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Product Specification

3HAC 13491-1/M2000/Rev. 4
IRB 7600 - 500/2.3
IRB 7600 - 400/2.55
IRB 7600 - 150/3.5

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a
commitment by ABB Automation Technology Products AB, Robotics. ABB Automation Technology
Products AB, Robotics assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
In no event shall ABB Automation Technology Products AB, Robotics be liable for incidental or
consequential damages arising from use of this document or of the software and hardware described
in this document.
This document and parts thereof must not be reproduced or copied without ABB Automation
Technology Products AB, Roboticss written permission, and contents thereof must not be imparted to
a third party nor be used for any unauthorized purpose. Contravention will be prosecuted.
Additional copies of this document may be obtained from ABB Automation Technology Products AB,
Robotics at its then current charge.

Copyright 2001 ABB. All rights reserved.


Article number: 3HAC 13491-1
Issue: M2000/Rev. 4
ABB Automation Technology Products AB
Robotics
SE-721 68 Vsters
Sweden

Product Specification IRB 7600


CONTENTS
Page
1 Description ....................................................................................................................... 3
1.1 Structure.................................................................................................................. 3
Different robot versions ......................................................................................... 4
Definition of version designation........................................................................... 4
1.2 Safety/Standards ..................................................................................................... 7
1.3 Installation .............................................................................................................. 11
External Mains Transformer .................................................................................. 11
Operating requirements.......................................................................................... 11
Mounting the manipulator...................................................................................... 11
1.4 Load diagrams ........................................................................................................ 15
Maximum load and moment of inertia for full and limited axis 5
(centre line down) movement......................................................................... 22
Mounting equipment .............................................................................................. 23
Holes for mounting extra equipment ..................................................................... 24
1.5 Maintenance and Troubleshooting ......................................................................... 27
1.6 Robot Motion.......................................................................................................... 28
Performance according to ISO 9283...................................................................... 30
Velocity .................................................................................................................. 30
1.7 Cooling fan for axis 1-3 motor (options 113-115).................................................. 30
1.8 DressPack for Material Handling ........................................................................... 31
DressPack options .................................................................................................. 31
Process cable package............................................................................................ 32
Communication...................................................................................................... 33
2 Specification of Variants and Options........................................................................... 37
3 Accessories ....................................................................................................................... 43
4 Index ................................................................................................................................. 45

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Product Specification IRB 7600

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description

1 Description
1.1 Structure
A new world of possibilities opens up with ABBs new Power Robot family. It comes
in three versions, 500 kg, 400 kg, and 150 kg handling capacities.
The IRB 7600 is ideal for heavy-weight applications, regardless of industry. Typical
areas can be handling of heavy fixtures, turning car bodies, lifting engines, handling
heavy parts, loading and unloading of machine cells, alternatively handling large and
heavy pallet layers.
There is more to this benchmark product than sheer power. We have added a range of
software products - all falling under the umbrella designation of Active Safety - to
protect not only personnel in the unlikely event of an accident, but also the robot itself.
When handling payloads of 500 kg, it is clear that safety features are vital in protecting
the new investment.
There are a large number of process options for spot welding and material handling
integrated in the robot. For a complete description of process options for spot welding
see the Product Specification SpotPack.
The robot is equipped with the operating system BaseWare OS. BaseWare OS controls
every aspect of the robot, like motion control, development and execution of
application programs, communication etc. See Product Specification S4Cplus.
For additional functionality, the robot can be equipped with optional software for
application support - for example spot welding, communication features - network
communication - and advanced functions such as multi-tasking, sensor control, etc.
For a complete description on optional software, see the Product Specification
RobotWare Options.
Axis 3
Axis 4

Axis 6
Axis 5

Axis 2

Axis 1

Figure 1 The IRB 7600 manipulator has 6 axes.

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
Different robot versions
The IRB 7600 is available in three versions. The following different robot types are
available:
Standard:
IRB 7600 - 500 kg / 2.3 m
IRB 7600 - 400 kg / 2.55 m
IRB 7600 - 150 kg / 3.5 m
Definition of version designation
IRB 7600 Mounting - Handling capacity / Reach

Prefix
Mounting

Floor-mounted manipulator

Handling capacity

yyy

Indicates the maximum handling capacity (kg)

Reach

x.x

Indicates the maximum reach at wrist centre (m)

Manipulator weight

Description

IRB 7600-500/2.3
IRB 7600-400/2.55
IRB 7600-150/3.5

2490 kg
2500 kg
2530 kg

Airborne noise level:


The sound pressure level outside
the working space

73 dB (A) Leq (acc. to


Machinery directive 98/37/EEC)

Power consumption at maximum load:


ISO Cube
Normal robot movements

3.4 kW
5.8 kW

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description

IRB 7600-500/2.3

7600-500/2.3
250
806
250
806

IRB 7600-400/2.55

IRB 7600-150/3.5

7600-400/2.55
1056

250

7600-150/3.50
2012
2012

250
250

Figure 2 View of the manipulator from the side and rear (dimensions in mm).
Allow 200 mm for cables behind the manipulator foot.

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description

R700

Robot power cable

200

R700

Fork
lift device fr Gabelstapler
FHebevorrichtung
ork lift device

Figure 3 View of the manipulator from above (dimensions in mm)

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description

1.2 Safety/Standards
The robot conforms to the following standards:
EN 292-1
Safety of machinery, terminology
EN 292-2
Safety of machinery, technical specifications
EN 954-1
Safety of machinery, safety related parts of control
systems
EN 60204
Electrical equipment of industrial machines
IEC 204-1
Electrical equipment of industrial machines
ISO 10218, EN 775
Manipulating industrial robots, safety
ANSI/RIA 15.06/1999 Industrial robots, safety requirements
ISO 9787
Manipulating industrial robots, coordinate systems
and motions
IEC 529
Degrees of protection provided by enclosures
EN 50081-2
EMC, Generic emission
EN 61000-6-2
EMC, Generic immunity
ANSI/UL 1740-1996 (option)Standard for Industrial Robots and Robotic
Equipment
CAN/CSA Z 434-94 (option)Industrial Robots and Robot Systems - General
Safety Requirements
The robot complies fully with the health and safety standards specified in the EECs
Machinery Directives.
The Power Robot Generation is designed with a unique combination of robot power and
control system intelligence.
The Service Information System (SIS)
The service information system gathers information about the robots usage and by that
determines how hard the robot has been used. The usage is characterised by the speed,
the rotation angles and the load of every axis.
With this data collection, the service interval of every individual robot of this generation
can be predicted, optimising and planning ahead service activities. The collection data
is available via the teach pendant or the network link to the robot.
The Power Robot Generation is designed with absolute safety in mind. It is dedicated to
actively or passively avoid collisions and offers the highest level of safety to the
operators and the machines as well as the surrounding and attached equipment. These
features are presented in the active and passive safety system.
The Active Safety System
The active safety system includes those software features that maintain the accuracy of
the robots path and those that actively avoid collisions which can occur if the robot
leaves the programmed path accidentally or if an obstacle is put into the robots path.

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
The Active Brake System (ABS)
All robots run with an active brake system that supports the robots to maintain the
programmed path even in an emergency situation.
The ABS is active during all stop modes, braking the robot to a stop with the power of
the servo drive system along the programmed path. After a specific time the mechanical
brakes are activated ensuring a safe stop even in case of a failure of the drive system or
a power interruption.
The maximal applicable torque on the most loaded axis determines the stopping
distance.
The stopping process is in accordance with a class 1 stop.
While programming the robot in manual mode a class 0 stop, with mechanical brakes
only, applies.
The Self Tuning Performance (STP)
The Power Robot Generation is designed to run at different load configurations, many
of which occur within the same program and cycle.
The robots installed electrical power can thus be exploited to lift heavy loads, create a
high axis force or accelerate quickly without changing the configuration of the robot.
Consequently the robot can run in a power mode or a speed mode which can be
measured in the respective cycle time of one and the same program but with different
tool loads. This feature is based on QuickMoveTM.
The respective change in cycle time can be measured by running the robot in NoMotionExecution with different loads or with simulation tools, like RobotStudio.
The Electronically Stabilised Path (ESP)
The load and inertia of the tool have a significant effect on the path performance of a
robot. The Power Robot Generation is equipped with a system to electronically stabilise
the robots path in order to achieve the best path performance.
As the path performance as such is measured in a combination of speed and path accurac,
the user can choose himself the optimal configuration by applying the parameter WorldAccLim which can limit the linear acceleration along a programmed path.
This has an influence while accelerating and braking and consequently stabilises the
path during all motion operations with a compromise of the best cycle time. This feature
is secured through TrueMoveTM.
Over-speed protection
The speed of the robot is monitored by two independent computers.
Restricting the working space
The movement of each axis can be restricted using software limits.
As options there are safeguarded space stops for connection of limit switches to restrict
the working space.
Axes 1-3 can also be restricted by means of mechanical stops.
Collision detection (option)
In case an unexpected mechanical disturbance occurs, like a collision, electrode sticking,
etc., the robot will detect the collision, stop on the path and slightly back off from its stop
position, releasing tension in the tool.
The Passive Safety System
The Power Robot Generation has a dedicated passive safety system that by hardware
construction and dedicated solutions is designed to avoid collisions with surrounding
equipment. It integrates the robot system into the surrounding equipment safely.
8

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
Compact robot arm design
The shape of the lower and upper arm system is compact, avoiding interference into
the working envelope of the robot.
The lower arm is shaped inward, giving more space under the upper arm to re-orientate
large parts and leaving more working space while reaching over equipment in front of
the robot.
The rear side of the upper arm is compact, with no components projecting over the edge
of the robot base even when the robot is moved into the home position.
Moveable mechanical limitation of main axes (option)
All main axes can be equipped with moveable mechanical stops, limiting the working
range of every axis individually. The mechanical stops are designed to withstand a
collision even under full load.
Zone switches on main axes (option)
All main axes can be equipped with zone switches. The double circuitry to the cam
switches is designed to offer personal safety according to the respective standards.
The Internal Safety Concept
The internal safety concept of the Power Robot Generation is based on a two-channel
circuit that is monitored continuously. If any component fails, the electrical power
supplied to the motors shuts off and the brakes engage.
Safety category 3
Malfunction of a single component, such as a sticking relay, will be detected at the next
MOTOR OFF/MOTOR ON operation. MOTOR ON is then prevented and the faulty
section is indicated. This complies with category 3 of EN 954-1, Safety of machinery
- safety related parts of control systems - Part 1.
Selecting the operating mode
The robot can be operated either manually or automatically. In manual mode, the robot
can only be operated via the teach pendant, i.e. not by any external equipment.
Reduced speed
In manual mode, the speed is limited to a maximum of 250 mm/s (600 inch/min.).
The speed limitation applies not only to the TCP (Tool Centre Point), but to all parts of
the robot. It is also possible to monitor the speed of equipment mounted on the robot.
Three position enabling device
The enabling device on the teach pendant must be used to move the robot when in
manual mode. The enabling device consists of a switch with three positions, meaning
that all robot movements stop when either the enabling device is pushed fully in, or
when it is released completely. This makes the robot safer to operate.
Safe manual movement
The robot is moved using a joystick instead of the operator having to look at the teach
pendant to find the right key.
Emergency stop
There is one emergency stop push button on the controller and another on the teach
pendant. Additional emergency stop buttons can be connected to the robots safety
chain circuit.

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
Safeguarded space stop
The robot has a number of electrical inputs which can be used to connect external safety
equipment, such as safety gates and light curtains. This allows the robots safety
functions to be activated both by peripheral equipment and by the robot itself.
Delayed safeguarded space stop
A delayed stop gives a smooth stop. The robot stops in the same way as at a normal
program stop with no deviation from the programmed path. After approx. 1 second the
power supplied to the motors is shut off.
Hold-to-run control
Hold-to-run means that you must depress the start button in order to move the robot. When
the button is released the robot will stop. The hold-to-run function makes program testing
safer.
Fire safety
Both the manipulator and control system comply with ULs (Underwriters Laboratory)
tough requirements for fire safety.
Safety lamp (option)
As an option, the robot can be equipped with a safety lamp mounted on the manipulator.
This is activated when the motors are in the MOTORS ON state.

10

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
1.3 Installation
All versions of IRB 7600 are designed for floor mounting. Depending on the robot
version, an end effector with max. weight of 150 to 500 kg including payload, can be
mounted on the mounting flange (axis 6). See Load diagrams for IRB 7600 generation
robots from page 16 to page 21.
Extra loads (valve packages, transformers) can be mounted on the upper arm with a
maximum weight of 50 kg. On all versions an extra load of 500 kg can also be mounted
on the frame of axis 1. Holes for mounting extra equipment on page 24.
The working range of axes 1-3 can be limited by mechanical stops. Position switches
can be supplied on axes 1-3 for position indication of the manipulator.
External Mains Transformer
The robot system requires a 475 VAC power supply. Therefore an external transformer
will be included when a mains voltage other than 475V is selected.
Operating requirements
Protection standards
Standard and Foundry Manipulator

IP67

Cleanroom standards
Cleanroom class 100 for manipulator according to:
DIN EN ISO 14644: Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments
US Federal Standard 209 e - Air-clean-classes
Explosive environments
The robot must not be located or operated in an explosive environment.
Ambient temperature
Manipulator during operation
For the controller: Standard
Option

+5oC (41oF) to +50oC (122oF)


+45oC (113oF)
+52oC (126oF)

Complete robot during transportation and storage, -25oC (13oF) to +55oC (131oF)
for short periods (not exceeding 24 hours)
up to +70oC (158oF)
Relative humidity
Complete robot during transportation and storage Max. 95% at constant temperature
Complete robot during operation
Max. 95% at constant temperature
Mounting the manipulator
Maximum load in relation to the base coordinate system.

Force xy
Force z
Torque xy
Torque z

Endurance load
in operation

Max. load at
emergency stop

14000 N
32000 10000 N

31000 N
39000 16000 N

42000 Nm
11000 Nm

72000 Nm
19500 Nm

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

11

88 0.3

Description

Recommended screws for fastening


the manipulator to a base plate: M24 x 120 8.8 with 4 mm flat washer
Torque value 775 Nm

Figure 4 Hole configuration (dimensions in mm).

12

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description

B
5

325

D
B

37,5 o

15

C
o

10

50
522

0.1
A

A-A

1.5

B-B

C-C

D
Two guiding pins required, dimensions see Figure 6
Figure 5 Option Base plate (dimensions in mm).

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

13

Description

Protected from corrosion


Figure 6 Guide sleeves (dimensions in mm).

14

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
1.4 Load diagrams
The load diagrams include a nominal payload inertia, J0 of 35 kgm2, and an extra load
of 50 kg at the upper arm housing, see Figure 7.
At different arm load, payload and moment of inertia, the load diagram will be
changed.
For an accurate load diagram, please use the calculation program, ABBLoad for 7600
on:
inside.abb.com/atrm, click on Products --> Robots --> IRB 7600
or
http://www.abb.com/roboticspartner, click on Product range --> Robots --> IRB
7600.
Centre of gravity 50 kg
400

200

Figure 7 Centre of gravity for 50 kg extra load at arm housing (dimensions i mm).

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

15

Description
Load diagram for IRB 7600-500/2.3

Z (m)
1,30

1,20

150 kg
1,10

1,00

200 kg

0,90

0,80

250 kg
0,70

300 kg
0,60

350 kg
0,50

425 kg
0,40

400 kg

450 kg

475 kg

500 kg
0,30

0,20

0,10

L (m)

250 mm

0,00
0,00

0,10

0,20

0,30

0,40

0,50

0,60

0,70

0,80

Figure 8 Maximum permitted load mounted on the robot tool flange at different positions
(centre of gravity).

16

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
Load diagram for IRB 7600-500/2.3 Vertical Wrist (10o)

Vertical wrist

Pay
load

250 mm

10o 10o

Z
0,0

0,2

0,4

0,6

0,8

1,0

1,2

0,0

0,2

600 kg
550 kg
0,4

450 kg
300 kg
0,6

200 kg

0,8

1,0

1,2

Figure 9 Maximum permitted load mounted on the robot tool flange at different positions
(centre of gravity) at Vertical Wrist (10o), J0 =35 kgm2.

For wrist down (0o deviation from the vertical line).


Max load = 650kg, Zmax = 0,439m and Lmax = 0,096m

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

17

Description
Load diagram for IRB 7600-400/2.55

Z (m)
1,30

1,20

150 kg
1,10

1,00

200 kg
0,90

0,80

250 kg
0,70

300 kg
0,60

350 kg
0,50

400 kg

0,40

425 kg
0,30

0,20

250 mm

0,10

0,00
0,00

L (m)
0,10

0,20

0,30

0,40

0,50

0,60

0,70

0,80

Figure 10 Maximum permitted load mounted on the robot tool flange at different positions
(centre of gravity).

18

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
Load diagram for IRB 7600-400/2.55 Vertical Wrist (10o)

Vertical wrist

Pay
load
10o 10o

250 mm

0,0

0,2

0,4

0,6

0,8

1,0

1,2

1,4

0,0

0,2

500 kg
450 kg
0,4

400 kg
300 kg
0,6

200 kg
0,8

1,0

1,2

1,4

Figure 11 Maximum permitted load mounted on the robot tool flange at different positions
(centre of gravity) at Vertical Wrist (10o), J0 =35 kgm2.

For wrist down (0o deviation from the vertical line).


Max load = 540 kg, Zmax = 0,498m and Lmax = 0,103m
Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

19

Description
Load diagram for IRB 7600-150/3.5

Z (m)
2,00
1,90

80 kg

1,80
1,70

90 kg

1,60

100 kg

1,50
1,40
1,30

110 kg

1,20
1,10
1,00

120 kg
0,90
0,80
0,70

130 kg

0,60
0,50

140 kg

0,40
0,30

150 kg

0,20

250 mm

0,10
0,00
0,00 0,10 0,20 0,30 0,40 0,50 0,60 0,70 0,80 0,90 1,00 1,10

L (m)

Figure 12 Maximum permitted load mounted on the robot tool flange at different positions
(centre of gravity).

20

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
Load diagram for IRB 7600-150/3.5 Vertical Wrist (10o)

Vertical wrist

Pay
load
10o 10o

250 mm

0,0

0,2

0,4

0,6

0,8

1,0

1,2

1,4

1,6

1,8

2,0

2,2

0,0

0,2

170 kg
150 kg
0,4

130 kg

0,6

110 kg

90 kg
0,8

1,0

Figure 13 Maximum permitted load mounted on the robot tool flange at different positions
(centre of gravity) at Vertical Wrist (10o), J0 =35 kgm2.

For wrist down (0o deviation from the vertical line).


Max load = 180kg, Zmax = 0,337m and Lmax = 0,126m

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

21

Description
Maximum load and moment of inertia for full and limited axis 5 (centre line down)
movement.
Note. Load in kg, Z and L in m and J in kgm2
Full movement of axis 5 (120o):
Axis 5
Maximum moment of inertia:
Ja5 = Mass ((Z+0.250)2 +L2) + max J0L 500 kgm2
Axis 6
Maximum moment of inertia:
Ja6 = Mass L2 + J0Z 315 kgm2

Centre of gravity
J0L = Maximum own moment of inertia
around the maximum vector in the X-Y-plane
J0Z = Maximum own moment of inertia around Z

Figure 14 Own moment of inertia.

Limited axis 5, centre line down:


Axis 5
Maximum moment of inertia:
Ja5 = Load ((Z+0.250)2 +L2) + J0L 550 kgm2
Axis 6
Maximum moment of inertia:
Ja6 = Load L2 + J0Z 500 kgm2
Centre of gravity
J0L = Maximum own moment of inertia
around the maximum vector in the X-Y-plane
J0Z = Maximum own moment of inertia around Z

Z
Figure 15 Moment of inertia when axis 5 centre line down.

22

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
Mounting equipment
Extra loads can be mounted on the upper arm housing, the lower arm, and on the frame.
Definitions of distances and masses are shown in Figure 16 and Figure 17.
The robot is supplied with holes for mounting extra equipment (see Figure 18).
Maximum permitted arm load depends on centre of gravity of arm load and robot
payload.
Upper arm
Permitted extra load on upper arm housing plus the maximum handling
weight (See Figure 16):
M1 50 kg with distance a 500 mm, centre of gravity in axis 3 extension.

7600-500/2.3 /
250
806

M1

a
Mass
centre
M1

Figure 16 Permitted extra load on upper arm.

Frame (Hip Load)


Permitted extra load on frame is JH = 200 kgm2.
Recommended position (see Figure 17).
JH = JH0 + M4 R2
where

JH0
R
M4

View from the rear

543
473

200

View from above

is the moment of inertia of the equipment


is the radius (m) from the centre of axis 1
is the total mass (kg) of the equipment including
bracket and harness (500 kg)

View from the rear

800

600
600
View from above

1180

Figure 17 Extra load on the frame of IRB 7600 (dimensions in mm).

Mounting of hip load


The extra load can be mounted on the frame. Holes for mounting see Figure 20.
When mounting on the frame all the four holes (2x2, 16) on one side must be used.
Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

23

Description
Holes for mounting extra equipment
(2012)
(1056)
806

165

250

50

777

1075

100

780

477

M12 (4x)

2512,5

M12 (4x)
150

Figure 18 Holes for mounting extra equipment on the upper and the lower arm (dimensions in mm).

24

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description

Figure 19 Holes for mounting of extra load on the upper arm (dimensions in mm).

240
240

50

60

290
290

M16(4x)
(4x)
M16

Figure 20 Holes for mounting of extra load on the frame, and for mounting of fork lift device
(dimensions in mm).

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

25

Description

31
A

1,6
0,04 A
12 H7 Depth 15

12 x
0,2 A B

(24)

15

12

30

12 H7 Depth 15
0,04 A
1,6

200

0,02 A

A-A
Figure 21 The mechanical interface; mounting flange (dimensions in mm).

26

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description

1.5 Maintenance and Troubleshooting


The robot requires only a minimum of maintenance during operation. It has been
designed to make it as easy to service as possible:
- Maintenance-free AC motors are used.
- Liquid grease or oil is used for the gear boxes.
- The cabling is routed for longevity, and in the unlikely event of a failure, its
modular design makes it easy to change.
The following maintenance is required:
- Changing filter for the transformer/drive unit cooling every year.
- Changing batteries every third year.
The maintenance intervals depend on the use of the robot. For detailed information on
maintenance procedures, see Maintenance section in the Product Manual.

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

27

Description

1.6 Robot Motion


Type of motion
Axis 1
Axis 2
Axis 3
Axis 4
Axis 5
Axis 6

Rotation motion
Arm motion
Arm motion
Wrist motion
Bend motion
Turn motion

Range of movement
+180oto-180o
+85oto-60o
+60oto-180o
+300oto-300o
+100oto-100o
+300oto -300o

IRB 7600-500/2.3

Figure 22 The extreme positions of the robot arm specified at the wrist centre
(dimensions in mm).

28

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description

IRB 7600-400/2.55

IRB 7600-150/3.5

Figure 23 The extreme positions of the robot arm specified at the wrist centre (dimensions in mm).

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

29

Description
Performance according to ISO 9283
At rated maximum load, maximum offset and 1.6 m/s velocity on the inclined ISO test
plane, 1 m cube (for IRB 7600-500/2.3 a 0.63 m cube) with all six axes in motion.
IRB 7600
-400/2.55
Pose accuracy, AP
0.10 mm
Pose repeatability, RP
0.19 mm
Path repeatability, RT
1.27 mm
Pose stabilization time, Pst 0.38 s

-500/2.3
0.13 mm
0.24 mm
0.34 mm
0.29 s

-150/3.5
0.10 mm
0.19 mm
0.40 mm
0.75 s

Velocity
Maximum axis speeds.
IRB 7600
Axis no.
1
2
3
4
5
6

-400/2.55

-500/2.3

-150/3.5

75/s
60/s
60/s
100/s
100/s
160/s

75/s
60/s
60/s
100/s
100/s
160/s

100/s
60/s
60/s
100/s
100/s
190/s

1.7 Cooling fan for axis 1-3 motor (options 113-115)


A motor of the robot needs a fan to avoid overheating if the average speed over time
exceeds the value given in Table 1. The maximum allowed average speed is depending
on the load.
The average speed can be calculated with the following formula:
Average speed =

Total axis movement, number of degrees, in one cycle


360 x cycle time (minutes) incl. waiting time

The maximum allowed average speed for axis 1-3 at the maximum ambient
temperature of 50oC according to Table 1.
IP 54 for cooling fan.
Table 1

Variant

30

Maximum
average speed
axis 1 (rpm)

Maximum
average speed
axis 2 (rpm)

Maximum
average speed
axis 3 (rpm)

IRB 7600-500/2.3

5.4 - 7.0

1.4 - 1.5

1.2 - 1.6

IRB 7600-400/2.55

5.4 - 7.0

1.4 - 1.5

1.2 - 1.6

IRB 7600-150/3.5

4.1 - 5.3

1.3 - 1.4

2.2 - 2.9

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description

1.8 DressPack for Material Handling


DressPack options
Dress Pack options include options for Upper arm harness, Lower arm harness and
Floor harness. These are described separately below but are designed and meant to be
seen as a complete package for either Material handling or Spot welding application.
The Upper Arm Harness consists of a process cable package and supports, clamps,
brackets, and a retractor arm. The process cable package contains special designed
cables and hoses that have been long term tested. The cables and hoses are partly
placed in a protective hose to extend the lifetime.
The Upper Arm Harness is designed to follow the robot arm movements and minimise
damages to the harness or the manipulator. The interface to the lower arm harness is
located well protected below the motor for axis 3.
The complete harness is tested and proven to be well suited for both spot welding
applications and other applications with the same type of movements and very high
requirements. The cable and hose package has a 1000-mm free length at axis 6 for
connection to a robot tool. A tension arm unit keeps hose package in the right position
for the robot arm movement approved for the DressPack. An arm protection will
prevent wearing on the protective hose and on the robot itself. Please note that when
the robot is operating, some multiply axis movement might end up with an
overstraining of the hose package. These movements must be avoided.
For more information see the Installation and Maintenance Manual.
Option 2205
Process Cable package
Harness support axis 6
Tension arm unit

Arm protection

Figure 24 Mechanical equipment upper arm harness.

Note. The upper arm harness specification is based on the selection of lower arm
harness.
The Lower Arm Harness consists of a process cable package and supports, clamps
and brackets. The process cable package, containing special designed cables and hoses,
has been long term tested.
Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

31

Description
The process cable package is routed along the lower arm to minimize space required
and to give no limitation in the robot working envelope. The cables and hoses are partly
placed in a protective hose to extend the lifetime.
The lower arm harness is connected to the upper arm harness at the connection point
under the axis 3 motor. The interface plate at the manipulator base is the place where
the floor harness and the process media are connected.
The Floor Harness consists of signal cables for customer signals. The floor harness is
connected to the lower arm harness at the interface plate at the manipulator base and to
the left side of the control cabinet. The signal connection inside the control cabinet
depends on chosen options. As example bus option and parallel option mean different
connections.
The cables and hose which are used to form the DressPack for the Material Handling
application has the following specification and capacity:
Table 2

Type

Pcs

Area

Allowed capacity

Customer Power (CP)


Utility Power
Protective Earth

2+2
1

0,5 mm2
1,0 mm2

500 VAC, 5 A rms


500 VAC

19
4

0,23 mm2
0,23 mm2

50 VAC/DC, 1 A rms
50 VAC/DC, 1 A rms

Customer Bus (CBus)


Bus signals
Bus signals
Bus signals
Bus utility signals

2
2
4
4

0,18 mm2
0,18 mm2
0,18 mm2
0,23 mm2

Profibus 12 Mbit/s spec*


Can/DeviceNet spec*
Interbus spec*
50 VAC/DC, 1 A rms

Media
Air (PROC 1)

12,5 mm
inner
diameter

Max. pressure 16 bar / 230


PSI

Customer Signals (CS)


Signals twisted pair
Signals twisted pair and
separate shielded

Quad twisted under separate screen. Can also be used for very sensitive signals

Process cable package


For material handling the DressPack can be chosen in different configurations, where
details of the signals and media are added.
Option 056 Connection to manipulator
No floor cables for the DressPack are chosen. The connector at the base for interfacing
is specified in the installation and maintenance manual. Terminal connections could be
found in the circuit diagrams.
32

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
Option 057 Connection to cabinet
Floor cables for the DressPack are chosen. The number of cables and cable type
depends on chosen options. The length of the process cable package at the floor is
specified under the options below:
- Option 675-678 for parallel communication
- Option 660-663 for bus communication with CANDeviceNet
- Option 665-668 for bus communication with Profibus
- Option 670-673 for bus communication with Interbus
The connection inside the cabinet depends on communication type.
- If parallel communication is chosen, signals are found at terminals inside the
cabinet (XT5.1, XT5.2 and XT6)
- If bus communication is chosen, signals are both routed to valid bus card. The
remaining are found at terminals inside the cabinet (XT5.1, XT5.2 and XT6).
Communication
Option 2063 Parallel communication
The process cable package has been chosen for parallel communication. The number
as well as the type of signals are defined under Material handling application, Option
2204, 2205.
Option 2064 Bus communication
The process cable package has been chosen for bus communication. This alternative
includes both the signals for the bus communication as well as some parallel signals.
The number as well as the type of signals are defined under Material handling
application, Option 2204, 2205. The type of bus is defined by the choice of floor
cabling (see also option 057)
Option 2204 Material Handling axis 1 to axis 3
The Lower arm harness for the Material Handling has been chosen. This includes the
process cable package as well as brackets, connectors etc. to form a complete dressing
package from manipulator base to connectors on axis 3. Depending on the choice
above the process cable package will have different content. See tables below.
For all process cable packages some of the content are common. These common parts
for Material Handling application are shown in Table 3 below. Unique parts for
different option combinations are shown in Table 4, Table 5 and Table 6. These tables
are valid for option 2204 and 2205.

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

33

Description

option 2204
option 2205

From base to axis 3

From axis 3 to axis 6

Figure 25 Material Handling from base to axis 3, and Material Handling from axis 3 to axis 6.

Table for Common content Material Handling (with option 2063/2064)


Table 3

Type

Pieces at
Connection point

Note

Allowed capacity

12,5 m inner
diameter

Max pressure 16 bar / 230 PSI

Media
Air (PROC 1)

Table for Material Handling with option 2063


Table 4

Type
Customer Power (CP)
Utility Power
Protective earth
Customer Signals (CS)
Signals twisted pair
Signals twisted pair and
separate shielded

Pieces at
Terminal*

Pieces at
Connection point**

Allowed capacity

2+2
1

2+2
1

500 VAC, 5 A rms


500 VAC

19
4

19
4

50 VAC, 5 A rms
50 VAC, 5 A rms

* Terminals inside the cabinet if option 057 is chosen


** At manipulator base or axis 3 interface (or axis 6 under option 2205)

34

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Description
Table for Material Handling with option 2064 and Can/DeviceNet
Table 5

Type
Customer Power (CP)
Utility Power
Protective earth
Customer Bus (CBus)
Bus signals
Bus signals
Signals twisted pair
Utility signals

Pieces at
Terminal*

Pieces at
Connection point**

Allowed capacity

2+2
1

2+2
1

500 VAC, 5 A rms


500 VAC

4
4

2
2
4
4

Can/DeviceNet spec
50 VAC, 1 A rms
50 VAC, 1 A rms
50 VAC, 1 A rms

* Terminals inside the cabinet if option 057 is chosen


** At manipulator base or axis 3 interface (or axis 6 under option 2205)
Table for Material Handling with option 2064 and Interbus
Table 6

Type
Customer Power (CP)
Utility Power
Protective earth
Customer Bus (CBus)
Bus signals
Bus signals
Signals twisted pair
Utility signals

Pieces at
Terminal*

Pieces at
Connection point**

Allowed capacity

2+2
1

2+2
1

500 VAC, 5 A rms


500 VAC

4
3

4
1
4
3

Interbus spec
50 VAC, 1 A rms
50 VAC, 1 A rms
50 VAC, 1 A rms

* Terminals inside the cabinet if option 057 is chosen


** At manipulator base or axis 3 interface (or axis 6 under option 2205)
Option 2205 Material Handling axis 3 to axis 6
The Upper arm harness for the Material Handling has been chosen. This includes the
process cable package as well as brackets, connectors etc. to form a complete dressing
package from interface at axis 3 to the connectors at axis 6. Depending on the earlier
choice (see option 2204) the process cable package will have different content.
For content see Table 3, Table 4, Table 5 and Table 6. See also Figure 24.
The connector type at the manipulator base, at axis 3 and axis 6 is specified in the
installation and maintenance manual.

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

35

Description

36

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Specification of Variants and Options

2 Specification of Variants and Options


The different variants and options for the IRB 7600 are described below.
The same numbers are used here as in the Specification form. For controller options,
see Product Specification S4Cplus, for software options, see Product Specification
RobotWare Options, and for SpotPack options, see Product Specification SpotPack.

1 MANIPULATOR
VARIANTS
021 IRB 7600-150/3.5
024 IRB 7600-400/2.55
025 IRB 7600-500/2.3
Manipulator colour
330 Standard
The manipulator is painted in ABB orange.
352 Ral code
Colours according to RAL-codes.
Protection
035 Standard (IP 67)
036 Foundry
Robot adapted for foundry or other harsh environments.
The robot has the FoundryPlus protection which means that the whole manipulator is
IP67 classified and steam washable. An excellent corrosion protection is obtained by a
special coating. The connectors are designed for severe environment, and bearings,
gears and other sensitive parts are highly protected.

PROCESS CABLE PACKAGE


For more information see chapter 1.8 DressPack for Material Handling.
Regarding DressPack for spot welding see Product Specification SpotPack.
2204 Material Handling from base to axis 3
Requires Communication Parallel or Bus option 2063/2064.
See Figure 25, and chapter1.8 DressPack for Material Handling and Table 2 - Table 6.
2205 Material Handling from axis 3 to axis 6
Requires Material Handling from base to axis 3 option 2204 and Communication
Parallel or Bus option 2063/2064.
See Figure 25, and chapter1.8 DressPack for Material Handling and Table 2 - Table 6.

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

37

Specification of Variants and Options


Communication
2063 Parallel
Includes customer power CP, customer signals CS and Air for MH-process cable
package.
2064 Bus
Includes CP, Air and CAN/DeviceNet, Interbus or Profibus for MH-process cable
package.
R1.SW1

R1.SW2/3

R3.FB7

R1.MP

R1.SMB

R1.PROC1 1 x 1/2

R1.CP/CS

Figure 26 Location of MH connections on the foot.

R2.CP/CS
R2.PROC1 1 x 1/2

R2.MP 5/6

Figure 27 Location of MH connections on axis 3.

38

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Specification of Variants and Options


Connection to
056 Manipulator
The signals are connected directly to the manipulator base to one heavy duty industrial
housing with a Harting modular connector R1.CP/CS, see Figure 26.
The cables from the manipulator base are not supplied.
057 Cabinet
The signals CP/CS are connected to 12-pole screw terminals, Phoenix
MSTB 2.5/12-ST-5.08, in the controller.
The cable between R1.CP/CS and the controller is supplied.
For information about the limited number of signals available,
see DressPack options on page 31.

Connection to cabinet (Cable lengths)


Parallel/CANDeviceNet/Interbus/Profibus
675/660/670/665 7m
676/661/671/666 15m
678/663/673/668 30m

EQUIPMENT
691 Safety lamp
A safety lamp with an orange fixed light can be mounted on the manipulator.
The lamp is active in MOTORS ON mode.
The safety lamp is required on a UL/UR approved robot.
092 Fork lift device
Lifting device on the manipulator for fork-lift handling.
Note. When Cooling Fan for axis 1 motor unit is used, this must be disassembled in
order to use fork lift device.
087 Base plate
See chapter 1.3 Installation, for dimension drawing.
091 Brake release cover
A cover for the break release buttons.
113 Cooling fan for axis 1 motor (IP 54)
Cannot be combined with Cooling fan for axis 2 motor option 114.
For in use recommendations see 1.7 Cooling fan for axis 1-3 motor (options 113-115).
See Figure 28.
Not for protection Foundry.
114 Cooling fan for axis 2 motor (IP 54)
For in use recommendations see 1.7 Cooling fan for axis 1-3 motor (options 113-115).
Not for protection Foundry.
115 Cooling fan for axis 3 motor (IP 54)
For in use recommendations see 1.7 Cooling fan for axis 1-3 motor (options 113-115).
See Figure 28.
Not for protection Foundry.
Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

39

Specification of Variants and Options


088 Upper arm covers
Included in protection Foundry.
See Figure 29.

Option 115

Option 113

Figure 28 Cooling fan for axis 1 motor and axis 3 motor.

Option 088

Figure 29 Upper arm covers.

CONNECTION KITS
The connectors fit to the connectors at the manipulator base, axis 3 and 6 respectively.
The kit consists of connectors, pins and sockets.
2220 R1.CP/CS and PROC1
For the Customer Power/Customer Signal connector and one Process connector on the
manipulator base. Sockets for bus communication are included.
2221 R1.WELD and PROC2-4
For the Weld connector and three Process connectors on the manipulator base.
2222 R1.SW1 and SW2/3
For the position switch asis 1 connector and the position axis 2/3 connector on the
manipulator base.
40

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Specification of Variants and Options


2223 R3.FB7
For the 7-axis connector on the manipulator base.
2224 R2.CP/CS and PROC1
For the Customer Power/Customer Signal connector and one Process connector at
axis 3. Pins for bus communication are included.
2225 R2.WELD and PROC2-4
For the Weld connector and three Process connectors at axis 3.
2070 WELD and PROC1-4 axis 6
Weld connector and four Process connectors at axis 6, the manipulator side.

POSITION SWITCHES
Position switches indicating the position of the three main axes. Rails with separate
adjustable cams are attached to the manipulator. The cams, which have to be adapted
to the switch function by the user, can be mounted in any position in the working range
for each switch. No machining operation of the cams is necessary for the adaptation,
simple hand tools can be used.
For axis 1, there are three redundant position zones available, each with two
independent switches and cams. For axes 2 and 3, two redundant position zones are
available, each with two independent switches and cams.
For axis 1 it is possible to mount a second set of position switches, doubling the number
of redundant zones to six.
Each position zone consists of two switches mechanically operated by separate cams.
Each switch has one normally open and one normally closed contact. See Product
Specification S4Cplus.
The design and components fulfil the demands to be used as safety switches.
These options may require external safety arrangements, e.g. light curtains, photocells
or contact mats.
The switches can be connected either to the manipulator base (R1.SW1 and R1.SW2/
3, see Figure 26), or to the controller. In the controller the signals are connected to
screw terminal XT8 Phoenix MSTB 2.5/12-ST-5.08.
Switch type Balluff Multiple position switches BNS, according to EN 60947-5-1 and
EN 60947-5-2.
Connection to
075 Manipulator
Connection on the manipulator base with one/two FCI Sealok 32-pin connector.
076 Cabinet
Connected to 12-pole screw terminals, Phoenix MSTB 2.5/12-ST-5.08, in the
controller. Position switch cables are included.
Position switches axis 1
071 Three redundant position zones are available, each with two independent switches and
cams.

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

41

Specification of Variants and Options


Connection of signals axis 1 (cable lengths)
078 7m
079 15m
081 30m
072 Position switches axis 2
Two redundant position zones are available, each with two independent switches and
cams.
073 Position switches axis 3
Two redundant position zones are available, each with two independent switches and
cams.
Connection of signals axes 2 and 3 (cable lengths)
083 7m
084 15m
086 30m

WORKING RANGE LIMIT


To increase the safety of the robot, the working range of axes 1, 2 and 3 can be
restricted by extra mechanical stops.
Axis 1
061 Four stops, two which allow the working range to be restricted in increments of 7,5o.
062 Two stops which allow the working range to be restricted in increments of 15o.
063 Axis 2
Six stops which allow the working range to be restricted in increments of 15o at both
end positions. Each stop decreases the motion by 15o.
064 Axis 3
Six stops which allow the working range to be restricted in increments of 20o at both
end positions. Each stop decreases the motion by 20o.

42

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Accessories

3 Accessories
There is a range of tools and equipment available, specially designed for the robot.
Basic software and software options for robot and PC
For more information, see Product Specification S4Cplus, and Product Specification
RobotWare Options.
Robot Peripherals
- Track Motion
- Tool System
- Motor Units
- Spot welding system for transformer gun
Tools
Brake release box
Includes six brake release buttons and 24V battery unit which can be connected to
R1.BU on the manipulator frame. The brake release box can be ordered from
ABB Automation Technology Products AB, Robotics, department S.
Calibration Cube
This calibration tool can be ordered from ABB Automation Technology Products AB,
Robotics, department S.

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

43

Accessories

44

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Index

4 Index
A
accessories 43
Active Brake System 8
Active Safety System 7

motion 28
mounting
extra equipment 23
robot 11
mounting flange 26
N

noise level 4

Collision detection 8
colours 37
cooling device 4

E
Electronically Stabilised Path 8
emergency stop 9
enabling device 9
equipment
mounting 23
permitted extra load 23
F
fire safety 10
fork lift device 39
H
hold-to-run control 10
hole configuration 12
holes for mounting extra equipment 24
humidity 11

operating requirements 11
options 37
overspeed protection 8
P
Passive Safety System 8
payload 11
position switches 41
protection 37
protection standards 11
R
range of movement 28
reduced speed 9
Robot Peripherals 43
robot versions 4
S

lifting device 39
load 11
load diagrams 15

safeguarded space stop 10


delayed 10
safety 7
Safety category 3 9
safety lamp 10, 39
Self Tuning Performance 8
service 27
Service Information System 7
space requirements 4
standards 7
structure 3

maintenance 27
manipulator colour 37
mechanical interface 26

temperature 11
troubleshooting 27

I
installation 11
Internal Safety Concept 9
L

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

45

Index

V
variants 37
W
weight 4
working space
restricting 8, 11, 42
Z
zone switches 9

46

Product Specification IRB 7600 M2000

Product Specification S4Cplus


CONTENTS
Page
1 Description ....................................................................................................................... 3
1.1 Structure.................................................................................................................. 3
1.2 Safety/Standards ..................................................................................................... 5
1.3 Operation ................................................................................................................ 7
Operators panel ..................................................................................................... 9
1.4 Memory .................................................................................................................. 11
Available memory .................................................................................................. 11
1.5 Installation .............................................................................................................. 12
Operating requirements.......................................................................................... 12
Power supply.......................................................................................................... 12
Configuration ......................................................................................................... 13
1.6 Programming .......................................................................................................... 13
Movements............................................................................................................. 14
Program management ............................................................................................ 14
Editing programs.................................................................................................... 15
Testing programs.................................................................................................... 15
1.7 Automatic Operation .............................................................................................. 15
1.8 The RAPID Language and Environment................................................................ 16
1.9 Exception handling ................................................................................................. 17
1.10 Maintenance and Troubleshooting ....................................................................... 17
1.11 Robot Motion........................................................................................................ 18
Motion concepts..................................................................................................... 18
Coordinate systems ................................................................................................ 18
Stationary TCP....................................................................................................... 20
Program execution ................................................................................................. 20
Jogging ................................................................................................................... 20
Singularity handling............................................................................................... 20
Motion Supervision................................................................................................ 20
External axes .......................................................................................................... 21
Big Inertia .............................................................................................................. 21
Soft Servo............................................................................................................... 21
1.12 External Axes ....................................................................................................... 21
1.13 I/O System ............................................................................................................ 23
Types of connection ............................................................................................... 24
ABB I/O units (node types) ................................................................................... 24
Distributed I/O ....................................................................................................... 25
Signal data.............................................................................................................. 26
Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Product Specification S4Cplus


System signals........................................................................................................
1.14 Communication ....................................................................................................
2 Specification of Variants and Options...........................................................................
3 Index.................................................................................................................................

