportation sector, social infrastructure,
sewerage and storm water drainage are other major sectors.
Table No. 63. Estimated investment requirements for Joura under various sectors
Sr. No. Sector
Total Investment ( in lakhs)
% Share
1
Economic Development
840.00
7.49
2
Water Supply
1017.65
9.07
3
Sewerage & Sanitation
2645.88
23.59
4
Solid Waste Management
288.91
2.58
5
Traffic & Transportation
1384.80
12.35
6
Street Lighting
165.83
1.48
7
Fire Fighting
450.00
4.01
Page 108

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

8
9
10
11

Social Infrastructure
Environment
Affordable Housing
Institutional Strengthening
Total Investment

3350.00

29.87

76.25
750.00
245.00
11214.32

0.68
6.69
2.18
100.00

The funding pattern of the investment for Joura over the mission duration is given in the table
below which shows that the initial investment for the years 2011-2015 will be about 52.53
percent of the total investment. Nagar Parishad will be mainly responsible for the funds.
Nagar Parishad will be responsible for development of markets, solid waste management,
social infrastructure, environment, institutional strengthening, basic services for the urban
poor, water supply, sewerage & storm water drainage.
Table No. 64. Sector wise investment distribution
S. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

Sector
Economic Development
Water Supply
Sewerage & Sanitation
Solid Waste Management
Traffic & Transportation
Street Lighting
Fire Fighting
Social Infrastructure
Environment
Affordable Housing
Institutional Strengthening
Total Investment
Percentage

2011-15 2015-25 2025-36 Total Investment (Lac)


504.00
336.00
0.00
840.00
388.76
566.09
62.80
1017.65
1116.85 1068.75
460.28
2645.88
65.43
223.48
0.00
288.91
657.30
527.50
200.00
1384.80
74.62
58.04
33.17
165.83
450.00
0.00
0.00
450.00
2050.00 1300.00
0.00
3350.00
37.68
25.73
12.85
76.25
337.50
262.50
150.00
750.00
209.00
27.00
9.00
245.00
5891.14 4395.09
928.09
11214.32
52.53
39.19
8.28
100.00

14.4 PROJEC T SUS T AI N AB ILI T Y AN AL Y SIS


Here we will focus on the financial sustainability of the new investment components planned
for Joura Nagar Parishad.

14.4.1 Scenario I: No revenue reforms, capital commitment to be


financed by loan
In case there are no revenue reforms the additional capital expenditure has to be financed by
institutional borrowing. Even if Joura Nagar parishad borrows at annual interest of 5% to be
repaid during the next 25 years with a grace period of 5 years, it will not be in a position to
repay the loan amount. The debt servicing commitment for the loan to the extent of the new
investment will make the finances unsustainable for a long time to come.

Page 109

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Table No. 65. Trend in municipal finance without reforms: Scenario 1


Municipal
Finance (in
1000s)
Revenue
Income
Capital
Receipts
Total Income
Revenue
Expenditure
Capital
Expenditure
Total
Expenditure
Gap

2010-11

2011-12

2011-15

2015-25

2025-36

360.57

632.58

785.33

941.74

1410.65

0.40
360.97

1.07
633.65

0.07
785.40

0.07
941.67

0.10
1410.08

104.67

61.59

94.93

97.40

103.72

185.01

248.90

361.60

419.32

586.66

289.68
71.29

310.49
323.16

456.54
328.86

506.04
435.63

643.23
766.85

14.4.2 Scenario II: Joura Nagar Parishad; Financial sustainability w ith


fiscal reform
Property tax reform
The present status of the coverage of property tax is very low. The coverage of the house tax
is considerably low. Also there exists lot of gap between the tax demand and tax actually
collected. There have been suggestions for extending the coverage to the other properties
and also improve the collection. Further, the system of levy needs review. Presently only one
type of rate prevails for the entire city. Dividing the city in various zones is under
consideration. Also, the list of exemptions will be reviewed. A minimum tax from all
categories of people will be considered.

