‘WILD’ NOT PLAYING

WITH FULL DECK
WEEKEND PAGE 19

WHAT RED INK?

PANTHERS
PULL EVEN

AS DEFICITS DIP, ALL SIDES SEEKING MORE
SPENDING
NATION PAGE 7

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015 • Vol XV, Edition 144

Zoning changes draw dissent
Amendments aim to make it easier to add to Belmont single-family homes
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Changes aimed at easing
Belmont property owners’ ability
to remodel their homes are drawing strong opinions from both
current and former members of the
City Council and an outgoing
planning commissioner.

Vice Mayor Eric Reed, a former
planning commissioner, and
Councilman Charles Stone joined
Community
Development
Department staff on a subcommittee proposing amendments to the
city’s zoning ordinance impacting
single-family homes.
While the councilmen insist the
current laborious zoning procedures are onerous to growing fami-

lies and inconsistent with neighboring cities’ policies, two former
councilmembers and a current
planning commissioner are concerned Belmont will lose its
small-town charm.
The draft amendments to the
Belmont Zoning and Tree ordinances outlines 37 changes that
will again be reviewed by the
Planning Commission before

heading to the City Council for
public hearings before a finale
proposal is solidified.
Currently, the city caps most
homes at 3,500 square feet without
consideration for lot size and has
the lowest threshold for singlefamily design reviews with projects as small as a 400-square-foot
addition triggering evaluation by
the Planning Commission.

The draft amendments include
eliminating blanket size caps,
instead giving consideration for
lot size. It also suggests reevaluating parking requirements and hiring a zoning administrator to
review less extensive remodel
applications.
“I think as written and as

See ZONING, Page 23

San Carlos to vote
on school parcel tax
Proposed measure will increase
annual amount by $58 per year
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

A cook with Donato Enoteca in Redwood City serves up some fresh pasta.The menu features homemade raviolis,
fresh vegetables and other favorites from Italy.

An authentic Italian experience
Michelin puts Redwood City’s Donato Enoteca on 2015 Bib Gourmand list
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Gregory Chang likes to take his
clients to downtown Redwood
City’s Donato Enoteca to discuss
business over an authentic Italian
meal.
But he also has lunch there at
least twice a month all by himself
because the food is so good.
He’s a big fan of the food and the
owner, Donato Scotti, who opened
the Middlefield eatery almost six
years ago. Chang’s favorite dish is
the Agnolotti Del Plin, a ravioli

Voters in San Carlos will be
asked to pass a $246 parcel tax
intended to support the San Carlos
Elementary School District in a
mail-only ballot election.
The San Carlos Elementary
School District Board of Trustees
unanimously approved to put the
parcel tax on the ballot, which
will be mailed to homes on April
6. The deadline to vote will be
May 5.
The proposed measure extends
Measure B, a $78 per year tax
passed in 2009, which is set to
expire in June, and increases it by
$58. It also bundles the tax renewal with Measure A, which was
approved at $110 per parcel in
2011. The new tax is proposed to
expire in 2021.

S up e r i n t e n dent
Craig
Baker expressed
excitement at
the proposal to
ask the community for support.
“I
am
extremely
Craig Baker
pleased with the
board’s decision, ” said Baker.
“This is necessary to maintain the
quality education programs that we
have.”
Should the bond pass, Baker said
the district would prioritize spending it to attract and retain toplevel educators, and implement
curriculum that is focused on 21stcentury teaching methods.
Trustee Seth Rosenblatt said that
the money would also be used to

See TAX, Page 24

Sutter settles with Blue Shield
Dispute affected hundreds of thousands of patients
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

Sutter
Health
network
announced Friday it reached agreement on a new two-year contract
with Blue Shield of California,
preserving patient access to the
doctors and care centers that insurer sold to patients during fall open
enrollment.
The contract applies to all Blue
Shield products in which Sutter
Health providers historically parSee DONATO, Page 24 ticipated, including HMO, PPO

and those offered through Covered
California. There will be no lapse
in coverage for Sutter Health
patients,
the
nonprofit
announced.
Because of the dispute, notices
were sent to customers that, as of
Jan. 1, the health insurer canceled
coverage for all hospitals and
medical providers affiliated with
Sutter Health. In the Bay Area, the
contract termination affected

See SUTTER, Page 24

2

FOR THE RECORD

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“We live in a moment of history where change
is so speeded up that we begin to see the
present only when it is already disappearing.”
— R.D. Laing, Scottish psychiatrist (1927-1989)

This Day in History

1865

The U.S. House of Representatives
joined the Senate in passing the 13th
Amendment to the United States
Constitution abolishing slavery,
sending it to states for ratification.
(The amendment was adopted in Dec.
1865.) Gen. Robert E. Lee was named
general-in-chief of the Confederate
States Army by President Jefferson
Davis.

In 1 6 0 6 , Guy Fawkes, convicted of treason for his part in
the “Gunpowder Plot” against the English Parliament and
King James I, was executed.
In 1 7 9 7 , composer Franz Schubert was born in Vienna.
In 1 9 1 5 , entertainer and TV personality Garry Moore was
born in Baltimore.
In 1 9 2 9 , revolutionary Leon Trotsky and his family were
expelled from the Soviet Union.
In 1 9 3 4 , President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Gold
Reserve Act.
In 1 9 4 5 , Pvt. Eddie Slovik, 24, became the first U.S. soldier since the Civil War to be executed for desertion as he
was shot by an American firing squad in France.
In 1 9 5 8 , the United States entered the Space Age with its
first successful launch of a satellite into orbit, Explorer I.
In 1 9 6 1 , NASA launched Ham the Chimp aboard a MercuryRedstone rocket from Cape Canaveral; Ham was recovered
safely from the Atlantic Ocean following his 16 1/2-minute
suborbital flight.
In 1 9 7 1 , astronauts Alan Shepard, Edgar Mitchell and
Stuart Roosa blasted off aboard Apollo 14 on a mission to
the moon.
In 1 9 8 0 , Queen Juliana of the Netherlands announced she
would abdicate on her birthday the following April, to be
succeeded by her daughter, Princess Beatrix.
In 1 9 9 0 , McDonald’s Corp. opened its first fast-food
restaurant in Moscow.

Birthdays

Singer Justin
Rock singer
Timberlake is 34.
Johnny Rotten is
59.
Composer Philip Glass is 78. Former Interior Secretary
James Watt is 77. Princess Beatrix of the Netherlands, the former queen regent, is 77. Actor Stuart Margolin is 75. Actress
Jessica Walter is 74. Former U.S. Rep. Dick Gephardt, D-Mo.,
is 74. Blues singer-musician Charlie Musselwhite is 71. Actor
Glynn Turman is 69. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Nolan Ryan is
68. Actor Jonathan Banks (TV: “Breaking Bad”) is 68. Singermusician Harry Wayne Casey (KC and the Sunshine Band) is
64. Actress Kelly Lynch is 56. Actor Anthony LaPaglia is 56.
Singer-musician Lloyd Cole is 54. Rock musician Al Jaworski
(Jesus Jones) is 49. Actress Minnie Driver is 45.

Actress Carol
Channing is 94.

CHARLES GOULD/DAILY JOURNAL

A vehicle hit a fire hydrant at approximately 12:37 p.m. Friday at Old County Road and Holly Street in San Carlos. Deputies
cleared the scene at approximately 1:57 p.m.

T

he Japanese word for chef is
itamae, which means ‘in front
of cutting board.’
***
The Swiss consume the most chocolate per capita then any other nation.
In Switzerland, people eat an average
of 22 pounds of chocolate per person
per year. Americans eat 11 pounds per
person.
***
Sherwood Forest is located in
Nottinghamshire, England. Famous
for being the home of legendary
Robin Hood, the forest has been
owned by English royalty for more
than 600 years and used as hunting
grounds, timber and grazing.
***
The 1963 movie “The Birds” has no
music. According to director Alfred
Hitchcock (1899-1980), the stark
sound of the movie emphasizes the
vulnerability of people when they
cannot control nature.
***
Simon and Garfunkel have made
music together since they were
teenagers. Do you know what their

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Jan. 28 Powerball

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

OTABU

MURMYC

12

24

35

49

36

1
Powerball

18

31

39

55

45

6
Mega number

Jan. 28 Super Lotto Plus
2

10

36

43

46

9

16

19

20

30

2

1

5

Daily Four
9

Daily three midday
2

23

roses, carnations and gladioli.
***
There are specific regulations for
competitive bowling set by the U.S.
Bowling Congress. The bowling lane
must be 60 feet long and 42 inches
wide. A bowling ball must be made of a
completely solid material and cannot
weigh more than 16 pounds.
***
Before the advent of the cotton mattress, people slept on beds stuffed
with straw or down feathers, which
attracted insects. Hence the term “bed
bugs.”
***
Prior to using nylon in 1938, hair
from pigs was used for toothbrush
bristles.
***
The Gerber Baby, pictured on all
Gerber products since 1928, is Ann
Turner Cook (born 1926) at 4 months
old. Cook is a mystery novelist and
retired English teacher living in
Florida.
***
A n s w e r: The first hit song for
musical pair Paul Simon (born 1941)
and Art Garfunk el (born 1941) was
“The Sound of Silence” in 1966. Some
of their other hits include “Mrs.
Robinson” (1968) and “Bridge Ov er
Troubled Water” (1970).

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five

Jan. 30 Mega Millions

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

PURET

first hit song was, and the year it came
out? See answer at end.
***
The San Francisco earthquake of
1906 struck on April 18 at 5:12 a.m.
The earthquake was felt from Oregon
to Los Angeles, and as far inland as
central Nevada.
***
A Harvard student began the college
fad of swallowing goldfish. In 1939,
the classmates of Lothrop Withington
Jr. offered him $10 to swallow a 4inch goldfish, which he did. The
Boston newspapers publicized it and
the college fad was born.
***
Jeannette Rankin (1880-1973) was
the first U.S. congresswoman. The
suffragist and pacifist from Montana
served in Congress from 1917 to
1919.
***
It costs $50,000 to have a fantasy
fulfilled on the television show
“Fantasy Island” (1978-1984).
***
The “whiskers” on a catfish are
called barbels. The fish search for food
with the barbels, which have taste
buds on them.
***
The career of comedienne Phyllis
Diller (1917-2012) began in 1955
with a stand-up comedy routine at The
Purple Onion, a comedy club in San
Francisco’s North Beach neighborhood. Diller’s act at the club sold out
for 87 straight weeks.
***
The best-selling cut flowers are

4

1

Daily three evening

Mega number

9

0

1

The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,
No. 11, in first place; Soild Gold, No. 11, in second
place; and Eureka, No. 7, in third place. The race
time was clocked at 1:47.86.

Saturday : Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
North winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday ni g ht: Mostly clear. Lows in
the upper 40s. Northwest winds around 5
mph.
Sunday : Partly cloudy.

Correction
The story “District discusses d.tech destinations” in the
Thursday, Jan. 29 edition of the Daily Journal incorrectly
attributed comments made regarding the San Mateo Adult
School to Elizabeth McManus, deputy superintendent of
Business Services for the San Mateo Union High School
District. Those comments were made by Board of Trustees
member Peter Hanley.

HNUYCK
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

(Answers Monday)
Jumbles: AUDIO
COACH
ARTERY
MURMUR
Answer: He was going to quit teaching at the acting school
because there was — TOO MUCH DRAMA

The San Mateo Daily Journal
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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CPUC releases 65K emails between PG&E, agency officials
Action follows lawsuit by city of San Bruno,‘judge shopping’ scandal
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

records requests dating back more than 10
months.
San Bruno officials became involved in
legal proceedings against the CPUC and
PG&E after a PG&E natural gas pipeline
exploded in that city on Sept. 9, 2010, leveling a portion of a neighborhood and killing
eight people.
San Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane said the release
of the messages marks “a significant victory
in the city of San Bruno’s tireless efforts to
expose corruption at PG&E and the CPUC and
to promote transparency for the safety and
benefit of all citizens.”
“San Bruno’s fight for justice originally
brought to light a shocking and illegal relationship between the CPUC and PG&E,”
Ruane said in a statement. “The city’s efforts
have now culminated in PG&E fighting — and
losing — the battle to keep all 65,000 emails
out of the public eye.”
The city’s lawsuit resulted in the CPUC
handing over to the city more than 7,000
pages of communications between the CPUC
and PG&E, exposing potentially illegal communication between the two. After those
emails went public, PG&E disclosed additional emails and terminated three of its top executives.
In November, the CPUC imposed a $1.05
million fine for illegally judge shopping in
the rate case along with an additional potentially multimillion-dollar penalty.

The California Public Utilities Commission
released Friday roughly 65,000 email messages exchanged between PG&E and agency
officials between 2010 and 2014 as ordered
because of a “judge shopping” scandal with
PG&E, CPUC officials said.
Earlier this month, CPUC administrative
law judge Amy Yip-Kikugawa ordered Pacific
Gas and Electric to provide the messages
directly to the city of San Bruno and to the
commission by the end of the day Friday. The
emails were posted on the website shortly
after 4 p.m.
The city of San Bruno asked for the release
of the messages after a smaller set of emails
appeared to show a cozy and improper relationship between the agency and the utility.
That set of private messages were sent by
since-fired PG&E Vice President for
Regulatory Relations Brian Cherry in Jan.
2014 to former Commission President
Michael Peevey and Commissioner Michel
Florio and to Peevey’s former chief of staff,
Carol Brown.
In the emails, Cherry negotiated with the
commissioners and Brown to influence the
selection of a commission administrative law
judge in a natural gas transmission and storage
rate case.
The emails came to light after the city of
San Bruno filed a lawsuit in February 2014 to
force the CPUC to comply with four unfilled

San Francisco police detain
man in human remains case

Around the Bay
released grainy surveillance photos of a man
wearing a striped baseball cap, light blue jeans
and a blue and orange jacket.
Police spokesman Albie Esparza said earlier
in the day the man was a person of interest
because he was in the area where the suitcase
containing human remains was found
Thursday.
The San Francisco medical examiner has

SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco police
said they detained a man shown in photos
released earlier in the day in the case of human
remains found inside a suitcase.
San
Francisco
Chronicle
reports
(http://bit.ly/1Dpchju) Police Chief Greg Suhr
confirmed the man was detained for questioning in the Tenderloin district Friday evening.
The move came only hours after police

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In her decision on the fine, Commissioner
Carla Peterman wrote PG&E had “severely
harmed the integrity of the regulatory
process” by sending private emails to two
commissioners and a top staff member in an
effort to influence the selection of an administrative law judge.
PG&E Chairman and CEO Tony Earley said
Friday the utility company had “learned critical lessons” from the experience and is working to develop a “world-class regulatory compliance model that reflects the highest ethical
standards.”
“We’re absolutely committed to doing the
right thing and to interacting with our state
regulator in a transparent and ethical manner
that upholds both the letter and spirit of the
law and the company’s own code of conduct at
all times,” Earley said in a statement.
Earley said the “vast majority” of the
65,000 communications have been “completely appropriate” but in the few instances
that they were not, the company took “immediate and definitive action.”
“When we first discovered violations of the
CPUC ex parte rules, we self-reported them,
we held senior level officers accountable, and
we are making independent law enforcement
investigations into this matter,” Earley said.
The emails are located on the CPUC’s website and can be accessed by following the link
http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUC/events/pge_em
ails01302015.htm.

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

3

Police reports
Shady people
A group of people ran into the Sunglass
Hut, stole sunglasses and ran out at the
Hillsdale Shopping Center in San
Mateo before 3:13 p.m. Friday, Jan. 23.

BURLINGAME
Burg l ary . A resident found his back door
open and his home burglarized on
Vancouver Avenue before 3:57 p. m.
Wednesday, Jan. 28.
As s aul t and battery . A patient at a care
facility reported that a staff member
assaulted him on the 1500 block of
Trousdale Drive before 6:01 a. m.
Wednesday, Jan. 28.
Burg l ary . A vehicle was broken into and
items were stolen on the 700 block of
Airport Boulevard before 4:32 p. m.
Tuesday, Jan. 27.
S h o p l i f t i n g . A man was reported for
shoplifting for the second time in a week
on the 1200 block of Burlingame Avenue
before 4:50 p.m. Monday, Jan. 26.
Burg l ary . A burglary occurred on Airport
Boulevard before 3:45 a.m. Monday, Jan.
26.

SAN MATEO

Mi n o r i n j ury ac c i de n t . An accident
resulted in injuries in a parking lot on
South Grant Street before 3:24 p. m.
Saturday, Jan. 24.
Sus pi ci o us ci rcums tances . An elderly
woman was scammed by a couple who told
determined that the human remains found her to take $13,000 out of her bank account
inside a suitcase abandoned on a downtown and help them redeem a $900,000 lottery
street belong to an unidentified light-skinned ticket winning before 10:21 p. m.
Wednesday, Dec. 3.
man.

4

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Mateo Ci ty Co unci l
will hold a public hearing on the
site plan and architectural review
for the Stati o n Park Green proposal for 1700 and 1790 S.
Delaware St., the site of the former
Kmart at its regular meeting
Monday.
The proposal by EBL&S Dev el o pment is to construct a 1-acre park and up to 599 apartments, 30,000
square feet of retail space and 15,000 square feet of office
space at the corner of Delaware Street and Concar Drive.
Plans were approved by the Pl anni ng Co mmi s s i o n
Jan. 13.
The proposal outlines four main buildings with residences wrapping around an enclosed, above-ground parking structure. The former proposal called for eight, smaller buildings and increased office and retail space.
The council will also be swearing in newly appointed
councilman Ri ck Bo ni l l a.
The City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 2 at City
Hall, 220 W. 20th Ave.
• At its Tuesday meeting, the San Mateo Pl anni ng
Co mmi s s i o n recommended the Ci ty Co unci l proceed
with the installation of synthetic turf at Lo s Prado s
Park. The $2.3 million proposal outlines replacing nearly 4.2 acres of grass with synthetic turf at the well-used
park off Bahia Street.
While the commission approved the proposal, it was
unanimously against using controversial recycled tires as
infill and recommended the council consider alternate
materials.
The City Council will conduct a study session Feb. 17
to review possible infill materials for the project. For
more information visit www.cityofsanmateo.org.
• The city of Burl i ng ame is hosting a study session
regarding Ci ty Hal l and downtown parking lots at 6
p.m. in the council chambers located at 501 Primrose
Road.
Following the study session will be a regular council
meeting, beginning at 7 p.m., in which city officials will
discuss easing restrictions on the number of food establishments in the Broadway commercial area.
Later, council members will also receive feedback from
the Bro adway Co mmerci al Di s tri ct Co mmuni ty
Meeti ng .

Around the nation
Alaska halibut catch sees first increase in decade
JUNEAU, Alaska — Fishermen in Alaska will have access
to slightly more halibut this year than last.
The International Pacific Halibut Commission voted
Friday in Vancouver, British Columbia, for a total catch in
Alaska of 21.215 million pounds, up from 19.705 million
pounds in 2014. That’s the first time in a decade the commission has increased the catch.
The six-member panel meets annually to set the halibut
catch limits from Northern California to the Bering Sea.
There are three commissioners from the U.S. and three from
Canada.
The Alaska catch limit is divided between several areas,
and includes commercial and charter halibut sectors, as well
as their wastage.

LOCAL/NATION
Peninsula Health Care
District seeks board member
The Peninsula Health Care District is
seeking applications to fill a vacancy
on its Board of
Directors by Daniel
Ullyot, the district
announced Friday.
Ullyot first joined
the
board
in
December 2004 and
his term is up
December 2016.
“Ten years in any
Daniel Ullyot spot is probably
enough. I really
enjoyed my time 10 years on the board,
five as chair,” said Ullyot, adding it was
time for the board to have some “fresh
perspective.”
Cheryl Fama, chief executive officer
for the district, said it was an honor to
work with Ullyot in her eight years
there.
“He is a statesman, scholar,
author/editor, educator, health care
leader and mentor to anyone privileged
enough to work with him,” she wrote in
an email.  
The district serves San Bruno,
Millbrae, Burlingame, Hillsborough,
San Mateo and Foster City. The district
was originally created to build and operate Peninsula Medical Center. In 1985,
the board voted to lease the hospital and
all operations to Mills-Peninsula
Health Services. In 2006, district voters
overwhelmingly approved an agreement to build a new hospital in
Burlingame.
In its most recent election, three
incumbents Helen Galligan, Lawrence
Cappel and Dennis Zell retained their
seats with challenger Doug Radtke coming in fourth place.
Applications for the open seat are
available at the District Office, 1819
Trousdale Drive, Burlingame, or on the
district’s website www.peninsulahealthcaredistrict.org and must be submitted
no later than noon on Tuesday, Feb. 17.
Eligible applicants will be promptly
contacted to schedule an interview with
the Nominating Committee of the
Board. Those wishing to express support of any particular applicant are
asked to do so in writing. Letters of support may be addressed to the PHCD
Board of Directors, 1819 Trousdale
Drive, Burlingame, CA 94010.

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

Local briefs
The PHCD Board of Directors will
consider all applications and will make
an appointment within 10 days of
receipt of the application.
For additional information visit
www.peninsulahealthcaredistrict.org or
call (650) 697-6900.

