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KING ABDULLAH DIES SERRA
FROM CCS PLAYOFFS

‘BOY NEXT DOOR’
NOTHING SPECIAL

SAUDI’S NEW KING, SALMAN, A FORCE FOR UNITY IN ROYAL
FAMILY
WORLD PAGE 6

WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 16

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015 • Vol XV, Edition 137

County counts homeless
Action seeks info to tailor service programs
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Teams of volunteers, including
Supervisor Don Horsley, fanned
out throughout San Mateo County
Thursday to count the homeless.
The point-in-time count is a program of the Housing and Urban
Development Department, which
will compare the data to previous
counts as well as counts conducted

in other regions to determine where
its federal dollars should be spent.
Locally, the information is used
by the Human Services Agency to
tailor homeless services through
the Housing Our People Effectively
Interagency Council, or HOPE.
Horsley was part of a team that
searched for homeless people living in wooded areas of Pacifica.
“There are encampments in
remote areas. We’re trying to find

where they are and then get the
resources so people are not camping in the woods. We found some
encampments and the people are
obviously living in very primitive
circumstances in secluded areas
around Pacifica,” Horsley wrote in
a statement.
Seeing how some people live in
the county was an “eye-opening

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SAN MATEO COUNTY

See COUNT, Page 20

San Mateo County Supervisor Don Horsley looks for a homeless
encampment in the woods of Pacifica Thursday morning.

DNA leads to
1976murder
extradition
Oregon prisoner suspected of
two gruesome‘GypsyHill’slayings
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Redwood City residents are split on a plan to reduce the number of lanes on Farm Hill Boulevard and Jefferson
Avenue from four lanes to three.

Road plan draws mixed reactions
Redwood City Council to discuss reducing lanes on Farm Hill Boulevard
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A proposal to reduce the number
of lanes from four to three on busy
Farm Hill Boulevard in Redwood
City is drawing mixed reviews
with some saying the plan is long
overdue while others say it is simply “ridiculous.”
Some residents who live in the
area have complained that Farm
Hill, which meets Jefferson Avenue
west of El Camino Real, has
become a magnet for drag racing.
But others say that a lane reduction will only make traffic worse.

The City Council will consider
approving a pilot project to
reconfigure the road at its Monday
night meeting.
The plan is to reconfigure the
traffic lanes on Farm Hill
Boulevard and Jefferson Avenue,
from the city’s western limit to
Alameda de las Pulgas, from four
lanes to three lanes with a two-way
left turn center lane and two bicycle lanes.
Joshua Vaughn, who lives on the
3500 block of Farm Hill, applauds
the plan.
He regularly commutes to work
by bicycle on Farm Hill as it meets

A violent convict who has spent
most of the past 38 years in prison
was formally charged Thursday for
killing two young women in 1976
in the gruesome “Gypsy Hill” murders that left a total of five local
women dead.
Rodney Halbower, 66, was
extradited from an Oregon prison
and charged for the murders of
Paula Baxter, 17, and Veronica

Anne Cascio,
18, who were
both
found
stabbed
to
death. Cascio’s
body was discovered at the
Sharp Park Golf
Course
in
Pacifica
and
Rodney
Baxter’s body
Halbower
was
found
behind a church in Millbrae about

See GYPSY, Page 20

Jefferson toward downtown.
Vaughn witnessed a crash on his
block last May when a motorist
was allegedly drag racing his
Mercedes and collided into a tree in
front of his apartment complex.
“A lot of people think they are
still on 280, ” he said about
motorists who drive up to 60 mph
on Farm Hill after exiting
Interstate 280.
But Redwood City resident Tye
Tyson told the Daily Journal that
the plan “would bog traffic down
even worse.”
Farm Hill is already congested

Redwood City superintendent retiring

See FARM HILL, Page 20

See JAN, Page 8

Phones Cameras Watches
Cars Hearing Aids Tools

Just South of Whipple Avenue

Jan Christensen led elementary school district
since 2006, some say new direction needed
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Jan Christensen, superintendent
of the Redwood City Elementary
School District since 2006,
announced Thursday she will retire
at the end of the school year.
Christensen informed the district Board of Trustees of her decision during a closed-session meeting Wednesday night. Her retire-

Jan Christensen

ment will begin
July 1, 2015.
“It has been
an honor and
privilege
to
serve as superintendent
in
Redwood City,”
Ch ri s t en s en
said in a pre-

2

FOR THE RECORD

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“The trouble is that hardly anybody in
America goes to bed angry at night.”
— George J. Stigler, American economist (1911-1991)

This Day in History
North Korea seized the Navy intelligence ship USS Pueblo, charging its
crew with being on a spying mission.
(The crew was released 11 months
later.)
In 1 7 8 9 , Georgetown University was established in present-day Washington, D.C.
In 1 8 4 5 , Congress decided all national elections would be
held on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in
November.
In 1 9 1 5 , U.S. Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart was
born in Jackson, Michigan.
In 1 9 3 3 , the 20th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution,
the so-called “Lame Duck Amendment,” was ratified as
Missouri approved it.
In 1 9 3 7 , 17 people went on trial in Moscow during Josef
Stalin’s “Great Purge.” (All were convicted of conspiracy;
all but four were executed.)
In 1 9 4 4 , Norwegian painter Edvard Munch (“The Scream”)
died near Oslo at age 80.
In 1 9 5 0 , the Israeli Knesset approved a resolution affirming Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
In 1 9 6 0 , the U.S. Navy-operated bathyscaphe Trieste carried two men to the deepest known point in the Pacific
Ocean, reaching a depth of more than 35,000 feet.
In 1 9 6 4 , the 24th Amendment to the United States
Constitution, eliminating the poll tax in federal elections,
was ratified as South Dakota became the 38th state to
endorse it.
In 1 9 7 3 , President Richard Nixon announced an accord had
been reached to end the Vietnam War, and would be formally
signed four days later in Paris.
In 1 9 8 5 , debate in Britain’s House of Lords was carried on
live television for the first time.
In 1 9 9 5 , the Supreme Court, in McKennon vs. Nashville
Banner Publishing Co., ruled that companies accused of firing employees illegally could not escape liability by later
finding a lawful reason to justify the dismissal.

1968

Birthdays

Singer Anita Baker
Actor Richard
is 57.
Dean Anderson is
65.
Actress Jeanne Moreau is 87. Actress Chita Rivera is 82.
Actor-director Lou Antonio is 81. Actor Gil Gerard is
72.Rhythm-and-blues singer Jerry Lawson (The Persuasions)
is 71. Sen. Thomas R. Carper, D-Del., is 68. Singer Anita
Pointer is 67. Rock musician Bill Cunningham is 65. Rock
singer Robin Zander (Cheap Trick) is 62. Former Los Angeles
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is 62. Princess Caroline of
Monaco is 58. Reggae musician Earl Falconer (UB40) is 56.
Actress Gail O’Grady is 52. Actress Mariska Hargitay is 51.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Marc Nelson is 44. Actress Tiffani
Thiessen is 41.

Actor Rutger
Hauer is 71.

REUTERS

Glow-in-the-dark blue waves caused by the phenomenon known as harmful algal bloom or ‘red tide,’ are seen at night near
Sam Mun Tsai beach in Hong Kong, China.

In other news ...
Surprise! Magnets used to plant
drugs under cars from Mexico
SAN DIEGO — Drug smugglers are
turning “trusted travelers” into unwitting mules by placing containers with
powerful magnets under their cars in
Mexico and then recovering the illegal
cargo far from the view of border
authorities in the United States.
One motorist spotted the containers
while pumping gas after crossing into
Southern California this month, and
thought it might be a bomb. His call to
police prompted an emergency
response, and then a shocker: 13
pounds of heroin were packed inside.
There have been four such incidents
in San Diego since Jan. 12, all involving drivers enrolled in the federal
“trusted traveler” program, which
enables hundreds of thousands of people who pass extensive background
checks to whiz past inspectors with
less scrutiny.

California surgeon convicted
in liposuction death case
LOS ANGELES — A former Southern
California cosmetic surgeon has been
convicted of involuntary manslaughter
in the death of a 61-year-old patient
during a liposuction operation that
lasted more than 11 hours.
City News Service reports jurors
deliberated just under two hours before
returning a guilty verdict Wednesday

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Jan. 21 Powerball

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

EEZIS

TANYIV

11

12

15

SAN FRANCISCO — In true San
Francisco irony, smartphones were
used Thursday to snap pictures of a historic phone that was used to make the
first coast-to-coast phone call 100
years ago.
On Jan. 25, 1915, to celebrate the
completion of the Panama Canal and to
show that San Francisco had recovered
from the 1906 earthquake and fire,
American Telephone and Telegraph Co.
conducted a call between the city and
New York before the opening of the
Panama-Pacific
International
Exposition and World’s Fair in San
Francisco.
“Thinking about the ability to transmit the human voice over 3,400 miles
was considered absolutely impossi-

57

23

Jan. 20 Mega Millions
31

35

56

59

63

6
Mega number

Jan. 21 Super Lotto Plus
4

15

26

27

39

8

17

22

35

38

5

1

2

Daily Four
8

Daily three midday
5

3

ble,” said current AT&T California
President Ken McNeely, who snapped a
selfie with the old black handheld.
“Fast forward to today when we hold all
knowledge of human kind in the palm
of our hands with smartphones, we’ve
come a long way.”
The original phones will be on display at the California Historical
Society as part of its “City Rising: San
Francisco and the 1915 World Fair”
exhibition that opens on Feb. 22.
That first call was made by Alexander
Graham Bell in New York to his assistant Thomas Watson who was attending the World’s Fair in San Francisco.
Graham Bell had invented the phone a
few decades earlier.
Listening in were President
Woodrow Wilson in Washington, and
Theodore Vail, president of American
Telephone and Telegraph Co. in
Georgia.
According to the transcript of that
call, Bell’s first words were “Ahoy!
Ahoy! Mr. Watson, are you there? Do
you hear me?” to which Watson
replied “Yes, Mr. Bell, I hear you perfectly.”
The call actually lasted about 3 1/2
hours as they kept the line open for a
series of conversations. And unlike
today, there was no such thing as
unlimited talk time for a set price.
The cost of a three-minute coast-tocoast call in 1915 was about $20
which translates into about $500 in
current dollars.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five
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Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

YAONN

Old phone unveiled 100 years
after first coast-to-coast call

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

against 46-year-old Ehab Aly
Mohamed.
Mohamed was charged in the 2010
death of Sharon Carpenter after the
procedure in which prosecutors say he
gave her a lethal combination of lidocaine, fentanyl and oxycodone.
Mohamed was also convicted of elder
abuse involving a second patient.
Prosecutors say the 77-year-old
woman lost consciousness during
liposuction and had ongoing health
issues afterward.
Sentencing is set for Feb. 3.
Mohamed faces five years in prison.

7

5

Daily three evening

Mega number

7

2

1

The Daily Derby race winners are California
Classic, No. 5, in first place; Winning Spirit, No. 9,
in second place; and Hot Shot, No. 3, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:45.26.

Fri day : Sunny. Highs in the 60s. East
winds 10 to 20 mph... Becoming north 5
to 10 mph in the afternoon.
Fri day ni g ht: Mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 50s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday : Sunny. Highs in the upper
60s. Northeast winds 10 to 20 mph.
Saturday ni g ht: Clear. Lows in the
lower 50s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday : Sunny. Highs around 70.
Sunday ni g ht and Mo nday : Mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 50s. Highs in the upper 60s.
Mo nday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s.
Tues day thro ug h Thurs day : Mostly cloudy. A slight
chance of rain. Highs in the lower 60s. Lows in the lower
50s.

TALFUN
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Yesterday’s


(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: METAL
BASIS
BRUNCH
WALLOP
Answer: The fashion shoot featured a model dressed as
a hitchhiker with a — “A-POSABLE” THUMB

The San Mateo Daily Journal
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

Bay Meadows welcomes
renters, hosts art exhibit
Fame by Frame illustrates 2014 through locals’ lenses
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Highlighting life and new residents at one
of the state’s largest transit-oriented developments will take shape Friday as Bay
Meadows hosts a photography exhibit created by everyday shutterbugs.
The four-hour pop-up exhibit Fame by
Frame will showcase life in 2014 at San
Mateo’s fastest growing community
through the lenses of those who shared their
Bay Meadows pictures through social
media.
One hundred finalists were chosen out of
more than 1,200 photographs submitted on
Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and email
under the hashtag BayMeadowsLife.
Photographs ranging from excited children to sunsets backdropping a Caltrain station will be displayed for one night only at
the Bay Meadows Welcome Center between
5 p.m. and 9 p.m.
The public is encouraged to attend and
vote, as the fans’ choice will receive a $500
grand prize, Bay Meadows spokeswoman
Maureen Futtner wrote in an email.
“As Bay Meadows welcomes new residents and San Mateo in general sees new
shops and more great restaurants open and

Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
cool events taking place, we wanted to visually capture a year in the life of this special
place,” Futtner said.
The entire 160 acres of the former race
track next to Highway 101 between the
Hillsdale Caltrain station and 25th Avenue
has been transformed over the last decade
and is continuing to become home to hundreds of residents.
While the photo exhibit seeks to illustrate life at Bay Meadows, the site’s first
rental residents have also begun to move in.
Field House, a 108-unit apartment community at 282 Pony Lane, is the first forlease residential offering with about 10
units having been occupied as of this
month, Futtner said. Nearly a dozen more
units will be move-in ready in the coming
month, Futtner said.
Field House is comprised of studios and
one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments as
well as two-bedroom townhomes. A 580square-foot studio is running between
$2,700 to $2,900 per month while a three-

bedroom, two-bath apartment between
1,360 and 1,620 square feet ranges from
$4,875 to $5,200 per month.
In total, Bay Meadows will become home
to more than 1,100 residences, 750,000
square feet of office space, 93,000 square
feet of retail space and 18 acres of parks.
Development of the former race track was
broken into two phases and includes the
new Kaiser Permanente medical center,
Whole Foods Market, Franklin Templeton
headquarters, San Mateo police station and
the private Nueva School.
Friday’s event will serve as a unique
opportunity for the public and Bay
Meadows residents to meet and mingle at
the Welcome Center, which will boast cocktails by downtown’s Mortar & Pestle, poetry and live art.
“Bay Meadows has always been about
involving the public,” Futtner said. “So
Fame by Frame is right in line with welcoming not only residents, but the greater community to have fun and enjoy
#BayMeadowsLife.”
Fame to Frame is 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday
at the Bay Meadows Welcome Center, 380 E.
28th Av e., San Mateo. For more information v isit bay meadows.com.

UC regents shelve policy tying coach bonuses to academics
By Lisa Leff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — The University of
California’s governing board tabled a policy
on Thursday that would have made the public
college system the nation’s second to tie
bonuses awarded to winning athletic coaches
to how well their players do in the classroom.
The new policy approved by UC President
Janet Napolitano last month would have
made coaches ineligible for lucrative incentive payouts if their intercollegiate sports
teams failed to meet certain minimum academic standards. The University of Maryland
adopted the same compensation provision in
the fall.
The California policy also would have
applied to campus athletic directors and was
set to take effect this week but ran into oppo-

sition on Thursday. Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom
and some other members of the university’s
Board of Regents argued that the academic
performance standard underlying the policy
was not ambitious enough since all but one
of UC’s Division 1 teams already meets it.
“The reform, it seems to me, is a bit modest at best. In fact, it is a bit illusory,”
Newsom said. “We are doing almost nothing
here under the illusion that we are doing
something.”
Newsom specifically faulted the policy for
using the same cutoff score for satisfactory
academic performance that the National
Collegiate Athletic Association already uses
to determine how many hours teams can practice, how many scholarships they can award,
and whether they can compete in the postseason.
By reserving the most lucrative bonuses
for a team’s athletic prowess and relying on

the NCAA’s academic eligibility benchmark,
the new rule does not give coaches any real
additional incentive to make sure their players are succeeding academically, he argued.
Dan Guerrero, athletic director at UCLA,
cautioned against what he said would be the
unintended consequences of the University of
California setting a standard higher than the
NCAA’s. Sports agents might insist on higher salaries for their coach clients.

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

3

Police reports
As think as you drunk he is
A drunk man walked into a telephone
pole on Jefferson Avenue and Oakridge
Drive in Redwood City before 11:07
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 15.

FOSTER CITY
Theft. A woman reported several packages
that were taken from the porch of her home
on Bounty Drive before 7:40 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 20.
Arres t. A man was arrested for driving with
a suspended license on Chess Drive before
8:44 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 20.
Burg l ary . A car was broken into on Foster
City Boulevard before 10:20 a.m. Monday,
Jan. 19.
Unl i cens ed dri v er. A man was cited and
had his car impounded for driving with a suspended license on Vintage Park Drive before
11:01 a.m. Monday, Jan. 19.
Arres t. A man was arrested for driving without a license on Edgewater and Beach Park
boulevards before 9:34 a.m. Monday, Jan.
19.

BURLINGAME
Co de v i o l ati o n. A resident reported a gardener who appeared to be preparing to use a
leaf blower illegally on Quesada Way before
8:51 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 20.
Grand theft. A grand theft occurred on the
1100 block of Howard Avenue before 5:27
p.m. Monday, Jan. 19.
As s aul t wi th a deadl y weapo n. A person
was attacked and cut by an intoxicated man
wielding a knife on Bellevue Avenue before
1:52 a.m. Monday, Jan. 19.
Mi no r i njury acci dent. Medics responded to a traffic accident on Ralston Avenue
before 3:20 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 18.

BELMONT
Burg l ary . The entire contents of a 16-foot
trailer containing construction tools was
stolen on Shoreway Road before 7:45 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 21.
Theft. A bicycle was stolen from the back
of a truck on Alameda de las Pulgas before
2:26 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 20.

LOCAL/STATE
4 Friday Jan. 23, 2015
posing as utility worker
State billionaire to skip contest for U.S. Senate Man
robs South San Francisco resident

THE DAILY JOURNAL

By Michael R. Blood

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Billionaire climate
activist Tom Steyer announced Thursday
that he will not enter the race to succeed
U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer in California, a
move that reshaped the early contest that
has attracted a pack of potential candidates.
Steyer, 57, was seriously considering a
2016 bid after Boxer said this month she
would step down at the end of her term.
The wealth of Steyer, a Democrat and for-

CITY
GOVERNMENT
• The San Carl o s
Ci ty Co unci l will
consider renaming
Laurel Street Park
the Fran k
D.
Harri n g t o n Park
at its next meeting. At the same meeting,
the council will also consider authorizing
the mayor to sign and send a letter from the
city to the S e quo i a Un i o n Hi g h
Scho o l Di s tri ct to urge it to reconsider
building a magnet school on Old County
Road. The council meets 7 p.m., Monday,
Jan. 26, City Hall, 600 Elm St., San
Carlos.
• The Redwo o d Ci ty Co unci l will
consider adopting a resolution to create a
pilot program for a lane reduction on Farm
Hill Boulevard and to create a Co mpl ete
S t re e t s Adv i s o ry Co mmi t t e e . The

mer hedge fund manager,
and his involvement in
environmental
issues
that resonate in left-leaning California could have
made him a strong contender.
He said in a statement
on The Huffington Post
that global warming will
Tom Steyer
“define the success or
failure of our generation,” and the nation
needs leadership in, and outside of, government.
council meets 7 p.m., Monday, Jan. 26,
City Hall, 1017 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City.
• The Fo s ter Ci ty Co unci l is holding
a special study session Monday to discuss
the mid-year financial report.
The city’s general fund is anticipated to
finish the current fiscal year with an additional $2.2 million in revenue, above the
original $33. 7 million projected. The
increased revenue is attributed to higher
property and hotel tax income as well as
development fee contributions from commercial projects, according to a city staff
report. Based on the increases, the city’s
general fund may end with a more than $1.8
million surplus.
The council will also be reviewing a status report on the city’s capital improvement projects.
The meeting begins 4 p.m. Monday, Jan.
26 at City Hall, 620 Foster City Blvd.