27
29
31
51

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description

1 Description
1.1 Structure
The controller contains the electronics required to control the manipulator, external
axes and peripheral equipment.
The controller also contains the system software, i.e. the BaseWare OS (operating
system), which includes all basic functions for operation and programming.
Controller weight

250 kg

Controller volume:

950 x 800 x 620 mm

Airborne noise level:


The sound pressure level outside
the working space

< 70 dB (A) Leq (acc. to


Machinery directive 98/37/EEC)

Teach pendant

Operators panel

Mains switch

Disk drive

Figure 1 The controller is specifically designed to control robots, which means that optimal
performance and functionality is achieved.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description

Air distance to wall

200

200

800

Cabinet extension
800

Option 124

820
Extended cover

500

Option 123
250

950
980 *

Lifting points
for forklift

500

* Castor wheels, Option 126


71

52
623

Figure 2 View of the controller from the front, from above and from the side (dimensions in mm).

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description

1.2 Safety/Standards
The robot conforms to the following standards:
EN 292-1
Safety of machinery, terminology
EN 292-2
Safety of machinery, technical specifications
EN 954-1
Safety of machinery, safety related parts of control
systems
EN 60204
Electrical equipment of industrial machines
IEC 204-1
Electrical equipment of industrial machines
ISO 10218, EN 775
Manipulating industrial robots, safety
ANSI/RIA 15.06/1999
Industrial robots, safety requirements
ISO 9787
Manipulating industrial robots, coordinate systems
and motions
IEC 529
Degrees of protection provided by enclosures
EN 50081-2
EMC, Generic emission
EN 61000-6-2
EMC, Generic immunity
ANSI/UL 1740-1996 (option) Standard for Industrial Robots and Robotic
Equipment
CAN/CSA Z 434-94 (option) Industrial Robots and Robot Systems - General
Safety Requirements
The robot complies fully with the health and safety standards specified in the EECs
Machinery Directives.
The robot controller is designed with absolute safety in mind. It has a dedicated safety
system based on a two-channel circuit which is monitored continuously. If any
component fails, the electrical power supplied to the motors shuts off and the brakes engage.
Safety category 3
Malfunction of a single component, such as a sticking relay, will be detected at the next
MOTOR OFF/MOTOR ON operation. MOTOR ON is then prevented and the faulty
section is indicated. This complies with category 3 of EN 954-1, Safety of machinery
- safety related parts of control systems - Part 1.
Selecting the operating mode
The robot can be operated either manually or automatically. In manual mode, the robot
can only be operated via the teach pendant, i.e. not by any external equipment.
Reduced speed
In manual mode, the speed is limited to a maximum of 250 mm/s (600 inch/min.).
The speed limitation applies not only to the TCP (Tool Centre point), but to all parts of
the robot. It is also possible to monitor the speed of equipment mounted on the robot.
Three position enabling device
The enabling device on the teach pendant must be used to move the robot when in
manual mode. The enabling device consists of a switch with three positions, meaning
that all robot movements stop when either the enabling device is pushed fully in, or
when it is released completely. This makes the robot safer to operate.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description
Safe manual movement
The robot is moved using a joystick instead of the operator having to look at the teach
pendant to find the right key.
Over-speed protection
The speed of the robot is monitored by two independent computers.
Emergency stop
There is one emergency stop push button on the controller and another on the teach
pendant. Additional emergency stop buttons can be connected to the robots safety chain
circuit.
Safeguarded space stop
The controller has a number of electrical inputs which can be used to connect external
safety equipment, such as safety gates and light curtains. This allows the robots safety
functions to be activated both by peripheral equipment and by the robot itself.
Delayed safeguarded space stop
A delayed stop gives a smooth stop. The robot stops in the same way as at a normal
program stop with no deviation from the programmed path. After approx. 1 second the
power supplied to the motors shuts off.
Collision detection
In case an unexpected mechanical disturbance like a collision, electrode sticking, etc.
occurs, the robot will stop and slightly back off from its stop position.
Restricting the working space
The movement of each axis can be restricted using software limits.
There are safeguarded space stops for connection of limit switches to restrict the working
space.
For some robots the axes 1-3 can also be restricted by means of mechanical stops.
Hold-to-run control
Hold-to-run means that you must depress the start button in order to move the robot. When
the button is released the robot will stop. The hold-to-run function makes program testing
safer.
Fire safety
Both the manipulator and control system comply with ULs (Underwriters Laboratory)
tough requirements for fire safety.
Safety lamp
As an option, the robot can be equipped with a safety lamp mounted on the manipulator.
This is activated when the controller is in the MOTORS ON state.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description

1.3 Operation
All operations and programming can be carried out using the portable teach pendant
(see Figure 3) and operators panel (see Figure 5).
.

Hold-to-run
Menu keys

Motion keys

Display

P5
P4
7
4
1

Window
keys
1
2

P1

8
5
2
0

9
6
3

Joystick

Enabling
device

P2
P3

Function keys

Emergency stop
button
Navigation keys

Cable 10 m
Figure 3 The teach pendant is equipped with a large display, which displays prompts,
information, error messages and other information in plain English.

Information is presented on a display using windows, pull-down menus, dialogs and


function keys. No previous programming or computer experience is required to learn
how to operate the robot. All operations can be carried out from the teach pendant,
which means that an additional keyboard is not required. All information, including the
complete programming language, is in English or, if preferred, some other major
language. (Available languages, see options on page 35).
Display
Displays all information during programming, to change programs, etc.
16 text lines with 40 characters per line.
Motion keys
Select the type of movement when jogging.
Navigation keys
Used to move the cursor within a window on the display and enter data.
Menu keys
Display pull-down menus, see Figure 4.
Function keys
Select the commands used most often.
Window keys
Display one of the robots various windows.
These windows control a number of different functions:
- Jog (manual operation)
- Program, edit and test a program
- Manual input/output management
Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description
- File management
- System configuration
- Service and troubleshooting
- Automatic operation
User-defined keys (P1-P5)
Five user-defined keys that can be configured to set or reset an output (e.g. open/close
gripper) or to activate a system input.
Hold-to-run
A push button which must be pressed when running the program in manual mode with
full speed.
Enabling device
A push button which, when pressed halfway in, takes the system to MOTORS ON.
When the enabling device is released or pushed all the way in, the robot is taken to the
MOTORS OFF state.
Joystick
The joystick is used to jog (move) the robot manually; e.g. when programming the
robot.
Emergency stop button
The robot stops immediately when the button is pressed in.

Menu keys
File

Edit
View
1 Goto ...
Inputs/Outputs
2 Goto Top
3 Goto Bottom
Name
Value

I/O list

di1
di2
grip1
grip2
clamp3B
feeder
progno
1

1
0
1
0
1
1
13

Menu
4(6)

Line indicator

Cursor

Function keys

Figure 4 Window for manual operation of input and output signals.

Using the joystick, the robot can be manually jogged (moved). The user determines the
speed of this movement; large deflections of the joystick will move the robot quickly,
smaller deflections will move it more slowly.
The robot supports different user tasks, with dedicated windows for:
- Production
8

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description
- Programming
- System setup
- Service and installation
Operators panel

MOTORS ON button
and indicating lamp

Operating mode selector

Emergency stop
If pressed in,
pull to release

Duty time counter


Indicates the operating time for
the manipulator (released brakes)

MOTORS ON
Continuous light
Fast flashing light (4Hz)

= Ready for program execution


= The robot is not calibrated or the revolution counters
are not updated
Note: The motors have been switched on

Slow flashing light (1 Hz) = One of the safeguarded space stops is active
Note: The motors have been switched off

Operating mode selector


Using a key switch, the robot can be locked in two (or three)
different operating modes depending on chosen mode selector:

100%

Automatic mode

= Running production

Manual mode
at reduced speed

= Programming and setup


Max. speed 250 mm/s (600 inches/min.)

Optional:
Manual mode
= Testing at full program speed
at full speed
Equipped with this mode,
the robot is not approved
according to ANSI/UL

Figure 5 The operating mode is selected using the operators panel on the controller.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description
Both the operators panel and the teach pendant can be mounted externally, i.e.
separated from the cabinet. The robot can then be controlled from there.
The robot can be remotely controlled from a computer, PLC or from a customers panel,
using serial communication or digital system signals.
For more information on how to operate the robot, see the Users Guide.

10

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description
1.4 Memory
Available memory
The controller has two different memories:
- a fixed DRAM memory of size 32 MB, used as working memory
- a flash disk memory, standard 64 MB, used as mass memory. Optional 128 MB.
The DRAM memory is used for running the system software and the user programs and
it is thus divided into three areas:
- system software
- system software execution data
- user RAPID programs, about 5.5 MB, see Figure 6 (when installing different
options, the user program memory will decrease, at most by about 0.7 MB).
The flash disk is divided into four main areas:
- a base area of 5 MB, with permanent code for booting
- a release area of 20 MB, where all the code for a specific release is stored
- a system specific data area of 10 MB, where all the run time specific data
including the user program for a system is stored at backup
- a user mass memory area which can be used for storing RAPID programs, data,
logs etc.
The flash disk is used for backup, i.e. when a power failure occurs or at power off, all
the system specific data including the user program, see Figure 6, will be stored on the
flash disk and restored at power on. A backup power system (UPS) ensures the
automatic storage function.
DRAM memory
32 MB

Flash disk memory


64/128 MB
Boot 5 MB

System
soft ware

Release storage
20 MB

Data

User RAPID
program 5.5 MB

System data and


user program
10 MB
Power on restore

Power
off store

Mass memory area


available for
the user

Figure 6 Available memory.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

11

Description
Several different systems, i.e. process applications, may be installed at the same time
in the controller, of which one can be active. Each such application will occupy another
10 MB of the flash memory for system data. The release storage area will be in common
as long as the process applications are based on the same release. If two different
releases should be loaded, the release storage area must also be doubled.
For RAPID memory consumption, see RAPID Developers Manual. As an example, a
MoveL or MoveJ instruction consumes 236 bytes when the robtarget is stored in the
instruction (marked with *) and 168 bytes if a named robtarget is used. In the latter
case, the CONST declaration of the named robtarget consumes an additional 280 bytes.
Additional software options will reduce the available user program memory, most of
them however only marginally, i.e. the user program area will still be about 5.5 MB.
Only the SpotWare option will reduce memory significantly, i.e. down to about 4.8 MB
depending on the number of simultaneous welding guns.

1.5 Installation
The controller is delivered with a standard configuration for the corresponding
manipulator, and can be operated immediately after installation. Its configuration is
displayed in plain language and can easily be changed using the teach pendant.
Operating requirements
Protection standards
Controller electronics

IEC529
IP54

Explosive environments
The controller must not be located or operated in an explosive environment.
Ambient temperature
Controller during operation
with option 473
Controller during transportation and storage,
for short periods (not exceeding 24 hours)

+5oC (41oF) to +45oC (113oF)


+52oC (125oF)
-25oC (13oF) to +42oC (107oF)
up to +70oC (158oF)

Relative humidity
Transportation, storage and operation

Max. 95% at constant temperature

Vibration
Controller during transportation and storage
Bumps
Controller during transportation and storage

10-55 Hz:
55-150 Hz:

Max. 0.15 mm
Max. 20 m/s2

Max. 100 m/s2 (4-7 ms)

Power supply
Mains voltage

12

Mains voltage tolerance

200-600 V, 3p (3p + N for certain


options
+10%,-15%

Mains frequency

48.5 to 61.8 Hz

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description
Rated power:
IRB 140, 1400, 2400
IRB 340, 14001, 24001,4400, 6400, 940
IRB 6600
IRB 7600
External axes cabinet
Computer system backup capacity
at power interrupt

4.5 kVA (transformer size)


7.8 kVA (transformer size)
6 kVA
7.1 kVA
7.2 kVA (transformer size)
20 sec (rechargeable battery)

Configuration
The robot is very flexible and can, by using the teach pendant, easily be configured to
suit the needs of each user:
Authorisation
Most common I/O
Instruction pick list
Instruction builder
Operator dialogs
Language
Date and time
Power on sequence
EM stop sequence
Main start sequence
Program start sequence
Program stop sequence
Change program sequence
Working space
External axes
Brake delay time
I/O signal
Serial communication

Password protection for configuration and program


window
User-defined lists of I/O signals
User-defined set of instructions
User-defined instructions
Customised operator dialogs
All text on the teach pendant can be displayed in
several languages
Calendar support
Action taken when the power is switched on
Action taken at an emergency stop
Action taken when the program is
starting from the beginning
Action taken at program start
Action taken at program stop
Action taken when a new program is loaded
Working space limitations
Number, type, common drive unit, mechanical
units
Time before brakes are engaged
Logical names of boards and signals, I/O mapping,
cross connections, polarity, scaling, default value at
start up, interrupts, group I/O
Configuration

For a detailed description of the installation procedure, see the Product Manual Installation and Commissioning.

1.6 Programming
Programming the robot involves choosing instructions and arguments from lists of
appropriate alternatives. Users do not need to remember the format of instructions,
since they are prompted in plain English. See and pick is used instead of remember
and type.

1. Enlarged transformer for external axes


Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

13

Description
The programming environment can be easily customized using the teach pendant.
- Shop floor language can be used to name programs, signals, counters, etc.
- New instructions can be easily written.
- The most common instructions can be collected in easy-to-use pick lists.
- Positions, registers, tool data, or other data, can be created.
Programs, parts of programs and any modifications can be tested immediately without
having to translate (compile) the program.
Movements
A sequence of movements is programmed as a number of partial movements between
the positions to which you want the robot to move.
The end position of a movement is selected either by manually jogging the robot to the
desired position with the joystick, or by referring to a previously defined position.
The exact position can be defined (see Figure 7) as:
- a stop point, i.e. the robot reaches the programmed position
or
- a fly-by point, i.e. the robot passes close to the programmed position. The size
of the deviation is defined independently for the TCP, the tool orientation and
the external axes.
Stop point

Fly-by point
User-definable distance (in mm)

Figure 7 The fly-by point reduces the cycle time since the robot does not have to stop at
the programmed point. The path is speed independent.

The velocity may be specified in the following units:


- mm/s
- seconds (time it takes to reach the next programmed position)
- degrees/s (for reorientation of the tool or for rotation of an external axis)
Program management
For convenience, the programs can be named and stored in different directories.
The mass memory can also be used for program storage. These can then be
automatically downloaded using a program instruction. The complete program or parts
of programs can be transferred to/from the network or a diskette.
The program is stored as a normal PC text file, which means that it can be edited using
14

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description
a standard PC.
Editing programs
Programs can be edited using standard editing commands, i.e. cut-and-paste, copy,
delete, find and change, undo etc. Individual arguments in an instruction can also be
edited using these commands.
No reprogramming is necessary when processing left-hand and right-hand parts, since
the program can be mirrored in any plane.
A robot position can easily be changed either by
- jogging the robot with the joystick to a new position and then pressing the
ModPos key (this registers the new position)
or by
- entering or modifying numeric values.
To prevent unauthorised personnel from making program changes, passwords can be
used.
Testing programs
Several helpful functions can be used when testing programs. For example, it is
possible to
- start from any instruction
- execute an incomplete program
- run a single cycle
- execute forward/backward step-by-step
- simulate wait conditions
- temporarily reduce the speed
- change a position
- tune (displace) a position during program execution.
For more information, see the Users Guide and RAPID Reference Manual.

1.7 Automatic Operation


A dedicated production window with commands and information required by the
operator is automatically displayed during automatic operation.
The operation procedure can be customised to suit the robot installation by means of
user-defined operating dialogs.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

15

Description

Select program to run:

Front A Front B Front C

Other

Service

Figure 8 The operator dialogs can be easily customised.

A special input can be set to order the robot to go to a service position. After service,
the robot is ordered to return to the programmed path and continue program execution.
You can also create special routines that will be automatically executed when the power
is switched on, at program start and on other occasions. This allows you to customise
each installation and to make sure that the robot is started up in a controlled way.
The robot is equipped with absolute measurement, making it possible to operate the
robot directly when the power is switched on. For your convenience, the robot saves
the used path, program data and configuration parameters so that the program can be
easily restarted from where you left off. Digital outputs are also set automatically to the
value prior to the power failure.

1.8 The RAPID Language and Environment


The RAPID language is a well balanced combination of simplicity, flexibility and
powerfulness. It contains the following concepts:
- Hierarchical and modular program structure to support structured programming
and reuse.
- Routines can be Functions or Procedures.
- Local or global data and routines.
- Data typing, including structured and array data types.
- User defined names (shop floor language) on variables, routines and I/O.
- Extensive program flow control.
- Arithmetic and logical expressions.
- Interrupt handling.
- Error handling (for exception handling in general, see Exception handling).
- User defined instructions (appear as an inherent part of the system).
- Backward handler (user definition of how a procedure should behave when
stepping backwards).
- Many powerful built-in functions, e.g mathematics and robot specific.
- Unlimited language (no max. number of variables etc., only memory limited).
Windows based man machine interface with built-in RAPID support (e.g. user defined
pick lists).
16

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description
1.9 Exception handling
Many advanced features are available to make fast error recovery possible.
Characteristic is that the error recovery features are easy to adapt to a specific
installation in order to minimise down time. Examples:
- Error Handlers (automatic recovery often possible without stopping
production).
- Restart on Path.
- Power failure restart.
- Service routines.
- Error messages: plain text with remedy suggestions, user defined messages.
- Diagnostic tests.
- Event logging.

1.10 Maintenance and Troubleshooting


The controller requires only a minimum of maintenance during operation. It has been
designed to make it as easy to service as possible:
- The controller is enclosed, which means that the electronic circuitry is
protected when operating in a normal workshop environment.
- There is a supervision of temperature, fans and battery health.
The robot has several functions to provide efficient diagnostics and error reports:
- It performs a self-test when power on is set.
- Computer status LEDs and console (serial channel) for fault tracing support.
- Errors are indicated by a message displayed in plain language.
The message includes the reason for the fault and suggests recovery action.
- Faults and major events are logged and time-stamped. This makes it possible to
detect error chains and provides the background for any downtime. The log can
be read on the teach pendant display, stored in a file or printed on a printer.
- There are commands and service programs in RAPID to test units and
functions.
- LEDs on the panel unit indicate status of the safeguarded switches.
Most errors detected by the user program can also be reported to and handled by the
standard error system. Error messages and recovery procedures are displayed in plain
language.
For detailed information on maintenance procedures, see Maintenance section in the
Product Manual.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

17

Description

1.11 Robot Motion


Motion concepts
QuickMoveTM
The QuickMoveTM concept means that a self-optimizing motion control is used. The
robot automatically optimizes the servo parameters to achieve the best possible
performance throughout the cycle - based on load properties, location in working area,
velocity and direction of movement.
- No parameters have to be adjusted to achieve correct path, orientation and
velocity.
- Maximum acceleration is always obtained (acceleration can be reduced, e.g.
when handling fragile parts).
- The number of adjustments that have to be made to achieve the shortest possible
cycle time is minimized.
TrueMoveTM
The TrueMoveTM concept means that the programmed path is followed regardless of
the speed or operating mode even after an emergency stop, a safeguarded stop, a
process stop, a program stop or a power failure.
This very accurate path and speed is based on advanced dynamic modelling.
Coordinate systems
BaseWare includes a very powerful concept of multiple coordinate systems that
facilitates jogging, program adjustment, copying between robots, off-line
programming, sensor based applications, external axes co-ordination etc. Full support
for TCP (Tool Centre Point) attached to the robot or fixed in the cell (Stationary
TCP).

18

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description

Tool Centre Point (TCP)


Y

Tool coordinates
Z

Base coordinates

X
Y

Axis 3

Axis 2

Axis 3

X
Base coordinates

Axis 1

Axis 1

Y
Tool coordinates

Z
Tool Centre Point (TCP)

Z User
coordinates

Object
coordinates

Y
X

World coordinates
X
X
Figure 9 The coordinate systems, used to make jogging and off-line programming easier.

The world coordinate system defines a reference to the floor, which is the starting
point for the other coordinate systems. Using this coordinate system, it is possible to
relate the robot position to a fixed point in the workshop. The world coordinate system
is also very useful when two robots work together or when using a robot carrier.
The base coordinate system is attached to the base mounting surface of the robot.
The tool coordinate system specifies the tools centre point and orientation.
The user coordinate system specifies the position of a fixture or workpiece
manipulator.
The object coordinate system specifies how a workpiece is positioned in a fixture or
workpiece manipulator.
The coordinate systems can be programmed by specifying numeric values or jogging
the robot through a number of positions (the tool does not have to be removed).
Each position is specified in object coordinates with respect to the tools position and
orientation. This means that even if a tool is changed because it is damaged, the old
program can still be used, unchanged, by making a new definition of the tool.
If a fixture or workpiece is moved, only the user or object coordinate system has to be
redefined.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

19

Description
Stationary TCP
When the robot is holding a work object and working on a stationary tool, it is possible
to define a TCP for that tool. When that tool is active, the programmed path and speed
are related to the work object.
Program execution
The robot can move in any of the following ways:
- Joint motion (all axes move individually and reach
the programmed position at the same time).
- Linear motion (the TCP moves in a linear path).
- Circle motion (the TCP moves in a circular path).
Soft servo - allowing external forces to cause deviation from programmed position can be used as an alternative to mechanical compliance in grippers, where imperfection
in processed objects can occur.
If the location of a workpiece varies from time to time, the robot can find its position
by means of a digital sensor. The robot program can then be modified in order to adjust
the motion to the location of the part.
Jogging
The robot can be manually operated in any one of the following ways:
- Axis-by-axis, i.e. one axis at a time.
- Linearly, i.e. the TCP moves in a linear path (relative to one of the coordinate
systems mentioned above).
- Reoriented around the TCP.
It is possible to select the step size for incremental jogging. Incremental jogging can be
used to position the robot with high precision, since the robot moves a short distance
each time the joystick is moved.
During manual operation, the current position of the robot and the external axes can be
displayed on the teach pendant.
Singularity handling
The robot can pass through singular points in a controlled way, i.e. points where two
axes coincide.
Motion Supervision
The behaviour of the motion system is continuously monitored as regards position and
speed level to detect abnormal conditions and quickly stop the robot if something is not
OK. A further monitoring function, Collision Detection, is optional (see option Load
Identification and Collision Detection).

20

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description
External axes
Very flexible possibilities to configure external axes. Includes for instance high
performance coordination with robot movement and shared drive unit for several axes.
Big Inertia
One side effect of the dynamic model concept is that the system can handle very big
load inertias by automatically adapting the performance to a suitable level. For big,
flexible objects it is possible to optimise the servo tuning to minimise load oscillation.
Soft Servo
Any axis (also external) can be switched to soft servo mode, which means that it will
adopt a spring-like behaviour.

1.12 External Axes


The robot can control up to six external axes. These axes are programmed and moved
using the teach pendant in the same way as the robots axes.
The external axes can be grouped into mechanical units to facilitate, for example,
the handling of robot carriers, workpiece manipulators, etc.
The robot motion can be simultaneously coordinated with for example, a linear robot
carrier and a work piece positioner.
A mechanical unit can be activated or deactivated to make it safe when, for example,
manually changing a workpiece located on the unit. In order to reduce investment
costs, any axes that do not have to be active at the same time, can share the same drive
unit.
An external axis is an AC motor (IRB motor type or similar) controlled via a drive unit
mounted in the robot cabinet or in a separate enclosure. See Specification of Variants
and Options.
Resolver
Resolver supply

Connected directly to motor shaft


Transmitter type resolver
Voltage ratio 2:1 (rotor: stator)
5.0 V/4 kHz

Absolute position is accomplished by battery-backed resolver revolution counters in


the serial measurement board (SMB). The SMB is located close to the motor(s)
according to Figure 10.
For more information on how to install an external axis, see the Users Guide - External
Axes.
External axes for robot types IRB 4400 and IRB 6400X:
When more than one external axis is used, the drive units for external axis 2 and
upwards must be located in a separate cabinet as shown in Figure 10.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

21

Description
External axes for robot types IRB 140, IRB 1400, and IRB 2400:
When more than three external axes are used, the drive units for external axis 4 and
upwards must be located in a separate cabinet as shown in Figure 10.
External axes for robot types IRB 6600 and IRB 7600:
The drive units for all external axes must be located in a separate cabinet as shown in
Figure 10.
Not supplied on delivery

Motor channel
Serial signals for
measurement and
drive system

Single External Axes

SMB

Measurement
System 1

Not supplied on delivery

Multiple External Axes

SMB

alt.
Measurement
System 2
Drive System 2

ABB Drives

Figure 10 Outline diagram, external axes.

22

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description

1.13 I/O System


A distributed I/O system is used, based on the fieldbus standard CAN/DeviceNet. This
makes it possible to mount the I/O units either inside the cabinet or outside the cabinet
with a cable connecting the I/O unit to the cabinet.
Two independent CAN/DeviceNet buses allow various conditions of I/O handling.
Both channels can be operating as master or slave. One bus, CAN1, is operating with
fixed data rate, and the other, CAN2 (accessible by the software option I/O Plus), with
different data rates.
tap

thick/thin cable

S4Cplus

multiport-tap

trunk line

R
node

thick/thin cable

node
node

I/O CPU
node

Daisy chain

node
node

node

node
R = terminating resistor
short drop max. 6m each
Figure 11 Example of a general DeviceNet bus.

A number of different input and output units can be installed:


- Digital inputs and outputs.
- Analog inputs and outputs.
- Gateway (slave) for Allen-Bradley Remote I/O.
- Gateway (slave) for Interbus Slave.
- Gateway (slave) for Profibus DP Slave.
S4Cplus with the option I/O Plus can be configured for fieldbus units from other
suppliers. For more details see the Product Specification RobotWare Options.
The inputs and outputs can be configured to suit your installation:
- Each signal and unit can be given a name, e.g. gripper, feeder.
- I/O mapping (i.e. a physical connection for each signal).
- Polarity (active high or low).
- Cross connections.
- Up to 16 digital signals can be grouped together and used as if they were a
single signal when, for example, entering a bar code.
- Sophisticated error handling.
- Selectable trust level (i.e. what action to take when a unit is lost).
Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

23

Description
- Program controlled enabling/disabling of I/O units.
- Scaling of analog signals.
- Filtering.
- Polarity definition.
- Pulsing.
- TCP-proportional analog signal.
- Programmable delays.
- Simulated I/O (for forming cross connections or logical conditions without need
the for physical hardware).
- Accurate coordination with motion.
Signals can be assigned to special system functions, such as program start, so as to be
able to control the robot from an external panel or PLC.
The robot can function as a PLC by monitoring and controlling I/O signals:
- I/O instructions are executed concurrent to the robot motion.
- Inputs can be connected to trap routines. (When such an input is set, the
trap routine starts executing. Following this, normal program execution
resumes. In most cases, this will not have any visible effect on the robot motion,
i.e. if a limited number of instructions are executed in the trap routine.)
- Background programs (for monitoring signals, for example) can be
run in parallel with the actual robot program. Requires Multitasking option, see
Product Specification RobotWare.
Manual functions are available to:
- List all the signal values.
- Create your own list of your most important signals.
- Manually change the status of an output signal.
- Print signal information on a printer.
I/O signals can for some robots also be routed parallel or serial to connectors on the
upper arm of the robot.
Types of connection
The following types of connection are available:
- Screw terminals on the I/O units
- Industrial connectors on cabinet wall
- Distributed I/O-connections inside or on cabinet wall
For more detailed information, see Chapter 2, Specification of Variants and Options.
ABB I/O units (node types)
Several I/O units can be used. The following table shows the maximum number of
physical signals that can be used on each unit. Data rate is fixed at 500 Kbit/s.
24

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description

Digital

Analog

DSQC

Option
no.

In

Out

Digital I/O 24 VDC

328

20x

16

16

Internal/External1

Digital I/O 120 VAC

320

25x

16

16

Internal/External

Analog I/O

355

22x

AD Combi I/O

327

23x

16

16

Relay I/O

332

26x

16

16

Allen-Bradley
Remote I/O Slave

350

241

1282

128

Interbus Slave

351

242-285

642

64

Profibus DP Slave

352

243-287

1282

128

100

100

Type of unit

Simulated I/O3
Encoder interface
unit4
Encoder interface
unit5

354

244

377

249

Voltage
inputs

Voltage
output

3
2

Current
output

Power supply

Internal
Internal/External1
Internal/External1

30

30

1. The digital signals are supplied in groups, each group having 8 inputs or outputs.
2. To calculate the number of logical signals, add 2 status signals for Allen-Bradley Remote I/O unit and 1
for Interbus and Profibus DP.
3. A non physical I/O unit can be used to form cross connections and logical conditions without
physical wiring. No. of signals are to be configured. Some ProcessWares include SIM unit.
4. Dedicated for conveyor tracking only.
5. Only for PickMaster 4.0

Distributed I/O
The maximum number of logical signals is 1024 in total for the CAN/DeviceNet buses
(inputs or outputs, group I/O, analog and digital including field buses)
CAN1
Max. total no of units*
Data rate (fixed)
Max. total cable length
Cable type (not included)

CAN2 (option)

20 (including SIM units)


20
500 Kbit/s
125/250/500 Kbit/s.
100 m trunk + 39m drop
up to 500m
According to DeviceNet specification release 1.2

* Max. four units can be mounted inside the cabinet.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

25

Description
Signal data
Permitted customer 24 V DC load
Digital inputs
24 V DC

max. 7,5 A

(option 201/203)
Optically-isolated
Rated voltage:
24 V DC
Logical voltage levels: 1
15 to 35 V
0
-35 to 5 V
Input current at rated input voltage:
6 mA
Potential difference:
max. 500 V
Time delays:
hardware
515 ms
software
3 ms
Time variations:
2 ms

Digital outputs (option 201/203)


24 V DC
Optically-isolated, short-circuit protected, supply polarity protection
Voltage supply
19 to 35 V
Rated voltage
24 V DC
Logical voltage levels: 1
18 to 34 V
0
<7V
Output current:
max. 0.5 A
Potential difference:
max. 500 V
Time delays:
hardware
1 ms
software
2 ms
Time variations:
2 ms
Relay outputs

Digital inputs
120 V AC

26

(option 205)
Single pole relays with one make contact (normally open)
Rated voltage:
24 V DC, 120 VAC
Voltage range:
19 to 35 V DC
24 to 140 V AC
Output current:
max. 2 A
Potential difference:
max. 500V
Time intervals: hardware (set signal)
typical 13 ms
hardware (reset signal) typical 8 ms
software
4 ms
(option 204)
Optically isolated
Rated voltage
Input voltage range: 1
Input voltage range: 0
Input current (typical):
Time intervals: hardware
software

120 V AC
90 to 140 V AC
0 to 45 V AC
7.5 mA
20 ms
4 ms

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description
Digital outputs
120 V AC
(option 204)
Optically isolated, voltage spike protection
Rated voltage
120 V AC
Output current:
max. 1A/channel, 12 A
16 channels
or
max. 2A/channel, 10 A
16 channels
(56 A in 20 ms)
min. 30mA
Voltage range:
24 to 140 V AC
Potential difference:
max. 500 V
Off state leakage current:
max. 2mA rms
On state voltage drop:
max. 1.5 V
Time intervals: hardware
12 ms
software
4 ms
Analog inputs (option 202)
Voltage Input voltage:
+10 V
Input impedance:
>1 Mohm
Resolution:
0.61 mV (14 bits)
Accuracy:
+0.2% of input signal
Analog outputs

Analog outputs

(option 202)
VoltageOutput voltage:
Load impedance:
Resolution:
CurrentOutput current:
Load impedance:
Resolution:
Accuracy:

min.
min.

+10 V
2 kohm
2.44 mV (12 bits)
4-20 mA
800 ohm
4.88 A (12 bits)
+0.2% of output signal

(option 203)
Output voltage (galvanically isolated):
Load impedance:
min.
Resolution:
Accuracy:
Potential difference:
Time intervals: hardware
software

0 to +10 V
2 kohm
2.44 mV (12 bits)
25 mV 0.5% of output
voltage
max. 500 V
2.0 ms
4 ms

System signals
Signals can be assigned to special system functions. Several signals can be given the
same functionality.
Digital outputs

Motors on/off
Executes program
Error
Automatic mode
Emergency stop
Restart not possible
Run chain closed

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

27

Description
Digital inputs

Motors on/off
Starts program from where it is
Motors on and program start
Starts program from the beginning
Stops program
Stops program when the program cycle is ready
Stops program after current instruction
Executes trap routine without affecting status of stopped
regular program1
Loads and starts program from the beginning1
Resets error
Resets emergency stop
System reset

Analog output

TCP speed signal

1. Program can be decided when configuring the robot.

For more information on system signals, see Users Guide - System Parameters.

28

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Description

1.14 Communication
The controller has three serial channels for permanent use - two RS232 and one
RS422 Full duplex - which can be used for communication point to point with
printers, terminals, computers and other equipment. For temporary use, like service,
there are two more RS 232 channels.
The serial channels can be used at speeds up to 19,200 bit/s (max. 1 channel with speed
19,200 bit/s).
The controller has two Ethernet channels and both can be used at 10 Mbit/s or
100 Mbit/s. The communication speed is set automatically.

Temporary
Main CPU console
Ethernet 10 Mbit/s

Permanent
Ethernet or serial
Figure 12 Point-to-point communication.

The communication includes TCP/IP with intensive network configuration


possibilities like:
- DNS, DHCP etc. (including multiple gateway)
- Network file system accesses using FTP/NFS client and FTP server
- Control and/or monitoring of controllers with RAP protocol makes it possible
to use OPC, ActiveX, and other APIs for integration with Window applications
- Boot/upgrading of controller software via the network or a portable PC.

Figure 13 Network (LAN) communication.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

29

Description

30

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Specification of Variants and Options

2 Specification of Variants and Options


The different variants and options for the controller are described below.
The same numbers are used here as in the Specification form.
For manipulator options, see Product Specification respectively, and for software
options, see Product Specification RobotWare Options.

1 SAFETY STANDARDS
EU - Electromagnetic Compatibility
693 The controller complies with the European Union Directive Electromagnetic
Compatibility 89/336/EEC. This option is required by law for end users in the
European Union.

UNDERWRITERS LABORATORY
695 UL/CSA
The robot is certified by Underwriters Laboratory to comply with the Safety Standard
ANSI/UL 1740-1996 Industrial Robots and Robotic Equipment and
CAN/CSA Z 434-94.
UL/UR certification is required by law in some US states and Canada.
UL (UL/CSA) means certification of complete product and UR (UL recognized
Component) means certification of component or not complete product.
Safety lamp (691) Door interlock (145 or 142) Operating mode selector standard
2 modes (193) are mandatory.
Not with Cabinet height 950 mm no cover (122), Cabinet height 1200 mm (123),
Cabinet height 1750 mm (124), Cabinet variant Prepared for Arcitec (112), Mains
connection type CEE17 connector (132, 133), Service outlet type 230V Europe (412).
696 UR (UL Recognized)
The robot is certified by Underwriters Laboratory to comply with the Safety Standard
UL 1740 Industrial Robots and Robotic Equipment. UL/UR certification is required
by law in some US states and Canada. UL (UL listed) means certification of complete
product and UR (UL Recognized Component) means certification of component or not
complete product.
Safety lamp (691), Door interlock (145 or 142), Operating mode selector standard 2
modes (193) are mandatory.
Not with Cabinet variant Prepared for Arcitec (112), Mains connection type CEE17
connector (132, 133), Service outlet type 230V Europe (412).

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

31

Specification of Variants and Options


2 CONTROL SYSTEM
CABINET
Variant
111 Standard cabinet with upper cover.
112 Prepared for Arcitec
Rotary switch 80A (143) and Circuit breaker standard (147) and Arcitec 4.0 (556) are
mandatory.
Not with Wheels (126) or Mains connection type CEE17 connector (132, 133) or
6HSB (134) or Mains switch Flange disconnector (142) or Servo disconnector (144) or
UL (695) or UR (696).
Cabinet Height (wheels not included in height)
121 Standard cabinet 950 mm with upper cover.
122 Standard cabinet 950 mm without upper cover. To be used when cabinet extension is mounted
on top of the cabinet after delivery.
Not with Door interlock (145) or UL (695) or UR (696).
123 Standard cabinet with 250 mm extension. The height of the cover increases the available space
for external equipment that can be mounted inside the cabinet.
Not with UL (695).
124 Standard cabinet with 800 mm extension. The extension is mounted on top of the standard
cabinet. There is a mounting plate inside. (See Figure 14).
The cabinet extension is opened via a front door and it has no floor. The upper part of
the standard cabinet is therefore accessible.
Not with UL (695) and Servo disconnector (144).
20

665

9 (x4)

690

730

20
705
Figure 14 Mounting plate for mounting of equipment (dimensions in mm)

126 Cabinet on wheels. Increase the height by 30 mm.


Not with Prepared for Arcitec (112).
32

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Specification of Variants and Options


OPERATORS PANEL
The operators panel and teach pendant holder can be installed in different ways.
181 Standard, i.e. on the front of the cabinet.
182 External, i.e. in a separate operators unit. (See Figure 15 for required preparation)
All necessary cabling, including flange, connectors, sealing strips, screws, etc., is
supplied.
External enclosure is not supplied.
183 External, mounted in a box. (See Figure 16)

M4 (x4)
M8 (x4)
o

45

Required depth 200 mm

196

193

180 224 240

223

70

62
140

96
Holes for
flange

184
200
Holes for
operators panel

External panel enclosure


(not supplied)

Holes for
teach pendant holder

Teach pendant
connection

Connection to
the controller

90

5 (x2)

155

Figure 15 Required preparation of external panel enclosure (all dimensions in mm).

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

33

Specification of Variants and Options

M5 (x4) for fastening of box

337

Connection flange
370
Figure 16 Operators panel mounted in a box (all dimensions in mm).

OPERATORS PANEL CABLE


185 15 m
186 22 m
187 30 m

DOOR KEYS
461
462
463
464
466

Standard
Doppelbart
Square outside 7 mm
EMKA DB
Locking cylinder 3524

OPERATING MODE SELECTOR


193 Standard, 2 modes: manual and automatic.
191 Standard, 3 modes: manual, manual full speed and automatic.
Does not comply with UL and UR safety standards.

CONTROLLER COOLING
472 Ambient temperature up to 45oC (113oF)
Standard design. The computer unit is provided with a passive heat exchanger (cooling
fins on the rear part of the box).
473 Ambient temperature up to 52oC (125oF)
The computer unit is provided with an active Peltier cooling equipment (replaces the
cooling fins from option 472.

34

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Specification of Variants and Options


TEACH PENDANT
601 Teach pendant with back lighting, connection cable 10 m.
Teach pendant language:
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618
619
620
621
622

English
Swedish
German
French
Spanish
Portuguese
Danish
Italian
Dutch
Japanese
Czech
Finnish
Extension cable for the teach pendant:

606 10 m
An extension cable can be connected between the controller and the teach pendant.
The total length of cable between the controller and the teach pendant should not
exceed 30 m.
Note that the length of the optional operators panel cable must be included in the
limitation.
607 20 m

MAINS VOLTAGE
The control system can be connected to a rated voltage of between 200 V and 600 V,
3-phase and protective earthing. A voltage fluctuation of +10% to -15% is permissible.
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158

200V
220V
400V
440V
475V
500V
525V
600V
For all robots except for IRB 6600/7600 the voltage range must be specified. This gives
the possibility to select between three different transformers.

162 Voltage range 200, 220, 400, 440V


163 Voltage range 400, 440, 475, 500V
164 Voltage range 475, 500, 525, 600V
The robots IRB 7600 (all versions) and IRB 6650-125/3.2 are supplied with an external
transformer, see Figure 17, except for the option 155. The mains voltage 475V does not
need any drive system transformer.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

35

Specification of Variants and Options

560

300

398

Figure 17 Transformer unit (dimensions in mm).

MAINS CONNECTION TYPE


The power is connected either inside the cabinet or to a connector on the cabinets left-hand side.
The cable is not supplied. If option 133-136 is chosen, the female connector (cable part) is
included.
131 Cable gland for inside connection. Diameter of cable:
11-12 mm.
132 CEE17-connector 32 A, 380-415 V, 3p + PE (see Figure 18).
Not with Flange disconnector (142) or UL/UR (695/696) or
Service outlet power supply (432).
Not available for IRB 6600/7600.
Figure 18 CEE male connector.

133 32 A, 380-415 V, 3p + N + PE (see Figure 18).


Not with Flange disconnector (142) or UL/UR (695/696).
Not available for IRB 6600/7600.
134 Connection via an industrial Harting 6HSB connector in
accordance with DIN 41640. 35 A, 600 V, 6p + PE (see Figure 19).
Cannot be combined with Flange disconnector (142).

Figure 19 DIN male connector.

MAINS SWITCH
141 Rotary switch 40 A in accordance with the standard in section 1.2 and IEC 337-1,
VDE 0113. Customer fuses for cable protection required.
142 Flange disconnector in accordance with the standard in section 1.2.
Includes door interlock for flange disconnector and a 20A circuit breaker with interrupt capacity
14 kA.
0058 Flange disconnector in accordance with the standard in section 1.2.
Includes door interlock for flange disconnector and a 20A circuit breaker with interrupt
36

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Specification of Variants and Options


143
144

145
147

capacity 65 kA at 400V, 25 kA at 600V.