Suspects

5

capacity for classroom and faculty use.
Last year, local Philanthropist Tad
Taube offered a challenge grant of $6
million, which required the school to
raise a matching amount by the end of
2015. Taube has also agreed to raise the
additional $8 million required to finish
the retrofit project.
The $1.35 million anonymous donation brings the university’s grand total
of raised funds to $1.5 million.
Ralston Hall, on NDNU campus, was
built in 1868 by William Ralston.
Prior to its closure, it served as home to
more than 60 offices for faculty and
staff, and was also the university’s
main venue for musical performances,
meetings, conferences and community
events.

New measles cases confirmed
in San Mateo and Marin counties

Thieves caught on tape
using stolen credit cards
Belmont police are seeking help in
identifying two men caught on camera
using credit cards stolen during a vehicle
burglary earlier in the month.
The suspects stole two wallets from a
car parked at an apartment complex on
the 2200 block of Lake Road during the
middle of the night Jan. 16, according to
Belmont police.
The following day, the stolen credit
cards were used to purchase over $500
worth of items throughout the Bay Area.
The men were caught on camera using
the cards at Home Depot stores in San
Carlos and Newark, as well as at a Lucky
Supermarket in San Carlos, according to
police. The suspects can be seen on
video at the Belmont Public Safety
YouTube Channel at youtube.com/belmontpublicsafety.
Anyone with information is asked to
call Belmont police at (650) 595-7400
or the tip line at (650) 598-3000.

Donor gives NDNU $1.35M
An anonymous donor gave $1.35 million to Notre Dame de Namur University
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The donor said that the money could
be used to renovate the hall, a national
historic landmark, which was closed for
seismic retrofitting in 2012.
The university anticipates that it
would cost roughly $20 million to retrofit the building and restore it to full

Health officials Friday announced
that they have confirmed a third case of
measles in San Mateo County, bringing
the total new cases announced in the
Bay Area to three.
The announcement follows the news
that two unvaccinated siblings have
contracted the first cases of measles in
Marin County since 2001.
The Marin County children were
exposed outside the county as part of
the Disneyland Resort outbreak and
were not in contact with any children at
their school at the time they could have
transmitted the disease, county Public
Health Officer Dr. Matt Willis said.
As of Wednesday, the unvaccinated
children at the siblings’ school have
not been asked to stay home because of
measles, the Marin County Department
of Health and Human Services said.
California law authorizes a local
health department to exclude children
unvaccinated for measles from that
school for the maximum incubation
period of 21 days.
The previous two San Mateo County
cases were not connected to the
Disneyland outbreak, according to
county health system spokeswoman
Robyn Thaw. Thaw said she did not yet
know the source of the newest case.
Measles is a respiratory disease that
is transmitted through the air. It spreads
through coughing and sneezing and
often begins with a fever, runny nose,
red eyes and sore throat followed by a
rash that spreads over the body.

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6

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

Around the nation
Romney out of 2016 race
WASHINGTON — Mitt Romney ended his rollercoaster
return to presidential politics on Friday, declaring his party
would be better served by the “next generation of
Republican leaders” and concluding his unlikely comeback
as suddenly as it began.
Aides said it was a deeply personal and even painful decision for the 2012 Republican presidential nominee. He
insisted he could win the next election if he ran, but his
announcement followed a three-week fact-finding effort that
revealed significant resistance to a third campaign.

LOCAL/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Man faces 46 felonies for molestation, child porn
San Carlos resident allegedly abused underage relative
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

Prosecutors are working to build a
case against a man they say is
responsible for molesting an underage relative for six years and videotaping it.
Daniel Joseph Collins, a 31-yearold San Carlos resident, is charged
with 46 felonies he allegedly committed between 2008 and 2014, according to the San Mateo County District
Attorney’s Office.
Collins, who could face more than
10 life sentences, pleaded not guilty
Dec. 10.
Collins’ charges include 10 counts
of substantial sexual conduct with a
child 10 years old or younger, seven
counts of lewd and lascivious acts
with a child under 14 years of age, 24

counts of oral copulation with a child
under 14 years of
age and five counts
of possessing or
producing
child
pornography, said
prosecutor
Sean
Gallagher.
Collins appeared
Daniel Collins
in court Friday,
however, his preliminary hearing was
continued to March 6 to allow both
parties to continue their investigations, Gallagher said.
Collins allegedly began molesting
the victim in 2008 when she was 7
years old and continued until she was
13 years old, according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
Collins had access to the victim,

who was splitting her time living
with relatives in San Carlos and in
Southern California, as he would
allegedly pick her up from school and
baby-sit her, Gallagher said.
The victim eventually disclosed to a
parent who contacted authorities
around September, Gallagher said.
The San Mateo County Sheriff’s
Office conducted a six-week investigation during which a search of his
cellphone turned up videos of Collins
molesting the victim on approximately 14 separate occasions, according to the District Attorney’s Office.
Child pornography was also found
on his computer, Gallagher said.
Collins’ defense attorney could not
be reached for comment.
Collins was arrested Nov. 24 and is
being held in jail without bail.

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NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

7

As deficits dip, all sides seek more spending
By Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The deficit is
dead. Long live the deficit.
As the nation’s ledger adjusts to
decreasing levels of deficit spending, the voices in Washington calling for austerity are barely audible.
Republicans want more defense
spending. Democrats want more
domestic spending. And President
Barack Obama wants both.
For the first time since the 2011
Budget Control Act put in place a
series of automatic spending cuts,
Obama might be in the best bargaining position to move the
debate his way. And that’s with
Republicans in charge of Congress.
Obama on Thursday called for a 7
percent boost in government
spending that would nullify those

2011 so-called
s eques t rat i o n
cuts
and
increase domestic and defense
spending by a
total of $74 billion in nearly
equal amounts.
“Let’s make
Barack Obama
sure that we end
this across-the-board sequester that
doesn’t differentiate between smart
government spending and dumb
government spending,” he told a
gathering of Democratic lawmakers
in Philadelphia.
That’s not to say that Obama’s
budget, set for release on Monday,
stands any better chance than his
previous budgets at winning congressional support — i.e., zero.
But as a negotiating document, it

might not be so easily dismissed.
“President Obama would like
there to be more nondefense spending, and will try to use defense
spending to drive a wedge in the
Republican Party, and build support
for busting the sequester levels. He
will likely succeed,” said Kevin
Hassett, an economist at the conservative American Enterprise
Institute and an adviser to Mitt
Romney’s 2012 presidential campaign.
Left out of all these equations is
the nation’s long-term fiscal picture. Amid the current wish lists for
more child care, free community
college, and bigger ship and submarine fleets, little is said about an
aging population, a growing
national debt and the demands on
the government created by greater
health care access.

White House grapples with fraught terrorism language
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Twice this
month, the White House has publicly grappled with the politically
fraught language of terrorism.
In the days after a deadly terror
spree in Paris, President Barack
Obama was criticized for purposely avoiding calling the attacks an
example of “Islamic extremism,”

settling for the more generic “violent extremism.” This week, the
White House struggled to explain
why the administration sometimes
classifies the Afghan Taliban as a
terrorist organization — and
sometimes does not.
The rhetorical wrangling underscores the extent to which a president who pledged to end to his predecessor’s war on terror is still
navigating how to explain the

threats that persist to the
American public, while also being
mindful of the impact his words
can have abroad.
“They do believe that the part of
the roots of terrorism comes from
the way the United States acts and
talks and is perceived globally,”
said Trevor McCrisken, a professor at Britain’s University of
Warwick who has studied Obama’s
foreign policy rhetoric.

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Obama calls on Congress to
fund ’precision medicine’
By Lauran Neergaard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Holding out
the promise of major medical
breakthroughs, President Barack
Obama on Friday called on
Congress to approve spending
in medical research that tailors
treatment to an individual’s
genes.
Obama wants $215 million for
what he’s calling a precision
medicine initiative that moves
away from one-size-fits-all treatments. The ambitious goal:
Scientists will assemble databases of about a million volunteers
to study their genetics — and
other factors such as their environments and the microbes that
live in their bodies — to learn
how to individualize care.
“That’s the promise of precision medicine -- delivering the
right treatment at the right time,
every time, to the right person,”
Obama said in announcing the
proposal Friday.
The effort is a hot but challenging field in medical research that

has already yielded some early
results.
For example, it’s becoming
more common for patients with
certain cancers to undergo molecular testing in choosing which
drug is their best match. People
with a rare form of cystic fibrosis
now can choose a drug designed
specifically to target the genetic
defect causing their illness. Some
medical centers, such as the
Mayo Clinic, have opened “individualized medicine clinics.”
But only recently has the cost
of genomic sequencing dropped
enough, and the computer power
of medicine increased, to make it
possible for large-scale pursuit of
the approach, said Dr. Francis
Collins, director of the National
Institutes of Health, which will
lead the initiative.
The hope is to “harness the
power of science to find individualized health solutions,” Collins
said.
Obama noted that doctors often
try to personalize care, such as
matching blood transfusion to
blood types.

8

LOCAL/WORLD

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

Sylviane ‘Sylvia’ Morales
Sylviane “Sylvia” Morales, age 58, born
in Toulon, France, died Wednesday, Jan. 28,
2015, after a difficult
battle with breast cancer.
Sylviane was a longtime
resident of Redwood City
and a vice president for
Visa International and an
employee for 35 years.
She is survived by her
husband Roland, children: Jason, Christopher
and Amanda,  Monique and Victor, Carmi,
Elisha and James, Rolando and Dana, Chico
and Katie and 12 grandchildren. Also survived by her mother Lucienne, Bernard and
Jennifer, Chantal and Robert, Carole and
Christian and numerous nieces and
nephews.
“Sylviane loves with her full heart. She
has always been the rock/director/glue that
has held our large blended family together.
She’s a beautiful person, kind-hearted, selfless, guiding-light, loving, strong-willed
and is loved by everyone she has touched.
She is passionate about family, antiquing,
garage picking, purses, shoes, handbags,
the ocean, jewelry, her vacation home in
Texas and of course her crab Louie salads
from Scoma’s. She has left her imprint on
many people’s lives. She will be missed
dearly but never forgotten. Her legacy is
known as ‘family is priority, everything
else can wait.’”
Her family will be having an intimate ceremony celebrating her life.

Marilyn ‘Lynn’
Lorraine Morosoli (Brown)
Marilyn “Lynn” Lorraine Morosoli
(Brown), born July 21, 1930, died Jan. 10,
2015, in San Mateo,
California.
She was born in
Gloversville, New York,
to Orville and Mabel
Brown. She was a longtime resident of Northern
California, and called
San Francisco, Millbrae
and San Mateo, home.
Lynn graduated from Gloversville High
School and attended Rider College in
Princeton, New Jersey. She spent her career
as a secretary at General Electric in

Jordan awaits proof hostage
is alive after swap deadline
TOKYO — The fates of a Japanese journalist and Jordanian military pilot were
unknown Friday, a day after the latest purported deadline for a possible prisoner swap
passed with no further word from the Islamic

Obituaries
Schenectady, New York and as an airline
stewardess with TWA during the ’50s.
She was a loving mother to her three children, Susan Morosoli (Mark) of San Mateo,
Katherine Mertz (Jon) of Dallas, Texas, and
David Morosoli of Grover Beach,
California; grandmother to Jessica and
Matthew Morosoli of Arroyo Grande,
California, and Ethan and Cole Mertz of
Dallas, Texas; sister to Robert Brown
(Rosemary) of Coupeville, Washington,
and Harold Brown (Nancy) of Los Altos,
California; and a dear friend to many.
Donations may be made in Marilyn’s
memory to the USTA Adaptive Tennis
Program for the Disabled: www.ustafoundation.com/adaptive/; or the TWA Museum:
http://www.twamuseumat10richardsroad.or
g/htdocs/DonationMember.html, or a charity of your choice.

Claire Marie Daley
Claire Marie Daley, 88, longtime resident
of Belmont, died peacefully in her home
Jan. 26.
Claire was born and
raised in San Francisco
and graduated from St.
Vincent’s Preparatory.
Following school, Claire
worked for the Bank of
America and later had a
long career with Sears
Roebuck and Co.
Claire was born to the late Guido and
“Minnie” Canepa. She was the wife of
Charles Daley for 35 years until he died in
1983. She is survived by daughters Denise
and Lynn; sons Kevin and Bill; grandchildren Brian, Carrie, Shauna, Megan,
Michelle and Colleen; great-grandchildren
Taylor, Brooke, Jack and Cole along with
countless other friends and family who were
blessed to know her.
Claire loved spending time with family
and friends, taking classes on local history
and traveling.
“Claire touched the lives of many people
with her warm personality and kindness.”
Friends and family are invited to attend a
vigil service to be held from 7 p. m.
Monday, Feb. 2 at the Crippen and Flynn
Chapel in Belmont. A funeral Mass will be
held at the IHM Church in Belmont 10:30
a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 3.

Around the world
State group holding them captive.
Jordan has said it will only release an alQaida prisoner, Sajida al-Rishawi, from
death row if it gets proof the pilot, Lt.
Muath al-Kaseasbeh, is alive and so far has
received no such evidence from the hostagetakers.
At the same time, the government is under domestic
pressure to win the release of
al-Kaseasbeh, the first foreign pilot to be captured by

Barbara Barbagelata
Barbara Barbagelata, born April 22,
1939, died Jan. 27, 2015, with her family
by her side in her South
San Francisco home.
She was 75.
Born to Vernon and
Evon Davis, she was
raised in San Francisco
and attended Notre Dame
High School. Barbara is
survived by her husband
of 48 years Candido
(Steve), and her children Sharon Ambra
(Tony), David Barbagelata (Annette) and
Denise Pieri (Paul). She was an adoring
Nonni to Miles and Matthew Ambra,
Sarah and Victoria Pieri and Ava
Barbagelata.
Barbara took great joy in spending time
with her family at her summer home in
Clearlake, enjoying dinners with her husband, children and grandchildren.
“She taught us the value of family and the
pleasure that it brings.”
Family and friends may visit after 5 p.m.,
Monday, Feb. 2 and are invited to attend the
7 p. m. vigil service at Chapel of the
Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive at El
Camino Real in Millbrae. The funeral mass
will be celebrated at St. Veronica Catholic
Church, 434 Alida Way, South San
Francisco 10 a. m. Tuesday, Feb. 3.
Committal at Holy Cross Cemetery in
Colma.

Nicholas Gerald Ioimo
Nicholas Gerald Ioimo, born April 24,
1920, died Jan. 28, 2015.
He was born in the Bronx, New York,
April 24, 1920. He served in the U.S. Army
during World War II. He is 68-year resident
of Redwood City, worked at the Pisano
Bakery as a route drive for 27 years, then
worked 11 years for the Redwood City
Elementary School District. His passion
since childhood was playing softball, he
played for the Pisano Bakery team and then
RWC Seniors League until age 92. He was
married to Florence (Turiello) Ioimo for 55
years.
He is survived by his sons: Nick,
Rudolph, John and Tom; nine grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren, and numerous
nieces and nephews. A sister, Julia Porcaro,
and brother, Albert Ioimo also survive him.
Visitation will be 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Monday,
Islamic State militants since a U.S.-led military coalition began carrying out air
strikes against IS-controlled areas of Iraq
and Syria in September. Jordan is part of the
coalition.

Five may face preliminary
charges over jihadi network in France
PARIS — Five people have appeared
before a French judge and could face preliminary charges over a jihadi recruiting network in a small southern town from where
several youths went to fight in Syria and
Iraq.

THE DAILY JOURNAL
Feb. 2, 2015, at Crippen
&
Flynn
Woodside
Chapel, 400 Woodside
Road in Redwood City,
with a 7 p.m. vigil service. The funeral service
will be 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 3 also at the mortuary. Interment will follow at Gate of Heaven
Cemetery in Los Altos.

Francis Troy Lynch
Francis Troy Lynch, born June 26, 1993,
died in his sleep Jan. 15, 2015, in Rohnert
Park, California.
He was 21.
A student at Sonoma State University,
studying communications, Francis, affectionately known to his family as “Spike,”
would have graduated this year. Sonoma
State will be issuing his degree posthumously.
“He was a kind and generous young man,
who loved life, sports and snowboarding.
He will be missed by his family, friends and
loving girlfriend.”
Francis aspired to work in sports television and was recently hired as a camera
operator assistant at Fox Sports filming the
49ers. He also worked at Sonoma state’s
radio station KSUN.
Francis loved baseball and played catcher
competitively. He graduated from Junipero
Serra High School in 2011.
He is the son of Christopher Emmett
Lynch of Charleston, South Carolina, and
Karen Lynch of Belmont, California, and
the oldest grandson of Bernice and George
Bajada of San Jose, and Dan Lynch of St.
Helena.
A family memorial service was held, as
well as services at Serra High School,
Sonoma State and a funeral in Illinois.
As a public serv ice, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approx imately 200
words or less with a photo one time on a
space av ailable basis. To submit obituaries,
email information along with a jpeg photo
to news@smdaily journal.com. Free obituaries are edited for sty le, clarity, length and
grammar. If y ou would lik e to hav e an obituary printed on a specific date, or more than
once, or longer than 200 words or without
editing, please submit an inquiry to our
adv ertising department at news@smdaily journal.com.
Friday’s move comes after three days of
police questioning of the five after security
forces detained them in connection with the
network in southern Lunel. Authorities say
at least six people from the town died in Iraq
and Syria in recent months.
Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve has
said Tuesday’s raids dismantled a jihadi network.
France says about 3,000 citizens have
links to extremist fighters in Syria and Iraq,
with important contingents in both the
Islamic State group and al-Qaida-linked
Nusra Front.

NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

9

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

Bomb blast at Shiite Muslim
mosque in Pakistan kills 56
By Rebecca Santana
and Zarar Khan
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ISLAMABAD — A bomb blast
ripped through a Shiite mosque in
southern Pakistan as worshippers
gathered for Friday prayers,
killing at least 56 people and
wounding dozens more, in the
deadliest act of anti-Shiite violence in two years.
The
attack
compounds
Pakistan’s security challenge to
contain a surge in militancy following last month’s killing of 150
people, mostly children, at a
Peshawar school.
The militant Sunni group
Jundullah claimed responsibility
for Friday’s bombing in the city of
Shikarpur in Sindh province, 500
kilometers (310 miles) north of
the port city of Karachi.
That area of Pakistan has suffered
comparatively little violence in
contrast to the northwestern tribal
areas bordering Afghanistan and in
Karachi. Friday’s bloodshed raised
fears that extremists could be gaining a foothold in the region.
Hadi Bakhsh Zardari, the deputy
commissioner of Shikarpur district, said 56 had died and 31 were
hospitalized. Dr. Shaukat Ali
Memon, director of the hospital in
Shikarpur, appealed on Pakistan’s
state television for residents to

donate blood.
Pakistani television showed residents and worshippers frantically
ferrying the dead and wounded to
the hospital. Local media reported
that parts of the roof had collapsed
on the worshippers, and some people had been trapped inside.
Amid the chaos following the
explosion, victims were shuttled
to the hospital on motorcycles and
rickshaws, according to hospital
official Imtiaz Hussain.
Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif
condemned the violence and called
it a suicide bombing, but Zardari
and other officials said they were
still investigating the cause.
“Explosive experts and police
are still debating whether it was a
planted bomb or a suicide attack
due to conflicting evidence on
either side,” Zardari said.
Jundallah spokesman Fahad
Mahsud claimed responsibility for
the attack in a telephone call to the
Associated Press, but gave no
details about how it was committed. The militant group previously
has claimed responsibility for
attacks on Shiites and other religious minorities, including a 2013
double suicide bombing of an
Anglican church in Peshawar that
killed 85 people.
Many Sunni extremists do not
consider Shiites, who represent 10
percent to 20 percent of Pakistan’s

REUTERS

Rescue workers and a policeman stand at the site of an explosion in a Shiite mosque in Shikarpur, Pakistan.
population, to be true Muslims.
Sunni militants in Pakistan have
bombed Shiite mosques, killed
Shiite pilgrims traveling to neighboring Iran and assassinated Shiite
religious figures and community
leaders.
Friday’s death toll was the worst
against Shiites since January
2013, when a bomb in the neighboring province of Baluchistan
killed 81 people in a Shiite area of
Quetta. Human rights groups have

Balloon crew makes history crossing Pacific Ocean
By Susan Monotoya Bryan
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. — A
pair of American and Russian
pilots has traveled farther and
longer in a gas balloon than anyone in history, trying to eliminate any remaining debate over a
century of records in long-distance ballooning.
Th e Two Eag l es p i l o t s s urp as s ed t h e di s t an ce an d durat i o n reco rds t h at h av e h el d
s i n ce t h e 1 9 7 0 s an d 1 9 8 0 s ,
an d were ai mi n g Fri day fo r a
s afe l an di n g s o mewh ere o n a
b each i n Mex i co ’s Baj a

Cal i fo rn i a p en i n s ul a.
Troy Bradley of Albuquerque and
Leonid Tiukhtyaev of Russia lifted off from Japan Sunday morning, and by Friday, they beat
what’s considered the “holy
grail” of ballooning achievements, the 137-hour duration
record set in 1978 by the Double
Eagle crew of Ben Abruzzo, Maxie
Anderson and Larry Newman in
the first balloon flight across the
Atlantic.
By Friday afternoon, the Two
Eagles team had been in the air
more than 143 hours and was
smashing the distance record,
having traveled more than 6,000

miles across the Pacific Ocean.
“The technology has improved
so much in the last couple of
years. I don’t think there’s going
to be any question about the
records, ” said Katie Griggs, a
regional director with the nonprofit Balloon Federation of
America.
The world has been tracking
their progress online and through
social media sites. Still, the official distance and time of the Two
Eagles flight must be confirmed
by the Federation Aeronautique
Internationale, which requires
staying aloft 1 percent longer and
farther than the previous record.

faulted the government and security services for failing to protect
Shiites adequately or pursuing
those responsible with sufficient
effort.
While Karachi has been the site
of repeated bombings blamed on
militant groups such as the
Pakistani Taliban, much of the
rest of Sindh province has been
much more peaceful — but experts
warn this could be changing rapidly.