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A man posing as a utility worker robbed a
South San Francisco resident after being
allowed into his home.
The resident returned to his home on the
3700 block of Cork Place around 9 a.m.
Monday when the suspect followed him
inside claiming to be with the water department, according to South San Francisco
police.
The man instructed the resident to turn on
all of the water faucets under the guise of
conducting a test. While the victim was
busy turning on the faucets, the suspect
covertly stole several items of jewelry then
left, according to police.
The man is described as black, between 30
to 40 years old, approximately 5 feet 9
inches tall and wearing all black. Police
remind residents a utility company would
generally notify residents before sending
an employee and if in doubt, should check
identification and with the company before
letting a stranger into one’s home.
Anyone with information is asked to call
South San Francisco police at (650) 8778900.

Police investigate shooting death
Police in East Palo Alto are investigating
a shooting death Wednesday night.
Police responded at 6:05 p.m. to the 1300
block of Camellia Drive in reference to
shots fired and located a man suffering from
gunshot wounds sitting in a white Lexus
sedan.
The victim, identified as Steven Porter Jr.,
36, of San Jose, was pronounced deceased at

Local briefs
the scene.
The suspect was described as an unidentified man wearing dark clothing, police said.
The suspect was seen fleeing the scene on
foot on Camellia Drive toward Jasmine
Way.
Police are asking anyone with information about the incident to call police at
(650) 321-1112. Anyone wishing to remain
anonymous can send an email to epa@tipnow.org, send a text to (650) 409-6792 or
leave a voice mail at (650) 409-6792.

La Honda man faces life in
prison for molesting two girls
A La Honda man was convicted Thursday
on 40 felony counts for molesting his 10year-old stepdaughter and
one of her friends,
according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
Neil Aunko, 40, faces
100 years to life in
prison when he returns to
court March 10 for sentencing, according to the
District
Attorney’s
Neil Aunko
Office.
Aunko fled to Washington after the investigation started and denied any molestation
after being arrested and during the trial,
according to the District Attorney’s Office.
Aunko testified he had no improper contact with the victims and claimed they were
lying about his conduct in his testimony.
He had no explanation how his seminal
fluid got onto one of the victim’s pajamas,
according to the District Attorney’s Office.

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Reverse Mortgage Financial Assessment to begin March 2015
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has issued a financial assessment for
reverse mortgage borrowers that will take effect
March 2, 2015
HUD writes in explaining the purpose of financial
assessment, “The mortgagee must evaluate the
mortgagor’s willingness and capacity to timely meet
his or her financial obligations and to comply with the
mortgage requirements.” The mortgage requirements
include paying property taxes, homeowner’s insurance
and keeping up home maintenance.
HUD states, “In conducting this financial
assessment, mortgagees must take into consideration that some mortgagors seek a HECM due
to financial difficulties, which may be reflected
in the mortgagor’s credit report and/or property
charge payment history. The mortgagee must also
consider to what extent the proceeds of the HECM

could provide a solution to any such financial difficulties.” For borrowers who do not demonstrate
their willingness to meet their loan obligations, life
expectancy set-asides will be required.
The mortgagee letter also specifies documents that
must be collected and submitted to all borrowers. The
documentation has been updated to include “Financial
Assessment Documentation” including, credit history,
income verification, asset verification, property charge
verification, residual income analysis, documentation
of extenuating circumstances or compensating factors
and calculations for life expectancy and residual
income shortfall set-asides.
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mortgage today, or how the financial assessment will
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NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

GOP pushes abortion bill through
House on March for Life Day
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — With thousands of
abortion protesters swarming the city
in their annual March for Life,
Republicans muscled broadened abortion restrictions through the House on
Thursday after a GOP rebellion forced
leaders into an awkward retreat on an
earlier version.
By a near party-line 242-179 vote,
the House voted to permanently forbid
federal funds for most abortion coverage. The bill would also block tax credits for many people and employers
who buy abortion coverage under
President Barack Obama’s health care
overhaul.
A White House veto threat and an
uncertain fate in the Senate mean the
legislation has no realistic chance of
becoming law. But on a day when
crowds of anti-abortion demonstrators
stretched for blocks outside Capitol
windows — and hours after the embarrassing GOP stumble on another abortion measure — Thursday’s vote let
party leaders signal that the Congress
they now command is at least trying to
end abortion.
The GOP’s passage of one bill and
the abrupt derailment of another forbidding most late-term abortions
underscored the party’s perilous balancing act of backing abortion restrictions crucial to conservatives while
not alienating women and younger
voters wary of such restrictions.
Obama, out West to promote his
State of the Union economic agenda,
embraced the same 1973 Supreme
Court decision legalizing abortion
that the protesters were vilifying.
He said that decision “reaffirms a

5

Around the nation
Powerful New York politician
arrested on bribery charges
NEW YORK — Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, who
bent state government to his will for more than 20 years as
one of New York’s most powerful and
canny politicians, was arrested Thursday
on charges of taking nearly $4 million in
payoffs and kickbacks.
The 70-year-old Democrat was taken
into custody by the FBI on federal conspiracy and bribery charges that carry up
to 100 years in prison and could cost him
his political seat. He was released on
Sheldon Silver $200,000 bail.
U. S. Attorney Preet Bharara said
Silver, a lawyer by training, lined up jobs at two firms and
then accepted large sums of money over more than a decade
in exchange for using his “titanic” power to do political
favors. The money was disguised as “referral fees,” Bharara
said.

Barriers set up, water
tested at site of North Dakota spill
REUTERS

Thousands participate in the anti-abortion March for Life past the U.S. Supreme
Court building in Washington, D.C.
fundamental American value: that government should not intrude in our most
private and personal family matters.”
He said the House-passed bill would
“intrude on women’s reproductive freedom and access to health care and
unnecessarily restrict the private
insurance choices that consumers have
today.”
Republican House Speaker John
Boehner of Ohio praised the marchers
in a written statement that also seemed
to acknowledge discord among
Republicans.
“This march is part of a longer one,
and our destination is clear: to secure
and protect the rights of every unborn
child. When there is disagreement, we
should pause and listen closely. When
there is movement, we should rejoice,
and the House’s vote to ban taxpayer

funding of abortion is cause for doing
so,” he said.
Even so, the GOP sidetracking of the
late-term abortion measure sparked
grumbling from politically potent
allies.
In a sharp statement that singled out
Rep. Renee Ellmers, R-N.C., and others, National Right to Life President
Carol Tobias criticized GOP dissenters
on the late-term bill and warned,
“Some of these lawmakers may ultimately conclude that they were ill
advised to sacrifice the trust of their
pro-life constituents so egregiously.”
Ellmers, who has had a strong antiabortion voting record, was among
those who had objected to portions of
the late-term abortion bill. Her
spokeswoman, Blair Ellis, declined to
comment.

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BISMARCK, N.D. — Earthen barriers have been set up
across a creek and water was being tested Thursday around
the site of a nearly 3 million-gallon leak of saltwater generated by oil drilling, the largest spill of its kind during North
Dakota’s current oil rush.
The berms were built at Blacktail Creek to prevent potentially contaminated water from flowing out of the creek and
into a bigger body of water that eventually leads into the
Missouri River.

Obituary

Sonia Fuenzalida Kneier
April 3, 1934 – January 17, 2015
Resident of San Mateo
Passed away at home on January 17, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Alan Kneier. Devoted
mother of Amanda Sanchez (Rich), Peter Frankel Jr (Lalaine). and Christian Frankel (Michelle).
Cherished grandmother of Maria Baker, Joseph Costanzo, Jessica, Ashley, Nicholas and Matthew
Frankel. Loving daughter of the late Amanda and Lucho Fuenzalida. Dear sister of Luis
Fuenzalida and Carlos Fuenzalida.
A native of Curico’ Chile, Sonia was devoted to the loved ones in her life. She enjoyed jewelry
making, dried floral arranging, singing, flamenco dancing, and playing the guitar.
Friends are invited to attend a Rosary at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, January 23, 2015 at St. Bartholomew
Catholic Church, 300 Alameda de las Pulgas in San Mateo. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at
10:30 a.m. on Saturday, January 24, 2015 at the church. In lieu of flowers, donations preferred
to the Special Olympics.

6

WORLD

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

King Abdullah has died,
Prince Salman successor
By Aya Batrawy
and Abdullah Al-Shihri
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — Saudi
Arabia’s King Abdullah, the powerful U.S. ally who fought al-Qaida
and sought to modernize the ultraconservative Muslim kingdom,
including by nudging open greater
opportunities for women, has died.
He was 90.
A royal court statement said the
king died at 1 a.m. on Friday. His
successor was announced as 79year-old half-brother, Prince
Salman, a Royal Court statement
carried on the Saudi Press Agency
said.
Salman was Abdullah’s crown
prince and had recently taken on
some of the ailing king’s responsibilities. The 69 year-old Prince
Muqrin, a former head of intelligence in Saudi Arabia and halfbrother to both Salman and
Abdullah, was announced as the
kingdom’s crown prince.
More than his guarded predecessors, Abdullah — who ascended to
the throne in 2005 — assertively
threw his oil-rich nation’s weight

behind trying
to shape the
Middle
East.
His priority was
to counter the
influence
of
rival, mainly
Shiite
Iran
wherever it tried
to
make
Prince Salman advances. He
and
fellow
Sunni Arab monarchs also
staunchly opposed the Middle
East’s wave of pro-democracy
uprisings, seeing them as a threat
to stability and their own rule.
Regionally, perhaps Abdullah’s
biggest priority was to confront
Iran, the Shiite powerhouse across
the Gulf. He backed Sunni Muslim
factions against Tehran’s allies in
several countries, where colliding
ambitions stoked proxy conflicts
around the region that enflamed
Sunni-Shiite hatreds — most horrifically in Syria’s civil war, where
the two countries backed opposing
sides. Those conflicts in turn
hiked Sunni militancy that
returned to threaten Saudi Arabia.
Abdullah was selected as crown

REUTERS FILE PHOTO

Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah arrives at Heathrow Airport in west London.
prince in 1982 on the day his halfbrother Fahd ascended to the
throne. He became de facto ruler in
1995 when a stroke incapacitated
Fahd. Abdullah was believed to
have long rankled at the closeness
of the alliance with the United
States, and as regent he pressed
Washington to withdraw the

League to approve an unprecedented offer that all Arab states would
agree to peace with Israel if it withdrew from lands it captured in
1967. Alarmed by the prospect of a
rift, President George W. Bush
soon after advocated for the first
time the creation of a Palestinian
state alongside Israel.

troops it had deployed in the kingdom since the 1990 Iraqi invasion
of Kuwait. The U.S. finally did so
in 2003.
He was constantly frustrated by
Washington’s failure to broker a
settlement
to
the
IsraelPalestinian conflict. In 2000,
Abdullah convinced the Arab

U.S., Cuba move toward embassies, disagree on human rights
HAVANA — The United States
and Cuba closed two days of historic talks in Havana with some
progress toward restoring diplomatic ties after a half-century of
estrangement, but sharp differences over the role of human
rights in their new relationship.

“As a central element of our
policy, we pressed the Cuban
government for improved human
rights conditions, including freedom of expression,” said Roberta
Jacobson, the top U.S. diplomat
for Latin America and most senior
American official to visit the
island country in more than three
decades. In Spanish, however, her

statement said the U. S. “pressured” Cuba on the issue.
“Cuba has never responded to
pressure,” Josefina Vidal, Cuba’s
top diplomat for U. S. affairs,
responded.
The comments by Jacobson and
Vidal reflected longstanding
positions of their governments
and it wasn’t immediately clear

whether the issue, which has previously blocked closer U. S. Cuban relations, would pose a
threat to the new diplomatic
process.
Yet it laid bare the pressures
each side faces at home — the
U.S., from Republican leaders in
Congress and powerful CubanAmerican groups and Cuba, from

hardliners deeply concerned that
rapprochement could undermine
the communist system founded by
Fidel Castro.
In the first face-to-face talks
since last month’s declaration of
detente, the two countries laid out
a detailed agenda for re-establishing full diplomatic relations.
Further talks were planned.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

WORLD

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

Iraq coalition tensions emerge in IS fight
By Qassim Abdul-Zahra
and Vivian Salama
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAGHDAD — Iraqi commanders heavily
dependent on outside support to defeat the
Islamic State group are increasingly voicing
frustration over the U.S.-led coalition’s
efforts, complaining of miscommunication,
failed deliveries of weapons, inadequate
training and differences in strategy.
Speaking to the Associated Press this
week, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi
said, “We want to see an acceleration of the
training, acceleration of the delivery of
arms” from foreign allies. Al-Abadi complained that Iraq is “left almost alone to get
these arms and munitions for the army, for
our fighters, and we expect much more.”
At the same time, he reiterated that his
government does not want any foreign boots
on the ground, and he acknowledged that
coalition airstrikes had been “very, very
effective.”
Leaders of the coalition stressed its successes at a London meeting Thursday, with
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry saying
that nearly 2,000 airstrikes had helped
ground forces retake 700 square kilometers
(270 square miles) of territory, kill 50 percent of Islamic State commanders and choked

REUTERS

A Kurdish Peshmerga fighter takes his position as he keeps watch during the battle with
Islamic State militants on the outskirts of Mosul, Iraq.
off some of the group’s oil revenue.
But three Iraqi generals who spoke to the
AP on condition of anonymity because they
are not authorized to discuss ongoing operations said the U.S. has on several occasions
ignored guidance from Iraqi commanders and
has failed to provide ample training and
weapons to Iraq’s beleaguered forces.

“Whenever we complain about the poor
training they provided us, they remind us
that it was Iraq who forced them to leave” in
2011, one of the generals said.
The generals noted, by contrast, Iran’s
willingness to quickly accommodate their
urgent needs for weapons and training, while
the coalition makes them wait.

Yemen’s U.S.-backed president quits; country could split apart
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANAA, Yemen — Yemen’s U.S.-backed
president quit Thursday under pressure from
rebels holding him captive in his home,
severely complicating American efforts to
combat al-Qaida’s powerful local franchise
and raising fears that the Arab world’s poorest
country will fracture into mini-states.
Presidential officials said Abed Rabbo
Mansour Hadi submitted his resignation to
parliament rather than make further conces-

sions to Shiite rebels,
known as Houthis, who
control the capital and are
widely believed to be
backed by Iran.
The prime minister and
his cabinet also stepped
down, making a thinly
veiled reference to the
Houthis’ push at gunAbed Hadi
point for a greater share
of power. Houthis deployed their fighters

around parliament, which is due to discuss the
situation on Sunday.
Yemeni law dictates that the parliament
speaker — Yahia al-Rai, a close ally of former
autocratic ruler Ali Abdullah Saleh — will
now assume the presidency. Saleh still wields
considerable power and is widely believed to
be allied with the Houthis.
There were conflicting reports suggesting
that authorities in Aden, the capital of southern region of Yemen, would no longer submit
to the central government’s authority.

7

Around the world
Obama to pass on meeting
Netanyahu during Washington visit
WASHINGTON — Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu’s planned trip to
Washington in March is
kicking up a diplomatic
dust storm in the nation’s
capital.
On Thursday, the White
House said President
Barack Obama would not
meet the prime minister
when he comes to the
Barack Obama U.S. to address a joint
session of Congress. The
official White House explanation was that
Netanyahu’s visit fell too close to the Israeli
election and the Obama administration wanted to avoid the appearance of taking sides.
“As a matter of longstanding practice and
principle, we do not see heads of state or candidates in close proximity to their elections,
so as to avoid the appearance of influencing
a democratic election in a foreign country,”
National Security Council spokeswoman
Bernadette Meehan said.

Japan faces deadline to
free Islamic State hostages
TOKYO — The deadline for paying ransom
for two Japanese hostages held by the Islamic
State group was fast approaching early Friday
with no signs of a breakthrough.
With time running short, the mother of one
of the hostages, journalist Kenji Goto,
appealed for an end to hatred and destruction.
“My son is not an enemy of the Islamic
State,” Junko Ishido said in a tearful appearance in Tokyo. She said she was astonished to
learn from her daughter-in-law that she had a
newborn baby, and said the child needs his
father. In very Japanese fashion, she apologized repeatedly for “all the trouble my son
has caused.”
The status of efforts to free the two men was
unclear, with hours to go before the presumed
deadline.

8

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

LOCAL

JAN

Reporters’ notebook

Continued from page 1
pared statement.
Under Christensen, district schools,
teachers and staff won various awards for
outstanding scholastic achievement, such
as Adelante Spanish Immersion School,
Orion Alternative School and North Star
Academy winning recognition as California
Distinguished Schools by the state
Department Of Education, according to a
district report.
“I am so proud of the creative and rigorous
work I see in our classrooms, and the dedication of each and every employee,” she said.
“I look forward to hearing about great
achievements by RCSD graduates in the
future.”
The Association of California School
Administrators named her the 2013 superintendent of the year in region five, which
covers San Mateo and San Francisco counties.
Despite her successes in leading the district, Christensen’s tenure was not without
its contentious moments.
The proposal to add two charter schools to
the district last summer pitted some parents
against the administration, over concerns
that the new schools might divert money
away from district students.
Christensen drew the ire of some parents
when she recommended to adopt KIPP Bay
Area Schools and Rocketship Education
into the district, under the justification that
the district could not deny the charter
schools admission on the grounds of financial hardship.
Melissa Haussler, a Redwood City resident
and parent of students in the district, spoke
during the public comment portion of a
school board discussion about the charter
schools, and suggested that Christensen
step down as superintendent.
Haussler said she appreciated what
Christensen had accomplished for the local
schools, especially the superintendent’s
ability to raise money for the district, and
lead with a limited budget.
But she also said she is ready to see the
district chart a fresh course.
“She’s done a lot for our community,” said
Haussler. “But it’s time for new leadership,
new blood and a new direction.”
Under Christensen, contract negotiations
with the Redwood City Teachers
Association grew heated in 2013, when educators requested a raise, which would have
been the first of its kind since 2008.
The two sides initially came to an impasse
over the teachers’ demands, but that was
eventually resolved in June of last year,
when a 3.5 percent rate hike was agreed
upon.
Bret Baird, former teacher union presi-

THE DAILY JOURNAL

W

dent, characterized the negotiations at the
time as “rocky,” but expressed satisfaction
over the eventual outcome.
Board Vice President Alisa MacAvoy
spoke highly of Christensen’s ability to
lead the district.
“I think Jan has been an excellent superintendent, and I’m sorry to see her go” said
MacAvoy.
MacAvoy also noted that Christensen
joined the district right as the country suffered an economic downturn, and she
admired the superintendent’s willingness to
prioritize student welfare at all times,
despite budget hardships.
“She always had less money than she
needed, and she always managed to put students first,” MacAvoy said.
Board members will formally begin the
process of searching for Christensen’s
replacement during a closed-session meeting Wednesday, Jan. 28.
MacAvoy
said
she
appreciated
Christensen giving the district so much
advance warning in leading up to beginning
its process to find another superintendent.
There is hope that the district might be
able to find a new superintendent before
Christensen’s slated July 1 departure, as that
might provide an opportunity to establish a
more seamless transition, said MacAvoy.
Christensen’s announcement did not come
as a complete surprise to the board, as the
superintendent had recently begun to make
her intent to leave known, said MacAvoy.
“She had been talking about it for a little
while,” said MacAvoy.
According to a prepared statement,
Christensen plans to form a consulting
practice with her husband Bill, who is a
counselor at Gunn High School in Palo
Alto, focused on serving high school students applying to college.
“I really thank her for her nine plus years
of service to the students and staff,” said
MacAvoy.

