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Marc no. off newsletter Salle-Colleg • Mar c h 24 - A pril 6, 2008 • Volume 9 no. 19 • The official newsletter of De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde •

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Just as he pledged during his investiture, Br. Victor Franco FSC has made the school’s scholarship program to the less fortunate and marginalized his presidency’s cornerstone.

Photos show Br. Victor Franco FSC during the MOA signing with the indigenous people group led by Datu Gardigo (middle photo, third from left) of the Manobo tribe.

aying the Benildean Hope Scholarship (BHS) is the project closest to his heart, DLS-CSB president Br. Vic Franco FSC recently led the signing of two “joint mission agreements” that would extend scholarships to abused children and members of the indigenous community. This is the third year that the school is providing scholarships to Children in Need of Special Protection (CNSP) and the second year for the indigenous minority, per Student Grants Office chief Sofia Caccam.

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Under the deal, DLS-CSB will provide tuition, miscellaneous fees, and other major fees (retreat, recollection, yearbook, and graduation fees) to three CNSP students who are under the care of non-government organizations (NGOs). “De La Salle–College of Saint Benilde recognizes that many CNSPs are deprived of good education. It further recognizes that quality education would help build a good future for these children and to nation building. Thus, DLS-CSB is willing to provide Lasallian

education through the BHS,” the agreement states. Present during the signing ceremonies last March 14 was John Frederick Nojara, a BHS scholar, who narrated how the program changed his life and how it gave him hope for a bright future. The terms of the program stipulate that three CNSP scholars should have a high school average of 83 percent, an official endorsement from the NGO, a case study from his/her house
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chool of Hotel and Restaurant Institution Management (SHRIM) student Lalaine Lim, a perennial winner in various cooking contests, has done it again by winning the first-ever bento box competition in the Philippines held at the Shangri-la Plaza last February 24, 2008. Lim was not alone in bringing glory to the school as fellow Benildeans also earned recognition by besting their respective rivals in two separate culinary competitions. Over at the “Flavors Culinary Challenge,” Christopher Jade Lee, Stephanie Kho, and Enzo Catimbuhan teamed up with Chef-Coach Kim Santos to clinch first runner-up honors last March 14, 2008 at SM City North Edsa. Lim was again part of the team that won in the “3rd Goldilocks Intercollegiate Cake Decorating Challenge.” She joined forces with Grace Sevilla, Jezel Domasin, and Marian Huang, with Chef Peachy Juban as coach, in winning the “Best Roll Cake” and “Best Round Cake” categories at the event held last March 3, 2008 at the SM Mall of Asia. The DLS-CSB-SHRIM squad won two out of the four categories. Cameras kept a close watch on the event specially as it was graced with the presence of personalities including a

Once again, DLS-CSB-SHRIM chalks up a string of victories in culinary competitions across the metro including topping the first ever bento box contest in the country.

By Robert Ritchie Calo

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number of Japanese bento box masters and celebrity Chef Tristan Encarnacion, who was there to judge and host a short cooking demo. Eight contestants participated in the event, including professional cooks, some coming from far-flung provinces like Bicol and Iloilo. The competitors unleashed their creativity with gusto, the first runner up even transforming her entry into a bahay kubo bento box. When it was Lim’s turn to present her entry to the judges, she impressed them with the simplicity and elegance of her dishes since she focused more on flavors rather than on the garnishings. Lim’s bento box, a blend of different tastes: sweet, sour, salty, bitter and umami (considered the fifth sense of taste) was magical and made her the big winner! Lending technical and moral support to our student-chefs were SHRIM chefs Kim Santos, Pam Obieta, Kristine Pascua, Shirley Jpseph, Bong Villanueva and Peachy Juban. The author is a faculty member of the School of Hotel Restaurant and Institution Management.