An American think tank, the
United States Institute of Peace,
reported earlier this week that sectarian groups targeting Shiites are
building a power base in the traditionally harmonious north.
“The province is at a tipping
point. Extremist groups are
increasingly active in the central
and northern districts, disrupting
the pluralistic culture that has long
defined the province,” the report
found.

50 years after
funeral, Churchill
towers over U.K. politicians

Around the world

LONDON — Fifty years after
Winston Churchill’s funeral,
British politicians paid tribute
Friday to the wartime leader — and
tried to energize their election
campaigns with a little of the
Churchill magic.
Prime Minister David Cameron

facing
pressure
from
Euroskeptics to chart a more isolationist path — hailed a statesmen
whom he said knew Britain was
“not just a place on the map but a
force in the world, with a destiny
to shape events and a duty to stand
up for freedom.”
When Churchill died in 1965 at

the age of 90, a million people
lined the streets of London to
watch the funeral cortege pass by.
The man who led Britain to victory against Nazi Germany still
looms large over British politics.
Cameron was joined by other
party leaders for a wreath-laying
ceremony at Parliament’s statue of
Churchill, whose bronze toes
Conservative lawmakers still rub
for good luck.
Outside, ceremonies recreated
parts of Churchill’s final journey
on Jan. 30, 1965. His descendants
traveled up the River Thames in
the same boat that carried the
statesman’s coffin away from St.
Paul’s Cathedral for burial.

10

BUSINESS

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks sag; January finishes on weak note
By Alex Veiga
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
17,164.95 -251.90 10-Yr Bond 1.68 -0.08
Nasdaq 4,635.24 -48.17 Oil (per barrel) 47.74
S&P 500 1,994.99 -26.26 Gold
1,284.10

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
MasterCard Inc., up 65 cents to $82.03
The processor of debit and credit card payments reported better-thanexpected fourth profit on a boost in consumer spending.
Abbvie Inc., down $2.77 to $60.35
The drugmaker reported better-than-expected fourth-quarter adjusted
profit due to sales growth of its blockbuster anti-inflammatory drug
Humira.
Deckers Outdoor Corp., down $16.22 to $66.05
The maker of Ugg footwear reported worse-than-expected fiscal thirdquarter profit and revenue and cut its outlook.
The Manitowoc Co., down 54 cents to $18.70
The crane-maker said it will split, spinning off the food service business
which focuses on refrigeration and other equipment.
Nasdaq
Amazon.com Inc., up $42.75 to $354.53
The e-commerce company reported better-than-expected fourth-quarter
profit and key growth in its Prime service membership.
Google Inc., up $24.32 to $537.55
The technology company reported worse-than-expected quarterly profit,
but told investors it will spend in a “prudent manner.”
Hawaiian Holdings Inc., down $7.18 to $19.44
The parent of Hawaiian Airlines reported better-than-expected fourthquarter profit, but it set a weak first-quarter outlook.
ImmunoGen Inc., up $1.43 to $7.63
The drug developer reported better-than-expected quarterly profit and
revenue results and reaffirmed its revenue outlook.

Consumers fuel steady U.S.
economy as rest of world struggles
WASHINGTON — There’s a good reason
the U.S. economy is impressing the world
right now despite a slowdown in the final
three months of 2014: In a word, steadiness.
Companies have been hiring at healthy
rates for the past year. Layoffs hover near
historic lows. Auto sales are strong. Gas
prices have sunk. Congressional budget
fights have faded. Americans are increasingly confident.
All that fed a surge of consumer spending
last quarter, offsetting weaker business
spending caused in part by a pullback by oil
drillers and a frail global economy.
The U.S. economy as a whole expanded at
a 2.6 percent annual rate, the government
said Friday, down from a sizzling 5 percent
gain the previous quarter. Yet consumers
signaled their optimism by spending at the
fastest rate in nearly nine years.
“This hasn’t changed my picture on the

The U. S. stock market capped a
rough month Friday, delivering its
third loss in five days and extending
its declines for the year.
All told, the Standard & Poor’s 500
index fell 3 percent in January, its
worse monthly performance in a year.
While the U.S. economy continued to
show signs of strength, energy companies suffered from a sharp drop in oil
prices and some big multinational
companies saw their earnings dinged
by a stronger dollar.
On Friday, investors also weighed
the consequences of a slowdown in
U.S. economic growth and how further
strength in the dollar could dent corporate profits.
“The real issue still is the confusion,
the uncertainty around the speed of
decline in oil prices and what that
means, and the rise in the dollar and
what that means for earnings,” said
Bob Doll, chief equity strategist at
Nuveen Asset Management.
The concerns about a surging dollar
intensified after Russia’s central bank
unexpectedly cut interest rates to 15
percent from 17 percent to help the
weakening economy. That sent the
ruble down against the dollar.
Before the U.S. market opened, the
government said that the economy

Business briefs
strength and resilience of the U.S. economy,” said Scott Anderson, chief economist
at the Bank of the West. “Almost all the
drivers of consumer spending are pointing
in the right direction.”
Nearly six years into the recovery from
the Great Recession, the economy has
finally gone from straining just to grow to
posting consistently solid gains. The gains
have come even though many households
continue to struggle without much of a
financial cushion. Nearly half say they
spend all their income, go into debt or use
savings to meet their expenses, a new
analysis by the Pew Charitable Trusts has
found.

Shake Shack shares more than
double in stock market debut
NEW YORK — Wall Street went wild for
burgers Friday.
Shares of Shake Shack, a burger chain

grew 2.6 percent in the last quarter of
2014, as weaker government and business spending held growth back. The
decline was unexpected and down from
a gain of 4.6 percent in the second quarter and 5 percent in the third quarter.
But others news signaled the steady
health of the U.S. economy. Consumer
spending surged in the final three
months of 2014.
The Labor
Department reported that wages and
benefits rose last year by 2.2 percent,
the biggest calendar-year increase
since 2008
Investors also sifted through the latest batch of corporate earnings news,
and the results were mixed.
Amazon. com and Visa reported
strong results late Thursday. Amazon
jumped 13.7 percent, while Visa rose
2.8 percent.
Several companies didn’t fare as
well, including Ugg footwear maker
Deckers Outdoor and the parent of
Hawaiian Airlines, which offered discouraging outlooks. Deckers slumped
19. 7 percent, while Hawaiian
Holdings slid 27 percent.
The Dow Jones industrial average
dropped 251.90 points, or 1.5 percent, to close at 17,164.95. The S&P
500 index lost 26.26 points, or 1.3
percent, to 1,994.99. The Nasdaq composite fell 48.17 points, or 1 percent,
to 4,635.24.
Nine of the 10 sectors in the S&P

that started as a New York City hot dog cart,
more than doubled in their first day of trading.
The company raised $105 million in its
initial public offering Thursday, selling 5
million shares at $21 per share. It had initially forecast that its shares would fetch
$14 to $16 per share from investors, and
raised that prediction to $17 to $19 per
share on Wednesday as demand grew.

IBM boss gets bonus
despite company’s woes
SAN FRANCISCO — IBM boss Virginia
Rometty will get a $3.6 million bonus for
her performance last year, even though the
company’s sales and profits declined in
2014.
Rometty and other top executives did not
take bonuses for 2013, after IBM turned in
disappointing results for that year. But even
though IBM is still struggling to catch up
with recent shifts in the way corporate customers buy technology, it disclosed a new

500 fell, and utilities declined the
most.
The one sector that rose was energy.
Benchmark U.S. crude jumped $3.71 to
close at $48.24 a barrel in New York
on expectations of lower supplies. The
number of working drilling rigs continued to fall, according to a closelywatched industry count. Concerns over
an attack on oil-rich Kirkuk, Iraq, by
Islamic insurgents also spurred oil
buying and higher prices.
While oil had a strong day, it
remains in a deep slump. U.S. crude has
fallen to $48 a barrel from $107 last
June.
Demand for ultra-safe bonds rose
Friday. The yield on the 10-year
Treasury note fell to 1. 66 percent
Friday, the lowest since May 2013.
Yields fall as bond prices rise.
“I think that the bond market is
starting to scare equity investors:
‘What do they know that I don’t?”’ said
Jim Paulsen, chief investment strategist at Wells Capital Management.
“The bond market is telling us that
things are getting worse.”
The stock of Shake Shack, a burger
chain that started as a New York City
hot dog cart, more than doubled in
their first day of trading. Shake Shack
jumped $24.90, or 119 percent, to
close at $45.90, putting the market
value of the small chain at more than
$1.6 billion.

pay package that appears to be a vote of
confidence in her efforts.
IBM has said it’s making progress by
selling off less profitable divisions and
investing in new businesses including data
analytics, cloud computing and mobile
software.

Barbie blues gave
Mattel holiday disappointment
Slumping sales of Barbie did little to
bring a happy holiday to her maker, Mattel
Inc.
Mattel’s fourth-quarter earnings release
Friday drilled down into the details of a
weak performance that led to the resignation of its chairman and CEO.
Barbie sales fell 12 percent, though that
wasn’t as bad as the third quarter’s 21 percent drop. Fisher-Price sales fell 11 percent.
While American Girl slipped 4 percent, it
was better than the 7 percent decline in the
third quarter.
Hot Wheels sales rose 5 percent.

WARRIORS ON RARE LOSING STREAK: UTAH HANDS GOLDEN STATE A SECOND STRAIGHT LOSS >> PAGE 12

<<< Page 13, Tiger Woods
shoot a career-worst 82
Weekend • Jan. 31-Feb. 1, 2015

Seahawks vs. Patriots: Key Super Bowl matchups
By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Matchups for the Super Bowl on Feb. 1
between the Seattle Seahawks and New
England Patriots at University of Phoenix
Stadium:

When the Seahawks (14-4) have the ball:
If the Patriots can tame the Beast, they will
have a big head start toward a fourth NFL
championship since 2001. RB Marshawn
Lynch (24) will try to impose his will on a
solid but not overwhelming defense led by DT
Vince Wilfork (75), DE Rob Ninkovich (50),

LBs Jamie Collins (91)
and Dont’a Hightower
(54). If Lynch is slowed,
that leaves the onus for
running on QB Russell
Wilson (3). While highly
capable — he rushed for
849 yards and six TDs in
2014 — Wilson would
prefer balance on offense.
Marshawn
When he throws, he
Lynch
must avoid the interceptions that plagued him vs. Green Bay for the
NFC title. Not that Wilson was always off-tar-

get, with two of his picks being off tips by
WR Jermaine Kearse (15). But he was not
nearly as precise as usual.
Kearse, who caught the winning TD pass in
the past two NFC title matches, was targeted
on all four interceptions against the Packers.
He’ll see plenty of CBs Darrelle Revis (24)
and Brandon Browner (39), a Seahawk last
season, and could struggle getting open deep.
S Devin McCourty (32) also will help in coverage on WR Doug Baldwin (89) and TE Luke
Willson (82).
One thing Seattle won’t do is lose faith even
when things aren’t working on offense. And

behind an unsung offensive line led by LT Russell
Okung (76) and C Max
Unger (60), they won’t
back off, either.

When the Patriots (144) have the ball:
Unquestionably the key
matchup, as it often is
these days when the
Rob
Gronkowski Patriots are on the field,
will be All-Pro TE Rob
Gronkowski (87) against the legions trying

See MATCUPS, Page 16

Draw
keeps
Race
is
on
in
PAL
South
Burlingame boys pull into first place tie with Mills after 59-42 win SHP in first
By Nathan Mollat

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Burlingame’s Tyler Garlitos was making
his season debut when the Panthers opened
Peninsula Athletic League South Division
play against Mills Jan. 9.
Garlitos sat out the preseason as dictated
by the Central Coast Section following his
transfer from Serra.
Garlitos had a so-so game in that opener,
finishing with seven points and five
rebounds as Mills handed the Panthers a 6142 loss.
Fast-forward to the rematch between the
two teams in Burlingame Friday night and
Garlitos was a completely different player.
Showing an array of skills that included
strong ball handling, a nice touch on his
jump shots and confident drives to the basket, Garlitos was the driving force in the
Panthers’ 59-42 victory, finishing with 20
points and 10 rebounds.
“[Friday] was definitely a big game. We
lost last time, by a lot,” Garlitos said. “I didn’t feel like I contributed a lot last game.”
The win moves Burlingame into a firstplace tie with Mills atop the PAL South
Division standings. Both teams are now 7-1
in league play with five games left in the
regular season.
The 6-5 Garlitos was hardly a one-man
show, however. Joining Garlitos on the
highlight reel was junior point guard Vinnie
Ferrari, who spent last season seeing spot
duty as a defensive specialist before taking
over the starting point guard duties this season — following in the footsteps of older
brother Frankie Ferrari, who is now a freshman playing at University of San Francisco.
Ferrari did a good job of channeling his
older brother Friday night. Not only did he
seamlessly get his team into its offense, he
also provided a ton of electricity in the
Burlingame gym, draining five 3-pointers
on his way to a 17-point night.
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
“We just needed a big win,” Ferrari said. “I
just work every night in the gym, work on Burlingame’s Tyler Garlitos drives to the basket during the Panthers’ 59-42 win over Mills

Friday’s rematch between Sacred Heart
Prep and Menlo was a much different goaround than the first time the archrivals met
earlier this season.
After the West Bay Athletic League boys’
soccer opener Jan. 7 turned into a rowdy
free-for-all that saw SHP prevail 2-0,
Friday’s rematch was a much more tame
affair in that it was controlled by the referee’s whistle from the outset.
With bragging rights for top spot in the
WBAL on the line, the rivals battled to a 22 draw at Menlo School. As a result, SHP (50-1 WBAL, 8-1-2 overall) remains in first
place in the standings, just three points
ahead of second-place Menlo (3-1-1, 5-4-2).
“We kind of needed the win to get level
with them on points,” Menlo head coach
Marc Kerrest said. “So, I think the tie,
they’re probably a little happier with it than
we are. But there are a lot of games to play.
... So, we’ve just got to go out and make sure
we win our games; and maybe they drop
some points here and there and we can get
back in front of them.”
Of the four goals scored Friday, three were
by way of penalty kick. Menlo got on the
board in the 18th minute on a penalty kick
from Will Chisholm. The junior forward got
his first of two penalty kicks in the game
after SHP sophomore goalkeeper Zach Haire
committed a foul on a ball via a corner kick.
The penalty forced SHP to swap out keepers,
with junior Alex Szeptycki entering cold to
defend the penalty kick.
The Knights rode Chisholm’s penalty
kick to a 1-0 halftime lead. But the Gators
quickly got even, and then some, in the second half.
In the 50th minute, SHP converted a
penalty kick of its own with Derek Chou
netting a clean shot on goal to tie it at 1-1.
Menlo had three chances in the following
five minutes, including its best chance of
the game when freshman Dylan Williams

See PANTHERS, Page 16

Friday night. Garlitos scored a game-high 20 points and grabbed 10 rebounds as the
Panthers pulled into a first-place tie with the Vikings in the PAL South Division.

See SOCCER, Page 14

Lancers take control of WCAL with win over Serra
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The destiny of the West Catholic Athletic
League is now solely in the hands of St.
Francis.
The Lancers boys’ basketball team rumbled to a 59-54 over Serra Friday night at
Morton Family Gymnasium. St. Francis (71 WCAL, 16-2 overall) took the lead quickly on its first possession with a statement
bucket with a picturesque bounce pass from

Noah Stapes to a wide open Peter Hewitt
under the basket and the 6-9 junior center
converted for an easy 2.
Hewitt’s presence and Stapes’ court savvy
would be a recurring theme throughout.
Serra (6-2, 14-4) never led in the game and
proved to be in fits attempting to guard
Hewitt.
“We’ve played them once already, so we
knew what they were going to do,” Serra
junior Jake Killingsworth said. “They’re a
great team. All the respect to them in the

world. But we knew we had to contain him.
We worked on it all practice … but they
played a heck of a game. Hats off to them.”
The last time the two teams met, on Jan.
10, St. Francis prevailed on its home court
62-50. The win put the Lancers in the driver’s seat in the WCAL standings and, until
earlier this week, they remained unbeaten in
league play. But Wednesday's 62-41 loss to
Mitty, combined with Serra’s 62-38 walk
over St. Ignatius left the Padres and the
Lancers in a tie for first place in the WCAL

entering Friday’s classic rivalry showdown.
But Serra’s preoccupation with Hewitt got
the Padres in trouble early Friday.
Two Serra post players — Trevor Brown
and Paul Smoot — found themselves in foul
trouble early in the second quarter. Each had
been charged with three fouls with 5:49
remaining in the first half. And while
Hewitt’s early bucket would be the only two
points the junior would score in the game,
Stapes stepped up to score a game-high 25

See SERRA, Page 14

12

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

Local sports roundup
Girls’ basketball
Burlingame 39, Mills 37
Despite throwing the ball away on their
final two offensive possessions, the
Panthers buckled down defensively to pull
out the win over the Vikings Friday night.
Leading 38-35, Burlingame (5-3 PAL
South, 7-11 overall), threw the ball away
with just over a minute to play. Mills (4-4,
10-11) cut the lead to 38-37 with less than a
minute to go.
The Panthers, however, threw the ball
away again on their ensuing possession,
giving Mills one last shot to pull out the
win with under 20 seconds to play.
Burlingame, however, got a pair of blocks
— including one from Claire Phillips on an
Aubrie Businger 3-point attempt with less
than five seconds to play. Phillips was
fouled, hit 1 of 2 free throws and the
Panthers escaped with the victory.

Menlo School 57, Castilleja 38
For the second time in three days, the
Knights downed the Gators in West Bay
Athletic League Foothill Division play.
De’Jeane Stine led Menlo (5-1 WBAL
Foothill, 14-4 overall) with 12 points,
while Hannah Paye added 11.
Menlo scored in double figures in each of
the four quarter and defensively, the Knights
limited Castilleja (1-6, 9-10) to just 15
points in the second half.

Menlo-Atherton 55, Carlmont 37
The Bears took a 34-12 lead at halftime
and cruised the rest of the way to improve to
7-1 in PAL South Division to stay in a tie for
first place with Hillsdale.
Ilana Baer led the way for M-A (7-1 PAL
South, 15-5 overall), scoring a game-high
14 points. Greer Hoyem added 12 points.

SPORTS
Alexa Bayangos, Stephannie Tong-Woo
and Alyssa Hayes each scored seven points
to pace Carlmont (4-4, 9-11).

Eastside Prep 45, Sacred Heart Prep 17

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Utah hands Warriors
second straight loss

It was not a banner night for the Gators
Friday, as they failed to crack double digits
in any quarter as the fell to the Panthers in
WBAL Foothill Division action.
SHP (2-5 WBAL Foothill, 10-8 overall)
was led by Ma’ata Makoni, who finished THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
with nine points.
SALT LAKE CITY — Gordon Hayward
Boys’ basketball
scored 26 points and grabbed 15 rebounds as
the Utah Jazz upset the league’s highestHillsdale 67, Capuchino 52
scoring team, the Golden State Warriors,
The Knights and Mustangs were tied at 29 110-100 on Friday night.
at halftime before Hillsdale pulled away in
It was Jazz’s first win in three tries against
the second half for the win.
the Warriors.
Hillsdale (5-3 PAL South, 14-6 overall)
Hayward showed no lingering effects from
outscored Capuchino (2-6, 6-14) 15-9 in the sinus congestion that held him out of practhird quarter to take a six-point lead going tice Thursday. He added six assists to his
into the fourth before exploding for 23 double-double. The Jazz got a huge lift from
points over the final eight minutes.
the bench with 17 points from Trevor
The Knights had four players score in dou- Booker and 15 from Trey Burke.
ble figures, led by a game-high 18 points
“It was good to see (Hayward) get enerfrom Adam Cook. Adam Schembri added 17 gized and get some of his juice back,” Jazz
while Colin Low and Peter Chebi each coach Quin Snyder said. “I think he’s always
chipped in with 12 points.
risen to a challenge in a matchup. He played
Capuchino was led by Lucas Magnani, really well and played really hard. ... The
who finished with 15 points. Neadal Nasser biggest thing is his rebounding.”
added nine points for the Mustangs.
Stephen Curry had his ninth 30-point
game of the season and finished with 32.
His fellow All-Star backcourt teammate
Sacred Heart Prep 81, Priory 55
Klay
Thompson was held to 12 after scoring
The Gators remained undefeated in WBAL
play as they cruised to the victory over the at least 22 in the last five games. The
Warriors were never able to put together one
Panthers.
of their trademark scoring runs.
SHP (8-0 WBAL, 16-2 overall) had four
The Jazz (17-30) used an 11-2 run early in
players finish in double digits scoring, led
the second quarter to take a 39-27 lead as the
by Mason Randall’s 20 points, hitting six
Warriors just didn’t resemble the team with
3-pointers in the process. James McLean
the NBA’s best record. Golden State (36-8)
added 16, Connor Moses finished with 15
never led, tied just twice in the first quarter
and Corbin Koch chipped in with 14 points
and shot 43.0 percent from the field. Curry
for the Gators.