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105

ith the recent deadly mystery
goo affecting hundreds of birds
across the Bay, the nonprofit
Wi l dl i fe Emerg ency Serv i ces is
offering a seminar to train rescuers for
future disasters.
The Oi l ed Bi rd Res cue training program is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 20 at the
Fo rt Mas o n Center in San Francisco.
The training will prepare those who
want to help rescue oiled or imperiled
birds and serve as a refresher for responders who help capture birds.
There is a $60 fee for the six-hour class
located in room C-260 at the Fort Mason
Center, 2 Marina Blvd., San Francisco.
Attendees can register at wildlifeservices.bigcartel.com/product/oiled-birdrescue-training, by emailing
training@wildlifeservices.org or by calling (866) WILD-911 ext. 4.
***
The San Mateo Publ i c Li brary ’s
Chi l dren’s Department is beginning
its second annual Fami l y Read Al o ud
Pro g ram Monday, Jan. 26. It’s designed
for participants, regardless of age, to read
aloud to each other as a means of spending time together and to promote lifelong
literacy.
To complete the program, families must
read four hours during the program’s duration. Upon signing up families will
receive a reading log and a Family Read
Aloud Program bookmark. Starting
Monday, Feb. 23, participants can turn in
their logs for a chance to win prizes.
The Family Read Aloud Program is made
possible with funding support from the
San Mateo Publ i c Li brary
Fo undati o n and the Geo rg e Archer
Memo ri al Fo undati o n fo r Li teracy .
The San Mateo Main Library is located at
55 W. Third Ave. in San Mateo. For additional information call (650) 522-7838.
***
Retired and former aviators of all ages
are invited to take to the skies again on
Saturday, Feb. 7 as San Carl o s Fl i g ht
Center hosts Si l v er Eag l es , a celebration of flight at San Carlos Airport. San
Carl o s Fl i g ht Center created the
Silver Eagles program as a way for club
members to pay tribute to elder aviators,
to honor fellow pilots who are no longer
flying.
Any Silver Eagle who is interested in
attending the celebration can call 946-

1700 or go to sancarlosflight.com.
Flights will begin at 9 a.m. and the barbecue lunch starts at 1 p.m.
***
January is always “Battl e o f the
Crab Feeds ” in Belmont, with three big
events put on by Ho l y Cro s s Greek
Ortho do x Church, Immacul ate Heart
o f Mary Church and Bel mo nt Ro tary
Cl ub.
Events include a crab feed at Holy Cross
6:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 24 and a Crab
Bl as t 6 p.m.-11 p.m. also on Jan. 24 at
the San Mateo El ks Lo dg e, 229 W.
20th Ave. hosted by the Immaculate Heart
of Mary Church in Belmont. The Rotary’s
crab feed dinner will take place Jan. 31
and tickets go for $55 a person.
***
The Sequo i a Ho s pi tal Fo undati o n
last week served as one of only four foundations selected to welcome German
health care philanthropy executives to the
United States during a two-week visit.
The exchange program grew from a
series of meetings held in Germany over
the past three years facilitated by the
As s o ci ati o n fo r Heal thcare
Phi l anthro py and the German
Fundrai s i ng As s o ci ati o n. This
exchange was formally hosted by Bi l l
Li ttl ejo hn of the Sharp Heal thcare
Fo undati o n in San Diego. The visitors,
from university hospitals in Essen and
Schleswig-Holstein (Kiel and Lübeck) in
Germany, visited Lo ng Beach
Memo ri al Medi cal Center and Rady
Chi l dren’s Ho s pi tal in San Diego, in
addition to Sharp and the Sequoia Hospital
Foundation.
***
The San Mateo Ro tary Cl ub is
beginning the process of awarding scholarships for community college and fouryear colleges to 2015 high school graduates from Arag o n, San Mateo ,
Hi l l s dal e and Serra hi g h s cho o l s .
Applications have been sent to the counselors at each school. The Rotary program
funds students who have a combination of
financial need and merit. Last year, the
club awarded $55,000 in four-year scholarships and $14,000 in community college scholarships.
The Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection
of facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

Letters to the editor
Bridge blockade
Editor,
On Monday evening, traffic was
brought to a standstill on the San
Mateo Bridge. This was not due to a
horrendous crash or a cataclysmic
natural disaster, but rather a group of
self important Stanford students.
These privileged young people from a
prestigious university took it upon
themselves to take thousands of commuters hostage to publicize their
cause du jour.
With no regard for the lives of thousands of motorist, they foisted their
signs and began their chant for the
few dozen people who were trapped
within earshot of these morally and
intellectually superior juveniles. I
was confined with my family several
hundred feet from the blockade, so I
was not privy to the ever so important announcements. While trapped
on the shoulderless portion of the
elevated span, I explained to my 10year old son that what these people
were doing was not protected by the
Constitution that my fellow soldiers
have sworn to protect. These naive
young people had no idea of the hardship they have inflicted upon the tens
of thousands of commuters who had
to endure the consequences of this
criminal act. How many flights,
birthday dinners, family gatherings
and other important events were
missed due to this mob? How many
collisions, medical emergencies and
thousands of lost hours were the
direct result of the actions of these
criminals? And when my young child
was forced to urinate in a discarded
beverage container I was moved to
anger.
Having spent more than 20 years
risking my life to protect the people
of this great nation, I was outraged
that these pompous children were
comfortable holding myself and my
family against our will. This unnecessary incident reflects the selfishness
of a group of people who have no
regard for the lives of others. I can
only hope that the judicial system of
San Mateo County will represent the
thousands of people who were victimized by the Stanford 68.

P. McCarthy
Redwood City

Plan Bay Area is irresponsible
Editor,
Hooray for your Jan. 14 story about
Foster City residents “upset with
state mandates” about high-density
growth. Everyone should be upset.
But the average Joe has no idea that
the entire Peninsula is about to be
inundated with housing, while any
accompanying plans for improved

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha
Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

infrastructure are limping along, and
the only plan to mitigate traffic is to
get everyone out of their cars.
People should read pages 22-29 of
this report to familiarize themselves
with the 188,000 residences being
planned this time around:
http://www.abag.ca.gov/files/ABAG_
Final_RHNA_Publication.pdf.
The current development plan foisted upon us by Plan Bay Area won’t
work. Numerous articles have been
written, and numerous lawsuits have
been filed:
http://agenda21news.com/2014/12/s
even-reasons-plan-bay-area-illegalbad-policy-california.
If residents want to have a quality
of life they came here for, they need
to get informed and demand better.
Aren’t they the ones paying for
everything in the end?
Residents in all our cities need to
band together today and make a statement to state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San
Mateo, and Sacramento that any
future planned growth should be
responsible, and that they reject Plan
Bay Area as it fatally fails to fit that
definition.  

Lisa Taner
San Mateo

Belmont should keep its
campaign finance rules
Editor,
Having read the article about the
city of Belmont rethinking its rules
on campaign finance (“Belmont
explores campaign finance regulation
update” the Jan. 19 edition of the
Daily Journal), I would encourage the
City Council to hold on to the limits
it set back in 2009. In this age of outsized contributions leading to
bought-and-paid-for elections (and
candidates), these limits represent an
important benchmark and would
remain a strong statement in favor of
letting people decide who is the best
candidate, not just who can afford to
advertise the most.
Too often that candidate represents
the voices of wealthy interests with
only their own benefit in mind, as
opposed to that of the larger populace. The voice of the “rest of us” is
drowned out. Might someone who
abhors campaign finance limits bring
legal action? Perhaps, and while I
would understand if the Belmont City
Council backed down in order to save
its resources from large legal fees, I
would also relish seeing the names of
those taking said legal action in
these pages for all of the Daily
Journal’s readers to see.

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Kathleen Magana
Joe Rudino

Charles Gould
Paul Moisio

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Mari Andreatta
Robert Armstrong
Arianna Bayangos
Sanne Bergh
Kerry Chan
Caroline Denney
Darold Fredricks
Mayeesha Galiba
Dominic Gialdini
Tom Jung
Dave Newlands
Jeff Palter
Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner
Emily Shen
Samson So
Gary Whitman

Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

Guest
perspective

Regarding
Belmont zoning changes
Editor,
After reading the letter submitted by
Belmont Planning Commissioner
Kristin Mercer, I must applaud her for
having the strength, foresight and
gumption to stand up for what she feels
is correct (“Belmont zoning changes”
in the Jan. 20 edition of the Daily
Journal).
The city of Millbrae needs to have
people like her on the City Council
and Planning Commission. Instead,
Millbrae has a group of spineless puppets who cave and give into anyone
who is willing to issue promises and
show them money. Millbrae allowed
the Tai Wu restaurant with a capacity,
over 200 patrons, to be built without
parking or final building plans. Tai Wu
rented parking space from Burger King
and True Value Hardware store to
appease the Planning Commission and
the citizens in the surrounding neighborhood, who complained they could
not park in front of their own houses.
So what has happened? The patrons
still park in the surrounding neighborhood and in front of other businesses.
This results in other businesses losing
patronage from lack of parking, and
residents who still cannot park in front
of their homes. Maybe, had the planners and councilmembers taken a firm
stand and not buckled to the whims and
cries of Tai Wu owners, the long-established businesses and homeowners
wouldn’t be hurting for parking.
Kristin, hold your ground and try to
convince other Belmont city officials
to see the damage that will occur if
they allow “in-law” apartments and
“converted garages” to be turned into
additional living areas. Indeed,
Belmont will become a city over run
with additional renters and vehicles.

E. Picchi
Millbrae

Thank you, Jon and Michelle
Editor,
I am thankful for the Daily Journal
(and that it’s free!). The paper provides
terrific coverage (thank goodness) of
local stories. Not all of us have a computer to receive the news. Thank goodness for newspapers.
I will miss Michelle Durand’s column. It was rather refreshing to read
Jon’s Jan. 16 column, “So long old
pal,” about Michelle. It provided us
with a behind-the-scene view of the
closeness in the relationships at the
Daily Journal.
Thanks also for making it fairly easy
to express my opinion in your paper
when I feel a need to say something.
You both deserve a pat on the back.

Ron Zucker
San Mateo

David Thom
San Carlos
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Seton sale to Prime
best for community
By Herminigildo Valle

A

s chief of the medical staff at Seton Medical
Center and Seton Coastside, and speaking on
behalf of Seton’s medical executive committee,
I am proud to say that the physicians of Seton and Seton
Coastside are united in their support for the purchase of
Seton, Seton Coastside and other
Daughters of Charity Health System
facilities by Prime Healthcare
Services.
A year ago, the board of the
Daughters of Charity Health System
made the difficult but unavoidable
decision to sell its hospitals and
facilities. For more than 150 years,
these facilities have been among the
means by which the Daughters of Charity have provided
care to the sick and the poor of California.
Unfortunately, given the economic realities of 21st-century health care, the Daughters can no longer financially
support their hospitals and the enormous monetary
losses they are incurring.
Bearing in mind the needs of their patients and communities, DCHS conducted a thorough search for a buyer
for their acute care hospitals and medical foundation.
After careful review, Prime Healthcare was selected as
the buyer for DCHS.
As chief of medical staff and on behalf of the Medical
Executive Committee and the entire medical staff of
Seton Medical Center and Seton Coastside, we strongly
endorse and support the purchase of Seton Medical
Center and Seton Coastside by Prime Healthcare
Services. We have communicated our position to
California Attorney General Kamala Harris who must
approve the sale.
We believe this transaction is vital to the continued
health and well-being of our communities and to our
continued commitment to the Daughters of Charity’s
legacy of service to the sick and the poor. It is also
vital to the well-being and employment of our union
members, our nurses and other colleagues with whom we
physicians have worked side by side throughout the
years.
As physicians with a deep investment to the health of
our communities, we are deeply concerned about the dire
consequences if our sale is not approved. The hospitals,
which have provided a safety net for many in our communities, could file bankruptcy and close. The end result
of bankruptcy and closure are clear: community access
to essential health care services will be gravely compromised. Thousands of jobs will be lost. In the case of
Seton Medical Center, the largest employer in Daly
City, and Seton Coastside, that loss is in excess of
1,300 jobs. That is a devastating blow to our colleagues
who work here, to their families and to the local economy.
With due diligence and in the spirit of collaboration,
members of the medical staff leadership have met with
leadership from the Service Employees International
Union and listened carefully to their concerns and their
alternative proposal for the purchase of DCHS. We have
considered their issues and proposal with an open mind.
However, after thorough and objective analysis, we have
determined without a doubt, that what they propose is
not a viable option.
Prime Healthcare can extend our mission of care, preserve employee and retiree pensions, invest in capital
improvements and maintain charity care policies. They
have financial strength and stability for future operations, as well as experience in managing hospitals in
California.
As physicians sincerely committed to the welfare of
all those we serve, we are convinced that Prime
Healthcare will be bound by their commitment to Seton
and Seton’s physicians in delivering excellent and highquality care.
We are joined by our peers at other DCHS hospitals in
seeking the approval of Attorney General Harris for this
transaction. This is the only moral and realistic option
that will serve the greatest good for those who will be
most affected by your decision and will determine the
welfare of future generations.
Herminigildo Valle, M.D., M.P.A., is the chief of staff,
Seton Medical Center and Seton Coastside.

10

BUSINESS

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks up, Europe’s stimulus plan sinks euro
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
17,813.98 +259.70 10-Yr Bond 1.90 +0.04
Nasdaq 4,750.40 +82.98 Oil (per barrel) 46.55
S&P 500 2,063.15 +31.03 Gold
1,301.80

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Southwest Airlines Co., up $3.52 to $45.35
The airline reported better-than-expected quarterly results on cheaper
fuel costs and a boost in passenger traffic.
Discover Financial Services, down $3.52 to $57.32
The financial services company’s quarterly profit fell short of expectations
as several one-time charges cut into gains in credit card and loan revenue.
American Express Co., down $3.30 to $84.37
The financial services company said it will cut more than 4,000 jobs this
year as part of a companywide efficiency drive.
Verizon Communications Inc., down 45 cents to $47.80
The cellphone carrier reported a fourth-quarter loss, but its earnings and
revenue still topped Wall Street expectations.
Nasdaq
eBay Inc., up $3.77 to $57.15
The online auctioneer reported a boost in quarterly profit and plans to
cut 2,400 jobs, or about 7 percent of its workforce.
SanDisk Corp., down $1.54 to $78.90
The flash-memory chip maker reported worse-than-expected fourthquarter profit and revenue and gave a weak outlook.
Dollar Tree Inc., up $2.44 to $70.25
Family Dollar Stores Inc. shareholders approved the sale of the company
to the discount store operator for about $8.5 billion.
Land’s End Inc., down $8.74 to $41.97
The apparel retailer provided a weaker-than-expected fourth-quarter
profit and revenue outlook, citing disappointing sales.

NEW YORK — A plan to revive
Europe’s sagging economy rippled
through the financial world on
Thursday, setting off a rally in the stock
market that wiped out its losses for the
year.
The pledge by the European Central
Bank to spend 1.1 trillion euros on
bonds knocked down government borrowing rates across Europe and drove
the euro to its lowest level against the
dollar in 11 years. For investors, the
long wait for action in Europe was over.
“It’s all about the ECB today,” said
Jeff Kravetz, regional investment
strategist at U.S. Bank Wealth
Management. “This is a very positive
development. They have a reputation of
overpromising and under-delivering,
and today they delivered.”
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
jumped 31.03 points, or 1.5 percent, to
close at 2,063.15. That nudged it into
positive territory for the year, up 0.2
percent.
The Dow Jones industrial average
climbed 259.70 points, or 1.5 percent,
to 17,813.98 while the Nasdaq climbed
82.98 points, or 1.8 percent, to
4,750.40.
The ECB announced Thursday that it
would start buying 60 billion euros

worth of government and private bonds
every month, slightly more than what
many in the markets anticipated. The
central bank said the program will run
18 months, from this March until
September of next year, but left open
the option of extending the program if
necessary.
That wiggle room is crucial, said
Joseph Quinlan, chief market strategist
at U.S. Trust. Turning around an economy often takes longer than people
think. The Federal Reserve launched its
first bond-buying effort at the end of
2008 and kept expanding it over the
following years.
“The biggest positive is that it
appears to be open-ended,” Quinlan
said. “As we learned in the U.S., it takes
time for this to work.”
Major markets in Europe ended the
day with solid gains. Germany’s DAX
rose 1.3 percent and France’s CAC-40
gained 1.5 percent. Britain’s FTSE 100
picked up 1 percent.
Prices for government bonds across
Europe jumped, pushing yields to
record lows. The yield on the 10-year
German bond hit 0.39 percent.
Borrowing costs for governments in
France, Italy and other countries also
reached new lows.
“It’s hard not to see this as a positive,
but there will be lingering doubts,” said
Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist at the Bank of Tokyo, in a note to

clients. “Is there even enough debt for
them to buy?”
The euro fell further against the U.S.
dollar on Thursday, reaching $1.13.
The euro hasn’t been that cheap since
September 2003, according to FactSet
data. A weakened euro makes European
goods cheaper, which could help boost
exports from the region and lift inflation from dangerously low levels.
The dollar index, which measures the
greenback against a basket of major
currencies, climbed 1.6 percent, putting it up 4.6 percent for the month.
A strong dollar has its drawbacks,
especially for big U.S. corporations
that depend on overseas sales. It raises
prices for U.S. products in foreign
countries, and means the revenue that
U.S. companies collect in other currencies translates into fewer dollars when
they bring the money home. A strong
dollar, in other words, can pinch profits. For companies in the S&P 500
index, roughly half of total revenue
comes from outside the United States.
The strong dollar, for example, hurt
Johnson & Johnson in the fourth quarter, and triggered a sell-off in its shares
on Tuesday.
Big-name companies turning in
results on Thursday were spared damage
from currency fluctuations, however.
Southwest Airlines reported higher
quarterly profit and revenue than Wall
Street expected.

Apple’s CEO Tim Cook gets hefty bonus for 2014
By Brandon Bailey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple CEO Tim
Cook got a hefty cash bonus that brought
his total compensation to $9.2 million last
year. That’s more than double what he
received the previous year, as the company
enjoyed a surge in sales and profit fueled by
the popularity of its new, over-sized iPhone
6 models.
Cook’s pay for fiscal 2014 included $1.7
million in salary and $6.7 million in incentive pay that was awarded by Apple’s board
after he beat the performance goals that
directors had set for him, according to a regulatory filing Thursday. He also received
$774,176 in other compensation, includ-

ing a 401k contribution,
company-paid insurance
premiums and security
expenses.
Apple reported $182.8
billion in revenue for the
fiscal year that ended
Sept. 27 and $39.5 billion in profit, after seeing record sales last fall.
Tim Cook
Sales of iPhones rose 21
percent in the company’s fourth quarter,
which made up for a decline in sales of
iPads. Apple’s annual revenue has increased
in each of the last three years.
Cook and the company’s other top officers were awarded the maximum bonus possible under Apple’s incentive plan, after the

company’s annual revenue and $52.5 billion in operating profit each exceeded the
plan’s maximum goals by 7 percent, the filing said.
The Associated Press calculates an executive’s total compensation by counting
salary, bonuses, perks, stock and options
awarded during the year.
Despite his bonus, Apple’s CEO collected
less than the company’s four other top officers, all of whom garnered sizable stock
awards. The highest paid was Senior Vice
President Angela Ahrendts, the former CEO
at luxury goods maker Burberry who was
hired in May to run Apple’s retail operations. Her $73 million pay package included a hiring bonus of $33 million in restricted Apple stock grants and another $37 mil-

Jobless aid applications drop for first time in four weeks
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The number of
Americans seeking unemployment benefits
fell last week for the first time in a month, a
sign that layoffs remain low and hiring is
probably still healthy.
The Labor Department says that weekly
applications dropped 10,000 to a seasonally adjusted 307,000. The decline comes
after applications spiked the previous week
to a seven-month high.
Most of the volatility reflects widespread
layoffs of temporary employees hired by
retailers, restaurants and other companies
for the winter holidays. The government

seeks to adjust the data for those seasonal
trends, but doesn’t always do so perfectly.
Applications have been near or below
300,000 since September, a historically
low level that suggests companies are cutting few workers. Instead, strong economic
growth in the spring and summer has
encouraged employers to add more jobs.
“Through the volatility, claims are up a
little recently,” Jim O’Sullivan, chief U.S.
economist at High Frequency Economics,
said in a note to clients. “The rise is too
small to date to signal an uptrend, but the
data merit watching.”
Week l y
ap p l i cat i o n s
av erag ed
3 0 8 , 0 0 0 i n 2 0 1 4 , O’Sul l i v an n o t ed,
almost the same as last week’s figure.
Job gains averaged 246, 000 a month

last year, the most in 15 years.
Some companies are announcing large
layoffs. American Express said Wednesday
that it is cutting 4,000 jobs, or about 6 percent of its workforce.
Even with the recent increases, applications are still lower than a year ago. The
four-week average, a less volatile measure,
rose to 307,000. That is 8.5 percent lower
than 12 months earlier.
The decline in layoffs has been matched
by an increase in hiring.
Employers added 252, 000 jobs last
month, topping off the best year for hiring
in 15 years. The economy gained nearly 3
million jobs last year, helping to push
down the unemployment rate to a six-year
low of 5.6 percent.

