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FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 • VOL. 17, NO. 40 • FREE

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Baseball teams
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Water main
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local, 8A

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Volunteers clean old Stone
Mountain cemetery on MLK day

Nearly 30 volunteers spent MLK Day cleaning the historic Shermantown Cemetery in Stone Mountain. Photos by Carla Parker.

by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com

S

tone Mountain was one of the cities
named in Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.
In the speech, delivered Aug. 28,
1963 at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., King said, “Let freedom ring
from Stone Mountain of Georgia.” The city
honored King and his legacy by cleaning
Shermantown Cemetery on Martin Luther
King Jr. day Jan. 19.
Stone Mountain city officials along with
30 volunteers cleaned the historic cemetery
as a King National Day of Service project.
The cemetery, which has been in the city
since the early 1900s, was overrun with
trees and brush. Volunteers spent three
hours cleaning the cemetery, and afterward, gathered in Stone Mountain Village
to ring the Freedom Bell.
Councilman Steve Wells, who co-organized the event, said the service project
was an opportunity to bring the community together.
“Martin Luther King did so many great

See Cleans on page 15A

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Page 2A The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

Seniors want more
money for centers
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
It’s budget-planning season for the DeKalb County
government, and local seniors don’t want to be forgotten.
Dozens of seniors boarded buses and traveled to
the Jan. 13 DeKalb County
Board of Commissioners
meeting to plead for financial consideration as the
board prepares to approve a
2015 budget.
Brenda Butler, who attends the DeKalb-Atlanta
Senior Center on Warren
Street, asked commissioners to allocate money in
the county budget to fix the
parking for the center.
“We park on a hill. The
building sits on a hill,”
Butler told commissioners.
“You have seniors that are
walking on walkers, canes,
and we are not in the best
shape to be climbing hills,
but we do the best we can.”
Butler told commissioners that seniors “need to
have that parking replaced
back like it was …when that
center was first opened.”
“The parking went all the
way to the curb of Warren
Street,” she said. Workers
“beautified that and put up
trees. The trees now have
roots that have broken up
the sidewalk and nobody
could walk on if they wanted to—not seniors, because

we would hurt ourselves.
“We have to climb a hill
to go [across] another hill
to get into the building,”
she said. “Also we’re passing an open trench area that
anybody could come by,
push us over because we are
seniors.”
Butler said commissioners should consider that “we
are the largest population of
seniors that you’re ever going to see in this century, I
believe, because we are the
baby boomers.
“We’re not going to decrease in numbers. We’re
going to increase in numbers.”
Another senior, Helen
Alexis of Atlanta, asked
commissioners to maintain
or increase the current funding for senior centers.
“As you’re looking
at your budget, please,
please—and I’m saying this
for all the centers—do not
cut senior center budgets,”
she said.
“We are growing,” Alexis
said. “We are growing at a
fast rate. At DeKalb-Atlanta
we need more room, actually. We appreciate that fact
that we’ve been allowed
to admit more citizens, but
they’re coming. So I ask
you to please assist in getting some money in here for
all of the centers.”
Alexis also said there is a
need for a “senior day care
in this area…[for] those

See Center on page 14A

Seniors either have to tackle a long hill or a crumbling sidewalk to get to the DeKalb-Atlanta Senior Center.
They are asking the county to improve access to the building. Photos by Andrew Cauthen.

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The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

local

Page 3A

Author takes readers on journeys to the supernatural
by Kathy Mitchell
Violette Meier has a ready laugh
and describes herself as a cheerful,
optimistic person, but when she
writes fiction she’s inclined to go to
the dark side. Science fiction, fantasy
and paranormal fiction are her favorite genres, she said.
“I think it comes from my greatgrandmother,” Meier said. “She was
born in the late 19th century, and I
was still a child when she died, but I
remember her stories of ghosts and
the supernatural. She was a devout
Christian, as I am, but she was able
to combine that with some of the traditions of her African roots.”
The Decatur author, who says on
her website she’s “seen a few ghosts,”
said her stories aren’t dark enough to
be called horror stories but include
“eerie adventures that take readers to
some strange places.”
“These are not the stories readers
expect from an African-American
writer,” Meier said. “Most AfricanAmerican writers produce urban
fiction or historic fiction. People ask
me why I don’t write urban fiction
since it sells so well, but it’s not my
thing. Some of the themes that are
popular among Black readers surface
in my books but in a different genre.
You don’t have to talk about drugs
and jail to talk about choices and
consequences.”
The author of a poetry book, a
book of short stories as well as two
novels with a third scheduled for
release Jan. 20, Meier said she has
been writing since she was a child
but started to take her literary efforts
more seriously when she was a student at Clark Atlanta University.
“Like a lot of college students, I
was playing around a lot and not doing as well with my academic work
as I could have. Then an instructor
assigned us to write a novella—a
short novel. I not only got an ‘A’ on
it, but the teacher pulled me aside
and said, ‘What are you doing clowning around when you can write like
this?’”

Later Meier expanded the school
assignment into a full length novel,
Out of Night, and sold it through
a small publishing house. “Even
though it has supernatural elements,
it taps into my background as a
Christian,” said Meier, who holds
a master’s degree in divinity from
Interdenominational Theological
Center. “It explores whether a person
with a dark nature who truly wants
to become a good person can actually change or can only suppress his
true nature.”
After publishing a couple more
books through a small publisher,
Meier, with encouragement from her
husband, decided to start her own
publishing company. “It’s relatively
easy to do today and the upside is
that you get to keep 70 percent of
the profits as opposed to 10 percent
of the profits when you work with a
publishing house,” she said.
The downside, she acknowledged, is that “anybody can self-publish” and potential readers often have
low expectations with self-published
books.
“The publishing business has
changed dramatically in only the
past few years. With social media
and sites such as Amazon, readers
can learn about your work and see
samples of your writing. The big
book store chains where nearly everyone bought their books a decade
or so ago have almost disappeared.
It’s all done on the Internet these
days,” Meier said, adding, “No matter which route you take, the biggest
challenge is marketing—getting the
word out about your work.”
After establishing her own publishing company, Viori, Meir bought
back the rights to her books and
reissued them. “My goal is to have
a book on The New York Times best
seller list. That would have been an
absurd thing for a self-publishing
author to shoot for at one point,
but now it can and does happen.
No matter what,” she added, “I will
definitely continue writing. It’s my
passion.”

Violette Meier says her interest in the paranormal dates back to stories she heard from
her grandmother. Photo by Kathy Mitchell

The Champion Free Press, Friday Jan. 23, 2015

opinion

Page 4A

Southerners and cold weather
Those of us who were
born and raised in the South
aren’t very adept at coping
with frigid temperatures
that we often experience this
time of year. For most of us,
especially those in the Atlanta area and farther southward below the gnat line,
there are only a few days
John Hewitt
each year when we have to
wear heavy coats, unless we
are visiting a colder environ- johnh@dekalbchamp.com
Chief Operating Officer
ment.
Often, during the typically colder months of January
some of us dress that we are
and February, we may have
expecting to be out in the
a few days when we’re percold for hours on end and
fectly comfortable in short
that our vehicles don’t have
sleeves and there are other
days when a flannel shirt or working heaters—much less
climate control and heated
light sweater is sufficient.
On the first day tempera- seats!
Once we are in cars, we’re
tures drop below 50, folks
asking
ourselves “now, what
will be lighting their first
the
heck
do I do with all this
fire of the season and poststuff?”
We
may get to the
ing pictures on social media
first
stop
sign
or traffic light
with posts similar to “We
and
we’re
struggling
to get
had our first fire of the seaall
the
layers
off
or
we
end
son tonight. Had to open the
up
with
our
car
windows
windows, but it sure is cozy
down so we don’t suffocate.
in here and we love a warm
Either way, I’m sure we look
fire. #ShortSleevesWarm”
But, let the thermometer pretty silly to those who
drop below freezing for any have migrated here from
colder environs.
length of time and we pull
It is also around this time
out our heavy coats, hats,
of
year
that you may see
scarves and gloves that may
road
or
infrastructure projbe 20 years old and still look
ects
that
require water pipes
new. Folks will be bundled
to
be
emptied
before repairs
up like Eskimos just to walk
can
be
done.
Do
we really
from their front door to
not
realize
the
possible
outtheir car and then the our
comes
here?
The
workers
are
workplace.
instructed
to
complete
the
You’d think by the way

project on time. The pipes
need draining, so they drain
them. Later in the evening,
the temperature drops below freezing and then we
suddenly have a miniature
ice rink where there is no
admission charge. Folks will
be joyfully slipping and sliding all over that five square
feet of ice as if they’re winter
Olympic athletes.
Some will also inevitably
leave their automatic sprinklers, fountains or pond
pumps running without
thinking of the outcomes.
I actually learned this
lesson the hard way several
years ago.
It was bitterly cold and
had been for a few days.
Because of the commute I
make each day to and from
work, I rarely see my front
yard in daylight during the
winter months. My wife
called me at work in a panic
telling me that the water in
one of our koi ponds was
completely frozen in a huge
mound of ice and that the
pump was making a horrible
noise. I told her to pour
warm water over where the
pump was located and to
add more water to the pond
so the fish would have water.
I assured her that I’d take
care of it when I got home.
She did as I suggested and
thought nothing else of it.
When I got home and
turned the front floodlights
on, I was shocked to see

what had become a several
foot high ice structure protruding from our koi pond,
especially since we didn’t
have a fountain in it.
You see, all the water that
was initially beneath the
frozen surface of the pond
had pumped on top of the
frozen surface and layered.
This had drained almost all
of the water under the ice
and relocated it to above
the surface. When my wife
put even more water in the
pond, it too layered on top
of the already frozen surface.
I frantically started trying to break the ice up in
hopes that there was still
enough water underneath
to have kept the fish alive. I
heaved huge chunks of ice
four to five inches in depth
until I could see the bottom
of the pond. There were my
beloved fish, frozen solid–
some straight up in what
little slush was still in the
bottom of the pond, others on their sides with eyes
bulging with a look of “how
could you do this to us?” I
was devastated.
Then I remembered that
many fish, particularly those
in the carp family such as
goldfish and koi, could actually freeze and come back to
life when the water thaws.
(Look it up, it’s true!).
So, I then start grabbing
frozen koi and gently placing them in a big bucket of

water, hoping they would
revive.
Most of them didn’t.
One fish that was still beneath the surface of frozen
muck and leaves did eventually start to move around
a bit, but it had a rather
awkward movement about
it as it attempted to swim.
It survived and lived for
many years, but was forever
deformed. Its back was permanently curved at pretty
much the same angle it had
been in when frozen. Apparently, it suffered permanent
curvature of the spine due to
my negligence.
The moral of the story
here is that we Southerners
just aren’t perceptive enough
to deal with sub-freezing
temperatures. We make
dumb mistakes. We make
fools of ourselves on social
media. We dress as if we’re
trying to be an abominable
snowman on Halloween.
Thankfully, we don’t
have to deal with this kind
of weather very often. We’ll
just wait for the next ice or
snowstorm when Atlanta
ends up as the top story in
national and world news
because of our inability to
cope.
Hopefully, with each cold
snap, we gain a little more
experience and knowledge,
but it doesn’t seem to stay
with us very long.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

opinion

Page 5A

One Man’s Opinion

New rules for schools?
The Quality Basic Education Act (QBE) turns 30 this
year. On the campaign trail,
Gov. Nathan Deal compared
the law to a couple of other
80s era relics—parachute
pants and jelly shoes. Though
QBE is far from perfect, many
governors have looked and
tried to reconfigure the formula—and then left it largely
intact. However no governor,
including QBE’s original author, Gov. Joe Frank Harris,
have ever been able to fully
fund QBE.
But more money alone is
not the key to solving Georgia’s education woes, and
money alone will not be able
to save, salve or salvage many
of Georgia’s too numerous
failing schools or troubled
school systems.
Gov. Deal is perhaps
taking the more difficult
step first to improving performance at chronically
underachieving schools—a
potential state takeover, and
remake, in the guise of “opportunity school districts”
and a fast track to potentially
dozens of charter schools
across the state.
But before every tiny
school system begins quaking, remember that bigger is
not necessarily better. Two of
the state’s continually high-