Rotary switch 80 A. Customer fuses for cable protection required.
Included in the option Prepared for Arcitec (112).
Servo disconnector.
This option adds a rotary switch 40 A to the two contactors in the AC power supply for
the drive system. The handle can be locked by a padlock, e.g. in an off position.
Door interlock for rotary switch.
Included in the options UL/CSA/UR (695, 696) and Servo disconnector (144).
Circuit breaker for rotary switch. A 16A (option 163 and 164) or 25A
(option 162) circuit breaker for short circuit protection of mains cables in the
cabinet. Circuit breaker approved in accordance with IEC 898, VDE 0660.
Interrupt capacity 6 kA.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

37

Specification of Variants and Options


I/O INTERFACES
The standard cabinet can be equipped with up to four I/O units. For more details, see
page 23.
X6 (CAN 1.2) X7 (CAN 1.3)

X8 (CAN 2)

Base Connector Unit


DSQC 504
CAN 1
NS MS

Ph.5-Pol

X7
CAN 1.3

X10 SIO1

Test

9-Pol D-sub

X15 CAN 1.1

X12 PANEL BOARD

X20 DRIVE
SYSTEM 2

R
E
L

Ph.5-Pol

8-Pol

DB-44

9-Pol D-sub

X1 I/O COMPUTER

X11 CONSOLE

X9 SIO2

X15 (CAN 1.1)

Ph.5-Pol

15-Pol D-sub

9-Pol D-sub

X9 (COM3, RS422)

X8
CAN 2

Ph.5-Pol

X5 MEASUREMENT SYSTEM 2

X2 AXIS COMPUTER

X6
CAN 1.2

25-Pol D-sub

X10 (COM2, RS232)

CAN 2
NS MS

X4 MEASUREMENT SYSTEM 1

15-Pol D-sub

15-Pol D-sub

15-Pol
Female
FCI
X3 DRIVE SYSTEM 1

X14 EXPANSION BOARD

15-Pol
Male
FCI

25-Pol D-sub

X13 POWER SUPPLY

Cabinet view from above


I/O Units (X4)

Computer system
(COM1, RS232)
XT 31
(24V I/O)

Panel Unit
WARNING
DSQC 509

Manipulator connections

X1-X4
Safety Signals

115/230 VAC

REMOVE JUMPERS BEFORE CONNECTING


ANY EXTERNAL EQUIPMENT
EN

MS NS

ES1 ES2 GS1 GS2 AS1 AS2

X3 X1-X4
CUSTOMER
CONNECTIONS

X1

X2

X4

POWER UNIT / POWER CONTROL


X5
X8
1

XP5

XP58

X9, BASE CONN UNIT

XP6

RL2

X7, TEACH PENDANT

XT21

Connection to
Position switches

X6, CONTROL PANEL

RL1

XP8

Connection to
Customer power
Customer signals
Figure 20 I/O unit and screw terminal locations.

38

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Specification of Variants and Options


201 Digital 24 VDC I/O: 16 inputs/16 outputs.
202 Analog I/O: 4 inputs/4 outputs.
203 AD Combi I/O: 16 digital inputs/16 digital outputs and 2 analog outputs (0-10V).
204 Digital 120 VAC I/O 16 inputs/16 outputs.
205 Digital I/O with relay outputs: 16 inputs/16 outputs.
Relay outputs to be used when more current or voltage is required from the digital
outputs. The inputs are not separated by relays.
Connection of I/O
251 Internal connection (options 201-204, 221-224, 231-234, 251-254, 261-264)
The signals are connected directly to screw terminals on the I/O units in the upper part
of the cabinet (see Figure 20).
252 External connection
The signals are connected via 64-pole standard industrial connector in accordance
with DIN 43652. The connector is located on the left-hand side of the controller.
Corresponding customer part is included.
208 Prepared for 4 I/O units
The internal CAN/Devicenet cabling to the I/O units exists in two versions, one for up
to two I/O units and one for up to four I/O units. The versions are selected to match
the number of ordered I/O units. By this option it is possible to get the four unit version
even if less than three I/O units are ordered.

SAFETY SIGNALS
206 Internal connection
The signals are connected directly to screw terminals in the upper part of the cabinet
(see Figure 20).
207 External connection
The signals are connected via 64-pole standard industrial connector in accordance
with DIN 43652. The connector is located on the left-hand side of the controller.
Corresponding customer part is included.

FIELD BUS AND COMMUNICATION


245 CAN/DeviceNet
Connection on the left side to two 5-pole female connectors in accordance with ANSI.
(Male connectors are supplied).
240 LAN/Ethernet
RJ45 connector to be used for LAN connector.
(When the connector is not used, a protective hood covers it).
246 Profibus DP Master/Slave
The hardware of the Profibus-DP field bus consists of a master/slave unit, DSQC
510, and distributed I/O units, called slave units. The DSQC 510 unit is mounted in
the S4Cplus computer system where it is connected to the PCI bus while the slave
units are attached to the field bus network.
Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

39

Specification of Variants and Options


The slave units can be I/O units with digital and/or analogue signals. They are all
controlled via the master part of the DSQC 510 unit.
The slave part of the DSQC 510 is normally controlled by an external master on a
separate Profibus-DP network. This network is a different one than the network
holding the slave units for the master part of the board. The slave part is a digital input
and output I/O unit with up to 512 digital input and 512 digital output signals.
The signals are connected to the board front (two 9-pole D-sub). 19 units (internal or
external) can be connected to the cabinet.
Profibus DP M/S CFG Tool (option 270) is
required when setting up the master part or when changing the number of signals for
the slave part. For more information see Product Specification RobotWare Options.
247/248 Interbus Master/Slave
The hardware of the Interbus field bus consists of a Master/Slave unit (DSQC512/529)
and distributed I/O units. The master and the slave units are two separate boards
connected by a flat cable. The DSQC512/529 unit is connected to the S4Cplus robot
controller PCI bus while the I/O units are attached to the field bus net.
The I/O units may be digital or analog modules. They are all controlled by the master
part of the DSQC512/529 unit.
The slave part of the DSQC512/529 unit is normally controlled by an external master
on a separate Interbus network. This network is a different one than the network hold
ing the I/O units for the master part of the board. The slave part is a digital in- and out
put I/O unit with up to 160 digital in- and 160 digital out signals.
Two variants are available:
247 for optical fibre connection (DSQC512)
248 for copper wire connection (DSQC529)
Interbus M/S CFG Tool (option 271) is required when setting up the master part or
when changing the number of signals for the slave part. For more information see
Product Specification RobotWare Options.

GATEWAY UNITS
For more details, see I/O System on page 23.
241 Allen-Bradley Remote I/O
Up to 128 digital inputs and outputs, in groups of 32, can be transferred serially to a
PLC equipped with an Allen Bradley 1771 RIO node adapter. The unit reduces the
number of I/O units that can be mounted in cabinet by one. The field bus cables are
connected directly to the A-B Remote I/O unit in the upper part of the cabinet (see
Figure 20). Connectors Phoenix MSTB 2.5/xx-ST-5.08 or equivalent are included.
242 Interbus Slave
Up to 64 digital inputs and 64 digital outputs can be transferred serially to a PLC
equipped with an InterBus interface. The unit reduces the number of I/O units that
can be mounted in the cabinet by one. The signals are connected directly to the
InterBus slave unit (two 9-pole D-sub) in the upper part of the cabinet.
40

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Specification of Variants and Options


243 Profibus DP Slave
Up to 128 digital inputs and 128 digital outputs can be transferred serially to a PLC
equipped with a Profibus DP interface. The unit reduces the number of I/O units that
can be mounted in the cabinet by one. The signals are connected directly to the
Profibus DP slave unit (one 9-pole D-sub) in the upper part of the cabinet.
244 Encoder interface unit for conveyor tracking (DSQC 354)
Conveyor Tracking, RobotWare option 540, is the function whereby the robot follows
a work object which is mounted on a moving conveyor. The encoder and
synchronization switch cables are connected directly to the encoder unit in the upper
part of the cabinet (see Figure 20). Screw connector is included.
This option is also required for the function Sensor Synch, RobotWare option 547.
249 Encoder interface unit for conveyor tracking (DSQC 377)
Only available for IRB 140 and IRB 340, required for PickMaster 4.0.
Physically similar to option 344.

EXTERNAL I/O UNITS


I/O units can be delivered separately. The units can then be mounted outside the cabinet
or in the cabinet extension. These are connected in a chain to a connector
(CAN 3 or CAN 2, see Figure 20) in the upper part of the cabinet. Connectors to the
I/O units and a connector to the cabinet (Phoenix MSTB 2.5/xx-ST-5.08), but no
cabling, is included. Dimensions according to Figure 21 and Figure 22.
For more details, see I/O System on page 23.
221 Digital I/O 24 V DC: 16 inputs/16 outputs.
222 Analog I/O.
223 AD Combi I/O: 16 digital inputs/16 digital outputs and 2 analog outputs (0-10V).
224 Digital I/O 120 V AC: 16 inputs/16 outputs.
225 Digital I/O with relay outputs: 16 inputs/16 outputs.

EXTERNAL GATEWAY UNITS


231 Allen Bradley Remote I/O
232 Interbus Slave
233 Profibus DP Slave
234 Encoder interface unit DSQC 354 for conveyor tracking
235 Encoder interface unit DSQC 377 for conveyor tracking (IRB 140 and IRB 340 only)

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

41

Specification of Variants and Options

EN 50022 mounting rail

195

203

49

Figure 21 Dimensions for units 221-225.

EN 50022 mounting rail

170

49

115
Figure 22 Dimension for units 231-234.

EXTERNAL AXES IN ROBOT CABINET


(not available for IRB 340, IRB 6400PE, IRB 6600, IRB 7600)
It is possible to equip the controller with drives for external axes. The motors are
connected to a standard industrial 64-pin female connector, in accordance with DIN
43652, on the left-hand side of the cabinet. (Male connector is also supplied.)
391 Drive unit C
The drive unit is part of the DC-link. Recommended motor type see Figure 23.
Not available for IRB 640.
392 Drive unit T
The drive unit is part of the DC-link. Recommended motor type see Figure 23.
Not available for IRB 640, 6400R.
397 Drive unit U
The drive unit is part of the DC-link. Recommended motor types see Figure 23.
Not available for IRB 4400, 6400S, 6400PE, 640.
For IRB 140, 1400 and 2400 the option consists of a larger transformer, DC link DC4U
with integrated U drive unit and one extra axis computer with its connection board.
42

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Specification of Variants and Options


No cabling from the drive unit U to cabinet wall is included.
For IRB 6400R the option consists of a DC link DC4U with integrated U drive unit
with cabling to the cabinet wall.
393 Drive unit GT
A separate drive unit including two drives. Recommended motor type see Figure 23.
Not available for IRB 4400, 6400R, 6400S
396 Prepared for drives GT
The same as 393 but without the GT drive module. The preparation includes; larger
transformer, larger DC link DC2, and one additional axis computer with its connection
board.
Not available for IRB 4400, 640, 6400R, 6400S
398 Prepared for drives GT
The same as 396 but without additional axes computer and connection board.
399 Prepared for drives GU
The same as 396 but intended for a GU drive module. The preparation includes: larger
transformer, larger DC link DC4, and one additional axis computer with its connection
board.
Not available for IRB 4400, 640, 6400R, 6400S.
394 Drive unit T+GT
A combination of 392 and 393.
Not available for IRB 4400, 640, 6400R, 6400S
395 Drive unit C+GT
A combination of 391 and 393
Not available for IRB 4400, 640, 6400R, 6400S
365 Trackmotion
A special wiring for the three motor combination 394 (IRB 140, 1400, 2400 only) to
be used when axis 7 is intended for an ABB Trackmotion. The drive unit in the
DC link and the Trackmotion measurement board is then connected to the robot axes
computer 1 while the drive unit and the measurement board for motor 8 and 9 is
connected to axes computer 2. All motor power wiring is routed to one common
connector, XS7.
701-706 Servo gun interfacing (IRB 6400R, IRB 6600 and 7600)
For further information see the Product Specification IRB 6400R chapter Servo Gun
or IRB 6600 chapter Servo Gun (overview), and the Product Specification RobotWare
Options (function description).
701 Stationary gun (SG)
IRB 6400R
The option consists of an encapsulated Serial Measurement Board (SMB) and cabling
inside the controller.
The cabling between SMB and the controller is selected in the option range 686689.
Drive unit 397 is required.
IRB 6600/7600
The option includes cabling inside the controller and the manipulator, and a 7m
resolver cable between the manipulator and the welding gun pedestal. The customer
connector to this cable should be an 8-pin Burndy, wired according to Motor Unit
Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

43

Specification of Variants and Options


specification.
The cable between the controller DDU and the welding gun pedestal is selected in the
option range 686-687 (different lengths). The customer connector to this cable should
be of Industrial Multi-connector type, corresponding to the manipulator CP/CS (see
Product Specification IRB 6600/7600). Besides the necessary motor wiring, it also
contains 12 wires for gun I/O, accessible on screw terminals in the cabinet.
Drive unit 381 (DDU-V) must be selected.
702 Robot Gun (RG)
IRB 6400R
The option consists of an encapsulated SMB and cabling inside the controller.
It also includes bracket for 6400R foot mounting of the SMB box, and cabling between
the SMB box and the manipulator.
The cabling between SMB and the controller is selected in th option range 681-684.
Drive unit option 397 is required.
IRB 6600/7600
The option includes cabling inside the controller and the manipulator. The cable
between the controller and the manipulator is selected in the option range 697-699.
Besides the necessary motor wiring the cable also contains 22 wires for gun I/O and
CAN/DeviceNet fieldbus. The I/O wiring is accessible on screw terminals in the
cabinet.
Drive unit 381 (DDU-V) must be selected.
703 One SG and one RG
IRB 6400R
The option is a combination of 701 and 702. A distributed drive unit (DDU) controls
the SG motor.
The cabling between the SG SMB and the controller is selected in the option range
686-689, and the cabling between the RG SMB and the controller is selected in
the option range 681-684.
Drive unit options 397 (for the RG) and 380 (for the SG) are required.
IRB 6600/7600
The option includes cabling inside the controller and the manipulator. The cable
between the controller and the welding gun pedestal is selected in the option range
686-687. The customer connector to this cable should be of Industrial Multi-connector
type, corresponding to the manipulator CP/CS (see Product Specification IRB 6600/
7600). Besides the necessary motor wiring it also contains 12 wires for gun I/O,
accessible on screw terminals in the cabinet.
The cable between the controller and the manipulator is selected in the option range
697-699. Besides the necessary motor wiring the cable also contains 22 wires for gun
I/O and CAN/DeviceNet fieldbus.
The option also consists of an SMB box for two resolvers, a serial cable between the
box and the controller (the same length as 641-642), and two resolver cables, one 1.5m
for the RG and one 7m for the SG. The customer connector to the SG cable should be
an 8-pin Burndy, wired according to the Motor Unit specification. The SMB box
should be mounted close to the manipulator foot. Dimensions and mounting
information can be found in the Product Specification Motor Unit.
Drive unit 382 (DDU-VW) must be selected.
44

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Specification of Variants and Options


704 Twin SG
IRB 6400R
The option is a combination of two options 701. A distributed drive unit controls the
second SG motor.
The cabling between the SG SMBs and the controller is selected in the option range
686-689.
Drive unit options 397 (for one SG) and 380 (for the second SG) are required.
IRB 6600/7600
The option includes cabling inside the controller. The two cables between the
controller and the pedestals are selected in the option range 686-687.
Customer connectors to the cables should be of Industrial Multi-connector type,
corresponding to the manipulator CP/CS (see Product Specification IRB 6600/7600).
Besides the necessary motor wiring, the cables also contain 12 wires for gun I/O,
accessible on screw terminals in the cabinet (SG axis 7), or on the Multi
connector inside (SG axis 8) the DDU.
The option also consists of an SMB box for two resolvers, a serial cable between the
box and the controller (the same length as 686-687), and two 7m resolver cables. The
customer connector to the SG cable should be an 8-pin Burndy, wired according to the
Motor Unit specification.The SMB box should be mounted close to the manipulator
foot.
Dimensions and mounting information can be found in the product Specification
Motor Unit.
Drive unit 382 (DDU-VW) must be selected.
705 SG and Track Motion (T)
IRB 6400R
The option is a combination of 701 and a track motion IRBT 6002S controlled by a
distributed drive unit.
The cabling between the SG SMB and the controller is selected in the option range
686-689.
Drive unit options 397 (for the SG) and 380 (for the T) are required.
IRB 6600/7600
The option includes cabling inside the controller. The cable between the controller and
the welding gun pedestal is selected in the option range 686-687.
The customer connector to the cable should be of Industrial Multi-connector type,
corresponding to the manipulator CP/CS (see Product Specification IRB 6600/7600).
Besides the necessary motor wiring the cable also contains 12 wires for gun I/O,
accessible on screw terminals in the cabinet.
The resolver cable for the SG must be ordered together with the Track Motion.
The customer connector to the cable should be an 8-pin Burndy, wired according to the
Motor Unit specification.
The SMB box and the power cable between the controller and the Track Motion are
included in the Track Motion delivery. The serial measurement cable between the
controller and the Track Motion are included in option 705 (length according to 641642).
Drive unit 382 (DDU-VW) must be selected.
Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

45

Specification of Variants and Options


706 RG and T
IRB 6400R
The option is a combination of 702 and a track motion IRBT 6002S controlled by a
distributed drive unit.
The cabling between the RG SMB and the controller is selected in the option range
681-684.
Drive unit options 397 (for the SG) and 380 (for the T) are required.
IRB 6600/7600
The option includes cabling inside the controller. The RG cable between the controller
and Track Motion is selected in the option range 697-699 except for the track motor
cable which is included in the Track Motion delivery.
Besides the necessary motor wiring, the RG cable also contains 22 wires for gun I/O
and CAN/DeviceNet fieldbus.
The option also consists of a 1.5m resolver cable for the RG to be connected to the
Track Motion mounted SMB box.
Drive unit 382 (DDU-VW) must be selected.

EXTERNAL AXES MEASUREMENT BOARD


(not available for IRB 340, IRB 6400PE)
The resolvers can be connected to a serial measurement board outside the controller.
387 Serial measurement board as separate unit

EXTERNAL AXES - SEPARATE CABINET


(not available for IRB 340, IRB 6400PE)
An external cabinet can be supplied when
there is not space enough in the standard cabinet.
The external cabinet is connected to one
Harting connector (cable length 7 m)
on the left-hand side of the robot controller.
Door interlock, mains connection, mains voltage
and mains filter according to the robot controller.
One transformer and one mains switch are included.
371/372
373
374
375

46

Drive unit GT, for 4 or 6 motors. Recommended motor types see Figure 23.
Drive unit ECB, for 3 or 6 motors. Recommended motor types see Figure 23.
Drive unit GT + ECB
Drive unit GT + GT + ECB

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Specification of Variants and Options

Drive unit
identity

Motor max
current Arms

Drive unit rated


current Arms

Suitable motor
type

11.5-57

30

XL

5.5-26

14.5

XL

11 - 55A

24A

M, L

6 - 30A

16A

S, M, L

7.5-37

20

S, M, L, XL

4 - 19A

8,4A

S, M

2,5 - 11A

5A

1,5 - 7A

4A

Figure 23 Motor selection table. Motor types according to external axes Motor Unit.

380 Drive unit DDU-U


A separate box (H=500mm W=300mm D=250mm)
including a DC link DC4 and a drive unit GU where
the U part is used (the G part is not connected).
The DDU-U is operated from an additional axis computor,
included in the option.
DDU-U is mainly intended for Servo Gun solutions
according to options 703-706 and is available for IRB 4400
and 6400R.
381 Drive unit DDU-V
(IRB 6600/7600)
382 Drive unit DDU-VW (IRB 6600/7600)
383 Drive unit DDU-W
(IRB 6600/7600)
A separate box (H=500mm, W=300mm, D=250mm) including a DC link DC5
and a drive unit VW.
The box has 4 keyholes on the back of the encapsulation for fastening.
Connection cabling (length 5m) to the controller is included.
The DDU-VW is operated from an additional axis computer
included in the option, while the DDU-V and -W are operated
from the basic robot axes computer.
The options also include appropriate cabling inside the
manipulator for different resolver configurations, see
Product Specification IRB 6600, chapter Servo Gun.
E.g. 7 axes applications utilise the built in 7 resolver SMB.
The DDU-V and VW are mainly intended for Servo Gun
solutions according to options 701-706.
The DDU-W is intended for a Track Motion without
Servo Gun.

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

47

Specification of Variants and Options


EQUIPMENTManipulator cable, external connectors
653 Standard
Cable length
641
642
643
644
649

7m
15 m, not available for IRB 140
22 m, not available for IRB 140
30 m, not available for IRB 140
3 m, only available for IRB 140
Manipulator connection (only available for IRB 340)

657 External (not for the SA-version i.e. WashDown)


658 Internal
Protection for manipulator cable
845 Each unit length is 2 m. Totally 40 m protection can be specified.

SERVICE OUTLET
Any of the following standard outlets with protective earthing can be chosen for
maintenance purposes.
The maximum load permitted is 500 VA (max. 100 W can be installed inside the
cabinet).
411 120 V in accordance with American standard; single socket, Harvey Hubble.
412 230 V mains outlet in accordance with DIN VDE 0620; single socket suitable for
EU countries.

POWER SUPPLY (to the service outlet)


431 Connection from the main transformer.
The voltage is switched on/off by the mains switch on the front of the cabinet.
432 Connection before mains switch without transformer.
Note this only applies when the mains voltage is 400 V, three-phase with neutral
connection and a 230 V service socket.
Note! Connection before mains switch is not in compliance with some national
standards, NFPL 79 for example.

MEMORY
Removable mass memory
320 Floppy drive
The disk drive normally works well at temperatures up to 40oC (104oF). The disk drive

48

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Specification of Variants and Options


will not deteriorate at higher temperatures but there will be an increase in the number
of reading/writing problems as the temperature increases.
Extended mass memory
310 Flash disc 128 Mb. Standard is 64 Mb

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

49

Specification of Variants and Options

50

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Index

3 Index
A
absolute measurement 16
Allen-Bradley Remote I/O 23, 25, 40
analog signals 23, 27
automatic operation 15
B
backup
computer system backup 13
memory 11
base coordinate system 19
Big Inertia 21
bumps 12
C
cabinet wheels 32
CAN/DeviceNet 39
collision detection 6
communication 29
concurrent I/O 24
configuration 12, 13, 23
connection 48
mains supply 36
cooling device 3
coordinate systems 18
cross connections 23
cursor 7

event routine 16
explosive environments 12
extended memory 11
external axes 21
external panel 33
F
fire safety 6
flash disk memory 11
fly-by point 14
function keys 7
H
hold-to-run 8
hold-to-run control 6
humidity 12
I
I/O units 24
I/O-system 23
incremental jogging 20
inputs 23
installation 12
Interbus Slave 23, 25, 40
interrupt 24
J
jogging 20
joystick 8

diagnostics 17
digital signals 23, 26
display 7
distributed I/O 25

LAN/Ethernet 39
language 13
lighting
connection 48
teach pendant 35

E
editing
position 15
programs 15
emergency stop 6, 7
emergency stop button 8
enabling device 5, 8
display 7
Encoder interface unit 25, 41

M
mains supply 36
mains switch 36
mains voltage 35
maintenance 17
manipulator cable 48
length 48
protection 48

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

51

Index

mass memory 11
memory
backup 11
extended 11
flash disk 11
mass storage 11
RAM memory 11
menu keys 7
mirroring 15
motion 18
motion keys 7
motion performance 18
Motion Supervision 20
Multitasking 24
N
navigation keys 7
noise level 3
O
object coordinate system 19
operating mode 9
operating mode selector 9, 34
operating requirements 12
operation 7
operator dialogs 13
operators panel 9, 33
options 31
outputs 23
over-speed protection 6
P
password 13, 15
performance 18
PLC functionality 24
position
editing 15
execution 20
programming 14, 19
position fixed I/O 24
power supply 12
production window 15
Profibus 39
Profibus DP Slave 23, 25, 41
program
editing 15
testing 15
52

programming 13
protection standards 12
Q
QuickMove 18
R
RAPID Language 16
reduced speed 5
S
safe manual movements 6
safeguarded space stop 6
delayed 6
safety 5
safety lamp 6
serial communication 29
service 17
service outlets 48
signal data 26
singularity handling 20
Soft Servo 21
space requirements 3
standards 5
stationary TCP 20
stop point 14
structure 3
system signals 27
T
TCP 19
teach pendant 7
cable 35
language 35
lighting 35
temperature 12
testing programs 15
tool coordinate system 19
tools centre point 19
trap routines 24
troubleshooting 17
TrueMove 18
U
user coordinate system 19
user-defined keys 8
Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Index
V
variants 31
vibration 12
volume 3
W
window keys 7
windows 7
working space
restricting 6
world coordinate system 19

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

53

Index

54

Product Specification S4Cplus M2000/BaseWare OS 4.0

Product Specification
RobotWare Options
3HAC 9218-1/Rev.2
BaseWare OS 4.0

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a
commitment by ABB Automation Technology Products AB, Robotics. ABB Automation Technology
Products AB, Robotics assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
In no event shall ABB Automation Technology Products AB, Robotics be liable for incidental or
consequential damages arising from use of this document or of the software and hardware described
in this document.
This document and parts thereof must not be reproduced or copied without ABB Automation Technology Products AB, Robotics written permission, and contents thereof must not be imparted to a third
party nor be used for any unauthorized purpose. Contravention will be prosecuted.
Additional copies of this document may be obtained from ABB Automation Technology Products AB,
Robotics at its then current charge.

ABB Automation Technology Products AB


Robotics
Article number: 3HAC 9218-1 Rev.2
Issue: BaseWare OS 4.0
ABB Automation Technology Products AB, Robotics
SE-721 68 Vsters
Sweden

Product Specification RobotWare Options


CONTENTS
Page
1 Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 3
2 BaseWare Options ........................................................................................................... 5
[544] Absolute Accuracy ....................................................................................... 5
[541] Load Identification and Collision Detection (LidCode) .............................. 7
[542] ScreenViewer ............................................................................................... 9
[532] Multitasking ................................................................................................. 11
[531] Advanced Motion ......................................................................................... 12
[530] Advanced Functions ..................................................................................... 14
[537] Developers Function ................................................................................... 19
[558] Discrete Application ..................................................................................... 22
[540] Conveyor Tracking ....................................................................................... 23
[533] Electronically Linked Motors ....................................................................... 24
[547] Sensor Synchronization ................................................................................ 25
[539] Sensor Interface ............................................................................................ 26
[561] Servo Tool Control ....................................................................................... 27
[631] Servo Tool Change ....................................................................................... 29
[535] RAP Communication ................................................................................... 31
[543] Ethernet Services .......................................................................................... 32
[534] FactoryWare Interface .................................................................................. 33
[271] Interbus Configuration Tool ......................................................................... 34
[270] Profibus DP Configuration Tool ................................................................... 35
[538] I/O Plus ......................................................................................................... 36
3 ProcessWare..................................................................................................................... 37
[551] ArcWare ........................................................................................................ 37
[552] ArcWare Plus ................................................................................................ 40
[556] Arcitec .......................................................................................................... 41
[553] SpotWare ...................................................................................................... 42
[554] SpotWare Plus .............................................................................................. 44
[625] SpotWare Servo ............................................................................................ 46
[626] SpotWare Servo Plus .................................................................................... 49
[569] DispenseWare ............................................................................................... 51
[571] PalletWare .................................................................................................... 53
4 Index ................................................................................................................................. 57

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

Product Specification RobotWare Options

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

Introduction

1 Introduction
RobotWare is a family of software products from ABB Automation Technology
Product AB, Robotics, designed to make you more productive and lower your cost of
owning and operating a robot.
ABB Automation Technology Product AB, Robotics has invested many man-years
into the development of these products and they represent knowledge and experience
based on several thousand robot installations.
Within the RobotWare family there are three classes of products:
BaseWare OS - This is the operating system of the robot and constitutes the kernel of
the RobotWare family. BaseWare OS provides all the necessary features for
fundamental robot programming and operation. It is an inherent part of the robot but
can be provided separately for upgrading purposes.
For the description of BaseWare OS, see Product Specification S4Cplus.
BaseWare Options - These products are options that run on top of BaseWare OS of the
robot. They represent functionality for robot users that need additional functionality,
for example run multitasking, transfer information from file to robot, communicate
with a PC, perform advanced motion tasks etc.
ProcessWare - ProcessWare products are designed for specific process applications
like welding, gluing and painting. They are primarily designed to improve the process
result and to simplify installation and programming of applications. These products
also run on top of BaseWare OS.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

Introduction

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[544] Absolute Accuracy

2 BaseWare Options
[544] Absolute Accuracy
Absolute Accuracy (AbsAcc) is a calibration concept, which ensures a TCP absolute
accuracy of better than 1 mm in the entire working range.
The user is supplied with robot calibration data (error parameter file) and a certificate
that shows the performance (Birth Certificate).
The difference between an ideal robot and a real robot can be typically 8 mm, resulting
from mechanical tolerances and deflection in the robot structure. Absolute Accuracy
option is integrated in the controller algorithms for compensation of this difference,
and does not need external equipment or calculation.
Features
Compensation of mechanical tolerances.
Compensation of deflection due to load (tool, object and equipment on arm).
Applications
Any application where Absolute Accuracy is needed to facilitate:
- Exchangeability of robots
- Off-line programming with minimum touch-up.
- On-line programming with accurate linear movement as well as accurate
reorientation of tool
- Re-use of programs between applications
Controller algorithms
Inherent mechanical tolerances and deflection due to load in the robot structure
decrease the robots absolute accuracy. Practical compensation of such errors is a
complex and highly non-linear problem. The ABB solution is to compensate positions
internally in the controller, resulting in a defined and measurable robot TCP (Tool
Center Point) accuracy. A generic robot control model is used for each robot family and
robot individuals are described by a set of error parameters, generated during
calibration at ABB Automation Technology Products, Robotics. Accuracy of each
robot will be ascertained and verified through the Birth Certificate which statistically
describes the robot accuracy in a large sample of robot positions.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[544] Absolute Accuracy


Performance
Once the Absolute Accuracy parameter file is loaded and activated, the robot can be
used.
Absolute Accuracy is active in:
- Motion function based on robtarget (MoveJ, MoveL, MoveC and ModPos)
- Reorientation jogging
- Linear jogging (no online compensation as the user defines the physical
location, but absolute coordinates are determined for the active pose and shown
in jogging window)
- Tool definition (4, 5, 6 point tool definition, room fixed TCP, stationary tool)
- Workobject definition
Absolute Accuracy is inactive in:
- Motion function based on a jointtarget (MoveAbsJ). Independent joint
- Joint based jogging
- External axes
- Track motion
- Any feature not listed in Absolute Accuracy is active in
For joint based motions, switching to the jogging window and selecting a cartesian jog
mode (Linear, Reorient) will show the correct absolute coordinates. Similarly creation
of a robtarget at a point taught by joint based motion will be absolutely accurate.
Requirements
Each Absolute Accuracy robot is shipped with an error parameter file that is unique to
that robot. This file must be loaded into the controller and subsequently activated in
order to use Absolute Accuracy. Absolute Accuracy functionality may also be
deactivated. Both actions require a cabinet restart.
Supported robot types
Please contact your local ABB office in order to get the latest list of supported robot
types.
RAPID instructions included in this option
No specific RAPID instructions are included.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[541] Load Identification and Collision Detection (LidCode)

[541] Load Identification and Collision Detection (LidCode)


This option is available for the following robot families: IRB 140, IRB 1400,
IRB 2400, IRB 4400, IRB 6400 (not 640) IRB 7600 and for external manipulators IRBP-L,
IRBP-K, IRBP-R and IRBP-A.
Load identification is not available for the hanging variants of IRB 1400 and IRB 2400
robots.
LidCode contains two very useful features:
Load Identification
To manually calculate or measure the load parameters accurately can be very difficult
and time consuming. Operating a robot with inaccurate load parameters can have a
detrimental influence on cycle time and path accuracy.
With LidCode, the robot can carry out accurate identification of the complete load data
(mass, centre of gravity, and three inertia components). If applicable, tool load and
payload are handled separately.
The identification procedure consists of limited predefined movements of axes 3, 5 and
6 during approximately three minutes. The starting point of the identification motion
pattern can be chosen by the user so that collisions are avoided.
The accuracy achieved is normally better than 5%.
Collision Detection
Abnormal torque levels on any robot axis (not external axes) are detected and will
cause the robot to stop quickly and thereafter back off to relieve forces between the
robot and environment.
Tuning is normally not required, but the sensitivity can be changed from Rapid or
manually (the supervision can even be switched off completely). This may be
necessary when strong process forces are acting on the robot.
The sensitivity (with default tuning) is comparable to the mechanical alternative
(mechanical clutch) and in most cases much better. In addition, LidCode has the
advantages of no added stick-out and weight, no need for connection to the e-stop
circuit, no wear, the automatic backing off after collision and, finally, the adjustable
tuning.
Two system outputs reflect the activation and the trig status of the function.
RAPID instructions included in this option
MotionSup
ParIdRobValid

Changing the sensitivity of the collision detection or


activating/deactivating the function.
Checking that identification is available for a specific robot
type.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[541] Load Identification and Collision Detection (LidCode)


ParIdPosValid
LoadId
MechUnitLoad

Checking that the current position is OK for identification.


Performing identification.
Definition of payload for external mechanical units.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[542] ScreenViewer

[542] ScreenViewer
This option adds a user window to display user defined screens with advanced display
functions. The user window can be displayed at any time, regardless of the execution
state of the RAPID programs.
User defined screens
The user defined screens are composed of:
A fixed background with a size of 12 lines of 40 characters each. These characters
can be ASCII and/or horizontal or vertical strokes (for underlining, separating or
framing).
1 to 5 function keys.
1 to 4 pop-up menus containing from 1 to 10 choices.
1 to 30 display and input fields defined by:
- Their position and size.
- Their type (display, input).
- Their display format (integer, decimal, binary, hexadecimal, text).
- A possible boundary with minimum and maximum limits.
Example of a user defined screen. The ### represent the fields.
SpotTim
Program number: ###

PHASES
SQUEEZE
PREHEAT
COOLING
## HEAT
COLD
LASTCOLD
POSTHEAT
HOLD
Next

View

File

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

XT
##
##
##
##
##
##
##
##

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

CURENT (A)
START | END
|
####
|
| ####
####
|
|
|
####
| ####
|
Prev.

(Copy)

Heat stepper: ###


interpolated: ##
|
| Tolerance: ###%
| Force: ###daN
| Forge: ###daN
|
| Fire chck: ###
|
| Err allow: ###%
| Numb err: ###

Valid

Advanced Display functions


The user defined screens run independently of the RAPID programs.
Some events occur on a screen (new screen displayed, menu choice selected, function
key pressed, field modified, ...). A list of user screen commands can be associated with
any of these events, then when the event occurs, the command list will be executed.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[542] ScreenViewer
A screen event can occur
- When a new screen is displayed (to initialize the screen contents).
- After a chosen interval (to refresh a screen).
- When a menu choice or a function key is selected (to execute a specific action,
or change the screen).
- When a new value is entered in a field, or when a new field is selected (to execute some specific action).
The commands that can be executed on screen events are
- Reading/writing RAPID or I/O data.
- Reading/writing fields contents.
- Arithmetical (+, -, /, *, div) or logical (AND, OR, NOT, XOR) operations on the
data read.
- Comparing data read (=, <, >) and carrying out a command or not, depending
on the comparison result.
- Displaying a different screen.
Capacities
The user screens can be grouped in a screen package file under a specific name. Up to
8 packages can be loaded at the same time.
A certain amount of memory (approx. 50 kbytes) is reserved for loading these screen
packages.
- The screen package to be displayed is selected using the far right hand menu
View (which shows a list of the screen packages installed).
ScreenMaker
ScreenMaker is a complete tool for creating and editing screens for the ScreenViewer
on desktop computers running Windows 95/98 or Windows NT.
See ScreenMaker Product Specification.

10

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[532] Multitasking

[532] Multitasking
Up to 10 programs (tasks) can be executed in parallel with the normal robot program.
- These additional tasks start automatically at power on and will continue until
the robot is powered off, i.e. even when the main process has been stopped and
in manual mode.
- They are programmed using standard RAPID instructions, except for motion
instructions.
- They can be programmed to carry out various activities in manual or automatic
mode, and depending on whether or not the main process is running.
- Communication between tasks is carried out via I/O or global data.
- Priorities can be set between the processes.
Examples of applications:
- The robot is continuously monitoring certain signals even when the robot
program has stopped, thus taking over the job traditionally allocated to a PLC.
- An operator dialogue is required at the same time as the robot is doing, for
example, welding. By putting this operator dialogue into a background task, the
operator can specify input data for the next work cycle without having to stop
the robot.
- The robot is controlling a piece of external equipment in parallel with the
normal program execution.
Performance
When the various processes are programmed in the correct way, no performance
problems will normally occur:
- When the priorities for the various processes are correctly set, the normal
program execution of the robot will not be affected.
- Because monitoring is implemented via interrupts (instead of checking
conditions at regular intervals), processor time is required only when
something actually happens.
- All input and output signals are accessible for each process.
Note that the response time of Multitasking does not match that of a PLC. Multitasking
is primary intended for less demanding tasks. The normal response time is about 5 ms,
but in the worst cases, e.g. when the processor is computing new movements, it can be
up to 120 ms.
The available program memory can be divided up arbitrarily between the processes.
However, each process in addition to the main process will reduce the total memory,
see Product Specification S4Cplus.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

11

[531] Advanced Motion

[531] Advanced Motion


Contains functions that offer the following possibilities:
- Resetting the work area for an axis.
- Independent movements.
- Contour tracking.
- Coordinated motion with external manipulators.
Resetting the work area for an axis
The current position of a rotating axis can be adjusted a number of complete turns
without having to make any movements.
Examples of applications:
- When polishing, a large work area is sometimes needed on the robot axis 4 or
axis 6 in order to be able to carry out final polishing without stopping. Assume
that the axis has rotated 3 turns, for example. It can now be reset using this
function, without having to physically rotate it back again. Obviously this will
reduce cycle times.
- When arc welding, the work object is often fitted to a rotating external axis. If
this axis is rotated more than one turn during welding, the cycle time can be
reduced because it is not necessary to rotate the axis back between welding
cycles.
Coordinated motion with multi-axis manipulators
Coordinated motion with multi-axis manipulators or robot carriers (gantries) requires
the Advanced Motion option. Note that simultaneous coordination with several single
axis manipulators, e.g. track motion and workpiece manipulator, does not require
Advanced Motion.
Note! There is a built-in general method for defining the geometry for a manipulator
comprising two rotating axes (see Users Guide, Calibration). For other types of
manipulators/robot carriers, comprising up to six linear and/or rotating axes, a special
configuration file is needed. Please contact your nearest local ABB office.
Contour tracking
Path corrections can be made in the path coordinate system. These corrections will take
effect immediately, also during movement between two positions. The path corrections
must be entered from within the program. An interrupt or multitasking is therefore
required to activate the correction during motion.
Example of application:
- A sensor is used to define the robot input for path correction during motion.
The input can be defined via an analog input, a serial channel or similar.
Multitasking or interrupts are used to read this information at specific intervals.
Based on the input value, the path can then be adjusted.
12

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[531] Advanced Motion


Independent movements
A linear or rotating axis can be run independently of the other axes in the robot system.
The independent movement can be programmed as an absolute or relative position.
A continuous movement with a specific speed can also be programmed.
Examples of applications:
- A robot is working with two different stations (external axes). First, a work
object located at station 1 is welded. When this operation is completed, station
1 is moved to a position where it is easy to change the work object and at the
same time the robot welds the work object at station 2. Station 1 is moved
independently of the robots movement, which simplifies programming and
reduces the cycle time.
- The work object is located on an external axis that rotates continuously at a
constant speed. In the mean time, the robot sprays plasma, for example, on the
work object. When this is finished the work area is reset for the external axis in
order to shorten the cycle time.
Friction Compensation
During low speed (10-100 mm/s) cutting of fine profiles, in particular small circles, a
friction effect, typically in the form of approximately 0.5 mm bumps, can be noted.
Advanced Motion offers a possibility of compensating for these frictional effects.
Typically a 0.5 mm bump can be reduced to about 0.1 mm. This, however, requires
careful tuning of the friction level (see Users Guide for tuning procedure). Note that
even with careful tuning, there is no guarantee that perfect paths can always be
generated.
For the IRB 6400 family of robots, no significant effects can be expected by applying
Friction Compensation.
RAPID instructions and functions included in this option
IndReset
IndAMove
IndDMove
IndRMove
IndCMove
IndInpos
IndSpeed
CorrCon
CorrWrite
CorrRead
CorrDiscon
CorrClear

Resetting the work area for an axis


Running an axis independently to an absolute position
Running an axis independently for a specified distance
Running an axis independently to a position within one
revolution, without taking into consideration the number of turns
the axis had rotated earlier
Running an axis continuously in independent mode
Checking whether or not an independent axis has reached the
programmed position
Checking whether or not an independent axis has reached the
programmed speed
Activating path correction
Changing path correction
Read current path correction
Deactivating path correction
Removes all correction generators

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

13

[530] Advanced Functions

[530] Advanced Functions


Includes functions making the following possible:
- Information transfer via serial channels or files.
- Setting an output at a specific position.
- Checking signal value at a specific position.
- Executing a routine at a specific position.
- Defining forbidden areas within the robots working space.
- Automatic setting of output when the robot is in a user-defined area.
- Robot motion in an error handler or trap routine, e.g. during automatic error
handling.
- Cross connections with logical conditions.
- Interrupts from analog input or output signals.
Transferring information via serial channels
Data in the form of character strings, numeric values or binary information can be
transferred between the robot and other peripheral equipment, e.g. a PC, bar code
reader, or another robot. Information is transferred via an RS232 or RS485 serial
channel.
Examples of applications:
- Printout of production statistics on a printer connected to the robot.
- Reading part numbers from a bar code reader with a serial interface.
- Transferring data between the robot and a PC.
The transfer is controlled entirely from the robots work program. When it is required
to control the transfer from a PC, use the option RAP Communication or FactoryWare
Interface.
Data transfer via files
Data in the form of character strings, numerical values or binary information can be
written to or read from files on a diskette or other type of mass storage/memory.
Examples of applications:
- Storing production statistics on a diskette or flashdisk. This information can
then be read and processed by an ordinary PC.
- The robots production is controlled by a file. This file may have been created
in a PC, stored on a diskette, and read by the robot at a later time.