Water charges reform


As per the financial budget of the local body, the revenue collection from water tax is very
low, the Nagar Parishad charges Rs. 40/- as the user charges. The charges are not
calculated at a uniform rate, Nagar Parishad also charges Rs. 250/- per household for
cleaning the toilets. If the water user charges are effectively implemented the revenue
generation of the local body will improve.
Table No. 66. Financial Reforms
Year
2015
2021
2025
2031
2035

Population
48,702
56,429
65,461
75,950
88,079
Total

No. of HH
9740
11286
13092
15190
17616

Water user Charges


(@ Rs. 40/month /HH)
4675200
5417280
6284160
7291200
8455680
3,21,23,520

Sewerage Charges
(@ Rs. 7/month /HH)
818160
948024
1099728
1275960
1479744
56,21,616

By implementation of the water user charges the local body will be in a position to completely
sustain the projects on its own but the capacity of the local body will improve.
Page 110

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

14.5 FUNDI NG SO UR C ES
As observed from the Nagar parishads budget, it is in a poor fiscal competency and capacity
to fund the projects. The project funding is proposed from the State Grants and Central
grants. The role of Nagar parishad is envisaged in the Operation and Maintenance of the
projects and can levy charges to the people on the services. Under 74th Constitutional
Amendment Act-1992 CAA, an initiative was launched to decentralize power and strengthen
democracy at the local level. It provided ULBs with political, functional and fiscal
empowerment for good governance. Promoting peoples participation in planning is one of
the tools for achieving the vision of the City, better informed citizens and local government
can work together towards achieving the development objectives.
Properly Tax is one of the important sources of income for local bodies, by proposing the
property tax mapping for the City the local body will be in a position of cost recovery. Thus,
sound financial management, efficient system for collection of revenues, cost effective civic
amenities, equity and efficiency in delivery of services, implementation of the reforms as per
the 74th Constitutional Amendment Act-1992 (CAA) can be expected to improve the budget
of the Nagar Parishad and implementation of the proposed projects.
Strengthening the audit function in urban local bodies through technical guidance and
supervision and establishment of appropriate linkages with other state organizations can also
help in improving the budget of the local bodies.

Page 111

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

15. ON & DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES


Summary: This chapter gives the detailed framework of developing vision and goals & strategies for
each and every sector helps in the development of town.

15.1 CIT Y VIS ION


The vision of the town is formed on the basis of consultative process with the stakeholders to
identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the development of the town.
Based on the above SWOT analysis the vision has been framed for 2035. Following
objectives were of topmost priority in public consultations for envisioning the vision of the
town:
To generate higher service facilities for attracting various developmental activities,
and industries.
To generate facilities and activities to support small scale industries, informal sectors
and slum inhabitants and rural migrants
To improve the Transport Network system for faster communication and standard
linkages between the growth centers and their rural hinterlands.
To provide decent housing for all sections of people living in the town.
To manage the natural and human resources for development.
To provide high levels of physical and social infrastructure ensuring safe drinking
water, improved sanitation, well distributed education, health, recreation and cultural
facilities.
To design an effective development control mechanism with a high value of public
serviceability.
To reenergize the institutional and administrative system to manage future urban
development in the town.
Identifying a sustainable development mechanism that improves environment and
development.
The foundation for economic development in the town is agro based. Along with expansion in
production it is necessary to develop markets for trading activities and other services in the
town. Apart from local markets catering to basic requirements, specialized markets for
specific industrial goods also need to be established. However regulations would have to be
made for regulating the location and spread of these commercial units.
Such expansion is to be supported by an efficient transport system not only for traffic
movement but also for distribution of raw materials and finished products. This would lead to
an influx of population. This in turns would generate the need for more housing and other
infrastructure along with appropriate training and education facilities.
An efficiently trained man power is a key ingredient of economic diversification. It is
necessary to develop training institutes and colleges in Joura that would impart training in the
various spheres of industrial activities.
All planning initiatives are to be designed based on a minimum-environmental-impact
approach. Industrialization cannot be planned at the cost of environmental degradation.
Apart from industries the other major causes of environmental degradation in Joura are lack
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