Jazz 110, Warriors 100
was the lone bright spot
outside of 15 points from
Leandro Barbosa, 13 of
which were scored in the
fourth quarter.

Tip-ins
Jazz: The Jazz bench
players scored 28 of the
Leandro
team’s 56 first-half
Barbosa
points and finished with
51. ... The Jazz finished
their four-game homestand 2-2. ... Dante
Exum went to the locker room in the third
quarter after being hit in the throat by an
elbow. He returned to the bench later that
quarter and to the game midway through the
fourth quarter.
Warri o rs : The Warriors trailed by double-digits at halftime for fifth time this season — all on the road. They are 1-4 in those
games ... Outside of Curry and Thompson,
Golden State starters scored just 15 points.
... The 100 points were the fewest scored by
the Warriors since an 86-point effort in a
loss to the Los Angeles Clippers on Dec.
25.

Up next
Warri o rs :
Saturday.

Host

Phoenix

Suns

on

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

13

Shocking day for Tiger: An all-time worst 82
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Tiger Woods never
shot a score this high in his 1,267 official
rounds as a pro.
He never looked more lost on a golf course.
Woods hit wedges fat and thin, but never
close. He hit one drive into the water, another into the base of a desert bush. And when he
missed a 10-foot par putt on his final hole
Friday in the Phoenix Open, he had the worst
score of his career — an 11-over 82.
Woods was in last place when he headed
home to Florida to try to fix a game in disarray, even behind Arizona club pro Michael
Hopper, who had yet to tee off. It was the first
time in his career that he missed the cut in

consecutive PGA Tour
events, the most recent
one in August at the PGA
Championship.
About the only thing he
didn’t lose was his sense
of humor.
“I’m just doing this so I
don’t get fined,” Woods
Tiger Woods said with a smile as he
faced the media, repeating
Marshawn Lynch’s only line at Super Bowl
media day.
Even so, this round might have been more
painful than getting his tooth knocked out
last week in Italy.
His previous worst score was an 81 in the
third round at Muirfield in the 2002 British

Open, where he caught the brunt of whipping
rain in 40 mph wind. There was only a light
drizzle in the Valley of the Sun, and Woods hit
a low point in his career.
“We all have days like this,” Woods said.
“Unfortunately, mine was in a public forum.
We take the good with the bad, and the thing
is, even on bad days like this, just keep fighting. On the good days, you’ve got to keep
fighting, as well.”
He attributed his shocking play to his latest swing change, which he described in
December as “new but old,” although this
game resembles neither. He left Sean Foley
during his four-month break to fully heal
from back surgery and now has Californiabased Chris Como as a swing consultant.
“I was caught right between patterns, just

old pattern, new pattern,” Woods said. “And I
got better, more committed to what I was
doing on my back nine and hit some better
shots. But still got a lot of work to do.”
He scrapped plans to go to the Super Bowl
and headed home to Florida to practice before
returning next week to Torrey Pines.
The most glaring weakness remains the
short game — chips, bunker play and putting.
Nothing was uglier than the par-3 fourth
hole when his tee shot went over the green.
The chip was difficult because he short-sided
himself and was only 35 feet from the flag.
Woods hit it 47 yards, the ball shooting low
and hot all the way across the green and into
a front bunker. He blasted out to 20 feet and
two-putted for double bogey.

Lawmakers support fantasy football
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA, Wash. — On the last weekday
before the Super Bowl, legislators wearing
Seattle Seahawks gear made noise over a bill
to allow Washington state residents to legally
play fantasy football.
The activity has become increasingly popular in recent years with an estimated 40 million players participating each NFL season,
often for money.
There has been debate, however, over
whether it should be considered illegal gambling, based on luck, or a game of skill, which
rewards knowledge.
Fantasy sports leagues invite players to

compete against one another by selecting athletes from a league-wide pool and tracking
how well they play. If Seattle’s Marshawn
Lynch has a big game, the fantasy football
team manager who selected him will get a
boost.
The federal government and 45 other states
consider fantasy sports as legal games of
skill. Washington, Louisiana, Montana, Iowa
and Arizona — site of Super Bowl 49, where
the defending champion Seahawks will face
the New England Patriots on Sunday — all
consider fantasy sports illegal.
Bills that would legalize the practice are
pending in Iowa and Montana. And on Friday,
Washington state Sen. Pam Roach asked her

legislative colleagues to support a plan to
join the larger group.
Wearing a blue and green Seahawks scarf,
Roach told the Senate Commerce and Labor
Committee that her bill would formally define
fantasy sports as games of skill. She supported the position, saying fantasy football is
based on understanding factors including a
player’s abilities and individual matchups.
“We don’t want to expand gambling,” said
Roach, a Republican from Auburn. “That’s not
what this bill is about.”
Committee chairman Michal Baumgartner,

a Spokane Republican, said he was surprised
by the complexity of the debate around “what
we thought was going to be a pretty simple
bill.”
Officials from the state Gambling Control
Board and a lobbyist for fantasy sports
leagues turned up for the hearing to describe
the issues involved.
A key topic of debate is whether seasonlong fantasy leagues should be regulated the
same way as day-to-day leagues, which are
popular online partly because of their moneyearning potential.

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Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

SERRA
Continued from page 11
points, including 19 points during a wild
second half.
St. Francis outscored Serra 13-5 in the
second quarter to take a 21-11 lead into halftime. St. Francis was ice cold from 3-point
range early, shooting just 1 for 10 from
beyond the arc in the first half. The second
half, however, was another matter.
Stapes quickly established the 3-point
game to start the second half, hitting his
first of four treys in the half on the Lancers’
first possession. Serra refused to lay down
though, as Killingsworth hit back-to-back
3s to close the St. Francis lead to 24-19.
But after Serra guard Jimmy Wohrer produced a steal and failed to convert on the
ensuing break, St. Francis made Serra pay.
On the other end of the court, Stapes produced a four-point play, hitting a 3-pointer
while drawing a foul in the process to give
the Lancers a huge momentum swing.
“When a few guys start getting hot it energizes the whole team,” Stapes said. “We
come out and start knocking down 3s, and it
was big for us. The 3-point shot was key for
us in the third quarter especially.”
Midway through the fourth quarter, St.
Francis held its biggest lead of the game at
51-34. But Serra head coach Chuck Rapp
unloaded his deep arsenal of defenders who
scrapped for turnovers and ultimately closed
it to a two-score game.

SPORTS
Serra junior Jeremiah Testa had the
biggest burst off the bench, tallying eight
of his team-high 12 points in the fourth
quarter. But senior Stephon Nettles had the
most spectacular late showing with a baseline drive to convert a reverse layup to close
the Lancers’ lead to 53-45. On the next St.
Francis possession, Nettles grabbed a steal
at midcourt and sped to the hoop for another quick bucket, closing the lead to 53-47.
“We hit a couple shots, the bench energy
kept it up,” Killingsworth said of the comeback. “[The bench] kept coming in with
energy. It was a team effort. No one person
could do it.”
With just over a minute left in the game,
the Padres produced a counterintuitive 3pointer when Wohrer — Serra’s top 3-point
shooter — dished to center Brown, who
drilled a trey to close the Lancers’ lead to
54-50.
Serra came up with a turnover and got into
a half-court set, but with 40 seconds remaining turned the ball over on a baseline pass
that would have been a gimme lay-in. St.
Francis all but eased to victory from there.
Serra shot 20 for 51 from the field and 5
for 19 from 3-point land throughout. Serra
outrebounded St. Francis 29-24 overall.
With the Padres in foul trouble, they went
to 6-9 freshman center Jack Wilson early in
the second quarter. The matchup between
Wilson and the junior Hewitt, looking
ahead, showed all the promise of a classic
matchup in the 2015-16 season. Wilson
finished with four points and four rebounds.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SOCCER
Continued from page 11
got a through ball on a lob pass and took
a 10-yard diagonal attempt in a 1-on-1
matchup with Haire, but fired a rocket just
wide of goal.
Shortly after, Menlo could not convert on
back-to-back corner kicks. SHP made the
Knights pay two minutes later when, in the
56th minute, Gators sophomore forward
Danny Sanchez got a close-range match up
and took a creative shot with a foot slide to
hook the ball around a Menlo defender and
the keeper to score off an assist from
Connor Johnston, giving the Gators a 2-1
lead.
“Connor, he flipped the ball up and I saw
coming in,” Sanchez said. “The defender was
right [in front of me]. I told myself I have to
go all in. I did and I was able to put it in the
back of the net.”
The goal was Sanchez’s fourth of the season, all of which have had a bit of acrobatics involved, according to SHP head coach
Armando del Rio.
“All of his goals this season … have all
been one-touch finishes at the box. So, he’s
got the timing down pretty well,” del Rio
said. “Pretty much every goal is just like
that, so he’s perfect at timing those
things.”
Aggressions picked up between both
teams but the referee kept the game in
check. In the 69th minute, a double-yellow
card was issued. The strict officiating had an
impact on the teams’ ability to establish a
rhythm, del Rio said.
“I don’t think any team ever got into a
rhythm,” del Rio said. “It was tightly called
for safety reasons. So, it was kind of a game
of dead balls, free kicks. It wasn’t a great
game, I don’t think, by either team. But
that’s just the way it went.”
In the 74th minute, one of the most flagrant fouls of the game led to Menlo tying it
up. With Menlo’s Williams taking a through
ball into the box for a close-range attempt,
Haire lurched from his post and nearly tackled Williams, drawing a penalty, but not a
yellow card. Chisholm then scored his second penalty kick to tie it 2-2.
“I think we really wanted the win, ”
Chisholm said. “We definitely had the desire
for it. We didn’t quite play as well as we
could have, but we’re OK with this draw, I
think. They’re a good team and we’re the
first ones to take points off of them in

PAM MCKENNY/MENLO SCHOOL ATHLETICS

Menlo’s Chris Strong, right, closes down SHP’s
Tyler Morgane during a 2-2 tie Friday.
league. And I think we can be happy with
that.”
Chisholm said the Knights have been
playing much better soccer of late, unlike
the first matchup with SHP in the WBAL
opener.
“We weren’t quite prepared coming into
league,” Chisholm said. “That was our first
game of league, against Sacred Heart. I think
that we hit our stride three or four games
into league. We found a formation that we
liked and we stuck with it. Since then, we've
had three solid wins.”
SHP has undergone some changes as well.
The Gators’ top scorer, Riley Tinsley, was
lost two weeks ago to a leg injury.
According to del Rio, Tinsley is out for the
season. With the loss of Tinsley, SHP has
shifted from a four-man defensive back row
to three-man, relying heavily on defensemen Chou, Cam Chapman and AJ Hamer to
afford an additional attacker up front.
“Tinsley had a lot of speed up front and
aggressiveness,” Hamer said. “His injury
really took away from our speed and aggressiveness up top. … I think we’re doing fine
(on defense). We have a lot of chemistry
now in the back after playing halfway
through the season.”
SHP proved it Friday with its defense
notching a veritable shutout as both
Menlo’s goals were scored on penalty kicks
— the only two shots on goal the Knights
produced throughout.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

15

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

Kings’ Cousins to replace injured Kobe on All-Star roster
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DeMarcus Cousins is going to the
All-Star game, after all.
NBA Commissioner Adam Silver
selected the Sacramento Kings center
to replace injured Lakers star Kobe
Bryant on the Western Conference
All-Star team Friday.
Silver’s choice leaves Portland

Trail Blazers point guard Damian
Lillard as the game’s biggest snub.
Lillard could still be picked if another player drops out before the Feb. 15
game at New York’s Madison Square
Garden.
Golden State Warriors coach Steve
Kerr, who is leading the West, will
decide who replaces Bryant in the

SUPER BOWL ROSTERS
New England Patriots
Head Coach: Bill Belichick
No. Player
3 Stephen Gostkowski
6 Ryan Allen
10 Jimmy Garoppolo
11 Julian Edelman
12 Tom Brady
18 Matthew Slater
19 Brandon LaFell
21 Malcolm Butler
23 Patrick Chung
24 Darrelle Revis
25 Kyle Arrington
26 Logan Ryan
27 Tavon Wilson
28 James White
29 LeGarrette Blount
30 Duron Harmon
32 Devin McCourty
34 Shane Vereen
35 Jonas Gray
38 Brandon Bolden
39 Brandon Browner
43 Nate Ebner
46 James Develin
47 Michael Hoomanawanui
48 Danny Aiken
50 Rob Ninkovich
52 Jonathan Casillas
54 Dont’a Hightower
55 Akeem Ayers
58 Darius Fleming
59 Chris White
61 Marcus Cannon
62 Ryan Wendell
63 Dan Connolly
65 Jordan Devey
66 Bryan Stork
67 Josh Kline
71 Cameron Fleming
72 Joe Vellano
75 Vince Wilfork
76 Sebastian Vollmer
77 Nate Solder
80 Danny Amendola
81 Tim Wright
82 Josh Boyce
84 Brian Tyms
87 Rob Gronkowski
90 Zach Moore
91 Jamie Collins
94 Chris Jones
95 Chandler Jones
96 Sealver Siliga
97 Alan Branch

Pos
K
P
QB
WR
QB
WR
WR
CB
S
CB
CB
CB
S
RB
RB
S
S
RB
RB
RB
CB
S
RB
TE
C
DE
LB
LB
LB
LB
LB
T
C
G
T
C
G
T
DT
DT
T
T
WR
TE
WR
WR
TE
DE
LB
DT
DE
DT
DT

Seattle Seahawks
Ht
6-1
6-2
6-2
5-10
6-4
6-0
6-3
5-11
5-11
5-11
5-10
5-11
6-0
5-10
6-0
6-1
5-10
5-10
5-10
5-11
6-4
6-0
6-3
6-4
6-4
6-2
6-1
6-3
6-3
6-2
6-3
6-5
6-2
6-4
6-6
6-4
6-3
6-6
6-2
6-2
6-8
6-8
5-11
6-4
5-11
6-3
6-6
6-6
6-3
6-1
6-5
6-2
6-6

Wt
215
215
225
200
225
210
210
190
210
198
190
195
215
205
250
205
195
205
225
220
221
210
255
260
255
260
227
270
255
255
238
335
300
305
317
310
295
325
300
325
320
320
195
220
205
204
265
275
250
309
265
325
325

Head Coach: Pete Carroll
No. Player
3 Russell Wilson
4 Steven Hauschka
5 B.J. Daniels
7 Tarvaris Jackson
9 Jon Ryan
13 Chris Matthews
15 Jermaine Kearse
19 Bryan Walters
20 Jeremy Lane
22 Robert Turbin
23 Jeron Johnson
24 Marshawn Lynch
25 Richard Sherman
26 Steven Terrell
27 Tharold Simon
28 Marcus Burley
29 Earl Thomas
31 Kam Chancellor
33 Christine Michael
35 Deshawn Shead
41 Byron Maxwell
46 Will Tukuafu
49 Clint Gresham
50 K.J. Wright
51 Bruce Irvin
52 Brock Coyle
53 Malcolm Smith
54 Bobby Wagner
56 Cliff Avril
57 Mike Morgan
60 Max Unger
61 Lemuel Jeanpierre
64 J.R. Sweezy
65 Patrick Lewis
66 Keavon Milton
67 Landon Cohen
68 Justin Britt
70 David King
72 Michael Bennett
76 Russell Okung
77 James Carpenter
78 Alvin Bailey
79 Garry Gilliam
81 Kevin Norwood
82 Luke Willson
83 Ricardo Lockette
84 Cooper Helfet
88 Tony Moeaki
89 Doug Baldwin
93 O’Brien Schofield
94 Kevin Williams
95 Demarcus Dobbs
99 Tony McDaniel

Pos
QB
K
QB
QB
P
WR
WR
WR
CB
RB
S
RB
CB
S
CB
CB
S
S
RB
CB
CB
RB
C
LB
LB
LB
LB
LB
DE
LB
C
C
G
C
G
DT
T
DE
DE
T
G
T
T
WR
TE
WR
TE
TE
WR
DE
DT
DE
DT

starting lineup. Kerr will choose
from a roster that includes Houston’s
James Harden and Golden State’s
Klay Thompson.
Cousins is headed to the All-Star
game for the first time in his fiveyear
career.
He
becomes
Sacramento’s first All-Star since
Brad Miller and Peja Stojakovic in

“I’m extremely excited to play in
my first All-Star game,” Cousins
said. “I appreciate the recognition
and want to also thank my teammates and the fans for their support
throughout
the
season.
Representing the Kings and the city
of Sacramento is a great honor.”

Last season, Cousins was passed
over as an injury replacement — also
for Bryant. New Orleans Pelicans big
man Anthony Davis was chosen
instead. Cousins had better traditional statistics, while Davis’ defensive
numbers and efficiency ratings
ranked higher. It also didn’t hurt that
New Orleans hosted the event.

NHL GLANCE

NBA GLANCE

NBA ALL-STAR ROSTERS

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Ht
5-11
6-4
5-11
6-2
6-0
6-5
6-1
6-0
6-0
5-10
5-10
5-11
6-3
5-10
6-3
5-10
5-10
6-3
5-10
6-2
6-1
6-4
6-3
6-4
6-3
6-2
6-0
6-0
6-3
6-3
6-5
6-3
6-5
6-1
6-4
6-1
6-6
6-4
6-4
6-5
6-5
6-3
6-5
6-2
6-5
6-2
6-3
6-3
5-10
6-3
6-5
6-2
6-7

Wt
206
210
217
225
217
218
209
190
190
222
212
215
195
197
202
189
202
232
221
220
207
293
240
246
248
245
226
241
260
226
305
301
298
311
293
300
325
300
274
310
321
320
306
199
252
211
239
252
189
242
311
282
305

2004.

Atlantic Division
GP W L OT
Tampa Bay 50 31 15 4
Montreal 47 31 13 3
Detroit
49 28 12 9
Boston
49 26 16 7
Florida
46 21 15 10
Toronto
50 22 24 4
Ottawa
47 19 19 9
Buffalo
50 14 33 3
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT
N.Y. Islanders48 32 15 1
Pittsburgh 49 28 13 8
Washington 48 25 14 9
N.Y. Rangers 46 27 15 4
Philadelphia 50 21 22 7
Columbus 47 21 23 3
New Jersey 49 18 22 9
Carolina
48 17 25 6

Pts
66
65
65
59
52
48
47
31

GF
163
127
145
131
114
144
129
94

GA
132
108
128
123
129
155
134
179

Pts
65
64
59
58
49
45
45
40

GF
157
145
144
135
139
119
110
104

GA
135
125
124
111
151
148
137
125

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT
Nashville
48 31 11 6
St. Louis
48 31 13 4
Chicago
49 31 16 2
Winnipeg 50 26 16 8
Colorado 50 21 18 11
Dallas
48 22 19 7
Minnesota 48 22 20 6

Pts
68
66
64
60
53
51
50

GF
145
156
155
140
131
152
131

GA
115
117
113
127
141
157
138

Pacific Division
GP W L OT
Anaheim 50 32 12 6
Sharks
49 26 17 6
Vancouver 47 27 17 3
Calgary
49 26 20 3
Los Angeles 48 21 15 12
Arizona
48 17 25 6
Edmonton 49 13 27 9

Pts
70
58
57
55
54
40
35

GF
147
137
129
140
133
111
113

GA
134
135
120
127
129
161
162

Friday’s Games
St. Louis 3, Carolina 2, SO
Pittsburgh 2, New Jersey 1, OT
Colorado 3, Nashville 0
Vancouver 5, Buffalo 2
Chicago 4, Anaheim 1
Saturday’s Games
Washington at Montreal, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Detroit, 11 a.m.
Arizona at Ottawa, noon
Dallas at Winnipeg, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Florida at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
Los Angeles at Boston, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 7 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Arizona at Montreal, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Washington, 10 a.m.
Nashville at Pittsburgh, 11 a.m.
Minnesota at Vancouver, noon

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
32
Brooklyn
18
Boston
16
Philadelphia
10
New York
9
Southeast Division
Atlanta
39
Washington
31
Miami
20
Charlotte
19
Orlando
15
Central Division
Chicago
30
Cleveland
28
Milwaukee
24
Detroit
17
Indiana
17

L
15
28
29
37
38

Pct
.681
.391
.356
.213
.191

GB

13 1/2
15
22
23

8
16
26
27
34

.830
.660
.435
.413
.306


8
18 1/2
19 1/2
25

19
20
22
30
31

.612
.583
.522
.362
.354


1 1/2
4 1/2
12
12 1/2

Pct
.739
.702
.646
.638
.532

GB

1 1/2
4
4 1/2
9 1/2

.681
.500
.404
.362
.174


8 1/2
13
15
23 1/2

.818
.681
.583
.356
.277


5 1/2
10
20 1/2
24 1/2

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Memphis
34
12
Houston
33
14
Dallas
31
17
San Antonio
30
17
New Orleans
25
22
Northwest Division
Portland
32
15
Oklahoma City
23
23
Denver
19
28
Utah
17
30
Minnesota
8
38
Pacific Division
Warriors
36
8
L.A. Clippers
32
15
Phoenix
28
20
Sacramento
16
29
L.A. Lakers
13
34

Friday’s Games
Philadelphia 103, Minnesota 94
Atlanta 105, Portland 99
Houston 93, Boston 87
Toronto 127, Brooklyn 122, OT
Cleveland 101, Sacramento 90
New Orleans 108, L.A. Clippers 103
Dallas 93, Miami 72
Utah 110, Golden State 100
Phoenix 99, Chicago 93
Saturday’s Games
Toronto at Washington, 4 p.m.
Dallas at Orlando, 4 p.m.
Sacramento at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Houston at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Portland at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Denver, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 6 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Miami at Boston, 10 a.m.
L.A. Lakers at New York, 11 a.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Starters
Player
Pos Ht
Carmelo Anthony, NY
F
6-8
Pau Gasol, Chi
F
7-0
LeBron James, Cle
F
6-8
Kyle Lowry, Tor
G
6-0
John Wall, Was
G
6-4
Reserves
Chris Bosh, Mia
F-C 6-11
Jimmy Butler, Chi
G-F 6-7
Al Horford, Atl
F-C 6-10
Kyrie Irving, Cle
G
6-3
Paul Millsap, Atl
F
6-8
Jeff Teague, Atl
G
6-2
Dwyane Wade, Mia
G
6-4
Coach: Mike Budenholzer, Atlanta
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Starters
Player
Pos
Kobe Bryant, LAL
G
Stephen Curry, GS
G
Anthony Davis, NO
F
Marc Gasol, Mem
C
Blake Griffin, LAC
F
Reserves
LaMarcus Aldridge, Por F
Tim Duncan, SA
F
Kevin Durant, Okl
F
James Harden, Hou
G
Chris Paul, LAC
G
Klay Thompson, GS
G
Russell Westbrook, Okl
G
Coach: Steve Kerr, Golden State

Wt
240
250
250
205
195
235
220
250
193
253
181
220

Ht
6-6
6-3
6-10
7-1
6-10

Wt
212
190
220
265
251

6-11
6-11
6-9
6-5
6-0
6-7
6-3

240
250
240
225
175
215
200

TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended Milwaukee LHP Tyler Alexander, Baltimore 3B Austin
Anderson, San Francisco RHP Dylan Brooks 50
games and free agent RHP Tyler Gonzales 100
games for violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program.
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Agreed to terms with 1B
Steve Pearce on a one-year contract.
National League
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Designated OF Chris
Dominguez for assignment.