McDonald’s faces employee lawsuit over franchisee behavior
By Tom Murphy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Some McDonald’s workers who say they
were fired because of their race are suing the
fast-food giant, accusing it of dodging
responsibility for the discrimination and
harassment they say they endured.
The workers said in a federal complaint
filed Thursday that about 15 AfricanAmerican employees of some southern
Virginia restaurants run by Soweva Co. were
fired last May after several white employees
were hired. Many of those fired were told by

Soweva owner Michael Simon that while
they were good workers they “didn’t fit the
profile” he was trying to build for the company, according to the complaint.
The employees said that McDonald’s
Corp. controls nearly every aspect of how
franchisees operate restaurants, but corporate officials did nothing when they were
contacted about the dismissals and “blatant
racial discrimination.”
A statement from McDonald’s Corp. said
the company had not seen the lawsuit and
couldn’t comment on the allegations, but it
and its franchisees “share a commitment to
the well-being and fair treatment of all peo-

ple who work in McDonald’s restaurants.”
Representatives of Soweva and Simon did
not return calls from the Associated Press
seeking comment.
The workers said in the complaint that
before they were fired, restaurant supervisors frequently demeaned African-American
workers by using terms like “ghetto” to
describe them and by complaining that
there were “too many black people in the
store. ” The complaint also states that
female employees were inappropriately
touched by a male supervisor who also sent
them naked photos and offered better working conditions in exchange for sex.

lion in restricted stock grants that Apple
said were intended to compensate for
Burberry stock that she forfeited on leaving
her old job.
While Cook’s total pay has increased for
the last two years, it still pales against the
$378 million in cash and stock grants he
was awarded when he took the CEO job in
2011.
Apple reported the compensation figures
in advance of its annual shareholder meeting on March 10. The company also
announced that board member Millard
“Mickey” Drexler, will retire when his term
expires at that meeting. Drexler, 70, is CEO
of J. Crew and former CEO of the Gap retail
chain. Apple said a replacement has not
been nominated.

Business brief
No quick fix for battery
anxiety but plenty of workarounds
NEW YORK — At a cozy watering hole in
Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, bartender Kathy Conway counted four
different phone chargers behind the bar.
Call it the scourge of the red zone or battery
anxiety. Smartphone users are tired of begging to charge devices behind bars or hunting
for outlets in airports and train stations.
Where, oh where, is a better battery?
The common lithium-ion battery used to
power laptops, cellphones and tablet computers has improved in recent years. Battery
capacity has tripled since 1990, says K. M.
Abraham, a professor at Northeastern
University who researches batteries. But it’s
not nearly enough to keep up with the needs
of gadget addicts who demand thin, lightweight mobile devices and use them constantly.
Two billion mobile phones were shipped
worldwide in 2014, 75 percent of which were
smartphones, says the longtime technology
analyst and president of Creative Strategies,
Tim Bajarin. Demand is growing by 10 to 12
percent each year. And all those users want to
send email, play games and stream music and
videos — all battery hogs.
“We are reaching the limit of what a good
battery material can do,” Abraham says.
“Going beyond what we have now is taking a
new understanding of chemistry, material science ... People are working all over the world
on it, but there is nothing on the horizon.”

X GAMES’ GIRL WONDER: 14-YEAR-OLD SNOWBOARDER CHLOE KIM READY TO SOAR IN HALFPIPE >> PAGE 12

<<< Page 13, Steph Curry dethrones
King LeBron with most All-Star votes
Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

Gordon to retire after 2015
By Jenna Fryer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jeff Gordon, with a nagging back injury, a
young family he wanted to spend more time
with and a phenom waiting in the wings at
Hendrick Motorsports, knew midway
through last season that he had one more
year in him.
NASCAR’s most charismatic driver, the
man behind the wheel of the famed and sometimes feared No. 24, had decided it was time to
call it quits on one of the most successful
careers in motorsports history. The four-time
BRIAN BLANCO/REUTERS champion conferred with Rick Hendrick, the
NASCAR driver Jeff Gordon announced only team owner he has had over 23 years of
Thursday he will retire after the 2015 season. Sprint Cup racing, and settled on a date.

The 43-year-old Gordon announced
Thursday that 2015 will be his final season
as a full-time driver, saddening legions of
fans, fellow drivers and others who watched
him became the face of stock car racing as
the sport exploded in popularity a generation ago.
In an interview with The Associated Press,
Gordon said he reached his decision last
summer. He had seen other drivers embark
on distracting farewell tours, and he didn’t
want to be that guy. Although he told his
crew chief of his decision after narrowly
missing out on shot at a fifth championship, it took time to settle on the day to
tell the world.
It started with a conversation with his two

young children when they woke up for
school. They worried they won’t go to the
race track anymore, that other kids might
think of them differently if their father is
not a famous race car driver.
The conversation with Ella and Leo made
the decision a reality for Gordon — and he
wept.
“Ella just stared at me, she’d never seen
me cry like that before,” Gordon told AP.
“After that, I seriously broke down. It hit me
like a ton of bricks, and I got so emotional
and thought, ‘How am I going to get
through this day?”’
Gordon said he sobbed during the entire

See GORDON, Page 14

Serra football
banned from
CCS playoffs
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Half Moon Bay’s Khalil Droubi works an arm bar for an eventual pin of El Camino’s Tyler Mercado in the 140-pound division Thursday night
under the lights at El Camino. Half Moon Bay went on to score a 56-21 victory to improve to 2-0 in the PAL Bay Division.

Cougars take down Colts
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Two of the big three from the Peninsula
Athletic League Bay Division wrestling circuit clashed Thursday night as Half Moon
Bay scored a 56-21 win at El Camino.
The Cougars won 10 of the 14 individual
matches under El Camino’s newly added spotlight in the round, including eight by way of
pin. The Cougars’ Hugo Plancarte, Jim Alves,
Ricky Camacho, Marcos Sarabia and David
Corona strung together falls in each of the
final five matches to close out a dominant
Half Moon Bay performance.
The dual-meet win leaves Half Moon Bay
(2-0) in great shape in the PAL Bay Division.
With three matches remaining in the fivemeet league season, the toughest test remaining for the Cougars comes in their season

finale against Terra Nova — the other Bay
Division frontrunner — on Feb. 12.
“We thought it was going to be a lot closer,” Half Moon Bay head coach Tom Baker
said of Thursday’s meet. “We got a lot of
upsets tonight.”
The unexpected heroes got the five-match
winning streak started, with Half Moon Bay
moving two wrestlers up in weight class to
fill out its roster. Plancarte, a 160-pounder,
was reassigned to the 170-pound class. Alves
moved from 170-pounds to the 184-pound
class.
Then Camacho emerged in the 197-pound
match for the first varsity win of his career.
The freshman was promoted from the froshsoph ranks earlier this year and was defeated
in his varsity debut. Against El Camino’s
Bilguun Khishigbat, Camacho fell behind 40 early in the first round. But a quick reversal

changed the tide, as Camacho scored a quick
two points followed by a pin.
El Camino got solid performances from its
own individual big by Christian Diokno,
Roman Reich and Alec Goff. Aside from a win
by resignation in the 108-pound division to
open the meet, Diokno, Reich and Goff
accounted for the only El Camino victories of
the evening.
Diokno won a gritty match over Emilio
Bautista in the 126-pound class. The Colts
senior is the two-time defending PAL champion in the 115-pound class, and is currently
ranked third in the Central Coast Conference
and 23rd in the state for the 120-pound class.
He took first place in the 126-pound class
earlier this season in El Camino’s opening
tournament at Half Moon Bay.

See HMB, Page 14

Central Coast Section commissioner
Nancy Lazenby Blaser handed down her ruling Thursday for the Serra football team's
decision to withdraw from the CCS
OpenDivision consolation championship
game against Milpitas Dec. 5.
CCS did not give the Padres a slap on the
wrist.
A CCS press release said the Serra varsity
football will be banned from the CCS playoffs for the 2015 and 2016 seasons, all other
teams – at every level – will be on probation
through the end of the 2015-16 athletic season and the school will have to pay $6,000
in restitution for the canceled game.
“[Serra] knowingly decided to disregard its
commitment to complete scheduled competitions. … This decision caused Serra to violate
the bylaws of the [California Interscholastic
Federation] and the CCS Board of Managers
and its member schools,” Blaser said in a
release of a letter sent to Serra’s president,
principal and athletic director. “Allowing
school leaders to determine that it need not
continue with scheduled competitions when a
school decides that such a competition is not
important enough to play, undermines the
very foundation of an organization like the
CCS, formed by its member schools.”
CCS installed a consolation bracket to the
Open Division for the 2014 playoffs. Serra
lost 28-0 to Los Gatos in the first round. In all
other previous seasons, that would have been
the end of the season for the Padres, but the
addition of the consolation bracket meant the
possibility of playing two more games.
After beating Palma 28-14 in the first round of
the consolation bracket, coach Patrick Walsh
made the decision, with the backing of the

See CCS, Page 15

S.F. man close to running 7 marathons in 7 days on 7 continents
By Kristin J. Bender
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — A San Francisco man
is one race away from completing seven
marathons in seven days on seven continents.
Tim Durbin is the only American competing
in the World Marathon Challenge that started
last Saturday and ends in Sydney on Friday.
So far, the 31-year-old has run six
marathons, each 26.2 miles, through snow,
rain and jetlag in Antarctica, Chile, Miami,
Madrid, Morocco and Dubai.

“In the last 48 hours I’ve
slept less than 9 hours and
ran three marathons,” he
said in an email earlier this
week. He said most of his
sleep has been on the airplanes between cities with
a few hours spent in hotels
following the races. He did
have one full night of rest
Tim Durbin
after running in Chile and
before heading to Miami.
Durbin added that the biggest challenge has

been the quick turn-around times.
“Twice we have done two marathons in 24
hours. Sleep deprivation will likely be a factor
going forward,” he said.
So far, the Morocco marathon was the
toughest.
He started running in Marrakech less than 7
hours after he completed the race in Spain.
Durbin is averaging about 5 1/2 hours for
each 26.2-mile marathons.
The race in Morocco took nearly six hours.
Durbin spent roughly $37,000 to participate with 11 others, who are from Brazil,

India, Great Britain, Hong Kong, France,
Finland and Australia.
The World Marathon Challenge is part of a
bigger challenge that Durbin started two years
ago. In 2013, he started logging his miles for
walking, running, cross country skiing and
swimming in order to complete the distance
around the equator — 24,901 miles before
2022.
“I am just trying to prove to myself that an
average person can do what most others think
is impossible,” he said. “It’s a mental challenge as much as it is physical.”

12

SPORTS

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

Snowboarder Chloe Kim
ready to soar in halfpipe
By Pat Graham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASPEN, Colo. — One of the best snowboarders in the
world was too young to go to the Sochi Olympics a year
ago. So teenager Chloe Kim watched the halfpipe competition in the comfort of her living room while eating popcorn with her family.
She wouldn’t have had it any other way.
At 14 now, a year older and a year
wiser, she realizes that kind of pressure
and exposure may have been way too
much for her to handle.
“I’m glad I wasn’t able to go, to be
honest,” said Kim, who’s one of the
favorites Saturday in the halfpipe final at
the Winter X Games. “I just don’t think I
was ready.”
But she will be by the 2018
Chloe Kim
Pyeongchang Olympics in South Korea,
the country where her parents are from.
She’s actually ready to start dominating the scene now.
In between geometry homework, of course, and teaching
her 2-year-old parrot, Kiwi, how to talk (she proudly proclaims the bird can say, “Whatcha doing,” “Step up” and
“Tickle, tickle, tickle.”).
Kim in many ways is just your ordinary teenager. She
receives a $100 allowance a month from her parents, which
she blows on clothes, and gushes about her recent trip to a
local chocolate factory and making homemade fudge. She
also doesn’t particularly care for writing essays for her
ninth-grade English class at her school in Mammoth
Lakes, California.
Watch her drop into the halfpipe, though, and she’s far
from typical. She’s the snowboarder with the difficult
tricks, huge air and a smoothness that reminds many of
Kelly Clark, the most decorated female in X Games history.
Kim grew up idolizing Clark, even standing in long lines
just to get her autograph. Kim once rode up a chairlift with
Clark and was so mesmerized, she didn’t know what to say.
“All I could think was, ‘I’m going to get Kelly Clark
powers now,”’ Kim said, laughing.
Clark, a three-time Olympic medalist, is set to hand the
torch off to Kim. Not this year — she wants to defend her

See KIM, Page 14

Girls’ soccer

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Local sports briefs

Sacred Heart Prep 2, Menlo 0
Tierna Davidson continues to be a
force for the Gators.
Davidson scored both of Scared Heart
Prep’s goals in Thursday’s shutout of
rival Menlo. Her first score was from
15 yards out on an assist by Mia
Shenk. Her second goal was on a free
kick from 20 yards out.
Menlo had an opportunity to tie it
with SHP leading 1-0 when Cleo King
booted an attempt off the crossbar.
Knights goalkeeper Schuyler Tilney
Volk had seven saves.

Notre Dame-Belmont 4, Sequoia 0
The Tigers (6-5-1) cruised to nonleague shutout Thursday behind a
Jessica Parque hat trick. Luca Deza
scored the first goal for NDB in the
11th minute. Then Deza tabbed three
assists on Parque’s three goals; two
were tabbed in the first half and the
final in the second half.

WEDNESDAY

grabbed a team-high 10 rebounds.
With the win, Mills remains in the
thick of the PAL South Division race,
staying tied in the standings with
Burlingame. With the loss, Hillsdale
drops into a first-place tie with
Wednesday winners Capuchino and
Menlo-Atherton, all with 4-1 records
in league.

Capuchino 70, Sequoia 45
The Mustangs (4-1 in PAL South, 9-7
overall) cruised to a big victory after
opening up a 28-7 lead after the first
quarter. Three Cap players scored in
double-figures with sophomore Ani
Uikilifi pacing her team with 12
points. Brianna Deckman added 11
points and Xenia Collins had 10 points
and a team-high six rebounds.
With the win over the Cherokees (23, 5-12) the Mustangs move into a
three-way tie for first place in the PAL
South Division with Hillsdale and
Menlo-Atherton.

Mills 33, Hillsdale 29
It was the tale of two halves as the
Knights (4-1 in PAL South, 11-6 overall) suffered their first loss of the season in Peninsula Athletic League South
Division play.
The first half was a defensive battle
with the Vikings (3-2, 9-9) taking an
11-7 lead into halftime. Hillsdale went
scoreless in the second quarter. Then in
the second half, Mills held off an outburst by Hillsdale junior Emily
Nepomuceno, who scored a game-high
15 points. But the Vikings outscored
the Knights 14-11 in the third quarter
with the steady play of its starting five.
No Mills players scored in double-digits, but Julia Gibbs led a balanced
attack with eight points, Lauryn Shek
and Aubrie Businger had six points
apiece and Stephanie Mar and Ryzza
Sabado each scored five. Businger

The Scots led 30-25 heading into the
fourth quarter but the Panthers rallied to
outscore Carlmont 14-9 in the fourth.
With the win, Burlingame remains tied
with Mills, just one game back of the
three-way tie atop the division.

Menlo-Atherton 60, Aragon 55
The Bears (4-1, 9-7) relied on freshman center Greer Hoyem who netted a
game-high 16 points in the pivotal
win.
The Dons (3-3, 8-6) led 50-49 after
three quarter of play, but M-A rallied for
a big finish by winning the fourth quarter 12-5.
M-A forward Megan Sparrow tabbed
four 3-pointers in the game. Aragon
junior Briana Reynolds paced the Dons
with 13 points.
With the win, M-A moves into a threeway tie for first place in the PAL South
Division with Hillsdale and Capuchino.

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The Sharks (3-2 in PAL North, 11-3
overall) took a 28-18 lead into halftime
and held off the Colts in the second
half. A pair of juniors paced El Camino
in scoring with Monica Orosa tabbing
a team-high 14 points Rachelle
Ricasata scoring 13.
Westmoor (4-0, 9-5) remains alone
in first place in the North Division
after a 60-33 win over Terra Nova (4-1,
8-9) in a battle of unbeatens in league.
Oceana is tied with Half Moon Bay (32, 12-5) for third place in the division.

Boys’ soccer
Burlingame 1, Woodside 1
The Panthers bounced back with a
second-half goal after a first-half goal
by Woodside junior Will Jordan on an
assist from freshman Luis Mendoza.
The tie marks the first non-win of the
season for first-place Burlingame (3-01, 4-2-3) in Peninsula Athletic League
Bay Division play.

Menlo-Atherton 4, South City 1
Burlingame 58, Carlmont 51

Girls’ basketball

DR. ANDREW C. SOSS

Oceana 43, El Camino 40

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The Bears cruised to a big win to
remain in second place in the PAL Bay
Division. South City’s lone goal came
from senior Alexis Oliveras on an
assist from sophomore Rafael Vieyra in
the second half.

Aragon 3, Capuchino 1
The Dons (5-0 in PAL Ocean, 8-2-1
overall) remain unbeaten in Peninsula
Athletic League Ocean Division play
with a convincing win over Cap. The
Mustangs’ only goal came in the second half from junior Emanuel Tirado on
an assist from Sergio Diaz.
Aragon is currently all alone in first
place in the PAL Ocean.