Bill Crane
bill.csicrane@gmail.com

Columnist

est performing systems, the
City Schools of Decatur and
Trion city school each have
only one high school and one
middle school. And several of
the state’s largest systems face
some of the greatest challenges. Clayton County was only
recently re-accredited, and
DeKalb County, and its student population of 100,000,
is on an “accredited warned”
status.
Deal, the son of two
educators, and whose wife is
also a former school teacher,
believes the time has come
to put children and the classrooms ahead of failing bureaucracies, local patronage
hires and routinely mediocre
and substandard performance. Though Georgia’s
overall performance K-12 lags
behind most of the nation, the

state commits $6 out of every
$10 to public education and
per capita student expenditure, as well as teacher salaries
in the metro counties lead the
southeast.
This governor has demonstrated with his recasting
of the DeKalb County school
board—following Gov. Sonny
Perdue’s similar intervention in the Hancock County
Schools—that pushing the
reset button and bringing in
new leadership at the top is
critical to turning around a
struggling or poorly performing school or school system.
A system superintendent,
overseen by a part-time or
volunteer school board, hires
and fires all other administrators and principals, who
in turn generally manage
the staff at the school house
level. Weak or bad management from the top, like a fish,
will cause rot from the head
down. Federal government
requirements, often tied to
funding, call for assistant and
deputy superintendents of all
stripes, in many cases overseeing only one function or
one school.
Deal is hoping, and betting, that there are more
parents and families dissatisfied with poorly performing
schools, and the disservice

being done to their children’s
education and future livelihood, than there are educators and other stakeholders
more desirous of clinging to
the status quo.
There will be pushback. Deal is seeking a constitutional amendment to
substantially broaden the
state’s authority to take over
schools or systems failing the
standard performance metrics
for three years or more, and
converting those “opportunity
schools” into communitybased charter schools.
The Georgia Charter
Schools Commission and
the Georgia Department of
Education can bring to bear
know-how and the resources
required to turn around quite
a few slow slinking ships—if
the entrenched bureaucracy,
in many cases, causing or
continuing the problems are
moved out of the way. We
Georgians also like our “local
control” and most love our
neighborhood schools regardless of their actual education
outcomes. This will be an
emotional battle, waged all
the way up to the November
General Election, if a proposed constitutional amendment makes it that far.
I wish Gov. Deal and his
legislative team luck, and

hope that the General Assembly will take this step and
risk some political backlash,
but I would also counsel, as
you probably only get to successfully fire this bullet once,
go for the full brass ring. Give
the state the power to take
over failing government
entities of all stripes—cities, counties and school systems. Nineteen states already
have that power to bring in
emergency managers, which
report to the judiciary, or
court-appointed receivers to
manage financial morasses as
Detroit, Mich, and more recently Birmingham, Ala., have
experienced. 
Our normal system of
checks and balances takes
a great deal of time for selfcorrection. Sometimes the
system needs a quicker reboot, or simply a sharp kick
in the ass.
Bill Crane also serves as a
political analyst and commentator for Channel 2’s Action
News, WSB-AM News/Talk
750 and now 95.5 FM, as well
as a columnist for The Champion, Champion Free Press
and Georgia Trend. Crane is
a DeKalb native and business
owner, living in Scottdale. You
can reach him or comment
on a column at bill.csicrane@
gmail.com. 

F ree P ress

Let Us Know What You Think!

THE CHAMPION FREE PRESS encourages opinions from its readers.
Please write to us and express your views. Letters should be brief, typewritten and contain the writer’s name, address and telephone number
for verification. All letters will be considered for publication.
Send Letters To Editor, The Champion Free Press, P. O. Box 1347, Decatur, GA 300311347; Send email to Andrew@dekalbchamp.com • FAX To: (404) 370-3903 Phone:
(404) 373-7779 . Deadline for news releases and advertising: Thursday, one week prior
to publication date.
EDITOR’S NOTE: The opinions written by columnists and contributing editors do not
necessarily reflect the opinions of the editor or publishers. The Publisher reserves the
right to reject or cancel any advertisement at any time. The Publisher is not responsible
for unsolicited manuscripts.

Publisher: John Hewitt
Chief Financial Officer: Dr. Earl D. Glenn
Managing Editor: Andrew Cauthen
Production Manager: Kemesha Hunt
Photographer: Travis Hudgons
Staff Reporters: Carla Parker, Ashley Oglesby
The Champion Free Press is published each Friday by ACE III
Communications, Inc., • 114 New Street, Suite E, Decatur, GA.
30030 • Phone (404) 373-7779.

www.championnewspaper.com
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Statement from the publisher
We sincerely appreciate the discussion surrounding this and
any issue of interest to DeKalb County. The Champion was
founded in 1991 expressly to provide a forum for discourse
for all community residents on all sides of an issue. We have
no desire to make the news only to report news and opinions
to effect a more educated citizenry that will ultimately move
our community forward. We are happy to present ideas for
discussion; however, we make every effort to avoid printing
information submitted to us that is known to be false and/or
assumptions penned as fact.

local

Page 6A The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

Paul Mitchell
Paul Mitchell said he’s
enjoyed construction and
home repair since he was a
youth. He recalls being part
of a maintenance crew as a
14-year-old summer camper. “I loved it,” he said.
With his interest and
skills Mitchell decided that
he was an ideal match for
Decatur’s Martin Luther
King Jr. Service Project,
conducted annually on
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
weekend. Volunteers work
in teams making repairs and
improvements at the homes
of low-income senior residents in Decatur.
“I just contacted them
and said I’d like to help,” he
recalled.
“I’ve been involved in
community projects before
and give to a number of

charities, but I’ve never
been involved at this level
before. It’s a great benefit to
the homeowners we work
with. Most of them don’t
have the knowledge to make
these repairs themselves,
and they can’t afford to hire
a professional. They’re re-

ally grateful for the work we
do.
“It’s nice to give to charity, but there’s something
really special about having
a one-on-one relationship
with the people you’re helping. You’re able to see firsthand the difference you’re
making in their lives,” he
said, adding that this year’s
plan includes building
four ramps to make homes
wheelchair accessible.
Mitchell’s work with the
MLK Service Project led to
his being selected as one of
city’s Hometown Heroes for
2012. The Hometown Heroes program honors Decatur residents who work hard,
often behind the scenes, to
make the community a better place to live and work.
Lee Ann Harvey of

Volunteer! Decatur said that
Mitchell has been an invaluable asset because in addition to being dedicated and
hardworking, he has professional skills in all aspects
of home repair and renovation. Moreover, she said,
he has people skills needed
to organize volunteers and
work with homeowners.
“He helps the seniors feel
comfortable with what the
project will do for them and
with the volunteers who will
work on their homes,” she
said.
In 2010, Mitchell joined
the leadership committee
and has served as project
chairman for two years, according to Harvey. In that
role, he assesses the work to
be done at all of the homes
and develops reports for the

committee to review doing indepth assessments on
between 25 and 40 homes,
depending on the number of
applicants.
Harvey said that Mitchell
has served on the board for
several years and has taken
on many administrative duties, as well as grant writing
and other fundraising duties
for the MLK Project.
“He works with the operations committee to assign
the appropriately skilled
house captains to each of
the selected homes. Paul
oversees material purchases,
tool rentals and overseeing
all aspects of the project. I
can’t think of anyone who
does more work as a volunteer than he does,” she said.

If you would like to nominate someone to be considered as a future Champion of the Week, please contact Andrew Cauthen
at andrew@dekalbchamp.com or at (404) 373-7779, ext. 117.

News briefs
Dog attack victim awarded $72 million verdict

ages for each dog, totaling $72 million.

The family of a child critically injured in a
dog attack has been awarded one of the largest
verdicts ever against a pet owner.
The landmark $72 million civil verdict follows the 2012 criminal trial that DeKalb County
Solicitor General Sherry Boston tried against
Twyann Vaughn of Lithonia. Vaughn was found
guilty of six misdemeanor counts after her dogs
mauled the child. Erin Ingram was 8 years old
when the two pit bulls attacked her in her driveway.
“Sadly, Erin and her family’s lives were
changed forever by this attack,” Boston said. “I
hope this verdict sends a clear message that we
will not tolerate reckless conduct by dog owners.
“I personally chose to prosecute the criminal
case because I felt so strongly that this could have
been prevented if Vaughn had followed the law,”
Boston said. “We must protect our citizens and
especially our children from aggressive dog attacks.”
Ingram’s left arm had to be amputated below
the elbow, and she lost function in her right arm.
In addition to other scars and having to wear a
prosthetic, Erin has endured several surgeries and
physical therapy and will need more surgeries.
In January 2012, a jury found Vaughn guilty
of six misdemeanor charges in the criminal case:
two counts each of reckless conduct, violation of
the county’s vicious dog ordinance and failure to
have the dogs immunized for rabies. Judge Dax
Lopez sentenced Vaughn to 16 months in jail and
36 months of probation.
On Jan. 12, attorneys Kevin Adamson and
Alan Cleveland tried the civil case against
Vaughn. The verdict includes $36 million in general damages and $18 million in punitive dam-

DeKalb Medical earns ‘Baby Friendly’
designation
DeKalb Medical has earned the international
Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) designation from Baby-Friendly USA Inc.
DeKalb Medical, the first hospital in Georgia
to achieve this designation, also was awarded a
5-STAR Hospital Recognition from the Georgia
Department of Public Health.
 “This is a great accomplishment for our hospital, and we could not be more proud,” said Rose
McKelvie, executive director of DeKalb Medical’s
Women and Infant Services division. “It has been
a long journey and a lot of work, but we are committed to bringing the best childbirth options to
expecting mothers and families in the community.”
 The designation process began in June 2012
when DeKalb Medical was chosen as one of 90
hospitals in the United States to participate in
the Best Fed Beginnings Collaborative, a project
for improving breastfeeding rates in the United
States by the National Initiative for Children’s
Healthcare Quality, with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and
aligned with Baby-Friendly USA.
“To be one of the 90 hospitals selected, and
one of the seven selected in Georgia, says a lot
about where we are as a facility,” McKelvie said.
“As a hospital, we decided that the best way to
continue to lead in maternity was to work towards the Baby-Friendly designation in conjunction with Baby-Friendly USA.”
 There are more than 20,000 designated BabyFriendly hospitals and birth centers worldwide,

227 of which are in the United States.
 “This is not only a change in hospital procedure but also a cultural mindset,” stated Dr.
Cathy Bonk, OB/GYN and DeKalb Medical
board member. “With this mindset, we learned,
educated and instilled the 10 steps of BabyFriendly designation. This was imperative to us
and also led to our Five-Star designation.”
 The Five-Star designation is awarded to hospitals that have accomplished all 10 steps of the
“Baby-Friendly” designation.

County awarded $75,000 to address gangs
DeKalb County has received a $75,000 grant
from the state of Georgia through the Criminal
Justice Coordinating Council’s program. The Byrne Innovative Communities Program responds
to local needs and provides communities with
resources to address complex criminal justice issues.
“The receipt of this grant allows DeKalb
County to build upon the governor’s nationally
recognized criminal justice reforms for juveniles
that were first proposed in House Bill 242 and
which place a renewed emphasis on communitybased solutions to criminal justice issues,” said
interim DeKalb County CEO Lee May.
With the funds, DeKalb’s Gang Reduction
and Intervention Program (GRIP) will conduct
a needs assessment that captures the scope and
extent of gang activity within the county and create a shareable database of gang information for
multiple law enforcement agencies.
DeKalb’s GRIP is based on the strategies of
the U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s “comprehensive gang model.”

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

local

AroundDeKalb

Atlanta

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Perimeter Business Association
to hold leadership luncheon

DeKalb Symphony Orchestra to
hold children’s concert

The Perimeter Business Association will hold a leadership
luncheon and a discussion on
transit-related development,
land use and economic impact
indications on Jan. 23 at 11:30
a.m.

The DeKalb Symphony
Orchestra will hold its annual
Children’s Concert Jan. 25 in the
gymnasium of Georgia Perimeter College Clarkston Campus.
The concert will feature Peter
and the Wolf and other childfriendly selections. Avondale
Estates resident and musician
George Brandt will serve as
concertmaster. Dancers from
the Decatur School of Ballet will
also perform. Tickets for the 3
p.m. concert can be purchased at
www.dekalbsymphony.tix.com,
or call (678) 891-3565. Georgia
Perimeter College Clarkston
Campus is located at 555 North
Indian Creek Drive in Clarkston.

Panelists include: Mike
Alexander, division manager,
research and analytics, Atlanta
Regional Commission; Dan
Reuter, division manager, community development, Atlanta
Regional Commission; Amanda
Rhein, senior development
manager for real estate development with MARTA; Brenda
Robbins, senior project manager, Georgia Power Community
& Economic Development; and
Valerie Seidel, president, The
Balmoral Group.
The event will be at Villa
Christina, 4000 Summit Blvd.,
Atlanta.
For more information, contact Sue Rodman at (404) 7845650 or rodman@soukmc.com.

Avondale
Estate
Men’s Club to host meeting
Avondale Estates resident
Dr. Brett Schug and friends will
entertain the Avondale Estates
Men’s Club with their talking
parrots Jan. 28 at noon All men
are invited to attend the meeting, which will be held at the
American Legion Post 66. The
meeting will be informal, with
no membership dues or officers.
After the presentation, lunch
will be provided by the American Legion at a cost of $10 per
person (cash only). American
Legion Post 66 is located at 30
Covington Road. For more information, contact Bob Boyd at
rmboyd@bellsouth.net or (404)
501-9118.