WHAT’S ON TAP
SATURDAY
Boys’ soccer
Valley Christian at Serra, 11 a.m.
Girls’ soccer
Notre Dame-Belmont at Valley Christian, 11 a.m.
MONDAY, FEB. 2
Boys’ soccer
Terra Nova at Capuchino, 3 p.m.; Westmoor at Jefferson, 4 p.m.

16

SPORTS

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

PANTHERS
Continued from page 11
my shooting. Just doing whatever I can to
help the team.”
Ferrari also had four rebounds and four
assists.
It was Ferrari late in the third quarter and
early in the fourth that propelled
Burlingame (7-1 PAL South, 10-10 overall)
to the win. He hit three of his five 3s over a
span of three minutes, which bridged the
two periods. After Mills’ Miguel Madrigal
knocked down a 3-pointer to cut
Burlingame’s lead to 35-33 with 2:04 to
play in the third, Ferrari hit his first bucket
since knocking down a pair of 3s early in
the third quarter.
Each one of Ferrari’s 3s in the second half
brought a bigger and bigger explosion from
the Burlingame crowd. His third of the night
put the Panthers up 38-33 with a minute to
play in the quarter. He followed that with
one from a little deeper with six second to
play, giving Burlingame a 41-33 lead going
into the fourth quarter.
A Garlitos bucket to start the fourth gave
Burlingame its biggest lead of the night to
that point, 43-33, before Ferrari took one
more step back and buried his third 3 in as

MATCHUPS
Continued from page 11
to cover him. However, for Seattle’s Legion
of Boom, much of the assignment will fall to
S Kam Chancellor (31). Chancellor has the
size (6-3, 232), speed and tackling skills to
somewhat neutralize Gronkowski.
If he can do that, it frees All-Pro S Earl
Thomas (29) to help with versatile WR Julian
Edelman (11), who mostly will draw All-Pro
CB Richard Sherman (25) in coverage. QB
Tom Brady (12) is particularly comfortable
throwing to Gronk and Edelman, and the
Seahawks want to force him to look at others
instead.
But even if the coverage is strong, Seattle
must get pressure from pass rushers DEs
Michael Bennett (72) and Cliff Avril (56) and
LBs Bobby Wagner (54), an All-Pro, and
Bruce Irvin (51). Brady is most vulnerable —
which isn’t very vulnerable — when he has to
throw before he wants to and can’t set his
feet.
That means an unheralded offensive line
featuring tackles Sebastian Vollmer (76) and
Nate Solder (77) needs to be steady.
Green Bay showed the Seahawks can be run
on, so RB LeGarrette Blount (29) could wind
up being a featured player.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

many minutes — and the explosion from
the fans was deafening.
“That was just in the flow,” Ferrari said. “I
knew we needed them.”
That last 3 ignited a 16-5 run to end the
game for the Panthers.
Ferrari had five of the Panthers’ eight 3s
for the game.
So, what did Mills coach Rick Hanson
think was the difference?
“They made some really long shots,”
Hanson said, alluding the 3-pointers.
Mills started off the game pretty well,
jumping out to a quick 8-3 lead after less
than three minutes as Marquez Bura knocked
down a jumper before burying a 3-pointer.
Bura scored all seven of his points in the
opening three minutes of the game.
His two free throws put the Vikings up 83 before Burlingame went on a 9-0 run.
Center Bassel Mufarreh scored four points
during the run, Ferrari knocked down his
second 3 of the quarter and Garlitos added a
pair of free throws as Burlingame took a 1210 lead.
The teams went back and forth and when
the quarter ended, Burlingame held an 18-17
lead.
Things slowed down considerably in the
second quarter as the teams combined for
just 14 points. Justin Gutang got untracked
for the Panthers a little bit, knocking down

one of two Burlingame 3-pointers in the
quarter as the Panthers took a 26-23 lead
into break.
Gutang finished with eight points and
five boards.
In the third quarter, Mills made a concerted effort to use dribble penetration deep into
the paint and then kicking the ball out to
shooters on the perimeter to give them
some space to shoot.
Unfortunately for the Vikings, their shots
just weren’t falling. Mills managed just 19
points in the second half, compared to 33
for Burlingame.
“It wasn’t as productive as we had hoped,”
Hanson said of the attacking style in the
second half. “We thought we could get to the
free throw line (more).”
Burlingame, however, was mostly lights
out shooting in the third and fourth quarters,
shooting a combined 9 for 19 in the half.
“It was their turn to shoot well tonight,”
Hanson said.
Mills was led by Madrigal’s 10 points.
Point-forward Marquis Adkins, who scored
14 points and pulled down 16 rebounds in
the first meeting Jan. 9, finished Friday
with eight points and 11 rebounds.
“We got a race (for the PAL South title),”
said Burlingame coach Pete Harames. “And
we’re happy to be in it.”

Special Teams: Although
the Seahawks were not
great on special teams this
season, they were spectacular in beating Green
Bay. A fake field goal pass
for a TD by holder Jon
Ryan (9) — one of the
NFL’s most accurate punPete Carroll ters — and an onside kick
that kept them alive for
the NFC title won’t be forgotten in the Pacific
Northwest.
Generally, though, New England has the
edge here. Coverage is very good on punt and
kickoff returns, led by Pro Bowler Matthew
Slater (18). Edelman (11) was second in the
NFL with 12 yards per punt return and had one
for an 84-yard TD. Stephen Gostkowski (3)
missed only two field goals and led the NFL
with 156 points.
Coaching: Pete Carroll’s revenge? It’s not a
major story line, but it should be recognized
that Carroll preceded Bill Belichick in New
England. He wasn’t a bad coach there, either,
going 28-23, but that pales compared to Belichick’s numbers.
No team brings more energy to the field
than the Seahawks, and it stems from Carroll.
He always has the pulse of his team: Carroll
saw how Seattle was suffering from a Super
Bowl hangover early in the schedule. He not
only got the Seahawks to snap out of it, but

reach peak form down the
stretch — at least until
last week, when they got
lucky, too.
Belichick just surpassed
Tom Landry’s mark for
postseason
victories
(21). Regardless of the
findings of the NFL’s
Bill Belichick probe into under-inflated
footballs in the AFC
championship contest, he is known as an
innovator — just as much as he is known for
stretching the parameters of the rulebook.
Belichick keeps things fresh by finding new
ways to exploit the opposition.
He will have something unusual lined up for
Carroll and the Seahawks.
Intangibles: Seattle seeks to become the first
repeat winner since the Patriots managed it a
decade ago. A victory would stamp these Seahawks as an all-time great team, particularly
having beaten Peyton Manning and Brady in
successive Super Bowls. The Seahawks also
come off a mediocre performance in the NFC
title game, which should spur them on.
New England, of course, doesn’t want to add
a stigma of Super Bowl loser by dropping
three in a row after winning in its first three
trips with Brady and Belichick. Brady can
equal Terry Bradshaw and Joe Montana with
four Super Bowl rings, while Belichick can
tie Chuck Noll with four.

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Super Bowl briefs
Goodell: Pats could be penalized
even if no competitive edge
PHOENIX — Commissioner Roger Goodell
says that even if no competitive advantage
was gained, the New England Patriots could
face increased penalties if
the NFL investigation
finds they violated rules
by deflating footballs in
the AFC championship
game.
Goodell says at his
annual pre-Super Bowl
news conference Friday:
“We have rules. We’re a
Roger Goodell league of rules.”
The league appointed lawyer Ted Wells to
look into what happened to the Patriots’ footballs during the 45-7 victory over the Colts
that sent New England to the Super Bowl.
Patriots owner Robert Kraft has said he
expects the investigation to determine his
team did nothing wrong — and he expects an
apology from the NFL.

Former Seattle DB to be
Seahawks’ honory catptain
Former NFL defensive player of the year
Kenny Easley will serve as the Seattle
Seahawks honorary captain for the coin toss
of Sunday’s Super Bowl.
Easley was a standout strong safety for the
Seahawks whose career was cut short by kidney issues that eventually resulted in a transplant in 1990. Easley was the defensive player of the year in 1984 and a three-time firstteam All-Pro selection from 1983-85.
Easley harbored ill feelings toward the franchise for many years before being inducted
into the club’s Ring of Honor in 2002. He
raised the team’s “12th Man Flag” prior to the
Seahawks divisional round playoff win over
Carolina earlier this month.
Easley finished his career with 498 tackles,
32 interceptions and 10 forced fumbles.

Top trainers saddling up to Patriots
The nation’s leading horse trainers are
going with the Patriots in the Super Bowl.
Todd Pletcher, recent winner of his seventh Eclipse Award as the No. 1 trainer in
earnings at more than $22 million, is looking at a one-point New England win over
Seattle on Sunday: “24-23 Pats. Brady,
Belichick and Vince Wilfork.”
Three-time Eclipse Award winner Bob
Baffert, a three-time Kentucky Derby winner
born in Nogales, Arizona, is a fan of the
Patriots’ coach: “I’ve always been a Bill
Belichick fan. He presented the Eclipse
Award to us when Point Given was Horse of
the Year in 2001.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

17

Travels,
tours + trips
Washingtonon-the-Brazos
State Historic Site

SEE PAGE 21

18-year-old child
By Dominic Gialdini

O

n Jan. 11, my 18th birthday, I
made the first purchase of my adult
life: a lottery ticket. The next day,
I made my second purchase: another lottery
ticket. The third day, I did it again.
I was so certain that I would win the
$270,000,000 Mega Millions jackpot; in
fact, I had already begun to think about
how to allocate the
money. My plans included using it to pay for college and the remainder of
my parents’ mortgage,
along with giving hefty
sums to other family
members as Christmas
gifts. I would invest a
great deal of it, save a
chunk for travel and — as can only be
expected — donate half of it to a cause to
avoid the feeling of financial gluttony.
I was rather taking aback when the numbers on my ticket didn’t match the numbers
that were drawn. I had a three in
258,890,850 chance of winning and miraculously still lost.
The following day, I was overcome with
grief. It felt like it was a given that I would
become the world’s luckiest birthday boy,
and yet the result was nothing more than
the squandering of a few dollars.
After experiencing a brief existential crisis, I recomposed myself. How could I be
so foolish as to think that fortune would
favor me over everyone else? My mind
bombarded me with a horrible future vision
of myself, a poor old man with a gambling
problem, unable to beat the vice, not even
after multiple stints in rehab. I admit, it
wouldn’t be unreasonable to call my forebodings hasty, but they did help me to realize something: I am still a kid.
Some laws discriminating on the basis of
age are, in a sense, arbitrary. What makes
an 18-year-old responsible enough to partake in the lottery while a 17-and-364-dayyear-old cannot? I suppose it is for the sake
of convenience, but it almost makes our
social standards laughable.
Age is not the best determinant of what a
person should be qualified to do. Of course,
we shouldn’t be selling cigarettes and
booze to 10-year-olds or anything like

See STUDENT, Page 22

Tragedies of ‘Timbuktu’
told with rare beauty
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The hot Malian sands of Abderrahmane Sissako’s
“Timbuktu” are a cool reservoir of placid beauty, where
desert dunes are swept by quiet ripples of colorful,
everyday village life and haphazard storms of violence.
“Timbuktu, ” the Oscar-nominated foreign-langue
film from Mauritania, is set outside Timbuktu, a place

long associated with exotic adventure. But here it’s
occupied by Islamist forces, as it was from early 2012
until 2013 before French and Malian troops pushed
them out.
But “forces” suggests a more formal command than
the patrolmen seen in Sissako’s poetically humanist
film. Avoiding stereotypes, the movie shrinks larger

See TIMBUKTU, Page 22

‘X’s and O’s’ looks at love,
lure and danger in football
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

PHOTO COURTESY OF KEVINBERNE.COM

From left, Anthony Holiday (Addicott) and Eddie Ray Jackson (Anthony) perform in the world
premiere of ‘X’s and O’s.’

Baseball may be America’s favorite pastime, but football runs a close second or
maybe comes up in a tie.
Playwright KJ Sanchez with Jenny
Mercein explores part of the lure of football
in “X’s and O’s (A Football Love Story).”
Berkeley Repertory Theatre is presenting
its world premiere under the astute direction
of artistic director Tony Taccone.
Much of the play focuses on the sport’s
risks, especially brain injuries, specifically
chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.
“CTE is a progressive degenerative disease

of the brain found in people with a history
of repetitive brain trauma, including symptomatic concussions as well as sub-concussive hits to the head that do not cause symptoms,” according to Wikipedia.
Football players are susceptible to it
because the sport involves so many hard
falls and violent collisions between players. The problem has been in the news with
a suit by former players against the
National Football League as well as other
incidents, including the suicide of Junior
Seau, a retired player, in 2012.
The play touches on other aspects of foot-

See PLAY, Page 22

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

19

‘Wild Card’
lacks punch
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

It becomes quickly clear in “Wild Card,” the latest vehicle for the
hunky, brooding British action star Jason Statham, that his character
doesn’t need a gun to maim or kill. Guns are for wimps. Statham can
wreak havoc with virtually any sharp implement, including his
own head.
What he does need, however, is a sharper script.
The pedigree of Oscar-winning screenwriter
William Goldman notwithstanding, “Wild
Card,” a remake of the writer’s 1986 “Heat” based
on his novel of the same name, is an unsatisfying mishmash of action movie, unlikely-buddy flick and meditation
on the scourge of gambling. At times, it recalls “The Gambler”
(another recent disappointment, and also a remake); at others, “The
Equalizer,” and at others, any number of moody, seedy Vegas-themed films. All
these directions could have been promising, but nothing truly coherent
emerges.
Not that Statham doesn’t display his sturdy, reliable appeal here — particularly when we get to see the humanity peeking through his brawny, altogether
pleasing exterior.
We learn immediately that his Nick Wild, a freelance Las Vegas bodyguard
who’s seen better days, is a thoroughly decent guy at heart. In an opening
scene, we see him harass a shorter, weaker, man out for a drink with his gorgeous girlfriend (Sofia Vergara, one of several big names making quick cameos).
Improbably, the smaller guy cleans Nick’s clock. Later, we learn it was all an act,
allowing the guy to impress his gal. He offers Nick $1,000, twice what was
planned. Nick refuses the bonus.
Nick also rises to the occasion when Holly (Dominik Garcia-Lordo), a woman from
his past, comes to him with a problem: She’s been brutally assaulted by a gangster
thug based in a fancy hotel, and wants vengeance. Nick resists — he doesn’t want to
get killed — but they both know he’ll step in and defend her.
Then there’s Nick’s unlikely friendship with a nerdy young entrepreneur, Cyrus (Michael
Angarano), who comes to Vegas seeking Nick’s tutelage in how to become a tougher man.

See WILD CARD, Page 22

Ex-rap mogul ‘Suge’ Knight arrested in deadly hit-and-run
By Tami Abdollah and Brain Melly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Marion “Suge” Knight,
the former music mogul who created one of
hip-hop’s leading labels and became the
impresario of gangster rap, was arrested
Friday on suspicion of hitting and killing a
man with his truck and fleeing the scene of
the crash near Los Angeles.
Knight’s attorney said the founder of
Death Row Records accidentally ran over
and killed a friend and injured another man
Thursday as he tried to escape attackers.

Witnesses told police an
argument between the
men
escalated into
Knight ramming the pair,
then changing direction
and ramming them a second time.
He was booked on suspicion of murder and held
‘Suge’ Knight on $2 million bail.
The
49-year-old
Knight, who has a long history of violence,
started the label that helped solidify West
Coast rap with Dr. Dre, who had been a
member of the legendary group N.W.A. The

label also launched the career of Snoop
Dogg and had Tupac Shakur in the last
months of his life.
Many of the records Knight released
helped immortalize Compton, the LA-area
city where Thursday’s crash occurred, in
hip-hop folklore as a gritty and violent
urban environment, although crime there
has dipped significantly there since its
1990s peak.
He turned himself in to authorities at 1
a.m. PST and was arrested two hours later
after being interviewed by detectives.
Sheriff’s spokeswoman Nicole Nishida
said Knight got into an argument with two

men at a film shoot and was asked to leave.
The argument later escalated at a fast-food
restaurant about two miles from the film set,
and the driver of a red pickup truck struck
the men around 3 p.m. and took off, according to authorities.
“Looks like he drove backwards and
struck the victims and drove forwards and
struck them again, ” sheriff’s Lt. John
Corina said. “The people we talked to say it
looked like it was an intentional act.”
A 55-year-old man died at a hospital, and
a 51-year-old man was injured, but authorities did not immediately know his condition.

20

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

21

By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

THE OTHER DECLARATION OF
INDEPENDENCE:
WAS HINGTONON- THE- B RAZOS ,
WHERE THE
LONE STAR STATE WAS BORN. On
Feb. 28, 1836, as the siege of the Alamo
raged in San Antonio 170 miles to the
west, a small group of men arrived in the
Texas market town of Washington, on the
bluffs above the Brazos River. The men
were delegates from communities across
the then-Mexican territory, assembling to
consider whether to break away from
Mexico. The decision was made quickly
and on March 2 a Declaration of
Independence was signed, creating the
Republic of Texas. On March 6, the Alamo
fell, but the delegates pressed doggedly
ahead with their work, adopting a constitution on March 16. On March 17, to escape
General Antonio López de Santa Anna’s
advancing army, the townspeople and the
delegates fled. After the April 21, 1836,
Texas victory at San Jacinto, the residents
returned, and in 1837 Texans from all sections attended a ball at Washington to celebrate the first anniversary of Texas independence.
Today the 293-acre Washington-on-theBrazos State Historic Site includes a replica of the Hall where the Declaration was
signed. (The town of Washington became
known as “Washington-on-the-Brazos”
after the Civil War to distinguish it from
“Washington-on-the-Potomac” — i. e.
Washington, D.C.). Jonathan P. Failor,
Park Ranger and Lead Interpreter at
Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic
Site, said: “Washington-on-the-Brazos
State Historic Site is dedicated to preserving the history of the people who settled
Texas, created a nation and transformed
that nation into the 28th state of the
Union. It is revered as the site of the signing of the Texas Declaration of
Independence on March 2, 1836, and in the
15 days following it saw the creation of a
constitution and a nation’s first leadership. To most Texans this site is heralded
as one of the state’s most sacred; but to

anyone living here that is not from Texas,
to anyone moving here or to those living
elsewhere this site represents something
that burns in the heart of everyone who
cherishes those core American values of
freedom, opportunity, hard work and
achievement. On the third of March, 1836,
William Barrett Travis, facing insurmountable odds and certain death at the Alamo,
penned a letter to the 59 men gathered at
Washington and urged them ‘make a declaration of independence, and we will then
understand and the world will understand
what we are fighting for.’ To anyone who
ever stood firm in the face of adversity,
took great risks or fought for something
greater than yourself, this place, a humble
wood-framed building above the banks of
the muddy Brazos River represents those
fundamental values.”
In addition to the replica of
Independence Hall, the Historic Site
includes the Barrington Living History
Farm, the home of Anson Jones, the last
President of the Republic of Texas; and The
Star of the Republic Museum, which interprets the culture and history of the
Republic of Texas from 1836-1846. For
more information about Washington-onthe-Brazos State Historic Site visit
www.tpwd.state.tx.us or call (936) 8782214.
R PLACE IS FOR U: GOOD EATS
TEXAS STYLE. Just down the road from
Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic
Site is R Place, a converted general store
where restauranteur Randy Rogers serves
up generously sized Kaiser roll sandwiches
of sliced barbecue beef, sausages and ribs
(bones and all) with sides of German potato salad and ranch style beans. Specialty
desserts include peach cobbler topped with

SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL

A replica of the Independence Hall of Texas stands in Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic
Site. A Declaration of Independence was signed there on March 2, 1836, forming the Republic
of Texas. An inscription on an obelisk near the door reads:‘Here a Nation was born.’
locally made Blue Bell Ice Cream. 23254
FM Road 1155 E. , Washington, TX.
www.rplacetexas.com or (936) 878-1925.
RPlace08@sbcglobal.net.
A VICTORIAN BED AND BREAKFAST IN BLUEBONNET COUNTRY.
Brilliant patches of bluebonnets and
vibrant Indian paintbrush line the roads
near Washington-on-the-Brazos from midMarch through mid-April. Lillian Farms
Bed and Breakfast, a hilltop Victorianstyle mansion that overlooks 230 acres of
this picturesque country between Houston
and Austin, has themed guest rooms that
give a feel of the Texas frontier. Check out
The Longhorn Suite with its wood floor
inlaid with “Texas Stars, ” faux-leather
cowhide walls and ceiling of 100-year-old

weathered barn wood. An on-site lake is
fully stocked with bass for catch-andrelease fishing at no extra charge. 12570
FM Road 1155 E. , Washington, TX.
www.lillianfarms.com.
AND REMEMBER: The traveler was
active; he went strenuously in search of
people, of adventure, of experience. The
tourist is passive; he expects interesting
things to happen to him. He goes “sightseeing.” — Daniel J. Boorstin.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North American
Travel Journalists Association, Bay Area Travel
Writers, and the International Food, Wine &
Travel Writers Association. She may be reached
at susan@smdailyjournal.com. More of her stories
may
be
found
at
http://ifwtwa.org/author/susan-cohn.