Mills 1, Jefferson 0
The Vikings received a second-half
goal from senior Jun Jang on an assist
from sophomore Ulysses Gomez to
prevails at Jefferson.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

13

Curry tops in NBA All-Star votes Kobe Bryant has
By Brian Mahoney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pau and Marc Gasol have been voted the
first brothers to start in the NBA All-Star
game, while Toronto’s Kyle Lowry made a late
surge in fan balloting and will start for the
Eastern Conference.
Lowry passed Dwyane Wade and will start
alongside Washington’s John Wall, the first
time the East has had two first-time starters at
guard since 2000.
Golden State’s Stephen Curry made his own
late surge to pass LeBron James as the overall
leading vote-getter, the league announced
Thursday. Kobe Bryant was also voted to start
at West guard, though that’s in jeopardy
because of a torn right rotator cuff.
Pau Gasol of Chicago will start up front for
the East along with James and Carmelo
Anthony for the Feb. 15 game in New York.
Memphis’ Marc Gasol joins New Orleans’
Anthony Davis and the Clippers’ Blake
Griffin in the West frontcourt.
Tom and Dick Van Arsdale played in the
1970 and 1971 games, but the Gasols — once
traded for each other — are the first brothers to
chosen to start.
Both were among the leaders in all the balloting updates, but Lowry was running more
than 100,000 votes behind Wade, a perennial
All-Star and fan favorite, when the last results

Mexico to play exhibitions in U.S.
NEW YORK — Mexico will play a pair of
exhibition games in the U.S. in March.
El Tri will meet Ecuador at the Los Angeles
Coliseum in March 28, then play Paraguay
three days later at Arrowhead Stadium in
Kansas City, Missouri. The games are with-

were released. Fans rewarded him for his hardnosed play in leading the Raptors to a huge
lead in the Atlantic Division with his first AllStar appearance.
Wall earned his first last year, and now he’s
earned his first start. The East hasn’t had both
its guards making their first start since
Philadelphia’s Allen Iverson and Charlotte’s
Eddie Jordan in 2000.
Fans had to vote for two guards and three
frontcourt players. The reserves will be picked
by the head coaches in each conference and be
announced next Thursday.
The star of the NBA-leading Golden State
Warriors, Curry ended up with more than 1.5
million votes, more than 42,000 ahead of
James, who had a 13,285-vote lead over the
sharpshooter at the last update. Curry, who just
two years ago was an All-Star snub, becomes
the first Warriors player elected to consecutive
starts since Chris Mullin in 1991-92.
His partner in the backcourt is up in the air
after the Lakers revealed Bryant’s injury earlier Thursday. Though the severity of the injury
is unknown, many rotator cuff injuries require
surgery and several months of rehabilitation.
That could rule Bryant out of his 17th AllStar appearance, second all-time behind
Kareem Abdul Jabbar’s 19. Bryant’s first was
in 1998 at Madison Square Garden, cite of this
year’s game.
Commissioner Adam Silver would name an

Sports briefs
in the international fixture period on FIFA’s
calendar, which means most top players
should be available.
Mexico also is scheduled to play the U.S.
at San Antonio on April 15, which is not a
FIFA date.

torn rotator cuff
By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant tore his
right rotator cuff in the Los Angeles Lakers’
latest defeat, the club announced Thursday.
Bryant injured his right shoulder in the
second half of the Lakers’ loss at New
Orleans on Wednesday night when he drove
the baseline for a two-handed dunk.
An MRI exam Thursday in San Antonio
revealed the tear, and Bryant headed home to
Los Angeles while the Lakers prepared to
play the Spurs on Friday.
The Lakers declined to speculate on the
severity of the injury, but many rotator cuff
injuries require surgery and several months
of rehabilitation.
Bryant briefly returned to the game in
New Orleans and played essentially with
TROY TAORMINA/USA TODAY SPORTS one arm after the injury, making a 14-foot
Steph Curry made a late surge to surpass jumper with his left hand. He is a rightLeBron James as the NBA’s top vote-getter for handed shooter.
After the game, Bryant said it felt as if his
the 2014-14 All-Star game.
injury replacement if needed, and coaches shoulder “came out of joint a little bit” on
Steve Kerr (Golden State) of the West and the dunk.
“I felt fine when I went up, and didn’t feel
Mike Budenholzer (Atlanta) of the East would
determine who replaces an injured player in too good when I came down,” he said.
the lineup.
Bryant is the third-leading scorer in NBA
history, but he had played in just six games
Scimeca, Knierim win short program over the previous 18 months before this
season began after recovering from two
GREENSBORO, N.C. — Alexa Scimeca major leg injuries.
and Christopher Knierim lead the pairs comBryant has sat out eight games in the past
petition at the U. S. Figure Skating
month strictly to rest. Coach Byron Scott is
Championships after the short program.
They scored 74.01 points Thursday, a attempting to preserve his 36-year-old
record for the event, to lead Haven Denney superstar through the length of his contract,
which extends to next season.
and Brandon Frazier by 5.63.

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14

SPORTS

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

Bouchard, Berdych
reach 4th round at
Australian Open
By John Pye
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, Australia — Eugenie
Bouchard struggled through a scrappy opening set before getting on top in a 7-5, 6-0
third-round win over Carolina Garcia that
featured 10 breaks of serve on Friday at the
Australian Open.
In the earlier matches, Yanina Wickmayer
beat a seeded player for the second time in
three rounds with a 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 comeback
win over No. 14 Sara Errani.
Wickmayer, who took out No. 23
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova on the first day,
could face No. 3 and French Open finalist
Simona Halep in the next round.
No. 10 Ekaterina Makarova had a 6-4, 6-4
win over No. 22 Karolina Pliskova and No.
21 Peng Shuai beat Yaroslava Shvedova 7-6
(7), 6-3 to move into a possible fourthround showdown with No. 2 Maria
Sharapova, who was playing No. 31 Zarina
Diyas in a night match.
Seventh-seeded Tomas Berdych became
the first man to advance to the fourth round
when he beat Viktor Troicki 6-4, 6-3, 6-4,
and No. 10 Grigor Dimitrov had a tough
third-rounder against 2006 Australian Open
finalist Marcos Baghdatis before winning
4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3.
Berdych lost the 2010 Wimbledon final
and reached the semifinals here last year.

GORDON
Continued from page 11
30-minute drive to Hendrick Motorsports,
where he tearfully informed his team and his
longtime employees of his decision.
Gordon choked back tears yet again during
his interview with AP when his mother sent
him a text message that he read aloud: “I
never knew watching SportsCenter could be
so emotional.”
“I’m emotional because I am so proud,”
Gordon said. “It’s all I ever wanted, to be a
race car driver. And here I’ve lived this
incredible dream and yet that chapter of my
life has been fulfilled and it’s now time to
go to the next step and the next chapter.”
He made a point to say he didn’t use the
word “retirement” because he could still

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Half Moon Bay set the tone early by winning the first three contested matchups of the
night. EdRey Casmina scored a decisive 12-2
victory over Lemmy Boquiren in the 115pound class. Tristan Keller followed with a
victory in the 122-pound class by pinning
Javis Balestier on a keen reversal in the third
round. Will Fullerton made it three straight
for the Cougars in the 128-pound class with a
10-2 win over Evan Balestier.
The Cougars’ next two wins were perhaps
their most impressive because of their respective swiftness in response to El Camino
wins. After Diokno earned El Camino’s first
win on the mat, Half Moon Bay’s Khalil
Droubi earned a fast pin of Tyler Mercado on a
first-round arm bar in the 140-pound class.
Then after Reich’s win, Chase Lawson
responded with another quick victory for the
Cougars, pinning Omar Valdez in the first
round of the 154-pound match.
After Goff’s win, the Cougars didn’t drop
another match. Plancarte, Alves and

Camacho set the stage for the heavyweights.
Sarabia scored one of the most creative
falls of the night in the 220-pound match,
pinning Jerell Pelesauma by turning a singleleg takedown into a half nelson. In the final
match of the night, David Corona pinned
Malik Demartha in the 288-pound class.
Sarabia is a fourth-year senior who has
competed at the same 220-pound class since
he was a freshman. The added challenge for
maintaining his weight is he is also a twoway lineman with the Half Moon Bay football team, for which he carries 20 more
pounds than he does as a wrestler.
“This year was really tough because I
gained more muscle from football and has
less fat,” Sarabia said. “(After football season) I just didn’t eat much.”
For El Camino, next week is something of
a must-win. The Colts take on Terra Nova
under the lights at El Camino next Thursday
at 7 p.m.

crown yet again — but down the road.
“She’s one of most talented athletes I’ve
seen in a long time,” Clark said. “She’s
amazing now and she has tons of potential.
“In years to come, I’ll be able to look at
women’s snowboarding and know that not
only is it in good hands, but it’s in the
hands of someone I’m proud of.”
That’s a lot of pressure to live up to.
Although, Kim insisted she’s ready to take
it on. She’s older now — she will turn 15 in
April — and not that awe-struck 13-year-old

of last year, the one who finished second in
the halfpipe to become the youngest athlete
to earn a medal at Winter X.
Sure, there was a part of her that wanted to
go to Russia had age limits not been in
place. Not so much to compete, but to try
out that mushy halfpipe that led to a lessthan-stellar show in the mountains above
Sochi.
“Just to kind of explore how bad a halfpipe could actually get, because I guess
that’s how bad it was,” said Kim. “But
again, I was really glad I wasn’t able to go.”
Her competitors felt the same way.
Kaitlyn Farrington, who won Olympic gold
in Russia, jokes with Kim that it was a
“good thing you’re not old enough to go to
the Olympics, because it gives some of us

older ladies a chance.
“She’s just amazing,” added the 25-yearold Farrington, who recently retired from
snowboard competitions due to a degenerative spine condition. “Kelly is still pushing
the sport so much. But Chloe is going to
continue to fight after Kelly. It’s great to
watch Chloe. She’s progressing so much.”
Kim even has some new tricks she’s planning to unveil at Winter X. Any hints?
“Top secret,” she said. “You have to tune
in to find out. But they’re pretty cool.”
As for Pyeongchang, she’s already looking forward to it.
“The timing is perfect, since my parents
are from Korea and I’ll be 17,” Kim said.
“That’s (an age) when you’re full of energy.”

drive again after this season.
Gordon’s 92 wins trail only Hall of Fame
drivers Richard Petty (200) and David
Pearson (105). His fame reaches far beyond
the track and resonates with non-sports
fans. He won all the big races, collected four
championships in just seven years and had
58 victories before his 30th birthday.
He was a new breed of driver when he
broke into NASCAR’s top series, arriving
with a sprint car pedigree and talent that
made him an immediate contender. The
clean-cut kid helped raised NASCAR’s corporate image beyond its moonshine roots,
making it a legitimate power on Madison
Avenue as tens of thousands of new fans
flocked to automobile racing in the late
1990s and 2000s.
“Jeff changed the personality and perception of a race car driver in NASCAR,” retired
NASCAR crew chief Larry McReynolds
said. “Before he came along, the perception
was more about the good old Southeastern

boy wearing blue jeans, big belt buckles
and boots. But he created a new buzz in our
sport because he looked like he stepped off
the cover of a GQ magazine.”
Gordon became such a household name
that he even hosted “Saturday Night Live”
and was name-dropped in a Nelly song. He
did it all while dominating at the track as
the “Rainbow Warrior,” teaming with crew
chief Ray Evernham to collect checkered
flags at a record pace.
Gordon, who debuted in the final race of
the 1992 season in Atlanta, won championships in 1995, 1997, 1998 and 2001. He
also has three Daytona 500 victories and a
record five Brickyard 400 wins. Gordon told
AP that his 1994 win in the inaugural
Brickyard 400 — NASCAR’s first race at
historic Indianapolis Motor Speedway —
was easily the highlight of his career.
The low point? Intentionally wrecking
Clint Bowyer in the closing laps of the
2012 race at Phoenix, where frustrations

over a disappointing season got the best of
him. Gordon also said a post-race melee
with Brad Keselowski last November was in
part triggered by his knowledge that perhaps a shot at another championship had
slipped away. He was racing for the win
when contact with Keselowski effectively
ended his title chances. He wound up missing the four-driver championship field by a
single point.
Coming so close didn’t change his decision to drive only one more year, though.
With an ownership stake at Hendrick, and
plans to remain involved with the organization for years to come, Gordon told AP “the
timeline was just right.”
Gordon suffered serious issues years ago
in his back, specifically his lower spine,
and needed anti-inflammatory medication
and workouts with a trainer to return to full
strength. He drove in pain during a winless
2008 season and briefly contemplated
retirement.

Continued from page 11
Thursday Diokno matched up with an old
rival in Bautista to take an early lead on a
blast double-leg takedown before soldiering
to a 9-5 victory.
Two matches later in the 147-pound class,
Reich scored a pin over Brandon Guio on a
half nelson in the first round. Two matches
after that in the 162-pound class, Goff earned
a gritty win over Luis Vazquez by taking a 7-6
lead in the second round before winning via a
head-and-arm pin.
As El Camino head coach Ray Reyes was
quick to point out, however, it takes more
than three standouts to win a dual meet.
“It’s always the other group that wins a dual
meet,” Reyes said.

KIM
Continued from page 12

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

15

Former Rabobank cycling doctor banned for life for doping
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Former
Rabobank cycling team doctor Geert Leinders
was banned for life on Thursday for multiple
doping violations during his time with the
Dutch squad.
The Belgian was punished for violations
committed while he was working with
Rabobank from 1996 to 2009, before he
joined Team Sky.
The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency announced
that a three-member American Arbitration
Association panel found Leinders “possessed,
trafficked, and administered banned performance-enhancing substances and methods
without any legitimate medical need ... to athletes under his care, and was complicit in
other anti-doping rule violations.”
USADA, which worked on the case with

WHAT’S ON TAP
FRIDAY
Boys’ soccer
King’s Academy at Sacred Heart Prep, 2:45 p.m.;
Hillsdale at San Mateo,Westmoor at Mills, Half Moon
Bay at El Camino, 3 p.m.; Menlo School at Crystal
Spring, 3:30 p.m.; Capuchino at Terra Nova, Aragon
at Jefferson, Carlmont at South City, Sequoia at
Woodside, Menlo-Atherton at Burlingame, 4 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Castilleja at Sacred Heart Prep, Pinewood at Menlo
School, 6 p.m.; Sequoia at Carlmont, Menlo-Atherton at Woodside, Hillsdale at Aragon, San Mateo
at Burlingame, Mills at Capuchino, Westmoor at
Jefferson, Half Moon Bay at Terra Nova, El Camino
at South City, 6:15 p.m.; Notre Dame-Belmont at
Sacred Heart Cathedral, 7:30 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
Crystal Springs at Menlo School, Pinewood at Sacred Heart Prep, 7:30 p.m.; Sequoia at Carlmont,
Menlo-Atherton at Woodside, Hillsdale at Aragon,
San Mateo at Burlingame, Mills at Capuchino,Westmoor at Jefferson, Half Moon Bay at Terra Nova, El
Camino at South City, 7:45 p.m.
Men’s college basketball
Foothill at Skyline, Canada at San Francisco, 7 p.m.
Women’s college basketball
San Mateo at San Francisco, 5 p.m.; San Jose at Skyline, 5:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
Boys’ basketball
Eastside Prep at Alma Heights, 1 p.m.; Crystal
Springs at Lick-Wilmerding, 3:30 p.m.; Bellarmine at
Serra, 6:30 p.m.
Boys’ soccer
Serra at Mitty, 2:30 p.m.
Girls’ soccer
Mitty at Notre Dame-Belmont, 2:30 p.m.

anti-doping authorities in Denmark and the
Netherlands, said Leinders was involved in
doping with EPO, blood transfusions, testosterone, insulin, DHEA, corticosteroids, and
other substances.
“It shocks the conscious that a board member and team doctor would abuse his trusted
position by overseeing and participating in
this type of dangerous and fraudulent activity,” USADA CEO Travis Tygart said.
The case was based on evidence discovered
by USADA in 2012 during its investigation of
doping in cycling that led to the demise of
Lance Armstrong.
USADA said Leinders was sanctioned after a
hearing that included presentation of “eyewitness testimony, corroborating documentation, and an expert analysis of abnormal
blood values of cyclists.”
Leinders was hired by Sky in 2011 and 2012

CCS

NBA GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
27
Brooklyn
18
Boston
14
Philadelphia
8
New York
7
Southeast Division
Atlanta
35
Washington
29
Miami
18
Charlotte
18
Orlando
15
Central Division
Chicago
28
Cleveland
23
Milwaukee
21
Detroit
17
Indiana
15

L
15
25
26
34
36

Pct
.643
.419
.350
.190
.163

GB

9 1/2
12
19
20 1/2

8
14
24
25
30

.814
.674
.429
.419
.333


6
16 1/2
17
21

16
20
21
26
29

.636
.535
.500
.395
.341


4 1/2
6
10 1/2
13

Pct
.714
.698
.674
.614
.500

GB

1/2
1 1/2
4
9

.705
.524
.429
.349
.171


8
12
15 1/2
22 1/2

.850
.674
.591
.381
.279


6 1/2
10
19
23 1/2

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Memphis
30
12
Dallas
30
13
Houston
29
14
San Antonio
27
17
New Orleans
21
21
Northwest Division
Portland
31
13
Oklahoma City
22
20
Denver
18
24
Utah
15
28
Minnesota
7
34
Pacific Division
Warriors
34
6
L.A. Clippers
29
14
Phoenix
26
18
Sacramento
16
26
L.A. Lakers
12
31

Thursday’s Games
Chicago 104, San Antonio 81
Utah 101, Milwaukee 99
Boston 90, Portland 89
L.A. Clippers 123, Brooklyn 84
Friday’s Games
Toronto at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m.
Orlando at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 5 p.m.
New Orleans at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Houston at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Boston at Denver, 6 p.m.
Sacramento at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

on a freelance basis but has left the team.
In 2007, Rabobank removed Danish rider
Michael Rasmussen from the Tour de France
while he was leading the race after he repeatedly declined to explain why he missed
three doping tests ahead of the event. He
was subsequently given a two-year ban and
later admitted he took banned drugs for more
than a decade.
Rasmussen’s cooperation and testimony in
the investigation of Leinders were “integral to
the outcome,” said the head of the Danish
anti-doping agency, Lone Hansen.
The reformed doper also implicated the
former chief of the UCI medical commission Mario Zorzoli, accusing the doctor of
protecting potential cheats, and encouraging doping.
According to the USADA document,
Rasmussen testified that on the first rest day

Continued from page 11
school administration, to abandon the
consolation final against Milpitas,
knowing full well the school would
face sanctions from CCS.
Walsh told the Daily Journal in
December that he had wrestled with
the decision since the consolation
bracket was enacted for the 2015
season. He cited player’s health as
the main reason for not wanting to
play, as the Padres had a number of
starters injured and others who had
turned in their gear following the
first-round loss to Los Gatos.
He said he held a meeting with the
team captains following the win over
Palma and they were willing to play
Milpitas so as not to jeopardize future
seasons. Walsh ultimately decided he

of the 2005 Tour de France, his team was
approached by the UCI because a test showed
a very low reticulate count suggesting blood
transfusions. Leinders met with Zorzoli, then
told the rider that he should not worry and was
“the most protected rider in the race.”
Rasmussen added that according to
Leinders, either in 2004 or 2005, Zorzoli
advised the Rabobank doctor to give his riders
the banned hormone DHEA because “all the
other teams were doing it as well.”
Zorzoli is still serving as a doctor and a scientific adviser for cycling’s governing body.
The UCI said in a statement it is aware of
the accusations against Zorzoli and “is now
waiting to receive the full file to look closely into these allegations, and whilst this
investigation is taking place, Dr. Zorzoli
will not be involved in any matters relating
to anti-doping.”

was not willing to risk having any
player on either team getting injured.
“I’ve struggled with it since the
time it (the consolation bracket) was
announced. … It didn’t make sense to
me,” Walsh said in a Dec. 10 interview
with the Daily Journal. “That night
(before the game) at 4 in the morning,
my only goal was to make sure no one
got hurt. If that’s your goal, that game
should not be played.”
That reasoning didn’t fly with
Blaser who said in the release that
Serra admitted it would have continued playing if there was more
than fifth place at stake.
“If Serra was concerned with the
playoff format and had safety concerns based on its team composition, it should not have agreed to
enter the playoffs, thereby excluding another team desiring to participate,” Blaser said in the release.
Serra, which has shared the past two
West Catholic Athletic League titles
and captured the 2013 CCS Open

Division crown, will also have to pay
the money lost by its forfeit. CCS calculated the amount of money missed
from game admissions, lost concessions, event expenses and officials
fees to arrive at a $6,000 figure.
The commissioner also recommends downgrading Serra’s standing in CCS, from that of “member
in good standing” to “probationary
membership.” That will be determined at a Jan. 28 meeting.
“While I take no enjoyment from
handing down these sanctions, it is
the duty of the Commissioner to
uphold the integrity of interscholastic athletics and the bylaws as enacted by the CCS member schools,”
Blaser said in the release. “Today’s
announcement is a reminder that our
member schools establish our rules
and agree to follow them in order to
protect the integrity of high school
athletics in our section.”
Serra will have an opportunity to
appeal this ruling.

‘Boy Next Door’ too predictable
Jennifer Lopez: ‘The artist
in me wants more freedom’
By Alicia Rancilio

to the 2000 Golden Globe
Awards to the nude sequined
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
bodysuit she wore to perform
NEW YORK — Jennifer at the 2011 American Music
Lopez turns heads with her Awards.
wardrobe choices, from the Lopez pulled from her closgreen Versace gown she wore
See LOPEZ, Page 18

By Sheri Linden
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — No good
adulterous affair goes unpunished in Hollywood movies.
The latest proof is J.Lo starrer
“The Boy Next Door,” a gender-reversing B-movie spin on
“Fatal Attraction” that sets
suburban
family
values
against that one night of misguided, irresistible passion.
An economically told popcorn

pic built from horror-movie
tropes, the film stars Jennifer
Lopez and Ryan Guzman as,
respectively, the world’s most
glamorous high school teacher
and its oldest 19-year-old.
As counterprogramming to
awards-focused prestige titles,
it offers January moviegoers
some guilty-pleasure thrills
and laughs, while falling way
short of its potential on both
See BOY, Page 18

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

17

MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

THE REMARKABLE JOURNEY OF A PRINCE AND
AN ARTIST: EARLY VIEWS OF THE AMERICAN
WEST AT JOSLYN ART MUSEUM IN OMAHA,
NEBRASKA. From 1832 to 1834, the explorer and naturalist Prince Alexander Philipp Maximilian of WiedNeuwied, Germany, embarked on a 2,500-mile journey into
the American Interior, generally following the path of the
Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806). Maximilian was
accompanied by the Swiss artist Karl Bodmer, whom the
prince had hired to record the cities, rivers and people along
the way. Maximilian and Bodmer left St. Louis and went by
steamship and keelboat up the Missouri River, traveling as
far as Fort McKenzie, Montana. Among the hundreds of
images Bodmer created were remarkable likenesses of Native
Americans, which memorialized not just their culture and
artifacts, including clothing and weapons, but their individual personalities and life stories.
One notable portrait is that of Mató-Tópe (Four Bears),
painted at Fort Clark, North Dakota, during the winter of
1833-34. Mató-Tópe was a highly respected military and
religious leader among the Mandan. Bodmer shows the chief
formally attired in a shirt of bighorn sheepskin elaborately
trimmed with ermine tails, locks of hair and strips of quillwork outlined in beads. Mató-Tópe’s headdress, with its
long trailer of eagle feathers, is thought to signify the combined battle coups of a war party or men’s warrior society.
The lance in his right hand was said to have been used to kill
an Arikara who had murdered his brother, its shaft afterward
decorated with the enemy’s scalp stretched on a hoop.
The prince and the artist spent over a year among the
tribes of the Upper Missouri, recording the Mandan, the
Hidatsa, the Sioux and the Blackfoot. Years after the conclusion of their expedition, many of Bodmer’s works were
adapted as hand-colored engravings to illustrate
Maximilian’s 1840 book entitled Maximilian Prince of
Wied’s Travels in the Interior of North America, which documented the Native peoples, natural history and fur trade of
the High Plains. Bodmer’s watercolors became the first truly
accurate portrayals of the far western Indians to reach general public view and to depict dramatic landscapes that were
still unfamiliar to audiences in the eastern United States and
Europe.
Today, Maximilian’s journals and 350 of Bodmer’s watercolors and drawings are highlights of Joslyn Art Museum in

Omaha. Toby Jurovics, Joslyn Art Museum’s Chief Curator
and Holland Curator of American Western Art, said: “Joslyn
Art Museum is renowned for its comprehensive holdings of
work by the Swiss artist Karl Bodmer, whose watercolors and
prints document his 1832-1834 journey along the Missouri
River frontier with the German naturalist Prince Maximilian
of Wied-Neuwied. The Maximilian/Bodmer Collection,
which also contains the prince’s illustrated journals, is
notable not only for Bodmer’s artistic achievement, but as
an invaluable historic record of the American West at a pivotal historical moment. His watercolors capture the dramatic topography of the Missouri River, focusing on the landscape from Nebraska to present-day Montana, as well as
offering a first-hand account of the American Indian tribes
that lived on the High Plains.”
A WIFE’S TRIBUTE TO A HUSBAND CREATES A
MASTERPIECE OF ART DECO. Married in 1874, New
Englanders George and Sarah Joslyn came to Omaha in 1880
when George Joslyn took a job with a newspaper company.
Throughout their long marriage the couple gave generously
to Omaha’s civic institutions and after her husband’s death
Mrs. Joslyn built Joslyn Art Museum in his memory. The
museum, which opened on Nov. 29, 1931, is a jewel of Art
Deco design, with a three-level interior decorated with 38
different kinds of marble from around the world. Its dramatic
exterior walls are finished in Georgia Pink (Ethowa Fleuri)
marble. Native American themes are expressed throughout
and Moravian floor tiles in the Storz Fountain Court include
symbols for literature, music, architecture and painting.
MUSEUM PARTICULARS. Joslyn Art Museum is
located at 2200 Dodge St. Omaha. The North American
Journals of Prince Maximilian of Wied — Volume 1: May
1832-April 1833; Volume 2: April-September 1833; and
Volume 3: September 1833-August 1834 are available in
Joslyn Art Museum’s Hitchcock Museum Shop for $85 per
volume. The Journals are edited by Stephen S. Witte and
Marsha V. Gallagher. Volumes 1 and 2 are translated by
William J. Orr, Paul Schach and Dieter Karch with forewords
by John Wilson. Volume 3 is translated by Dieter Karch with
a foreword by Joslyn’s Executive Director and CEO Jack
Becker. For more information visit www.joslyn.org or call
(402) 342-3300. Admission is free. The museum is located
within miles of the route followed by Prince Maximilian and
Karl Bodmer.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com or
www.twitter.com/susancityscene.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSLYN ART MUSEUM

Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Neb., is home to the largest
known collection of Swiss artist Karl Bodmer’s watercolors,
drawings and prints. From 1832 through 1834, Bodmer
accompanied German explorer Prince Maximilian zu WiedNeuwied on a 2,500-mile expedition from St. Louis into the
High Plains of the Dakotas and Montana. Among the pieces
in the Joslyn collection is Bodmer’s 1834 watercolor on paper
portrait of Mandan Chief Mató-Tópe (Four Bears).

18

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

BOY
Continued from page 16
the dramatic and the camp fronts. Still, given
the star power and the lurid material, the wide
release is sure to score at the box office.
Set in an unidentified section of Southern
California, the movie finds literature teacher
Claire Peterson (Lopez) separated from her
husband for almost a year but not quite ready
to move on, however much her best
friend/sassy vice principal (Kristin
Chenoweth) urges her to do so. Played with
typical nice-guy earnestness by John
Corbett, repentant cheating husband Garrett
is eager for a second chance with Claire.
Soon enough, somebody else wants a second
chance with her too — but he’s not asking.
Before he reveals his predatory stripes,
Noah (Guzman, of the series “Pretty Little

LOPEZ
Continued from page 16
et for the new movie “The Boy Next

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Liars” and the “Step Up” franchise) arrives
on the scene as a fix-it hero of a new neighbor, offering such incontestable wisdom as
“It’s the clutch.” Nobody (other than the
audience) pays much attention to the unlikely high-school senior’s murmured references
to dead parents and an accident.
Transferring his know-how from the driveway to the bedroom, Noah gives Claire a
night to remember. Her quickness, the morning after, to label their steamy get-together
as a mistake proves a major mistake in itself
when dealing with Noah, who invests a
whole lotta menace in the supposed compliment, “A woman like you should be cherished.” Have more threatening words ever
been spoken?
Her instant guilt coupled with his instant
wacko routine deprives the film of any real
sense of naughty indulgence, not to mention
nuance. But director Rob Cohen avoids sexscene clichés and gives the encounter, and
much of what follows, energy. Once Claire

distances herself, it’s “game on” for studly
and strategic Noah, whose first step is to
take Claire’s good-natured but timid teenage
son, Kevin (well played by Ian Nelson),
under his wing and poison him against his
father.
Noah quickly turns into a one-note character — the note being “pathological.” In
Lopez’s rootable portrayal, Claire is far
more complex: conflicted about her marriage, capable of walking out on a disastrous
blind date and alive to the possibilities that
her handsome young neighbor initially represents, especially when viewed late at night
across their rain-streaked bedroom windows.
The screenplay by prosecutor-turnedscreenwriter Barbara Curry lays out some
heavy-handed background to explain Noah’s
derangements and fixations, but everything
gives way to full-tilt lunacy, leading to an
inevitable showdown complete with don’tgo-into-the-basement suspense, flat-out torture and implausible heroics.

Though the script settles into ordinary
thriller territory way too soon, Cohen (“The
Fast and the Furious,” ‘’Alex Cross”) doesn’t
belabor things, delivering a concise and
good-looking genre piece and making the
most of a microbudget ($4 million). In the
earthy interiors of Claire’s home, Charles
Varga’s production design accentuates her
maternal warmth. The excellent score by
Rand Edelman and Nathan Barr ratchets up
the dread.
If only that high-tension music played
against less obvious action and dialogue.
Everything is signaled clearly in “Boy”: A
gun appears early in the story, as does a
kitchen knife, pointing to dire circumstances ahead. But at least as disappointing
as the film’s predictability is the way the
cheesy, giddy double entendres of its early
scenes give way, all too readily, to the business of protecting professional reputations
and the sanctity of the nuclear family — not
half as much fun.

Door, ” which opens Friday. She was an
executive producer of the film, which was
made for less than $4 million.
“Wardrobe can get really expensive, ”
she explained in a recent interview. “With
this movie, we didn’t have that luxury. It
was about, ‘Who is Claire? What’s the
p al et t e? We’l l us e my
j ean s , my s h o es , my
sweaters. ’ A lot of things
were mine. ”
Lo p ez p l ay s Cl ai re, a
recently separated teacher
wi t h a t een ag e s o n wh o
shares a steamy night with
a 1 9 -y ear-o l d n ei g h b o r
(played by Ryan Guzman),
who then turns 50 shades of
crazy.
“The artist in me wants
more freedom to do more

things as far as stories and movies and
acting, ” she said. “It’s about finding
avenues and ways to do that instead of
waiting for people to hire me. (To) know
that I can do different kinds of movies.
Any kind I want. Put my name on the line,
do it for free and say, ‘Yeah, I believe in
this. ’ I like the idea. It’s very empowering to me that that’s a possibility. ”
Co-star Kristen Chenoweth said recently that she marveled at Lopez’s work
ethic and feels she’s “a kindred spirit. ”
“I cannot believe the type A, perfectionist, professionalism that that woman
carries. It’s something that I try to have
and it’s something I admire in women.
She’s a strong woman, ” Chenoweth said.
Lopez made sure to weigh in on the
film’s big sex scene.
“There’s power in preparation and so
the more I knew each and every shot that

(director Rob Cohen) was doing, I could
feel confident in what I was doing, ” she
said. “I was like, ‘I don’t want to do this
and I don’t want to do this. I feel comfortable with this. I don’t feel comfortable
with that. ’”
Speaking up and saying no is something she’s learned over time, said Lopez,
a mother of 6-year-old twins, Max and
Emme, with ex-husband Marc Anthony.
“There were times I hit the wall early on
and you go, ‘OK I can’t do that. ’ You don’t
k n o w y o u h av e l i mi t s wh en y o u’re
young. Then you reach the limit and you
go, ‘Oh, I can’t do that. And next time I
won’t. ’ Then when you have kids it’s
another reality check. I have to be the
best for them. You go, ‘I can’t do this, I
can’t do that. No. The answer is no.
That’s too much in one day. Take that out.
Move that. ’”

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Playwright puts new
twist on ‘Eurydice’
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Playwright Sarah Ruhl gives the
classic story of Orpheus and Eurydice a
new interpretation in “Eurydice,” presented by Palo Alto Players.
Rather than focus on musician
Orpheus’ efforts to retrieve his
deceased wife, Eurydice, from the
underworld, Ruhl makes Eurydice the
center of attention.
In Ruhl’s version, Eurydice (Sarah
Moser) reunites with her father (Scott
Solomon), who has been trying to
contact her. Father is a character
invented by Ruhl.
Orpheus (Wes Gabrillo) goes to the
underworld to bring his wife back.
However, the Nasty Interesting
Man/Child
(Evan
Michael
Schumacher), who rules there, tells
him she will follow him back to the
upper world, but if he looks back,
she’ll die again.
Director Jeffrey Lo has assembled a
solid cast, which also includes
Maureen O’Neill, Monica Ho and
Monica Cappuccini as the Chorus of
Stones in the underworld.
He al s o h as a g o o d des i g n t eam
wi t h t h e s et b y J an n y Co t é, l i g h t i n g b y Ni ck Kumamo t o , co s t umes
b y Tan y a Fi n k el s t ei n an d s o un d

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

People in the news
Paula Abdul, Jason Derulo
to judge Fox’s dance contest
LOS ANGELES — Paula Abdul is getting back into the
judging business on Fox.
The former “American Idol” judge will join the “So You
Think You Can Dance” panel when the talent show returns
this summer.
Jason Derulo also is coming aboard as a judge, the network said Thursday. The singer-songwriter’s hits include
“Talk Dirty” and “Wiggle.”
Returning judge Nigel Lythgoe, who’s also the show’s
executive producer, said the 12th season will include a twist:
Stage dancers will compete against street dancers.
Cat Deeley will be back as host, Fox said. Auditions for
the new season begin Saturday in New York.

Prince Andrew denies claims
he had sex with underage girl
DAVOS, Switzerland — Britain’s Prince Andrew on
Thursday publicly denied for the first time allegations that
he had sex with an underage teenager.
The 54-year-old royal, Queen Elizabeth II’s second son
and fifth in line to the British throne, has faced increasing
pressure to respond to the accusations after the woman,
identified only as Jane Doe No. 3 in court papers, named
him in documents filed with a Florida court.

JOYCE GOLDSCHMID

From left, Sarah Moser, Wes Gabrilloand Scott Solomon star in ‘Eurydice.’
b y J eff Graft o n .
However, neither strong acting nor
first-rate designs can overcome the
production’s slow pace and the plot’s
lack of compelling interest, thus making the 90 minutes without intermission seem much longer.
It’s a disappointment after Ruhl’s

more successful plays, such as “Dear
Elizabeth,” “Dead Man’s Cell Phone”
and “The Clean House.”
“Eurydice” will continue through
Feb. 1 at the Lucie Stern Theater, 1305
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. For tickets and information call (650) 3298583 or visit www.paplayers.org.

LUNCH * DINNER * WKND BREAKFAST

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19

20

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

WEEKEND JOURNAL

COUNT

Calendar

Continued from page 1
experience” for the former sheriff.
“There are many more homeless people than one would imagine. I want to
advocate for resources for appropriate
housing for people who are down on
their luck,” Horsley wrote in the statement.
Horsley was part of a team that included Dr. Loc Nguyen, the director of children and family services for San Mateo
County. They specifically looked at
wooded areas near the Sharp Park Archery
Range and the ridge along Skyline
College overlooking Pacifica.
The last time a count was conducted, in
2013, San Mateo County's homeless
population had increased to 2,281, up
slightly from 2,149 in 2011, said Effie
Verducci, spokeswoman for the county’s
Human Services Agency.
The homeless population had
increased significantly since 2009, however, when there were just 1,796 homeless people living in San Mateo County.

GYPSY
Continued from page 1
a month later in February 1976.
The FBI named Halbower a person of
interest in September after DNA linked
him to the crimes. The suspect allegedly
raped both women before killing them.
San Mateo County District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe said Halbower is being
charged for the murders “we can prove.”
He is also a suspect in three other murders that occurred in north San Mateo
County in early 1976.
Wagstaffe praised the value of DNA in
solving the cold case murders.
“Fear was prevalent throughout the
county,” Wagstaffe said about the string
of murders. Wagstaffe was an intern in
the District Attorney’s Office when the
murders occurred and described the case

FARM HILL
Continued from page 1
and gets backed up in the mornings and
afternoons when school starts and lets
out, he said.
“It’s going to be a nightmare,” said
Tyson, who sent the council a letter urging it not to pursue the pilot project.
“By implementing such a ridiculous
proposal as outlined this would create
many other problems,” Tyson wrote the
council.
He contends the plan will increase
traffic and pollution and also cause
many motorists to resort to using side
streets to avoid congestion.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

FRIDAY, JAN. 23
Age Well Drive Smart Seminar.
9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Twin Pines
Community Center, 20 Twin Pines
Lane, Belmont. RSVP at 363-4572.
Space is limited.
Preschool Story Time. 10:30 a.m. to
11 a.m. Belmont Library. For more
information
contact
belmont@smcl.org.
Russian Immersion Story Time.
11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Belmont
Library. Ideal for toddlers. For more
information
contact
belmont@smcl.org.
Health and Wellness at the
Library: Lunchtime Tai Chi. Noon.
South San Francisco Public Library,
840 W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. Open to all. For more
information contact Anissa Malady
at ssfpladm@plsinfo.org.

Janice Carter, San Mateo County Human Services Agency’s Homeless One Day
Count project manager, tallied seven homeless people at the Menlo Park Caltrain
Station Thursday morning.
The results of Thursday’s count will not
be immediately available, Verducci said.
First, the data will have to analyzed and

verified after the count. The final report
typically gets published in May, she
said.

as “near and dear to
me personally.”
Three
other
women were also
killed in the county
in similar fashions
that year including
Carol Lee Booth,
26, Denise Lampe,
19,
and Tanya
Paula Baxter Blackwell, 14.
Blackwell’s body
was discovered months after her disappearance in January off Gypsy Hill Road
in Pacifica.
Halbower is also a suspect in the murder of a young woman in 1976 in Reno,
Nevada.
He was serving time in Oregon for
kidnapping and attempting to kill a
woman there.
He faces life in prison if found guilty
of the murders with the special circumstance of murder during the course of a

rape.
He
was
arraigned Thursday.
The San Mateo
County
Sheriff’s
Office’s crime lab
and Washoe County,
Nevada, crime lab,
with the assistance
of the Oregon State
Police,
linked
Veronica Cascio Halbower’s DNA to
the deaths during an
examination of DNA profiles of cold
cases.
The investigation continues into
whether Halbower is responsible for the
other murders, according to the Sheriff’s
Office.
“These cases are never closed,”
Wagstaffe said at a Thursday press conference alongside Sheriff Greg Munks,
Pacifica police Chief Joe Spanheimer
and FBI Special Agent in Charge David
Johnson.

Farm Hill Boulevard and Jefferson
Avenue have a long history of concerns
by residents, according to the city,
including:
• Speeding and drag racing;
• Difficulty exiting driveways and side
streets;
• No dedicated space for people riding
bikes;
• Parked cars being sideswiped;
• Safety of children walking to
school;
• Unsafe driving around Stulsaft park;
and
• Difficulty crossing the street.
The pilot program is just that, however, and can be modified after time, said
Redwood City spokeswoman Meghan
Horrigan.
The council can review down the road

whether the lane reduction is the best
way to solve resident concerns about the
road, she said.
The pilot design maintains some
existing features to minimize additional
delays for drivers, according to the city,
including:
• Both travel lanes on the upper part
of Farm Hill, going toward Cañada
College and Interstate 280, remain the
same to keep cars from being trapped
behind slower moving vehicles such as
SamTrans buses;
• All travel lanes remain at the intersection with Emerald Hill to maintain
the existing capacity.
The City Council meets 7 p.m.,
Monday, Jan. 26, City Hall, 1017
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.

Coffee with Kevin. Noon to 2 p.m.
Philz Coffee, 2248 Westborough
Blvd., South San Francisco. Join
Assemblyman Kevin Mullin for a cup
of coffee and share your thoughts
on legislative issues. For more information call 349-2200.
Science Club. 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Belmont Library. For more information contact belmont@smcl.org.
Winter Tween Evening. 5 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. San Mateo Public Library,
Oak Room, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Fun winter tween crafts and
activities like mug making and team
trivia for tweens in fifth-, sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade. Sign up in
the children’s room. Food will be
provided. For more information call
522-7838.
Dragon Theatre’s 15th Season to
Open with a Greek Classic. 8 p.m.
Dragon Productions Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. $22 for
general admission. For tickets and
info visit dragonproductions.net.
SATURDAY, JAN. 24
Java with Jerry Hill. 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Antigua Coffee Shop, 437A Grand
Ave., South San Franciscio. Coffee
will be provided; drop by for a brief
chat. No appointment or RSVP is
necessary. For more information call
the District Office at 212-3313.
Orchid Show and Sale. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. 1400 Roosevelt Ave., Redwood
City. $5 general admission, $3 for
seniors, free or children under 12
who are with an adult.
World Chess Champion and
Grandmaster
Susan
Polgar
Lecture
and
Free
Chess
Tournament. 10
a.m.
Park
Elementary, 161 Clark Drive, San
Mateo. For more information call
Steve Stacy at (510) 337-6406.
Ukulele Story Time. 10:30 a.m. to 11
a.m. Belmont Library. For more information contact belmont@smcl.org.
Imagination Playground. 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. Belmont Library. For more
information
contact
belmont@smcl.org.
Tom Chapman: ‘From Professional
Jockey to Full Time Artist.’ 1 p.m.
San Mateo County History Museum,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free
with the price of admission ($6 for
adults, $4 for seniors and students).
For more information call 299-0104.
Mel-Mel’s Lucky Birthday Noodles
Book Reading. 1 p.m. Reach and
Teach, 144 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo.
Free. For more information contact
craig@reachandteach.com.

City. $5 general admission, $3 for
seniors, free or children under 12
who are with an adult.
St. Pius School Open House. 10:30
a.m. to noon. St. Pius School, 1100
Woodside Road, Redwood City. Visit
the Science Fair, tour the classrooms
and learn about the curriculum and
student life. For more information
visit stpiusschool.org or call 3688327.
Shan Shan Sheng Exhibit opens.
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peninsula Museum
of Art, 1777 California Drive,
Burlingame. Runs until April 5.
St. Dunstan Catholic School —
Open House and Tour. 11 a.m. 1150
Magnolia St., Millbrae. For more
information call 697-8119.
The Sea Level Rise Scene. 11:30
a.m. Unitarian Universalists of San
Mateo, 300 E. Santa Inez Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 342-5946.
‘Peter Pan Jr.’ 1 p.m. Mustang Hall,
828 Chestnut St., San Carlos. Tickets
can be purchased online at
www.SanCarlosChildrensTheater.co
m.
Sunday Line Dance. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road. $5.
Poetry Cafe and Cookies. 2 p.m.
Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Children
may read their original poems and
share cookies. For more information
and to sign up visit burlingame.libcal.com/event.php?id=870397.
Dragon Theatre’s 15th Season to
Open with a Greek Classic. 2 p.m.
Dragon Productions Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. $22 for
general admission. For tickets and
info visit dragonproductions.net.
The Crestmont Conservatory of
Music — Student Recitals. 2 p.m.
and 3:30 p.m. 2575 Flores St., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 574-4633.
Walk Together: Benefit Concert. 3
p.m. Eastside College Preparatory
School, 1041 Myrtle St., East Palo
Alto. A musical tribute to Martin
Luther King Jr. Tickets $20 and $5
seniors and students. For more information email gandolfi@aol.com. For
tickets go to http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/864620.
Winter Concert. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Belmont Library. For more information contact belmont@smcl.org.
Live Concert Series — Seasons of
Blessing. 4 p.m. Our Redeemer’s
Lutheran Church, 609 Southwood
Drive (corner of Southwood and El
Camino Real), South San Francisco.
Featuring Musicians Doug Adamz
and Steve Eulberg. No cost to attend.
A Freewill offering will be received
to benefit Community Lunch and
Community Garden. RSVP to 4018064 ext. 100 to save your seat
The Woody Herman Orchestra
directed by Frank Tiberi. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Performing Arts Center at
Menlo-Atherton High School, 555
Middlefield
Road,
Atherton.
Orchestra will perform its ‘Ultimate
Tribute Concert’ to Dr. Herb
Wong. Tickets $40 general, $35 PAJA
members, $15 students. For more
info, call 345-9543 or email harvey.mittler@gmail.com.

Walk Together: Benefit Concert. 3
p.m. Eastside College Preparatory
School, 1041 Myrtle St., East Palo
Alto. A musical tribute to Martin
Luther King Jr. Tickets $20 and $5
seniors and students. For more information email gandolfi@aol.com. For
tickets go to http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/864620.

MONDAY JAN. 26
Peninsula Quilters Guild ‘Quilt-AThon’ Donations. Midnight to 8 a.m.
Runs through Jan. 26. Tax deductible
donation helps support the guild
and its charity outreach programs.
Quilts go to the neonatal unit at
Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital.
Send flat rate donations or hourly
sponsorships to Peninsula Quilters
Guild P.O. Box 2423 Redwood City.
For more information visit peninsulaquilters.org.

‘Peter Pan Jr.’ 7 p.m. Mustang Hall,
828 Chestnut St., San Carlos. Tickets
can be purchased online at
www.SanCarlosChildrensTheater.co
m.

Baby Sign Language Class. 10:30
a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Belmont Library.
Ages newborn to 18 months. For
more information contact belmont@smcl.org.

Dragon Theatre’s 15th Season to
Open with a Greek Classic. 8 p.m.
Dragon Productions Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. $22 for
general admission. For tickets and
info visit dragonproductions.net.

Senior Health Talk. Noon to 1 p.m.
Belmont Library. Refreshments will
be provided. For more information
contact belmont@smcl.org.

SUNDAY, JAN. 25
Peninsula Quilters Guild ‘Quilt-AThon’ Donations. 8 a.m. to 8 a.m.
Runs through Jan. 26. Tax deductible
donation helps support the guild
and its charity outreach programs.
Quilts go to the neonatal unit at
Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital.
Send flat rate donations or hourly
sponsorships to Peninsula Quilters
Guild P.O. Box 2423 Redwood City.
For more information visit peninsulaquilters.org.
Orchid Show and Sale. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. 1400 Roosevelt Ave., Redwood

Mentoring Mothers Support
Group. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. MillsPeninsula Medical Center Family
Birth Center Conference Room,
Second floor, 1501 Trousdale Drive,
Burlingame. Focuses on perinatal
emotional health. Free. Group meets
every Monday. For more information
visit emergencementalhealth.com.
Political Issues Book Club. 2:30
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. San Carlos Library,
610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free. For
more information call 591-0341 ext.
237.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT®

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

21

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Swallow hard
5 Volcanic dust
8 Indent key
11 Hunter constellation
13 Moo goo — pan
14 Miscellany
15 Relieve
16 Kind of penguin
18 Attired
20 Practical joke
21 Impromptu (2 wds.)
23 Time period
24 Zuider —
25 Gists
27 Osiris’ beloved
31 Sooner than
32 ER “pronto”
33 Sundance Kid’s girl
34 Dainty drinks
36 Makes do with
38 Ugh!
39 Exam
40 Scallion kin
41 Amigo of Fidel

GET FUZZY®

42
44
46
49
50
52
56
57
58
59
60
61

Mr. Orbison
Dirty
Faint
— of Wight
Concert soloist
Work with dough
Heating fuel
Refinery shipment
Rathskeller mug
TV Tarzan
— de plume
Ginger ale

DOWN
1 — — few rounds
2 Home page addr.
3 Mae West role
4 Fish without a license
5 Made mellow
6 Pianist at Rick’s
7 River horse, briefly
8 Fictional plantation
9 Unknown auth.
10 Kennel noise
12 Hose

17
19
21
22
23
24
26
28
29
30
35
37
43
45
46
47
48
49
51
53
54
55

“Sesame Street” name
Keenly
Hawk’s refuge
Ocean areas
Regards highly
Tangy taste
Kind of sale
Hockey need
Restless
Wine served warm
Leather for honing
Lurks
Hamburger extra
Pennies
Pump, e.g.
Go like a siren
Air France destination
Big-ticket —
B’way posting of yore
Fair-hiring letters
Pitch in
Spiral molecule

1-23-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 2015
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Confidence and
tenacity will lead to achievement. A romantic
encounter will not be as straightforward as you
hope. Honesty is essential if you are looking for a
partnership to go the distance.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You’ll have trouble
analyzing a situation if you don’t get all the facts
and figures. Don’t rely on hearsay or speculation,
and don’t make assumptions.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — If you are able to help
someone out, it will end up benefi ting you as well.
Do whatever possible to form a close bond with

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

friends as well as colleagues.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Financial or health
concerns will cause some diffi culties if you haven’t
been diligent in the way you handle such matters.
Review your personal paperwork and make the
necessary adjustments.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You will be able to
outmaneuver the competition if you multitask and are
determined. Any challenge you take on will contribute
to your advancement. Do whatever it takes.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You will be acclaimed
for choosing a unique approach to reach your goal.
A collaborative effort will be successful once you
take control and lead the way.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Building partnerships with

1-23-15

Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

clients who live in your community will be as fruitful as
doing business with someone far away. The time saved
networking locally will also save money.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Your reputation will be
questioned if you exaggerate or embellish what you
have to offer. If you want to be treated as a contender,
present a realistic view of your skills and mindset.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — All eyes will be on
you. Favorable attention will help you achieve
what you have been working toward. Collaborative
ventures will pay off. Set aside some time to
celebrate with someone special.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — You won’t have a lot of
time to make a critical decision. Close family members
or the people you live with will be hard to get along

with. Spend time with a sympathetic friend.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — A trip will
bring surprising and beneficial results. You will
be better off if you distance yourself from anyone
harboring unpredictable emotions that could lead
to a heated confrontation.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Avoid anyone trying
to push you against your will. You will be intrigued
by something that will prove to be a viable venture.
Check out potential ways to profit from your interests.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

22

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED
PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO ABOVE IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS
DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR.
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 03/30/2007. UNLESS
YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.
Trustor: Ella Marie Cotton, An Unmarried Woman
Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC
Recorded 4/05/2007 as Instrument No.2007-051724 in book ---, page --- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Mateo County, California.
Date of Sale: 02/13/2015 at 12:30 PM
Place of Sale: AT THE MARSHALL STREET ENTRANCE TO THE HALL OF JUSTICE AND RECORDS, 400 COUNTY CENTER, REDWOOD CITY, CA
Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $953,414.11
WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S
CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A
STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR
SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE:
All right, title, and interest conveyed and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as
Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it
is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt.
More fully described in said Deed of Trust
Street Address or other common designation of real property: 314 East Santa Inez
Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94401
A.P.N.: 032-211-030
The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above.
The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the
note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the
obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is:
$953,414.11.
If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's
sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and
the successful bidder shall have no further recourse.
The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a
written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located.
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property
lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction.
You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the
property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior
lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title
to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of
outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender
may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be
postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information
about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a
courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date
has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call (866) 960-8299, visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices/Sales.aspx using
the file number assigned to this case 2013-04227-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale
may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web
site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.
Date: 12/19/2014
Western Progressive, LLC , as Trustee
C/o 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450
Irvine, CA 92606
Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299
http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.asp
x
For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 240-3530
THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION
WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE
(Published 01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15)

104 Training

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000

CASHIER - PT/FT, Will Train! Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
HOTEL -

NOW HIRING
• Housekeepers PT / FT
• Front desk PT / FT / Temp
Los Prados Hotel
2940 S. Norfolk St.
San Mateo
(650)341-3300

Customer Service
Are you…..Dependable, friendly,
detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English
skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: 650-342-6978

GREAT OPPORTUNITY
Carpet Cleaner
$17 - $20 per hour starting
20 - 40 hours per week
Call (650)773-4117
NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

JOB FAIR
COMPANY
– LSG Sky Chefs
LOCATION
BURLINGAME, CA
POSITION TYPE
FULL TIME
JOB FAIR ON FRIDAY JANUARY 23, 2015
10:00 am to 4:00 pm
868 Cowan Road - Burlingame, CA

NOW HIRING!
DRIVERS - CLASS A and B
DRIVER HELPER
COOK - HALAL & ARABIC FOODS
COOK – PRODUCTION
ASSEMBLY - BEVERAGE & EQUIPMENT
FOOD PREPARER
UTILITY WORKER
Contact Info: Phone: 650-259-3100 Fax: 650-692-2318
Email: linda.perryment@lsgskychefs.com

110 Employment

110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

RESTAURANT Drivers
and
Prep
Cooks–
Burlingame/SSF Catering Co. filling positions immediately. FT, M-F, Days, Drivers need clean DMV.
Joe 650 692-2711/fax 692-3354

THE DAILY JOURNAL
110 Employment

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015
203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263539
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Reflections, 205 Collins
Ave, DALY CITY, CA 94014. Registered
Owner: Apollo Fund I, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Theresa Hart /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 1/06/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/29/15, 01/30/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263473
The following person is doing business
as:Give Thanks Raw, 972 15th Ave,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered
Owner:Julia Beal, same address. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Julia Beal/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263494
The following person is doing business
as: EEG Patterns, 157 Elm Street Apt
306, SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered Owner: Deepthi Duddempudi,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/05/15
/s/ Deepthi Duddempudi /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/05/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/29/15, 01/30/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263233
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Bakers in the City, 2) Love Bug
Bites, 3936 Beresford St., SAN MATEO,
CA 94403. Registered Owner: Glenda
Smith, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Glenda Smith /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/9/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/29/15, 01/30/15).

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263415
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Move Better Now, 2) Move Better
Pilates, 3-West 37th Ave, Suite 23, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner:
Olga Lubarsky, 1308 North Rd, Belmont
CA 94002. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Olga Lubarsky /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/29/14. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/29/15, 01/30/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-263534
The following person is doing business
as: Edelman Interiors, 1328 Bernal Ave
BURLINGAME, CA 94010. Registered
Owner: Eliza Edelman, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 01/01/15
/s/ Eliza Edelman /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/06/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/29/15, 01/30/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263327
The following person is doing business
as: Bella Look, 944 10th Ave, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered
Owner: Lila Vasquez, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Lila Vasquez /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/16/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/29/15, 01/30/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263552
The following person is doing business
as: Rendezvous Solutions, 4000 Marshall Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94403.
Registered Owner: Ankur Shukla, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Ankur Shukla /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/07/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/29/15, 01/30/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-263409
The following person is doing business
as: New Revival Ministries, 150 Harrison
Ave #2A, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061.
Registered Owner: Jeovanny Escobar,
1312 Maple St, San Mateo CA 94402.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 12/10/14
/s/ Jeovanny Escobar /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/26/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/14/15, 01/21/15, 01/28/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263627
The following person is doing business
as:Thrift City Furniture, 45 West 43rd
Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner: Albert Campoy, 1921 W
San Carlos St., San Jose, CA 95128.
The business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Albert Campoy/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED
PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO ABOVE IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS
DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR.
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/23/2005. UNLESS
YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.
Trustor: Jeffrey L. Varnell, A SINGLE MAN.
Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC
Recorded 12/30/2005 as Instrument No.2005-227129 in book ---, page --- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Mateo County, California.
Date of Sale: 02/23/2015 at 12:30 PM
Place of Sale: AT THE MARSHALL STREET ENTRANCE TO THE HALL OF JUSTICE AND RECORDS, 400 COUNTY CENTER, REDWOOD CITY, CA
Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,309,116.62
WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S
CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A
STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR
SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE:
All right, title, and interest conveyed and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as
Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it
is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt.
More fully described in said Deed of Trust
Street Address or other common designation of real property: : 3747 Hamilton Way,
Redwood City, CA 94062-3406
A.P.N.: 057-234-030
The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above.
The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the
note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the
obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is:
$1,309,116.62.
If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's
sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and
the successful bidder shall have no further recourse.
The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a
written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located.
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property
lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction.
You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the
property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior
lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title
to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of
outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender
may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be
postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information
about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a
courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date
has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call (866) 960-8299, visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices/Sales.aspx using
the file number assigned to this case 2014-04539-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale
may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web
site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.
Date: January 8, 2015
Western Progressive, LLC , as Trustee
C/o 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450
Irvine, CA 92606
Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299
http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.asp
x
For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 240-3530
THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION
WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE
(Published 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263402
The following person is doing business
as:SS Strategic Consulting, 1324 El Camino Real #1, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. Registered Owner: Shahida Subedar, same address. The business is
conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 11/26/2014.
/s/ Shahida Subedar/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/23/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263644
The following person is doing business
as:Zirelli Baseball, 3272 Brittan Ave,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered
Owner: Michael Gary Zirelli, same address. The business is conducted by an
individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Michael Gary Zirelli/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/15/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263649
The following person is doing business
as:Old County Deli, 1331 Old County
Rd, BELMONT, CA 94002. Registered
Owner: Huda Sami Judeh, 1000 Continentals Way, Belmont, CA 94002. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Huda Sami Judeh /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/15/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263404
The following person is doing business
as Pinky Nails, 1664 Palm Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402. Registered Owner:
Thuy Nguyen, same address. The business is conducted by an individual. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Thuy Nguyen/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/24/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263561
The following person is doing business
as Frontier Coffee Roasting Company,
2040 Spyglass Dr, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066. Registered Owner: Tyler Toy,
same address. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Tyler Toy /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 1/8/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

23

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

Books

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263686
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Organized by Christine 2) Hillsborough Professional Organizer 3)San Mateo Professional Organizer 4) Room
Configurations, 58 E. Poplar Ave., #9,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner: Organized by Christine, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by an Limited
Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/05/2015
/s/ Christine Sato/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/20/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/13/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263600
The following person is doing business
as: Serrano’s Gardening Service, ,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
Registered Owner: Monica Serrrano,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Monica Serrrano /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/12/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/13/15).

16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263717
The following person is doing business
as: Sutterfield Consignment, 1174
Broadway, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
Registered Owner: Greg Holtmann, 469
Clementina St. #18, San Francisco, CA
94103. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2015
/s/ Greg Holtmann/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/13/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263720
The following person is doing business
as: Neuroimaging, 35 Bay View Drive,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered
Owner: Neuroimaging LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Max Wintermark /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/13/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263734
The following person is doing business
as: Shama Thai Massage, 1100 Howard
Ave, Suite B, BURLINGAME, CA 94010
Registered owners: Shama Thai Massage, CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Scott Selig /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/30/15).

210 Lost & Found
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT (415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST CELL PHONE Metro PCS Samsung. Light pink cover, sentimental value. Lost in Millbrae on 9/30/14 Reward
offered. Angela (415)420-6606

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

$12.,

JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
NASCAR BOOKS - 1998 - 2007 Annuals, 50th anniversary, and more. $75.
(650)345-9595

295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166

296 Appliances
CHAMPION JUICER, very good, coral
color $25. Phone 650-345-7352
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208
FRIDGE, MINI, unopened, plugs, cord,
can use for warmer also $40, (650) 5789208
FRUIT PRESS, unopened, sturdy, make
baby food, ricer, fruit sauces, $20.00,
(650) 578 9208
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR(415)346-6038

$40.,

WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER. Almost
new. located coastside. $75 650-8676042.

297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hardly Used $80 (650)293-7313

298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1980 SYLVANIA 24" console television
operational with floor cabinet in excellent
condition. FREE. (650) 676-0974.
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345
NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260
OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260
RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

24

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015
298 Collectibles

302 Antiques

303 Electronics

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

310 Misc. For Sale

TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good condition, $10. each, (650)571-5899

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

WESTINGHOUSE 28" flat screen TV
LCD with Remote. works perfect, little
used. $99. 6503477211.

EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

PATTERN- MAKING KIT with 5 curved
plastic rulers. $60. Call 574-3229 after
10 am.

299 Computers

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

FADED GOLD antique framed mirror,
25in x 33in— $15 Cell number:
(650)580-6324

WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and
foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

PROCRASTINATION CURE - 6 audiocassette course by Nightingale- Conant.
$30. Call 574-3229 after 10 am

FREE GENTLY used full-sized blue
couch, you take away! Contact 650391-9299.

306 Housewares

STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167

DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

300 Toys
$25 OBO. Star Wars, new Battle Droid
figures, all four variations.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30.
(650)622-6695

TABLE, OLD ENGLISH draw-leaf, barley twist legs, 36” square. $350
(650)574-7387
VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35. (650)558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329

302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
73 HAPPY Meal toys. 1990's vintage, in
the
original
unopened
packages.
$60.(650)596-0513
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $60. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE MAYTAG Ringer type Washing Machine, (1930-35 era) $85.
650-583-7505
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

WESTINGHOUSE 32” Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available **SOLD**

304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l

Very

BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD and VHS Flat Screen Remote 06
$40: (650)580-6324

CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549

BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATER, surround sound system. Harman Kardon amplifier tuner and
6 speakers, NEW. $400/obo. Call
(650)345-5502
INFINITY FLOOR speakers ( a pair) in
good condition $ 60. (650)756-9516. Daly City.
JVC DVD Player and video cassette recorder. NEW. *SOLD!*
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
TUNER AMPS, 3, Technics SA-GX100,
Quadraflex 767, Pioneer VSX-3300. All
for $99. (650)591-8062

CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

made in Spain

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER, OLD four drawer, painted
wod cottage pine chest of drawers. Solid
and tight. Carved wood handles. 40”
wide x 35.5” high x 17.5” deep. $65. Call
or text (207)329-2853. San Carlos.
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169
ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021
EXECUTIVE DESK 60”, cherry wood,
excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 “Mad Men”
productions
4 Bark elicitor
9 Lax
13 Force (open)
14 Close-fitting
dress
15 Powerful dept.?
16 Striking painting
of paddles, net
and ball?
19 Uber
20 Facebook button
21 Truncation abbr.
22 Austin of “Knot’s
Landing”
23 Extraordinary
northern bird?
26 Statistician’s
challenge
28 Plot component
29 “__ thoughts?”
30 Reasonable
32 Purim heroine
34 Mythological
figure who
touched 16-, 23-,
46- and 55Across?
36 Available
39 Anthony Hopkins’
“Thor” role
40 Channel for old
films
43 Noodle
44 “I’m not
kidding!”
46 Alaskan insects?
51 Chief Justice
Warren
52 Subjects of some
conspiracy
theories
53 Specks on cartes
54 Enthralled
55 Overdevelop a
high plain?
60 It may be
cautionary
61 “I shall be late!”
speaker of fiction
62 Letter director
63 Narrow opening
64 Indo-__
languages
65 Nixon has two
DOWN
1 Angry Birds, e.g.
2 “Happy Days”
setting

47 Help
35 “Cool, man!”
3 Cooperative
48 Uber
36 Things
action
49 “The View” alum
4 “Dexter” airer, for 37 __ color
Joy
38 Fictional pilot with
short
50 Milk carton words
the iconic line,
5 Write
54 Snitch
“Laugh it up,
6 Scout rank
56 18th Amendment
fuzzball”
7 Top story
opposer
8 Uniform material 40 Circus staple
57 Cops’ org.
41 Sun block
9 Sprinkling on
58 Harvard grad
42 “The Producers”
French fries?
Jeremy who’s
screenwriter
10 Free sample
now a Laker
Brooks
limitation
59 Rises
45 Milk dispenser
11 Top story
12 Cab driver?
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
14 One of a pair of
Mad adversaries
17 Off the __
18 Arthur of “The
Golden Girls”
22 Sched.
uncertainty
23 Witness __
24 Sharp feeling
25 Rowing
beneficiaries, for
short
27 Z-zebra link
31 Dashboard
Confessional’s
genre
32 Changes, in a
way
33 Without
01/23/15
34 Rosebud’s owner xwordeditor@aol.com

GRACO 40" x28" x 28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.
INTAGE ART-DECO style wood chair,
carved back & legs, tapestry seat, $50.
650-861-0088.
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LEATHER couch, about 6ft long— dark
brown $45 Cell number: (650)580-6324
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429

COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30 OBO
(650) 995-0012
NEW PORTABLE electric fan wind machine, round, adjustable— $15
Cell phone: (650)580-6324
ROTISSERIE ELECTRIC machine. Never been used $100 (650)678-5133
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

307 Jewelry & Clothing
AMETHYST RING Matching earings in
14k gold setting. $165. (650)200-9730

308 Tools

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208

311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR nylon string excellent condition w/case $95. (650)5765026
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
ROLAND GW-7 Workstation/Keyboard,
with expression pedal, sustain pedal, and
owner’s manual. $500. (415)706-6216

OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
OVAL LIVING room cocktail table. Wood
with glass 48x28x18. Retail $250.
$75 OBO (650)343-4461

BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269

WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001

CIRCULAR SAW heavy duty" Craftman"
new in box $45.00- D.C. (650)992-4544

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO SET for sale, glass table and six
chairs $100 for the set. (650)678-5133
PATIO TABLE 5’x5’ round, Redwood,
rollers, 2 benches, good solid
condition $30 San Bruno (650)588-1946
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
SINGLE BED with 3 drawer wood
frame,exc condition $99. 650-756-9516
Daly City.
SOLD WOOD TV Tables, set of 4 + rack,
perfect cond $29 650-595-3933
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516
TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141
TABLE, WHITE, sturdy wood, tile top,
35" square. $35. (650)861-0088

CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer. Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 10" one horse power motor saw. Cast iron top. $99. (650) 3455224 before 8:00 p.m.
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373

312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM WITH oak stand: Blue
background show tank. 36"x16.75"x10".
$50, good condition. (650) 692-5568.
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084

CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large, Excellent
Condition, $275 (650)245-4084

CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

PET FURNITURE covers. 1 standard
couch 2 lounge chairs. Like new $70
OBO (650)343-4461

DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
NEW FOLDING Hand Truck, 100 lb capacity, compact. lite, $29, 650-595-3933

315 Wanted to Buy
WE BUY

TOOL BOX Set"Snap-On"on rollers19
drawers 34x56 ex/con.$700.00 (650)9924544

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057

WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

316 Clothes

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

310 Misc. For Sale

ALPINESTAR JEANS Tags Attached
Twin Stitched Knee Protection Never
used Blue/Grey Sz34 $65 (650)357-7484

TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505
UPHOLSTERED SIDE office chairs (2).
3ft X 2ft, $85 each, (650)212-7151
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent condition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE CABINETS (2) - each has a
drawer & 1 door with 2 shelves.
36x21x18. $25 each. (650)867-3257

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058

01/23/15

BOXED RED & gold lg serving bowl
18inches - $65 (650) 741-9060 SB

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

7.5 GALLON compressor, air regulator,
pressure gauge, .5 horse power. $75.
(650) 345-5224 before 8:00 p.m

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

By Sam Buchbinder
(c)2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

8 SKEWERS, unopened, for fondue,
roasting marshmallows, or fruit, ($7.00)
(650) 578 9208

10 VIDEOTAPES(3 unused) - $3
each/$20 all. Call 574-3229 after 10 am.
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484
NEW MEN'S Wristwatch sweep second
hand, +3 dials, $29 650-595-3933

KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037

PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl, like new
$40 obo (650)349-6059

LIGHT GREEN Barbar Chair, with foot
rest good condition $80 Call Anita
(650)303-8390

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10 "x
10", cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229

VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SEWING MACHINE Kenmore, blonde
cabinet, $25 (650)355-2167

317 Building Materials
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955

THE DAILY JOURNAL
317 Building Materials

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015
379 Open Houses

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $69
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

318 Sports Equipment
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
CASINO CHIP Display. Frame and ready
to hang, $99.00 or best offer.
650.315.3240

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

GERMAN ARMY Helmet WW2, 4 motorbike DOT $59 650-595-3933

440 Apartments

IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270

BELMONT – 1 BR, 2 BR, and 3BR
apartments No Smoking No Pets
(650)591-4046

NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
NORDIC TRACK AEROBIC EXERCISER -$45. (650)630-2329
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

SKI EQUIPMENT PACKAGE $35. Skis,
poles, boots, jacket. Youth or petite
woman, 4'8"-5'3". (650)630-2329
TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
TWO SOCCER balls -- $10.00 each
(hardly used) (650)341-5347

470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos

$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax

TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933

Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

Mention Daily Journal

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

322 Garage Sales

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

325 Estate Sales

ESTATE
SALE
201 Palm Ave
Millbrae
FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY
Jan 23 &
Jan 24
10am-4pm
www.allstarliquidation.com

335 Rugs
AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505

340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598

345 Medical Equipment
INVACARE ADJUSTABLE hospital bed,
good condition. $500. (415)516-4964
PETERMANN BATTERY operated chair
bath lift. Stainless steele frame. Accepts
up to 350 lbs. Easily inserted in/out of
tub. $250 OBO. (650) 739-6489.
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
(650)670-2888

(650) 593-3136

620 Automobiles
'06 MERCEDES AMG CL-63.. slate
gray, great condition, 1 owner, complete
dealer maintenance records available.
8,000 miles of factory warranty left. car
can be seen in Fremont...Best offer. Call
(408)888-9171
or
email:
nakad30970@aol.com
‘08 BMW 528i, beige, great condition,
complete dealer maintenance. Car can
be seen in Foster City. (650)349-6969
1978 CLASSIC Mercedes Benz, 240D,
136k miles, 2nd owner, all scheduled
maintenance & records available. Good
condition. All original. Always garaged.
New tires. 4 speed manual. Runs &
drives great. Sunroof. Clean interior.
Good leather and carpets. AM/FM radio.
$4500. Call (650)375-1929

Cabinetry

Concrete

650 RVs

670 Auto Parts

2006 CADILLAC Brake rotors, 4 available, $15 each (650)340-1225
2006 CADILLAC CTS-V Factory service
manuals, volumes 1 thru 3, $100
(650)340-1225
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
BORLA CAT-BACK exhaust system, ‘92
to ‘96 Corvette LT-1, $600/obo.
olivermp2@gmail.com, (650)333-4949
CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912

t
Free showroom
design consultation & quote
t
BELOW HOME
DEPOT PRICES
t
PLEASE VISIT

HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947

SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

Gardening

TIRES 4 plus one spare. Finned rims,
165 SR15 four hole. $150 obo.
(650)922-0139

BRENT LANDSCAPING
Garden and Landscape
Maintenance

TONNEAU COVER Brand new factory,
hard, folding, vinyl. Fits 2014 Sierra 6.6
$475 (650)515-5379

• Bi-monthly and Monthly
• Reliable and punctual

680 Autos Wanted

(650)288-8663

Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

CA LIC# 959138

CALL NOW FOR
SPRING LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Sprinklers and irrigation
Lawn Aeration
Pressure washing, rock gardens,
and lots more!
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Concrete

from Karl Rothe

Removal of poison oak
and berry bushes
(650)307-4695

(650)533-0187

Celebrating 50 years
in the gardening business

Lic# 947476

Rambo
Concrete
Works

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

90 MASERATI, 2 Door hard top and convertible. New paint Runs good. $4500
(650)245-4084

ROSE PRUNING

Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto

625 Classic Cars

Flooring

Flamingo’s Flooring

by Greenstarr
www.greenstarr.net

t Walkways
t Driveways
t 1BUJPT
t $PMPSFE
t "HHSFHBUF
t #MPDL 8BMMT
t 3FUBJOJOH XBMMT
t 4UBNQFE $PODSFUF
t 0SOBNFOUBM DPODSFUF
t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM

Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
License # 752250

Since 1985

SHOP
AT HOME

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
1964 HARLEY DAVIDSON FHL Panhead (motor only) 84 stoker. Complete
rebuild. Many new parts.Never run. Call
for details. $6,000. Jim (650) 293-7568
1966 CHEVELLE 396 motor. Standardbore block. Standard domed pistons,
rods, crank cam only. 360 HP, code
T0228EJ $600, (650)293-7568

650-655-6600

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands!

Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING & WINDOWS
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business
Lic#1211534

630 Trucks & SUV’s

DODGE ‘89 AIRES Only 44,300 miles! 4
cylinder auto, very good condition, runs
fine. Only $2,000. Broken hip ends driving. (650)591-8062

Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

(650)278-0157

Gutters

DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,999 /OBO (650)364-1374

635 Vans

650-322-9288

ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!

MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
for all your electrical needs

RADIAL TIRE Hankook 235/75/15 NEVER USED, retail $125.00 yours for ONLY $75.00 650-799-0303

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

HONDA ‘96 LX SD all power, complete,
runs. $3,700 OBO, (650)481-5296 - Joe
Fusilier

Electricians

Construction

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296

(650)248-4205

650-294-3360

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

Licensed-Bonded

or call

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

BMW ‘06 525, silver, fully loaded, 130K
miles, excellent condition. $10,900.
Clean title, smogged. (650)342-6342

Small jobs only
Local references
Free Estimates
30 years in Business

bestbuycabinets.com

Cleaning

Drywall
DRYWALL /
PLASTER / STUCCO
Patching w/
Texture Matching
Invisible Repair

COLEMAN LARAMIE
pop-up camper, Excellent Condition,
$2,250. Call (415)515-6072

1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many
heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449

G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.

25

O.K.’S RAINGUTTER

ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY

(650)556-9780
OSCAR
GUTTER CLEANING

Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

• Gutters & Downspout Repair
• Roofing Repair
• Screening & Seeling

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

(650)669-1453

Free Estimates
Lic# 910421

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

Gutters

Hauling

Landscaping

Plumbing

ROLANDO’S
GUTTER CLEANING
My specialty is power
washing and rain gutter
cleaning. Call me at
(650) 283-9449

CHAINEY HAULING

GET YOUR LAWN
READY FOR SPRING

ECONOMY PLUMBING
Fast Free Estimate
24 Hour Emergency Service
Ask About
$48.88 Drain & Sewer
Cleaning Special
(650)731-0510

Handy Help
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES
• Fences • Decks
• Concrete Work • Pebbles
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling

Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

(650)296-0568

FRANK’S HAULING
Junk and Debris
Furniture, bushes,
concrete and more
FREE ESTIMATES
(650)361-8773

Free Estimates
Lic.#834170

Call us for our spring yard
maintenance special and get
your home looking beautiful!
Sprinklers, Irrigation, Rock
Gardens and Lawn Aeration!

Tree Service

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

Moving
BAY AREA
RELOCATION SERVICES

(650)630-0424

Service
• Trimming

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

• Large

Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

Free
Estimates

Lic. #479564

(650)341-7482

ROOFING
Dry Rot, Gutters & Down Spout Repair

• Granite Install • Kitchens
• Decks
• Bathrooms
• Tile Repair
• Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces

(650) 367-8795
&

– SERVING THE PENINSULA –

by Greenstarr

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635

FULLY INSURED / LICENSED & BONDED

Call Joe

A+ BBB Rating

TAPIA

Family business, serving the
Peninsula for over 30 years

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

Free Estimates

Mention

Roofing

(415)971-8763

The Village
Handyman

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975

(650)740-8602

$40 & UP
HAUL

Pruning

Lic #514269

Lic.# 891766

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

• Shaping

(650)368-8861

Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small

AAA RATED!

Notices

LOCALLY OWNED

PAINTING

HONEST HANDYMAN

Hauling

CLEANING

Family Owned Since 2000

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

Lic# 979435

Since 1985

Hillside Tree

License 619908

(650)701-6072

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Licensed Bonded and Insured

Fully Lic & Bonded Cal-T190632

GUTTER

www.greenstarr.net
www.yardboss.net

License # 752250

JON LA MOTTE

Electrical and
General home repair
(650)341-0100
(408)761-0071

Yardby Greenstarr
Boss

Tom 650.834.2365

Specializing In:
Homes, Apts, Storages
Professional, Friendly, Careful
Peninsula Personal mover

Painting

HANDYMAN

Window Washing

LICENSE # 729271

TAPIAROOFING.NET

Tile

CUBIAS TILE

Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates

(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492

Chris’s Hauling
• Yard clean up - attic,
basement
• Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
• Demolition
• Concrete removal
• Excavation
• Swimming pool removal

Tom 650.834.2365
Chris 415.999.1223
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
License # 752250

Since 1985

STAFFORD PAINTING
Interior / Exterior
Residential / Commercial
“A Professional Licensed
Contractor”
36 years experience

(650) 692-2647
CA Lic #692520

Featuring Scandinavian & American Classics
Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Every Day

With respect to tradition, a penchant for excellence and the conviction to try new

Danish Pancakes pancakes with lingonberry jam

techniques and ingredients, Scandia transforms Scandinavian cuisine with extraordinary care.

Hot Reuben Sandwiches from house-made sauerkraut

For lunch we serve Scandinavian classics such as Frikadeller, Gravlax and Herring.

Prime Rib served every night

For dinner our entrees include five choices of our popular soups or our house salad.

Frikadeller (Danish Meatballs) with red cabbage,

The dining room is modern with artwork that will remind you of Europe and enhances
your dining experience.

mashed potatoes & choice of soup or salad

In the Bar you can savor a variety of Scandinavian tastes and wine tailored to your
selections ideal for a date, casual meeting or an after-work gatherings.

Monday thru Friday  BN UP  QNt 5IFO  QN UP  QN
Saturday & Sunday  BN UP  QN t 5IFO  QN 5P  QN

742 Polhemus Road, San Mateo (Hi 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit Near Crystal Springs Shopping Center) (650) 372-0888

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

Attorneys

Food

Furniture

Health & Medical

Law Office of Jason Honaker

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F

Bedroom Express

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE

Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

www.steelheadbrewery.com

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

RENDEZ VOUS
CAFE
Tea, espresso, Duvel, Ballast
Point Sculpin and other beers
today

106 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR

Lunch• Dinner• Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit

(650)372-0888

RUSSO DENTAL CARE

Financial

Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

RETIREMENT
PLAN ANALYSIS

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Entertainment
HOME THEATER System" KLH"digital
DVD/CD/MP3.Player
6
speakers
ex.$100. (650)992-4544
PANASONIC STEREO color TV 36"
ex/con/ $30 (650)992-4544

Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

(650) 295-6123

1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

401(k) & IRA & 403(b)
(650)458-0312
New Stage Investment Group
Hans Reese is a Registered Representative with, and securities offered
through, LPL Financial,
Member FINRA/SIPC

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com

Where Dreams Begin

184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

(650)591-3900

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental

Health & Medical
AMEO ESSENTIAL OILS
Let’s have a Party
Test 43 Oils - Diffusers
Demonstration video
Clinical-grade standards
Listen to Dr. Joshua Plant
Learn the health benefits
Call (650)366-6606

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

Housing

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)

Please call to RSVP

(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

LEGAL

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA

Marketing

GROW

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Massage Therapy

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $24.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr
Insurance

EYE EXAMINATIONS

Legal Services

BLUE SHIELD OF
CALIFORNIA

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

27

Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS

We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
All Credit Accepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY

Where every child is a gift from God

K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco

(650)588-6860

ww.hillsidechristian.com

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

CARE ON CALL
24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help

(650)389-2468

OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY

Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)

(650)212-2966

1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com

Music
KENWOOD STEREO Receiver/cassette
deck/CD,3 speakers box ex/con. $60
(650)992-4544

Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

Wills & Trusts
ESTATE PLANNING
TrustandEstatePlan.com

San Mateo Office
1(844)687-3782
Complete Estate Plans
Starting at $399

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 23, 2015

OYSTER PERPETUAL E XPLORER II

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oyster perpetual and explorer are trademarks.