14

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[530] Advanced Functions


Fixed position output
The value of an output (digital, analog or a group of digitals) can be ordered to change
at a certain distance before or after a programmed position. The output will then change
at the same place every time, irrespective of the robots speed.
Consideration can also be given to time delays in the process equipment. By specifying
this time delay, the output is set at the corresponding time before the robot reaches the
specified position.
The distance can also be specified as a certain time before the programmed position.
This time (max. 500 ms) must be within the deceleration time when approaching that
position.
Examples of applications:
- Handling press work, to provide a safe signalling system between the robot and
the press, which will reduce cycle times. Just as the robot leaves the press, an
output is set that starts the press.
- Starting and finishing process equipment. When using this function, the start
will always occur at the same position irrespective of the speed. For dispensing
and sealing, see DispenseWare.
Fixed position IO check
The value of an input/output signal (digital, analog or group) can be checked at a certain
distance before or after a programmed position. The signal will then be checked at the
same place every time, irrespective of the robot's speed.
The distance can also be specified as a certain time (max 500 ms) before the
programmed position.
The data being checked is compared with a certain programmed value and if the
comparison is false, the robot will stop and an interrupt routine will be executed. In the
interrupt routine appropriate error handling can be executed.
Examples of applications:
- A robot is used for extraction of parts from a die casting machine. Before entering the machine the robot can check, in the fly, if the gate is open. If not, the
robot will stop and, in the interrupt routine, wait for the gate to open.
Fixed position procedure call
A procedure call can be carried out when the robot passes the middle of a corner zone.
The position will remain the same, irrespective of the robots speed.
Example of application:
- In the press example above, it may be necessary to check a number of logical
conditions before setting the output that starts the press. A procedure which
takes care of the complete press start operation is called at a position just outside
the press.
Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

15

[530] Advanced Functions


World Zones
A spherical, cylindrical or cubical volume can be defined within the working space.
When the robot reaches this volume it will either set an output or stop with the error
message Outside working range, both during program execution and when the robot
is jogged into this area. The areas, which are defined in the world coordinate system,
can be automatically activated at start-up or activated/deactivated from within the
program.
Examples of applications:
- A volume is defining the home position of the robot.
When the robot is started from a PLC, the PLC will check that the robot is
inside the home volume, i.e. the corresponding output is set.
- The volume is defining where peripheral equipment is located within the
working space of the robot.
This ensures that the robot cannot be moved into this volume.
- A robot is working inside a box.
By defining the outside of the box as a forbidden area, the robot cannot run into
the walls of the box.
- Handshaking between two robots both working in the same working space.
When one of the robots enters the common working space, it sets an output and
after that enters only when the corresponding output from the other robot is
reset.
Movements in interrupt routines and error handlers
This function makes it possible to temporarily interrupt a movement which is in
progress and then start a new movement which is independent of the first one. The
robot stores information about the original movement path which allows it to be
resumed later.
Examples of applications:
- Cleaning the welding gun when a welding fault occurs. When a welding fault
occurs, there is normally a jump to the programs error handler. The welding
movement in progress can be stored and the robot is ordered to the cleaning
position so that the nozzle can be cleaned. The welding process can then be
restarted, with the correct parameters, at the position where the welding fault
occurred. This is all automatic, without any need to call the operator. (This
requires options ArcWare or ArcWare Plus.)
- Via an input, the robot can be ordered to interrupt program execution and go to
a service position, for example. When program execution is later restarted
(manually or automatically) the robot resumes the interrupted movement.
Cross-connections with logical conditions
Logical conditions for digital input and output signals can be defined in the robots
system parameters using AND, OR and NOT. Functionality similar to that of a PLC
can be obtained in this way.

16

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[530] Advanced Functions


Example:
- Output 1 = Input 2 AND Output 5.
- Input 3 = Output 7 OR NOT Output 8.
Examples of applications:
- Program execution to be interrupted when both inputs 3 and 4 become high.
- A register is to be incremented when input 5 is set, but only when output 5=1
and input 3=0.
Interrupts from analog input or output signals
An interrupt can be generated if an analog input (or output) signal falls within or outside
a specified interval.
RAPID instructions and functions included in this option
Open
Close
Write
WriteBin
WriteStrBin
ReadNum
ReadStr
ReadBin
Rewind
WriteAnyBin
ReadAnyBin
ReadStrBin
ClearIOBuff
WZBoxDef
WZCylDef
WZLimSup
WZSphDef
WZDOSet
WZDisable
WZEnable
WZFree
StorePath
RestoPath
TriggC
TriggL
TriggJ
TriggIO
TriggEquip
TriggCheckIO
TriggInt
MoveCSync
MoveLSync

Opens a file or serial channel


Closes a file or serial channel
Writes to a character-based file or serial channel
Writes to a binary file or serial channel
Writes a string to a binary serial channel
Reads a number from a file or serial channel
Reads a string from a file or serial channel
Reads from a binary file or serial channel
Rewind file position
Write data to a binary serial channel or file
Read data from a binary serial channel or file
Read a string from a binary serial channel or file
Clear input buffer of a serial channel
Define a box shaped world zone
Define a cylinder shaped world zone
Activate world zone limit supervision
Define a sphere shaped world zone
Activate world zone to set digital output
Deactivate world zone supervision
Activate world zone supervision
Erase world zone supervision
Stores the path when an interrupt or error occurs
Restores the path after an interrupt/error
Position fix output/interrupt during circular movement
Position fix output/interrupt during linear movement
Position fix output/interrupt during joint movement
Definition of trigger conditions for one output
Definition of trigger conditions for process equipment with
time delay
Definition of trigger condition for check of signal value
Definition of trigger conditions for an interrupt
Position fix procedure call during circular movement
Position fix procedure call during linear movement

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

17

[530] Advanced Functions


MoveJSync
ISignalAI
ISignalAO

18

Position fix procedure call during joint movement


Interrupts from analog input signal
Interrupts from analog output signal

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[537] Developers Function

[537] Developers Function


This option is intended to be used by application developers requiring more advanced
functions than normally available for an end user. The package includes a detailed
reference manual on the RAPID language kernel and a number of instruction and
function groups useful for different application development as listed below.
The groups are:
- Bit Functions
- Data Search Functions
- RAPID Support Functions
- Power Failure Functions
- Trigg Functions
- File Operation Functions
RAPID Kernel Reference Manual
The manual describes the RAPID language syntax and semantics in detail concerning
the kernel, i.e. all general language elements which are not used to control robot or
other equipment. In addition to this the manual includes descriptions on:
- Built-in Routines
- Built-in Data Objects
- Built-in Objects
- Intertask Objects
- Text Files
- Storage allocation for RAPID objects
Bit Functions
This is a package for handling, i.e. setting, reading and clearing, individual bits in a
byte. The instructions/functions are:
byte
BitSet
BitClear
BitCheck
BitAnd
BitOr
BitXOr
BitNeg
BitLSh
BitRSh

Data type for a byte data


Set a specified bit in a byte
Clear a specified bit in a byte
Check if a specified bit in a byte is set
Logical bitwise AND operation on byte
Logical bitwise OR operation on byte
Logical bitwise XOR operation on byte
Logical bitwise NEGATION operation on byte
Logical bitwise LEFT SHIFT operation on byte
Logical bitwise RIGHT SHIFT operation on byte

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

19

[537] Developers Function


Data Search Functions
With these functions it is possible to search all data in a RAPID program, where the
name or the data type is given as a text string. This might be useful for instance in the
following examples:
- A common problem is to check if a data with a certain name is declared in the
system, and in such case what is its value, e.g.a robtarget
- Another problem is to list all variables of a certain datatype, which are declared
in the system, and write their values on the screen, e.g. all weld data.
The following instructions/functions are included in the package:
SetDataSearch

Define the search criteria

GetNextSym

Search next data and get its name as a string

GetDataVal

Get the value of a data, specified with a string for the name

SetDataVal

Set the value of a data, specified with a string for the name

RAPID Support Functions


This package includes a number of miscellaneous instructions etc., which are used in
application development.
User defined data typesThis will make it possible to create your own data types, like a
record definition

20

AliasIO

Instruction used to define a signal of any type with an alias


(alternative) name. The instruction can be used to make
generic modules work together with site specific I/O, without
changing the program code.

ArgName

Function used inside a routine to get the name of a data object,


which is referenced as argument in the call of the routine. The
name is given as a string. The function can also be used to convert the identifier of a data into a string.

BookErrNo

Instruction used to book a new RAPID system error number.


This should be used to avoid error number conflicts if different
generic modules are combined in a system.

TextTabGet

Function used to get the text table number of a user defined


text table during runtime.

TextGet

Function used to get a text string from the system text tables
(installed at cold start).

TextTabInstall

Instruction used to install a text table in the system.

TextTabFreeToUse

Function to test whether the text table name (text resource


string) is free to use.

IsSysId

Function used to test the system identity.

SetSysData

Instruction which will activates the specified system data (tool


or workobject). With this instruction it is possible to change
the current active tool or workobject.
Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[537] Developers Function


IsStopStateEvent

Function which will return information about the movement of


the Program Pointer (PP).

ReadCfgData

Read system configuration data.

WriteCfgData

Write system configuration data.

Power Failure Functions


The package is used to get I/O signal values before power failure and to reset them at
power on. The following instructions are included and are normally used in the power
on event routine:
PFIOResto

Restore the values of all digital output signals.

PFDOVal

Get the value of the specified digital output signal at the time
for power failure.

PFGOVal

Get the value of the specified digital output group at the time
for power failure.

PFRestart

Check if path has been interrupted.

Trigg Functions
TriggSpeed

Instruction to define conditions and actions for control of an


analog output signal with an output value proportional to the
actual TCP speed.
Note that this instruction must be used in combination with a
TriggL/C/J instruction (see [530] Advanced Functions).

StepBwdPath

Instruction used to move backward on its path in a RESTART


event routine.

TriggStopProc

Generation of restart data at program stop or emergency stop.

File Operation Functions


The package includes instructions and functions to work with directories and files on
mass memory like floppy disc, flash disc or hard disc. It can be used when creating
application packages, using RAPID, where RAPID programs and modules should be
loaded or stored. It can also be used to search for all files in different directories and
e.g. list them on the teach pendant.
The following instructions and functions are available:
dir
MakeDir
OpenDir
CloseDir
RemoveDir
ReadDir
RemoveFile
IsFile

Datatype for variables referencing a directory


Create a new directory
Open a directory to read the underlaying files or subdirectories
Close a directory
Delete a directory
Read next object in a directory, file or subdirectory
Delete a file
Check the type of a file

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

21

[537] Developers Function


FileSize
FSSize

22

Get the size of a file


Get the size of a file system

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[558] Discrete Application

[558] Discrete Application


Discrete Applications Platform (DAP) is a software platform for time critical
applications, where certain actions shall be performed at specific robot positions.
Target users are advanced application software engineers and system integrators, e.g.
for spot welding, drilling, measuring, quality control. The main advantages are
achieved in the following areas:
- Development time
- Program execution time.
- RAPID- program memory needed
- Similar look and feel between applications
- Tested kernel software
Features
Specialized RAPID instructions and datatypes.
A single instruction for motion and process execution.
Combination of fine point positioning with execution of up to 4 parallel processes.
Specialized process for monitoring of external process devices, like spot welding
controllers.
Supports encapsulation of the process and motion, in shell-routines provided to the
end-user.
The Advanced Functions option is included in DAP.
Application
Creation of software for advanced applications with a discrete behaviour, such as spot
welding, drilling, measuring, quality control.
Performance
C-code kernel and RAPID calls.
The DAP platform is designed to have an internal kernel, administrating the fast and
quality secured process sequence skeleton. The kernel calls RAPID routines, which are
prepared by the application writer to fulfil the specific tasks. The application developer
regulates the degree of flexibility of the end-user.
Requirements
There are no other requirements than S4CPlus cabinet and BaseWare.
Rapid instructions included in this option
See RAPID Discrete Application Platform Users Guide.

22

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[540] Conveyor Tracking

[540] Conveyor Tracking


Conveyor Tracking (also called Line Tracking) is the function whereby the robot
follows a work object which is mounted on a moving conveyor. While tracking the
conveyor, the programmed TCP speed relative to the work object will be maintained,
even when the conveyor speed is changing slowly.
Note that hardware components for measuring the conveyor position are also necessary
for this function. Please refer to the Product Specification for your robot.
Conveyor Tracking provides the following features:
- A conveyor can be defined as either linear or circular.
- It is possible to have four conveyors connected simultaneously and to switch
between tracking the one or the other.
- Up to 254 objects can reside in an object queue which can be manipulated by
RAPID instructions.
- It is possible to define a start window in which an object must be before tracking can start.
- A maximum tracking distance may be specified.
- If the robot is mounted on a parallel track motion, then the system can be configured such that the track will follow the conveyor and maintain the relative
position to the conveyor.
- Tracking of a conveyor can be activated on the fly, i.e. it is not necessary to
stop in a fine point.
Performance
At 150 mm/s constant conveyor speed, the TCP will stay within 2 mm of the path as
seen with no conveyor motion. When the robot is stationary relative to the conveyor,
the TCP will remain within 0.7 mm of the intended position.
These values are valid as long as the robot is within its dynamic limits with the added
conveyor motion and they require accurate conveyor calibration.
RAPID instructions included in this option
WaitWObj
DropWObj

Connects to a work object in the start window


Disconnects from the current object

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

23

[533] Electronically Linked Motors

[533] Electronically Linked Motors


This option is used to make master/slave configurations of motors, which are defined
as external axes. The main application is to replace mechanical driving shafts of Gantry
machines, but the option can be used to control any other set of motors as well.
Features
Up to 4 master motors.
Up to 11 motors total (masters and followers).
Jogging and calibration routines.
Replacement of mechanical driving shafts.
Arm/Motor position available on the TPU.
Possibility to activate/deactivate link during process.
Automatic calibration at startup.
Application
Gantry machines: to replace mechanical driving shafts.
Requirements
There are no software or hardware requirements for this option.
Performance
- When jogging, the electronically linked motors will follow the master motor
- Calibration running follower motors independent of the master - is performed
through a RAPID calibration program, to ensure high personnel safety
- At startup, a routine will automatically set the master- and follower motors at
the start position, through a safe maneuver
RAPID instruction included in this option
There are no RAPID instructions included in this option.

24

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[547]Sensor Synchronization

[547] Sensor Synchronization


Sensor Synchronization adjusts the robot speed to an external moving device (e.g. a
press or conveyor) with the help of a sensor. This option simplifies programming and
improves productivity of any loading /unloading application since it provides
automatic sensor status check and speed adjustment.
The robot TCP speed will be adjusted in correlation to the sensor output so that the
robot will reach the programmed robtargets at the same time as the external device
reaches their programmed positions. The synchronization is started/stopped with a new
instruction, SyncToSensor, combined with movement instructions (fine points or
corner zones).
Note that hardware components for measuring the sensor output are needed for this
function. The same hardware as for Conveyor Tracking is used: encoder and canbus
boards. Please refer to the Product Specification for your robot.
Features
Up to 4 sensors/robot.
On-the-fly activation.
Valid for any type of movement.
RAPID access to sensor and queue data.
Object queue: the same functionality as conveyor tracking.
Applications
Press synchronization
Side robotor Top_Robot (1 plane work robot NOFAC), paint application
Performance
The TCP will stay within 50ms delay of the teached sensor position with linear sensor
and constant sensor speed.
Rapid instructions included in this option
SyncToSensor
WaitSensor
DropSensor

Start/stop synchronization
Connect to an object in the start window
Disconnect from current object

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

25

[539] Sensor Interface

[539] Sensor Interface


The Sensor Interface option can be used to integrate sensor equipment for adaptive
control, like path correction or process tuning. The option includes a driver for serial
communication with the sensor system using a specific link protocol (RTP1) and a
specific application protocol (LTAPP). The communication link makes it easy to
exchange data between the robot controller and the sensor system, using predefined
numbers for different data like x,y,z offset values, gap between sheets, time stamp etc.
Features
Interrupt routines, based on sensor data changes.
Read/write sensor data from/to sensors using RAPID functions.
Store/retrieve sensor data as a block to/from a mass memory.
Seam tracking functionality, when combined with option Advanced Motion, based
on using the contour tracking (path correction) functionality.
Application
In any application where it is wanted to read/control a sensor during execution, and to
react on changes in certain data, like path offset or process supervisory data, thus
making adaptive seam tracking and process control possible.
Requirements
External sensors communicating with the robot controller via serial links.
RAPID instruction included in this option
IVarValue
ReadBlock
ReadVar
WriteBlock
WriteVar

26

Used to order and enable an interrupt when the value of a


variable accessed via the serial sensor interface has been
changed
Used to read a block of data from a device connected to the
serial sensor interface
Used to read a variable from a device connected to the serial
sensor interface
Used to write a block of data to a device connected to the serial
sensor interface
Used to write a variable to a device connected to the serial
sensor interface

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[561] Servo Tool Control

[561] Servo Tool Control


The Servo Tool Control is a general and flexible software platform for controlling an
integrated servo tool from S4CPlus. For additional features, like control of external
processes, or control of several ServoGuns in parallel, please refer to the option
SpotWare Servo.
Target users are advanced system integrators who want to develop customer specific
application software, such as spotwelding packages.
As a quick-start, the option includes an example code package. This package can be
used as a base for application development.
Features
Position control (gap).
Force control.
Dynamic and kinematic model (tool configured as external axis).
Example code package.
Application
Spot Welding with Servo Guns: The option provides advanced control functionality for
Servo Guns. Communication with Weld timers and other process control functionality
needs to be implemented outside this option. For a total spot welding package, please
refer to the option SpotWare Servo.
Performance
The tool is configured as an external axis, which ensures optimal performance,
regarding path following and speed. (Dynamic and kinematic model.)
The option Servo Tool Change can be added to the system in order to allow a switch
between two or more servo tool, which will then utilize the same drive unit and
measurement board.
Requirements
Motion parameter file
A specific servo tool parameter file has to be installed in the controller, for each
servo tool. The parameter file is optimized for each system, concerning system
behaviour and motion/process performance.
Drive Module & Measurement board
See Users Guide External Axes.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

27

[561] Servo Tool Control


Rapid instructions included in this option
STClose
STOpen
STCalib
STTune
STTuneReset
STIsClosed
STIsOpen
STCalcTorque
STCalcForce

28

Close a Servo Tool with a predefined force and thickness


Open a Servo Tool
Calibrate a Servo Tool
Tune motion parameters for a Servo Tool
Reset tuned motion parameters
Test if a Servo Tool is closed
Test if a Servo Tool is open
Calculate the motor torque for a Servo Tool
Calculate the programmable force for a Servo Tool

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[631] Servo Tool Change

[631] Servo Tool Change


Servo Tool Change enables an on-line change of tools (external axes), for a certain drive- and
measurement system. The control is switched between the axes by switching the motor cables
from one servo motor to another. The switch is performed on-line, during production.

The main advantages are:


- Flexibility in the production process
One robot handles several tools
- Minimized equipment
A single drive-measurement system shared by many tools
Features
On-line change of tools.
Up to 8 different tools.
Application
Servo gun changing; Robot held servo guns, designed for different reach and weld
forces, equipped with different brands and sizes of servo motors, may be held and
operated by a robot, switching from one servo gun to another.
Servo Tool Change can be used as an independent option, or as an addition to the
SpotWare Servo or Servo Toool Control options.
Requirements
Servo Tool Change requires a mechanical wrist interface, a Tool Changer.
A MOC service parameter, Disconnect deactive = YES (Types: Measurement
channel), must be set for each tool (external axis) used with this function.
Performance
When switching tools, the following steps are performed (switching from Axis 1 to
Axis 2):
- Axis 1 is deactivated using the RAPID instruction DeactUnit.
- Axis 1 is disconnected from the motor cables.
- Axis 2 is connected to the motor cables.
- Axis 2 is activated using RAPID instruction ActUnit.
After activation, Axis 2 is ready to run.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

29

[631] Servo Tool Change


The motor position at the moment of deactivation of one axis is saved and restored next
time the axis is activated. Note: The motor position must not change more than half a
motor revolution, when the axis is disconnected. In SpotWare Servo, there is a
calibration routine, which handles larger position changes.
RAPID instructions included in this option
There are no specific RAPID instructions included in this option.

30

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[535] RAP Communication

[535] RAP Communication


This option is required for all communication with a superior computer, where none of
the WebWare products are used. It includes the same functionality described for the
option Factory Ware Interface.
It also works for the WebWare products. There is no difference from the FactoryWare
Interface (except that the price is higher).
Note that both FactoryWare Interface and RAP Communication can be installed
simultaneously.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

31

[543] Ethernet Services

[543] Ethernet Services


FTP
This option includes the same functionality as described for Ethernet Services NFS
except that the protocol used for remote mounted disc functionality is FTP.
The aspect of authorization differs between NFS and FTP.
Examples of applications:
- All programs for the robot are stored in the PC. When a new part is to be
produced, i.e. a new program is to be loaded, the program can be read directly
from the hard disk of the PC. This is done by a manual command from the teach
pendant or an instruction in the program. If the option RAP Communication or
FactoryWare Interface is used, it can also be done by a command from the PC
(without using the ramdisk as intermediate storage).
- Several robots are connected to a PC via Ethernet. The control program and the
user programs for all the robots are stored on the PC. A software update or a
program backup can easily be executed from the PC.
NFS
Information in mass storage, e.g. the hard disk in a PC, can be read directly from the
robot using the NFS protocol. The robot control program can also be booted via
Ethernet instead of using diskettes. This requires Ethernet hardware in the robot.

32

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[534] FactoryWare Interface

[534] FactoryWare Interface


This option enables the robot system to communicate with a PC. FactoryWare Interface
serves as a run-time license for WebWare, i.e. the PC does not require any license
protection when executing a WebWare based application.
Factory Ware Interface includes the Robot Application Protocol (RAP). The Robot
Application Protocol is used for computer communication. The following functions are
supported:
- Start and stop program execution
- Transfer programs to/from the robot
- Transfer system parameters to/from the robot
- Transfer files to/from the robot
- Read the robot status
- Read and write data
- Read and write output signals
- Read input signals
- Read error messages
- Change robot mode
- Read logs
RAP communication is available both for serial links and network, as illustrated by the
figure below.
RAP
RPC (Remote Procedure Call)
TCP/IP
Standard protocols
SLIP

Ethernet

RS232/RS422
Examples of applications:
- Production is controlled from a superior computer. Information about the robot
status is displayed by the computer. Program execution is started and stopped
from the computer, etc.
- Transferring programs and parameters between the robot and a PC. When many
different programs are used in the robot, the computer helps in keeping track of
them and by doing back-ups.
RAPID instruction included in this option
SCWrite

Sends a message to the computer (using RAP)

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

33

[271] Interbus-S Configuration Tool

[271] Interbus Configuration Tool


The Interbus Configuration Tool is used to configure the communication channels of
the DSQC 512 board. (See I/O Interfaces, in the S4Cplus Product Specification.)
The tool consists of standard PC software. The tool creates a bus configuration, which
is used by the controller.

34

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[270] Profibus DP Configuration Tool

[270] Profibus DP Configuration Tool


The Profibus Configuration Tool is used to configure the master channel of the
Profibus DP DSQC 510 board. (See I/O Interfaces, in the S4Cplus Product
Specification.)
The tool consists of standard PC software. The tool creates a bus configuration, which
is used in the robot controller.
Note: This tool is NOT needed for configuration and use of other channels than the
master channel of the DSQC 510 board.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

35

[538] I/O Plus

[538] I/O Plus


I/O Plus enables the S4Cplus to use non-ABB I/O units. The following units are
supported:
- Wago modules with DeviceNet fieldbus coupler, item 750-306 revision 3.
- Lutze IP67 module DIOPLEX-LS-DN 16E 744-215 revision 2
(16 digital input signals).
- Lutze IP67 module DIOPLEX-LS-DN 8E/8A 744-221 revision 1
(8 digital input signals and 8 digital output signals).
For more information on any of these units, please contact the supplier.
The communication between these units and S4Cplus has been verified (this does not,
however, guarantee the internal functionality and quality of the units). Configuration
data for the units is included.
In I/O Plus there is also support for a so-called Welder. This is a project specific spot
welding timer, and is not intended for general use.
In addition to the above units, the I/O Plus Generic Driver also opens up the
possibility to use other digital I/O units that conform with the DeviceNet specification.
ABB does not assume any responsibility for the functionality or quality of such units.
The user must provide the appropriate configuration data.
I/O Plus also opens up the use of the second DeviceNet channel named CAN2, the
configuration of the second channel is automatic if you have I/O Plus.
I/O Plus also opens up the DeviceNet Slave functionality, which allow the S4Cplus
controller to act as a slave unit towards another DeviceNet master, the configuration
data for the slave unit is included.

36

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[551] ArcWare

3 ProcessWare
[551] ArcWare
ArcWare comprises a large number of dedicated arc welding functions, which make the
robot well suited for arc welding. It is a simple yet powerful program since both the
positioning of the robot and the process control and monitoring are handled in one and
the same instruction.
I/O signals, timing sequences and weld error actions can be easily configured to meet
the requirements of a specific installation.
ArcWare functions
A few examples of some useful functions are given below.
Adaptation to different equipment
The robot can handle different types of weld controllers and other welding equipment.
Normally communication with the welding controller uses parallel signals but a serial
interface is also available.
Advanced process control
Voltage, wire feed rate, and other process data can be controlled individually for each
weld or part of a weld. The process data can be changed at the start and finish of a
welding process in such a way that the best process result is achieved.
Testing the program
When testing a program, welding, weaving or weld guiding can all be blocked. This
provides a way of testing the robot program without having the welding equipment
connected.
Automatic weld retry
A function that can be configured to order one or more automatic weld retries after a
process fault.
Weaving
The robot can implement a number of different weaving patterns up to 10 Hz
depending on robot type. These can be used to fill the weld properly and in the best
possible way. Weaving movement can also be ordered at the start of the weld in order
to facilitate the initial striking of the arc.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

37

[551] ArcWare
Wire burnback and rollback
These are functions used to prevent the welding wire sticking to the work object.
Fine adjustment during program execution
The welding speed, wire feed rate, voltage and weaving can all be adjusted whilst
welding is in progress. This makes trimming of the process much easier because the
result can be seen immediately on the current weld. This can be done in both manual
and automatic mode.
Seam finding and tracking
Seam finding and tracking can be implemented using a number of different types of
sensors. Please contact your nearest local ABB office for more information.
Interface signals
The following process signals are, if installed, handled automatically by ArcWare. The
robot can also support dedicated signals for workpiece manipulators and sensors.

38

Digital outputs
Power on/off
Gas on/off
Wire feed on/off
Wire feed direction
Weld error
Error information
Weld program number

Description
Turns weld on or off
Turns gas on or off
Turns wire feed on or off
Feeds wire forward/backward
Weld error
Digital outputs for error identification
Parallel port for selection of program number, or
3-bit pulse port for selection of program number, or
Serial CAN/Devicenet communication

Digital inputs
Arc OK
Voltage OK
Current OK
Water OK
Gas OK
Wire feed OK
Manual wire feed
Weld inhibit
Weave inhibit
Stop process
Wirestick error
Supervision inhibit
Torch collision

Description
Arc established; starts weld motion
Weld voltage supervision
Weld current supervision
Water supply supervision
Gas supply supervision
Wire supply supervision
Manual command for wire feed
Blocks the welding process
Blocks the weaving process
Stops/inhibits execution of arc welding instructions
Wirestick supervision
Program execution without supervision
Torch collision supervision

Analog outputs
Voltage
Wire feed
Current
Voltage adjustment
Current adjustment

Description
Weld voltage
Velocity of wire feed
Weld current
Voltage synergic line amplification
Current synergic line amplification

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[551] ArcWare
Analog inputs (cont.)

Description (cont.)

Voltage

Weld voltage measurement for monitoring and


supervision
Weld current measurement for monitoring and
supervision

Current

RAPID instructions included in this option


ArcL
ArcC
ArcKill
ArcRefresh

Arc welding with linear movement


Arc welding with circular movement
Aborts the process and is intended to be used in error
handlers
Updates the weld references to new values

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

39

[552] ArcWare Plus

[552] ArcWare Plus


ArcWare Plus contains the following functionality:
- ArcWare, see previous chapter.
- Arc data monitoring.
Arc data monitoring with adapted RAPID instructions for process supervision.
The function predicts weld errors.
- Contour tracking during welding.
Path corrections during welding, i.e. when executing ArcL or ArcC
instructions, can be made relative to the path using external sensors like Serial
Weld Guide or Laser Track. Such corrections will take effect immediately, also
during movement between two positions. The correction data are sent from the
sensor system to the controller using a serial link and will automatically affect
the path through built in functionality.
Please note, that this option is compulsory for Serial Weld Guide systems
(AWC) or Laser Track systems (M-Spot 90).
- Contour tracking in normal movements (path corrections)
Path corrections can also be activated when running normal movements like
MoveL using specific RAPID path correction instructions.
This functionality is also a part of option Advanced Motion, see this option for
more information.
- Adaptive process control for e.g. sensors like LaserTrak and Serial Weld Guide
systems. The sensor can for instance provide the robot system with changes in
the shape of the seam. These values can then be used to adapt the process
parameters, like voltage or wire feed, to the current shape. (See option Sensor
Interface for more information)
RAPID instructions and functions included in this option
CorrCon
CorrWrite
CorrRead
CorrDiscon
CorrClear
SpcCon
SpcWrite
SpcDump
SpcRead
SpcDiscon
IVarValue
ReadBlock
ReadVar
WriteBlock
WriteVar

40

Activating path correction


Changing path correction
Read current path correction
Deactivating path correction
Removes all correction generators
Activates statistical process supervision
Provides the controller with values for statistical process supervision
Dumps statistical process supervision data to a file or on a
serial channel
Reads statistical process supervision information
Deactivates statistical process supervision
Orders a variable interrupt
Read a block of data from the sensor device
Read a variable from the sensor device
Write a block of data to the sensor device
Write a variable to the sensor device

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[556] Arcitec

[556] Arcitec
This option is intended to be used in combination with the Arcitec power sources.
It shall only be ordered by the supplying unit of Arcitec.
The package is a special software, used together with the ArcWare package, to be able
to control not only the robot program but also the set up, configuration and
programming of the power source. Thus the robot teach pendant will be used for
programming and tuning both the robot and the power source.
The package also includes a special aid for easy welding programming, i.e. the synergic
function. This means that there is a pre-programmed relationsship between the wire
feed rate and all other data components in the power source, making it easy to control
the entire welding process, just by tuning the wire feed rate.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

41

[553] SpotWare

[553] SpotWare
The Spotweld options are general and flexible software platforms for creation of
customized and easy to use function packages for different types of spotweld systems
and process equipments.
The SpotWare option is used for sequential welding with one or several pneumatic gun
equipments. If welding with several pneumatic guns at the same time is desired then
the SpotWare Plus option has to be used instead.
The SpotWare option provides dedicated spotweld instructions for fast and accurate
positioning combined with gun manipulation, process start and supervision of the weld
equipment.
Communication with the welding equipment is normally carried out by means of
digital inputs and outputs but a serial interface is also available for some type of weld
timers.
It should be noted that the SpotWare options are general and can be extensively
customized. They have a default ready to use functionality directly after install but it
is intended that some configuration data, RAPID data and RAPID routines has to be
changed during the customizing.
SpotWare features
Some examples of useful functions are given below:
- Fast and accurate positioning using the unique QuickMove and TrueMove
concept.
- Gun pre-closing.
- Quick start after a weld.
- Handling of an on/off gun with two strokes.
- Dual/single gun.
- Manual actions for welding and gun control.
- Simulation possibilities for test purposes.
- Reverse execution with gun control.
- Spot counters.
- User-defined supervision and error recovery. Weld error recovery with
automatic rewelding.
- User-defined continuous supervision of the weld equipment, such as weld
current signal and water cooling start. Note: This feature requires the
MultiTasking option.
- Wide customizing possibilities.

42

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[553] SpotWare
Principles of SpotWare
The SpotWare functions will be controlled by separate internal program processes,
which will run in parallel. For instance the robot movements, the continuous supervision and the spot welding will be handled in different independent processes. This
means that if for instance the program execution and thus the robot movements is
stopped, then the welding and supervision will continue until they come to a well
defined process stop. For example, the welding process will carry on and finish the
weld and open the gun, although the program has been stopped during the weld phase.
For well defined points in the welding sequence and movements, calls to user routines
offer adaptations to the plant environment. A number of predefined parameters are also
available to shape the behaviour of the SpotWare instructions.
Programming principles
Both the robot movement and the control of the spot weld equipment are embedded in
the basic spot weld instructions SpotL and SpotJ.
The spot welding process is specified by:
- Spotdata: spot weld process data
- Gundata: spot weld equipment data
- The system modules SWUSRC and SWUSRF: RAPID routines and global data
for changing of process and test behaviour.
- System parameters: the I/O Signal configuration.
Spot welding instructions
Instruction

Used to:

SpotL

Control the motion, gun closure/opening and the welding


process.
Move the TCP along a linear path and perform a spot welding
at the end position.

SpotJ

Control the motion, gun closure/opening and the welding


process.
Move the TCP along a non-linear path and perform a spot
welding at the end position.

Spot welding data


Data type

Used to define:

spotdata

The spot weld process

gundata

The spot weld equipment

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

43

[554] SpotWare Plus

[554] SpotWare Plus


The SpotWare Plus package provides support for sequential welding with one or
several pneumatic on/off gun equipments, as the SpotWare package, but also welding
and full individual monitoring of up to four separate gun equipments at the same time.
SpotWare Plus features
The SpotWare Plus package contains the same features as SpotWare
but with following feature in addition:
- Possibility to weld with up to four guns at the same time.
Principles of SpotWare Plus
As in SpotWare the spotweld functions will be controlled by separate internal program
processes, which will run in parallel. For instance the robot movements, the continuous
supervision and each spotweld process will be handled in different independent program processes. This means that if for instance the program execution and thus the
robot movements is stopped, then the weld processes and supervision will continue
until they come to a well defined process stop. For example, the welding processes will
carry on and finish the welds and open the guns, although the program has been stopped
during the weld phase.
For well defined points in the welding sequence, calls to user routines offer adaptations
to the plant environment. A number of predefined parameters are also available to
shape the behaviour of the SpotWare instruction.
The opening and closing of the guns are always executed by RAPID routines. These
gun routines may be changed from the simple on/off default functionality to a more
complex gun control and they may contain additional gun supervision.
SpotWarePlus is based on the DAP (Discrete Application Platform).
Programming principles
Both the robot movement and control of up to four spot weld processes are embedded
in the basic spot weld instructions for multiple welding, SpotML and SpotMJ.
Each spot welding process is specified by:
- Spotmdata: spot weld process data
- Gunmdata: spot weld equipment data
- The system modules SWUSRF and SWUSRC: RAPID routines and global data
for customizing purposes and data for changing of process and test behaviour.
- System parameters: the I/O Signal configuration.

44

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[554] SpotWare Plus


Spot welding instructions
Instruction

Used to:

SpotML

Control the motion, gun closure/opening and 1 - 4 welding


processes.
Move the TCP along a linear path and perform spot welding
with 1 - 4 gun equipments at the end position.

SpotMJ

Control the motion, gun closure/opening and 1 - 4 welding


processes.
Move the TCP along a non-linear path and perform spot welding with 1 - 4 gun equipments at the end position.

Spot welding data


Data type

Used to define:

spotmdata

The spot weld process

gunmdata

The spot weld equipment

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

45

[625] SpotWare Servo

[625] SpotWare Servo


The Spotweld options are general and flexible software platforms for creation of
customized and easy to use function packages for different types of spotweld systems
and process equipments.
The SpotWare Servo option is used for sequential welding with one or two servo gun
equipments. If also welding with two servo guns at the same time is desired then the
SpotWare Servo Plus option has to be used instead.
The SpotWareServo option provides dedicated spotweld instructions for fast and
accurate positioning combined with gun manipulation, process start and supervision of
the different gun equipments.
Communication with the welding equipment is carried out by means of digital inputs
and outputs.
It should be noted that the SpotWare options are general and can be extensively
customized. They have a default ready to use functionality directly after install but it
is intended that some configuration data, RAPID data and RAPID routines has to be
changed during the customizing.
SpotWare Servo features
The SpotWare Servo package contains the following features:
- Fast and accurate positioning using the unique QuickMove and TrueMove
concept.
- Gun pre-closing, i.e having the gun closing synchronized with weld position.
- Gun equalizing, i.e. having the gun floating around the weld position.
- Constant tip force during welding.
- Manual actions for welding and gun control.
- Several simulation possibilities for test purposes.
- Reverse execution with gun control.
- Weld error recovery with automatic rewelding.
- User-defined supervision and error recovery.
- User-defined autonomous supervision, such as weld current signal and water
cooling start.
- Wide customizing possibilities.
- Default ready to use functionality directly after install.
- Detecting of missing or improper plates.
- Gun calibration functions.
- Spot counters and tip wear data for each used gun.

46

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[625] SpotWare Servo


- Fast switch between two servo guns with a tool changer. Note: This feature
requires the Servo Tool Change option.
Principles of SpotWare Servo
The SpotWare functions will be controlled by separate internal program processes,
which will run in parallel. For instance the robot movements, the continuous
supervision and the spotwelding will be handled in different independent processes.
This means that if for instance the program execution and thus the robot movements is
stopped, then the welding and supervision will continue until they come to a well
defined process stop. For example, the welding process will carry on and finish the
weld and open the gun, although the program has been stopped during the weld phase.
For well defined points in the welding sequence and movements, calls to user routines
offer adaptations to the plant environment. A number of predefined parameters are also
available to shape the behaviour of the SpotWare instructions.
Programming principles
Both the robot movement and the control of the spot weld equipment are embedded in
the basic spot weld instructions SpotL and SpotJ.
The spot welding process is specified by:
- Spotdata: spot weld process data
- Gundata: spot weld equipment data
- The system modules SWDEFINE and SWDEFUSR: RAPID routines and
global data for customizing purposes e.g. adaptations for a specific process
equipment.
- The system module SWUSER: RAPID routines and global data for changing
of process and test behaviour.
- System parameters: the I/O Signal configuration and the Manipulator
configuration.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

47

[625] SpotWare Servo


Spot welding instructions
Instruction

Used to:

SpotL

Control the motion, gun closure/opening and the welding


process.
Move the TCP along a linear path and perform a spot welding
at the end position.

SpotJ

Control the motion, gun closure/opening and the welding


process.
Move the TCP along a non-linear path and perform a spot
welding at the end position.

SetForce

Close the gun a predefined time then open the gun.

CalibL

Calibrate the gun during linear movement to the programmed


position.

CalibJ

Calibrate the gun during non-linear movement to the


programmed position.

Calibrate

Calibrate the gun in current position without movement.

STTune

Tune motion parameters for the servo gun.

STTuneReset

Reset tuned motion parameters for the servo gun.

Spot welding data

48

Data type

Used to define:

spotdata

The spot weld process

gundata

The spot weld equipment

forcedata

The SetForce process

simdata

Simulation modes

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[626] SpotWare Servo Plus

[626] SpotWare Servo Plus


The SpotWare Servo Plus package provides support for sequential welding with one
or several servo gun equipments, as the SpotWare Servo package, but also welding
with two servo guns at the same time.
SpotWare Servo Plus features
The SpotWare Servo Plus package contains the same features as SpotWareServo
but with following feature in addition:
- Possibility to weld with two servo guns at the same time.
Principles of SpotWare Servo Plus
As in SpotWare Servo the SpotWare functions will be controlled by separate internal
program processes, which will run in parallel. For instance the robot movements, the
continuous supervision and the spotwelding will be handled in different independent
processes. This means that if for instance the program execution and thus the robot
movements is stopped, then the weld processes and supervision will continue until they
come to a well defined process stop. For example, the welding processes will carry on
and finish the weld and open the guns, although the program has been stopped during
the weld phase.
Programming principles
Both the robot movement and the control of the spot weld equipments are embedded
in the basic spot weld instructions. SpotL and SpotJ are used for sequential welding.
With SpotML or SpotMJ it is possible to weld with several guns simultaneously.
Each spot welding process is specified by:
- Spotdata: spot weld process data
- Gundata: spot weld equipment data
- The system modules SWDEFINE and SWDEFUSR: RAPID routines and
global data for customizing purposes e.g. adaptations for a specific process
equipment.
- The system module SWUSER: RAPID routines and global data for changing
of process and test behaviour.
- System parameters: the I/O Signal configuration and the Manipulator
configuration.
Spot welding instructions
The SpotWare Servo Plus package contains the same instructions as SpotWareServo
plus following instructions in addition:

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

49

[626] SpotWare Servo Plus

50

Instruction

Used to:

SpotML

Control the motion, gun closure/opening and 1 - 2 welding


processes.
Move the TCP along a linear path and perform spot welding
with 1 - 2 gun equipments at the end position.