Decatur
Seed of South Sudan authors to
discuss book
Majok Marier and Estelle
Ford-Williamson will discuss
Seed of South Sudan: Memoir
of a ‘Lost Boy’ Refugee at 2 p.m.
on Sunday, Jan. 25, at Tall Tales
Bookshop. The event, sponsored
by a grant from Poets and Writers Inc., is free and open to the
public.
Ngor Mayol, another former
“lost boy” who contributed to
the book, will join the authors
in discussing the current situation in the new nation of South
Sudan. Tall Tales Bookshop is
located in the Toco Hills Shopping Center, 2105 LaVista Road,
Atlanta.
Seed of South Sudan details
the “lost boys’” journey, and also
updates the story 13 years after
the 3,800 lost boys and girls were
airlifted from refugee camps in
Sudan during the country’s civil
war,” according to an announcement about the event. “Children
of all ages, some as young as 7,
fled as villages were destroyed
in attacks on south Sudan by
the northern Sudanese army.
Most walked hundreds of miles
to Ethiopia and then were displaced several times; they only

found permanent homes when
they reached the United States in
2000 and 2001.”
The book also includes stories of many volunteers in Atlanta as well as other cities who
aided the “lost boys and girls” in
adapting to American life.

DeKalb Community Service
Board meets Jan. 22
The DeKalb Community
Service Board will meet Jan.
22 at 4 p.m. at 445 Winn Way,
Room 421, Decatur.
The meeting is open to the
public for those who are interested in services for mental
health, addiction and developmental disabilities.
The advocacy committee
meeting will be held in the same
room at 3 p.m. and is also open
to the public.
Those with disabilities in
need of assistance or accommodations to participate in the
meeting, should notify the community relations office at (404)
508-7875.

County recreation department
to hold vision meeting for
Brookside Park
DeKalb County Recreation,
Parks and Cultural Affairs will
host a vision meeting for Brookside Park, on Jan. 22, 7 p.m.
at DeKalb Extension Services
Training Room, 4380 Memorial
Drive, Decatur. Neighbors and
interested parties are encouraged to attend.
The Brookside Park property
is on North Decatur Road just
outside of I-285. It is the site a
former derelict apartment building. DeKalb acquired the property, demolished the structures
and removed thousands of used
tires that were dumped on the
site and in the stream.
The vision meeting will be
held to determine potential uses
for this new park space. Commissioner Kathie Gannon used
District 6 park bond money to
acquire the land. Now the community will have an opportunity
to give input regarding desired
park designs and facilities.
For more information about
the meeting, call LaShanda Da-

Page 7A

vis, public education specialist, at
(404) 371-3643.

Countywide
Zumba fitness offered at local
libraries
“Join your neighbors, family, and friends for an hour of
fun and fitness at Chamblee and
Clarkston Libraries,” states an
announcement of Zumba fitness
classes to be offered at the libraries in February.
Zumba instructor Akinya
Joy will teach Zumba Basic, a
Latin-inspired, dance fitness
class, at Chamblee Library on
Tuesday, Feb. 10, at 6 p.m., and
Saturday, Feb. 21, at 10:30 a.m.
She will teach at Clarkston Library on Valentine’s Day, Saturday, Feb. 14, at noon.
Classes are limited to 25 participants. To register, call Chamblee Library, located at 4115
Clairmont Road in Chamblee,
at (770) 936-1380 or Clarkston
Library, located at 951 North Indian Creek Drive in Clarkston,
at (404) 508-7175.
Participants are asked to
dress comfortably.
Funding is provided by the
Friends of the Chamblee Library
and the Friends of Clarkston Library.
For more information, visit
www.dekalblibrary.org.

local

Page 8A The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

Communities oppose Decatur’s annexation plan
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Two communities included in Decatur’s proposed annexation master
plan are fighting to stop the
proposed plan.
Clairmont Heights Civic
Association (CHCA) board
members have sent a letter
to the DeKalb delegation
voicing their opposition,
asking the delegation to
object to legislation related
to the plan during the current session of the General
Assembly. Medlock Area
Neighborhood Association
also sent a petition to the
delegation.
Decatur city officials released their plan report Dec.
8. The annexation master
plan proposes adding areas
mostly north of the city,
including parts of the Clairmont Heights and Medlock
communities. The proposed
map also includes areas
south of the city limits.
Some of the commercial
properties in the proposed
plan include Patel Plaza and
DeKalb Medical Center,
northeast of the city from
Scott Boulevard to DeKalb
Industrial and DeKalb Industrial to Ponce de Leon.
In Clairmont Heights’
letter to the DeKalb delegation, board members wrote

that the plan will negatively impact options for
the neighborhood as other
annexation and city creation
efforts in DeKalb continue.
“CHCA conducted a
neighborhood survey in

Decatur city manager to
seek their advice over the
past several months. In particular, following the advice
we received from our local
legislators, neighborhood
members carefully pursued

tersection of North Decatur
Road will negatively affect
the area.
“Their proposal would
remove an estimated $8
million in annual tax revenue that supports our local
schools while simultaneously cutting our contiguous relationship with these
schools,” board members
wrote. “Furthermore, the
Decatur proposal negatively
impacts other efforts our
neighbors are pursuing
to secure a strong voice
for Clairmont Heights as
DeKalb communities contemplate future city boundaries.
“This intersection and
section of North Decatur
Road are currently proposed as possible routes for
future light rail develop–Clairmont Heights Civic Association (CHCA) ment,” they added. “Decatur’s jurisdiction over this
area leaves our neighborhood without a voice in a
September to determine
the petition process set forth critical transportation issue.”
the course of action our
by Decatur. Decatur deMedlock said the annexresidents preferred, and we
clined to consider the petiation plan will harm DeKalb
have done our best to ensure tions they had solicited.”
schools with the “decreased
that our opinions would be
Board members wrote
local tax base and specificalknown and our voices heard that the proposed annexaly by removing a minimum
as the legislature considers
tion will change its school
of $5 million from the inthe current annexation and
zoning. Most children in the come of the DeKalb County
city creation efforts,” board
community attend Fernbank schools and potentially tens
members wrote. “CHCA
Elementary and Druid Hills of millions of dollars after
officers and individual
High School. They also said proposed commercial dehomeowners consulted with annexing adjacent commer- velopments in the area have
our local legislators and the
cial properties and the inbeen completed.”

‘The Decatur proposal
negatively impacts
other efforts our
neighbors are pursuing.’

The petition also stated
that the annexation will isolate the Medlock community
and take away its commercial resources.
“We believe that Decatur’s unilateral annexation
approach is unfair, disingenuous, and threatens to cut
off vibrant neighborhoods
from the businesses they
support while irreparably
harming our schools,” the
association wrote. “It will
also likely lead to higher
taxes for those residents remaining in unincorporated
DeKalb County.
“If Decatur insists on
taking adjacent commercial property, it should also
accept all of the contiguous neighborhood areas; it
should certainly not be permitted to violate the integrity of the neighborhood by
picking and choosing what it
wants without regard to the
best interests of all DeKalb
citizens,” the petition continued. “We urge our elected
representatives, to ensure
that changes to municipal
boundaries are made in a
fair manner and provide the
maximum benefit to all of
the county’s residents. There
should be no annexation of
commercial property without annexation of adjacent
residential areas.”

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

local

Page 9A

County holds 31st annual King celebration
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
Hundreds of DeKalb
residents and county workers gathered in Decatur Jan.
16 for the county’s 31st annual Martin Luther King Jr.
Day celebration.
“We of differing racial,
ethnic, religious and political persuasions have gathered on common ground,”
said Mike Thurmond, superintendent of the DeKalb
County School District,
who was the keynote speaker for the event.
“The Black and the
White; the red and the
brown; the rich and the
poor; Democrats, Republicans and Independents; the
PhDs and the no ‘Ds’; all
the saints and maybe even
a few sinners have gathered
here…to pay tribute to the
life and legacy of Rev. Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
“His life—and the
contributions of the brave
men and women, Black
and White, who marched
with him—teaches us and
informs us that a relatively
small group of people can

literally change the world,”
Thurmond said.
Thurmond urged his
listeners to “reaffirm and
rededicate” themselves to
“the unfinished task…of
securing, in the not-toodistant future, the prophesy
that he shared with us that
one day in DeKalb County,
one day in Georgia, one
day in America peace, love
and justice will roll down
like mighty thunder and
righteousness like a mighty
stream.
“We will live in a county
that’s devoid of racism,”
Thurmond said. “We will
live in a county where we
do not discriminate against
people because of the color
of their skin or the address
on their mailbox.”
Thurmond said, “In
DeKalb County, this King
Day 2015 needs also to be a
day of atonement and forgiveness.
“The Ku Klux Klan
don’t move DeKalb County
anymore,” he said. “We are
under attack—not from the
Ku Klux Klan, not from the
racists.
“Our biggest enemies

MJCCA expands
homeschool
extra program
by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com
On Jan. 7 the Marcus
Jewish Community Center
of Atlanta (MJCCA) announced the expansion of its
homeschool extra program.
MJCCA Communication Director Cheri Lewis
said the center is adding
new outdoor adventures
classes, featuring zip lining,
rock wall climbing and boating, among other activities.
The homeschool program has also added options, including Zumba for
kids and Out of the Box Art
Studio, an art and literaturebased class in which students read and discuss an
illustrated story such as “The
Cat in the Hat” by Dr. Seuss
and then create an art project based on the book.

Melisa Getzow has three
girls, ages 10, 8 and 6, in the
program who take dance
as well as a son; all the kids
take swimming. Two of her
daughters are the only two
in one of the dance classes,
and she was afraid they
would cancel the class, but
they didn’t, and her girls
virtually have private lessons
with a dance instructor.
“Where else in Atlanta
can I get a private dance lesson during the day,” Getzow
asked.
She added, “I was really
excited to have my children
do something that was
physical.”
Ten states currently
force public schools to allow homeschoolers access
to classes or sports parttime.
These states are Arizona,
Colorado, Florida, Idaho,

See MJCCA on Page 11A

are not from without…
but are from within,” Thurmond said. “So if you want
this day to be special, after
the speeches have been
spoken, after the songs have
been sung, after the prayers
have been prayed, what
will really matter…is what
you’re going to do this afternoon and tomorrow. It’s one
thing to talk about brotherhood and togetherness and
sharing and love, but it’s
another thing to live it.”
Thurmond said one way
to make MLK Day special
is to “hold on to, love and
protect your family.
“Family can be defined
in many ways,” Thurmond
said.
“Family is…a husband
and a wife, who live in a
nice upper income neighborhood in DeKalb, with
a smooth green lawn and

a white picket fence, a dog
and a cat, and cars in the
garage, he said.
“But family is also
Grandmama Susan who’s
raising granddaughter
Shaniqua and living with
Uncle Ted who really is nobody’s uncle but they’re in
the same house under the
same roof worshiping the
same God,” Thurmond said.
“That’s family, too.”
Interim DeKalb County
CEO Lee May encouraged
residents to live “what Dr.
King stood for—the mission, his ministry, his desire
for human rights for all
people.”
“Think about what he
meant to us and the work
that he lived out in his life,”
May said. “Forget that this
is another three-day weekend and we can sleep in on
Monday, forget about this

being a time when we can
rest—but think about how
you…can realize the dream,
mission, the vision that Dr.
King [had]. Think about
those things and then do it.”
Commissioner Larry
Johnson said King was
born “at time when prejudice, hate and injustice tore
at the fabric of our nation—
a time when Black Americans could not eat at the
same table…or even share
the same water fountains as
Whites.
“Dr. King began to tear
down those walls of ignorance [and] intolerance that
long divided the country.
Through his vision of social
change and nonviolent protests he carried out his mission,” Johnson said. “All of
us benefit from that vision
today.”

CLAUDIA G. LAWSON
Tax Commissioner
DeKalb County, GA

ATTENTION ALL DEKALB COUNTY
HOMEOWNERS
The 2015 Property Tax Exemption Deadline
is Fast Approaching!
If you owned and resided in a home in DeKalb County on January 1st, you may apply for
a Basic Homestead Exemption and Property Assessment Freeze with the County by
April 1st of this year. The home must be your primary domicile and legal residence for
all purposes, including the registration of your vehicles and the filing of your Federal and
State income taxes. Applications received after April 1st will be processed for 2016.
In addition to the basic homestead exemption available to all homeowners, there are
special exemptions available for residents 62 and older, disabled veterans or their unremarried spouses, and other disabled residents. Eligibility for special exemptions is
based upon age or disability, total household income, and must be applied for in person.
When applying, please bring your State and Federal income tax forms, Social Security
1099, and any other forms of income you may receive, to one of our three offices across
the County.

North Office

1358 Dresden Dr., NE
Atlanta, GA 30319

Main Office

4380 Memorial Dr.
Suite 100
Decatur, GA 30032

South Office

2801 Candler Rd. #66
South DeKalb Mall
Decatur, GA 30034

Remember, the deadline for applying for all homesteads is April 1st!
Apply for the Basic Homestead Exemption, the Property Assessment Freeze, or renew
your tag registration online at: www.dekalbcountyga.gov/taxcommissioner
Questions? Call (404) 298-4000 or email us proptax@dekalbcountyga.gov

local

Page 10A The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

From left, Rockell Coleman, charged with murder, leaves the courtroom with her attorney,
Daryl Queen.