Sunday news shows
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
Gov. Scott Walker, R-Wis.

NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.; former Defense Secretary Robert
Gates; DeMaurice Smith, executive director of the NFL
Players Association.

CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Dick Durbin, D-Ill.;
former Secretary of State James Baker; Joseph Califano,
former aide to President Lyndon B. Johnson.

CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.; former Gov. Mike Huckabee, RArk.

‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H.; Gov. Greg Abbott, R-Texas..

People in the news
Hilary Duff, George Lopez
help in search for stolen dog
BEVERLY HILLS — A Beverly Hills shop owner who got
celebrity help in hunting for her stolen dog has been reunited with the pooch.
Police Sgt. Max Subin says detectives found Charlie the
white Maltese on Friday at a Lynwood home and returned him.
Surveillance video showed a pregnant woman snatching
the little dog this week from the sidewalk outside Julia
Cohen’s boutique.
Cohen’s friend, actress Hilary Duff, comedian George
Lopez and singer Lance Bass all took to social media to urge
followers to help find the dog.

Kasem’s children urge elder
abuse prosecution against widow
LOS ANGELES — The children of Casey Kasem are urging
Los Angeles police to make progress in an elder abuse investigation focusing on the radio legend’s widow.
Kasem’s children claimed at a Friday news conference that
the investigation into Jean Kasem’s care that began last June
has stalled.

Baptist

Lutheran

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor

GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)

(650) 343-5415

217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm

www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM

Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo

(650) 342-2541

Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org

Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and
2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm

2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am

Non-Denominational

Church of the
Highlands

“A community of caring Christians”

1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor

REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...

To know Christ and make him known.

901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223

Sunday services:

9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org

A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST

HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman

Worship Service
Sunday School

10:00 AM
11:00 AM

Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.

Call (650) 349-0100

HopeLutheranSanMateo.org

22

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

STUDENT
Continued from page 18
that. But, there is something ironically
humorous in realizing that these young
people could potentially make more
responsible purchases and decisions than a
person who is legally able to.
When hitting a milestone age, it
becomes all too easy to falsely surmise
that you are somehow miraculously
changed, that some drastic transformation
occurred, which automatically makes you
act your age. But the fact of the matter is, a
person is subtly changed over large durations of time. Turning 18 doesn’t make
someone a mature adult. Nor does turning
65 necessitate that a person become a
sedentary invalid. The number game we
play is virtually meaningless.
I wasn’t struck with the wisdom needed to
be a sensible adult. I continued (and still,
to this day, continue) to behave the way I
did before my birthday. I am nothing more

WILD CARD
Continued from page 19
Nick is annoyed, at first, but this bromance
will become crucial by the end of the film.
It is Cyrus who sits by and watches, incredulously, as Nick wins, then loses, his future
— at the blackjack tables. Nick, you see, is
an addictive gambler, and like Mark
Wahlberg’s character in “The Gambler,” he
just doesn’t know when to walk away. He
dreams of leaving Vegas for good and settling
on the island of Corsica (why Corsica? It’s
lovely, but is there a compelling backstory
here?) And yet just when he’s made an inordinate sum at blackjack and is about to cash in,
he decides to take it all back to the table one
more time. You can imagine how THAT turns
out.
Meanwhile, remember that brutal gangster
thug? Well, Holly got her revenge, thanks to

WEEKEND JOURNAL
than an 18-year-old child.
That’s not to say that I am completely
naive, either. I’m a unique concoction of
maturity and immaturity, as is everyone
else.
Perhaps that is what makes age so interesting; common associations are nailed
down to certain numbers. We are expected
to act a certain way at age X, but when we
reach age Y, we must outgrow our “childish”
behaviors. It is only in realizing that there
are adults far more childish than children
(and children far more mature than adults)
that we can understand that age is not an
accurate indicator for one’s behavior.
Some of us grow older but never grow up;
others are grown up before they begin to
grow. The rest of us, the majority I would
say, experience the change gradually. And
in the process, we become a montage of
age-related oxymorons.

PLAY
Continued from page 18

ball, such as its history and evolution of
equipment, but barely mentions other issues
such as domestic violence and other criminal behavior, racism, commercialism and
big business.
“There are certain issues that are really
hot topics ... that we felt just couldn’t fit in
one play. A lot of these subjects deserve
their own plays,” the playwrights say in the
program. They also say that most of the dialogue comes directly from people they
interviewed for the play, but they changed
the names.
An excellent ensemble cast of four men
and two women portrays a range of characters. Bill Geisslinger first appears as a
retired running back, while Dwight Hicks is
first seen as a former defensive back. Hicks
Dominic Gialdini is a senior at Carlmont High may be most familiar to local audiences as a
School in Belmont. Student News appears in the
weekend edition. You can email Student News at former standout member of the San
Francisco 49ers.
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Among others, Anthony Holiday plays a
Nick, but now the thug, Danny DeMarco former defensive end, while Eddie Ray
(Milo Ventimiglia) is out to punish Nick for Jackson is a young fan and player. Marilee
the humiliation he endured (let’s just say it
involved a pair of garden shears, aimed at his
most private assets).
Suddenly, Stanley Tucci shows up for one
scene. As always, this is a very welcome
development. Tucci, who can liven up any
movie, plays Baby, a stylish mobster who Continued from page 18
wields enough power to play judge and jury in
the dispute between Nick and Danny. Also political and religious battles down to the
spicing up the proceedings is the excellent people of a desert town — city dwellers and
Hope Davis as Cassandra, a blackjack dealer nomadic Tuareg people out in the dunes —
with a soft spot for Nick.
being forced to change by a handful of halfWith a supporting cast like this, one might hearted oppressors.
— and should — expect more from Goldman
The orders of the newly arrived fundamenand his director, Simon West. But ultimately, talists (Abel Jafri plays their leader, with
we’re left with the vaguely uncomfortable subtle uncertainty) would be satirical if they
feeling like we missed the whole point.
weren’t so cruel. One with a bullhorn walks
“Wild Card,” a Lionsgate release, is rated R the streets, warning “not to sit in front of
by the Motion Picture Association of one’s house, to do any old thing, to spend
America “for strong violence, language and some time in the street. ” Another pair
some sexuality/nudity. “ Running time: 92 argues furiously about a beating that turns
minutes. One and a half stars out of four.
out to be a Spanish soccer match.
These armed enforcers of Sharia law aren’t
true believers, but merely lazy, ragtag gunmen (some speak Arabic, others French or
English) who just shrug when a local imam
(Adel Mahmoud Cherif) questions their
jihad. They spend a lot of time on their cellphones. Not obeying their own bans on

TIMBUKTU

THE DAILY JOURNAL
Talkington is authoritative as a team physician who talks about the physical and psychological aspects of CTE. Co-creator
Jenny Mercein (daughter of former pro player Chuck Mercein) completes the cast in
several female roles.
Although all of the play is fascinating,
one of the most effective scenes comes near
the end when three family members —
played by the two women and Jackson —
talk about how their loved ones, who were
former football players, declined mentally
and then died at tragically young ages.
Scenes that might need some tweaking
occur in a sports bar where three fans,
played by Holiday, Jackson and Mercein,
talk about their attitudes toward football
while watching a game.
This is a play that deserves a wide audience as it explores a serious issue regarding
the role of football in our culture and the toll
it takes on its players and their families. As
one character says, NFL actually stands for
“not for long.”
“X’s and O’s (A Football Love Story” will
continue through March 1 on Berkeley
Repertory Theatre’s Thrust Stage, 2025
Addison Ave., Berkeley. For tickets and
information call (510) 647-2949 or visit
www.berkeleyrep.org.
soccer or music, they’re playing a role without even that much dedication to it.
Sissako views the town’s people and its
intruders obliquely, roaming from character
to character. Outside the city is Kidane
(Ibrahim Ahmed), a cattle herder who lives
with his wife (Toulou Kiki) and 12-year-old
daughter, whose peaceful life is interrupted.
He’s told to cover the head of his wife, and
then when his prized cow is snarled by fishermen’s nets, a confrontation ensues.
There are moments here of mesmerizing
beauty: a pantomimed soccer match, played
on a dusty lot with an imaginary ball; a
Malian song gorgeously sung by a woman
(Fatoumata Diawara) clandestinely at night
(she’ll be whipped for the offense); a fatal
struggle on a shallow, shimmering lake,
seen from a distance.
These images of “Timbuktu” quietly, passionately argue for the richness of life
against the intolerance of those who would
suffocate it.
“Timbuktu, ” a Cohen Media Group
release, is rated PG-13 for “some violence
and thematic elements.” Running time: 97
minutes. Three and a half stars out of four.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

ZONING
Continued from page 1
enforced, the current zoning rules are antifamily and that really troubles me. And family, for me, it’s not just the nuclear family,
it’s grandma and grandpa needing to come
live with you; it’s adult sons and family who
suffered a job loss needing to come live with
you,” Stone said. “Those are things that
families face all the time and the way our
ordinance is currently written, they have a
de facto effect of making it impossible for
anyone to add on.”
Reed and Stone are the city’s two newest
councilmembers and say they heard from
many homeowners who complained about
Belmont’s stringent regulations while campaigning last November. Planning
Commissioner Kristin Mercer and former
mayors Coralin Feierbach and Dave Warden
said the proposed changes will have unintended consequences and fear rampant
growth of “McMansions,” or large homes
on small lots.
“If you increase densities, you add second
units, you add floor area, you’re going to
increase the burden on your infrastructure,
you’re going to increase the number of cars,
you’re going to decrease the number of
trees, you’re going to change the overall
look and feel of the community,” Warden
said.

How big can you go?
Both sides agree the hard 3,500-squarefoot home cap that’s not in line with neighboring cities should be adjusted and based
on lot size.
But while Stone and Reed propose eliminating a cap and instead basing the maximum on lot sizes, Mercer said the city’s
floor area ratio table must also be adjusted.
The FAR, which compares lot size and
slope, would be used to determine home
sizes under the proposed changes. But the
table is outdated and could lead to inappropriately sized homes on steep properties,
said Mercer, who will be leaving the
Planning Commission within the next two
months.
“When you take away that cap suddenly,
the impropriety of our ratio table becomes
prevalent. That ratio table was established
in the previous century when we didn’t
understand the implications of building on
hillsides,” Mercer said.
In a Daily Journal letter to the editor,
Mercer wrote that her analysis of 40 homes
revealed 75 percent would have building
potential under the changes.
Stone and Reed countered argued the average home size on those specific lots is just
1,700 square feet.
“They’d be able to expand today under the
current regulations, but they don’t,” Reed
said. “So the notion that the new regulation
is tomorrow going to suddenly spur an
increase in home size is something I don’t
agree with. … Current data doesn’t support
that.”
Stone suggested considering a drive along
Alameda de las Pulgas between Belmont and
San Mateo, which doesn’t have a hard cap
on sizes.
“If the simple removal of a hard cap resulted in ‘McMansions’ popping up everywhere
you’d expect to see those in San Mateo and
San Carlos, but you don’t,” Stone said.
“This isn’t going to result in huge changes
to the character of our town. But this is
going to give those with larger lots the
flexibility to build larger homes.”

In-law units
For lots 5,000 square feet or more, Mercer
and Feierbach said they were troubled to
learn property owners could build up to a
1,200-square-foot, detached in-law unit and
fear duplexes could become the norm.
Stone and Reed argue the increasingly
competitive housing market, where homes
often go above asking prices, makes it difficult for families to simply purchase larger
homes. It’s common for families to outgrow
homes as children mature or as elderly parents need to move in, they added.
Mercer, who said she moved into a larger
home when she had children 28 years ago,
said growing families should simply buy
bigger homes and it’s selfish for homeown-

ers to remodel instead of freeing up inventory.
“The Peninsula in particular has a shortage of small affordable single-family
homes. Belmont’s General Plan sets a policy of trying to retain our inventory of small
affordable homes,” Mercer said. “Residents
who buy a home … should know what they
can or cannot remodel. If they knew they
needed to expand their home, then they
shouldn’t have purchased it.”
Feierbach said even if current property
owners don’t intend to build in-law units,
the potential is there and people may use it
as a bargaining tool when looking to sell.

One of Mercer’s main concerns is the
Planning Commission wasn’t included in
the preparation of the proposed amendments.
“Had the council involved the Planning
Commission, even one commissioner, in
their drafting of these proposed ordinance
changes, they would have learned … about
these concerns,” Mercer said.
Warden said he hopes the city will undergo
a thorough environmental impact report
related to the proposed changes instead of a
smaller scale negative declaration as
increasing density will have lasting effects
on the city.
Reed and Stone said they take residents’
concerns seriously and will continue to
work on solidifying a proposal.
Reed, who served on the Planning
Commission for five years, said his experiences conducting single-family design
reviews and speaking with residents during
his campaign for council fueled him to make
changes he believes will help families.
“It’s about putting in place fair and flexible regulations. It’s not about responding to
any one planning commissioner or any one
resident’s concerns. I’m trying to take a
holistic approach to what the residents of
Belmont have told me they want, not just a
small group, but everybody,” Reed said.
“And the vast majority I’ve talked to want
the ability to make modest additions on
their home without being turned away at the
planning counter because of inflexibility
and arbitrary rules.”
City staff is currently responding to questions raised by the Planning Commission
during its Jan. 6 rev iew of the draft amendments. Staff will return to the commission
for further study of the draft and an env ironmental study in the near future. The public
will hav e opportunity to comment during
upcoming Planning Commission and City
Council hearings. For more information
v isit www.belmont.gov.

samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106

23

‘Black or White’ wrestles
with race in custody drama
By Jorda Mintzer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

“Black or White” may be the title, but
there are plenty of gray areas tackled in this
good ol’ fashioned family dramedy from
standup comic turned filmmaker Mike
Binder (“Reign Over Me,” ‘’The Upside of
Parking requirements
Anger”).
Current requirements for a single-family
Pitting a binge drinking Kevin Costner
Belmont home entail two covered and two against a butt whooping Octavia Spencer in
uncovered parking spaces, according to a a battle for custody over their beloved
staff report. Those wishing to add a mini- granddaughter, this well-performed and
mum of 600 square feet, even a non-bedroom occasionally amusing affair has a distincaddition, may also be required to upgrade tively ‘90s feel to it, laying on the sauce
garages.
rather thick at times, although it still creThe draft amendments would allow for ates a believable story raising questions
flexibility in providing on-site parking about parenthood and racial prejudice in
through the use of carports and tandem park- modern-day Los Angeles.
ing, according to a staff report.
A somewhat clumsy opening scene introMercer said she’s concerned garages would duces us to California attorney Elliot
no longer be required, could be converted Anderson (Costner), whose wife has just
into living spaces and that families who died in a car accident, leaving the man with
may be adding bedrooms for children would- little consolation outside a home bar fully
n’t be accountable to provide parking when stocked with Scotch. But he does have one
their teens start driving.
remaining hope in life: his mixed-race 7Reed said the strict parking requirement year-old granddaughter, Eloise (newcomer
was an impetus for amending the ordinance. Jillian Estell), who’s been living with him
“One of the main reasons why some of the ever since the girl’s mother died at childolder homes in Belmont built during the birth and her drug addicted father, Reggie
’40s and ’50s don’t get upgraded is because (Andre Holland), landed in jail.
when you add on 600 square feet, you have
Trying to cope with his granddaddy duties
to upgrade your garage to 20 feet by 20 feet.
That puts an undue financial burden on peo- as he slowly drinks himself into oblivion,
ple doing remodeling projects because it Elliot manages to keep things afloat for the
essentially requires a rebuild of the ground time being, especially after hiring an
overqualified math tutor, Duvan (Mpho
floor,” Reed said.
Studies show more than 90 percent of San Koaho), to serve as right-hand man and proMateo County residences have three vehi- vide some necessary comic relief to the
cles or fewer, which is why the new amend- household. Yet just when things are picking
ments say homes provide three on-site up, he’s paid a visit by Eloise’s paternal
grandmother, Rowena (Spencer), a loving
spots, Reed said.
but iron-fisted matriarch whose boggle-eyed

Collaborating on plans

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

glare is enough to push back an army, and
who soon takes it upon herself to demand
custody of her granddaughter through the
help of hotshot nephew lawyer, Jeremiah
(Anthony Mackie).
“Inspired by a true incident” per the opening credits, the screenplay by Binder paints
a broad but credible portrait of a fractured
family living on opposite sides of L.A.’s
racial barrier, with Elliot carousing around
his massive suburban mansion while
Rowena shelters relatives in a Compton
abode across the street from a crack den. Yet
neither household is shown to be a total
movie cliche, and the script intelligently
navigates both domains to reveal how they
have more in common than they may imagine, especially when it concerns the best
interests of their granddaughter.
As Rowena blindly (and not always understandably) continues her legal pursuits just
as Reggie pops back into the picture, the
race question is eventually brought into
play and even becomes a major factor in the
ensuing trial. Various plot mechanics, some
of them rather heavy-handed, lead to a resolution that predictably shows how little race
ultimately matters, although “Black or
White” never panders too easily to sentiments, creating characters who are riddled
with flaws but likeable all the same.
Such is the case with Elliot, and as both
producer and star this is clearly Costner’s
film for the taking. It’s a pleasure to see the
seasoned actor approaching this kind of
role after a recent run of genre-related material (“Man of Steel,” ‘’3 Days to Kill”),
reteaming with Binder (who he worked with
on “The Upside of Anger”) to play a man
whose life has been riddled with tragedy but
who still has a fighting spirit and dark sense
of humor. (Costner can also still play a convincing drunk, which is no easy task.)

24

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

WEEKEND JOURNAL

TAX
Continued from page 1
restore programs and services such as
student counselors, which the district
was forced to cut back on during leaner
budget times.
To pass, two-thirds of district voters
would need to support the measure.
Polling data from the fall suggested
that 67 percent of residents who do not
have students in the district would
probably support bundling the tax,
while 78 percent of parents with kids
in the district said they would favor it.
Mailing ballots to voters is cheaper
than alternative election methods, and
historically has been successful for the
district. Polling data showed that only
two of the previous 13 all-mail K-12
parcel tax elections have failed since
2009, and it has been fruitful for the
past two bond measures in San Carlos.
Rosenblatt said that should voters
pass the tax, seniors would have the
opportunity to opt out of paying.
Baker said that he feels relatively

DONATO
Continued from page 1
with sausage and veal.
With an outdoor patio, banquet room
and 150 Italian wines to serve, the
restaurant has attracted a growing list
of regular customers despite being surrounded by myriad construction projects, Scotti said.
Being named by Michelin as a 2015
Bib Gourmand restaurant also helps.
The award recognizes Donato Enoteca
as one of the best moderately-priced
restaurants in the Bay Area. The Bib
Gourmand award is given to restaurants
that are “often of most value to a city’s
residents, who regularly dine in neighborhood restaurants, ” according to
Michelin.
Scotti prepares “Italian food the way

SUTTER
Continued from page 1
Sutter facilities in communities including San Francisco, Oakland, Antioch,
Novato, Burlingame, Castro Valley,
Vallejo, Menlo Park and Santa Rosa.
Hundreds of thousands of people
were told they needed to switch doctors
soon due to a contract dispute and
affected 140,573 HMO members who

certain that voters will be willing to
support the bond.
“The indication is that there is an
appetite for this,” he said. “So I am
fairly confident it will be passed.”
A group of parents have volunteered
to lead rallying support for the tax,
said Baker.
Baker cited the district’s historical
success with getting parcel taxes
passed as part of his belief this measure will be approved.
“The San Carlos community has

always been very supportive and generous with the school community,” he
said.
Administration and trustees hosted
an outreach meeting last week to educate district voters on the nuances of
public school funding, and to field any
questions that concerned residents
might have regarding the district’s
finances.
According to a district report, failure
to pass the bond would cost the district
roughly $720,000 in annual revenue.
Without a new source of revenue, the
district is expected to run out of
reserves by next year, the report said.
The district had also considered asking voters for an $18 increase in a parcel tax that would span the course of 12
years, merely extending the current
$78 tax over the course of 12 years, or
increasing the tax $98 for six years,
according to district documents.
Trustee Nicole Bergeron was absent
from the meeting, and did not participate in the board vote.