SpotMJ

Control the motion, gun closure/opening and 1 - 2 welding


processes.
Move the TCP along a non-linear path and perform spot
welding with 1 - 2 gun equipments at the end position.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[569] DispenseWare

[569] DispenseWare
The DispenseWare package provides support for different types of dispensing
processes such as gluing and sealing.
The DispenseWare application provides fast and accurate positioning combined with a
flexible process control.
Communication with the dispensing equipment is carried out by means of digital and
analog outputs.
DispenseWare is a package that can be extensively customized. The intention is that
the user adapts some user data and routines to suit a specific dispensing equipment and
the environmental situation.
Dispensing features
The DispenseWare package contains the following features:
- Fast and accurate positioning.
- Handling of on/off guns as well as proportional guns.
- Speed proportional or constant analog outputs.
- Up to five different guns can be handled simultaneously, controlled by 1 - 5
digital output signals (for gun on/off control) and 1 - 2 analog output signals
(for flow control).
- Four different gun equipment, each controlled by 1 - 5 digital output signals
and 1 - 2 analog output signals, can be handled in the same program.
- Possibility to use different anticipated times for the digital and analog signals.
- Possibility to use equipment delay compensation for the TCP speed
proportional analog signals.
- Global or local flow rate correction factors.
- Dispensing instructions for both linear and circular paths.
- Dispensing in wet or dry mode.
- Wide opportunities of customizing the functionality to adapt to different types
of dispensing equipment.
- Possibility to restart an interrupted dispense sequence.
Programming principles
Both the robots movement and the dispensing process control are embedded in the
instructions, DispL and DispC respectively.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

51

[569] DispenseWare
The gluing process is specified by:
- Bead specific dispensing data. See Data types - beaddata.
- Equipment specific dispensing data. See Data types - equipdata.
- RAPID routines and global data for customizing purposes. See Predefined Data
and Programs - System Module DPUSER.
- The I/O configuration. See System Parameters - DispenseWare
Dispensing instructions
Instruction

Used to:

DispL

Move the TCP along a linear path and perform dispensing with
the given data

DispC

Move the TCP along a circular path and perform dispensing


with the given data

Dispensing data

52

Data type

Used to define:

beaddata

Dispensing data for the different beads.

equipdata

Dispensing data for the equipment in use.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[571] PalletWare

[571] PalletWare
General
PalletWare is a ready-to-use software package for the S4Cplus controller, focused on
palletizing. PalletWare imports data created with PalletWizard, the included off-line
PC-tool, to execute the defined palletizing cycles. PalletWare has a predefined
interface for connecting PLC (Programmable Logic Controller), which is the most
common way to control external equipment such as infeeders, outfeeders and sensor
equipment. The standard package includes software components such as priority and
scheduling routines that are ready to use. The package also includes components that
can be customized, e.g. grip tool control routines.
PalletWare supports system integrators who want to customize the system, by
presenting a standardized interface.
What is included
Included in the PalletWare package is software components to control robot motion,
and to communicate with the user and external equipment.
In order to minimize commissioning time, PalletWare is equipped with a standardized
set of modules, referred to as the Standard Package Add-On. Advanced users can
replace these modules with their own if special customizing is needed. PalletWare is
also delivered with template user routines that handles the most common solutions.
PalletWare offers a standardized interface where to connect all external equipment
such as infeeders, PLC, signal board, grip tool, sensor equipment etc. The package
includes a set of predefined signals connected to a simulated board. The integrator has
to implement the signal board and connect the signals. The configuration file for the
signals has also to be modified depending on what type of board is used. Because of
the large amount of signals, it is recommended to use a field bus such as for example
Profibus.
PalletWare features
PalletWare offers for example following functionality:
- Multiplacing
- Parallel processing, up to 5 stations simultaneously
- Multistationary production
- User dialogue interface with Screen Viewer
- On-line tuning of geometrical data
- Safety functionality
- Prepared PLC interface
- Prepared MMI interface

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

53

[571] PalletWare
- Tool control
- Standardized error handling
- Predefined user routines
Programming principles
PalletWare is added to the BaseWare system. PalletWare consists of predefined motion
principles and communication routines for communicating with external equipment. It
is not necessarily needed to implement any RAPID code. However, the system supports
integrators for customizing by standardized functions and instructions.
Customizing PalletWare
PalletWare can be up-and-running without any need for implementing RAPID code,
but it must be adapted to the current robot cell and its physical lay-out. For instance,
there are a number of steps which are compulsory, e.g:
- Connect external equipment such as infeeders, tool, PLC etc., via the predefined
interface.
- Connect safety equipment such as emergency stop, safety fences etc.
- Define tooldata if the tool does not match the templates
- Check the set-up in the configuration module PAL_CFG.
- Define/teach work objects to the stations
- Define/teach robtarget with tool in zero orientation
- Create and load pallet cycles with PalletWizard.
In addition to this, PalletWare offers a great deal of customizing possibilities for
advanced users, e.g.
- Using tools with suction cups or mechanical gripper
- Sliding uppermost layer to gain pallet height
- Controlling orientation on infeeder
- Add or skip safety height movements between stations
- Set priority when working with several pallet cycles in parallel.
- Etc.
Pallet Wizard
Pallet Wizard is a complete and easy to use stand alone tool running on a PC under
Windows 95/98 or Windows NT, for off line programming of palletizing or
depalletizing processes. It is delivered as a part of the PalletWare option package.
In PalletWizard the complete cell with its different components like the products, the
tools, the in/out feeders and pallet stations as well as the pallet cycles with the layers
and the pattern descriptions can be defined.
54

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

[571] PalletWare
PalletWizard offers for example the following features:
- Detailed On-line help
- Wizards for defining the products, tools, cell definition, station configurations,
pallet composition and the pallet cycles
- Automatic pick- and place definition
- Automatic calculating of grip zones to be used for the tool
- Software based collision detection
- Library of predefined patterns
Several different pallet cycles can be combined into a production cycle and saved into
a file, which can be downloaded to the robot. At the robot the operator can then select
what specific pallet cycle to run and on which infeeder and pallet station.

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

55

Index
INDEX

4 Index
A
AbsAcc 5
Absolute Accuracy 5
Advanced functions 14
arc welding 37, 40
Arcitec 41
ArcWare 37
ArcWare Plus 40
B
BaseWare 5
BaseWare Options 3
BaseWare OS 3
C
Collision Detection 7
communication
robot and PC 33
continuous movement 13
Contour tracking 12
Conveyor Tracking 23, 27, 29
coordinated motion 12
cross-connection
locigal conditions 16

output 15
procedure call 15
Friction Compensation 13
FTP 32
I
I/O Plus 36
independent movement 13
input or output signals
interrupts 17
Interbus Configuration Tool 34
interrupt routine movement 16
interrupts
from analog input or output signals 17
L
Load Identification 7
logical conditions
cross connections 16
N
NFS 32
O
output
in fixed position 15
P

D
data
read and write 14, 33
transfer 14
Discrete Applications Platform 22
DispenseWare 51
E
electronically linked motors 24
error handler movement 16
Ethernet Services 32
F
file
read and write 14, 33
fixed position

PalletWare 53
parallel processing 11
PLC functionality 16
printout 14
ProcessWare 3, 37
Profibus Configuration Tool 35
Profibus DP 35
program
back-up 33
transfer 33
R
RAP Communication 31
read
data 14
file 14

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

57

Index

Reset the work area 12


S
Sensor Interface 26
Sensor Synchronization 25
serial channel 14
Servo Tool Change 29
Servo Tool Control 27
SpotWare Servo 46
SpotWare Servo Plus 49
T
transfer
data 14, 33
file 33
program 33
W
World Zones 16
write
data 14
file 14

58

Product Specification RobotWare Options for BaseWare OS 4.0

Installation and Commissioning Manual


Industrial Robot
IRB 7600 - 500/2.3
IRB 7600 - 400/2.55
IRB 7600 - 150/3.5
M2000A



Installation and Commissioning Manual


IRB 7600 M2000A
3HAC 16261-1
Revision A

The information in this manual is subject to change without notice and


should not be construed as a commitment by ABB. ABB assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this manual.
In no event shall ABB be liable for incidental or consequential damages
arising from use of this manual and products described herein.
This manual and parts thereof must not be reproduced or copied without
ABBs written permission, and contents thereof must not be imparted to
a third party nor be used for any unauthorized purpose. Contravention
will be prosecuted.
Additional copies of this manual may be obtained from ABB at its then
current charge.

Copyright 2003 ABB All rights reserved.


ABB Automation Technology Products AB
Robotics
SE-721 68 Vsters
Sweden

Table of Contents

0.0.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
0.0.2 Product Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Chapter 1: Safety, service

1.0.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Section 1.1: General information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

1.1.1 Safety, service - General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6


1.1.2 Limitation of Liability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
1.1.3 Related information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Section 1.2: Safety risks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

1.2.1 Safety risks related to gripper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7


1.2.2 Safety risks related to tools/workpieces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
1.2.3 Safety risks related to pneumatic/hydraulic systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
1.2.4 Safety risks during operational disturbances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
1.2.5 Safety risks during installation and service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
1.2.6 Risks associated with live electric parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Section 1.3: Safety actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

1.3.1 Safety fence dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10


1.3.2 Fire extinguishing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
1.3.3 Emergency release of the manipulators arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
1.3.4 Brake testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
1.3.5 Risk of disabling function "Reduced speed 250 mm/s". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
1.3.6 Safe use of the Teach Pendant Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
1.3.7 Work inside the manipulators working range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Chapter 2: Reference information

13

2.0.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13


Section 2.1: Reference information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

2.1.1 Applicable Safety Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14


2.1.2 Screw joints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
2.1.3 Weight specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
2.1.4 Standard toolkit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
2.1.5 Special tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
2.1.6 Performing a leak-down test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
2.1.7 Lifting equipment and lifting instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Chapter 3: Unpacking

23

3.0.1 Pre-installation procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23


3.0.2 Working range, IRB 7600 - 150/3.5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
3.0.3 Working range, IRB 7600 - 400/2.55. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
3.0.4 Working range, IRB 7600 - 500/2.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
3.0.5 Risk of tipping/Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Chapter 4: On-site Installation

31

Section 4.1: On-site Installation, manipulator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

4.1.1 Lifting manipulator with fork lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32


4.1.2 Lifting manipulator with lifting slings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
4.1.3 Lifting manipulator with round slings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
4.1.4 Manually releasing the brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
4.1.5 Lifting the base plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
4.1.6 Securing the base plate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
4.1.7 Orienting and securing the manipulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
4.1.8 Fitting equipment on manipulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
4.1.9 Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56

3HAC 16261-1

Table of Contents

Section 4.2: Restricting the working range. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

4.2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.2.2 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.2.3 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.2.4 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
4.2.5 Position switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Section 4.3: On-site installation, controller cabinet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

4.3.1 Lifting the controller cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70


4.3.2 Required installation space, control cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
4.3.3 Bolt pattern, control cabinet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Chapter 5: Electrical connections

73

Section 5.1: Signal/Power cables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

5.1.1 Connecting the manipulator to the control cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74


5.1.2 Connection of manipulator cables to control cabinet, S4Cplus M2000A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
5.1.3 Connection of mains power to control cabinet, S4Cplus M2000A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Section 5.2: Signal connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

5.2.1 Signal Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80


5.2.2 Selecting Cables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
5.2.3 Interference elimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
5.2.4 Connection types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
5.2.5 Connections to screw terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
5.2.6 Connections to connectors (option) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Section 5.3: Customer connections on controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

5.3.1 The MOTORS ON/MOTORS OFF circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86


5.3.2 External customer connections on panel X1 - X4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
5.3.3 Connection of external safety relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Section 5.4: Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

5.4.1 External 24V supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96


5.4.2 24V I/O supply. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
5.4.3 115/230 VAC supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Section 5.5: Buses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

5.5.1 Connection of the CAN bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99


5.5.2 Interbus-S, slave DSQC 351 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
5.5.3 Profibus-DP, slave DSQC 352. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Section 5.6: I/O units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

5.6.1 Distributed I/O units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109


5.6.2 Distributed I/O, digital sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
5.6.3 Distributed I/O, digital I/O DSQC 328 (option) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
5.6.4 AD Combi I/O, DSQC 327 (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
5.6.5 Analog I/O, DSQC 355 (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
5.6.6 Encoder interface unit, DSQC 354 (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Section 5.7: Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

5.7.1 Allen-Bradley, general. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125


5.7.2 RIO, remote I/O for Allen-Bradley PLC DSQC 350. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
5.7.3 Communication, serial links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
5.7.4 Communication, Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
5.7.5 External operators panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Chapter 6: Start-up

135

6.0.1 Inspection before start-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135


6.0.2 Start-up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

ii

3HAC 16261-1

Table of Contents

Chapter 7: Robot controller

137

7.0.1 BootImage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137


7.0.2 Start window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
7.0.3 Reboot Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
7.0.4 Boot Disk Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
7.0.5 LAN Settings Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
7.0.6 Service Settings Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
7.0.7 System selection window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
7.0.8 How to perform a Restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
7.0.9 How to Start in Query Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147
Chapter 8: Installation of controller software

149

8.0.1 Loading system software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149


8.0.2 RobotWare CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
8.0.3 Installing new Robot Controller Software with RobInstall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
8.0.4 Create a new Robot Controller System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
8.0.5 Update the Robot Controller image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
8.0.6 Transfer Robot Controller System using Ethernet connection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159
8.0.7 Transfer Robot Controller System using floppy disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
8.0.8 RobInstall preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Chapter 9: System directory structure

165

9.0.1 Media pool in the PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165


9.0.2 System pool in the PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
9.0.3 File structure in the robot controller mass storage memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
9.0.4 Preparation of S4Cplus software to be installed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
9.0.5 Handling mass memory storage capacity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Chapter 10: Calibration

171

10.0.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171


Section 10.1: General information - both methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172

10.1.1 Determine the appropriate method of calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172


10.1.2 Calibration scales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173
10.1.3 Updating the revolution counter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Section 10.2: Calibration - Levelmeter 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176

General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
10.2.1 Calibration, prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
Preliminaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
10.2.2 Fine calibration procedure on TPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
10.2.3 Initialization of Levelmeter 2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
Fine calibration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
10.2.4 Resetting of Levelmeter 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
10.2.5 Calibration, axis 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184
10.2.6 Calibration, axis 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186
10.2.7 Calibration, axis 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189
10.2.8 Calibration, axis 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191
10.2.9 Calibration, axis 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
10.2.10 Calibration, axis 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Section 10.3: Calibration - Calibration Pendulum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198

General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
10.3.1 How to calibrate the robot system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
10.3.2 Calibration, prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
10.3.3 Calibration pendulum kit, contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200

3HAC 16261-1

iii

Table of Contents

Preliminaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
10.3.4 Checking the calibration position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
10.3.5 Calibration procedure on TPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
10.3.6 Initialization of calibration pendulum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
10.3.7 Calibration sensor mounting positions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
10.3.8 Calibration, all axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
10.3.9 Calibrating axes 3-4, IRB 7600/2.3/500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Section 10.4: After calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214

10.4.1 Post calibration procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214


Section 10.5: Alternative calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215

10.5.1 Alternative calibration position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215


10.5.2 Alternative calibrating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
10.5.3 New calibration position, axis 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
10.5.4 New calibration offset, axis 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
10.5.5 Retrieving offset values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Chapter 11: Decommissioning

221

11.0.1 Balancing device, IRB 7600 and IRB 6600/6650 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221

iv

3HAC 16261-1

0.0.1 Overview

0.0.1 Overview

About This
Manual

This information product is a manual containing instructions for installing the complete robot
system, mechanically as well as electrically.

Usage

This manual should be used during installation, from lifting the manipulator to its work site
through installing application software in the robot controller, making the robot ready for
operation.

Who Should Read


This Manual?

This manual is intended for:

Prerequisites

The reader should...

Organization of
Chapters

installation personnel on the installation site.

have the required knowledge of mechanical as well as electrical installation work.

The information product is organized in the following chapters:

Chapter

Contents

Safety, Service

Reference Information

Unpacking

On-site Installation

Electrical connections

Start-up

Installation of controller software

Robot controller

System directory structure

10

Calibration

11

Decommissioning

References

3HAC 16261-1

Reference

Document Id

Circuit Diagram, manipulator

3HAC 13347-1

Circuit Diagram, controller

3HAC 14189-2

0.0.1 Overview

Revisions
Revision

Description

First edition

Various corrections in text and in figures due to reconstructions,


new options, etc.

Manual completed with references to pagenumbers and numbering of sections (manipulator sections).

3HAC 16261-1

0.0.2 Product Documentation

0.0.2 Product Documentation

General

The complete product documentation kit for the robot, including controller, manipulator and
any hardware option, consists of the manuals listed below:

Installation and
Commissioning
Manual

The Installation and Commissioning Manual contains the following information:

Repair Manual

Maintenance
Manual

Safety, Service

Reference Information

Unpacking

On-site Installation

Electrical connections

Start-up

Installation of controller software

System directory structure

Calibration

If there is any, model specific information

The Repair Manual contains the following information:

Safety, Service

Reference Information

Remove/Refitting instructions for all manipulator details considered spare parts

Remove/Refitting instructions for all controller cabinet details considered spare parts

If there is any, model specific information

The Maintenance Manual contains the following information:

Safety, Service

Reference Information

Maintenance schedules

Instructions for all maintenance activities specified in the maintenance schedule, for
example cleaning, lubrication, inspection etc.

If there is any, model specific information

The information is generally divided into separate chapters for the manipulator and the controller, respectively.

Software manuals

The software documentation consists of a wide range of manuals, ranging from manuals for
basic understanding of the operating system to manuals for entering parameters during operation.
A complete listing of all available software manuals is available from ABB Robotics.

3HAC 16261-1

0.0.2 Product Documentation

Hardware option
manual

Each hardware option is supplied with its own documentation. Each document set contains
the types of information specified above:

Installation information

Repair information

Maintenance information

In addition, spare part information is supplied for the complete option.

3HAC 16261-1

1 Safety, service
1.0.1 Introduction

Chapter 1: Safety, service


1.0.1 Introduction

Definitions

This chapter details safety information for service personnel i.e. personnel performing installation, repair and maintenance work.

Sections

The chapter "Safety, service" is divided into the following sections:


1. General information contains lists of:
Safety, service -general
Limitation of liability
Referenced documents

2. Safety risks lists dangers relevant when servicing the robot system. The dangers are split into different categories:
Safety risks related to gripper/end effector
Safety risks related to tools/workpieces
Safety risks related to pneumatic/hydraulic systems
Safety risks during operational disturbances
Safety risks during installation and service
Risks associated with live electric parts

3. Safety actions details actions which may be taken to remedy or avoid dangers.
Safety fence dimensions
Fire extinguishing
Emergency release of the manipulators arm
Brake testing
Risk of disabling function "Reduced speed 250 mm/s"
Safe use of the Teach Pendant Unit enabling device
Work inside the manipulators working range

3HAC 16261-1

1 Safety, service
1.1.1 Safety, service - General

Section 1.1: General information


1.1.1 Safety, service - General

Validity and
responsibility

The information does not cover how to design, install and operate a complete system, nor
does it cover all peripheral equipment, which can influence the safety of the total system. To
protect personnel, the complete system must be designed and installed in accordance with the
safety requirements set forth in the standards and regulations of the country where the robot
is installed.
The users of ABB industrial robots are responsible for ensuring that the applicable safety laws
and regulations in the country concerned are observed and that the safety devices necessary
to protect people working with the robot system have been designed and installed correctly.
Personnel working with robots must be familiar with the operation and handling of the industrial robot, described in the applicable documents, e.g. Users Guide and Product Manual.

Connection of
external safety
devices

Apart from the built-in safety functions, the robot is also supplied with an interface for the
connection of external safety devices. Via this interface, an external safety function can interact with other machines and peripheral equipment. This means that control signals can act on
safety signals received from the peripheral equipment as well as from the robot.
In the Product Manual - Installation and Commissioning, instructions are provided for connecting safety devices between the robot and the peripheral equipment.

1.1.2 Limitation of Liability

General

Any information given in this information product regarding safety, must not be construed as
a warranty by ABB Robotics that the industrial robot will not cause injury or damage even if
all safety instructions have been complied with.

1.1.3 Related information

General

The list below specifies documents which contain useful information:

Documents

Type of information

Detailed in document

Installation of safety devices

Installation and Commissioning


Manual

Changing robot modes

Users Guide

Start-up

Restricting the working space

Installation and Commissioning


Manual

On-site installation Manipulator

Section

3HAC 16261-1

1 Safety, service
1.2.1 Safety risks related to gripper

Section 1.2: Safety risks


1.2.1 Safety risks related to gripper
Ensure that a gripper is prevented from dropping a workpiece, if such is used.

1.2.2 Safety risks related to tools/workpieces

Safe handling

It must be possible to turn off tools, such as milling cutters, etc., safely. Make sure that guards
remain closed until the cutters stop rotating.
It should be possible to release parts by manual operation (valves).

Safe design

Grippers/end effectors must be designed so that they retain workpieces in the event of a power
failure or a disturbance of the controller.

1.2.3 Safety risks related to pneumatic/hydraulic systems

General

Residual energy

Safe design

Special safety regulations apply to pneumatic and hydraulic systems.

Residual energy may be present in these systems so, after shutdown, particular care
must be taken.

The pressure in pneumatic and hydraulic systems must be released before starting to
repair them.

Gravity may cause any parts or objects held by these systems to drop.

Dump valves should be used in case of emergency.

Shot bolts should be used to prevent tools, etc., from falling due to gravity.

1.2.4 Safety risks during operational disturbances

General

Qualified personnel

Extraordinary
risks

3HAC 16261-1

The industrial robot is a flexible tool which can be used in many different industrial
applications.

All work must be carried out professionally and in accordance with the applicable
safety regulations.

Care must be taken at all times.

Remedial action must only be carried out by qualified personnel who are familiar with
the entire installation as well as the special risks associated with its different parts.

If the working process is interrupted, extra care must be taken due to risks other than those
associated with regular operation. Such an interruption may have to be rectified manually.

1 Safety, service
1.2.5 Safety risks during installation and service

1.2.5 Safety risks during installation and service

General risks during installation


and service

Nation/region
specific regulations

Non-voltage
related risks

To be observed
by the supplier of
the complete system

The instructions in the Product Manual - Installation and Commissioning must always
be followed.

Emergency stop buttons must be positioned in easily accessible places so that the
robot can be stopped quickly.

Those in charge of operations must make sure that safety instructions are available
for the installation in question.

Those who install the robot must have the appropriate training for the robot system in
question and in any safety matters associated with it.

To prevent injuries and damage during the installation of the robot system, the regulations
applicable in the country concerned and the instructions of ABB Robotics must be complied
with.

Safety zones, which have to be crossed before admittance, must be set up in front of
the robot's working space. Light beams or sensitive mats are suitable devices.

Turntables or the like should be used to keep the operator out of the robot's working
space.

The axes are affected by the force of gravity when the brakes are released. In addition
to the risk of being hit by moving robot parts, you run the risk of being crushed by the
tie rod.

Energy, stored in the robot for the purpose of counterbalancing certain axes, may be
released if the robot, or parts thereof, is dismantled.

When dismantling/assembling mechanical units, watch out for falling objects.

Be aware of stored heat energy in the controller.

Never use the robot as a ladder, i.e. do not climb on the robot motors or other parts
during service work. There is a serious risk of slipping because of the high temperature of the motors or oil spills that can occur on the robot.

The supplier of the complete system must ensure that all circuits used in the safety
function are interlocked in accordance with the applicable standards for that function.

The supplier of the complete system must ensure that all circuits used in the emergency stop function are interlocked in a safe manner, in accordance with the applicable standards for the emergency stop function.

1.2.6 Risks associated with live electric parts

Voltage related
risks, general

Voltage related
risks, controller

Although troubleshooting may, on occasion, have to be carried out while the power
supply is turned on, the robot must be turned off (by setting the mains switch to OFF)
when repairing faults, disconnecting electric leads and disconnecting or connecting
units.

The mains supply to the robot must be connected in such a way that it can be turned
off outside the robots working space.

A danger of high voltage is associated with the following parts:

Be aware of stored electrical energy (DC link) in the controller.

3HAC 16261-1

1 Safety, service
1.2.6 Risks associated with live electric parts

Units inside the controller, e.g. I/O modules, can be supplied with power from an external source.

The mains supply/mains switch

The power unit

The power supply unit for the computer system (230 VAC)

The rectifier unit (400-480 VAC and 700 VDC. Note: Capacitors!)

The drive unit (700 VDC)

The service outlets (115/230 VAC)

The power supply unit for tools, or special power supply units for the machining process

The external voltage connected to the control cabinet remains live even when the
robot is disconnected from the mains.

Additional connections

Voltage related
risks, manipulator

A danger of high voltage is associated with the manipulator in:

Voltage related
risks, tools, material handling
devices, etc

Tools, material handling devices, etc., may be live even if the robot system is in the OFF
position. Power supply cables which are in motion during the working process may be damaged.

3HAC 16261-1

The power supply for the motors (up to 800 VDC)

The user connections for tools or other parts of the installation (max. 230 VAC, see
Installation and Commissioning Manual)

1 Safety, service
1.3.1 Safety fence dimensions

Section 1.3: Safety actions


1.3.1 Safety fence dimensions

General

Fit a safety fence or enclosure around the robot to ensure a safe robot installation.

Dimensioning

Dimension the fence or enclosure to enable it to withstand the force created if the load being
handled by the robot is dropped or released at maximum speed. Determine the maximum
speed from the maximum velocities of the robot axes and from the position at which the robot
is working in the work cell (see Product Specification - Description, Robot Motion).
Also consider the maximum possible impact caused by a breaking or malfunctioning rotating
tool or other device fitted to the manipulator.

1.3.2 Fire extinguishing


Use a CARBON DIOXIDE (CO 2 ) extinguisher in the event of a fire in the robot (manipulator
or controller)!

1.3.3 Emergency release of the manipulators arm

Description

In an emergency situation, any of the manipulators axes may be released manually by pushing the brake release buttons on the manipulator or on an optional external brake release unit.
How to release the brakes is detailed in section "Manually releasing the brakes".
The manipulator arm may be moved manually on smaller robot models, but larger models
may require using an overhead crane or similar.

Increased injury

Before releasing the brakes, make sure that the weight of the arms does not increase the
pressure on the trapped person, which may further increase any injury!

1.3.4 Brake testing

When to test

During operation the holding brakes of each axis motor wear normally. A test may be performed to determine whether the brake can still perform its function.

How to test

The function of each axis motor holding brakes may be checked as detailed below:
1. Run each manipulator axis to a position where the combined weight of the manipulator arm and any load is maximized (max. static load).
2. Switch the motor to the MOTORS OFF position with the Operating mode selector
on the controller.
3. Check that the axis maintains its position.
If the manipulator does not change position as the motors are switched off, then the brake
function is adequate.

10

3HAC 16261-1

1 Safety, service
1.3.5 Risk of disabling function "Reduced speed 250 mm/s"

1.3.5 Risk of disabling function "Reduced speed 250 mm/s"


Do not change "Transm gear ratio" or other kinematic parameters from the Teach Pendant Unit
or a PC. This will affect the safety function Reduced speed 250 mm/s.

1.3.6 Safe use of the Teach Pendant Unit


The enabling device is a push button located on the side of the Teach Pendant Unit (TPU)
which, when pressed halfway in, takes the system to MOTORS ON. When the enabling device
is released or pushed all the way in, the robot is taken to the MOTORS OFF state.
To ensure safe use of the Teach Pendant Unit, the following must be implemented:
The enabling device must never be rendered inoperative in any way.
During programming and testing, the enabling device must be released as soon as there is no
need for the robot to move.
The programmer must always bring the Teach Pendant Unit with him/her, when entering the
robots working space. This is to prevent anyone else taking control over the robot without the
programmer knowing.

1.3.7 Work inside the manipulators working range


If work must be carried out within the robots work envelope, the following points must be
observed:
- The operating mode selector on the controller must be in the manual mode position to render
the enabling device operative and to block operation from a computer link or remote control
panel.
- The robots speed is limited to max. 250 mm/s when the operating mode selector is in position
< 250 mm/s. This should be the normal position when entering the working space. The position
100% full speedmay only be used by trained personnel who are aware of the risks that this
entails.
- Pay attention to the rotating axes of the manipulator! Keep a distance to the axes in order not
to get entangled with hair or clothing. Also be aware of any danger that may be caused by
rotating tools or other devices mounted on the manipulator or inside the cell.
- Test the motor brake on each axis, according to section Brake testing on page 10.

3HAC 16261-1

11

1 Safety, service
1.3.7 Work inside the manipulators working range

12

3HAC 16261-1

2 Reference information
2.0.1 Introduction

Chapter 2: Reference information


2.0.1 Introduction

General

3HAC 16261-1

This chapter presents generic pieces of information, complementing the more specific information in the following chapters.

13

2 Reference information
2.1.1 Applicable Safety Standards

Section 2.1: Reference information


2.1.1 Applicable Safety Standards

Standards,
general

Standards,
robot cell

14

The robot is designed in accordance with the requirements of:

EN 775 - Robot safety.

EN 292-1 - Basic terminology.

EN 292-2 - Technical principles.

EN 418 - Emergency stop.

EN 563 - Temperatures of surfaces.

EN 954-1 - Safety related parts of control systems.

EN 60204-1 - Electrical equipment of machines.

EN 1050 - Principles for risk assessment.

ANSI/RIA 15.06-1999 - Industrial robots, safety requirements.

DIN 19258 - Interbus-S, International Standard

The following standards are applicable when the robot is part of a robot cell:

EN 953 - Fixed and moveable guards

EN 811 - Safety distances to prevent danger zones being reached by the lower limbs.

EN 349 - Minimum gaps to avoid crushing of parts of the human body.

EN 294 - Safety distances to prevent danger zones being reached by the upper limbs.

EN 1088 - Interlocking devices

EN 999 - The positioning of protective equipment in respect of approach speeds of the


human body.

ISO 11 161 - Industrial automation systems - Safety of intergrated manufacturing systems.

3HAC 16261-1

2 Reference information
2.1.2 Screw joints

2.1.2 Screw joints

General

This section details how to tighten the various types of screw joints on the manipulator as well
as the controller.
The instructions and torque values are valid for screw joints comprising metallic materials
and do not apply to soft or brittle materials.
Any instructions given in the repair, maintenance or installation procedure description override any value or procedure given here, i.e. these instruction are only valid for standard type
screw joints.

UNBRAKO
screws

UNBRAKO is a special type of screw recommended by ABB in certain screw joints. It features special surface treatment (Gleitmo as described below), and is extremely resistant to
fatigue.
Whenever used, this is specified in the instructions and in such cases no other type of replacement screw is allowed. Using other types of screw will void any warranty and may potentially
cause serious damage or injury!

Gleitmo treated
screws

Gleitmo is a special surface treatment to reduce the friction when tightening the screw joint.
Screws treated with Gleitmo may be reused 3-4 times before the coating disappears. After this
the screw must be discarded and replaced with a new one.
When handling screws treated with Gleitmo, protective gloves of nitrile rubber type should
be used.

Screws lubricated
in other ways

Screws lubricated with Molycote 1000 (or another lubricant) should only be used when specified in the repair, maintenance or installation procedure descriptions.
In such cases, proceed as follows:
1. Lubricate the thread of the screw.
2. Lubricate between the plain washer and screw head.
3. Tighten to the torque specified in section "Tightening torque" below. Screw dimensions
of M8 or larger must be tightened with a torque wrench. Screw dimensions of M6 or
smaller may be tightened without a torque wrench if this is done by trained and qualified personnel.

3HAC 16261-1

Lubricant

Art. no.

Molycote 1000 (molybdenum disulphide grease)

1171 2016-618

15

2 Reference information
2.1.2 Screw joints

Tightening torque

Screws with slotted or cross


recess head

Below are tables specifying the torque values for different screw joint types:

Dimension

Tightening torque (Nm)


Class 4.8 "dry"

M2.5

0.25

M3

0.5

M4

1.2

M5

2.5

M6

5.0

Screws with
hexagon socket
head, dry

Screws with
hexagon socket
head, lubricated

16

Dimension

Tightening torque
(Nm)
Class 8.8 "dry"

Tightening torque
(Nm)
Class 10.9 "dry"

Tightening torque
(Nm)
Class 12.9 "dry"

M5

M6

10

M8

24

34

40

M10

47

67

80

M12

82

115

140

M16

200

290

340

Dimension

Tightening torque (Nm)


Class 10.9

Tightening torque (Nm)


Class 12.9

M8

28

34

M10

55

66

M12

96

115

M16

235

280

3HAC 16261-1

2 Reference information
2.1.3 Weight specifications

2.1.3 Weight specifications

Definition

In all repair and maintenance instructions, weights of the components handled are sometimes
specified. All components exceeding 22 kg (50 lbs) are high-lighted in this way.
ABB recommends the use of lifting equipment when handling components with a weight
exceeding 22 kg to avoid inflicting injury. A wide range of lifting tools and devices is available for each manipulator model.

Example

Below is an example of how a weight specification is presented:


The motor weighs 65 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

3HAC 16261-1

17

2 Reference information
2.1.4 Standard toolkit

2.1.4 Standard toolkit

General

All service (repairs, maintenance and installation) instructions contain lists of tools required
to perform the specified activity.
All special tools required are listed directly in the instructions while all the tools that are
considered standard are gathered in the Standard toolkit and defined in the table below.
In this way, the tools required are the sum of the Standard Toolkit and any tools listed in the
instruction.

Contents,
standard toolkit,
3HAC 15571-1

18

Qty

Tool

Rem.

Ring-open-end spanner 8-19mm

Socket head cap 5-17mm

Torx socket no:20-60

Box spanner set

Torque wrench 10-100Nm

Torque wrench 75-400Nm

Ratchet head for torque wrench 1/2

Hexagon-headed screw M10x100

Socket head cap no:14, socket 40mm bit L 100mm

Socket head cap no:14, socket 40mm bit L 20mm

Socket head cap no:6, socket 40mm bit L 145mm

To be shorted to 12mm

3HAC 16261-1

2 Reference information
2.1.5 Special tools

2.1.5 Special tools

General

All service (repairs, maintenance and installation) instructions contain lists of tools required
to perform the specified activity. The required tools are a sum of standard tools, defined in
section Standard toolkit on page 18, and of special tools, listed directly in the instructions and
also gathered in the table below.

Special tools, IRB


6600/6650/7600

The table below is an overview of all the special tools required when performing service
activities on the IRB 6600/6650/7600. The tools are gathered in two kits: Basic Toolkit
(3HAC 15571-3) and Extended Toolkit (3HAC 15571-2).
The special tools are also listed directly in the current instructions.

3HAC 16261-1

Description

IRB 66X0/Qty IRB 7600/Qty Art. no.

Angel bracket

68080011-LP

Bolts (M16 x 60) for Mech stop ax 3 2

3HAB 3409-86

Bolts (M16 x 80) for Mech stop ax 3 -

3HAB 3409-89

Cal. tool

68080011-GM

Calibration bracket

3HAC 13908-9

Calibration tool ax1

3HAC 13908-4

CalPen (Calibration Pendulum)

3HAC 15716-1

Extension 300mm for bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Fixture lower arm

3HAC 13659-1

Fixture lower arm

3HAC 13660-1

Gearbox crank

3HAC 16488-1

Guide pins M12 x 150

3HAC 13056-2

Guide pins M12 x 200

3HAC 13056-3

Guide pins M12 x 250

3HAC 13056-4

Guide pins M8 x 100

3HAC 15520-1

Guide pins M8 x 150

3HAC 15520-2

Guide pins sealing

3HAC 14445-1

Guide pins sealing

3HAC 14446-1

Guide pins M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1

Guide pins M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2

Guide pins M16 x 150

3HAC 13120-2

Guide pins M16 x 200

3HAC 13120-3

Guide pins M16 x 250

3HAC 13120-4

Guide pins M16 x 300

3HAC 13120-5

Guide pins sealing ax 2, 3, 100mm

3HAC 14628-2

Guide pins sealing ax 2, 3, 80mm

3HAC 14628-1

Guide pins sealing ax 2, 3, 100mm

3HAC 14627-3

Guide pins sealing ax 2, 3, 80mm

3HAC 14627-2

Hydraulic cylinder

3HAC 11731-1

Hydraulic pump 80Mpa

3HAC 13086-1

19

2 Reference information
2.1.5 Special tools

Description

IRB 66X0/Qty IRB 7600/Qty Art. no.

Hydraulic pump 80Mpa (Glycerin)

3HAC 13086-2

Levelmeter 2000 kit

6369901-348

Lifting device, base

3HAC 15560-1

Lifting device, manipulator

3HAC 15607-1

Lifting device, upper arm

3HAC 15994-1

Lifting device, upper arm

3HAC 15536-1

Lifting eye VLBG M12

3HAC 16131-1

Lifting eye M12

3HAC 14457-3

Lifting eye M16

3HAC 14457-4

Lifting tool (chain)

3HAC 15556-1

Lifting tool, gearbox ax 2

3HAC 13698-1

Lifting tool, gearbox ax 2

3HAC 12731-1

Lifting tool, lower arm

3HAC 14691-1

Lifting tool, motor ax 1, 4, 5

3HAC 14459-1

Lifting tool, motor ax 2, 3, 4

3HAC 15534-1

Lifting tool, wrist unit

3HAC 13605-1

Lifting tool, wrist unit

3HAC 12734-1

Measuring pin

3HAC 13908-5

Mech stop ax 3

3HAC 12708-1

Mech stop ax 3

3HAC 12708-2

Press tool, ax 2 bearing

3HAC 13527-1

Press tool, ax 2 bearing

3HAC 13453-1

Press tool, ax 2 shaft

3HAC 13452-1

Press tool, balancing device shaft

3HAC 17129-1

Press tool, balancing device

3HAC 15767-1

Puller tool, balancing device shaft

3HAC 12475-1

Removal tool, wheel unit

3HAC 15814-1

Removal tool, motor M10x

3HAC 14972-1

Removal tool, motor M12x

3HAC 14631-1

Removal tool, motor M12x

3HAC 14973-1

Rotation tool

3HAC 17105-1

Sensor plate

3HAC 0392-1

Support, base

3HAC 15535-1

Sync. adapter

3HAC 13908-1

Tool set balancing device

3HAC 15943-2

Tool set balancing device

3HAC 15943-1

Turn disk fixture

3HAC 68080011GU

Washers for Mech stop axis 3

3HAA 1001-186

Note a) Calibration tools for IRB 6600/6650/7600 when CalPen is not used (standard).
Note b) Special tools that may be rent from ATRP/S.

20

3HAC 16261-1

2 Reference information
2.1.6 Performing a leak-down test

2.1.6 Performing a leak-down test

General

After refitting any motor and any gearbox, the integrity of all seals enclosing the gearbox oil
must be tested. This is done in a leak-down test.

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Leakdown tester

Note

3HAC 0207-1

Leak detection spray

Procedure
Step

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Finish the refitting procedure of the motor or


gear in question.

2.

Remove the topmost oil plug on the gear in


question, and replace it with the leakdown
tester .
Adapters may be required, which are included
in the leakdown tester kit.

3.

Apply compressed air, and raise the pressure Recommended value: 0.2 - 0.25
with the knob until the correct value is shown on bar (20 - 25 kPa)
the manometer.

4.

Disconnect the compressed air supply.

5.

Wait for approx. 8-10 minutes. No pressure loss If the compressed air is signifimust be detected.
cantly colder or warmer than the
gearbox to be tested, a slight pressure increase or decrease respectively may occur. This is quite
normal.

6.

Was any pressure drop evident?


Localize the leak as detailed below.
Remove the leakdown tester, and refit the oil
plug. The test is complete.

7.

Spray suspected leak areas with leak detection Art. no. specified above!
spray .
Bubbles indicate a leak.

8.

When the leak has been localized: take the necessary measures to correct the leak.

Art. no. specified above!

21

2 Reference information
2.1.7 Lifting equipment and lifting instructions

2.1.7 Lifting equipment and lifting instructions

General

Many repair and maintenance activities require different pieces of lifting equipment, which
are specified in each activity instruction.
However, how to use each piece of lifting equipment is not detailed in the activity instruction,
but in the instruction delivered with each piece of lifting equipment.
This implies that the instructions delivered with the lifting equipment should be stored for
later reference.

22

3HAC 16261-1

3 Unpacking
3.0.1 Pre-installation procedure

Chapter 3: Unpacking
3.0.1 Pre-installation procedure

General

This instruction is primarily intended for use when unpacking and installing the manipulator
(mechanical robot) for the first time. It also contains information useful during later re-installation of the manipulator.

Checking the prerequisites for


installation

The checklist below details what must be observed before proceeding with the actual installation of the manipulator:

Step

Weight, manipulator

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Make sure only qualified installation personnel


conforming to all national and local codes are
allowed to perform the installation.

2.

Make sure the manipulator has not been damaged, by visually inspecting the manipulator
and control cabinet exterior.

3.

Make sure the lifting device used is dimenSpecified in Weight, manipulator


sioned to handle the weight of the manipulator. on page 23.

4.

If the manipulator is not to be installed directly, Specified in Storage conditions,


it must be stored.
manipulator on page 24.

5.

Make sure the appointed operating environSpecified in Operating conditions,


ment of the manipulator conforms to the speci- manipulator on page 24.
fications.

6.

Before taking the manipulator to its installation Specified in Loads on foundation,


site, make sure the site conforms to the
manipulator on page 24, Requiredemands.
ments on foundation, manipulator
on page 24 and Protection
classes, manipulator on page 25
respectively.

7.

Before moving the manipulator, please observe Described in Risk of tipping/Stabilthe risk of tipping!
ity on page 29.

8.

When these prerequisites have been met, the Specified in Lifting manipulator
manipulator may be taken to its installation site. with fork lift on page 32.

The table below shows the weights of the different models:

Manipulator model

Weight

IRB 7600 - 500/2.3

2490 kg

IRB 7600 - 400/2.55

2500 kg

IRB 7600 - 150/3.5

2530 kg

23

3 Unpacking
3.0.1 Pre-installation procedure

Loads on foundation, manipulator

The table below shows the different forces and torques working on the manipulator during
different kinds of operation.
NOTE! These forces and torques are extreme values that are rarely encountered during operation. The values also never reach their maximum simultaneously!

Requirements on
foundation,
manipulator

Force

Endurance load (operation)

Max. load (emergency stop)

Force xy

14000 N

31000 N

Force z

32000 10000 N

39000 16000 N

Torque xy

2000 Nm

72000 Nm

Torque z

11000 Nm

19500 Nm

The table below shows the requirements for the foundation where the manipulator is to be
fitted:
Requirement

Value

Min. levelness

0.5 mm

Max. tilt

Note
The limit for the maximum payload on the
manipulator is reduced if the manipulator is
tilted from 0.
Contact ABB for further information about
acceptable payload.

Min. resonance frequency

Storage conditions, manipulator

Operating conditions, manipulator

24

22 Hz

The table below shows the allowed storage conditions for the manipulator:

Parameter

Value

Min. ambient temperature

-25C

Max. ambient temperature

+55C

Max. ambient temperature (less than 24 h)

+70C

Max. ambient humidity

Max. 95% at constant temperature

The table below shows the allowed operating conditions for the manipulator:

Parameter

Value

Min. ambient temperature

+5C

Max. ambient temperature

+50C

Max. ambient humidity

Max. 95% at constant temperature

3HAC 16261-1

3 Unpacking
3.0.1 Pre-installation procedure

Protection
classes, manipulator

3HAC 16261-1

The table below shows the protection class of the manipulator:

Equipment

Protection class

Manipulator, IRB 7600

IP 67

25

3 Unpacking
3.0.2 Working range, IRB 7600 - 150/3.5

3.0.2 Working range, IRB 7600 - 150/3.5

Illustration

The illustration below shows the unrestricted working range of IRB 7600 - 150/3.5:

R B 7600-150/3.5

xx0100000101

26

3HAC 16261-1

3 Unpacking
3.0.3 Working range, IRB 7600 - 400/2.55

3.0.3 Working range, IRB 7600 - 400/2.55

Illustration

The illustration below shows the unrestricted working range of IRB 7600 - 400/2.55:

R B 7600-400/2.55

xx0100000100

3HAC 16261-1

27

3 Unpacking
3.0.4 Working range, IRB 7600 - 500/2.3

3.0.4 Working range, IRB 7600 - 500/2.3

Illustration

The illustration below shows the unrestricted working range of IRB 7600 - 500/2.3:

R B 7600-500/2.3

en0100000099

28

3HAC 16261-1

3 Unpacking
3.0.5 Risk of tipping/Stability

3.0.5 Risk of tipping/Stability

Risk of tipping

When the manipulator is not fastened to the floor and standing still, the manipulator is not
stable in the whole working area. Moving the arms will displace the centre of gravity, which
may cause the manipulator to tip over. DO NOT change the manipulator position before
securing it to the foundation.