Coleman’s mother, Lydia Pinckey, said the deaths of her grandchildren has ripped apart the
family. Photos by Andrew Cauthen

Mother charged in fire can’t visit surviving children
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
A Decatur woman
charged with murder after a
house fire took the lives of
three of her children was in
court Jan. 16.
Attorneys for Rockell
Coleman asked Superior
Court Judge Gregory Adams for clarification on the
conditions of the bond set
for Coleman.
“The first of the two
conditions says that Ms.
Coleman shall have no direct contact with any identified witnesses in the case,”
said Molly Parmer, an assistant public defender at
DeKalb County Public Defender’s Office.
“Since she has had a
bond set, she has been released on bond …[and] has
had a number of hearings in
front of the juvenile court
involving custody of her
children,” Parmer said.
Parmer said the motion
was filed to see if the judge
“will allow Ms. Coleman to
have contact with these children. Our position, judge, is
that she should have contact.
Whenever you have a case
like this with a concurrent
custody case, the goal is reunification of the family.”
DeKalb County Assistant District Attorney Mirna
Andrews argued that the
defendant should not have
contact with her children.
“They are not only witnesses in this case, but they
are victims of the case,”
Andrews said. “The two
surviving children are the
only witnesses who were at
the house at the time of the
[fire].”

Andrews said Coleman’s
9-year-old son told investigators that the children were
left home alone that day.
The home had no heat or
electricity, she added.
“The mother has stated
otherwise,” Andrews said.
“The child is very clear that
the mother not only left
them alone that night but
has left them alone on previous nights and often leaves
the children alone.”
Andrews said neighbors
of the family have stated
that the children were often
left without food “and came
begging for food.”
The boys would sometimes try to stay warm by
burning leaves in a pan in
the livingroom, Andrews
said.
Coleman lied to investigators when she said she was
handing out flyers for a tax
preparation service on the
night of the fire, Andrews
said.
“On that evening at
11:04 p.m., we have evidence from [Coleman’s] own
phone that she was at a restaurant eating dinner with
friends while her children
were home with no food and
no heat,” Andrews said.
Adams ruled that Coleman should not have contact
with the surviving children.
The children’s grandmother, Lydia Pinckey,
wants the surviving boys
to know “that their mother
loved them, that their mother was there for them, that
their mother took care of
them, basically by [herself].”
Pinckey said the fire and
her daughter’s legal troubles
have been traumatic for the
family.

“It has ripped us apart,”
Pinckey said. “It’s going to
continue to rip us apart.
It’s going to continue to go
on and on and on. The sad
thing about it is it’s affecting
my grandkids.”
Pinckey remarked that
the day of the hearing was
one month after her oldest
grandson was pronounced

dead.
“I stayed there with my
grandson every single day
at that hospital up until
the point they were getting
ready to take him down for
organ donations,” she said.
Andrews said Coleman
should not be allowed to
have custody of visit her surviving children because “she

does not have the means to
take care of them, nor the
desire.”
“There are repeated incidences of her not taking
care of the kids, not supervising them,” Andrews said.
“It would be detrimental to
the children to have contact
with the defendant.”

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
    Notice is hereby given by the City of Doraville City Council that a Public Hearing on the 
following item will be held by the Doraville City Council in the Council Chamber located at 3725 
Park Avenue, Doraville, Georgia on the following date: 
City Council Meeting 
February 9, 2015 
6:30 p.m. 
   Text Amendment to City of Doraville Code Section 23‐911 M‐1 Light Manufacturing to delete 
the restriction on the manufacture, bottling, and canning of alcoholic beverages. 
 
 
 
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
 
 
   Notice is hereby given by the City of Doraville City Council that a Public Hearing on the following item 
 
will be held by the Doraville City Council in the Council Chamber located at 3725 Park Avenue, Doraville, 

Georgia on the following date: 
City Council Meeting 
Monday, February 9, 2015 
6:30 p.m. 
   Application for a conditional use permit to conduct tax preparation and filing services at 5187 Buford 
Highway, Suite 68.  
 
 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
    Notice is hereby given by the City of Doraville City Council that a Public Hearing on the 
following item will be held by the Doraville City Council in the Council Chamber located at 3725 
Park Avenue, Doraville, Georgia on the following date: 
City Council Meeting 
Monday, February 9, 2015 
6:30 p.m. 
   Application for the Special Area Plan under Article XX Livable Community Form Based Code for 
the site formerly known as the General Motors Doraville Assembly Plant as shown on the City of 
Doraville Zoning Map as Special District 1 (SD1) and so identified on the Regulating Plan of the 
Livable Community Form Based Code (LCC) Article XX.  Said property being commonly referred 
to as 3900 Motors Industrial Way, City of Doraville, Georgia. 
 

local news

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

Page 11A

Dunwoody day care murderer MJCCA Continued from page 9A
Iowa, Maine, North Dakota,
“If we have the ability
appeals life sentence
Oregon, Utah, and Washing- to extend our community
The man sentenced in
the 2010 high-profile Dunwoody day care murder
appealed his murder conviction and life sentence before
the Georgia Supreme Court
Jan. 20.
Hemy Neuman confessed to the murder of
Rusty Sneiderman, the
husband of his employee,
Andrea Sneiderman, and
is now serving life in prison
without parole. Andrea
Sneiderman later was found
guilty of perjury during a
trial in which prosecutors
accused her having an affair
with Neuman and plotting
to kill her husband.
In his state Supreme
Court appeal, Neuman’s attorneys argued that his conviction should be reversed
because Andrea Sneiderman
lied about their affair on the
stand.
According to the state’s
case at trial, on Nov. 18,
2010, shortly after 9 a.m.,
Rusty Sneiderman dropped
off his 3-year-old son at the
Dunwoody Prep Daycare.
Before he got back to his car,
Neuman, donning a bearded
disguise, approached him
in the parking lot and shot
Sneiderman four to five
times in the neck and torso,
killing him.
While Neuman initially
pleaded not guilty, shortly
before trial, he changed his
plea to not guilty by reason
of insanity. In March 2012,
the jury found Neuman
mentally ill but guilty of
malice murder and possession of a firearm during the
commission of a felony and
he was sentenced to life in
prison with no chance of
parole.
According to court
briefs, Neuman’s attorney
argued the trial court made
four errors, including its
failure to void the state’s
subpoenas of Dr. Peter
Thomas and Dr. Julie Rand
Dorney, defense consultants
whose work was covered
by attorney-client privilege.
The state subpoenaed the records after learning the two
mental health professionals
had visited Neuman at the
DeKalb County Jail. And in
spite of having no plans to
call them as witnesses, “the
state and the lower court
took the unprecedented step
of requiring defense consultants to turn over their files”
for the judge to inspect their
contents before the judge

Neuman

ultimately turned them over
to the state.
Neuman’s attorney argued that the records hurt
Neuman’s case because the
state used them to attack
Dorney for his failure to test
Neuman to rule out whether
Neuman was faking mental
illness or “malingering,” according to court briefs. Dorney’s notes were also used
to question the credibility of
Neuman’s claims that he had
visions and hallucinations,
including believing he was
the father of Sneiderman’s
children.
The district attorney and
attorney general argued for
the state that the trial court
properly denied Neuman’s
motion to quash the subpoenas for the mental health
evaluations done by Thomas
and Dorney, according to a
court summary.
“Once [Neuman] raised
the issue of his mental
health, he waived any psychiatric privilege in testing
done in connection with the
pending charges,” the state
argues in court documents.
“If a defendant places his
mental capacity in issue, he
waives all privileges with regard to his medical records
which are relevant to the
medical condition placed
in issue. The attorney-client
privilege does not afford
[Neuman] any greater
protection in these circumstances.”
Furthermore, Neuman
signed a standard form stating that anything discussed
during the exam and any
written reports could be
disclosed in court, according to a court summary.
Additionally, the trial court
did not abuse its discretion
in excluding irrelevant evidence of an encounter between two witnesses outside
the presence of the jury, the
state argues in court docu-

ments.
Neuman also has not
established that there was
a violation of state law or
his due process rights due
to the perjury conviction
of Andrea Sneiderman,
a court summary stated.
Contrary to his claims, her
testimony was not essential
to his conviction. A verdict
must be set aside as a result
of perjury “only when the
judgment could not have
been obtained without the
perjured evidence and the
perjurer has been duly convicted,” the state argued.
In this case, the trial
court correctly ruled that,
“there was more than sufficient evidence to convict
[Neuman] without Ms.
Sneiderman’s testimony,” the
state contends in its appeal.

ton. All of these states, except Utah, have passed equal
access laws. Although specific requirements vary from
state to state, homeschooled
students can typically participate in public school programs only if the following
requirements are met: The
student must be in compliance with the state homeschool law and must meet
the same eligibility requirements as a public school
student. The state requires
the student to verify that he
or she is passing his or her
core subjects. Consequently,
the homeschooler may be
required to provide achievement test scores or periodic
academic reports, even if the
state’s homeschool statute
does not otherwise require
them.
At the MJCCA extracurricular activities are made
available to everyone.

resources to another community then it is extremely
important,” said homeschool
extra program director Ashley Cohen.
Cohen first started the
homeschool extra program
2012, “After so many years, I
realized that there is such a
large community in the metro Atlanta area, and there’s
very little homeschool specific extracurricular activities for them.”
She added, “We’ve got
the facility and we’ve got the
staff to provide them with
that service.”
MJCCA membership is
not required and classes are
open to families throughout
Atlanta.
The homeschool extras
program is entering its third
semester offering a variety
of 16-week programs for
children ages 4-13, Monday
through Friday.

NOTICE OF CITY OF ATLANTA SPECIAL ELECTION 
   There shall be and is hereby called a City of Atlanta Special Election to be held on Tuesday, 
the 17th day of March, 2015 at all of the regular  and  established  polling places  for  holding 
elections in each precinct in the City. 
   This Special Election shall be presented to determine the issuance or non‐issuance by the City 
of Atlanta of General Obligation Public Improvement Bonds in an Aggregate Principal amount 
not to exceed $252,000,000 including financing costs, to fund a combined $250,000,000 in 
Public Improvement Capital Outlay Projects. Two questions will be presented to all qualified 
voters in the City. 
   The ballot labels shall have printed thereon the word “YES” and the word “NO” in order that 
each voter may cast his or her vote in either the affirmative or the negative in response to the 
following questions: 
(1) "SHALL  GENERAL  OBLIGATION  PUBLIC  IMPROVEMENT  BONDS IN AN AGGREGATE 
PRINCIPAL  AMOUNT  NOT  TO  EXCEED  $64,055,000  BE  ISSUED  BY  THE  CITY  OF 
ATLANTA  FOR  THE  PURPOSE  OF  PAYING  THE  COSTS  OF  THE  ACQUISITION, 
CONSTRUCTION,  RECONSTRUCTION,  RENOVATION,  REPAIR,  IMPROVEMENT, 
CRITICAL  CAPITAL  MAINTENANCE  AND  EQUIPPING  OF  MUNICIPAL  FACILITES 
INCLUDING BUILDINGS, RECREATION CENTERS AND OTHER FACILITIES AND RELATED 
PUBLIC IMPROVEMNTS AND THE COST OF COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH 
DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990  FOR  SUCH  F A C I L I T I E S   A N D   IMPROVEMENTS IN  THE 
CITY  OF  ATLANTA, GEORGIA?" 
(2) "SHALL  GENERAL  OBLIGATION  PUBLIC  IMPROVEMENT  BONDS IN AN AGGREGATE 
PRINCIPAL  AMOUNT  NOT  TO  EXCEED  $187,945,000  BE  ISSUED  BY  THE  CITY  OF 
ATLANTA FOR THE ACQUISITION,  CONSTRUCTION, RECONSTRUCTION, RENOVATION, 
REPAIR,  IMPROVEMENT,  CRITICAL  CAPITAL  MAINTENANCE  AND  EQUIPPING  OF 
PUBLIC  STREETS,  TRAFFIC  CONTROL  INFRASTRUCTURE AND  EQUIPMENT, CURBING, 
STORM  WATER  DRAINAGE,  STREET  NAME  AND  DIRECTIONAL  SIGNAGE,  BRIDGES, 
VIADUCTS  AND  RELATED  PUBLIC  IMPROVEMENTS  INCLUDING,  BUT  NOT  LIMITED 
TO  STREETLIGHTS,  SIDEWALKS,  BICYCLE  LANES,  AND  TRANSIT  STOPS  SO  AS  TO 
IMPROVE  THE  PEDESTRIAN  AND  TRANSIT  ENVIRONMENT,  THE  COST  OF 
COMPLIANCE  WITH  THE  AMERICANS  WITH  DISABILITIES  ACT  OF  1990  FOR  SUCH 
IMPROVEMENTS, IN THE  CITY  OF  ATLANTA, GEORGIA?" 
   Each polling place shall be opened at 7:00 o’ clock a.m. and closed at 7:00 o’clock p.m.  
   The  final  day  for  registration to vote in such election shall be February 17, 2015. 
For information  on  how  to  register  and where  to vote, you may  call  the  Fulton  county 
department of  registrations  and elections at 404‐612‐7020 or inquire at the offices of the 
fulton county  department of  registrations and  elections at 130  peachtree street,  suite  2186, 
atlanta, georgia.  
CITY OF ATLANTA 
Rhonda Dauphin Johnson 
Municipal Clerk 
 

 

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

local news

FREE Family Reunion Planning

Workshop & Showcase
Family Reunion Capital of the South

Saturday, February 21, 2015 - Atlanta Evergreen Marriott Conference Center
4021 Lakeview Drive, Stone Mountain, Georgia 30083

Service Centric Academy
Thursday, February 5 & March 5, 2015

Discover DeKalb offers FREE Customer Service Training for
Hospitality Industry Professionals. Classes are held at the
Discover DeKalb Conference Room.
1957 Lakeside Pkwy, Suite 510, Tucker, Georgia 30084

Call 770-492-5000

Pre-registration is required

AtlantasDeKalb.com

Page 12A

Pet of the Week

Joy (ID#
24501077) – Her
name fits her
well; she brings
happiness to
everyone she
meets! This sweet
3 year old girl is
the perfect mix
of wiggly and
relaxed. Joy
loves to play and
she also loves
to just hang out
with you. Seeing
her hop around
in excitement is
sure to make your
heart melt. Joy is an easy going girl who gets
along great with other dogs. Come to the DeKalb
shelter and meet this squishy-faced, super cute
pittie girl today! From now until January 31st, if
you “Ring in the New Year with a New Pet”, your
adoption fee will be waived! You’ll pay nothing
for this wonderful pet including spay, vaccines
and microchip! Potential adopters will still be
screened as usual to ensure Joy is going to
a good home. To learn more about Joy email
adoption@dekalbanimalservices.com or call (404)
294-2165. To view other great pets available for
adoption visit www.dekalbanimalservices.com.