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105

I think it’s supposed to be done.”
The restaurant also only serves
Italian wines, said partner Eric Lecours
and Enoteca literally means wine
house.
It is also an “Italian-Italian” restaurant, not an “Italian-American” restaurant, Lecours said.
It is about creating an authentic
Italian experience, he said.
The menu also changes weekly
depending on what fresh produce is
available. Homemade pasta, woodburning oven pizzas, meat and fish
courses dominate the menu which
spans every region of Italy and incorporates fresh imported burrata, prosciutto, grappa and olive oil. Other
specialties include sausage, mostarda
and lamb prosciutto.
It will also have the occasional tasting menu that pairs six wines with five
courses.

Business is the most brisk during
dinner but is picking up at lunch.
Scotti expects the noon hour to pick
up as the construction of more offices
and apartments are finished and workers and residents move in.
Downtown Redwood City is becoming “a premier spot to spend an
evening” and will get even better when
a nearby parking garage opens, Scotti
said.
Downtown’s transformation has
been “fantastic,” he said.
“It’s taken an immense amount of
effort in a short span to bring this area
to life,” he said.

may have had to be assigned a new primary physician as of April 1, 2015,
Blue Shield spokesman Steve
Shivinsky said earlier this month.

“We sincerely regret the frustration
our patients experienced as the negotiations took longer than necessary —
especially when the final agreement is
extremely close to the reasonable offer
we made to Blue Shield several months
ago,” said Sutter Health Chief Medical
Officer Steve Lockhart, M.D., Ph.D.
“We take seriously our role in helping
control rising health care costs, and
the contract we reached with Blue
Shield reflects our significant
progress.”

Blue Shield had asked for a cut in
reimbursement rates and argued
Sutter’s costs were well above those of
other health care providers in the area
and would remain so even if the company accepted the new reimbursement
rates, in part due to the rapidly growing company’s dominant market position in much of California.

To learn more about Donato Enoteca
go to http://www.donatoenoteca.com.

bill@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
SATURDAY, JAN. 31
Free eWaste Collection. 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. San Mateo High School, San
Mateo. All funds raised go toward
SMHS Grad Night activities. For more
information go to http://sanmateogradnight2.wix.com/ewaste.

Peninsula Medical Center Family
Birth Center Conference Room,
Second floor, 1501 Trousdale Drive,
Burlingame. Focuses on perinatal
emotional health. Free. Group meets
every Monday. For more information
visit emergencementalhealth.com.

Core Studio, Second Location
Grand Opening. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Core Studio, 3176 Campus Drive, San
Mateo. There will be classes, local
food and shop vendors with booths
outside. For more information call
766-5895.

Hearing Loss Association of the
Peninsula meeting. 1 p.m. Veterans
Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. Free
refreshments. For more information
call 345-4551.

Drop-In Tech Help. 11 a.m. South
San Francisco Public Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
Get help with e-books, Kindles,
NOOKs, laptops or any other device.
Open to all. For more information
contact Anissa Malady at ssfpladm@plsinfo.org.
Family Read Aloud Multi-Cultural
Story Time. 2 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library, Oak Room, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. There will be Chinese,
Hindi and Spanish stories and crafts.
Free. For more information call 5227838.
Master Kan Kwok-Fan Chinse ink
and watercolor paintings reception. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. 1335 El Camino
Real, Millbrae. Runs through Feb. 15.
Free. For more information call 6364706.
2015 Mavericks of the Seas Photo
Exhibit Reception. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
300 Main St., Half Moon Bay. Gallery
open Friday through Monday, noon
to 5 p.m. Runs until March 1. For more
information call 726-6335 or go to
coasalartsleague.com.
Wonderous. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Neologian Art Gallery, 1027 S.
Claremont St., San Mateo. There will
be local artists, music and an art auction. $10. For more information go to
www.neologianartgallery.com.
The Libation Bearers. 7:30 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, Redwood City. Buy
your tickets online by leaving a voice
mail at 493-2006 ext. 2.
Post-Show Discussion Panel for
Aeschylus’ Play, ‘The Libation
Bearers.’ 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dragon
Productions Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Tickets are $30. For
more information and to purchase
tickets visit dragonproductions.net.
SUNDAY, FEB. 1
Peninsula Lightning 9U and 10U
Baseball Evaluation. 9 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Los Prados Baseball Field, 1837
Bahia St., San Mateo. The 9U and 10U
Peninsula Lightning Boys tournament baseball teams have a limited
number of openings for motivated
players who love baseball and are
looking to advance their skills
by competing in a number of city
tournaments and NCTB events at
Twin Creeks Sports Complex during
the 2015 summer baseball season
‘Near and Far.’ Noon to 4 p.m. Twin
Pines Art Center, the Manor, 10 Twin
Pines Lane, Belmont. Travel the world
through the eyes of Luz Maria
Hartley, whose selection of 25 oil
paintings will be on display. Exhibit
runs through Feb. 28. Free. For more
information call 281-5063.
First Sunday Line Dance with Tina
Beare and Jeanette Feinberg. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road. $5.
For more information call 616-7150.
Dragon Theatre’s 15th Season to
Open with a Greek Classic. 2 p.m.
Dragon Productions Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. $22 for
general admission. For tickets and
info visit dragonproductions.net.
MONDAY, FEB. 2
AARP Smart Driver Course. 9 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. San Mateo Senior Center,
2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo.
Register
online
at
www.erecreg.com. For more information call 522-7490.

Bite of Reality Financial Literacy. 4
p.m. Burlingame Public Library 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. A handson money management simulation
that gives students a taste of real
world financial challenges in a fun,
interactive setting. For more information contact John Piche
at
piche@plsinfo.org.
Dance Connection with Live Music
by Ron Gutierrez. Free dance lessons 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. with open
dance from 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
Burlingame Woman’s Club, 241 Park
Road, Burlingame. Admission $9
members, $11 guests. Plan to
join/renew your membership of $20
and save $2 every dance. Members,
bring a new first-time male friend
and earn free entry for yourself with
one free entry per new dancer. Male
dance hosts get free admission. Light
refreshments. For more information
call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, FEB. 3
Computer Coach. 10 a.m. to
noon. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Free and open to the
public. Offered every Tuesday to help
with technical questions. For more
information call Rhea Bradley at 5910341 ext. 237.
‘Need Tax Forms?’ 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos. Free and open to the public. Every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon volunteers will help you access
the forms/instructions booklets
you'll need for completing your 2015
taxes.
The Art of Assertiveness: CSIX-P
Job Support by JAUNTY founder,
Eric Waisman. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. First
Presbyterian Church, 1500 Easton
Drive, Room 201, Burlingame. All welcome. For more information call 5220701.
Wise-Minded Parenting: Seven
Essentials for Raising Successful
Tweens and Teens. 7 p.m. San Mateo
Performing Arts Center, 600 N.
Delaware St., San Mateo. Dr. Laura
Kastner will present highlights from
her book, ‘Wise-Minded Parenting.’
For
more
information
visit
smuhsd.org/peninsulaparentspeakerseries.
Lawyers in the Library. 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. The first Tuesday
of each month the library, in partnership with the San Mateo County Bar
Association, the Belmont Library
holds free legal clinics. For more
information email belmont.smcl.org.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 4
Computer Class: Google and
Wikipedia. 10:30 a.m. to noon.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Learn how to
evaluate and search the Internet for
information of all types. For more
information email belmont.smcl.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free, but
lunch is $17. For more information
call 430-6500 or visit sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
Oliver Chin — Teen Manga and
Cartoon Art Workshop. 3 p.m. to 5
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Learn how to draw and
make your own comics. Free. For
more information call 697-7607.

Tai Chi. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free
and open to the public. Offered
every Monday, Friday and Saturday.
For more information call Rhea
Bradley, Librarian at 591-0341 ext.
237.

Lifetree Cafe Conversations: Stem
Cells. 6:30 p.m. Bethany Lutheran
Church,1095 Cloud Ave., Menlo Park.
An hour-long conversation discussing stem cell therapies and ‘miracle cures’ you may be missing.
Complimentary snacks and beverages. For more information call 8545897.

Daytime Fiction Book Club. 10 a.m.
to 11 a.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm
St., San Carlos. Free and open to the
public. Offered first Monday of each
month. This month’s book is ‘Mambo
in Chinatown’ by Jean Kwok. For
more information call Rhea Bradley
at 591-0341 ext. 237.

Needles and Hooks — Knitting
and Crocheting Club. 6:30 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Join Olivia Cortez-Figueroa, who
both crochets and knits. For more
information
email
belmont.smcl.org.

Portola Art Gallery Presents ‘The
Philippines in Photos: From
Mountains to the Sea’ by Frances
Freyberg. 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Portola Art Gallery at Allied Arts
Guild, 75 Arbor Road, Menlo Park.
Runs Monday to Saturday through
Feb. 28. For more information call
321-0220.

Knitting with Arnie. 6:30 p.m. to 9
p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Every Wednesday
evening.

Mentoring Mothers Support
Group. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Mills-

For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

First Wednesday Book Group. 7
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Belmont Public
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT®

Weekend • Jan. 31-Feb. 1, 2015

25

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Athena’s symbol
4 Favorite —
7 Yearn for
11 Pi follower
12 Where hackles rise
13 On the briny
14 Aversion
16 Clenched hand
17 Orchard produce
18 LAX guesses
19 Bawl
20 Hi-tech scan
21 Ipso —
24 Eerie get-together
27 Sci-fi Doctor
28 Cordial
30 Pacific island
32 Floor model
34 Stash the bags
36 Old hand
37 Zany — Raye
39 Supermarket area
41 Produce an egg
42 Quick turn

GET FUZZY®

43
45
48
49
52
53
54
55
56
57

Tide type
Call forth
Fearsome cape
Kind of husky
Eager
Galley movers
Night before
Burrito alternative
Spiral molecule
Rover’s doc

DOWN
1 California fort
2 Beat to a froth
3 Forfeit
4 Given to back talk
5 Make a choice
6 Once named
7 Blowing gently
8 Largest continent
9 Monster’s loch
10 Trim a doily
12 Cramped
15 Diplomat’s need
18 Memorable decade

20
21
22
23
24
25
26
29
31
33
35
38
40
42
43
44
46
47
48
49
50
51

Written reminder
VCR button
Polite cough
Robin Cook thriller
Baja Ms.
Tea holders
“Fatha” Hines
Very pale
A Stooge
Citrus Bowl city
Forgoes
Drum, as fingers
Borodin prince
Striped animal
Exploding star
Ambler of spy novels
Ukraine capital
Icicle site
Head covering
Instant lawn
Scottish for John
After taxes

1-31-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You can please
your partner by just being present. You will enjoy
challenging and competitive games. Your strong need
to be first will lead you to the winner’s circle.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You will have to be
aggressive if you wish to stay on top of a personal
relationship. Don’t let anyone push you around or take
you for granted. You should set the rules and make
sure your partner sticks to them.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You need to interact
with relatives who will be able to shed some light on
your past. Trips will be rewarding, but expensive. Try to

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

1-31-15

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

get along with those you live with.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — It won’t do any good
to become angry over money matters. You have to
set a budget and make sure that everyone in the
family sticks to it.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You will be
emotional about a family problem. Deal with the
situation as quickly as possible and get back to
doing the things you enjoy most.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You will have to
be careful that someone you work with doesn’t
misinterpret your actions. Your intentions may be
honorable, but your approach may be questionable.
Don’t be too eager to let anyone know your secrets.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Get involved in groups that

offer intellectual stimulation. You can meet potential
new mates. However, make sure they aren’t already
involved with someone else.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — If you unite with
colleagues, you’ll be surprised how well strength in
numbers works. You can also make suggestions that
will improve working conditions and efficiency.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You’re in love with life.
You should get out as much as possible. Lectures
will bring you information as well as open up doors to
interesting new connections.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Children will be
frustrating. Don’t give in to their financial demands. It
is best not to take risks. Be sure to get enough rest.
Fatigue will lead to minor health problems.

Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Courses you sign
up for will turn into a form of entertainment. You are
likely to meet someone special through friends. Don’t
take on too much. Focus on your goals.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You can
accomplish a great deal if you focus on your job.
Avoid becoming sidetracked by people eager to
spread rumors about colleagues.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 31-Feb. 1, 2015

104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, Will Train! Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.

110 Employment

110 Employment

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.

Call
(650)777-9000

College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

HOTEL -

NOW HIRING
• Housekeepers PT / FT
• Front desk PT / FT / Temp

GOT JOBS?

Los Prados Hotel
2940 S. Norfolk St.
San Mateo
(650)341-3300

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE

The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.

Every Tuesday & Weekend

The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.

Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...

203 Public Notices

Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

RETAIL MERCHANDISERS needed for
weekly service work in San Mateo and
Sunnyvale. Smartphone capabilities required.
Knowledge
of
POG’s
preferred. This position is as an Independent Contractor.
Contact Deb (256) 438-5104

CASE# CIV 532110
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Malvika Vyas and Anirudh Vyas
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Malvika Vyas and Anirudh
Vyas filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Gargi Vyas
Proposed Name: Aria Vyas
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on 2-26-15 at 9
a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2D, at 400 County
Center, Redwood City, CA 94063. A
copy of this Order to Show Cause shall
be published at least once each week for
four successive weeks prior to the date
set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation:
San Mateo Daily Journal
Filed: 1/15/15
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 1/15/15
(Published, 01/17/2015, 01/24/2015,
01/31/2015, 02/07/2015)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-263829
The following person is doing business
as: Wong’s Properties, 3045 Ralston Ave
Hillsborough, CA 94010. Registered
Owners: 1. Stephen T.C. Wong, same
address, 2. David T.W. Wong, 1028 N.
San Jose St, Stockton, CA 95203, 3. Philip T.F. Wong, 3045 Ralston Ave, Hillsborough, CA 94010, 4. Mona W.N.
Wong, 8140 Richland Way, Stockton, CA
95209, 5. Sholastic W.Y. Wong, 5501
Fairfax road, Bakersfield, CA 93306. The
business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Stephen T.C.Wong/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/29/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15, 02/21/15).

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 31-Feb. 1, 2015

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263492
The following person is doing business
as: G & S Partners, 1636 Gilbreth Rd,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010. Registered
Owner: 1. Naifeh J. Gadala, 59 DenaliDr., San Mateo, CA , 2. Issa J. Shami,
100 Vailwood Place, San Mateo, CA
94403. 3. Maher J. Shami, 1030 Parkwood Way, Redwood City, CA 94061.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Maher J. Shami /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/05/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/10/15, 01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263567
The following person is doing business
as: Hourglass Boutique, 302 Baldwin
Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94401, Registered Owner: Lindsay Hoffman, 24628
Woodacre Ave, Hayward CA 94544. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 4/1/10
/s/ Lindsay Hoffman/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/08/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/10/15, 01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 263745
The following person is doing business
as: Happy Myanmar Cafe, 2025 Gellert
Blvd #200-201, DALY CITY, CA 94015.
Registered Owner: 1) Myo Zan, 79 Carleton Ave, DALY CITY, CA 94015, 2)
Tommy Saine, 243 Belhaven Ave, Daly
City CA 94015. The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Myo Zan, Tommy Saine /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/23/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/24/15, 01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263458
The following person is doing business
as: Beading by the Bay, 3516 Broadview
Ct.,SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered
Owner: 1. Susan Kazarian, same address., 2. MarciaDeLoster, 84633 Golden
Ave, Lemon Grove, CA 91945. The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Susan Kazarian /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/31/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/10/15, 01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261471
The following person is doing business
as: The Fisherman’s Taverna, 99 San
Mateo Road, HALF MOON BAY, CA
94019. Registered Owners: Ted and
Marie Giouzelis, 2122 Ralston Ave, Belmont, CA 94002. The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Marie Giouzelis/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 07/08/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/10/15, 01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263739
The following person is doing business
as: Dan Can, 341 Fourth Lane, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA, 94080. Registered Owner: Daniel Hernandez, 394
Capistrano Ave, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Daniel Hernandez/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/24/15, 01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263571
The following person is doing business
as: White & Red Moving Service, 21
22nd Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94403.
Registered Owner: Jose Ventura Diaza,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Jose Ventura Diaz /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/08/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/10/15, 01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-263562
The following person is doing business
as: Jie`s Income Tax, 1710 So. Amphlett
Blvd. Suite 350, SAN MATEO, CA
94402, Registered Owner: Jie Han Gardner, 2180 Pulgas Ave, East Palo Alto CA
94303. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Jie Gardner /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/08/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/10/15, 01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263470
The following person is doing business
as: Capstone Geophysics, 21 Valley Oak
Street, PORTOLA VALLEY, CA 94028,
Registered Owner: Elizabeth Hearn,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Elizabeth Hearn /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/10/15, 01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263616
The following person is doing business
as:Godspeed Tattoo, 620 S. Norfolk St,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner:Kevin Marr, 1270 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Redwood City, CA 94061. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 1-1-15.
/s/ Kevin Marr/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/13/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15, 02/07/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-263440
The following person is doing business
as: HAECO Americas Line Services, 612
McDonnell Rd Ste 208A, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94128. Registered owners: Triad
International Maintenance Corporation,
DE. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Lee Fox, /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/30/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15, 02/07/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263659
The following person is doing business
as: Giant Stride Marketing Group, 1790
Terrace Drive, BELMONT, CA 94002.
Registered Owner:Linda A. Sonne-Harrison, same address.The business is conducted by an individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on January 31, 2005
/s/ Linda A. Sonne-Harrison/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03109/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15, 02/07/15).

203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
Regular Meeting of the
City of Half Moon Bay
Planning Commission
Tuesday, February 10,
2015 – 7:00 PM
www.hmbcity.com
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Half
Moon Bay will hold a public
hearing at 7:00 PM on Tuesday, February 10, 2015, at
the Emergency Operations
Center, 537 Kelly Avenue, to
consider the following:

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

210 Lost & Found

27

City File: PDP-051-14
Location: Citywide
Applicant: City of Half
Moon Bay
Description: CONSIDERATION OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF RESIDENTIAL
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
GUIDELINES
The Planning Commission
will conduct a Public Hearing to receive public input
and feedback on the Public
Review Draft Single-Family
Residential Design Guidelines.

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 263737
The following person is doing business
as: Padgett Business Services, 161 W
25th Ave, Suite 109. Registered Owner:
Delong & Associates, Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on 5/1/13.
/s/ Christopher DeLong /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/24/15, 01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263640
The following person is doing business
as: Hall’s Mobile Live Scan, 2635 Brewster Ave, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062.
Registered Owner: Wade J. Hall, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
1/9/15.
/s/ Wade Hall /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15, 02/21/15).

This project is Statutorily Exempt from the requirements
of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA)
under Section 15265 of the
CEQA Guidelines.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263271
The following person is doing business
as: Opal Counseling, 1139 San Carlos
Ave. #307, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
Registered Owner: Sharon Gray, 744
Chesnut St #2, SAN CARLOS, CA
94070. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Sharon Gray /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/10/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/10/15, 01/17/15, 01/24/15. 01/31/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263831
The following person is doing business
as: Pillar To Post Professional Home Inspections, 2023 Valparaiso Ave, MENLO
PARK, CA 94025. Registered Owner:
Cedar Cove LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Karim Younes /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/30/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15, 02/21/15).

If you challenge the decision
of the City Council in court,
you may be limited to raising
only those issues you or
someone else raised at the
public hearing described in
this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to
the City of Half Moon Bay at,
or prior to, the public hearing.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263770
The following person is doing business
as: Workspan, 100 Marine Parkway,
Suite 215, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065.
Registered Owner: Angad Corp., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Mayank Bawa /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/26/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15, 02/21/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263713
The following person is doing business
as: Decor Staging, 764 Industrial Road,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered
Kerry Roth and Miitchell Roth, 307 Starfish Lane, Foster City CA 94404 . The
business is conducted by a Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on 2/3/09
/s/ Kerry Roth /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15, 02/21/15).

For More Information:
More information is on file at
City Hall, 501 Main Street,
and may be examined during regular business hours.
Comments, written or oral,
must be received before the
decision date. Please send
comments to: City of Half
Moon Bay Planning Department, 501 Main Street, Half
Moon Bay, CA 94019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-263548
The following person is doing business
as: Green Harbor Solutions, 385 Oyster
Point Blvd, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. Registered Owner: Jason R.
Ahrens, same address. The business is
conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Jason Ahrens/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/07/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/31/15, 02/0715, 02/14/15, 02/21/15).

Right of Appeal: This project is within the California
Coastal Commission appeal
zone; therefore final action
is appealable to the California Coastal Commission.
1/31/15
CNS-2713310#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-263815
The following person is doing business
as: Sunset Hardwood Floors, 20 Prague
St, SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner: Jose Rodolfo Graylan, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Jose Rodolfo Graylan /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/28/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15, 02/21/15).