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s a young man studying to get his university degree, Joaquin Jose Zulueta Aranda, or simply Jay to his family and friends, dreamt of becoming a national soccer player with the hopes of joining tournaments around the world. He thus suited up as a varsity player for the University of the Philippines in Diliman, not knowing that an accident would soon alter the course of his life. A case of peritonitis — the bursting of the appendicitis – put him away from the playing field for six months, effectively killing his hopes of becoming a globetrotting soccer player. “I got bored while waiting so I applied as an actor for Dulaang UP,” shared Aranda, referring to UP’s theatre group. He went on to perform with the group and relished the experience. “During that time, a teacher advised me to take a lighting course. This allowed me to learn backstage work and eventually, started my career in technical theatre. I haven’t stopped since,” he said. With some guidance from his aunt, renowned National Artist for Theatre Daisy Javellana, wife of National Artist for Film Lamberto Javellana, Aranda slowly padded his resume beginning with the play Oedipus Rex, directed by Chris Vertido. He then hooked up with the nowdefunct UP President’s Committee on Culture and the Arts where he served as assistant to stage director Gerry Fernandez with whom he would professional forge a business training taking up Jay Aranda is every inch a partnership that “Basics of virtuoso in the sphere where Automated lasts to this day. A number of Lighting he operates – as a media high-profile Systems and production specialist in engagements would Design” in soon follow, Orlando, Florida theatre, live performances, including stints in and in 2006, and special events. His the Manila run of “Broadway Miss Saigon in Lighting Master dedication to the craft has 2001. From 1993 to Class” in New brought him to different 2006, he was York. resident technical In 1999, he parts of the globe and a director and lighting signed up as a feeling of satisfaction he designer of the lecturer with De award-winning La Salle-College never quite expected. contemporary of Saint Benilde. dance group, He then helped Douglas Nierras’ Powerdance. draw up the original curriculum for His job would also take him on a Technical Theater and Production Design worldwide journey with various road shows Programs of the School for Design and across Asia, Europe, and North America. Arts. He’s now on his ninth year as a In 1999, he pursued additional member of the SDA faculty.
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As an active industry practitioner, Aranda is a member of various organizations including the Philippine Association of Theatre Designers and Technicians, the United States Institute for Theatre Technology and the Technical Theatre Network Asia. Asked to assess the state of the local industry, the master technician said a poor country like the Philippines could not possibly compete head-on with firstworld countries because of the high cost of equipment and technology. “However, Filipinos are very creative and, skills-wise, we’re okay. As long as you have the right attitude and the ability to provide the kind of programs required, one can have a rewarding career in technical theatre,” he said. Just like in his line of work, Aranda said a person wishing to become a successful technical director should be able to “create back-ups so as not to have a single point of failure.”

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Photos by Lawrence Ofrin and Cathy Licas, MCO

le t “It’s better to light a cand Jr. ma Lasallian Jose Concepcion the cry against the excesses of ubled certainly relevant in this tro n by to adopt a different variatio n at th horns to express indignatio by governme

the dark.” a candle than to curse in famous battle cion Jr. made this phrase a ip. This is sses of the Marcos dictatorsh ldeans chose his troubled times, and Beni s to blow their ariation by urging motorist g committed nation at the anomalies bein y government leaders.

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A Sunday with Little Angels
From a report by Paul Pajo

The faculty of the Information Management and Computer Applications Programs, together with the officers of the Association of Information Management (AIM), took a break from their usual routine to bring smiles to the faces of orphans.
quaintly-built house with a chapel, and upon arrival, the DLS-CSB group was warmly greeted by the children. AIM officers led the program and put a new twist to the games. In Trip to Jerusalem,” for example, children eliminated from each round got a prize and received applause. Other program features include the children’s “Papaya” dance, which was matched with much gusto by the AIM officers. The DLS-CSB group lunched with the children before ending the visit with gifts to remember them by.

One normally associates Tagaytay with mushroom burgers, cable cars and Taal Volcano. But unknown to most, Tagaytay is also home to an orphanage called Little Angels Home. The orphanage houses 20-35 children, with ages ranging from 3 months to 8 years, at any given time of the year. Last March 2, faculty and students from the Information Management and Computer Applications programs spent the day with 23 orphans. The orphanage is a

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counselor, barangay clearance, and other documents required by the Admissions Center. The BHS grantee should also pass the DLS-CSB entrance test and the admissions interviews. Upon acceptance, the grantee is free to choose any course offered in the college as long as the NGO concerned approves of it. He or she must also see the counselor assigned to him/her at least twice a month for monitoring and support. The grantee, however, loses the scholarship when he or she commits a major offense as stipulated in the Student Handbook, does not finish the degree within five school years, or goes on leave without filing an Official Leave of Absence (LOA). The NGOs, being the partners in the project, are also expected to support the grantees by providing for some of their needs such as food, shelter, medical, emotional and social support, among others. The terms are essentially the same with the scholars from the indigenous

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community, who will be identified by the San Miguel-Manobo Multi-Purpose Cooperative (SAMIMMCO), an NGO accredited by the National Commission on Indigenous People (NCIP). SAMIMMCO, an agency taking care of the welfare of the indigenous children and families of the Manobo tribe in San Miguel, Surigao del Sur, was represented by Datu Sagundie Benjamin V. Gardigo during the signing ceremonies held at the Angelo King International Center last March 10, 2008.

Photo shows the Benildean Hope Scholarship MOA signing between DLS-CSB and directors of different NGO partners: Bernard Pierquin of Aloutte Foundation Inc of the Phil., Dolores Alforte of ECPAT Philippines, Dolora Cardeno of ERDA Foundation Inc., Elnora Tabios of Open Heart Foundation Worldwide Inc., Edwin Philip Horca of Save the Children USA, Br. Francisco Tanega of Pangarap Foundation Inc, and Bernard Leveaux of Virlanie Foundation Inc. To the left of Br. Vic Franco FSC is John Frederick Nojara, a BHS scholar. Witnessing the event from DLS-CSB are Rudolf Yap Jr. (SAO coordinator), Me-Ann Pargas (CCS director), Jorge Canicula (assigned counselor for BHS), Pia Caccam (SGO director), and Vicky Dayao (AVP-LISS).

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Orientation pro for new employ Orientation program for new employees
As part of its continuing efforts in staff development, the Personnel Management & Development Office (PMDO) conducted the “Orientation for New Employees Program” last Februrary 28-29, 2008 at the Case Room, Mutien Building.
epresentatives from various departments of the college shared their time and expertise discussing the different functions, policies and background of their respective departments. The PMDO said it expects to have this exercise as a continuing program to develop new hires with the proper outlook and work ethics and become more aware of their responsibilities and tasks while they serve with the college. This activity, the PMDO said, is also the start of an initiative to inculcate the Mission, Vision, Core Values and the system of DLS-CSB among the new hires. Aside from this,

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the program also aims to foster a sense of camaraderie and belongingness among the new hires with the Benildean Community.

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exhibit of Watch out for the collegeDLS-CSB entries on d key wide wallpapers an ses. areas of the campu
De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde’s official entry to IALU-AIUL’s 2007 Campaign ”In Service of the Poor.” To view, visit http://www.ialu.net/images/gallery2008/ gallery2008/gallery2008.html

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Mark Communica unications Off Mar k eting Comm unica tions Of f ice Duerr 104 De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde 2544 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004

perspecti spectiv The per spective is published fortnightly by the Marketing Communications Office. perspecti spectiv The per spective welcomes contributions from the DLS-CSB community. Coordinate with Romeo Catap or Jhen Espiritu for particulars and appropriate arrangements. perspecti spectiv The perspective reserves the right to edit articles submitted for publication. Direct all concerns to Duerr 104, 526-7441 to 47 local 253, or e-mail mco@dls-csb.edu.ph.