In

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

WEEK

local

Page 13A

Pictures

Preschool students at Greenforest Christian Early Learning Center celebrated the life of Dr. Martin L. King Jr. Preschoolers took the stage with songs, poetry and skits about the life of
Dr. King. Photos by Ashley Oglesby

23

On Jan. 10, 56 walkers and runners were recognized for achieving Team Decatur Grand Slam Fitness Champion status at the annual Run With the Dogs 5k. To achieve the status, they participated in three of the qualifying races held in Decatur as well as the Kaiser Permanente Corporate Run Walk held in downtown Atlanta in
September 2014.

Photos brought to you by DCTV
DCTV Channel 23
@DCTVChannel23

Get your front row seat to all things DeKalb County
through your EMMY Award-winning station

DeKalb County Gov
Ustream.tv/channle/DCTV-Channel-23
VISIT US AT WWW.DCTVChannel23.tv

E-mail us at DCTV@DeKalbCountyGA.gov

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

Five qualify to
run for Avondale
Estates mayor
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Five people will face
off in March to be the new
mayor of Avondale Estates.
Paul Brown, Jonathan
Elmore, Jim Hutchens,
John Pomberg and Todd
Pullen qualified to run for
mayor. A special election
will be held March 17 to fill
the vacate position. Former
mayor, Ed Rieker, resigned
Oct. 2, 2014, Mayor Pro
Tem Terry Giager is acting
as mayor.
Rieker’s resignation
came a day after he apologized to residents at an Oct.
1 meeting for how he and
the commission handled an
annexation bill. Brown said
the city needs leaders and
a government that is transparent.
“I just want a transparent government, and I think
I can provide that, as well as
leadership through the annexation issues and new development that is occurring
in town,” he said.
Brown has lived in
Avondale Estates for seven
years and is a member of
the Avondale Estates Board
of Appeals, where he has
served since September
2013. He has owned Brown
Architects LLC for 28 years,
and is married to Jennifer
Fogleman Brown with two
stepsons ages 21 and 24.
He said future development and the growth of
downtown Avondale Estates
are among the issues that he
will focus on if he becomes
mayor.
Although this is his first
time running for an elected
position, Brown said he
has enough experience as
a businessman and working with government and
communities to be the new
leader of Avondale Estates.
“I look forward to listening to my fellow residents
of Avondale Estates, learning about their priorities
for the city and how we can
together preserve the character and quality of life that
we value,” Brown said.
Pomberg said he is running for mayor because the

local news

Page 14A

Center Continued From Page 2A
seniors who are not able to perform as they
should but…are not disabled.”
“We need to get an active senior adult
center in the area,” Alexis said.
Alexis had a
message for commissioners if they
consider cutting
the budget for senior centers.
“You’re going
to be called on
every day if we
see this coming
down the line,”
she said.
One senior,
Sandra Harris
of Decatur, had
praise for the
commissioners.
“I’m especially
proud of our commissioners for making our dream about to
come to fruition,” she said. “We were told
that in the spring of 2015 we [will] have a
grand opening and we are so excited.”
Harris was referring to the South DeKalb
Senior Center, located at 1931 Candler

Road, which, once completed, will be a
15,000-square-foot facility with amenities
including community meeting rooms, a
computer lab, a fitness area and more. Additionally, the center
will include classrooms to accommodate the various
activities requested
by the community
and a dining hall
seating approximately 120.
“I know sometimes the seniors
can be short tempered or sometimes
they are a little
impatient but that’s
our way of keeping you alert and
accountable,” Harris said. “We’ve
already begun drafting an invitation for
this grand opening and making a guest list.
We’re excited and we’re making plans to
move in by this spring. We look forward to
being there and occupying our new facility.”

'I’m especially proud of our
commissioners for making
our dream about to come to
fruition.'

Brown
city is at an exciting and
challenging time in its history and development.
“If elected, I envision my
role as mayor to be the facilitator of a wide spectrum
of viewpoints, interests and
opinions, always seeking the
common ground of what is
best for Avondale Estates,
now and in the future,”
Pomberg said.
Pomberg, a native of
Iowa, is married with two
adult children. Before moving to Avondale Estates in
2012, the retired Navy veteran worked for the Iowa
Department of Corrections
for 18 years.
Pomberg is a member
of the Avondale Community Club. He is president
of the Kensington Walk
Homeowner’s Association,
and participated in the 2013
Avondale Estates Citizens
Police Academy.
Issues that Pomberg
is focused on include annexation, development of
recently acquired commercial properties, continued
development of the Tudor
Village and adjacent properties, and the development of
the Fenner Dunlop tract.
“I have participated in
the workshops involved
in the formulation of the
newly revised master development plan for the city as
well as actively participating in [Board of Mayor and
Commissioners] meetings
and workshops related to
annexation,” he said.
Voting for mayor will
take place March 17 from 7
a.m. to 7 p.m. at Avondale
Estates City Hall.

–Sandra Harris

PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to O.C.G.A. §21-2-131 (a)(1)(A), qualification fees for elected officials were set
at the January 6, 2015 City Council meeting by the Mayor and Council of the City of
Stone Mountain, Georgia. The qualifying fee for the office of Council Member will be
$108.00 and $360.00 for the office of Mayor. Such fees shall be three percent (3%) of
the total gross salary of the office paid in the preceding calendar year.
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITY OF BROOKHAVEN
FIXING OF QUALIFYING FEES
The date of the Municipal Election for the Offices of Mayor, Councilmember of Council
Districts 1 (one) and 3 (three) is Tuesday, November 3, 2015. The qualifying fee for each
council seat is $360.00 and the Mayor is $480 which is 3% of the total gross salary of the
preceding year (Georgia Election Code 21-2-131). Notice of the opening and closing dates and
the hours for candidates to qualify will be published at a later date.  
Susan D. Hiott 
City Clerk  
  NOTICE OF SPECIAL ELECTION, QUALIFYING REQUIREMENTS, AND REGISTRATION  
 
CITY OF AVONDALE ESTATES, GEORGIA 
 
 

Notice is hereby given that a Special Election for the City of Avondale Estates will be held on Tuesday, 
March 17, 2015 to fill the vacancy and unexpired term of Mayor. The person elected to fill this unexpired 
term will serve through December 31, 2015.  This seat will be up for re‐election on November 3, 2015 
and the candidate elected in November will serve a four (4) year term beginning January 1, 2016. 
 
Voting will take place at the following locations: 
∙         Avondale Estates City Hall, 21 North Avondale Plaza, Avondale Estates, Georgia, 30002 from 
7 a.m. to 7 p.m.  
AND 
∙        For the newly annexed area of Stratford Green Townhomes (ONLY), voting will take place at 
Avondale  Pattillo  United  Methodist  Church,  3260  Covington  Highway,  Decatur,  Georgia 
30032 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.  
 
Any person who is a resident of the City of Avondale Estates and who is registered with DeKalb County 
Board  of  Registrations  and  Elections  by  February  17,  2015,  as  an  elector  within  the  City  of  Avondale 
Estates, shall be eligible to vote in this election.  
 
Advance voting begins February 23, 2015, at the DeKalb County Elections Division, 4380 Memorial Drive, 
Decatur, Georgia 30032, 404‐298‐4020. 
 
 

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

local news

Page 15A

It took three hours for the group to clean out trees and brush that overran the cemetery. Afterwards, the group went to Stone Mountain Village to ring the Freedom Bell in
honor of Dr. Kind. Photos by Carla Parker

Cleans Continued From Page 1A
things for not only the
African-American community but for this country
as a whole. People had the
foresight to turn this into a
day of service to honor his
legacy and his message,”
Wells said. “Because of that
I wanted to put together a
project that we can all come
together as a community, get
to know our neighbors and
do something great for the
benefit of the community as
a whole.
“I hope that this will spur
not only an annual event,
but also quarterly where
we can all get together as a
community and do some
sort of community serviceoriented event,” Wells added.
Councilwoman Chakira
Johnson said it meant a
lot to the city to see people
from the community and
outside the community
come together for the project.
“We’ve had people from
Covington and Lawrenceville come out today, and it
means a lot to see the community come together on a
special day,” Johnson said.
Alicia King from Cov-

ington said she rarely volunteer on King Day, and it was
her mother who suggested
that they both do something
to commemorate King’s
legacy. She found out about
the project online.
“Because [my mother]
could not make it, I just
took it upon myself to come
out here, and after seeing
Selma,” King said. “That was
even more motivation to be
a part of something.”
Wells said that since the
city has made progress in
cleaning up the cemetery,
they will continue to maintain it.
“I also hope that this will
spur the surrounding community that has loved ones
buried here that they will
come out here and continue
to do their part to maintain
it—put flowers and do stuff,”
Wells said. “The city can’t do
everything, as every city is
stretched thin. We definitely
need the help from the community, not just for this
cemetery but also for the
other cemetery, and all the
parks. We all need the community support to maintain
our beautiful spaces.”

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The DeKalb County Board of Commissioners will hold Public Hearings on the 2015 Proposed Budget at the times and places listed
below:
Tuesday
February 10, 2015
10:00AM
Maloof Center Auditorium
1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur
Tuesday
February 24, 2015
10:00AM
Maloof Center Auditorium
1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur
All interested citizens are invited to attend these hearings and have the right to present comments pertaining to the proposed
budget.
The recommended budget is available for public inspection in the office of the Director of Finance, 6th Floor, Maloof Center, at all
DeKalb County Libraries during normal business hours, and electronically at www.dekalbcountyga.gov.
2015 RECOMMENDED BUDGET RESOLUTION

2014 Budget at
2015 Executive

November, 2014
Recommendation
TAX FUNDS


GENERAL FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$37,403,925
$7,246,395


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Taxes
$215,838,035
$252,440,991

Licenses and Permits
93,013
0

Intergovernmental
2,008,128
1,678,553

Charges for Services
34,806,867
39,378,930

Fines and Forfeitures
10,276,796
10,441,768

Miscellaneous
4,209,144
3,064,589

Other Financing Sources
3,944,789
3,421,435
TOTAL REVENUES
$271,176,772
$310,426,266

TOTAL FUNDING
$308,580,697
$317,672,661

EXPENDITURES:

Chief Executive Officer
$1,288,906
$1,183,524

Board of Commissioners
3,142,455
3,250,832

Executive Assistant
1,065,230
1,073,212

Ethics Board
215,242
215,242

Law Department
4,775,812
4,704,169

Geographic Info Systems
2,109,772
2,266,975

Facilities Management
15,172,388
15,848,908

Purchasing
3,198,718
2,996,650

Human Resources & Merit System
3,199,620
3,418,182

Information Systems
19,392,272
21,505,619

Finance
6,510,396
8,566,178

Property Appraisal
4,488,440
4,514,374

Tax Commissioner
7,076,045
7,200,875

Registrar
3,422,532
1,964,754

Sheriff
76,386,127
77,527,484

Juvenile Court
8,991,757
8,958,199

Superior Court
8,631,724
8,749,446

Clerk of Superior Court
6,663,013
7,029,220

State Court
13,208,128
13,775,607

Solicitor - General
6,106,205
6,421,821

District Attorney
12,632,287
13,741,806

Child Advocate’s Office
1,995,675
2,012,794

Probate Court
1,573,773
1,609,209

Medical Examiner
2,501,104
2,443,290

Public Defender
7,706,696
8,318,684

Police
6,004,428
7,615,944

Magistrate Court
2,753,702
2,958,733

Fire & Rescue Services
9,053,795
9,041,340

GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES (cont.)