All persons in favor of, opposed to, or in any manner
interested in this request for
input on the development of
Single-Family
Residential
Design Guidelines are invited to attend this public hearing or forward written comments to:
Bruce Ambo, AICP
Planning Manager
City of Half Moon Bay
501 Main Street
Half Moon Bay, CA 94019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263467
The following person is doing business
as: Mango Garden, 111 E. 4th Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401. Registered Owner:
Mango Blaze Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Hai Jie Chen /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/10/15, 01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263310
The following person is doing business
as: Alpha Innovator Real Estate, 814
Redwood Dr, LA HONDA, CA 94020.
Registered owners: Aplha Innovator, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Gregori Niculitcheff/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/16/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/17/15, 01/24/15, 01/31/15, 02/07/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263811
The following person is doing business
as: Sage Massage Therapy, 601 South B
St., Ste. A, SAN MATEO, CA 94401.
Registered Owner: Ellen Kometani, 7
Cove Lane, Redwood City, CA 94065.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Ellen Kometani/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/28/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15, 02/21/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263641
The following person is doing business
as: Hall’s Mobile Notary, 2635 Brewster
Ave, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062. Registered Owner: Wade J. Hall, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Wade Hall /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/31/15, 02/07/15, 02/14/15, 02/21/15).

210 Lost & Found
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

Books
BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

$12.,

JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
NASCAR BOOKS - 1998 - 2007 Annuals, 50th anniversary, and more. $75.
(650)345-9595

295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

296 Appliances
CHAMPION JUICER, very good, coral
color $25. Phone 650-345-7352
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208
FRIDGE, MINI, unopened, plugs, cord,
can use for warmer also $40, (650) 5789208
FRUIT PRESS, unopened, sturdy, make
baby food, ricer, fruit sauces, $20.00,
(650) 578 9208

PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR(415)346-6038

$40.,

WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER. Almost
new. located coastside. $75 650-8676042.
WHIRLPOOL REAR tub assembly for a
front
loading
washing
machine,
$200/obo. (650)591-2227
WHIRLPOOL shock absorber for front
loading washing machine, $30/obo.
(650)591-2227

297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hardly Used $80 (650)293-7313

298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 31-Feb. 1, 2015
298 Collectibles

302 Antiques

303 Electronics

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

310 Misc. For Sale

1980 SYLVANIA 24" console television
operational with floor cabinet in excellent
condition. FREE. (650) 676-0974.

1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719

INFINITY FLOOR speakers ( a pair) in
good condition $ 60. (650)756-9516. Daly City.

WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858

2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048

73 HAPPY Meal toys. 1990's vintage, in
the
original
unopened
packages.
$60.(650)596-0513

KENWOOD STEREO Receiver/cassette
deck/CD,3 speakers box ex/con. $60
(650)992-4544

DRESSER, OLD four drawer, painted
wod cottage pine chest of drawers. Solid
and tight. Carved wood handles. 40”
wide x 35.5” high x 17.5” deep. $65. Call
or text (207)329-2853. San Carlos.

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent condition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169

WHITE CABINETS (2) - each has a
drawer & 1 door with 2 shelves.
36x21x18. $25 each. (650)867-3257

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

EXECUTIVE DESK 60”, cherry wood,
excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058

TUNER AMPS, 3, Technics SA-GX100,
Quadraflex 767, Pioneer VSX-3300. All
for $99. (650)591-8062

EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

WESTINGHOUSE 28" flat screen TV
LCD with Remote. works perfect, little
used. ** SOLD **

FADED GOLD antique framed mirror,
25in x 33in— $15 Cell number:
(650)580-6324

WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and
foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167

GRACO 40" x28" x 28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

306 Housewares

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.

8 SKEWERS, unopened, for fondue,
roasting marshmallows, or fruit, ($7.00)
(650) 578 9208

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858

ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $60. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063

MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345

ANTIQUE MAYTAG Ringer type Washing Machine, (1930-35 era) $85.
650-583-7505

NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260
OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good condition, $10. each, (650)571-5899

VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

WESTINGHOUSE 32” Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available **SOLD**

299 Computers

303 Electronics

304 Furniture

DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545

BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l

300 Toys
$25 OBO. Star Wars, new Battle Droid
figures, all four variations.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30.
(650)622-6695
LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695

Very

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD and VHS Flat Screen Remote 06
$40: (650)580-6324
COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767

PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769

HOME THEATER System" KLH"digital
DVD/CD/MP3.Player
6
speakers
ex.$100. (650)992-4544

RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878

HOME THEATER, surround sound system. Harman Kardon amplifier tuner and
6 speakers, NEW. $400/obo. Call
(650)345-5502

SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35. (650)558-8142

PANASONIC STEREO color TV 36"
ex/con/ $30 (650)992-4544

BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

made in Spain

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Plant reproductive
structure
9 Sharpens
14 Lindbergh
nickname
16 Goat __: chaotic
situation, in slang
17 European travel
pass
18 “You Must Love
Me” musical
19 NYC travel org.
20 Trig function
22 West end?
23 Internal walls
26 Lizard that can
shed its tail
27 Passing event?
28 Book ending
30 Like 23 of
Haydn’s
symphonies
31 Standing losses?
32 Signifies
35 “What have we
here?!”
36 School hallway
warning
38 Fingers
39 Media section
40 Anthologies
41 Project
42 Number of
single-syllable
U.S. states
43 Cosmo, for one
44 One Direction
singer Zayn __
46 Kirkuk native
50 “Every Moment
Counts” gp.
51 1965 Nobel
Peace Prize
recipient
53 Vow taker
54 8-Down and
others
56 A carve turn may
be taught in one
59 Bring forth
60 S-shaped sofa
61 Company with
antlers in its logo
62 Things to obey,
like 36-Across
and 8-Down
DOWN
1 Diets, with
“down”
2 Bridge overseas

47 Adams who shot
33 Rabble-rouser
3 Slated
4 R&B artist
El Capitan
34 Champion of the
Des’__
48 Repeat
common man
5 “As wicked dew
exactly
35 Successor to
as __ my mother
49 Novelist
Anwar
brush’d”: “The
Hammond __
36 Not laughing
Tempest”
52 Run
37 Brandy
6 1979-’80
55 Big name in
designation
Fleetwood Mac
bar code
41 31-day mo.
hit
scanners
44 Beaux-arts venue
7 Food stabilizers
57 Tin __
45 Sports
8 Highway warning
58 Tommy Pickles’
commentator
9 Highway closer,
dad in “Rugrats”
Olbermann
perhaps
10 Highway lane, for
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
short
11 Four-time Emmywinning actress
12 Four-stranded
DNA structure
13 Scoundrels
15 Where “Hamlet”
opens
21 Object
24 Spruces (up)
25 Like-minded
orgs.
29 __ Bannon, Paul
Newman role
31 Jerry who wrote
lyrics for many
Presley songs
32 How a stage line
might be spoken xwordeditor@aol.com
01/31/15

INTAGE ART-DECO style wood chair,
carved back & legs, tapestry seat, $50.
650-861-0088.
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LEATHER couch, about 6ft long— dark
brown $45 Cell number: (650)580-6324
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
OVAL LIVING room cocktail table. Wood
with glass 48x28x18. Retail $250.
$75 OBO (650)343-4461
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO SET for sale, glass table and six
chairs $100 for the set. (650)678-5133
PATIO TABLE 5’x5’ round, Redwood,
rollers, 2 benches, good solid
condition $30 San Bruno (650)588-1946
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337

HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30 OBO
(650) 995-0012
NEW PORTABLE electric fan wind machine, round, adjustable— $15
Cell phone: (650)580-6324
ONE CUP Coffee Maker office, apt, dorm
??? Only $9 650-595-3933
ROTISSERIE ELECTRIC machine. Never been used $100 (650)678-5133
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

307 Jewelry & Clothing
AMETHYST RING Matching earings in
14k gold setting. $165. (650)200-9730
VAN GOGH “Vase of White Roses”
wood and glass frame. 24” x 30”. $70.
(650)298-8546. p.m. only please

308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269

PROCRASTINATION CURE - 6 audiocassette course by Nightingale- Conant.
$30. Call 574-3229 after 10 am
SEWING MACHINE Kenmore, blonde
cabinet, $25 (650)355-2167

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208

311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR nylon string excellent condition w/case $95. (650)5765026
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
ROLAND GW-7 Workstation/Keyboard,
with expression pedal, sustain pedal, and
owner’s manual. $500. (415)706-6216
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

312 Pets & Animals

CIRCULAR SAW heavy duty" Craftman"
new in box $45.00- D.C. (650)992-4544

AQUARIUM WITH oak stand: Blue
background show tank. 36"x16.75"x10".
$50, good condition. (650) 692-5568.

CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer. Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427

BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500

CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

PET FURNITURE covers. 1 standard
couch 2 lounge chairs. Like new $70
OBO (650)343-4461

SINGLE BED with 3 drawer wood
frame,exc condition $99. 650-756-9516
Daly City.

CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269

315 Wanted to Buy

SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274

DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516

SAW WITH Scabbard 10 pt. fine steel
only $15 650-595-3933

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516
TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141
TABLE, WHITE, sturdy wood, tile top,
35" square. $35. (650)861-0088

CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

TOOL BOX Set"Snap-On"on rollers19
drawers 34x56 ex/con.$700.00 (650)9924544
VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.

TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057

WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

310 Misc. For Sale

TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505

VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858

01/31/15

COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

PATTERN- MAKING KIT with 5 curved
plastic rulers. $60. Call 574-3229 after
10 am.

dia,

ROUND BEVELED Mirror 22"
hangs, perfect $29, 650-595-3933

UPHOLSTERED SIDE office chairs (2).
3ft X 2ft, $85 each, (650)212-7151

By Ned White
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

BOXED RED & gold lg serving bowl
18inches - $65 (650) 741-9060 SB

LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10 "x
10", cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229

10 VIDEOTAPES(3 unused) - $3
each/$20 all. Call 574-3229 after 10 am.
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858

WE BUY

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

316 Clothes
ALPINESTAR JEANS Tags Attached
Twin Stitched Knee Protection Never
used Blue/Grey Sz34 $65 (650)357-7484
DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484
MAN'S BLACK Shoes 9D tassel slipons,
Excel $15, 560-595-3933
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl, like new
$40 obo (650)349-6059

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 31-Feb. 1, 2015

316 Clothes

345 Medical Equipment

630 Trucks & SUV’s

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

PETERMANN BATTERY operated chair
bath lift. Stainless steele frame. Accepts
up to 350 lbs. Easily inserted in/out of
tub. $250 OBO. (650) 739-6489.

DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

317 Building Materials
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955
CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605

WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS

WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $69
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.

318 Sports Equipment

Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
CASINO CHIP Display. Frame and ready
to hang, $99.00 or best offer.
650.315.3240

Call (650)344-5200

G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
NORDIC TRACK AEROBIC EXERCISER -$45. (650)630-2329
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

SKI EQUIPMENT PACKAGE $35. Skis,
poles, boots, jacket. Youth or petite
woman, 4'8"-5'3". (650)630-2329
TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
TWO SOCCER balls -- $10.00 each
(hardly used) (650)341-5347
TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

322 Garage Sales

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

325 Estate Sales

ESTATE
SALE
Entire
Contents
House Packed
with tons of
Collectibles!
Friday Jan 30th
and
Sat Jan 31st
10 to 4pm
521 Chesterton
Belmont CA
335 Rugs
AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505

340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598

345 Medical Equipment
INVACARE ADJUSTABLE hospital bed,
good condition. $500. (415)516-4964

635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374

640 Motorcycles/Scooters

1966 CHEVELLE 396 motor. Standardbore block. Standard domed pistons,
rods, crank cam only. 360 HP, code
T0228EJ $600, (650)293-7568
1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
(650)670-2888

650 RVs
COLEMAN LARAMIE
pop-up camper, Excellent Condition,
$2,250. Call (415)515-6072

BELMONT – 1 BR, 2 BR, and 3BR
apartments No Smoking No Pets
(650)591-4046

670 Auto Parts

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
ROOMS FOR RENT
BURLINGAME HOTEL
Close to Public Transport.
Shared & Private Bathroom
Weekly No Pet
$200 + Tax shared per week
$300 + Tax Pvt Bathroom per week
Cable TV, wifi. micro, freeze
287 Lorton Ave Burlingame
(650)344-6666

Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos

$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax

Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos

(650) 593-3136

Mention Daily Journal

620 Automobiles
'06 MERCEDES AMG CL-63.. slate
gray, great condition, 1 owner, complete
dealer maintenance records available.
8,000 miles of factory warranty left. car
can be seen in Fremont...Best offer. Call
(408)888-9171
or
email:
nakad30970@aol.com

Cabinetry

Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto

Small jobs only
Local references
Free Estimates
30 years in Business
Licensed-Bonded

(650)248-4205

bestbuycabinets.com
or call

650-294-3360

Electricians
Construction

Cleaning

for all your electrical needs

1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many
heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449

ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

2006 CADILLAC Brake rotors, 4 available, $15 each (650)340-1225

Gardening

2006 CADILLAC CTS-V Factory service
manuals, volumes 1 thru 3, $100
(650)340-1225
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283

BRENT LANDSCAPING
Garden and Landscape
Maintenance

BORLA CAT-BACK exhaust system, ‘92
to ‘96 Corvette LT-1, $600/obo.
olivermp2@gmail.com, (650)333-4949

(650)288-8663

• Bi-monthly and Monthly
• Reliable and punctual
CA LIC# 959138

CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947

CALL NOW FOR
SPRING LAWN
MAINTENANCE

NEW Z Snow Cables for 14" & 15"
wheels, $29 650-595-3933
RADIAL TIRE Hankook 235/75/15 NEVER USED, retail $125.00 yours for ONLY $75.00 650-799-0303

Sprinklers and irrigation
Lawn Aeration
Pressure washing, rock gardens,
and lots more!

SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

TONNEAU COVER Brand new factory,
hard, folding, vinyl. Fits 2014 Sierra 6.6
$475 (650)515-5379

Concrete

680 Autos Wanted

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN

Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

ROSE PRUNING
from Karl Rothe

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

Removal of poison oak
and berry bushes
(650)307-4695

(650)533-0187
Lic# 947476

Celebrating 50 years
in the gardening business

Rambo
Concrete
Works

Flooring

Flamingo’s Flooring

by Greenstarr
www.greenstarr.net

t Walkways
t Driveways
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Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured

License # 752250

Since 1985

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

HONDA ‘93 LX SD all power, complete,
runs. $2,500 OBO, (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

625 Classic Cars

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.

Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

650-655-6600

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands!

Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING & WINDOWS

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)278-0157
Lic#1211534

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

DODGE ‘89 AIRES Only 44,300 miles! 4
cylinder auto, very good condition, runs
fine. Only $2,000. Broken hip ends driving. (650)591-8062

SHOP
AT HOME

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

BMW ‘06 525, silver, fully loaded, 130K
miles, excellent condition. $10,200.
Clean title, smogged. (650)302-5523.

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

1978 CLASSIC Mercedes Benz, 240D,
136k miles, 2nd owner, all scheduled
maintenance & records available. Good
condition. All original. Always garaged.
New tires. 4 speed manual. Runs &
drives great. Sunroof. Clean interior.
Good leather and carpets. AM/FM radio.
$4500. Call (650)375-1929

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.

Drywall
DRYWALL /
PLASTER / STUCCO
Patching w/
Texture Matching
Invisible Repair

t
Free showroom
design consultation & quote
t
BELOW HOME
DEPOT PRICES
t
PLEASE VISIT

‘08 BMW 528i, beige, great condition,
complete dealer maintenance. Car can
be seen in Foster City. (650)349-6969

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

Concrete

1964 HARLEY DAVIDSON FHL Panhead (motor only) 84 stoker. Complete
rebuild. Many new parts.Never run. Call
for details. $6,000. Jim (650) 293-7568

440 Apartments

470 Rooms

29

Gutters

ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION

90 MASERATI, 2 Door hard top and convertible. New paint Runs good. $4500
(650)245-4084

Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,999 /OBO (650)364-1374

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

O.K.’S RAINGUTTER

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY

(650)556-9780
OSCAR
GUTTER CLEANING

• Gutters & Downspout Repair
• Roofing Repair
• Screening & Seeling
Free Estimates

(650)669-1453
Lic# 910421

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 31-Feb. 1, 2015

Gutters

ROLANDO’S
GUTTER CLEANING
My specialty is power
washing and rain gutter
cleaning. Call me at
(650) 283-9449

Hauling

$40 & UP
HAUL

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

• Fences • Decks
• Concrete Work • Pebbles
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling

(650)341-7482

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

CHAINEY HAULING

Free Estimates

DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170

HANDYMAN

Electrical and
General home repair
(650)341-0100
(408)761-0071

Painting

Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

&

by Greenstarr

Chris’s Hauling
• Yard clean up - attic,
basement
• Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
• Demolition
• Concrete removal
• Excavation
• Swimming pool removal

(650)740-8602

License # 752250

(415)850-2471

Pruning

• Shaping
• Large

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile

Roofing

CUBIAS TILE

STAFFORD PAINTING
Interior / Exterior
Residential / Commercial
“A Professional Licensed
Contractor”
36 years experience

(650) 692-2647
CA Lic #692520

Moving
BAY AREA
RELOCATION SERVICES
Specializing In:
Homes, Apts, Storages
Professional, Friendly, Careful
Peninsula Personal mover

(650)630-0424

Plumbing
CLEAN DRAINS PLUMBING
$89 TO CLEAN ANY

CLOGGED DRAIN! SEWER PIPES
Installation of Water Heaters,
Faucets, Toilets, Sinks, Gas, Water &
Sewer Lines. Trenchless
Replacement.

(650)461-0326

Commercial & Residential
Exterior & Interior
Free Estimates

(650)372-8361

HAULING
$25 and up!

• Trimming

TAPIA

Call us for our spring yard
maintenance special and get
your home looking beautiful!
Sprinklers, Irrigation, Rock
Gardens and Lawn Aeration!

CORDERO PAINTING

SAN MATEO

Lic. #479564

GET YOUR LAWN
READY FOR SPRING

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

Hauling

Family Owned Since 2000

Landscaping

Painting

Lic# 979435

LOCALLY OWNED

(415)971-8763

Since 1985

The Village
Handyman
(650)701-6072

Service

Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net

Fully Lic & Bonded Cal-T190632

Call Joe

Hillside Tree

Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

Tom 650.834.2365
Chris 415.999.1223

HONEST HANDYMAN

Lic.# 891766

Tree Service

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975

License 619908

Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small

Plumbing

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

AAA RATED!

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

Handy Help

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

Hauling

Lic # 35740 Insured

JON LA MOTTE

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

ROOFING
Family business, serving the
Peninsula for over 30 years
Dry Rot, Gutters & Down Spout Repair
FULLY INSURED / LICENSED & BONDED

(650) 367-8795
– SERVING THE PENINSULA –

LICENSE # 729271

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates

(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492

Window Washing

GUTTER
CLEANING

Tree Service

Yardby Greenstarr
Boss

Lic.# 983312

ECONOMY PLUMBING
Fast Free Estimate
24 Hour Emergency Service
Ask About
$48.88 Drain & Sewer
Cleaning Special
(650)731-0510

TAPIAROOFING.NET

• Granite Install • Kitchens
• Decks
• Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces

www.greenstarr.net
www.yardboss.net

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Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
License # 752250

Since 1985

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 31-Feb. 1, 2015

Attorneys

Food

Furniture

Health & Medical

Law Office of Jason Honaker

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F

Bedroom Express

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE

Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Food

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

www.steelheadbrewery.com

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

RENDEZ VOUS
CAFE
Tea, espresso, Duvel, Ballast
Point Sculpin and other beers
today

106 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR

Lunch• Dinner• Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit

(650)372-0888

Financial
RETIREMENT
PLAN ANALYSIS

401(k) & IRA & 403(b)
(650)458-0312
New Stage Investment Group
Hans Reese is a Registered Representative with, and securities offered
through, LPL Financial,
Member FINRA/SIPC

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

(650) 295-6123

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking

Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

unitedamericanbank.com

1221 Chess Drive Foster City

Where Dreams Begin

184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

(650)591-3900

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental

Health & Medical
AMEO ESSENTIAL OILS
Let’s have a Party
Test 43 Oils - Diffusers
Demonstration video
Clinical-grade standards
Listen to Dr. Joshua Plant
Learn the health benefits
Call (650)366-6606

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

Housing

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

LEGAL

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA

Marketing

GROW

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Massage Therapy

(650)389-5787 ext.2

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $24.99

Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

BLUE SHIELD OF
CALIFORNIA

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS

We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
All Credit Accepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY

Where every child is a gift from God

K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco

(650)588-6860

ww.hillsidechristian.com

(near Marriott Hotel)

Please call to RSVP

Insurance
EYE EXAMINATIONS

Legal Services

31

(650)389-2468

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$48

Belbien Day Spa

1204 West Hillsdale Blvd.
SAN MATEO
(650)403-1400

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

CARE ON CALL
24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help

Tax Preparation

QUALITY,
FAST
Tax Returns
starting at:

$50

Jie`s Income Tax

1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 350
San Mateo, CA 94402
Office:650-274-0968
Cell:650-492-1273

Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

Wills & Trusts
ESTATE PLANNING
TrustandEstatePlan.com

San Mateo Office
1(844)687-3782
Complete Estate Plans
Starting at $399

32

Weekend • Jan. 31–Feb. 1, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL