CIE-200.

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Common Intellectual Experience 2
Spring 2010 MWF 11-12 Fetterolf 110 Instructor: Nathan Rein Office hours: M 1:30-3pm, Tue 10 am-12 noon, and by appt. Olin 211, x. 2571, nrein@ursinus.edu

Course description and goals Every liberally educated student should confront three questions that form the foundation of a liberal arts education: • • • What does it mean to be human? How should we live our lives? What is the universe and how do we fit into it?

These questions get to the heart of a liberal arts education because they engage students and faculty in conversations about the fundamentals of human experience. Together, we will explore some of the diverse and conflicting responses to these questions expressed in the most thoughtful literature, music, and art throughout history. The Common Intellectual Experience is designed to facilitate this experience. Every First-Year student will study the same set of readings so that each will be able to discuss and debate these important ideas beyond the walls of the classroom. In this way each of you will become a participating member of our intellectual community. This course is also focused on the cultivation of the skills associated with liberal education, in particular: • critical thinking; • analytical and attentive reading; • clear, effective writing and speaking; and • respectful engagement in discussion. You must do the readings and assignments and learn from them; but just as large a part of the learning you should do in this course will come out of the cooperative work you do in this room—thinking, expressing yourself, and listening to your classmates. At a liberal arts college, we are all engaged in a collective enterprise; we work together at the project of furthering learning and building a better world. This course is a symbol of the enterprise you've joined as a new student here at Ursinus: ultimately, it will succeed or fail based on your efforts. By now, this all sounds familiar. You're a veteran. This semester will pick up where Descartes and Galileo left off, and will take us forward to the present day. Attendance and preparation This course is conducted through discussion of the assigned readings in class. Therefore, it is essential that you read the assigned texts carefully prior to class so

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that you are ready to participate in the discussion. You also have to be here. Remember: this course is about discussion, and you are graded on your participation—and to participate, you have to be present. Each missed class will lower your participation grade. Assignments and grading You will write four formal papers during the semester. Each will undergo at least one revision following review of the first draft, either by the section's writing fellow, or by your classmates. All sections will have a common due date for the first draft of each paper (give or take one day), but due dates of subsequent drafts will vary. The due date for the final draft will be determined as the semester progresses. Paper assignments will be handed out in the week before the due date. Each paper should be 1200-1500 words long and will count for 15% of your total grade. The remaining 40% of your grade will reflect your in-class participation; this will include a certain amount of informal writing (in-class quizzes, discussionpreparation notes, peer reviews of your classmates' papers, and similar short assignments; worth 10% of the final grade), most of which will not be graded (but which is required).

Reading list The following books have been ordered for purchase and are available on reserve in Myrin Library. IMPORTANT: Please be sure to have your reading with you at every class meeting. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs English Romantic Poetry: An Anthology, ed. S. Applebaum Communist Manifesto, by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels On the Genealogy of Morals, by Friedrich Nietzsche The River Between, by Ngugi wa Thiong'o The Drowned and Saved, by Primo Levi Happiness: The Science behind Your Smile, by Daniel Nettle Other readings are in the CIE 2 reader, which will be provided by yours truly.

The fine print HOW TO CONTACT ME: You should feel free to contact me by email or phone at any time. Unless things are really crazy, I should respond within 48 hours. You can also phone me at home if it's before, say, 10:00 p.m. (610-933-4686). If that's not good enough, try IMing me via AIM; my screen name is nathanrein. I'm on Facebook, and you can add me to your friends list if you like to say in touch that way. And finally, I am usually in my office, though it's always a good idea to call or email in advance and make an appointment.

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WRITTEN WORK: Rule 1. All written work must be submitted in order to receive a passing grade for the class. This means that if the end of the semester comes and I don't have one of your papers, you will receive an F for the course. If you don't hand something in, I'll assume that's your decision and I won't bother you about it. This semester, I'm going to ask that every paper be submitted via email. Rule 2. Late papers will be penalized by one grade-step (from B+ to B, etc.) for each day they are late, unless you have arranged with me for an extension well in advance of the due date. If you need an extension, talk to me about it — life is complicated — and we can probably work something out. Rule 3. Informal writing will never be accepted late. Rule 4. Follow the formatting guidelines that I give you. All written work must include both page numbers and a word count in the upper right corner of the first page. Staple it or I'll throw it out. This sounds crazy, I know, but I'm not kidding. ATTENDANCE: Attendance at every class meeting is expected. Missing class shows disrespect for your classmates and professor and for the collective enterprise of the class. As per Ursinus College's stated policy, no distinction will be made between excused and unexcused absences. Missing two class meetings may result in the issuance of an academic warning slip. Missing more than four meetings may result in a failing grade for the course. Congratulations for reading this; the first person to send an email to nrein@ursinus.edu containing the words "gimme gimme" will receive extra credit. In general, absenteeism will harm your participation grade. If you miss several classes in a row, I will call Residence Life, and someone will find you and make you talk about your feelings. ACADEMIC HONESTY: Plagiarism is a serious offence. In written work, all quotations must be properly attributed and appear in quotation marks. But at least as importantly, any time you are drawing on someone else's work you MUST cite it! This includes paraphrases, summaries, or any time you make use of an idea that's not your own. It also includes help you receive from other people -- it's fine to talk about your work with others, but if they actually write any of it for you, that's plagiarism too. Any violation of these principles is plagiarism and can result in one or both of the following: (1) a failing grade for the course or (2) College-level disciplinary action, including expulsion. If you have questions about the proper use of sources, please don't hesitate to contact me. Either parenthetical citations or footnotes are appropriate. You are better off handing in nothing at all than handing in a plagiarized paper. Even if the paper's due tomorrow and you're desperate, don't plagiarize. I will catch it, and it will ruin your semester, guaranteed. Instead, call me or email me and we can work something out. INCLEMENT WEATHER: In the event that class must be cancelled due to inclement weather, an announcement to that effect will be recorded on my office answering machine (call x2571).

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Schedule of readings, assignments, and out-of-class events The symbol indicates that the text is in the CIE 2 reader. This symbol means that the text is in one of the books you bought. Please note the dates and times of due dates and out-of-class events as listed. Attendance at out-of-class events is mandatory. All of them begin at seven p.m. and last between an hour and ninety minutes. Liberalism Discussion of winter reading Jefferson, "Letter to Weightman" The Declaration of Independence Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech
M 1/18 EVENING EVENT: MLK DOCUMENTARY 7 P.M., OLIN AUDITORIUM

M 1/18

W 1/20 F 1/22 M 1/25 W 1/27 F 1/29

Locke, Second Treatise Smith, Wealth of Nations

M 2/1

Debate about the Declaration The Southern Position on Slavery (Calhoun, Taney, Stephens) Lincoln, "Springfield Address" and "Second Inaugural" Douglass, "What the Fourth of July Means to the Negro" "Seneca Falls Statement" Elizabeth Cady Stanton, "Address to the Legislature of New York" Truth, "Ain't I A Woman?"

W 2/3 F 2/5
F 2/5 FIRST DRAFT OF FIRST PAPER DUE

M 2/8 W 2/10

F 2/12

Romantic Poetry Blake, "London," "Proverbs of Hell" Shelley, "Song to the Men of England," "England in 1819" Wordsworth, "The World is Too Much With Us," "Lines Composed Above Tintern Abbey,""Composed upon Westminster Bridge, Sept. 3, 1802"

M 2/15

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W 2/17

F 2/19 M 2/22 W 2/24 F 2/26

Marx Marx and Engels, The Communist Manifesto, "Preface to the German Edition," Chapters I, II, and IV

M 3/1

Darwin Paley, "Natural Theology" Darwin, On the Origin of Species, selections Darwin and his critics on "What It Means to be Human" Arnold, "Dover Beach" "Genetic Ties may be Factor in Violence in Stepfamilies"
M 3/1 EVENING EVENT: ETERNAL ENEMIES (FILM) 7 P.M., OLIN AUDITORIUM

W 3/3 F 3/5

F 3/5 FIRST DRAFT OF SECOND PAPER DUE 3/8-12 SPRING BREAK

M 3/15 W 3/17

Pearson, "Imperialism Justified by Nature"
W 3/17 EVENING EVENT: AFRICAN DANCE AND MUSIC 7 P.M., LENFEST

F 3/19 M 3/22 W 3/24

Ngugi Ngugi, The River Between

F 3/26 M 3/29 W 3/31

Nietzsche Nietzsche, On the Genealogy of Morals, Preface and Part One

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Rite of Spring, Nijinsky
W 3/31 EVENING EVENT: RITE OF SPRING 7 P.M., BOMBERGER

F 4/2

Hodson, Nijinsky's Crime Against Grace (preface) Acocella, "Imagining Dance" Preston-Dunlop, "Looking at Dances: A Choreological Perspective on Choreography"
F 4/2 FIRST DRAFT OF THIRD PAPER DUE

M 4/5 W 4/7

W 4/7 EVENING EVENT: LAST DAYS (FILM) 7 P.M., OLIN AUDITORIUM

F 4/9

The Holocaust Hitler, Mein Kampf, selections Browning, "One Day in Jozefow" Levi, The Drowned and the Saved, selections t.b.a.
TU 4/13 EVENING EVENT: ISMAR SCHORSCH, "GERMANY CONFRONTS ITS PAST" (LECTURE) 7 P.M., LENFEST

M 4/12 W 4/14 F 4/16

M 4/19 W 4/21 F 4/23 M 4/26 W 4/28 F 4/30 M 5/3

Happiness Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, selections Nettle, Happiness: The Science Behind Your Smile

M 4/26 EVENING EVENT: STUDENT PERFORMANCES 7 P.M., BOMBERGER

M 5/3 FIRST DRAFT OF FOURTH PAPER DUE

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