Planning & Development
1,357,012
1,262,057

Public Works - Director
291,588
297,857

Economic Development
1,293,717
865,702

Library
13,287,932
13,942,007

Cooperative Extension
$599,996
$610,465

Public Health
3,955,634
3,955,634

Community Service Board
1,784,057
1,784,057

DFACS
1,278,220
1,278,220

Human Services
4,459,282
4,068,045

Contributions to Capital Projects
7,314,330
1,500,000

Grants
(680)
0
CIP
(1)
0

Non - Departmental
14,160,365
20,546,172
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$289,047,694
$299,023,287

RESERVES
$19,533,001
$18,649,374

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$308,580,695
$317,672,661

FIRE FUND


Fund Balance Carried Forward
$6,303,289
$1,123,462


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Taxes
$54,374,589
$57,614,069

Licenses & Permits
670,296
0

Charges for Services
21,302
630,622

Miscellaneous Revenue
0
40,261

TOTAL REVENUE
$55,066,187
$58,284,952

TOTAL FUNDING
$61,369,476
$59,408,414

EXPENDITURES:

Fire & Rescue Services
$50,294,464
$48,932,418

Non - Departmental
8,877,171
7,788,670
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$59,171,635
$56,721,088

RESERVES
$2,197,841
$2,687,326

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$61,369,476
$59,408,414

DESIGNATED SERVICES

Fund Balance Carried Forward
($2,102,567)
$9,871,032


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Taxes
$14,831,533
$11,387,109

Charges for Services
891,068
655,227

Miscellaneous
259,737
270,213

Other Financing Sources
19,302,956
15,909,558

TOTAL REVENUES
$35,285,294
$28,222,107

TOTAL FUNDING
$33,182,727
$38,093,139

EXPENDITURES:

Public Works - Transportation
$3,114,763
$2,863,489

Public Works - Roads & Drainage
10,214,581
15,375,606

Parks & Recreation
10,887,119
11,153,997

Non - Departmental
8,526,030
6,702,210
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$32,742,493
$36,095,302

RESERVES
$440,234
$1,997,837

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$33,182,727
$38,093,139

UNINCORPORATED

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$3,990,208
$4,323,371


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Taxes
$30,802,294
$29,795,997

Licenses and Permits
20,862,265
21,643,363

Fines and Forfeitures
17,114,710
18,560,351

Miscellaneous
(101,998)
16,748

Other Financing Sources
(55,557,230)
(60,016,547)

TOTAL REVENUES
$13,120,041
$9,999,912

TOTAL FUNDING
$17,110,249
$14,323,283

EXPENDITURES:

C E O Office - Cable TV Support
$489,274
$562,462

Finance - Business License
873,721
0

Recorder’s Court
4,264,927
4,230,713

Planning & Development- Zoning Analysis 4,076,955
4,851,595

Non - Departmental
3,208,637
2,204,764
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$12,913,514
$11,849,534

RESERVES
$4,196,735
$2,473,749

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$17,110,249
$14,323,283

HOSPITAL FUND


Fund Balance Carried Forward
($5,497,078)
($870,323)


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Taxes
$17,153,238
$19,005,063

Investment Income
331,040
0
TOTAL REVENUES
$17,484,278
$19,005,063

TOTAL FUNDING
$11,987,200
$18,134,740

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$11,570,568
$17,491,406

RESERVES
$416,632
$643,334

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$11,987,200
$18,134,740

POLICE SERVICES FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$13,377,995
$3,388,133


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Taxes
$66,174,085
$62,146,156

Licenses and Permits
1,027,952
693,695

Charges for Services
477,817
420,841

Miscellaneous
165,342
91,552

Other Financing Sources
38,504,388
47,728,675
TOTAL REVENUES
$106,349,584
$111,080,919

TOTAL FUNDING
$119,727,579
$114,469,052

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$118,353,670
$107,609,728

RESERVES
$1,373,909
$6,859,324

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$119,727,579
$114,469,052

DEBT SERVICE FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$6,807,676
$3,699,062


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Taxes
$1,032,216
$674,138
TOTAL REVENUES
$1,032,216
$674,138

TOTAL FUNDING
$7,839,892
$4,373,200

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$3,799,133
$2,328,500

RESERVES
$4,040,759
$2,044,700

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$7,839,892
$4,373,200


SPECIAL TAX DISTRICT - DEBT SERVICE FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$5,458,897
$7,006,891


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Taxes
$26,327,873
$7,778,881
TOTAL REVENUES
$26,327,873
$7,778,881

TOTAL FUNDING
$31,786,770
$14,785,772

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$27,559,719
$12,620,219

RESERVES
$4,227,051
$2,165,553

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$31,786,770
$14,785,772


TOTAL TAX FUNDS EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$555,158,426
$543,739,064
TOTAL TAX FUNDS RESERVES
$36,426,162
$37,521,197
TOTAL TAX FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS
$591,584,588
$581,260,261

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS

DEVELOPMENT FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$868,909
$1,479,012


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Licenses and Permits
$5,196,400
$5,934,200

Charges for Services
26,000
20,000

Investment Income
1,500
2,500
Miscellaneous
(7,200)
(1,850)

TOTAL REVENUES
$5,216,700
$5,954,850


TOTAL FUNDING
$6,085,609
$7,433,862

EXPENDITURES:

Planning & Sustainability
$5,791,851
$5,660,999
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$5,791,851
$5,660,999

RESERVES
$293,758
$1,772,863

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$6,085,609
$7,433,862

PUBLIC EDUCATION & GOVERNMENT ACCESS FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$1,959,338
$1,399,553


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Investment Income
$10,000
$1,000

Miscellaneous
145,000
80,000
TOTAL REVENUES
$155,000
$81,000

TOTAL FUNDING
$2,114,338
$1,480,553

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$739,338
($62,621,947)

RESERVES
$1,375,000
$64,102,500

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$2,114,338
$1,480,553

COUNTY JAIL FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$2,000
$2,000


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Intergovernmental
$110,000
$110,000

Fines and Forfeitures
807,288
1,057,500
TOTAL REVENUE
$917,288
$1,167,500

TOTAL FUNDING
$919,288
$1,169,500

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$917,288
$1,149,110

RESERVES
$2,000
$20,390

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$919,288
$1,169,500

FORECLOSURE REGISTRY FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$939,147
$589,260


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Charges for Services
$240,000
$108,000

TOTAL REVENUES
$240,000
$108,000

TOTAL FUNDING
$1,179,147
$697,260


EXPENDITURES:
$469,089
$437,001


RESERVES
$710,058
$260,259

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$1,179,147
$697,260

HOTEL / MOTEL TAX FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$1,548,364
$1,548,364


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Taxes
$4,469,106
$5,000,000

TOTAL REVENUES
$4,469,106
$5,000,000

TOTAL FUNDING
$6,017,470
$6,548,364


EXPENDITURES:
$5,954,359
$5,000,000


RESERVES
$63,111
$1,548,364

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$6,017,470
$6,548,364

RENTAL MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$751,589
$647,998


ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Taxes
$655,938
$601,034

TOTAL REVENUES
$655,938
$601,034

TOTAL FUNDING
$1,407,527
$1,249,032


EXPENDITURES:
$707,625
$708,375

RESERVES
$699,902
$540,657

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$1,407,527
$1,249,032

VICTIM ASSISTANCE FUND

See Public Hearing on page 17A

Public Continued from page 16A

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$51,056
$52,697

Other Financing Sources
147,143
1,052,857


TOTAL REVENUE
$62,774,419
$64,915,857

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

TOTAL FUNDING
$70,212,487
$66,270,360

Intergovernmental
$380,000
$450,000


Fines and Forfeitures
1,000,000
350,000

Public Works - Sanitation
$69,962,853
$66,046,638
TOTAL REVENUES
$1,380,000
$800,000

Finance - Revenue Collections
249,634
223,722

TOTAL FUNDING
$1,431,056
$852,697
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$70,212,487
$66,270,360

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$1,370,500
$852,697

RESERVES
$0
$0

RESERVES
$60,556
$0

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$70,212,487
$66,270,360

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$1,431,056
$852,697


DEKALB - PEACHTREE AIRPORT
RECREATION FUND

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$8,090,018
$7,907,209

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$37,409
($124,043)



ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Miscellaneous
$5,071,400
$5,100,000

Charges for Services
$962,168
$880,580

TOTAL REVENUES
$5,071,400
$5,100,000
TOTAL REVENUE
$962,168
$880,580

TOTAL FUNDING
$13,161,418
$13,007,209

TOTAL FUNDING
$999,577
$756,537


TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$999,577
$756,537

Airport Operations
$3,035,151
$2,923,146

RESERVES
$0
$0

Transfer to Capital Projects
2,000,000
4,000,000

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$999,577
$756,537
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$5,035,151
$6,923,146


RESERVES
$8,126,267
$6,084,063
LAW ENFORCEMENT CONFISCATED MONIES FUND

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$13,161,418
$13,007,209

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$6,790,146
$6,523,948


STORMWATER UTILITY OPERATING FUND

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$16,140,474
$15,248,666

Intergovernmental
3,080,843
0


TOTAL REVENUES
$3,080,843
$0

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

TOTAL FUNDING
$9,870,989
$6,523,948

Charges for Services
$14,750,000
$14,125,000


Investment Income
12,000
12,000
EXPENDITURES:

TOTAL REVENUES
$14,762,000
$14,137,000

Sheriff
$796,238
$1,125,997

TOTAL FUNDING
$30,902,474
$29,385,666

District Attorney
108,750
185,575


State Court Marshal
9,005
0

EXPENDITURES:

Public Safety - Police
6,409,824
5,212,376

Stormwater Operations
$23,202,295
$20,314,353

Grants
600,000
0
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$23,202,295
$20,314,353
TOTAL - L.E.C.M. FUND
$7,923,817
$6,523,948

RESERVES
$7,700,179
$9,071,313

RESERVES
$0
$0

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$30,902,474
$29,385,666

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$7,923,817
$6,523,948


INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS
JUVENILE SERVICES FUND


Fund Balance Carried Forward
$223,524
$73,428


FLEET MAINTENANCE

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$383,026
$0

Charges for Services
$30,000
$28,000


Investment Income
225
200

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:
TOTAL REVENUES
$30,225
$28,200

Intergovernmental
$200,000
$245,889

TOTAL FUNDING
$253,749
$101,628

Charges for Services
33,100,000
33,900,250

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$253,749
$101,628

Miscellaneous
600,000
80,000

RESERVES
$0
$0

TOTAL REVENUES
$33,900,000
$34,226,139

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$253,749
$101,628

TOTAL FUNDING
$34,283,026
$34,226,139


DRUG ABUSE TREATMENT & EDUCATION FUND

EXPENDITURES:

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$133,096
$198,177

Public Works - Fleet Maintenance
$34,283,026
$34,226,139

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$34,283,026
$34,226,139

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

RESERVES
$0
$0

Fines and Forfeitures
$130,000
$225,000

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$34,283,026
$34,226,139


Investment Income
125
150
VEHICLE FUND
TOTAL REVENUES
$130,125
$225,150

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$24,318,261
$23,383,089

TOTAL FUNDING
$263,221
$423,327


TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$149,872
$423,327

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

RESERVES
$113,349
$0

Charges for Services
$15,955,490
$25,893,974

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$263,221
$423,327

Investment Income
7,500
10,000


Other Financing Sources
500,000
900,000
STREET LIGHT FUND
TOTAL REVENUE
$16,462,990
$26,803,974

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$2,223,526
$1,933,593

TOTAL FUNDING
$40,781,251
$50,187,063


TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$28,528,673
$43,550,107

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

RESERVES
$12,252,578
$6,636,956

Charges for Services
$4,500,000
$4,500,000

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$40,781,251
$50,187,063

Investment Income
900
1,000

TOTAL REVENUES
$4,500,900
$4,501,000
RISK MANAGEMENT

TOTAL FUNDING
$6,724,426
$6,434,593

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$11,585,528
$14,131,920

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$4,603,222
$4,607,114


RESERVES
$2,121,204
$1,827,479

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$6,724,426
$6,434,593

Charges for Services
$9,549,743
$8,400,000


TOTAL REVENUE
$9,549,743
$8,400,000
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE SYSTEM FUND

TOTAL FUNDING
$21,135,271
$22,531,920

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$4,890,849
$2,894,062



EXPENDITURES:

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Unemployment Compensation
$500,000
$500,000

Investment Income
$5,000
$0

Group Health & Life
550,000
816,000

Miscellaneous
10,525,000
9,000,000

Buildings & Contents
1,326,500
857,000

Other Financing Sources
0
514,023

Boiler & Machinery
51,000
0
TOTAL REVENUES
$10,530,000
$9,514,023

Non- Immunity Expenses
2,000,000
2,000,000

TOTAL FUNDING
$15,420,849
$12,408,085

Vehicle
4,452,655
3,302,500

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$14,104,048
$12,408,085

Airport Liability
6,588
7,000

RESERVES
$1,316,801
$0

Helicopter
150,000
125,000

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$15,420,849
$12,408,085

Money & Securities
35,000
23,000


Loss Control
478,000
478,000
SPEED HUMPS MAINTENANCE FUND

Other
0
14,423,420

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$1,357,255
$1,392,972
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$9,549,743
$22,531,920