of solid waste and sewerage disposal system. Currently, all wastes are dumped along the
water bodies which are leading to degradation of environmental quality. Thus, regulatory
mechanisms governing the waste disposal, storm water drainage, reduction of air pollution
etc. are necessary inputs to urban management. A significant thrust area, therefore, within
the vision for the city is infrastructure development. This includes augmenting water supply
and designing a scientific sewerage and solid waste management system.
With increasing pressures of urbanization, it will further be important to consider a
development style that can encourage new developments within limited expansion of the
urban extents of the town. This is especially significant considering the costs of infrastructure
development, operation and maintenance which must be considered as part of the financial
operative costs of the town. This balance of development and optimization of costs may be
achieved by a balance between conservation and up-gradation of the existing city and
redevelopment/ expansion for new urban developments.
Till recently, urban growth was considered undesirable and all policies emphasized
preventing migration from rural areas. However, these policies have not succeeded and
urban areas are growing rapidly and becoming more and more degraded. But urban areas
are engines of development. These developments spread and have an influence on its
surroundings. Thus, instead of being confined within the city, its linkages and spatial
interaction with the surrounding growth centres is going to be emphasized on.
The vision for the town was developed in a participatory process through a series of
consultations with a variety of stakeholders, including the Joura Nagar
Parishad,
departments from the MP state government involved in the CDP process, representatives of
NGOs, industry and business associations, educationists, civil society groups, media,
members of state legislature. Additionally, the JNP put out a press release asking for inputs
to the CDP from the general public. It should be noted here that all consultations in
connection with the CDP formulation have received wide coverage in the English and
vernacular press.

To develop Joura Town as economically vibrant, socially equitable and


environmentally sustainable Regional Commercial and Education centre
15.2 SECTO R AL VISIO N
Visions have been identified for each sector based on the stakeholder consultations and
technical assessment of the sector situation. The visions identified are as follows:
Table No. 67. Sector Vision
S.No

SECTOR

GOAL/VISION

Economy

2
3

Urban
Development
Water Supply

Sewerage and

Develop planned markets and small scale


industrial units area with provision of logistic,
infrastructure, financial and policy support
To initiate planned development as per master
plan 2021
To provide wholesome water to all and reduce
water losses
To ensure access to sewerage and sanitation for

TARGET
YEAR
2015-21

2015
2015
2015
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

sanitation
system
Drainage

Solid waste
management
Urban
Transportation
Urban
environment
and
entertainment
Education

10

Health

11

Housing and
Slums
Urban
Governance

7
8

12

all using all kind of environment friendly waste


disposal and treatment systems
To achieve city level comprehensive and
sustainable drainage system by regarding
existing natural drainage system
To achieve and promote environmentally
sustainable waste management practice
To achieve comfortable, sustainable, equitable,
and efficient transport system in city
To develop Joura as green city and develop
parks and recreational facilities

To promote quality education in city with special


focus to the marginalized section of society
To provide quality health facilities with special
focus towards primary health care facilities
To provide shelter for all with all basic services
To promote participatory , efficient, equitable,
accountable and transparent urban governance
system for city

2015

2015
2015
2015

2015
2015-25
2015
2015

Source: Analysis, Stakeholder Consultations


Based on the premise that water is the most essential requirement in life, maximum priority
should be given to it in terms of implementation. It is targeted that 100% of the people would
be covered by solid waste management system and water supply by 2015 and 2020
respectively. Since quantity of water available is less, the emphasis has to be on
improvement of efficiency. Solid waste would not require major constructions and moreover,
the site for disposal has already been identified. Drainage and sewerage would achieve
100% coverage by 2030. 100% coverage in terms of road would be achieved by 2035, as
that would involve construction of new roads, flyovers and by passes, up gradation of the
existing roads, identification of parking spaces, etc.

15.3 GO ALS AN D S TR ATEGIES


The CDP process has undergone extensive consultative process with its key stakeholders in
prioritizing the key sectors for investments and reform initiatives. The sector wise goals and
development strategies for achieving the city vision are:
15.3.1

Water Supply

The present supply of water supply is insufficient and the supply is not uniform for all the
parts of the city. As only a small percentage of the population is covered by piped water
supply the rest is served with hand pumps and wells. The quality of the water is also one of
the major concerns as water is treated by chlorination process only.
GOALS: Based on the analysis, stakeholder consultations and objectives of the project, the
sector wise goals for achieving the vision are:
Meeting the future demand and supply of water requirement to all the residents
including the urban poor.
100 percent coverage of piped water supply in the town.
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Per capita supply as per the UDPFI & CPHEEO standards.


Enhancement of water treatment capacities.
Conserve and utilize water bodies for the future needs.
Thus an effective and efficient water supply system is envisioned for the year 2035.
STRATEGIES: To achieve the above goals, the following development strategies need to be
adopted:
Augmentation of existing water supply to meet the present demand and future
requirements.
Entire town should be covered under Piped water supply.
Water Distribution system for the entire town by utilizing surrounding natural
resources.
Installation of water treatment plant for the proper utilization of treated waste water.
The above strategies suggests that more than half of the town is covered under piped water
supply, but especially in the core area near bus stand most of the supply lines condition not
maintained properly and those lines are in dilapidated stage. Those pipes should be
replaced, which could help in reducing T&D losses, and should be maintained in a proper
way for the future.
There is a need for the installation of water treatment plant for recycling of the waste water to
reuse, which helps in meeting the future water requirement. And another alternative source
of water for the future is Son River which is passing 5kms away from the town will helps in
providing the water and also helps in improving the per capita water supply to meet the
standards.
15.3.2

Sew erage

The town does not have a sewerage system. The sewer finds its way into the drains and
finally goes into the water bodies andnallahs, thus polluting them. This also leads to
unhygienic conditions and unhealthy environment in the town. The slum dwellers also lack
the sanitation facilities and are exposed to health related diseases.
GOALS: Based on the analysis, stakeholder consultations and objectives of the project, the
sector wise goals for achieving the vision are:
Provision of self-sustained sewerage system for the entire city.
To develop and manage the sewerage system, by providing the sufficient sewer
network, surface drains and suitable treatment plant. This will improve the quality of
citys environment.
STRATEGIES: To achieve the above goals, the following development strategies need to be
adopted:
Designing of proper sewage system by using the natural topography.
Providing the sufficient number of public toilets in the town.
Public participation for operation and maintenance of public toilets.
Sanitation facility in the slum areas.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

15.3.3

Solid Waste Management

The town lacks efficient sold waste management system. There is a need to have the system
for the entire town. Presently the entire town is not covered under segregation of waste thus,
household and hospital waste are mixed together and disposed in open areas and drains.
GOAL: The goal is to provide eco-friendly and sustainable solid waste management system
for the town.
STRATEGIES: To achieve the above goals, the following development strategies need to be
adopted:
Initiating door to door system of collection of waste in the town
Proper processing ofwaste by implementingsource segregation.
Public sectorparticipation (PSP) forestablishing suitablewaste processing plant.
Segregation of bio-medical waste with municipal waste and treatment as per the BioMedical Waste rule of MoEF
Providing adequate primary, secondary collection bins, vehicles for transportation of
waste
Outsourcing SWM including the collection of user charges.
Innovative technologies to treat the waste, like compost plants, landfill sites,
recyclable plants
Involve communities by creating awareness about the solid waste management plan.
The above strategies mentioned is to improve the SWM mechanism in the town especially in
the new developed which are taking place in the peripheral wards towards along the NH-75
towards southwest. For proper SWM need for the intervension of private parties which helps
in maintaining the town clean and environment friendly. Involvement of communities will
helps them by bringing awareness of segregation of wastes.
15.3.4

Traffic and Transportation

GOAL: Safe and reliable transport system that is sustainable and environment friendly
STRATEGIES: To achieve the above goals, the following development strategies need to be
adopted:
Provision of efficient and effective transportation system
Parking requirements as per the present and future demands to reduce the traffic
congestion on the roads
Discouraging privatevehicles usage byimposing parking feesand declaring busyareas
and core area markets as vehiclefree zone.
Removing of encroachments over roads
Improvement of Major Junction in the town.
Implementation of computerized signaling facilities
Up gradation of existing road capacities
Construction of a major logistic hub like a Transport Nagar

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Road surface improvements to improve the traffic movement near junctions to


minimize the congestion.
15.3.5

Social Infrastructure

GOAL: Improving the quality of human capital through provision of adequate and efficient
services
STRATEGIES: To achieve the above goals, the following development strategies need to be
adopted:
Intermediate Hospital with separate beds for maternity & child care
Facilities for treatment of certain major diseases so that the residents do not have to
depend on other cities for treatment
24 hrs ambulance service
Technical Training Institutes for skill up gradation of the local people.
15.3.6

Environment

GOAL: Sustainable environmental management for city and its people


STRATEGIES: To achieve the above goals, the following development strategies need to be
adopted:

15.3.7

Preservation and conservation of water bodies and parks


Strict pollution control norms
Urban Poor and Basic Services

GOAL: Providing basic infrastructure and housing to the urban poor


STRATEGIES: To achieve the above goals, the following development strategies need to be
adopted:
Provision of basic services in slum areas
Improvement of housing conditions
Slum improvement and rehabilitation programmes to cover the urban poor
Community empowerment
Identify institutions for imparting specialized training to the community for improving
their skills and talents.
Table No. 68. Sector-wise Summary of goals to be achieved
S.No.

Projects
2011-15

Economic Development: Industries and


Markets
Mandi & Godown
Development of HH industries for 300 HH (Bidhi
making from tendu leaves)
Water Supply
Expansion of network (20*2)
300 mm diameter of DI PIPE

% Goals
2015-25

60%
60%

40%
40%

20%

60%

2025-35

20%

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

150 mm diameter of DI PIPE


Renovation of existing pipe line
Community tap: Stand Posts
Installation of meters
WTP (2)
Rain water harvesting Structures
Sewerage & Storm Water Drainage
Septic Tanks:
Sewerage network
300 mm dia RCC pipe
200 mm dia RCC pipe
150 mm dia RCC pipe
Renovation of drains
Construction of Drains-40 kms
20 for combined system
20 km for construction of secondary drains
Community Toilets
Solid Waste Management
Waste Collection & Disposal
Containerised Handcarts
Containerised Tricycles
Community Bins
Closed Dumper placer container for secondary
collection
1 small vehicle
Composting of Waste
Traffic & Transportation
Widening of roads
MS Road, Panchbhiga road, Pagara Road
Improvement of Junctions: Bus Stand, Bazaar
area
Parking space : (2.5*5 sq m=15 approx) space for
50
cars/jeeps/3
wheeler(50*15=750)+15%
circulation
Road Signage & Traffic lights
Dedicated Public transport/Mini buses
Truck terminal
Upgradation of Bus Stand: bus bays, waiting
areas, computerized ticket counters and
information centres and kiosks
Street Lights at interval of 30 m
High Power Features
CFL
Central Light Fixtures
Fire Fighting
1sub fire station
Vehicles & Equipments

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100%
50%
50%
40%

50%
30%
60%
100%

20%

50%
40%

40%
40%

10%
20%

100%
30%

50%

20%

40%

30%

30%

40%
100%
100%
50%

60%

50%

100%
20%

80%

60%

40%

100%
100%

100%
50%

50%
100%

100%

45%

100%

35%

20%

City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

10

11

Rescue Van
Small Fire Water Tenders
Social Infrastructure
Intermediate Hospital with an additional capacity
of 100 beds (0.6 ha) including 30 beds for
Maternity and child care
Primary and Senior Secondary School
Construction of new college with playground
Industrial Training Institute
Urban Poor and Basic Services
Affordable Housing (1300 HH of existing BPL
and 10% of HH to be taken up for total
housing shortage)-10 % of total amount to be
bear by NP
Institutional Strengthening
Computer training & Capacity building
Property Tax Mapping
Water Utility Asset Mapping
Sewerage Utility Asset Mapping
Route Optimisation & Collection points for Solid
Waste Management
Environment
Conservation of water bodies
Development of parks - 2 parks
Beautification along roads

100%
100%
60%

40%

100%
100%
100%
45%

35%

20%

100%
20%

60%

20%

35%
50%
50%

45%
50%
30%

20%
20%

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

16. URBAN REFORMS


16.1

GOVERN AN CE FR AMEWO RK

16.1.1

Role of State Government - Reforms to be undertaken

The Government of Madhya Pradesh needs to play the role of a facilitator of urban
development activities in Joura City. For this, the Government of MP has to:
Fully implement the 74th Constitutional Amendment Act in letter and spirit by
complete devolution of all functions and powers.
State level reforms viz. repeal of ULC, Rent Act, rationalization of stamp duty and
bringing it down to 5 percent need to be implemented.
Elections need to be held within the stipulated time.
State govt. should facilitate in the setting up of the Metropolitan Planning
Committee District Planning Committee.
State govt. should facilitate municipal-parastatal coordination

16.1.2

Role of Urban Local Body - Reforms to be Undertaken

The Joura Nagar Parishad is the principal organisation which carries out various civic
functions in the City. The Nagar Parishad should at the earliest take up the following reforms:
Rationalization of property tax and implementation of MIS and GIS based system.
Full implementation of double entry accounting system.
Introduce e-governance for various functions such as property tax collection, issue
of birth and death certificates, building plan sanctions, citizen complaint redressal,
etc.
Coordinate with all concerned parastatals for smooth functioning of all civic
activities / works / projects in the City.
Implement Ward Committee byelaws so that the ward committees can start
functioning properly
Facilitate capacity building exercises for its staff so that they can be made aware of
the latest developments in the urban / municipal sector in India.
Develop a database for all properties owned by the Nagar Parishad so that
property portfolio management can be done.

Data base and MIS should be created so that all data is readily available.
16.1.3

Role of Private Sector - Proposed Areas of Involvement

Presently, there is no role of private sector in the City. The role of private sector can be
initiated in maintenance of basic services and affordable housing. For example, private
sector participation can be made possible in the following areas:
Provision and maintenance of public toilets
Provision and maintenance of parks and ponds
Solid waste management
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Provision and maintenance of night shelters for the urban poor


Maintenance of parking lots in the City
Maintenance of Street lighting

16.2

M AN D AT O R Y REF ORMS

16.2.1

State Level

Full implementation of 74th Constitutional Amendment Act


Repeal of Urban Land Ceiling and Regulation Act (ULCRA) (Repeal of ULCRA is
one of the mandatory reforms under JNNURM, the state of MP has already
implemented the reform)
Reform of Rent Control Laws/Act
Rationalize Stamp Duty - Stamp duty to be rationalized to 5%
Enactment of Public Disclosure Law
Enactment of Community Participation Law
Integration of City Planning and Delivery Functions (the state of Madhya Pradesh
has accomplished the reform)

16.2.2

ULB Level

Accrual based - Double Entry Accounting System


The proposed system is an improvement over the present cash based system and
not a mere replacement of the existing system. The appropriate accounting system
provides all the information that is available in the present dispensation, besides
providing such additional information which will make the accounting records more
complete from a users perspective. In a nutshell, the proposed accounting system
supplements the cash accounting system, and does not supplant it. While cash
accounts serve the purpose of legislative control over public finances, an accrual
system is helpful in expanding the efficacy of fiscal management.
E-Governance using MIS & GIS
All information may be integrated with the computerization of tax maps and MIS
systems. e- Governance programmes will be targeted to improve effectiveness of
birth and death registration, complaint redressal, payment of user charges, etc.
Property Tax Reforms with GIS
Property Tax is one of the most important revenues of urban local bodies and is
one of the mandatory reforms under JNNURM. Property tax not only includes the
property tax but also incudes other taxes like service taxes and cesses. Service
tax includes water tax, sewerage tax, scavenging tax, drainage tax, conservancy
tax, education tax, fire tax, education cess and tree cess. A proper mapping of
properties using the GIS system helps the local bodies to have a full record of the
properties under their jurisdiction and put them under the tax cover.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Budget for Urban Poor


As per JNNURM guidelines, ULBs have to undertake reforms for allocating of
funds in their budgets specifically for basic services to the urban poor. The ULB
should assign a percentage of total estimated municipal income that would be
utilized for provision of housing and basic services for the urban poor. The
provision of basic services as per the 7 point Charter of JNNURM. Thus, the
allocating of funds will ensure equity, efficiency, transparency and accountability of
the local body.
Basic services for Urban Poor
This is one of the mandatory reforms to be implemented by the urban local bodies
under JNNURM. Its goal is to provide basic services (including water supply and
sanitation) to all poor including security of tenure and improved housing at
affordable prices and ensure delivery of social services of education, health and
social security to poor people. Thus, by implementing this reform the urban poor
will get better access to services, quality of life will improve and hence decrease
their vulnerability. Its objective is also to involve the poor people in decision making
process.
Levy of User Charges
Under the JNNURM mission, levy of user chargers on different municipal services
like water supply, sewerage, solid waste management, public transport etc. is also
one of the reforms with an objective of creating effective linkages between asset
creation and maintenance and finally leading to self sustainability of the local body.

16.2.3

Optional Reforms

In addition to the mandatory reforms at the state and urban local body level there are some
optional reforms for states/ ULBs and parastatals which are listed below:
Revision of building by- laws
Simplification of legal and procedural frameworks of agricultural land for nonagricultural purposes
Property Title certification
Cross subsidization for EWS/ LIG Housing
Computerized land & property registration
Mandatory rain water harvesting
Recycled water by-laws
Administrative reforms
Structural reforms
Encouraging PPP
Joura Nagar Parishad and M.P. State Government have expressed their willingness to
undertake mandatory reforms as registered under JNNURM. However, JNP has been able to
implement only a few reforms so far. The status of ULB level reforms is given below:
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Table No. 69. ULB level reforms


S.NO
1.

Reforms
Accounting Reforms

Implentation status

a.
b.
c.
2.

Cash based single entry


Modified accruel
Accruel, double entry
E Governance in Functions of Parishad

Yes
No
No

a.
b.
c.

Property tax
Accounting
Water supply and other utilities

No
No
No

d.
e.
f.
g.

Birth and death registration


Citizen grievances
Personnel management
Procurement and monitoring of projects

No
No
No
No

h.
i.
j.
k.
3.

Building plan approval


Public health management
Licenses
Solid waste management
Property tax reforms

No
No
No
No

a.
b.
c.
4.

Assessment and valuation


GIS applications
Computer applications
Levy user charges

Yes
No
No
Yes

5.

Water supply

No

6.

Sewerage

No

7.

Public Transport

No

8.

Street lighting

No

9.

Primary health

Yes

10.

Hiring of Municipal assets

Yes

11.

Provision of basic services for urban poor

Yes
Source: Nagar Parishad

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

17. CONCLUSION
Based on the broad analysis and findings from the preceding chapters, this section highlights
the broad state level advantages followed by the city level potentials and bottlenecks.

17.1 ADV AN T AG E: M ADH Y A PR ADESH


Madhya Pradesh has an investment advantage as compared to other major states. The
major factors have been identified below which make the state conducive for attracting
investments:
1. Central location & good Connectivity: -The state is well linked with roads, rails and
air facilities which provide ideal conditions for business opportunities.
2. Specialised infrastructure: Presence of a number of medium and large scale
industries. The state has a number of educational institutions which provides quality
education at all levels of Primary, Secondary and Graduate level.
Low operating & set-up costs: Compared to other states the operating cost is much
lower, depending on the type of industry
Land Cost Advantage: The land cost is lower compared to other major tier III & IV
cities.
Manpower Cost Advantage: The state has the advantage of cheap labour compared
to other towns and cities.
Logistic Advantage: The state is well connected in terms of road and rail.
Fiscal Advantage of Industrial Policy: The fiscal advantage provides for capital
savings.
3. Government support: Investor Friendly Industrial Policy- Policy incentives.

17.2 ADV AN T AG E: JO U R A CIT Y


As discussed in the preceding sections, the city of Joura has its own advantages and
potentials. Keeping in view its varied facets, the citys opportunity has been assessed under
the four heads:
1. Territorial Endowment
2. Economic Profile
3. Human Resource
4. Institutional Scenario
17.2.1 Opportunity Assessment of Joura City

1. Location
Advantage & Potential: Joura lies at a strategic position between major cities like Delhi,
Mumbai, Allahabad, and Gwalior. Potential to develop Joura as an important regional centre.
Bottlenecks: Other major cities around Joura overshadow the growth potential of the city.

2. Linkages & Connectivity


Advantage & Potential: Joura is situated on the Delhi-Allahabad-Nagpur-Mumbai corridor;
consequently, the city holds immense potential for the development of containerised or non-

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

containerised cargo which will further enhance the development of warehouses & logistic
hub. Development of Freight Corridor and freight handling facility
Bottlenecks: No Air connectivity.

3. Natural Resources
Advantage & Potential: Favorable Climate, Earthquake disaster free area, adequate supply
of water through natural drainage
Potential:

Dry conditions for most industries.

Availability of large Contiguous land.

Resource base for agro industries.

Bottlenecks: Land Conversion issue

4. Infrastructure
Advantage & Potential:
Intra- Transportation Taxis, Autos & Tempos
Telecommunication Availability of all landline and mobile services
Basic Infrastructure - Water Supply & Solid Waste Project is underway
Hotels Mostly budget hotels and lodges
Banking & Institutional Support Many financial institutes are existing
Bottlenecks:

No proper traffic management and poor roads conditions leads to congestion and traffic
accidents.

Shortage of housing.

There are very few star hotels in the city.

Non availability of recreational resources to attract affluent classes.

The products showcased are not promoted and lack export quality.

Power Shortage.

City Sanitation is lacking.

5. Industrial Scenario
Advantage & Potential: Joura is in the stage of transformation to an emerging industrial town.
Development of Large and small scale industries in the city
Bottlenecks:

Labour Issues.

Lack of political support.

Crime & Insecurity.

6. Education
Advantage & Potential: There are only 11 schools available in the city
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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Bottlenecks: The quality of education within the city is not able to compete with major
institutes in cities like Delhi, Mumbai and Bhopal. Large number of the literate population
prefers to migrate out of the city in search for employment.

7. Local Agencies
Advantage & Potential: Initiative to improve urban governance through e-governance etc,
Policies for tourism, infrastructure, industries etc, Presence of active NGOs for slum upgradation projects.
Bottlenecks:

Inadequate byelaws to support the function of JNP.

Lack of departmental funds for O&M of the city.

Lack of departmental Coordination.

The state provides advantage in the form of Land Cost, Manpower Cost, Logistics and Fiscal
Benefits.
As per the opportunity assessment, Joura has all the requisite basic infrastructure to develop
the City to a regional industrial and tourist hub. Local initiative and further improvements in
infrastructure shall further attract investments in the city thus making Joura a very promising
investment destination.

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

ANNEXURES
Annexure No.1 Stakeholder Consultation Survey Format

Name:

City Development Plan for Joura


Joura Nagar Parishad Joura
Address:

Date:
Place of Interview:
Your Views about the Development of your city

Infrastructure related problems in city in your views:


1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
In your views Solution for the Problems:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
General problems in city:

Sectoral Priority for Development of City


1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
Your View About City Development Plan:

Main Priority for Development of Sector


1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)

Your Views are important to us in preparation of City


Development Plan. We request you to Include more pages for Signature and Name
your additional detailed Views
Thanks for Providing Your Views on City Development

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

Annexure-2: Kickoff Workshop Feedback

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City Development Plan Joura, Morena District

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