RESERVES
$11,585,528
$0

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$21,135,271
$22,531,920

Charges for Services
$312,000
$290,000


Investment Income
3,000
3,000
WORKERS’ COMPENSATION
TOTAL REVENUES
$315,000
$293,000

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$3,787,754
($138,153)

TOTAL FUNDING
$1,672,255
$1,685,972


TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$340,971
$379,272

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

RESERVES
$1,331,284
$1,306,700

Charges for Services
$2,846,562
$6,293,653

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$1,672,255
$1,685,972
TOTAL REVENUE
$2,846,562
$6,293,653


TOTAL FUNDING
$6,634,316
$6,155,500
ENTERPRISE FUNDS

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$6,288,000
$6,155,500


RESERVES
$346,316
$0


TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$6,634,316
$6,155,500
WATER & SEWERAGE OPERATING FUND



Fund Balance Carried Forward
$28,164,720
$28,164,720
REVENUE BONDS LEASE PAYMENT FUNDS



ANTICIPATED REVENUES:
BUILDING AUTHORITY LEASE PAYMENTS


Charges for Services
$257,655,000
$256,885,872

Fund Balance Carried Forward
($155,144)
$11,091

Investment Income
160,000
184,419


Miscellaneous
1,500,000
415,635

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

Other Financing Sources
0
116,315

Miscellaneous
$3,110,393
$2,704,715
TOTAL REVENUES
$259,315,000
$257,602,241
TOTAL REVENUES
$3,110,393
$2,704,715

TOTAL FUNDING
$287,479,720
$285,766,961

TOTAL FUNDING
$2,955,249
$2,715,806


TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$2,955,249
$2,715,806
EXPENDITURES:

RESERVES
$0
$0

Public Works - Water & Sewer
$273,973,750
$270,435,604

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$2,955,249
$2,715,806

Finance - Revenue Collections
7,418,759
8,245,778

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$281,392,509
$278,681,382
PUBLIC SAFETY AND JUDICIAL FACILITIES AUTHORITY LEASE PAYMENTS

RESERVES
$6,087,211
$7,085,579

Fund Balance Carried Forward
($3,046,655)
$138,281

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$287,479,720
$285,766,961



ANTICIPATED REVENUES:
WATER & SEWERAGE SINKING FUND

Miscellaneous
$6,272,327
$0

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$21,918,633
$3,603,435
TOTAL REVENUES
$6,272,327
$0


TOTAL FUNDING
$3,225,672
$138,281

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$3,103,601
$0

Miscellaneous
583114
$583,114
$541,498

RESERVES
$122,071
$138,281

Other Financing Sources
45646363 45,646,363
62,618,623

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$3,225,672
$138,281
TOTAL REVENUES
$46,229,477
$63,160,121


TOTAL FUNDING
$68,148,110
$66,763,556
URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY BONDS DEBT SERVICE

TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$67,564,996
$66,763,556

Fund Balance Carried Forward
($364,160)
$144,799

RESERVES
$583,114
$0

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$68,148,110
$66,763,556

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:


Miscellaneous
$1,265,477
$614,580
SANITATION FUND
TOTAL REVENUES
$1,265,477
$614,580

Fund Balance Carried Forward
$7,438,068
$1,354,503

TOTAL FUNDING
$901,317
$759,379


TOTAL EXPENDITURES
$758,011
$748,178

ANTICIPATED REVENUES:

RESERVES
$143,306
$11,201

Charges for Services
$62,576,776
$63,682,000

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$901,317
$759,379

Investment Income
4,000
0

Miscellaneous
46,500
181,000

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

Education

Page 18A

School district
releases updated
calendar
by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com

Jaguar’s baseball program ended due to a merger. Photo by Bill Roa

GPC suspends
athletic programs
by Rebecca Rakoczy
Georgia Perimeter College (GPC) has suspended
recruiting for all of its athletic teams and likely will
not field any athletic teams
next year.
The recruitment decision was made earlier this
week by GPC’s interim president, Rob Watts, following
the Jan. 6 announcement
of the University System
Georgia’s plans to consolidate Georgia Perimeter with
Georgia State University.
Although recruiting
occurs year-round, many
students typically sign their
college commitments in the
spring, said Alfred Barney,
GPC’s athletic director and
men’s basketball coach. Affected sports are men’s and
women’s basketball, soccer
and tennis plus softball and
baseball.
Watts made the announcement during the
question-and-answer session of GPC’s town hall
meeting Jan. 13.
“My office and the
athletic director’s office
have been inundated with
phone calls from parents of

students who have been recruited right now to play for
us next year,” Watts said.
“We found we could not
be fair to students and their
parents because we could
not look them in the eye
and say we will have a team
two years from now,” Watts
said. “And we cannot be fair
to the student athlete if that
student athlete is not going
to get a chance to play. So I
have suspended recruiting
for the next year for sports. “
Watts noted that 86 student freshman athletes on
scholarship will get a letter
stating that their scholarships will be honored
through their eligibility if
they want to stay at GPC
and complete their degrees.
“Or if they want to go off
and play somewhere else
and not sit out a year, we
will release them so they can
play immediately,” he said.
Currently, the school has
150 athletes participating
in all sports, according to
Barney.
GPC’s baseball, softball, tennis and basketball
programs will finish their
spring seasons, Barney
said. However, because of

the number of freshmen
students who likely will be
offered the option to leave,
he anticipates that there will
be no GPC team sports offered during the 2015-16
academic year.

The DeKalb County
Board of Education approved its 2015-2016 school
calendar at its Jan. 12 meeting.
Stacey Stepney, director
of special programs, said,
“The proposed calendar is
instructionally found in alliance with similarly sized
districts in close geographic
proximity.”
She added, “61.2 percent of our employees live
in DeKalb, 11.4 percent in
Gwinnett and 7.9 percent
in Fulton County. The reason that information is important is that you will see
many features of our calendar are aligned to the other
districts.”
The district calendar
committee convened in September to develop several
calendar options for DeKalb
Schools Superintendent Michael Thurmond’s consideration.
In the final proof of the
calendar, teachers will have
a week of planning starting Aug. 3. The first day of

school is scheduled for Aug.
10 like Gwinnett and Fulton
counties. There will be a total of 180 days of classes and
190 work days, no fall break
and the last day of school is
May 26 with a post planning
day on May 27.
The calendar committee
was comprised of students,
parents, guardians, community business partners,
school level staff and district
level advisory,” according to
Stepney.
She added, “The committee members were
tasked with considering the
following data sets other
metro districts’ calendars,
the number of days per semester, inclement weather
and emergency days, spring
holidays and state testing
parameters.”
“Also the members decided to obtain stakeholders
input through a survey rather than a vote. It is important to note that the district
made the survey available in
English as well as seven additional languages to reach
as many stakeholders as possible,” Stepney said.

Notice of Public Hearing 
   The Mayor and City Council of the City of Chamblee, Georgia will hold a public hearing on 
Thursday, February 12, 2015, at the Chamblee Civic Center, 3540 Broad Street, Chamblee, GA 
30341 at 6:00 p.m. to receive public comments regarding the following matters: 
   1) 2015PUD‐01: Kenneth J. Wood, on behalf of Planners and Engineers Collaborative, requests 
approval of a Planned Unit Development as provided in Section 207 of the City of Chamblee 
Code of Ordinances, Appendix A, Zoning Ordinance in order to develop 30 townhouses on a 2.6 
acre site consisting of DeKalb County tax parcels 18‐334‐01‐172, 18‐334‐01‐006, 18‐334‐01‐005, 
18‐334‐01‐004, 18‐334‐01‐003, and 18‐334‐01‐002, also known as 4135, 4139, 4147, 4153, 
4155, and 4161 North Peachtree Road in Chamblee, GA. The subject property is zoned Corridor 
Commercial (CC). 
   2) 2015PUD‐02: Jeff Garrison, on behalf of S.J. Collins Enterprises, requests approval of a 
Planned Unit Development as provided in Section 207 of the City of Chamblee Code of 
Ordinances, Appendix A, Zoning Ordinance in order to develop a planned shopping center 
consisting of 110,000 sq. ft. on a 11.2‐acre site consisting of DeKalb County tax parcels 18‐278‐
14‐002, 18‐278‐14‐006, 18‐278‐14‐007, and 18‐278‐14‐008, also known as 5001, 4961, 4949, 
and 4934 Peachtree Boulevard in Chamblee, GA.  The subject property is zoned Corridor 
Commercial (CC). 
   3) 2015V‐01: Tim Harper requests a stream buffer variance from Section 34‐1005 of the City of 
Chamblee Code of Ordinances, in order to construct one single‐family dwelling on a  
0.543‐acre lot being DeKalb County tax parcel 18‐307‐01‐007, also known as 5142 Cold Spring 
Lane in Chamblee, GA. The subject parcel is zoned Neighborhood Residential – 1 (NR‐1). 

 

Education

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

Page 19A

From left, GPC interim President Robb Watts, USG Vice Chancellor for planning and implementation Shelley Nickel and Georgia State University President Mark Becker. Photo taken by Bill
Roa

Key players in college merger defend mission
by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com
Georgia Perimeter College’s (GPC) Interim President Robb Watts on Jan. 13
hosted the first town hall
meeting on its upcoming
consolidation with Georgia
State University (GSU) after the University System of
Georgia Board of Regents
(USG) approved a plan to
make the two colleges one
institution.
The GPC and GSU
merger will make the new
institution the largest within
the state’s system of public
colleges and universities with
almost 54,000 students.
Georgia State President
Mark Becker will serve as
the president of the new institution.
Watts invited Becker and
Shelley Nickel, USG vice
chancellor for planning and
implementation, to answer
questions regarding the consolidation.
The meeting was held at
the GPC Dunwoody campus
and was streamed live to all
GPC campuses. Both presidents and Nickel also answered questions at GSU at
a second town hall meeting
later in the afternoon.

When GPC was first
opened in 1964 under the
Junior College Act of 1958
by the residents of DeKalb
County and the DeKalb
Board of Education, it was
established that any resident
of the DeKalb County School
District who had obtained
a high school diploma or its
equivalent and sought two
years of post-secondary education might have the opportunity to do so.
The college’s Decatur
campus opened in 1972 and
students enrolled in DeKalb
Area Technical School
were able to enroll dually
in vocational and collegiate
programs. The college was
designated DeKalb Community College. The name was
ultimately changed to Georgia Perimeter College.
GPC’s access mission was
established to communicate
the school’s core purpose and
focus to the public. Typically
an organization’s mission
remains the same but many
people are concerned that
the merge will eliminate the
GPC institution and decrease
enrollment of GPC’s minority population.
Watts said, “Georgia Perimeter College has played
an access mission to be the

college for people who otherwise wouldn’t or couldn’t
be in college this year for
50 years and for the next 50
years as a part of Georgia
State University will be playing an access mission.”
Watts said that he has
worked with access colleges
since 1986 and said, “The
one thing you can be assured
of in this process is we will
not lose the access mission in
the consolidation.”
“We will continue to
serve the kind of students
that we have always served,”
he added.
Nickel served as interim
president for Gordon College, a two-year unit of USG
when Watts served as USG’s
chief operating officer.
Nickel said, “The board
of regents is also committed
to preserving the access mission. It serves a great need

for both our students and the
communities that we serve
throughout metro Atlanta
and throughout our state. I
think you can be rest assured
that it will not be disrupted
through this consolidation.”
The merger will be the
sixth consolidation within
the past two years of schools
within the state’s system of
public colleges and universities.
System Chancellor Hank
Huckaby first suggested
mergers in September 2011,
a few months after he took
over as chancellor, as part of
a plan to deal with declining
state revenues. The plan first
went into effect early last
year, when the state Board
of Regents agreed to merge
eight institutions into four
new ones, which shrank the
system from 35 to 31 colleges.

“We have learned quite a
bit throughout the process,
they typically take about 18
months and part of that is
guided by Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
(SACS) accreditation,” said
Nickel.
Nickel said a prospectus
is one of the first things that
will be worked on “that will
most likely go to SACS by
Oct. 1 to meet their deadline
for next December’s meeting
where they will give approval, hopefully, to the consolidation plan.”
She added, “Students will
probably under that timeline
not register as new Georgia
State students until Fall of
2016.”
The website consolidation.gsu.edu has been created
to provide information about
the consolidation throughout
the process.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
    Notice is hereby given by the City of Doraville City Council that a Public Hearing on the 
following item will be held by the Doraville City Council in the Council Chamber located at 3725 
Park Avenue, Doraville, Georgia on the following date: 
City Council Meeting 
February 17, 2015 
6:30 p.m. 
   Amendment to City of Doraville Code of Ordinances Sections 23‐401 Definitions; 23‐907 – O‐I 
Office/Institutional; 23‐910 C‐2 General Commercial and Sec. 23‐912 M‐2 Heavy Manufacturing 
to revise zoning use regulations pertaining to Massage and Spa Establishments 
 
 

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

business

Page 20A

Surrounded by health center staff, DeKalb Chamber of Commerce staff and other well-wishers, Dr. Frank Lockwood cuts the ribbon to officially open the new facility.

New center offers urgent and primary healthcare
by Kathy Mitchell
A former pediatric health center in Decatur has been bought by
Texas-based American CareSource.
With the snip of a red, white and
blue ribbon, on Jan. 9 it officially reopened as a facility for ages “zero to
the grave,” its director explained.
Frank Lockwood, MD, medical
director of the American CareSource
office on Scott Boulevard, said the
facility is a model he predicts will
become more common in American
healthcare. The goal, he said, is to
make family healthcare accessible
and affordable.
The office is part of a chain of
medical centers throughout the
southeastern United States. Its business model involves offering extended hours and weekend service as well
as accepting patients by appointment
and on a walk-in basis with a range
of medical services, including family
practice and occupational medicine.
Two facilities in one, the American CareSourse office is an urgent
care facility and a primary care office. “On one side people come with
the types of medical issues that might
take them to the emergency room—
injuries, pain, sudden illness. On the
other side there is basic health and
wellness care, including screening,

Frank Lockwood, MD

routine care and preventive care,”
Lockwood said.
He said that while the two sides
are separate, he anticipates that many
patients will use both. “Someone
might come to the urgent care side
because they have a sudden fever or
chest pain or have burned themselves
cooking and learn that we also do
primary care,” Lockwood said.
“We ask patients whether they
have a regular physician. If they do,
fine. They should continue going to

that person. I’m a strong believer in
continuity of care,” the medical director said. “If they need a primary
care doctor, however, we let them
know that we also function as a primary care facility with everything
from laboratory services to diabetes
and weight management programs.”
At the same time, Lockwood
continued, “primary care patients
know they have a place to come for
urgent care at a lower cost than they
would normally find in a hospital
emergency room and with a shorter
wait time.”
He said the center’s goal is to get
urgent care patients in and out in an
hour. “Of course that’s not always
possible. If the case is complicated,
we may need to keep the person
longer to be sure everything is as it
should be before we release him or
her. But routine urgent care situations such as the flu or a minor burn
usually are treatable within the onehour timeframe,” according to Lockwood.
He said he wants the time patients spend at the center to be as
pleasant as possible. The staff, Lockwood said, is trained to be friendly,
helpful and approachable. “We know
that going for healthcare can be
stressful, so we do what we can to
help the person remain relaxed and
comfortable.”

The Voice of Business in DeKalb County

DeKalb Chamber of Commerce

Two Decatur Town Center, 125 Clairemont Ave., Suite 235, Decatur, GA 30030
404.378.8000
www.DeKalbChamber.org

The facility has been completely
remodeled. “We want patients to
enjoy being in a pleasant, modern,
attractive atmosphere,” Lockwood
said. “We don’t want people to feel
like they just stepped into the ‘70s.”
He noted that even the magazines
in the waiting room are current and
popular periodicals.
One feature that remains is the
strip of blue tile that winds through
the green floor tile, a detail that allowed staff to tell the pediatric patients to “follow the river” from the
examining room to the lab or to the
waiting room. Adults, too, can find it
helpful as they navigate through the
center, Lockwood noted.
The staff includes a number of
physician’s assistants, who are trained
to evaluate each situation and determine when to involve the doctor,
who usually is Lockwood. In more
extreme cases, the person might need
to be sent by ambulance to a hospital.
“There’s very little we can’t do
here. We have X-ray facilities and a
laboratory from which we can often
get results while the patient is still
here. If the situation calls for more
care than we can provide, we have
excellent relationships with the local
hospitals,” said Lockwood, who is
also on the faculty at Emory University Medical School.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

TheChampion

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The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

Sports

Page 22A

Three baseball teams
welcome new coaches
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Samuel Marion

Derwin McNealy

ented baseball players, and this season
is no different than the others as far as
the talent.
For the first time in 13 seasons,
“I’m coming into a program where
the Redan baseball team will open the I have tons of talent,” he said. “I’m
season with a new coach.
looking forward to it. The guys have
Patrick Wright is taking over the
been working hard this winter. We’re a
helm at Redan after longtime coach
well-balanced team.”
Marvin Pruitt retired. Wright is one
For Marion, his focus is on bringof three new head coaches this seaing back a winning culture to Lithoson. Lithonia alum Samuel Marion
nia.
is returning to his alma mater as head
“I played under coach [Ron] Elcoach, and Derwin McNealy is taking gin, who is at Marist, and I’m just tryover at M.L. King.
ing to bring everything back to LithoWright has been coaching baseball nia, the winning mentality,” the 2002
for more than 15 years. This is his first graduate said. “It’s a blessing. To come
year coaching in DeKalb County. The back to my old alma mater, I love it.
open position at Redan was brought to I just want to bring that winning culhis attention by a parent who knows
ture, bring what I’m use to coaching
the principal at Redan.
and what I went through.”
“He brought me in for an interMarion has been working with the
view, and I got the job,” Wright said.
players since August and their focus
Wright is coming into a program
has been on relearning baseball funwith a winning tradition, including a
damentals.
state championship in 2013. Wright
“I’m trying to get their IQ higher
said he understands that there is a
about baseball,” he said. “One thing I
high standard at Redan.
do love about our team is that we’re
“I love the pressure. I love the fact young. They’re all like family and
that I’m coming into a program that
that’s what I like.”
has a tradition of winning,” he said. “I
Lithonia will try to bring back the
wouldn’t call it pressure, I would say
winning culture in a tough Region
that it’s a high standard to live up to,
6-AAAA, that includes other winning
but I’m looking forward to it.
programs such as Columbia, Marist
“The goal is to win the region, go
and Redan. Marion expects to finish
to the state championship and win
in the top four in the region, and in
that. ‘No mediocre,’ that’s our slogan,” order to do that he reminds his players
Wright added.
that if they work hard enough, then
Redan is known for having talthey can compete with any team.

Patrick Wright

Next Level
Each week The Champion spotlights
former high school players from the county
who are succeeding in athletics on the college level.

Vaughn

Justin Colvin, Alabama A&M (basketball): The junior guard from Miller Grove
scored 14 points in the 51-48 win over
Arkansas-Pine Bluff Jan. 12. Colvin is averaging 4.9 points per game.
Chris Horton, Austin Peay (basketball): The junior center from Columbia
scored 14 points and had nine rebounds in
the 69-68 win over Tennessee State Jan. 15.
Horton is averaging 11.9 points and 10.1
rebounds per game.
KaDeeja Vaughn, Benedict (basketball): The junior forward from Columbia
scored nine points in the 66-57 win over
Kentucky State Jan. 15. Vaughn is averaging 9.6 points per game.

Colvin

Horton

“Let them know that they put on
their pants exactly the same way we
do,” he said. “They have two legs like
we have two legs. Don’t let the name
on the jerseys scare you. Play with
heart and you will win. I’ve always
said hard work beats talent when talent fails to work hard.”
McNealy, another DeKalb County
alum and McNair graduate, is coming
to the high school level after coaching
eight years on the college level.
“I just saw an opportunity to come
back down and create an opportunity
for kids to go to college, whereas as at
college I was creating opportunities
through recruiting,” he said. “Now I’m
able to–as a certified recruiter give
those kids the same opportunities and
give them the information that they
need to continue their baseball career
on the college level.”
McNealy is taking over a young
team with two returning starting seniors.
“We’re young, but I don’t know
how experienced we are though, because we could still be experienced
with the young guys that we have,”
he said. “I don’t want to set a limit on
what we can do. I just want to get us
out there, get the guys prepared and
see what we can do.
“We’re looking forward to laying
a solid foundation and a bright future
for the players in the community,” McNealy added.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

Sports

Page 23A

Stephenson
Jalen Atterburry

Jake Lovvorn

DeKalb baseball teams looking
to build off last year’s success
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com

gether as a group during the offseason
to prepare for this season.
“Our motto is, ‘no days off,’” AtMost DeKalb County baseball
terburry said. “That’s basically saying
teams will head into the 2015 season
that we work every day, work hard and
expecting to build on what they accom- get out and do what we have to do. We
plished last season.
just have to work ahead of the count,
There were a few “first-time exmake sure we throw strikes, not throw
periences” for a couple of teams, such
as many balls as we did last year, and
as Stephenson, which advanced to the
really just work as a staff to improve as
quarterfinals of the playoffs for the
a team.”
first time in the program’s history; and
Columbia coach Steve Dennis said
Tucker made their first playoff appear- pitching will be the key for this season.
ance since the 2007 season.
“That’s the key with baseball, that’s
Tucker will try to build on last
where the defense starts—with good
year’s success in a new classification,
pitching,” Dennis said. “If they continClass AAAAAA. Tucker coach Vince
ue to grow like they did last year it will
Byams said playing in a new classifica- be a fun ride.”
tion against new competition will not
Along with the pitching staff, the
affect his team much and their expecta- Columbia Eagles team has most of last
tions.
year’s players returning. With many se“I don’t believe the classification
niors returning, Dennis is expecting his
really matters for baseball,” he said. “If
team to make great strides.
your team plays good baseball, they
“We’re hoping that if everything
play good baseball. It’s about what we’re comes together we’ll be able to build
able to do when it comes down to play- on what we accomplished last year,” he
ing the game and playing our competi- said.
tion. We have to able to hit the ball, we
Another team expecting success
have to able to field the ball and manthis year is the Cedar Grove Saints. The
age the game the way we need to. We
Saints missed the playoffs last season,
still have to compete.”
but still finished above .500 with a 15Tucker’s leading pitcher Jake Lov11 record. The team will not have its
vorn had the same attitude.
leading hitter Deion Sellers, who led
“We don’t think it’s any different,”
the county in batting average with a
Lovvorn said. “We feel confident in
.557 average.
our team, and I think that we can go
However, they will have James
out and beat all these 6A teams. We
Hartsfield, who finished third in the
have the fire power, and we have what
county with a .479 batting average.
it takes, we just have to go out and exHartsfield said he has been working
ecute.”
hard during the offseason, especially
Lovvorn is coming off a 2014 seaon his opposite field hitting. He is conson where he led the county in pitching fident going into the season.
with a 0.82 earned run average (ERA).
“I know that if I hit the ball oppoHe had a 6-2 record last season, pitchsite field, which is the left field, that’s
ing 70 strikeouts in 51 innings. Lovan easy double for me,” he said. “I also
vorn said he spent the offseason work- worked on drag bunting and regular
ing on his velocity.
bunting. Bunting, with my speed, I can
“That’s the main thing,” he said.
get on base anytime I want to.”
“I’m hoping to get it up to 90-plus.”
The Saints are in a new region this
Another top pitcher hoping to have season, Region 4-AAA, but Hartsfield
another successful season is Columbia’s is confident his team will be one of the
Jalen Atterburry. Atterburry finished
best teams in the region and classificasecond in the county with a 1.24 ERA.
tion.
He had 61 strikeouts last season in 51
“We’re going to dominate,” he said.
innings.
“We lost maybe three or four playColumbia’s entire 2014 pitching
ers from last year, but most of the
staff, which led the county last season
team came back. We should dominate
with a 2.03 ERA, is returning this sea[Class] 3A.”
son. Atterburry said they worked to-

Lithonia

Miller Grove

Cedar Grove

Druid Hills

Photos by Ashley Oglesby

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015

local news

Page 24A

Water main break
closes schools
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
Water from a broken
pipe shot into the air at
times and caused nearby
schools to close because of
low water pressure.
The Jan. 15 water main
break on Parkhill Drive
near Glenwood Road in
unincorporated Decatur
caused low water pressure
in several areas in DeKalb
County including parts
of Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Clarkston, Decatur
and Scottdale, said Emily
Schwarz, a DeKalb County
public information officer, as crews dug a hole in
Parkhill Drive to make the
repair.
“As far as we know, it’s
simply affecting the pressure,” said Schwarz, adding
that the line will be replaced as part of the county’s “$ 1.35 billion water
sewer capital improvement
project, which is a project

to replace some of the older
sewer lines and pipelines in
DeKalb County.”
“This repair has been
going on for some time,”
said Burke Brennan,
DeKalb County’s press secretary. “We’ve been able to
maintain pressure, so it was
not anything that anyone
had noticed. This whole
line is going to be replaced.”
Nearby water storage
tanks were filled during the
night of Jan. 15 to stabilize
water pressure throughout
the system, except for the
immediate area around the
leak at Parkhill Drive.
Repairs on the 36-inch
pre‐stressed concrete pipe,
which is more than 40 years
old, have been completed.
During the repairs, there
were no boil water advisories in effect.
City Schools of Decatur
closed schools early on Jan.
15 and resumed the next
day as normal.
Crews repair a water main on Parkhill Drive in unincorporated Decatur. Because of the low pressure after the
break, schools in the city of Decatur were closed. Photos by Andrew Cauthen

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