Stabililty

The figure below shows the manipulator in its shipping position, which also is its most stable
position.

50

m
xx0100000103

1. DO NOT change the manipulator position before securing it to its foundation. The
shipping position is the most stable.

3HAC 16261-1

29

3 Unpacking
3.0.5 Risk of tipping/Stability

30

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation

Chapter 4: On-site Installation

3HAC 16261-1

31

4 On-site Installation
4.1.1 Lifting manipulator with fork lift

Section 4.1: On-site Installation, manipulator


4.1.1 Lifting manipulator with fork lift

General

The manipulator may be moved using a fork lift. Special aids are available.
This section applies to the IRB 7600 as well as IRB 6600.

Different designs

There are two different versions of the fork lift that fit one design of the frame respectevily.
The different designs of the frame and of the fork lift attachments are shown in the figure
below. Determine which fork lift set fits the current manipulator.
Note! The distance between the attachment holes for the fork lift pockets, shown in the following figure, are different depending on the design of the frame. This means that the fork
lift sets are unique for one type of frame, they are in other words not compatible!
Except for the shorter distance between the attachment holes, the later design of the frame
also includes an extra oil plug, located as shown in the figure below.

2
A

xx0200000386

32

Frame version without oil plug on the side (C), fork lift set to be used: 3HAC 0604-2

Frame version with oil plug on the side (C), fork lift set to be used: 3HAC 0604-1

Attachment holes, fork lift 3HAC 0604-2

Attachment holes, fork lift 3HAC 0604-1

Oil plug

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.1 Lifting manipulator with fork lift

Required equipment
Equipment, etc. Art. no.

Note

Fork lift set, incl. all 3HAC 0604-2


required hardware

See the figure in Illustration, 3HAC 0604-2 on page 33

Fork lift set, incl. all 3HAC 0604-1


required hardware

See the figure in Illustration, 3HAC 0604-1 on page 34.

Standard toolkit

Illustration, 3HAC
0604-2

3HAC 15557-1 The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on


page 24.

The figure below shows how to attach the fork lift set, 3HAC 0604-2, to the manipulator.

C
B

xx0100000102

3HAC 16261-1

Securing screws (2x4 pcs)

Fork lift pockets (2 pcs)

Spacer (2 pcs)

33

4 On-site Installation
4.1.1 Lifting manipulator with fork lift

Illustration, 3HAC
0604-1

The figure below shows how to attach the fork lift set, 3HAC 0604-1, to the manipulator.

A
B

xx0200000379

Lifting the manipulator with fork lift

Fork lift pocket (2 pcs, different from each other)

Spacer (2 pcs)

Securing screws (2x4 pcs), not oil lubricated

Securing screws (2 pcs), oil lubricated

Attachment point for spacer

The section below details how to secure the fork lift set to the manipulator in order to lift and
move the manipulator using the fork lift ONLY!
The IRB 6600/6650 manipulator weighs 1725 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

The IRB 7600 manipulator weighs 2550 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned
accordingly!

The shorter fork lift pocket weighs 22 kg while the longer version weighs 60 kg! Use a suitable
lifting device to avoid injury to personnel!

No personnel must under any circumstances be present under the suspended load.

34

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.1 Lifting manipulator with fork lift

Step

Info/Illustration

Make sure the manipulator is posiRelease the brakes if required as detailed in


tioned as shown in the figure to the
Manually releasing the brakes on page 40.
right. If it is not, position it that way.
Note! Depending on which fork lift set
50
is used, the manipulator may or may
not be equipped with a load, see figures on the right!

10

1.

Action

m
xx0200000079

When using fork lift set 3HAC 0604-2, no


load is permitted on the manipulator!

10

50

m
xx0200000387

When using fork lift set 3HAC 0604-1, a


load is permitted on the manipulator!

3HAC 16261-1

2.

Fit the two spacers to the manipulator Shown in the figures Illustration, 3HAC
and secure.
0604-2 on page 33 or Illustration, 3HAC
0604-1 on page 34!

3.

Secure the fork lift pocket horizontally


to the spacers with four washers and
securing screws.
Notice the tightening torques! All the
securing screws are identical, but
they are secured with different tightening torques!

Shown in the figure Illustration, 3HAC 06042 on page 33 or Illustration, 3HAC 0604-1
on page 34!
4 pcs; M16x60; tightening torque: 60 Nm
12 Nm (not oil lubricated screws).
Make sure the original screws are always
used (or replacements of equivalent quality:
M16, quality 12.9)!

35

4 On-site Installation
4.1.1 Lifting manipulator with fork lift

Step

Action

Info/Illustration

4.

Secure the fork lift pocket vertically by


fastening the two washers and oil
lubricated securing screws to the
frame (only in fork lift set 3HAC 06041!).

Shown in the figure Illustration, 3HAC 06041 on page 34!


2 pcs; M16x60; tightening torque: 300 Nm
45 Nm.
Make sure the original screws are always
used (or replacements of equivalent quality:
M16, quality 12.9)!

5.

Secure the second fork lift pocket on Shown in figure Illustration, 3HAC 0604-2
the other side of the manipulator with on page 33 or Illustration, 3HAC 0604-1 on
securing screws.
page 34!
4 pcs; M16x60; tightening torque: 60 Nm
12 Nm (not oil lubricated screws).
Make sure the original screws are always
used (or replacements of equivalent quality:
M16, quality 12.9)!

6.

Double-check that the pockets are


properly secured to the manipulator!
Insert the fork lift forks into the pockets and carefully lift the manipulator.

xx0200000380

Reposition the harness, if any, before using


a fork lift!
7.

36

Lift the manipulator and move it to its


installation site.

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.2 Lifting manipulator with lifting slings

4.1.2 Lifting manipulator with lifting slings

General

The section below applies to IRB 7600 as well as IRB 6600.

Illustration, lifting
slings

The figure below shows how to lift the complete manipulator with lifting slings.
Note the recommended manipulator position shown in the figure below and in the instruction!
Attempting to lift a manipulator in any other position may result in the manipulator tipping
over, causing severe damage or injury!

C
E
I

L
B
xx0200000153

3HAC 16261-1

Load hook

M12 lifting eye

Swivelling lifting eyes, 4 pcs

Lifting devices eye

Shortening hook

Lifting slings, 4 pcs

Chain

Hook

37

4 On-site Installation
4.1.2 Lifting manipulator with lifting slings

Required equipment
Equipment

Art. no.

Lifting device, manipulator 3HAC 15607-1, includes instruction, 3HAC 15971-2,


for how to use the lifting device.

Slings attached
directly onto
manipulator

The section below details how to lift and move the manipulator using lifting slings when these
are to be attached directly onto the manipulator frame.

The IRB 6600/6650 manipulator weighs 1725 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

The IRB 7600 manipulator weighs 2550 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned
accordingly!

No personnel must under any circumstances be present under the suspended load!

Step

Action

Note

1.

Run the overhead crane to a position


above the manipulator.

2.

Make sure the manipulator is positioned Release the brakes if required as detailed
as shown in the figure on the right. If it is in Manually releasing the brakes on page
not, position it that way.
40.

50

m
xx0100000103

38

3.

Fit the lifting device, manipulator to the


robot as described in the enclosed
instruction!

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 38!

4.

Raise the overhead crane to lift the


robot.

Make sure all hooks and attachments


maintain their correct positions while lifting the manipulator!
Always move the manipulator at very low
speeds, making sure it does not tip.

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.3 Lifting manipulator with round slings

4.1.3 Lifting manipulator with round slings

General

The manipulator may be lifted with round slings according to the illustration below.

Illustration

C
m

720-860

xx0200000315

3HAC 16261-1

3x Chain sling with shortener, 4250kg, 0,5m (2 pcs), 0,265m (1 pc)

2x Round sling, 1000kg

3x Round sling, 2000kg, 4 m

39

4 On-site Installation
4.1.4 Manually releasing the brakes

4.1.4 Manually releasing the brakes

General

The section below details how to release the holding brakes of each axis motor. It applies to
IRB 7600 as well as IRB 6600/6650. Differences between the versions are highlighted in the
affected sections.
The brakes may be released by:

Internal brake release unit: using push buttons on the manipulator. This requires either
that the controller is connected or that power is supplied to the R1.MP connector (on
manipulator base), 0V on pin 12 and 24V on pin 11.

IRB 7600: External brake release unit: using push-buttons on an external brake
release unit. This does NOT require the controller to be connected. The external unit
is used when there are no push-buttons on the manipulator.

Supplying power on the wrong pins may cause all brakes on the manipulator to be released!

Illustration, IRB
6600/6650

The internal brake release unit on the IRB 6600/6650 is located at the frame, as shown in the
figure below.

6
5
4
3
2
1

xx0300000044

40

Internal brake release unit with push buttons, located on the manipulator frame

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.4 Manually releasing the brakes

Illustration, IRB
7600 base

The internal brake release unit on the IRB 7600 is located either at the base or at the frame.
The figure below shows the unit located at the base.

xx0200000375

Illustration, IRB
7600 frame

Internal brake release unit with push buttons, located on the manipulator base

The internal brake release unit on the IRB 7600 is located either at the base or at the frame.
The figure below shows the unit located at the frame.

6 5 4

3 2 1

xx0200000376

3HAC 16261-1

Internal brake release unit with push buttons, located on the manipulator frame

41

4 On-site Installation
4.1.4 Manually releasing the brakes

Internal brake
release unit,
releasing the
brakes

The procedure below details how to release the holding brakes when the robot is equipped
with an internal brake release unit.

When relasing the holding brakes, the manipulator axes may move very quickly and sometimes in unexpected ways! Make sure no personnel is near the manipulator arm!

Step

Illustration, IRB
7600 external
brake release unit
connections

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

The internal brake release unit is equipped with


six buttons for controlling the axes brakes. The
buttons are numbered according to the numbers
of the axes.

The buttons are located according to the figures Illustration, IRB


6600/6650 on page 40 ,Illustration, IRB 7600 base on page 41
or Illustration, IRB 7600 frame on
page 41.

2.

Release the holding brake on a particular manipulator axis by pressing the appropriate button on
the internal brake release panel.
The brake will function again as soon as the button is released.

The illustration below shows where to connect the external brake release unit in order to
release the manipulators holding brakes.

C
D

xx0100000104

42

Connector R1.BU

Rear connector plate

Rear cover plate

External brake release unit

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.4 Manually releasing the brakes

Illustration IRB
7600, external
brake release unit
connectors

The illustration below shows the connectors on the manipulator and on the external brake
release unit.

D
E

xx0200000081

Rear connector plate

Connector R1.MP

Connector R1.BU

External brake release unit

Connect to R1.BU

Required equipment

External brake
release unit (only
IRB 7600)

Equipment

Art. no.

External brake release unit

3HAC 12987-1

This section details how to release the holding brakes when the robot is equipped with an
external brake release unit (only IRB 7600).

When releasing the holding brakes, the manipulator axes may move very quickly and sometimes in unexpected ways! Make sure no personnel is near the manipulator arm!

Step
1.

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Info/Illustration

Remove the rear cover plate on the base of Shown in Illustration, IRB 7600
the manipulator by unscrewing its attachment external brake release unit connecscrews and plain washers
tions on page 42!

43

4 On-site Installation
4.1.4 Manually releasing the brakes

Step

44

Action

Info/Illustration

2.

Locate the free connector, connected to the


Shown in Illustration IRB 7600,
rear of connector R1.MP behind the rear con- external brake release unit connecnector plate.
tors on page 43!
Make sure it is designated R1.BU.

3.

Connect the external brake release unit to


connector R1.BU.

4.

Release the holding brake of each manipulator axis by pressing the respective button on
the external brake release unit.

5.

Disconnect the external brake release unit.

6.

Refit the rear cover plate with its attachment


screws.

Art. no. specified in section


Required equipment on page 43!
Shown in Illustration IRB 7600,
external brake release unit connectors on page 43!

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.5 Lifting the base plate

4.1.5 Lifting the base plate

General

This section details how to lift the base plate

Equipment

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section


Standard toolkit on page 24!

Lifting eye, M16

3HAC 14457-4 Use three lifting eyes.


For lifting the base plate.

Lifting slings

Use three slings.


Length: approx. 2 m

Hole configuration

xx0200000096

Attachment holes for lifting eyes (x3)

The base plate weighs 335 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Lifting the base


plate
Step

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Fit lifting eyes in the three lifting holes. Shown in the figure Hole configuration on
page 45!

2.

Fit lifting slings to the eyes and to the


lifting device.

45

4 On-site Installation
4.1.6 Securing the base plate

4.1.6 Securing the base plate

General

This section details how to secure the base plate.

Base plate,
dimensions

2x 503
2x 453
2x 247
2x 182
2x 90 2x 90

2x 451
2x 407
2x 321
2x 273

B
B

455

A
A

540

480

A-A
B-B

xx0100000105

Base plate,
grooves and
holes

46

The illustration below shows the orienting grooves and guide sleeve holes in the base plate.

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.6 Securing the base plate

B
xx0300000045

Guide sleeve holes

Orienting grooves in the base plate

Required equipment
Equipment

Spare part no. Art. no.

Base plate

3HAC 12937-7 Includes all required guide


sleeves, screws and washers.
A drawing of the base plate
itself may be ordered from
ABB Robotics!

Guide sleeves, 2 pcs


(between guide plate and
manipulator)

3HAC 12937-3 Included in Base plate,


3HAC 12937-7.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 24!

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the step-bystep instructions below.

3HAC 16261-1

Note

These procedures include


references to the tools
required.

47

4 On-site Installation
4.1.6 Securing the base plate

Base plate

This section details how to secure the base plate to the foundation.
The table specifies any recommendations made by ABB:

Variable

Recommendation

Recommended foundation quality 1

Steel fibre reinforced concrete foundation, 30 kg/m3,


class K30, t=250 mm

Recommended foundation quality 2

Sturdy concrete foundation, double reinforced by 10


mm steel bars, distance 140 mm, class K25, t=250

Recommended bolt quality and


dimension

Hilti HDA-P, M20 x 200

The base plate weighs 335 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

48

Action

Info/illustration

1.

Make sure the foundation is level.

2.

Orient the base plate in relation to the robot


work location using the three grooves in the
base plate.

Shown in Base plate, grooves and


holes on page 46.

3.

Lift the base plate to its mounting position.

Detailed in Lifting the base plate on


page 45.

4.

Use the base plate as a template and drill 16 If possible, observe the recommenattachment holes as required by the selected dations specified in the table above.
bolt dimension.
ABB does not assume any responsibility for other foundation qualities,
due to great variations in the foundation properties.

5.

Fit the base plate and use the levelling bolts


to level the base plate.

6.

If required, fit strips of sheet metal underneath


the base plate to fill any gaps.

7.

Secure the base plate to the foundation with


screws and sleeves.

8.

Recheck the four manipulator contact surMax. allowed deviation: 0.5 mm


faces on the base plate to make sure they are
level and flat.
If they are not, pieces of sheet metal or similar
may be used to bring the base plate to a level
position.

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.7 Orienting and securing the manipulator

4.1.7 Orienting and securing the manipulator

General

This section details how to orient and secure the manipulator to the base plate after fitting it
to the foundation, in order to run the robot safely. The requirements made on the foundations
are shown in the following tables and figures.
The section below applies to IRB 7600 as well as IRB 6600/6650. The only difference
between these robot models is that IRB 7600 is secured using 12 attachment bolts while IRB
6600/6650 uses 8 attachment bolts.

Illustration,
manipulator fitted
to base plate

The illustration below shows the IRB 7600 manipulator base fitted to the base plate. The IRB
6600/6650 manipulator base does not have the attachment holes A (4 pcs).

A B

xx0100000107

Attachment
screws

3HAC 16261-1

Manipulator attachment bolts and washers, 4 pcs M24 x 120 (IRB 7600 only)

Manipulator attachment bolts and washers, 8 pcs M24 x 120

Levelling screws

Base plate attachment screws

The table below specifies the type of securing screws and washers to be used for securing the
manipulator to the base plate/foundation.

Suitable screws, lightly lubricated:

M24 x 120

Quality

Quality 8.8

Suitable washer:

Thickness: 4 mm
Outer diameter: 44 mm
Inner diameter: 25 mm

Tightening torque:

775 Nm

49

4 On-site Installation
4.1.7 Orienting and securing the manipulator

Securing the
manipulator

The procedure below details how to secure the manipulator to the base plate after fitting the
plate to the foundation.

Step

Hole configuration, IRB 6600/


6650

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Lift the manipulator.

Detailed in Lifting manipulator with fork lift


on page 32 or Lifting manipulator with lifting
slings on page 37.

2.

Move the manipulator to the vicinity of


its installation location.

3.

Fit two guide sleeves to the guide


sleeve holes in the base plate.

4.

Guide the manipulator gently using two Make sure the manipulator base is corM24 screws while lowering it into its
rectly fitted onto the guide sleeves!
mounting position.

5.

Fit the bolts and washers in the base


attachment holes.

6.

Tighten the bolts in a criss-cross pattern to ensure that the base is not distorted.

Shown in Base plate, grooves and holes on


page 46.
Note that one of the guide sleeve holes is
elongated!

Specified in Attachment screws on page


49.
Shown in the figure Illustration, manipulator fitted to base plate on page 49!
Note! Lightly lubricate the 8 or 12 screws
before assembly!

The illustration below shows the hole configuration used when securing the manipulator, IRB
6600.

R400
4
x

15

4x3
7,5

xx0200000029

50

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.7 Orienting and securing the manipulator

Hole configuration, IRB 7600

The illustration below shows the hole configuration used when securing the manipulator, IRB
7600.
4x

10

4
5 .5
x1 x7
4

4x
37.5

xx0300000046

Cross section,
guide sleeve hole

The illustration below shows the cross section of the guide sleeve holes.

xx0100000109

3HAC 16261-1

51

4 On-site Installation
4.1.8 Fitting equipment on manipulator

4.1.8 Fitting equipment on manipulator

General

The manipulator features mounting holes for additional equipment.


Access to any of the following mounting holes may be obstructed by any additional cabling,
equipment, etc., fitted by the robot user. Make sure the required mounting holes are accessible
when planning the robot cell.
Under certain conditions, mounting holes may be added on the manipulator.

Illustration, fitting
of extra equipment on lower
arm

The illustration below shows the mounting holes available for fitting extra equipment on the
lower arm.
Make sure not to damage the manipulator cabling on the inside of the lower arm when fitting
extra equipment. Always use appropriate attachment screws!

xx0100000115

52

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.8 Fitting equipment on manipulator

100

82.5

50
7.5
61.5

150

440.5

xx0100000120

Illustration, fitting
of extra equipment on upper
arm

The illustration below shows the mounting holes available for fitting extra equipment on the
upper arm.

R700

M12 (4x)

325
xx0100000116

3HAC 16261-1

53

4 On-site Installation
4.1.8 Fitting equipment on manipulator

Illustration, fitting
of extra equipment on frame

The illustration below shows the mounting holes available for fitting extra equipment on the
frame.

600
xx0100000117

xx0100000118

54

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.1.8 Fitting equipment on manipulator

Illustration, fitting
on mounting
flange

The illustration below shows the mounting holes available for fitting equipment on the
mounting flange.

0
x3
2
1
30

15

A-A

A
xx0100000119

Fastener quality

3HAC 16261-1

When fitting tools on the mounting flange (see the figures above), use only screws with quality 12.9. When fitting other equipment, standard screws with quality 8.8 can be used.

55

4 On-site Installation
4.1.9 Loads

4.1.9 Loads

General

Any loads mounted on the manipulator must be defined correctly and carefully (with regard
to the position of center of gravity and inertia factor) in order to avoid jolting movements and
overloading the motors. If this is not done correctly operational stops may result.

References

Load diagrams, permitted extra loads (equipment) and their positions are specified in the
Product Specification. The loads must also be defined in the software as detailed in Users
Guide.

Stop time and


braking distances

Manipulator motor brake performance depends on any loads attached. For further information about brake performance, please contact ABB Robotics.

56

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.2.1 Introduction

Section 4.2: Restricting the working range


4.2.1 Introduction

General

The working range of the manipulator may be limited to eliminate the risk of collisions. The
following axes may be restricted:

Axis 1, hardware (mechanical stop) and software (signal from adjustable position
switch)

Axis 2, hardware (mechanical stop) and software (signal from adjustable position
switch)

Axis 3, hardware (mechanical stop) and software (signal from adjustable position
switch)

This section describes the utilization of the mechanical stops and the position switches.

3HAC 16261-1

57

4 On-site Installation
4.2.2 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 1

4.2.2 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 1

General

The working range of axes 1 is limited by fixed mechanical stops and can be reduced by
adding additional mechanical stops giving 7.5 or 15 graduation in both directions.

Mechanical
stops, axis 1

The illustration below shows the mounting position of the mechanical stops on axis 1.

B
xx0300000049

Additional mechanical stop

Fixed mechanical stop

Required equipment
Equipment, etc. Spare part no. Art. no.

58

Note

7.5, mechanical
stop for axis 1

3HAC 11076-1 Includes attachment screws.

15, mechanical
stop for axis 1

3HAC 11076-2 Includes attachment screws.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in the section Standard toolkit on page 24.

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.2.2 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 1

Installation,
mechanical stops
axis 1

The procedure below details how to mount the mechanical stops on axis 1. An assembly
drawing is also enclosed with the product.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The addititonal mechanical stop must be replaced after a hard collision if the mechanical stop
has been deformed!

Step

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Mount the additional mechanical stop on the frame


according to the figure Mechanical stops, axis 1 on
page 58.

Tightening torque: 115 Nm.

2.

The software working range limitations must be


amended to correspond to the changes in the
mechanical limitations of the working range.

59

4 On-site Installation
4.2.3 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 2

4.2.3 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 2

General

The working range of axis 2 is limited by fixed mechanical stops and can be reduced by
adding up to six additional mechanical stops with 15 graduation in respective direction.

Mechanical
stops, axis 2

The illustration below shows the mounting position of the mechanical stops on axis 2.

A
B

xx0300000047

Additional mechanical stops

Fixed mechanical stop

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

60

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Mechanical stop set,


axis 2 IRB 6600/6650

3HAC 13787-1

Includes six stops, 3HAC


13786-1, each one restricting
the working range by 15.
Includes attachment screws.

Mechanical stop set,


axis 2 IRB 7600

3HAC 11077-1

Includes six stops, 3HAC


11407-1, each one restricting
the working range by 15.
Includes attachment screws.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 24.

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.2.3 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 2

Installation,
mechanical stops
axis 2

The procedure below details how to mount the mechanical stops on axis 2. An assembly
drawing is also enclosed with the product.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The addititonal mechanical stop must be replaced after a hard collision if the mechanical stop
has been deformed!

Step

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Mount and tighten the additional stops in a row,


starting from the fixed stop.

Tightening torque: 115 Nm.


Shown in the figure Mechanical
stops, axis 2 on page 60.

2.

The software working range limitations must be


amended to correspond to the changes in the
mechanical limitations of the working range.

61

4 On-site Installation
4.2.4 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 3

4.2.4 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 3

General

The working range of axis 3 is limited by fixed mechanical stops and can be reduced by
adding additional mechanical stops with 20 graduation in respective direction.

Mechanical
stops, axis 3

The illustration below shows the mounting position of the mechanical stops on axis 3.

xx0300000048

Additional mechanical stops

Fixed mechanical stop

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

62

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Mechanical stop set,


axis 3, IRB 6600/
6650

3HAC 13128-1 Includes six stops, one with


80restriction, 3HAC 12708-3
(use when limitation angle >=80),
and five with 20, 3HAC 12708-1.
Includes attachment screws.

Mechanical stop set,


axis 3, IRB 7600

3HAC 13128-3 Includes six stops, one with


80restriction, 3HAC 12708-4
(use when limitation angle >=80),
and five with 20, 3HAC 12708-2.
Includes attachment screws.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in the


section Standard toolkit on page
24.

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.2.4 Mechanically restricting the working range of axis 3

Installation,
mechanical stops
axis 3

The procedure below details how to mount the mechanical stops on axis 3. An assembly
drawing is also enclosed with the product.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The addititonal mechanical stop must be replaced after a hard collision if the mechanical stop
has been deformed!

Step

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Mount and tighten the additional stops in a row,


starting from the fixed stop.

Shown in the figure Mechanical


stops, axis 3 on page 62
Tightening torque: 115 Nm.

2.

The software working range limitations must be


amended to correspond to the changes in the
mechanical limitations of the working range.

63

4 On-site Installation
4.2.5 Position switches

4.2.5 Position switches

General

Position switches can be installed on axes 1-3. The position switches consist of cams and cam
stops as shown in the figures below.
The position switch kits may be delivered in one of two ways:

Axis 1

Fitted by ABB Robotics on delivery. In this case, the cams still must be fitted and
locked by the user. For axis 1, the cover for the cams must also be fitted.

As kits to be completely fitted to the manipulator and adjusted by the user.

Description

Art. no

Position switch, axis 1 complete

3HAC 12750-1

Position switch, axis 2 complete

3HAC 12785-1

Position switch, axis 3 complete

3HAC 12788-1

The illustration below shows the position switch for axis 1:

A
F
C

xx0100000158

64

Position switch, axis 1

Cam

Set screw, cam

Protection sheet

Rail

Rail attachment

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.2.5 Position switches

Axis 2

The illustration below shows the position switch for axis 2:

E
B

C
F
xx0100000159

3HAC 16261-1

Position switch, axis 2

Cam

Set screw, cam

Rail

Rail Attachment

65

4 On-site Installation
4.2.5 Position switches

Axis 3

The illustration below shows the position switch for axis 3:

C
B

xx0100000160

Specifications

Connections

66

Position switch, axis 3

Cam

Set screw, cam

Rail

Rail attachment

Maximum voltage/current for the position switches:

Parameter

Value

Voltage

Max. 240 VAC

Current

Max. 6 A

The position switches may be connected to different points on the robot system:

R1.SW1 at the manipulator base. Customer connection kit is recommended! Also see
"Customer Connection Kit"!

R1.SW2/3 at the manipulator base. Customer connection kit is recommended! Also


see "Customer Connection Kit"!

XT8, screw terminal in the controller cabinet

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.2.5 Position switches

Fitting and
adjusting cams
and stops

The instruction below details how to fit and adjust the parts of the position switches:

Step

Illustration,
adjust and secure
cams

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Cut the cam to a suitable length.

Use a sharp knife and rubber hammer or similar.

2.

Cut the edge of the cam edge to max. 30!

Shown in the figure Illustration, cutting the cam on page 68.


If the angle is larger, this may damage the position switch.

3.

Cut the part of the cam running in the profile to


90! Also see Illustration, cutting the cam on
page 68 below.

4.

Make sure the ends of the profile are chamfered to enable the cam to run through the
profile.

5.

Fit the cam with the M5 screw and nut. Tighten Shown in the figure Illustration,
the M5 screw to secure the cam.
adjust and secure cams on page
67.

The illustration below show how to adjust and secure the position switch cams and profiles.

C
30

xx0100000113

3HAC 16261-1

Cam stop, M5 nut and M5 x 6 set screw

Adjustable cam

Profile

67

4 On-site Installation
4.2.5 Position switches

Illustration, cutting the cam

The illustration below show how to cut the position switch cam.

o
30
o
90

xx0100000114

68

Remove the gray section

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.2.5 Position switches

Section 4.3: On-site installation, controller cabinet

3HAC 16261-1

69

4 On-site Installation
4.3.1 Lifting the controller cabinet

4.3.1 Lifting the controller cabinet

Lifting device

Use the four lifting devices on the cabinet or a fork lift when lifting the controller cabinet
S4Cplus M2000A as shown below.
The figure below shows the maximum angle between the lifting straps when lifting the controller.

60

xx0100000153

70

Min. 60 when lifting with straps

Fork lift

3HAC 16261-1

4 On-site Installation
4.3.2 Required installation space, control cabinet

4.3.2 Required installation space, control cabinet

Dimensions

The figure below shows the required installation space for the S4Cplus M2000A control cabinet:

A
A
xx0100000156

3HAC 16261-1

Distance to wall

71

4 On-site Installation
4.3.3 Bolt pattern, control cabinet

4.3.3 Bolt pattern, control cabinet

Dimensions

The figure below shows the bolt pattern for the S4Cplus M2000A control cabinet:
720

400

xx0100000157

72

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections

Chapter 5: Electrical connections

3HAC 16261-1

73

5 Electrical connections
5.1.1 Connecting the manipulator to the control cabinet

Section 5.1: Signal/Power cables


5.1.1 Connecting the manipulator to the control cabinet

General

Connect the manipulator and control cabinet to each other after securing them to the foundation. The lists below specify which cables to be used in each application.

Location of connectors

XS

Application interface

XS20

I/O connections

XS8

External axes in separate cabinet

X13/X5

Operators panel

XS78

Safety signals, external connections

XS77/X7

DeviceNet

LAN/XTDF

Mains connection

X24VE/VS

External axes

IBS

Position switches

XS41

Manipulator cables

XS58
XS2
Ext. contr. panel

Main cable
categories

All cables between manipulator and control cabinet are divided into the following categories:

Cable category

Description

Manipulator cables

Handles power supply to and control of the manipulators


motors as well as feedback from the serial measurement
board.

Position switch cables (option) Handles supply to and feedback from any position switches
and cooling fans on the manipulator.

74

Customer cables (option)

Handles communication with equipment fitted on the manipulator by the customer, including databus communication,
low voltage signals and high voltage power supply + protective earth.

External axes cables (option)

Handles power supply to and control of the external axes


motors as well as feedback from the servo system.

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.1.1 Connecting the manipulator to the control cabinet

These categories are divided into sub-categories which are specified below:

Manipulator
cables

These cables are included in the standard delivery. They are completely premanufactured and ready to plug in.

Cable subcategory

Connection Connection
point,
point,
cabinet
manipulator

Description

Manipulator
cable, power

Transfers drive power from the drive


XP1
units in the control cabinet to the manipulator motors.

R1.MP

Manipulator
cable, signals

Transfers resolver data from the serial


measurement board and power supply
to the SMB.

R1.SMB

XP2

Manipulator
cable, power
Cable

Article number

Manipulator cable, power, 7 m

3HAC 11818-1

Manipulator cable, power, 15 m

3HAC 11818-2

Manipulator cable, power, 30 m

3HAC 11818-4

Cable

Article number

Manipulator cable, signal, shielded, 7 m

3HAC 7998-1

Manipulator cable, signal, shielded, 15 m

3HAC 7998-2

Manipulator cable, signal, shielded, 30 m

3HAC 7998-4

Manipulator
cable, signals

Position switch
cables

3HAC 16261-1

These cables are not included in the standard delivery, but can be included in the delivery if
the Position switch option is ordered. (The position switches can also be ordered without
cables.) The cables are completely pre-manufactured and ready to plug in.

Cable

Article
number

Connection Connection
point,
point,
cabinet
manipulator

Position switch cable, axis 1, 7 m

3HAC 13175-1

XP8

R1.SW

Position switch cable, axis 1, 15 m

3HAC 13175-2

XP8

R1.SW

Position switch cable, axis 1, 30 m

3HAC 13175-4

XP8

R1.SW

Position switch cable, axes 2 and 3, 7 m 3HAC 13176-1

XP58

R1.SW2/3

Position switch cable, axes 2 and 3, 15 m 3HAC 13176-2

XP58

R1.SW2/3

Position switch cable, axes 2 and 3, 30 m 3HAC 13176-4

XP58

R1.SW2/3

75

5 Electrical connections
5.1.1 Connecting the manipulator to the control cabinet

Customer cables

External axes
cables

These cables are not included in the standard delivery, but can be included in the delivery of
each specific option. The cables are not ready to plug in, but requires connection to terminals
inside the control cabinet as well as keying. These activities are detailed in Customer Connection Kit.

Connection
point,
cabinet

Connection
point,
manipulator

3HAC 13173-1

XT/XP5.1
XT/XP6
XS6

R1.CP/CS

Fieldbus cable, CAN, 15 m

3HAC 13173-2

XT/XP5.1
XT/XP6
XS6

R1.CP/CS

Fieldbus cable, CAN, 30 m

3HAC 13173-4

XT/XP5.1
XT/XP6
XS6

R1.CP/CS

Fieldbus cable, Profibus, 7 m

3HAC 13174-1

XT/XP5.1
XT/XP6
DP/M

R1.CP/CS

Fieldbus cable, Profibus, 15 m

3HAC 13174-2

XT/XP5.1
XT/XP6
DP/M

R1.CP/CS

Fieldbus cable, Profibus, 30 m

3HAC 13174-4

XT/XP5.1
XT/XP6
DP/M

R1.CP/CS

Cable

Article number

Fieldbus cable, CAN, 7 m

These cables are not included in the standard delivery, but can be included if the External
axes option is ordered. The cables are ready to plug in.

Cable sub-category Description

76

Connection Connection
point,
point,
cabinet
manipulator

External axes cable,


power

Transfers drive power from the


XP7
drive units in the control cabinet to
the externa axes motors.

XS45

External axes cable,


signals

Transfers resolver data from the


serial measurement board and
power supply to the SMB.

XS47

XP41

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.1.2 Connection of manipulator cables to control cabinet, S4Cplus M2000A

5.1.2 Connection of manipulator cables to control cabinet, S4Cplus M2000A

General

Section "Connecting the manipulator to the control cabinet" specifies which cables to use and
to which connectors these are to be connected in order to to connect the controller to the
manipulator.

Connections to
the cabinet

All control cabinet connectors are shown in the figure below.

xx0100000247

The connections on the manipulator are located on the rear of the robot base.

3HAC 16261-1

Manipulator cable (Power)

Manipulator cable (Signal)

77

5 Electrical connections
5.1.3 Connection of mains power to control cabinet, S4Cplus M2000A

5.1.3 Connection of mains power to control cabinet, S4Cplus M2000A

General

Connect the power supply either inside the cabinet, or to a optional socket on the left-hand
side of the cabinet or the lower section of the front. The cable connector is supplied but not
the cable.
Dimension the mains supply cables and fuses in accordance with the rated power and line
voltage, see rating plate on the controller.

Connections to
the mains switch

Also see the Circuit Diagram.


The instruction below details how to make all required connections to the mains switch:

xx0100000248

Connector Q1 (L1, L2, L3)

Cable gland

Protective Earth connection PE

Step Action

78

Info/Illustration

1.

Remove the left cover plate under the top lid.

2.

Pull the mains cable (outer diam. 10.2 mm) through


the gland located on the left cabinet wall.

3.

Release the connector from the knob by pushing the


release buttons located on the side of the connector.

Shown in the figure above!

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.1.3 Connection of mains power to control cabinet, S4Cplus M2000A

Step Action
4.

Connection
through a power
socket

Info/Illustration

Connect phase:
1 to L1 (Not dependent on phase sequence)

2 to L2

3 to L3

0 to XT26.N (line neutral is needed only for


option 432)

and protective earth to theprotective earth


connection.

5.

Snap the breaker on to the knob again and check that


it is fixed properly in the correct position.

6.

Tighten the cable gland.

7.

Fasten the cover plate.

Shown in the figure above!


NOTE! Max. conductor size is
6 mm2 (AWG 10). Tighten to
a torque of 2.3-2.5 Nm.
Retighten after approx. 1
week.

It is also possible to connect the mains supply through an optional wall socket of type 3x32A
or 4x32A or via an industrial Harting connector (DIN 41 640). See the figure below. Cable
connectors are supplied (option 132 - 134).

A
xx0100000162

3HAC 16261-1

DIN connector

79

5 Electrical connections
5.2.1 Signal Classes

Section 5.2: Signal connections


5.2.1 Signal Classes

Overview

Signals

80

Different rules apply to the different classes when selecting and laying cable. Signals from
different classes must not be mixed.

Power Signals: Supplies external motors and brakes.

Control signals: Digital operating and data signals (digital I/O, safety stops, etc.).

Measuring signals: Analog measuring and control signals (resolver and analog I/O).

Data communication signals: Gateway (Field bus) connection, computer link.

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.2.2 Selecting Cables

5.2.2 Selecting Cables

Controller cables:

All cables laid in the controller must be capable of withstanding 70o C. In addition.

Power Signal:

Shielded cable with an area of at least 0.75mm2 or AWG 18.


Note that any local standards and regulations concerning insulation and area must always be
complied with.

Control signals:

Shielded cables.

Measuring
signals:

Shielded cable with twisted pair conductors.

Data communication signals:

Shielded cable with twisted pair conductors.

A specific cable should be used for Gateway (Fiel bus) connections.

CAN bus with


DeviceNet for distributing I/O units:

Thin cable according to DeviceNet specification release 1.2, must be used, e.g. ABB article
no. 3HAB 8277-1. The cable is shielded and has four conductors, two for electronic supply
and two for signal transmission.
Note that a separate cable for supply of I/O loads is required.

Allen-Bradley
Remote I/O:

Cables according to Allen-Bradley specification, e.g. "Blue hose", should be used for connections between DSQC 350 and the Allen-Bradley PLC bus.

Interbus-S:

Cables according to Phnix specification, e.g. "Green type", should be used for connections
between the DSQC 351 and external Interbus-S bus.

Profibus DP:

Cables according to Profibus DP specification should be used for connections between the I/
O unit DSQC 352 and the external Profibus DP bus.

Ethernet:

Shielded twisted pair conductors (10 Base T STP).

3HAC 16261-1

81

5 Electrical connections
5.2.3 Interference elimination

5.2.3 Interference elimination

External units

External relay coils, solenoids, and other units that will be connected to the controller must
be neutralized. The figure below illustrates how this can be done.
The turn-off time for DC relays increases after neutralisation, especially if a diode is connected
across the coil. Varistors give shorter turn-off times. Neutralising the coils lengthens the life of
the switches that control them

Clamping with a
diode

The diode should be be dimensioned for the same current as the relay coil, and a voltage of
twice the supply voltage.
+24V

0V

xx0100000163

Clamping with a
varistor

The varistor should be be dimensioned for the same current as the relay coil, and a voltage of
twice the supply voltage.
+24V

0V

xx0100000164

Clamping with an
RC circuit

R 100 ohm, 1W C 0.1 - 1 mF. >500V max. voltage, 125V nominal voltage.
+24V DC,
or AC voltage

0V

xx0100000165

82

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.2.4 Connection types

5.2.4 Connection types

General

I/O, external emergency stops, safety stops, etc. can be supplied on screw connections or as
industrial connectors.

Connections

3HAC 16261-1

Designation

Connection type

X(T)

Screw terminal

XP

Pin (male)

XS

Sockets (female)

83

5 Electrical connections
5.2.5 Connections to screw terminals

5.2.5 Connections to screw terminals

Overview

This section describes how to connect conductors to screw terminals. Detailed information
about connection location and functions will be found in the circuit diagram (Service Manual).

Installation

The installation should comply with the IP54 (NEMA 12) protective standard.
1. Bend unused conductors backwards and attach them to the cable using a clasp,
or similar.
To prevent interference, ensure that unused conductors are not connected at the other end of
the cable (antenna effect)
In environments with much interference, disconnected conductors should be grounded (0V) at
both ends.

84

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.2.6 Connections to connectors (option)

5.2.6 Connections to connectors (option)

Location of connectors

The industrial connectors can be found on the front of the control cabinet. See the figure
below and the figure in section "Control cabinet connections manipulator"!
The manipulator arm is equipped with round Burndy/Framatome connectors (customer connector not included).

xx0100000249

XS

Application interface

XS20

I/O connections

XS8

External axes in separate cabinet

X13/X5

Operators panel

XS78

Safety signals, external connections

XS77/X7

DeviceNet

LAN/XTDF

Mains connection

X24VE/VS

External axes

IBS

Position switches

XS41

Manipulator cables

XS58
XS2
Ext. contr. panel

Connectors,
description

Each industrial connector has accomodations for four rows of 16 conductors with a maximum
conductor area of 1.5 mm 2 . The pull-relief clamp must be used when connecting the shield
to the case.

Making the connection

The section below details how to crimp cable connections to pins:


1. Using a special crimp tool, crimp a pin or socket on to each non-insulated conductor.
When two conductors are be connected to the same pin or socket, both of them must be
crimped into the same pin or socket. A maximum of two conductors may be crimped into
the same pin or socket.

2. Snap the pin into the connector housing.


3. Push the pin into the connector until it locks.
4. When removing pins or sockets from industrial connectors, a special extractor
tool must be used.

3HAC 16261-1

85

5 Electrical connections
5.3.1 The MOTORS ON/MOTORS OFF circuit

Section 5.3: Customer connections on controller


5.3.1 The MOTORS ON/MOTORS OFF circuit

Outline diagram

The MOTORS ON/MOTORS OFF circuit is made up of two identical chains of switches.
The diagram shows the available customer connections, AS, GS and ES.
A
E
C
D

H
J
R

N
P

xx0100000174

Function of the
MOTORS ON/
MOTORS OFF
circuit

86

ES (emergency stop)

LS (Limit switch)

Solid state switches

Contactor

Mains

Drive unit

Second chain interlock

GS (general mode safeguarded space stop)

AS (Automatic mode safeguarded space stop)

ED (TPU enabling device)

Manual mode

Motor

Automatic mode

Operating mode selector

RUN

EN1

EN2

The circuit monitors all safety related equipment and switches. If any of the switches is
opened, the MOTORS ON/MOTORS OFF circuit switches the power to the motors off.
As long as the two chains are not identical, the robot will remain in MOTORS OFF mode.

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.3.1 The MOTORS ON/MOTORS OFF circuit

Connection of
safety chains

The diagram below shows the two-channel safety chain.


Supply from internal 24V (X3/X4:12) and 0 V (X3/X4:7) is displayed. When external supply
of GS and AS, X3/X4:10,11 is connected to 24V and X3/X4:8,9 is connected to external 0V.
Connection tables for X1-X4 are given in "External customer connections on panel X1 - X4".

24V
X3:12
X4:12

Ext LIM1
24V

K1
0V

X1:11 12
ES1

X3:10

Opto GS1
isol.
TPU En1

&

11
Opto AS1
isol.

Auto1

K1

EN
Run

Intern
locking

K2

Man1

External contactors
0V
24 V
0V

X3:3
X4:3

4
4

CONT1
CONT2

Ext LIM2
X2:11 12

K2

Drive Unit

ES2

X4:10

Opto GS2
isol.
TPU En2

&

11
9

24 V

Opto AS2
isol.
Auto2

Man2

xx0100000166

Technical data per chain

Connection of
ES1/ES2 on panel
unit

3HAC 16261-1

Limit switch

Load: 300 mV. Max. voltage drop: 1 V

External connectors

Load: 10 mA. Max. voltage drop: 4 V

GS/AS load at 24 V

25 mA

GS/AS closed "1"

>18 V

GS/AS open "0"

<5V

External supply of GS/AS

Max. + 35 VDC
Min. - 35 VDC

Max. potential in relation to the cabinet


earthing and other signal groups

300 V

Signal class

Control signals

The diagram below shows the terminals for the emergency circuits.
Supply from internal 24V (X1/X2:10) and 0V (X1/X2:10) is displayed. When ext. supply,
X1/X2:3 is connected to ext. 24V and X1/X2:8 is connected to ext. 0V (dotted lines).

87

5 Electrical connections
5.3.1 The MOTORS ON/MOTORS OFF circuit

A
24V 0V
B

X1:3

1:4

X1:7
X1:10

X1:9

X1:8
X1:1
X1:2

24V

X1:6
E
24V

G
24V 0V

F
B

2:4

X2:7
X2:8
X2:1
X2:2

24V

X2:6
H
24V
X2:4
X2:5
J
xx0100000191

Internal

Run chain 1 top

Ext shop

Internal

TPU

ES2 internal

Cabinet

Run chain 2 top

ES1 internal

Technical data

88

ES1 and ES2 max output voltage

120 VAC or 48 VDC

ES1 and ES2 max output current

120 VAC: 4 A
48 VDC L/R: 50 mA
24 VDC L/R: 2 A
24 VDC R load: 8 A

External supply of ES relay

Min. 22 V between terminals X1:9, 8 and X2:9 ,8


respectively

Rated current per chain

40 mA

Max. potential in relation to the cabinet


earthing and other signal groups

300 V

Signal class

Control signals

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.3.1 The MOTORS ON/MOTORS OFF circuit

Connection to
MOTORS ON/
MOTORS OFF
contactor

The diagram below shows the connection of terminals for customer use.
A
B

X3:2
1
X4:2
1
xx0100000193

K1 (Motor on/off 1)

K1 (Motor on/off 2)

Technical data
Max. voltage

48 VDC

Max. current

4A

Max. potential in relation to the cabinet earthing and other signal groups 300 V
Signal class

Connection to
operating mode
selector

Control signals

The diagram below shows the connection of terminals for customer use.

S1.1.x1 8
A

7
6
5

S1.1.x1 4
D

3
2
1

xx0100000197

Auto 1

MAN1

100 % (Option)

Auto 2

MAN2

100% (Option)

Technical data

3HAC 16261-1

Max. voltage

48 VDC

Max. current

4A

89

5 Electrical connections
5.3.1 The MOTORS ON/MOTORS OFF circuit

Technical data

Connection to
brake contactor

Max. potential in relation to the cabinet


earthing and other signal groups

300 V

Signal class

Control signals

The diagram below shows the connection of terminals for customer use.
A

X4:5
6
xx0100000199

K3 (Brake)

Technical data

90

Max. voltage

48 VDC

Max. current

4A

Max. potential in relation to the cabinet


earthing and other signal groups

300 V

Signal class

Control signals

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.3.2 External customer connections on panel X1 - X4

5.3.2 External customer connections on panel X1 - X4

Outline diagram

The diagram shows the customer connections X1 - X4 located on the panel unit
WARNING
REMOVE JUMPERS BEFORE CONNECTING
ANY EXTERNAL EQUIPMENT

xx0100000205

grey field Jumper

Connection of X1:
12-pole type
Phoenix COMBICON connector

Connection of X2:
12-pole type
Phoenix COMBICON connector

3HAC 16261-1

The table below shows the signal descriptions for X1


The signal names refer to the Circuit Diagram.

Signal

Terminal
Comment
number

ES1 out: A

Emergency stop out chain 1

ES1 out: B

Emergency stop out chain 1

ES1 top

Top of emergency stop chain 1

24 V panel

+ 24 V emergency stop chain 1 and run chain 1

Run ch1 top

Top of run chain 1

ES1 internal

Internal signal from emergency stop relay chain 1

Sep. ES1: A

Separated emergency stop chain 1

Sep. ES1: B

Separated emergency stop chain 1

ES1 bottom

Bottom of emergency stop chain 1

0V

10

0 V emergency stop chain 1

Ext. LIM1: A

11

External limit switch chain 1

Ext. LIM1: B

12

External limit switch chain 1

The table below shows the signal descriptions for X2


The signal names refer to the Circuit Diagram.

Signal

Terminal
Comment
number

ES2 out: A

Emergency stop out chain 2

91

5 Electrical connections
5.3.2 External customer connections on panel X1 - X4

Connection of X3:
12-pole type
Phoenix COMBICON connector

Connection of X4:
12-pole type
Phoenix COMBICON connector

92

Signal

Terminal
Comment
number

ES2 out: B

Emergency stop out chain 2

ES2 top

Top of emergency stop chain 2

0V

0 V emergency stop chain 2

Run ch2 top

Top of run chain 2

ES2 internal

Internal signal from emergency stop relay chain 2

Sep. ES2: A

Separated emergency stop chain 2

Sep. ES2: B

Separated emergency stop chain 2

ES2 bottom

Bottom of emergency stop chain 2

24 V panel

10

+ 24 V emergency stop chain 1 and run chain 2

Ext. LIM2: A

11

External limit switch chain 2

Ext. LIM2: B

12

External limit switch chain 2

The table below shows the signal descriptions for X2


The signal names refer to the Circuit Diagram.

Signal

Terminal
Comment
number

Ext. MON 1: A

Motor contactor 1

Ext. MON 1: B

Motor contactor 1

0V

External contactor 1 0 V

CONT1

External contactor 1

No connection

No connection

0V

0 V to auto stop (AS) and general stop (GS)

GS1-

General stop minus chain 1

AS1-

Auto stop minus chain 1

GS1+

10

General stop plus chain 1

AS1+

11

Auto stop plus chain 1

24 V panel

12

24 V to auto stop and general stop

The table below shows the signal descriptions for X2


The signal names refer to the Circuit Diagram.

Signal

Terminal
Comment
number

Ext. MON 2: A

Motor contactor 2

Ext. MON 2: B

Motor contactor 2

24 V panel

External contactor 2 24 V

CONT2

External contactor 2

Ext. BRAKE A

Contactor for external brake

Ext. BRAKE B

Contactor for external brake

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.3.2 External customer connections on panel X1 - X4

3HAC 16261-1

Signal

Terminal
Comment
number

0V

0 V to auto stop (AS) and general stop (GS)

GS2-

General stop minus chain 2

AS2-

Auto stop minus chain 2

GS2+

10

General stop plus chain 2

AS2+

11

Auto stop plus chain 2

24 V panel

12

24 V to auto stop and general stop

93

5 Electrical connections
5.3.3 Connection of external safety relay

5.3.3 Connection of external safety relay

Description

The motor contactors K1 and K2 in the controller can operate with external equipment if
external relays are used.
The figure below shows two examples of how to connect the external safety relays:

Connection
examples

X4:4
CONT 2
24 V X4:3
E xt MON 2
X4:2

0V

K2
X4:1
X3:2
K1
E xt MON 1

X3:1

24 V

0 V X3:3
CONT 1 X3:4

E
AS

AS

GS

GS

F
G

E
K
H
J

xx0100000246

94

Panel unit

Relays with positive action

Robot 1

Robot 2

External supply

ES (emergency stop) out

Safety relay

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.3.3 Connection of external safety relay

3HAC 16261-1

To other equipment

Safety gate

Cell ES (emergency stop)

95

5 Electrical connections
5.4.1 External 24V supply

Section 5.4: Supplies


5.4.1 External 24V supply

When is an external supply recommended?

How to connect
the external supply

An external supply is recommended to make use of the advantages offered by the galvanic
insulation on the I/O units or on the panel unit.
An external supply must be used in the following cases:

When the internal supply is insufficient

When the emergency stop circuits must be independent of whether or not the robot
has power on, for example.

When there is a risk that major interference can be carried over into the internal 24V
supply.

The external supply neutral wire must be connected to the chassis such that the maximum
permitted potential difference in the chassis earth is not exceeded. For example, a neutral wire
can be connected to the chassis earth of the controller, or some other common earthing point.

Technical data

96

Potential difference to chassis earth

Max. 60 V continuously
Max. 500 V during 1 minute

Permitted supply voltage

I/O units 19 VDC - 35 VDC incl. ripple


Panel unit 20.6 VDC - 30 VDC incl. ripple

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.4.2 24V I/O supply

5.4.2 24V I/O supply

General

24 VDC supply for


internal and
external use

24 VDC supply
available at XT 31

3HAC 16261-1

The 24V I/O is not galvanically separated from the rest of the controller voltages.

Voltage

24.0 - 26.4V

Ripple

Max. 0.2V

Permitted customer load

Max. 7A

Current limit

13,5 ~0A.

24V I/O available for customer connections at XT 31 is shown in the figure in "Connections
to screw terminals".

XT.31.2

24 V (through a 2 A fuse)

XT.31.1

for own fuses

XT.31.4

0 V (connected to cabinet structure)

97

5 Electrical connections
5.4.3 115/230 VAC supply

5.4.3 115/230 VAC supply

General

115/230 VAC supply for internal


and external use

115/230 VAC supply available at XT


21

98

This voltage is used in the robot for supplying optional service outlets. The AC supply is not
galvanically separated from the rest of the controller voltages.

Voltage

115 VAC or 230 VAC

Permitted customer load

Max. 500 VA

Fuse size, 115 V

6.3 A

Fuse size, 230 V

3.15 A

115 VAC/230 VAC available for customer connections at XT 21 is shown in the figure in
"Connection to screw terminals".

FU2 - 201

230 VAC

FU1 - 202

115 VAC

N - 203

N (connected to cabinet structure)

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.5.1 Connection of the CAN bus

Section 5.5: Buses


5.5.1 Connection of the CAN bus

Illustration

The illustration below shows an example of how to connect the CAN bus:
C
A

X15 CAN1.1 (Internal I/O)

X6 CAN1.2
X7 CAN1.3

G
D

D
E

X15, X6, X7

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

1. 0V_CAN
2. CAN_L
3. drain
4. CAN_H
5. 24V_I/O

xx0100000241

Base connector unit

Termination of last unit

CAN bus

120 ohm, 1%, 0.25 W metal film resistor

Control cabinet

See figure in section "CAN 2" below!

I/O

CAN 1.1

Used for internal I/O unit mounted inside the cabinet. No terminating resistor is to be
mounted on CAN 1.1 regardless of whether any I/O units are used or not. CAN 1.1 is connected to socket X15 on the Base connector unit (see Connection of the CAN bus).

CAN 1.2

If CAN 1.2 is not used, a terminating resistor must be connected to the X6 socket (exceptional
case see below!).

3HAC 16261-1

99

5 Electrical connections
5.5.1 Connection of the CAN bus

If CAN 1.2 is used, the terminating resistor should be moved to the last I/O unit on the CAN
1.2 chain.
If CAN 1.2, for example, is not connected in the end of any CAN chain but somewhere between
the end points of the chain, then no terminating resistor should be mounted in CAN 1.3. This
is in accordance with the basic rule, i.e. the CAN chain should be terminated in both end points.

CAN 1.3

If CAN 1.3 is unused, a terminating resistor must be connected to the X7 socket.


If CAN 1.3 is used, the terminating resistor should be moved to the last I/O unit on the CAN
1.3 chain.
If CAN 1.2, for example, is not connected in the end of any CAN chain but somewhere between
the end points of the chain, then no terminating resistor should be mounted in CAN 1.3. This
is in accordance with the basic rule, i.e. the CAN chain should be terminated in both end points.

Termination
resistors in CAN
bus

The CAN chain must be terminated with terminating resistors in each end!

CAN 2

The illustration below shows an example of how to connect the CAN 2 bus:

If CAN 1.2, for example, is not connected in the end of any CAN chain but somewhere
between the end points of the chain, then no terminating resistor should be mounted in CAN
1.3.

B
D

X8 CAN 2

X8

1. 0V_CAN
2. CAN_L
3. drain
4. CAN_H
5. 24V_I/O

1. 0V_CAN
2. CAN_L
3. drain
4. CAN_H
5. 24V_I/O

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

xx0100000242

100

Controller

Base connector unit

See figure in section "Illustration" above!

I/O

Termination of last unit

120 ohm, 1%, 0.25 W metal film resistor

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.5.1 Connection of the CAN bus

The illustration below shows CAN connections on base connector unit:

A
B
C
D

xx0100000243

3HAC 16261-1

X6 CAN 1.2 (external I/O)

X7 CAN 1.3 (external I/O)

X8 CAN 2 (external I/O)

X15 CAN 1.1 (internal I/O)

101

5 Electrical connections
5.5.2 Interbus-S, slave DSQC 351

5.5.2 Interbus-S, slave DSQC 351

General

The unit can be operated as a slave for a Interbus-S system.

Supply

The Interbus-S slave must be fed externally to avoid shutting down the Interbus-S net if a
robot cell is switched off. The 24V power supply must be fed from outside the control cabinet
and be connected to pin 2 Phoenix connector located on the Interbus-S cards front panel
marked 24V.

Technical data

Also see the Interbus-S specification.

Further information

For setup parameters, see Users Guide - System Parameters, Topic: Controller. Also see the
Circuit Diagram.

Unit ID

Unit ID to be entered in the Interbus-S master is 3. The length code depends on the selected
data. Width between 1 and 4.

Layout, DSQC
351

The figure below show the layout of the DSQC 351 board:

X20

X21

X5

X3

xx0100000225

102

X3

Power connector

X5

DeviceNet connector

X20

Interbus-S, input

X21

Interbus-S, output

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.5.2 Interbus-S, slave DSQC 351

Communication
concept

The Interbus-S system is able to communicate with a number of external devices, depending
on the number of process words occupied by each unit. The robot may be equipped with one
or two DSQC 351. The Interbus-S inputs and outputs are accessible in the robot as general
inputs and outputs.
For application data, refer to Interbus-S, International Standard, DIN 19258.
Below is shown an outline diagram of the communication concept:

E
A

B
In

C
Out

In
*1

D
Out

In

Out

*1

xx0100000224

Master PLC

Robot 1, word 1:3

Robot 1, word 4:7

Robot 2, word 8:11

128 inputs/128 outputs

64 inputs/64 outputs

*1

Termination link

A link is connected between pins 5 and 9 in the plug on the interconnection cable connected
to the OUT connector of each unit. The link informs the Interbus-S unit that more units are
connected further out in the chain. (The last unit in the chain does not have a cable connected
and therefore no link).

Connections, X5
DeviceNet connectors

See DeviceNet Connectors.

Connections,
connector X20,
Interbus-S IN

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:


5

6
9

xx0100000220

The table below show the connections to connector X20, Interbus-S IN:

3HAC 16261-1

Signal name

X20 pin

Function

TPDO1

Communication line TPDO1

TPDI1

Communication line TPDI1

GND

Ground connection

NC

Not connected

103

5 Electrical connections
5.5.2 Interbus-S, slave DSQC 351

Connections,
connector X21,
Interbus-S OUT

Signal name

X20 pin

Function

NC

Not connected

TPDO1-N

Communication line TPDO1-N

TPDI1-N

Communication line TPDI1-N

NC

Not connected

NC

Not connected

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:


5

6
9

xx0100000220

The table below show the connections to connector X21, Interbus-S OUT:

Connections,
connector X3

Signal name

X21 pin

Function

TPDO2

Communication line TPDO2

TPDI2

Communication line TPDI2

GND

Ground connection

NC

Not connected

+5V

+ 5 VDC

TPDO2-N

Communication line TPDO2-N

TPDI2-N

Communication line TPDI2-N

NC

Not connected

RBST

Synchronization

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:


5

1
xx0100000221

The table below show the connections to connector X3:

Bus status LEDs

Signal name

X3 pin

Function

0 VDC

External supply of Interbus-S

NC

Not connected

GND

Ground connection

NC

Not connected

+ 24 VDC

+ 24 VDC

The designations refer to LEDs shown in the figure in section "Layout, DSQC 352" above.
The figure and table below show the location and significance of the the LEDs on the board.

104

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.5.2 Interbus-S, slave DSQC 351

3HAC 16261-1

Designation

Color

Description

POWER-24 VDC

Green

Indicates that a supply voltage is present, and has a level


above 12 VDC.

NS/MS

Green/red

See section "CAN bus status LED description".

CAN Tx/CAN Rx

Green/red

See section "CAN bus status LED description".

POWER- 5 VDC

Green

Lit when both 5 VDC supplies are within limits, and no


reset is active.

RBDA

Red

Lit when this Interbus-S station is last in the Interbus-S network.


If it is not (which is required), check parameter setup.

BA

Green

Lit when Interbus-S is active.


If there is no light, check network, nodes and connections.

RC

Green

Lit when Interbus-S communication runs without errors.

105

5 Electrical connections
5.5.3 Profibus-DP, slave DSQC 352

5.5.3 Profibus-DP, slave DSQC 352

General

The unit can be operated as a slave for a Profibus-DP system.

Supply

The Profibus does not need any external power feed. All the robot cells are connected to the
trunk cable through a special D-sub connector which works as a very short drop cable.
Because of this the profibus will work correctly even if a robot cell is turned off.

Technical data

Also see the Profibus-DP specification, Internation Standard DIN E 19245 part 3.

Further
information

For setup parameters, see Users Guide - System Parameters, Topic: I/O Signals. Also see the
Circuit diagram.

Layout, DSQC
352

The figure below show the layout of the DSQC 352 board:

X20

X5

X3

xx0100000223

Communication
concept

X3

Power connector

X5

DeviceNet connector

X20

Profibus connection

The Profibus-DP system is able to communicate with a number of external devices, depending on the number of process words occupied by each unit. The robot may be equipped with
one or two DSQC 352. The Profibus-DP inputs and outputs are accessible in the robot as
general inputs and outputs.
Below is shown an outline diagram of the communication concept:

E
A

F
C

xx0100000222

106

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.5.3 Profibus-DP, slave DSQC 352

Master PLC

Robot 1, word 1:8

Robot 1, word 9:16

Robot 2, word 17:24

256 inputs/256 outputs

128 inputs/128 outputs

Termination

The Profibus cable must be terminated in both ends.

Connections, X5
DeviceNet
connectors

See "Device Net Connectors".

Connections,
connector X20,
Profibus-DP

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:


5

6
9

xx0100000220

The table below show the connections to connector X20, Interbus-S IN:

Connections,
connector X3

Signal name

X20 pin

Function

Shield

Cable screen

NC

Not connected

RxD/TxD-P

Receive/Transmit data P

Control-P

GND

+5 VDC

NC

Not connected

RxD/TxD-N

Receive/Transmit data N

NC

Not connected

Ground

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:


5

1
xx0100000221

The table below show the connections to connector X3:

3HAC 16261-1

Signal name

X3 pin

Function

0 VDC

External supply of Profibus-DP

107

5 Electrical connections
5.5.3 Profibus-DP, slave DSQC 352

Bus status LEDs

Signal name

X3 pin

Function

NC

Not connected

GND

Ground connection

NC

Not connected

+ 24 VDC

External supply of Profibus-DP

The figure and table below show the location and significance of the the LEDs on the board.
The designations refer to LEDs shown in the figure in section "Layout, DSQC 352" above.

Designation

Color

Description

Profibus active

Green

Lit when the node is communicating with the master.


If there is no light, check system messages in robot and in
Profibus net.

NS/MS

Green/red

See section "CAN bus status LED description".

CAN Tx/CAN Rx

Green/red

See section "CAN bus status LED description".

POWER, 24 VDC Green

108

Indicates that a supply voltage is present, and has a level


above 12 VDC.
If there is no light, check that voltage is present in power
unit and in the power connector. If not, check cables and
connectors.
If power is applied to the unit but it does not work, replace
the unit.

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.6.1 Distributed I/O units

Section 5.6: I/O units


5.6.1 Distributed I/O units

General

Up to 20 units can be connected to the same controller but only four of these can be installed
inside the controller. Normally a distributed I/O unit is placed outside the controller.

Connection

The maximum total length of the distributed I/O cable is 100 m (from one end of the chain to
the other end).
The controller can be one of the end points or be placed somewhere in the middle of the chain.

Parameter setup

3HAC 16261-1

For setup parameters, see Users Guide, section System Parameters, Topic: I/O Signals.

109

5 Electrical connections
5.6.2 Distributed I/O, digital sensors

5.6.2 Distributed I/O, digital sensors

General

Digital sensors are connected to one optional digital unit.

Technical data

See Product Specification for Controller S4Cplus.

Allowed types of
digital sensors

The table below shows the allowed types of digtal sensors to be used, and their signal levels
respectively:

110

Sensor type

Signal level

Digital one bit sensor

High, "1"
Low, "0"

Digital two bit sensor

High, "01"
No signal, "00"
Low, "10"
Error status, "11" (stop program running)

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.6.3 Distributed I/O, digital I/O DSQC 328 (option)

5.6.3 Distributed I/O, digital I/O DSQC 328 (option)

General

The digital I/O unit handles digital communication between the robot system and any external
systems.

Technical data
No. of inputs

16 (divided into two groups of 8, galvanically isolated from each


other)

No. of outputs

16 (divided into two groups of 8, galvanically isolated from each


other)

Supply voltage

24 VDC

Supply source

24 V I/O or separate external supply

Also see Product Specification for controller S4Cplus.

Further information

For setup parameters, see Users Guide - System Parameters, Topic: Controller. Also see the
Circuit Diagram.

Layout, DSQC
328

The figure below shows the layout of the DSQC328 board:

OUT

MS

IN

NS

X1

X3

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

OUT
IN

X2
1

10

10

X4
1

10

10

12

X5
xx0100000240

Connections,
connector X1

Status LEDs

If supervision of the supply voltage is required, a bridge connection can be made to an


optional digital input. The supervision instruction must be written in the RAPID program.
This is described in the Users Guide.
The table below show the connections to connector X1:

3HAC 16261-1

Unit function

Signal name

X1 pin

Optically isolated output

Out ch 1

Optically isolated output

Out ch 2

Optically isolated output

Out ch 3

Optically isolated output

Out ch 4

111

5 Electrical connections
5.6.3 Distributed I/O, digital I/O DSQC 328 (option)

Connections,
connector X2

Unit function

Signal name

X1 pin

Optically isolated output

Out ch 5

Optically isolated output

Out ch 6

Optically isolated output

Out ch 7

Optically isolated output

Out ch 8

Optically isolated output

0 V for outputs 1-8

Optically isolated output

24 V for outputs 1-8

10

If supervision of the supply voltage is required, a bridge connection can be made to an


optional digital input. The supervision instruction must be written in the RAPID program.
This is described in the Users Guide.
The table below show the connections to connector X2:

Connections,
connector X3

Unit function

Signal name

X2 pin

Optically isolated output

Out ch 9

Optically isolated output

Out ch 10

Optically isolated output

Out ch 11

Optically isolated output

Out ch 12

Optically isolated output

Out ch 13

Optically isolated output

Out ch 14

Optically isolated output

Out ch 15

Optically isolated output

Out ch 16

Optically isolated output

0 V for outputs 9-16

Optically isolated output

24 V for outputs 9-16

10

The table below show the connections to connector X3:


Unit function

Signal name

X3 pin

Optically isolated input

In ch 1

Optically isolated input

In ch 2

Optically isolated input

In ch 3

Optically isolated input

In ch 4

Optically isolated input

In ch 5

Optically isolated input

In ch 6

Optically isolated input

In ch 7

Optically isolated input

In ch 8

Optically isolated input

0 V for inputs 1-8

Optically isolated input

Not used

10

The input current is 5.5 mA (at 24V) on the digital inputs. A capacitor connected to ground,
to prevent disturbances, causes a short rush of current when setting the input.
When connecting outputs, sensitive to pre-oscillation current, a series resistor (100 W) may
be used.

112

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.6.3 Distributed I/O, digital I/O DSQC 328 (option)

Connections,
connector X4

The table below show the connections to connector X4:


Unit function

Signal name

X4 pin

Optically isolated input

In ch 9

Optically isolated input

In ch 10

Optically isolated input

In ch 11

Optically isolated input

In ch 12

Optically isolated input

In ch 13

Optically isolated input

In ch 14

Optically isolated input

In ch 15

Optically isolated input

In ch 16

Optically isolated input

0 V for inputs 9-16

Optically isolated input

Not used

10

The input current is 5.5 mA (at 24V) on the digital inputs. A capacitor connected to ground,
to prevent disturbances, causes a short rush of current when setting the input.
When connecting outputs, sensitive to pre-oscillation current, a series resistor (100 W) may
be used.

3HAC 16261-1

113

5 Electrical connections
5.6.4 AD Combi I/O, DSQC 327 (optional)

5.6.4 AD Combi I/O, DSQC 327 (optional)

General

The digital I/O unit handles digital and analog communication between the robot system and
any external systems.

Technical data
No. of digital inputs

16 (divided into two groups of 8, galvanically isolated from each


other)

No. of digital outputs

16 (divided into two groups of 8, galvanically isolated from each


other)

No. of analog outputs

2 (galvanically isolated from the controller electronics)

Supply voltage

24 VDC

Supply source, digital I/O

24 V I/O or separate external supply

Supply source, analog I/O 24 V_CAN (with galvanically isolated DC/AC converter)

Also see Product Specification for controller S4Cplus.

Further information

For setup parameters, see Userss Guide - System Parameters, Topic: Controller. Also see the
Circuit Diagram.

Layout, DSQC
327

The figure below show the layout of the DSQC327 board:


A

OUT

MS

IN

NS

X1

X3

OUT
9

10

11

12

13

14

15

IN

X2
1

10

X4

10

X6
1

10

16

10

12

X5
xx0100000239

Status LEDs

Connector X5 is a CAN connector further described in section "Connection and address keying of the CAN bus".

Connections,
connector X1

If supervision of the supply voltage is required, a bridge connection can be made to an


optional digital input. The supervision instruction must be written in the RAPID program.
This is described in the Users Guide.
The table below show the connections to connector X1:

114

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.6.4 AD Combi I/O, DSQC 327 (optional)

Connections,
connector X2

Unit function

Signal name

X1 pin

Optically isolated output

Out ch 1

Optically isolated output

Out ch 2

Optically isolated output

Out ch 3

Optically isolated output

Out ch 4

Optically isolated output

Out ch 5

Optically isolated output

Out ch 6

Optically isolated output

Out ch 7

Optically isolated output

Out ch 8

Optically isolated output

0 V for outputs 1-8

Optically isolated output

24 V for outputs 1-8

10

If supervision of the supply voltage is required, a bridge connection can be made to an


optional digital input. The supervision instruction must be written in the RAPID program.
This is described in the Users Guide.
The table below show the connections to connector X2:

Connections,
connector X3

3HAC 16261-1

Unit function

Signal name

X2 pin

Optically isolated output

Out ch 9

Optically isolated output

Out ch 10

Optically isolated output

Out ch 11

Optically isolated output

Out ch 12

Optically isolated output

Out ch 13

Optically isolated output

Out ch 14

Optically isolated output

Out ch 15

Optically isolated output

Out ch 16

Optically isolated output

0 V for outputs 9-16

Optically isolated output

24 V for outputs 9-16

10

The table below show the connections to connector X3:

Unit function

Signal name

X3 pin

Optically isolated input

In ch 1

Optically isolated input

In ch 2

Optically isolated input

In ch 3

Optically isolated input

In ch 4

Optically isolated input

In ch 5

Optically isolated input

In ch 6

Optically isolated input

In ch 7

Optically isolated input

In ch 8

Optically isolated input

0 V for inputs 1-8

Optically isolated input

Not used

10

115

5 Electrical connections
5.6.4 AD Combi I/O, DSQC 327 (optional)

Connections,
connector X4

Connections,
connectors X6

The table below show the connections to connector X4:

Unit function

Signal name

X4 pin

Optically isolated input

In ch 9

Optically isolated input

In ch 10

Optically isolated input

In ch 11

Optically isolated input

In ch 12

Optically isolated input

In ch 13

Optically isolated input

In ch 14

Optically isolated input

In ch 15

Optically isolated input

In ch 16

Optically isolated input

0 V for inputs 9-16

Optically isolated input

Not used

10

The table below show the connections to connectors X6:

Signal name

X6 pin

Explanation

AN_ICH1

For test purposes only

AN_ICH2

For test purposes only

0V

0 V for In channels 1-2

0 VA

0 V for Out channels 1-2

AN_OCH1

Out channels 1

AN_OCH2

Out channels 2

The input current is 5.5 mA (at 24V) on the digital inputs. A capacitor connected to ground,
to prevent disturbances, causes a short rush of current when setting the input.
When connecting outputs, sensitive to pre-oscillation current, a series resistor (100 W) may
be used.

116

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.6.5 Analog I/O, DSQC 355 (optional)

5.6.5 Analog I/O, DSQC 355 (optional)

General

The analog I/O unit handles communication between the robot system and any external systems through analog sensors.

Technical data
No. of analog inputs

4 (-10 V/+10 V)

No. of analog outputs

3 (-10 V/+10 V)
1 (4-20 mA))

No. of analog outputs

2 (galvanically isolated from the controller electronics)

Supply voltage

24 VDC

Also see Product Specification for controller S4Cplus.

Further information

For setup parameters, see Users Guide - System Parameters, Topic: Controller. Also see the
Circuit Diagram.

Layout, DSQC
355

The figure below show the layout of the DSQC 355 board:
X7

X8

X7

X8

Bus s tatus

S2S3
X2
X5 X3
Analog I/O

DS QC 355

X5

AB B F lexible Automation

X3

xx0100000238

3HAC 16261-1

X3

Not used

X5

DeviceNet input and ID connector

X7

Analog outputs

X8

Analog inputs

117

5 Electrical connections
5.6.5 Analog I/O, DSQC 355 (optional)

Connections,
connectors X7
analog output

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:

13

xx0100000236

The table below show the connections to connector X7:

Signal name

X7 pin

Explanation

ANOUT_

Analog output 1, -10 V/+10 V

ANOUT_

Analog output 2, -10 V/+10 V

ANOUT_

Analog output 3, -10 V/+10 V

ANOUT_

Analog output 4, 4-20 mA

Not used

Not used

Not used

Not used

Not used

Not used

10

Not used

11

Not used

12

Not used

13

Not used

14

Not used

15

Not used

16

Not used

17

Not used

18

GND

19

Analog output 1, 0 V

GND

20

Analog output 2, 0 V

GND

21

Analog output 3, 0 V

GND

22

Analog output 4, 0 V

GND

23

GND

24

The input current is 5.5 mA (at 24V) on the digital inputs. A capacitor connected to ground,
to prevent disturbances, causes a short rush of current when setting the input.
Connect a resistor (100 W) in series when connecting outputs, sensitive to pre-oscillation
current.

118

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.6.5 Analog I/O, DSQC 355 (optional)

Connections,
connectors X8
analog input

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:

xx0100000237

The table below show the connections to connector X8:

3HAC 16261-1

Signal name

X7 pin

Explanation

ANIN_1

Analog input 1, -10 V/+10 V

ANIN_2

Analog input 2, -10 V/+10 V

ANIN_3

Analog input 3, -10 V/+10 V

ANIN_4

Analog input 4, -10 V/+10 V

Not used

Not used

Not used

Not used

Not used

Not used

10

Not used

11

Not used

12

Not used

13

Not used

14

Not used

15

Not used

16

+24 V out

17

+24 VDC supply

+24 V out

18

+24 VDC supply

+24 V out

19

+24 VDC supply

+24 V out

20

+24 VDC supply

+24 V out

21

+24 VDC supply

+24 V out

22

+24 VDC supply

+24 V out

23

+24 VDC supply

+24 V out

24

+24 VDC supply

GND

25

Analog input 1, 0 V

GND

26

Analog input 2, 0 V

GND

27

Analog input 3, 0 V

GND

28

Analog input 4, 0 V

GND

29

GND

30

GND

31

119

5 Electrical connections
5.6.5 Analog I/O, DSQC 355 (optional)

Signal name

X7 pin

GND

32

Explanation

The input current is 5.5 mA (at 24V) on the digital inputs. A capacitor connected to ground,
to prevent disturbances, causes a short rush of current when setting the input.
Connect a resistor (100 W) in series when connecting outputs, sensitive to pre-oscillation
current.

Bus status LEDs

The figure and table below show the location and significance of the the LEDs on the board.

Designation

Color

Description

NS/MS

Green/red

See section 4.1.

RS232 Rx

Green

Indicates the state of the RS232 Rx line.


LED is active when receiving data. If there is no light,
check communication line and connections.

RS232 Tx

Green

Indicates the state of the RS232 Tx line. LED is active


when transceiving data.
If there is no light when transmission is expected, check
error messages and check also system boards in rack.

Green

Indicates that supply voltage is present and at correct


level.
If there is no light, check that voltage is present on
power unit and that power is present in power connector. If not, check cables and connectors.
If power is applied to the unit but it does not work,
replace the unit.

+5VDC / +12VDC /
-12VDC

120

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.6.6 Encoder interface unit, DSQC 354 (optional)

5.6.6 Encoder interface unit, DSQC 354 (optional)

General

The encoder interface unit handles communication with external conveyor:

One encoder input (synchronisation of conveyor position with robot movements). The
encoder is supplied with 24 V and 0 V, and sends position information in two channels.
This information is computed by the on-board computer using quadrature decoding
(QDEC) to determine position and direction.

One digital input (external start signal/conveyor synchronisation point)

Technical data
No. of encoder inputs

No. of digital inputs

1 (24 VDC)

Supply voltage

24 VDC

Supply source

24 V I/O or external supply

Also see Product Specification for controller S4Cplus.

Further information

User reference Description Conveyor Tracking. For setup parameters, see Users Guide - System Parameters, Topic: Controller. Also see the Circuit Diagram.

Layout, DSQC
354

The figure below show the layout of the DSQC 354 board:

X20

X5

X3

xx0100000233

3HAC 16261-1

X3

Not used

X5

DeviceNet input and ID connector

X20

Conveyor connection

121

5 Electrical connections
5.6.6 Encoder interface unit, DSQC 354 (optional)

Encoder
connections

The figure below show the encoder connections:


AF
AA
AB
24 VDC
0V
AC

A
B
24 VDC

AD

0V

AE

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

Opto
Opto

Opto

Opto
Opto

Opto

AG

xx0100000234

Connections,
connectors X20
encoder and
digital input
connections

122

AA

24 V I/O or external supply

AB

0 V I/O or external supply

AC

Encoder

AD

Sync switch

AE

10-16 not used

AF

Encoder unit

AG

Galvanic isolation

The table below show the connections to connector X20:

Signal name

X20 pin

Explanation

24 VDC

24 VDC supply

0V

0V

ENC

Encoder 24 VDC

ENC

Encoder 0 VDC

ENC_A

Encoder phase A

ENC_B

Encoder phase B

DIGIN

Synchronization switch 24 VDC

DIGIN

0V

DIGIN

Synchronization switch digital input

Not used

10

Not used

11

Not used

12

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.6.6 Encoder interface unit, DSQC 354 (optional)

Signal name

X20 pin

Not used

13

Not used

14

Not used

15

Not used

16

Explanation

The figure below show the layout of the pins in connector X20:

16
xx0100000235

Bus status LEDs

The figure and table below show the location and significance of the the LEDs on the board.

Designation

Color

Description

POWER, 24 VDC Green

Indicates that a supply voltage is present, and has a level


above 12 VDC.
If there is no light, check that voltage is present on power unit
and in connector X20. If not, check cables and connectors.
If power is applied to the unit but it does not work, replace the
unit.

NS/MS

Green/red

See section "CAN bus status LED description".

CAN Tx/CAN Rx Green/red

See section "CAN bus status LED description".

ENC 1A/1B

Indicates phase 1 and 2 from encoder. Flashes at each


Encoder pulse. At frequencies higher than a few Hz, flashing
can no longer be observed (light will appear weaker).
If there is no light, there is an error due to one or more of the
following reasons:
Faulty power supply for input circuit (internal or
external).

Green

Defective input circuit on board.

Short circuit or broken wire in external wiring or connectors.

Internal error in unit.

Constant light indicates constant high level on input and vice


versa.
No light on one LED indicates fault in one encoder phase.

3HAC 16261-1

123

5 Electrical connections
5.6.6 Encoder interface unit, DSQC 354 (optional)

124

Designation

Color

Description

DIGIN1

Green

Digital input. Lit when digital input is active. The input is used
for external start signal/conveyor synchronisation point.
If there is no light, there is an error due to one or more of the
following reasons:
Faulty power supply for input circuit (internal or
external).

Faulty limit switch, photocell etc.

Short circuit or broken wire in external wiring or connectors.

Defective input circuit on board.

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.7.1 Allen-Bradley, general

Section 5.7: Communication


5.7.1 Allen-Bradley, general

General

The robot may communicate with the Allen Bradley system only, or be used in combination
with the I/O system in the robot. For example, the inputs to the robot may come from the
Allen Bradley system while the outputs from the robot control external equipment via general
I/O addresses and the Allen Bradley system only reads the outputs as status signals.

Definitions

The Allen Bradley system can communicate with up to 64 external systems. Each of these
systems is called a Rack and is given a Rack Address 0-63. Basically, each robot connected
to the Allen Bradley system will occupy one rack.
Each rack is divided into four sections called Quarters. Each quarter provides 32 inputs and
32 outputs and a rack will subsequently provide 128 inputs and 128 outputs. A rack may also
be shared by 2, 3, or 4 robots. Each of these robots will then have the same rack address, but
different starting quarters must be specified.

Illustration

The following illustration shows a block diagram of the Allen-Bradley system, where Robot
1 uses a full rack while robot 2 and robot 3 share one rack. The rack address, starting quarter,
and other required parameters such as baud rate, LED status etc. are entered in the configuration parameters.
Allen Bradley
control system

Robot 1 - 128 in / 128 out


Quarter 1
Quarter 2

Robot 2 - 64 in / 64 out
Quarter 1

128 in / 128 out

64 in / 64 out

Quarter 4
Rack ID 12 (example)
Rack size 4
Starting quarter 1

Quarter 1
Quarter 2

Quarter 2
Rack ID 13 (example)
Rack size 2
Starting quarter 1

Quarter 3

Other systems

Quarter 3
Quarter 4

Robot 3 - 64 in / 64 out
Quarter 3

64 in / 64 out

Quarter 4
Rack ID 13 (example)
Rack size 2
Starting quarter 3
en0100000255

3HAC 16261-1

125

5 Electrical connections
5.7.2 RIO, remote I/O for Allen-Bradley PLC DSQC 350

5.7.2 RIO, remote I/O for Allen-Bradley PLC DSQC 350

General

The unit handles communication between the robot system and the Allen Bradley system.

Technical data
No. of digital inputs

Unit is programmable for 32, 64, 96 or 128 digital inputs

No. of digital outputs

Unit is programmable for 32, 64, 96 or 128 digital outputs

Also see the Allen-Bradley RIO specification.

Further information

For setup parameters, see Users Guide - System Parameters, Topic: I/O Signals. Also see
Circuit Diagram.

Connection

The RIO-unit should be connected to an Allen-Bradley PLC using a screened, two conductor
cable.

Layout, DSQC
350

The figure below show the layout of the DSQC 350 board:

X5
X9

X3

X8
DS QC 350

ABB F lexible Automation

xx0100000226

Connections,
connector X8

X3

Not used

X5

DeviceNet and ID connector

X8

RIO in

X9

RION out

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:


5

1
xx0100000221

126

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.7.2 RIO, remote I/O for Allen-Bradley PLC DSQC 350

The table below shows the connections to connector X8:

Connections,
connector X9

Signal name

X8 pin

Function

LINE1 (blue)

Remote I/O in

LINE2 (clear)

Remote I/O in

Shield

Remote I/O in

Cabinet ground

Remote I/O in

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:


5

1
xx0100000221

The table below show the connections to connector X9:

Signal name

X9 pin

Function

Blue

Remote I/O out

Clear

Remote I/O out

Shield

Remote I/O out

Cabinet ground

Remote I/O out

Termination

When the robot is last in a RIO loop, the loop must be terminated with a termination resistor
according to Allen-Bradleys specification.

Warranty

This product incorporates a communications link which is licensed under patents and proprietary technology of Allen-Bradley Company, Inc. Allen-Bradley Company, Inc. does not
warrant or support this product. All warranty and support services for this product are the
responsibility of and provided by ABB Flexible Automation.

Bus status LEDs

The figure and table below show the location and significance of the the LEDs on the board.
The designations refer to LEDs shown in the figure in section "Layout, DSQC 350" above.

Designation

Color

Description

POWER-24 VDC Green

NS/MS

Indicates that a supply voltage is present, and has a level


above 12 VDC.
If there is no light, check that voltage is present on power unit
and in power connector. If not, check cables and connectors.
If power is applied to the unit but it does not work, replace the
unit.

Green/red See section "CAN bus status LED description".

CAN Tx/CAN Rx Yellow

3HAC 16261-1

See section "CAN bus status LED description".

127

5 Electrical connections
5.7.2 RIO, remote I/O for Allen-Bradley PLC DSQC 350

128

Designation

Color

Description

NAC STATUS

Green

Steady green indicates RIO link in operation.


If there is no light, check network, cables and connections.
Also check that PLC is operational.
Flashing green indicates that communication is established,
but the INIT_COMPLETE bit is not set in NA chip, or configuration, rack size etc. does not match configuration set in
PLC.
If LED keeps flashing continuously, check setup.

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.7.3 Communication, serial links

5.7.3 Communication, serial links

General

T he robot has three serial channels, which can be used by the customer to communicate with
printers, terminals, computers, and other equipment (see the figure in "Connections" below).

Further
information

COM1 (computer system) - RS 232 115 kbps. This was formerly referred to as Com2.

COM2 - RS 232 with RTS-CTS-control and support for XON/XOFF, transmission


speed 300 - 38 400 b/s. This was formerly referred to as SIO1.

COM3 - RS 422 full duplex TXD4, TXD4-N, RXD4, RXD4-N, transmission speed 300 38 400 b/s. This was formerly referred to as SIO2.

For temporary use : MC/CONSOLE - RS 232 115 kb/s. This was formerly referred to
as Com1.

For setup parameters, see User's Guide - System Parameters, Topic: I/O Signals.

Circuit Diagram.

Location in the cabinet (see figure in section "Connection to screw terminals").

Technical data

See Product Specification for controller S4Cplus. Separate documentation is included when
the option RAP Serial link is ordered.

Connections

The figure below shows the connection of serial channels:

xx0100000219

External computer

Customer terminals, on base connector board: X10 (COM2) and X9 (COM3), see section
"Connection to screw terminals".

Connections on
DSQC 504, COM1

Standard RS232 port.


The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:
5

6
9

xx0100000220

3HAC 16261-1

129

5 Electrical connections
5.7.3 Communication, serial links

The table below shows the signals from the COM1 (RS232):

Connections on
DSQC 504, D-sub
connector X10,
COM2

Signal

Pin

Description

DCD

Data carrier Detect

RX

Receive Data

TX

Transmit Data

DTR

Data Terminal Ready

GND

Signal Ground

DSR

Data Set Ready

RTS

Request To Send

CTS

Clear To Send

RI

Ring Indicator

NC

10

Not Connected

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:


5

6
9

xx0100000220

The table below shows the connections to connector X10:

COM2 Signal name

X10 pin
1

RxD (Receive Data)

TxD (Transmit Data)

DTR (Data Terminal Ready)

0V

DSR (Data Ready Set)

RTS N (Request To Send N)

CTS (Clear To Send)

8
9

Connections on
DSQC 504, D-sub
connector X9,
COM3

The figure below shows the pin configuration of the connector:


5

6
9

xx0100000220

The table below shows the connections to connector X9:

130

COM3 Signal name

X9 socket

TxD (Transmit Data)

TxD N (Transmit Data N)

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.7.3 Communication, serial links

Connections to
MC/CONSOLE

COM3 Signal name

X9 socket

RxD (Receive Data)

RxD N (Receive data N)

0V

DATA (Data Signals in Half Duplex Mode)

DATA N (Data Signals in Half Duplex Mode N)

DCLK (Data Transmission Clock)

DCLK N (Data Transmission Clock N)

The figure below shows the MC/CONSOLE connection behind the service hatch:

xx0100000218

External computer

Standard RS232 port intended for temporary use, e.g. connection of laptop/PC.
The table below shows the signals on the MC/CONSOLE (RS232):

3HAC 16261-1

Signal

Pin

Description

RX

Receive Data

TX

Transmit Data

GND

Signal Ground

131

5 Electrical connections
5.7.4 Communication, Ethernet

5.7.4 Communication, Ethernet

General

Connection of
LAN (Main computer)

The robot has two Ethernet channels available:

LAN (connected to the Main computer)

Service (connected to the I/O computer)

The figure below shows an outline diagram of the Ethernet TCP/IP:

E thernet hub
xx0100000217

External computer

Controller Robot 1

Controller Robot 2

Used for connection of shielded twisted-pair Ethernet (TPE), or as defined in IEEE 802.3: 10/
100 BASE-T. Maximum node-to-node distance 100 meter. The main computer board has no
termination for a cable shield. The cable shield must be grounded at the cabinet wall with a
cable gland. 10BASE-T is a point-to-point net, connected via a HUB, see the figure above.

Signal

X1 Pin

Description

TX+

Transmit data line +

TX-

Transmit data line -

RX+

Receive data line +

NC

Not Connected

NC

Not Connected

RX-

Receive data line -

NC

Not Connected

NC

Not Connected

The figure below shows the main computer board front:

132

3HAC 16261-1

5 Electrical connections
5.7.4 Communication, Ethernet

X1
LAN

PWR

HDD

STATUS

X2

xx0100000216

Connection of
Service
(I/O Computer)

Used for connection of a laptop to the service outlet on cabinet front (behind service hatch)
on the controller.
The figure below shows how to connect a laptop to the service outlet:

E thernet

xx0100000215

For setup parameters, see Users Guide - System Parameters, Topic: I/O Signals. Also see the
Circuit Diagram. Separate documentation is included when the option Ethernet services is
ordered.

3HAC 16261-1

133

5 Electrical connections
5.7.5 External operators panel

5.7.5 External operators panel

General

All necessary components are supplied, except for the external enclosure.

Dimensions for
installation

Install the assembled panel in a housing which satisfies protection class, IP 54, in accordance
with IEC 144 and IEC 529!
The following figure shows the main dimensions of the external operators panel:

B
M8 (x4)

M4 (x4)

62

C
45
70
140
184
200

E
90
5 (x2)

155

F
G

xx0100000214

134

Holes for operators panel

Holes for flange

Required depth: 200 mm

External panel enclosure (option)

Holes for teach pendant unit (TPU) holder

Teach pendant unit (TPU) connector

Connection to the controller

3HAC 16261-1

6 Start-up
6.0.1 Inspection before start-up

Chapter 6: Start-up
6.0.1 Inspection before start-up

General

Perform the following checks before starting up the robot system:

Check:

1. The controller mains section is protected with fuses.


2. The electrical connections are correct and correspond to the identification plate
on the controller.
3. The teach pendant and peripheral equipment are properly connected.
4. That limiting devices that establish the restricted space (when utilised) are
installed.
5. The physical environment is as specified.
6. The operating mode selector on the operators panel is in the Manual mode position.
7. When external safety devices are used, check that these have been connected
or that the following circuits in either XS3 (connector on the outside left cabinet
wall) or X1-X4 (screw terminals on the panel unit) are strapped:

3HAC 16261-1

Device

XS3

Panel unit

External limit switches

A5-A6, B5-B6

X1.3-4, X2.3-4

External emergency stop

A3-A4, B3-B4

X1.9-10, X2.9-10

External emergency stop internal 24 V

A1-A2, B1-B2

X1.7-8, X2.7-8

General stop +

A11-A12, B11-B12

X3.10-12, X4.10-12

General stop -

A13-A14, B13-B14

X3.7-8, X4.7-8

Auto stop +

A7-A8, B7-B8

X3.11-12, X4.11-12

Auto stop -

A9-A10, B9-10

X3.7-9, X4.7-9

Motor off clamping

A15-A16, B15-16

X1.5-6, X2.5-6

135

6 Start-up
6.0.2 Start-up

6.0.2 Start-up

General

1. Switch on the mains switch on the cabinet.


2. The robot performs its self-test on both the hardware and software, which takes
approximately 1 minute.
3. If the robot is not supplied with the software already installed, install the software
as described in section "Robot Controller".
A welcome message is shown on the Teach Pendant Unit display.

4. To switch from MOTORS OFF to MOTORS ON, press the enabling device on the
teach pendant.
5. Update the revolution counters as described in "Updating the revolution
counters".
6. Check the calibration position as described in "Checking the calibration position".
7. When the controller, with the manipulator electrically connected, is powered up
for the first time, ensure that the power supply is connected for at least 36 hours
continuously, in order to fully charge the batteries for the serial measurement
board. It takes approx. 4 hours to fully charge a computer system battery.
8. After having checked the above, verify that:
the start, stop and mode selection (including the key lock switches) control devices
work as intended.
each axis moves and is restricted as intended.
emergency stop and safety stop (where included) circuits and devices are functional.
it is possible to disconnect and isolate the external power sources.
the teach and playback facilities work correctly.
the safeguarding is in place.
at reduced speed, the robot operates properly and has the capability to handle the
product or workpiece.
in automatic (normal) operation, the robot operates properly and has the capability to
perform the intended task at the rated speed and load.

9. The robot is now ready for operation.

Operating the
robot

136

Starting and operating the robot is described in the Users Guide. Before start-up, make sure
that the robot cannot collide with any other objects in the working space.

3HAC 16261-1

7 Robot controller
7.0.1 BootImage

Chapter 7: Robot controller


7.0.1 BootImage

General

The BootImage is a basic program which is used to start up the system from "scratch".

Purpose of the
program

This program is already installed in the controller at delivery and is used to:

3HAC 16261-1

restart the system

load the system from boot disks or network connections

set or check network settings

choose a system from the mass storage memory.

137

7 Robot controller
7.0.2 Start window

7.0.2 Start window

When is it
shown?

xx0100000168

The start window displays the start menu and will appear in the following cases:

When no controller operating system is installed at power on.

After X-START (see section "X-start").

After C-START (see section "C-start").

Possible actions

From this window you can choose to do one of the following:

Restart the
system, Reboot

The BootImage will be re-executed, used to apply changes in the system settings (see section
"Reboot").

Load a system
from diskettes,
Boot Disks

(See section 4.4)

Set the network


settings, Network
Settings

Set network settings for Main Computer or check how to configure your PC (see section
"Network Settings").

Choose a system
from the mass
storage memory,
Select System

If there are one or more systems in the mass storage memory, you can choose to activate one
of them (see section "Select System).

138

3HAC 16261-1

7 Robot controller
7.0.3 Reboot Window

7.0.3 Reboot Window

When is it
shown?

The Reboot window will be displayed if any of the system settings are changed or when
Reboot is pressed in the Start window as shown in the figure below:.

xx0100000169

3HAC 16261-1

Button

Function

YES

Restarts the system

NO

Returns to the start window

139

7 Robot controller
7.0.4 Boot Disk Window

7.0.4 Boot Disk Window

When is it
shown?

The Boot Disk window will be displayed when Boot Disks is pressed in the Start window as
shown in the figure in section "Start window".

How to create
boot disks

Information on how to create boot disks from RobInstall can be found in section "Create Boot
Diskettes from Robinstall".

Load the system


Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

Insert the correct diskette in the


floppy disk drive and press OK . If
the diskette is alright, the system
will be loaded.
CANCEL removes all previously
loaded data and returns to the
Start window as shown in the figure in section "Start window".

xx0100000170

140

3HAC 16261-1

7 Robot controller
7.0.5 LAN Settings Window

7.0.5 LAN Settings Window

When is it
shown?

The LAN Settings window will be displayed when LAN Settings is pressed in the Network
Settings window as shown in the figure in section "Network Settings".

en0100000256

NONE

will, after the system is rebooted, remove the IP settings.

CANCEL

returns to the Start window, as shown in the figure in section "Start Window", without changing any settings.

Parameter

Type

Description

MAC ID

Node identification

The Main Computers ethernet address.

Current IP

Node identification

The Main Computers current IP address. This row


is blank if the LAN Settings has not been defined.

IP

Network setting

Space for typing a new IP address, for the Main


Computer or the DHCP server. See Configure for
fixed IP network and Configure for DHCP distributed IP network below.

(Subnet mask)

Network setting

Shows the subnet mask of the network.


Only visible when configured for fixed IP.

(Gateway)

Network setting

Shows the gateway IP for the network.


Only visible when configured for fixed IP.

Node
identification

Configure for
fixed IP network

1. Press FIX IP .
2. Fill in the assigned IP address for the Main Computer, and the Subnet Mask and
Gatway for the Network and press OK .
You will be asked to reboot the system.

3. Press YES to make the new setting take effect.

Configure for
DHCP distributed
IP network

1. Press DHCP .
2. The value for IP will change to DHCP.
3. Press OK.
You will be asked to reboot the system.

4. Press YES to make the new setting take effect.


3HAC 16261-1

141

7 Robot controller
7.0.6 Service Settings Window

7.0.6 Service Settings Window

When is it
shown?

The Service Settings window will be displayed when Service Settings is pressed in the Network Settings window as shown in the figure in section "Network Settings".

en0100000257

OK

returns to the Start window as shown in the figure in section "Start Window".

Parameter

Description

Service Setting

IP (service setting) The IP Address for the I/O Computer

142

IP

Required to configure your PCs network settings for


communication between RobInstall and the I/O Computer.

Subnet mask

Required to configure your PCs network settings for


communication between RobInstall and the I/O Computer.

Gateway

Required to configure your PCs network settings for


communication between RobInstall and the I/O Computer.

3HAC 16261-1

7 Robot controller
7.0.7 System selection window

7.0.7 System selection window

When is it
shown?

The Select System window will be displayed when Select System is pressed in the Start
window as shown in the figure in section "Start Window".

xx0100000171

CANCEL

How to select
system

returns to the Start window as shown in the figure in section "Start Window".

The window shows all systems installed on the controller mass storage memory.

Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

Select by moving the X to a


desired system and press OK .
The system will reboot with the
new system and then present the
Welcome window as shown in the
figure.

xx0100000172

3HAC 16261-1

143

7 Robot controller
7.0.8 How to perform a Restart

7.0.8 How to perform a Restart

General

Performing a restart may be done in a number of ways. These are detailed below:

Reboot (Warm
start), apply
changed settings

When executing a Warm start, the system reboots with the current system, e.g. to make new
or changed settings take effect.

Step Action

Illustration/Info

1.

Press the button Miscellaneous and select Service window or System Parameter window

2.

Select Restart from the File menu and press OK .


The system reboots and returns to the Welcome window
as shown in the second figure in section "Select System".

Miscellaneous button:

xx0100000194

P-START, reinstallation of RAPID

A P-Start will warm start the current system, with a reinstallation of the RAPID language and
all auto loaded modules. This means that all RAPID program and system modules currently
loaded in the working memory will be closed, and thus have to be reloaded again after the PStart, with exception for such modules which are automatically loaded, due to settings in the
System Parameters/Controller/Task Modules.

Step Action
1.

Illustration/info

Press the button Miscellaneous and select Service window .

Miscellaneous button:

xx0100000194

X-START, change
active controller
system

2.

Select Restart from the File menu.

3.

Enter the numbers: 2_5_8 (the fifth function key changes


to P-START)

4.

Press P-START .
The system will reboot, reinstall RAPID and its auto
loaded modules, and return to the Welcome window as
shown in the second figure in section "Select System".

An X-start will exit the running system, store system data on the mass storage memory, and
then execute the BootImage to present the Start window. Any system stored in the mass storage memory, may then be selected as described in section "Select System".
When performing an X-Start all stored system data will be restored (similar to performing a
warm start).

Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

Press the button Miscellaneous and select Service win- Miscellaneous button:
dow.
xx0100000194

144

3HAC 16261-1

7 Robot controller
7.0.8 How to perform a Restart

Step Action

I-START, start in
Query mode

Illustration/Info

2.

Select Restart from the File menu.

3.

Enter the numbers: 1_5_9 (the fifth function key changes


to X-START)

4.

Press X-START .
The system will reboot and return to the Start window as
shown in the figure in section "Start Window".

If "Use Query Mode at System Boot" was selected when creating the running system in RobInstall (see section "Change options or system pack revision"), an I-Start can be done. An IStart will restart the current system and give the opportunity to set some values at start-up,
e.g. language, IRB type (within the same model) or options (see section "Start in Query
Mode").

Step Action

Illustration/Info

1.

Press the button Miscellaneous and selectService win- Miscellaneous button:


dow.

2.

Select Restart from the File menu.

3.

Enter the numbers: 1_4_7 (the fifth function key changes


to I-START).

4.

Press I-START .
The system will start to reboot, then pause to ask for
Silent, Easy, or Query mode. For more information on the
different modes, continue to section "Start in Query
Mode".

xx0100000194

C-START (Cold
start), delete the
active system

When executing a C-Start, the system exits the running system and deletes it from the mass
storage memory. The BootImage is then executed and the Start window as shown in the figure
in section "Start Window" is presented.
Use C-start with caution. Since it deletes the current system, it should not be used to just
switch between installed systems. For this purpose, use X-Start (see section "X-start").

It will take quite some time to implement a Cold start. Just wait until the robot shows the Start
window. When the Start window is shown, a new system can be selected if available in the
mass storage memory (see section "Select System) or a new system can be down loaded and
started (see section "Transfer Robot Controller System using Ethernet connection" or "Transfer Robot Controller System using floppy disks").
Do not touch any key, joystick, enable device, or emergency stop during the cold start until the
Start window is shown as in the figure in section "Start Window".

Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

Press the button Miscellaneous and selectService win- Miscellaneous button:


dow.
xx0100000194

2.

3HAC 16261-1

Select Restart from the File menu.

145

7 Robot controller
7.0.8 How to perform a Restart

Step Action

146

Illustration/Info

3.

Enter the numbers: 1_3_4_6_7_9 (the fifth function key


changes to C-START)

4.

Press C-START .

3HAC 16261-1

7 Robot controller
7.0.9 How to Start in Query Mode

7.0.9 How to Start in Query Mode

Preconditions for
selecting Query
Mode start

It is possible to set some values, e.g. language, IRB type (within the same model) or options,
at the first start-up of the system, using a C-Start (see section "C-start"), or later on when
performing an I-Start (see section "I-start") if "Use Query Mode at System Boot" was
selected when creating the system in RobInstall (see section "Change options or system pack
revision").

Types of Query
Mode

The first question from the system is what Query Mode to start. Depending on your needs,
you should select one of the following three:

Easy Query Mode

Silent Mode, pushbutton Silent . If Silent Mode is selected, the operating system will
be installed with the system configured as defined in RobInstall.

Easy Query Mode, pushbutton Easy Query . In Easy Query Mode you can change
language, remove selected options and select service or standard mode (see section
"Easy Query Mode").

Query Mode, pushbutton Query . In Query Mode you can, on top of the things in Easy
Query, select DC-link, change Robot type (within the same family) and for IRB 7600,
select balancing unit (see section "Query Mode").

If Easy Query was chosen as start-up query mode, the following steps will be required to start
the system:

Step Action

Query Mode

Illustration/Info

1.

Select Service/Standard motion param. Choose between


standard or service motion parameters (pushbutton
Stand / pushbutton Service ).

2.

Choose TP Language. If there was another language


than English selected in RobInstall (see section "Change
options or system pack revision"), it will be possible to
choose language (pushbutton English /pushbutton
"Other" ).

3.

Install xxx? For every option that was selected in RobInstall (see section "Change options or system pack revision") it is now possible to select Yes to keep the option,
or No to remove it from the system.

If Query Mode was chosen as start-up query mode, the following steps will be required to
start the system:

Step Action

3HAC 16261-1

Illustration/info

1.

Select Service/Standard motion param. See section


"Easy Query Mode", step 1.

2.

Choose TP Language. See section "Easy Query Mode",


step 2.

147

7 Robot controller
7.0.9 How to Start in Query Mode

Step Action
3.

Illustration/info

Select external axes config.


You can find the article number of the DC-link used on the
unit inside the controller, then use the table below to find
out the configuration ID for that DC-link.

148

4.

Select xxxx model. Choose Robot model type within in


the same family, e.g. 1400, 6400 etc. If there are more
than three options, press pushbutton SCAN to view
them.

5.

Install xxx? See section "Easy Query Mode", step 3.

3HAC 16261-1

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.1 Loading system software

Chapter 8: Installation of controller software


8.0.1 Loading system software

General

The robot system may delivered with or without system software. When the system is not
delivered with software, this must be downloaded in one of a number of ways.

Software installed
on delivery

If the robot controller is ordered with the software installed on delivery, the controller software and settings are already stored in the storage memory and the system is ready to use.

Software not
installed on
delivery

If the robot controller is ordered and delivered without software or if you want to reconfigure
your system, the RobInstall tool must be used to install the controller software. The RobInstall tool is included on the RobotWare CD-ROM (see section "RobotWare CD-ROM"). The
RobInstall tool can be used both for creation of the controller software and for downloading
it to the controller system.

Types of software
loading

A
B
C
D

E
xx0100000192

RobotWare CD-ROM to install RobInstall and System Pack on PC

Floppy Disks

IOC Ethernet (service) with delivered boot cable UTP-X

Connected to IOC

MC Ethernet (LAN) network in workshop

When downloading, the controller software can be transferred to the controller storage memory in three ways as shown in the figure above.

3HAC 16261-1

using floppy disks,

using Ethernet connected direct to the IO computer (IOC) service outlet on the front of
the controller cubicle,

using Ethernet connected via a local area network (LAN) to the main computer (MC).

149

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.1 Loading system software

Boot Image

The transfer and installation of the controller software to the controller storage memory via
Ethernet or floppy disks is executed by a basic program named Boot Image.
This basic program must always be in the storage memory. At start-up of the controller, without any controller software installed, Boot Image will start and ask the operator for controller
software installation instructions. If the controller software is already installed and a warm
start is performed, Boot Image is not used. The installed controller software can be deleted
by cold start and then the Boot Image will be reactivated.

150

3HAC 16261-1

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.2 RobotWare CD-ROM

8.0.2 RobotWare CD-ROM


The CD contains all the System software and should therefore be treated and stored carefully.

RobotWare
CD-ROM contents

Installation of the
RobotWare on the
PC (except FTP
Client)

The RobotWare CD-ROM contains the following:

Contents

Description

1.

RobInstall

A PC tool used to create and install the controller operating


system in the robot control system.

2.

Documentation

On-line documentation for the RobInstall application and


the Controller Operating System Package.

3.

Controller OS Package

Controller Operating System Package for S4Cplus. This


package includes all the software needed to create the controller operating system with any ordered options. Please
note that it is possible to install different releases with different versions of the same system package (see section
"Media Pool in the PC").

4.

Test Signal Viewer

A tool (created in LabView) for viewing MotionTest Signals


(oscilloscope function) and also for logging these signals.

5.

FTP Client

On the CD is also included a so called FTP client named


Voyager. Please note that this is not an ABB product but a
shareware program, which means that it can be installed
and used for a limited time, but that it has to be registered
for permanent use. Registering means that a certain fee
must be paid to the vendor.
The FTP client is used to transport files manually between
the PC and the robot controller storage memory. These
actions are carried out in the same way as in a file manager
or in Windows Explorer.

This section describes how to install the software delivered on the RobotWare CD-ROM onto
a PC hard drive, to be transferred to the robot system.
1. Insert the CD in your reader.
1. The Install Shield will automatically start and guide you through the install process
(if it does not start, double-click the CD icon on your PC). When the setup type
window is presented, it is recommended to select the Custom button. Then Next
button will open the Select Components window, where normally all the four
options, RobInstall, Documentation, Controller OS Package and Test Signal
Viewer should be marked as selected.

Installation of the
FTP Client on the
PC

This section describes how to install the FTP Client onto a PC hard drive.
1. In the Explorer, select and open the directory "ftp" on the CD.
2. Double-click the file ftpvsetup.exe.
The Install Shield for the FTP client will start and guide you through the installation. Please
read the "Readme" file for information about license regulations.

3HAC 16261-1

151

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.3 Installing new Robot Controller Software with RobInstall

8.0.3 Installing new Robot Controller Software with RobInstall

General

Nomenclature

How to use
RobInstall

Since most systems have the operating system installed already on delivery, the RobotWare
CD-ROM is normally not needed. However it should be used when:

creating a new controller operating system,

changing the current operating system configuration, e.g. concerning included


options.

In the text dealing with RobInstall, the following nomenclature is used:

Concept

Means

System pack

This is the RobotWare Controller Operating System Package for


S4Cplus, including all options, even if they are not ordered and activated.

Key

This is a text string, or a special file with the text string, which is used
to define and open both the BaseWare and all ordered RobotWare
options.

System

This is a complete controller software, i.e. controller operating system, based on the system pack and the key. It can also include any
user files to be added to the home directory on the controller storage
memory.

Robinstall is used to create and install the controller software in the S4Cplus robot controller.
With RobInstall, you can:

create a new system,

update an existing system,

download a system to the controller using the Ethernet connection,

create Boot Disks to transfer the system to the Controller.

Step Action

152

Illustration/Info

1.

Make sure RobInstall is installed. If


not, install it according to the
instructions in section "Installation
of the RobotWare on the PC".

2.

Click the start button on your PC


and select programs/ABB Robotics/RobInstall/RobInstall.

3HAC 16261-1

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.3 Installing new Robot Controller Software with RobInstall

Step Action
3.

Illustration/Info

The RobInstall start window will


open.

xx0100000185

3HAC 16261-1

153

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.4 Create a new Robot Controller System

8.0.4 Create a new Robot Controller System

Setting up the
system
Step Action

Illustration/info

1.

Start RobInstall as described in


section "How to use Robinstall".

2.

Choose New to create a new


Robot Controller system as
shown in the figure.

3.

Enter a name for the new controller system. Select a saving location or use the default directory,
normally "Program Files\ABB
Robotics\system" (see the figure
below, position 1).

4.

Enter the RobotWare key or add


from file. If added from a file, files
with the extension .kxt should be
used (see the figure above, position 2).

5.

Press OK . The configured system


will be displayed in the next window (see the figure below).

xx0100000179

xx0100000180

xx0100000181

154

3HAC 16261-1

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.4 Create a new Robot Controller System

Step Action
6.

Illustration/info

If no external options or parameters are to be added or changed,


press Finish to create the new
controller system. Otherwise
press Next to continue to "Additional Keys" (see section "Add or
remove external options").

Add or remove
external options
Step Action
1.

Illustration(info

To add or remove external


options, press Next in the screen
shown in the last figure in section
"Setting up the system" or click on
"Additional Keys" in the menu to
the left.

xx0100000182

Add or remove
additional system
parameters

2.

Enter the key string for the


selected option and press Add
Key to list, or pressAdd key from
file to select a key string file.

3.

To remove additional keys, select


the key in the Included Additional
Keys list and press Remove Key .

4.

Press Finish to create the controller system or press Next to continue to "Parameter Data" (see
section "Add or remove additional
system parameters).

Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

To add or remove additional


parameters, press Next in the
screen shown in the last figure in
section "Add or remove external
options" or click on "Parameter
Data" in the menu to the left.

xx0100000183

3HAC 16261-1

155

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.4 Create a new Robot Controller System

Step Action

Change options
or system pack
revision

Illustration/Info

2.

Press Add to load manipulator


calibration data (see the figure
above, position 1). This is the
calib.cfg file delivered on the
Manipulator Parameter disk (see
section "The manipulator parameter disk").

3.

To remove manipulator calibration


data, press Remove .

4.

Press Add to load additional system parameters, see pos. 2. All


system parameter files added
here will be automatically loaded
together with the system, when
the controller is restarted with the
new system.

5.

To remove additional parameters,


select the parameter in the
"Loaded Additional Parameters"
list and press Remove .

6.

Press Finish to create the controller system or press Next to continue to "Options" (see section
"Change options or system pack
revision").

Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

To change the option configuration, press Next in the screen


shown in the figure below or click
on "Options" in the menu to the
left.

xx0100000184

156

2.

To change the Teach Pendant Unit


language, robot type, or software
options, press Options (see the
figure above, position 1).

3.

Normally the latest release or revision of all system packages and


option packages stored in the
media pool (see section "Media
Pool in the PC") will be used. If an
earlier revision should be used,
uncheck the check mark and
press Rev. Select (see the figure
above, position 2). In the new window select the system package to
use and press OK .

3HAC 16261-1

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.4 Create a new Robot Controller System

Step Action

3HAC 16261-1

Illustration/Info

4.

If you want the system to start up


in query mode, put a mark in the
query mode selection square. For
further details of the query mode,
see section "Start in Query Mode".

5.

Press Finish to create the controller system or press Next to view


the current configuration.

157

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.5 Update the Robot Controller image

8.0.5 Update the Robot Controller image

Actions
Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

To update an existing controller


system, press Update , see the
figure below.

xx0100000189

2.

Select a system in the system


list and press OK , see the figure
above. Please note that a pop up
menu can be shown by clicking
right mouse button. With this
menu Copy, Rename or Delete
can be selected for the marked
system.

3.

The window displaying the current configuration of the system


will be shown. Follow the
instructions in sections "Add or
remove external options", "Add
or remove additional system
parameters" or "Change options
or system pack revision" to modify the system.

xx0100000190

158

3HAC 16261-1

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.6 Transfer Robot Controller System using Ethernet connection

8.0.6 Transfer Robot Controller System using Ethernet connection

Selecting type of
set-up

Before a system can be downloaded to a robot controller using the RobInstall tool some preparations and set up must be done. This may be done in one of two ways:

...then see instructions in


section:

If you are using:

a direct connection between "If using a direct connection


PC and IOC service outlet on between PC and IOC service
controller
outlet on controller" below!

If using a direct
connection
between PC and
IOC service outlet
on controller

...and continue in
section:
"Download Robot Controller System" below!

Network Intranet
connection with fixed IP
addresses

"If using Network Intranet con"Download Robot Controlnection with fixed IP addresses " ler System" below!
below!

Network Intranet
connection with DHCP
(Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol)

"If using Network Intranet connection with DHCP " below!

Step Action

"Download Robot Controller System" below!

Illustration/Info

1.

Connect a patch-cable between


the Ethernet connection on the
front of the controller and the corresponding connection on the PC/
Laptop.

2.

Make sure that the Network protocol is set for TCP/IP properties.

3.

Change the TCP/IP Properties in


accordance with the following
table and figure:

xx0100000178

3HAC 16261-1

159

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.6 Transfer Robot Controller System using Ethernet connection

If using
Network Intranet
connection with
fixed IP
addresses

If using Network
Intranet connection with DHCP

Step Action

Illustration/Info

1.

Make sure that the Network protocol is set for TCP/IP


properties.

2.

Change the TCP/IP Properties in accordance with the


values to be used for IP address, Subnet mask and Gateway.

3.

Perform a X-START (see section "x-START") or CSTART (see section "C-start") on the S4Cplus controller.

4.

Configure the IP address to be used for the robot controller from the TPU.

Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

Read Ethernet MAC-id on the Teach Pendant Unit (see


section "LAN settings").

Download Robot
Controller
System
Before downloading, check the following:
Make sure there is at least 25 Mb free disk space on the controller mass storage memory. For
information on how to perform a manual storage capacity check, see section "Check Storage
Capacity".
Make sure that the robot controller displays the Start Window on the Teach Pendant Unit (see
section "Start window").

Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

To download a controller system,


press Download as in the figure
below:

xx0100000176

160

3HAC 16261-1

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.6 Transfer Robot Controller System using Ethernet connection

Step Action

Illustration/Info

2.

Select a target system as in the fig- If a direct connection is used with the patch
ure, position 1.
cable between the PC and the controller front,
then just select the default IP address
(192.168.125.1) and "Direct" option.
In other cases, write the correct IP address for
the robot controller and select "Hostname or IPaddress". RobInstall will store already used IP
addresses, which can later be selected with the
down arrow.

3.

Type your username and password


if required by the robot controller as
in the figure below, position 2.

4.

Test the connection by pressing


Test Connection and press OK if a
connection is established.

5.

Select a system in the list on the left


and press OK as in the figure
below. Please note that it is possible to select another system pool
than the shown one (in such case
be sure to select the system pool
directory, not the system itself on
the lower level).

6.

RobInstall will now create a system After downloading it is possible to restart the
file and download it to the controller. controller with the new downloaded controller
system. Otherwise, the controller may be
restarted from the Teach Pendant Unit as
detailed in section "Reboot".

xx0100000177

xx0100000175

3HAC 16261-1

161

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.7 Transfer Robot Controller System using floppy disks

8.0.7 Transfer Robot Controller System using floppy disks


Before downloading, make sure:
there is at least 25 Mb free disk space on the controller mass storage memory. For information
on how to perform a manual storage capacity check, see section "Check Storage Capacity".
that the robot controller displays the Start Window on the Teach Pendant Unit (see section
"Start Window").
an optional floppy disk drive is installed in the robot controller.

Create Boot
Diskettes from
RobInstall

Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

Press Create Boot Disk as in the


figure below.

xx0100000173

2.

Select a system in the list on the


left and press OK as in the figure
below.
RobInstall will now create an
image file and estimate the number of disks needed.

xx0100000175

xx0100000188

162

3.

Insert a formatted 1.44 Mb diskette into the disk drive.

4.

Press Continue to start copy the


Robot Controller System image
to the disks.

3HAC 16261-1

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.7 Transfer Robot Controller System using floppy disks

Step Action
5.

3HAC 16261-1

Illustration/Info

Use the finished floppy disks to


boot your system as described in
section "Boot Disks".

163

8 Installation of controller software


8.0.8 RobInstall preferences

8.0.8 RobInstall preferences

Customizing RobInstall

RobInstall may be customized to suit particular requirements.

Step Action
1.

Illustration/Info

To customise RobInstall for new


programs and optional products,
press Preferences as shown in the
figure. See also chapter "System
Directory Structure".

xx0100000186

2.

To select another media pool (see


section "Media Pool in the PC"),
press Select Media Pool as shown
in the figure, position 1.

xx0100000187

3.

164

To add a new system package or


option package to the media pool,
press Import Program as shown in
the figure, position 2. Also see
chapter "System Directory Structure".

3HAC 16261-1

9 System directory structure


9.0.1 Media pool in the PC

Chapter 9: System directory structure


9.0.1 Media pool in the PC

Directory

All RobotWare System Packages and Option Packages are stored in a media pool directory
as shown in the table below.
Two revisions of the same system package may exist in the pool. By default, after having
installed RobInstall, a directory "MediaPool" will be found in the directory Program
Files\ABB Robotics\, and will also be the current one. However any directory in the structure
can be set up as the current media pool in the Preference window (see section "Robinstall
Preferences").

xx0200000156

Naming
conventions

3HAC 16261-1

Art. no./folder
name

Description

3HAXaaaa-1.00

RobotWare System Pack 3HAXaaaa-1, rev 00

3HAXbbbb-1.02

RobotWare System Pack 3HAXbbbb-1, rev 02

3HAXcccc-1.01

ABB Robotics external option program 3HAXcccc-1, rev 01

3HYZdddd-1.00

OEM customer external option program 3XYZdddd-1, rev 00

Each package is stored in a directory, the name of which is an article number ending with the
sub-number and with the revision number as shown in the table above. All the system packs
and option packs in one media pool must have the correct revision numbers in their directory
names. Thus a later revision can be loaded into the program pool, to be added to the old one,
without changing the article number.

165

9 System directory structure


9.0.2 System pool in the PC

9.0.2 System pool in the PC

Directory

All systems created with the RobInstall will be stored in a system pool. The default name of
such a system pool is "system" as shown below. Each system stored in the system pool is a
directory with the name of the system as shown in the table below.
By default, after installing RobInstall, a directory "system" will be found in Program
Files\ABB Robotics\ and will also be the current one. However any directory in the structure
can be set up as the current system directory in the Create New System window or Select
System window.

File system
requirements

166

Directory view

Folder "System 1"

xx0100000260

xx0100000261

The system directory must hold these files and directories to allow software installation:

key.id (encrypted key file for the actual controller)

program.id (file with paths to selected programs in the media pool)

A syspar directory containing .cfg files to be included in the software installation procedure. All system parameter files, included when creating a system with RobInstall,
are stored in this syspar directory as shown in the table in section "System Pool Directory".

A directory called Home. In this home directory the user can include any file or files,
which should be downloaded to the controller together with the operating system.
Such files will then be placed in the home directory of the system in the controller.

3HAC 16261-1

9 System directory structure


9.0.3 File structure in the robot controller mass storage memory

9.0.3 File structure in the robot controller mass storage memory

Files in root
directory, hd0a

The root directory of the mass storage memory is called hd0a. This includes several components:

File name

Description

E.g. 3HAC6811-1.00

Control system package, named as an article number

bin

BootImage code

BootRom.sys

System configuration and description file for the mass storage


memory

MC.cfg

Network configuration for the main computer

ctrl.bin

Holds e.g. revolution counter values

system.dir

Holds information on the current system

system directories

Different systems stored in the mass storage memory

Directories and
subdirectories

Each system directory holds a number of subdirectories, defining for instance language,
options, robots, etc.

"Home" directory

The system directory is the "home" directory for the system. When using the address "home:"
in the RAPID program, this directory will be addressed.

"Bin"
subdirectory

The subdirectory bin, containing the storage area for all system data, e.g. at power break. This
means that at warm start, in addition to restoring the operating system from the control system
package, all system data is restored from this directory and reloaded into the working memory.

Never change
these directories!

Never delete or change the \bin or BootRom.sys directories in the root directory. If this is
done, the controller cannot be restarted and the mass storage memory will be impossible to
use.

3HAC 16261-1

167

9 System directory structure


9.0.4 Preparation of S4Cplus software to be installed

9.0.4 Preparation of S4Cplus software to be installed

Illustration
Media pool
S ys tem Pack in
/3haxbbbb-1.nn
*.* s ignature no

S ys tem pool

E xt Option in
/3haxcccc-1.nn
*.* relkey.txt

E xternal option from


dis k or CD-R OM

ys tem Pack from


obotWare CD-R OM

Created files
key.id
program.id

My s ys tem
/s ys tem_n
key.id
program.id
keys tr.txt
/s ys par
*.cfg

Ins erted key s trings


are s aved in keys tr.txt
R obotWare keys trings define the options
to be included from the S ys tem Pack
they belong to and E xt opt keys trings define
added external option packages .
All keys mus t have the s ame s erial number.

xx0100000262

Files to be
prepared

168

The list details what happens during preparation:

RobInstall creates a file named Key.id from the key strings specifying the options to
be installed from the System Pack and the external option programs to be installed.

Unless deselected in RobInstall, the latest revision of the System Pack and External
Option Programs is selected as default (see section "Change options or system pack
revisions").

These are copied from the media pool and concatenated into one target file that also
holds the key.id and the syspar directory. This may then be downloaded to the controller via Ethernet or a set of diskettes. The target file is temporarily stored in the system
directory before downloading or creating diskettes.

3HAC 16261-1

9 System directory structure


9.0.5 Handling mass memory storage capacity

9.0.5 Handling mass memory storage capacity

General

In some cases it is very important that there is enough free space in the mass storage memory,
before attempting to download new system software. How to check its capacity, and if
required increase it, is detailed below.
A manual check on the free space can be done in one of the following ways:

Checking storage
capacity from the
Teach Pendant
Unit

Checking storage
capacity through
connection to the
MC/CONSOLE
port

1. Press the button Miscellaneous to select Service window .


2. Select Storage Capacity from the System Info menu. The Mass Storage
Memory is called hd0a .

1. Connect a console to the MC/CONSOLE outlet on the controller and execute the
command dosFsShow .

There should always be at least 25 Mb free disk space on the controller mass storage memory
before attempting to download a new system. For information on how to increase storage
capacity, see below!

Increasing
storage capacity

If the capacity of the mass storage memory is less than 25 Mb when a new controller system
is to be downloaded, storage memory must be released by removing old systems from the
mass storage memory. This can be done in one of the following ways:
1. Boot up on the system you would like to remove and then make a C-START (see
section "C-start").
2. Use the FileManager in the Teach Pendant Unit, see Users Guide - File Manager,
for more information on how to use the FileManager.
3. Use a third-party "ftp" client (like FTPVoyager supplied on the RobotWare CD).
Removing systems using the FileManager or FTP-client may be hazardous since the \bin and
BootRom.sys directories the must be kept intact.
Proceed with utmost care to avoid accidentally removing such files or directories!

3HAC 16261-1

169

9 System directory structure


9.0.5 Handling mass memory storage capacity

170

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.0.1 Introduction

Chapter 10: Calibration


10.0.1 Introduction

Definitions

When to calibrate

This chapter details two different methods of how to calibrate the IRB 7600. The chapter is
divided into the following sections:

General information. This section contains general information that is valid for both
methods of calibration.

Calibration - Levelmeter 2000. This section details how to calibrate the robot with Levelmeter 2000.

Calibration - Calibration Pendulum. This section details how to calibrate the robot with
Calibration Pendulum.

After calibration. This section details how to verify that all calibration positions are correct after calibration.

Alternative calibration. This section details alternative calibration in alternative positions.

Calibrate the measurement system carefully if any of the resolver values has been changed.
This may occur when parts affecting the calibration position have been replaced on the robot.
Calibrate the system roughly as detailed in section Updating the revolution counter on page
174 if the contents of the revolution counter memory are lost. This may occur when:

3HAC 16261-1

the battery is discharged

a resolver error occurs

the signal between a resolver and measurement board is interrupted

a robot axis has been moved with the control system disconnected

171

10 Calibration
10.1.1 Determine the appropriate method of calibration

Section 10.1: General information - both methods


10.1.1 Determine the appropriate method of calibration

Different calibration methods

Determine the
correct calibration method

Depending on the robot version, the IRB 7600 robot can be calibrated with two different
methods.

Levelmeter 2000

Calibration pendulum

To determine which method to use, identify the profiles at axis 1 according to the figure
below.

xx0200000377

172

Profile at axis 1, the robot must be calibrated with the Levelmeter 2000

Profile at axis 1, the robot must be calibrated with the Calibration Pendulum

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.1.2 Calibration scales

10.1.2 Calibration scales

Introduction

This section specifies the calibration scale positions.

IRB 7600

The illustration below show the calibration scale positions:

xx0100000198

3HAC 16261-1

Sync scale, axis 1

Sync scale, axes 2-5

Sync scale, axis 6

173

10 Calibration
10.1.3 Updating the revolution counter

10.1.3 Updating the revolution counter

Manually running
the manipulator
to the calibration
position

This section details the first step when updating the revolution counter; manually running the
manipulator to the calibration position.

Step

Storing the revolution counter


setting

Action

Illustration

1.

Select axis-by-axis motion mode

2.

Press the enabling device on the teach pendant and,


using the joystick, move the robot manually so that the
calibration marks lie within the tolerance zone.

3.

Note that axis 6 does not have any mechanical stop and
can thus be calibrated at the wrong faceplate revolution.
Do not operate axis 6 manually before the robot has been
calibrated.

4.

When all axes have been positioned as above, store the


revolution counter settings using the Teach Pendant Unit
as detailed below:

Shown in Calibration
scales on page 173.

This section details the second step when updating the revolution counter; storing the revolution counter setting.

If a revolution counter is incorrectly updated, it will cause incorrect robot positioning, which in
turn may cause damage or injury!

Step
1.

Action

Illustration

Press the button "Miscellaneous".

xx0100000194

2.

Select the Service window by


pressing ENTER.
xx0100000200

3.

Select Calibration from the


View menu.
The Calibration window appears.

xx0100000201

174

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.1.3 Updating the revolution counter

Step
4.

Action

Illustration

Select the desired unit and choose


Rev Counter Update from the
Calib menu.
The Revolution Counter Update
window appears.

xx0100000202

3HAC 16261-1

5.

Select the desired axis and press


Incl to include it (it will be marked
with an x) or press All to select
all axes.

6.

Press OK when all axes that are to


be updated are marked with an x.
CANCEL returns to the Calibration
window.

7.

Press OK again to confirm and


start the update.
CANCEL returns to the Revolution
Counter Update window.

8.

At this point, it is recommended


that the revolution counter values
are saved to a diskette.

Not required.

9.

Recheck the calibration position.

Detailed in Checking the calibration position on


page 202

175

10 Calibration
10.2.1 Calibration, prerequisites

Section 10.2: Calibration - Levelmeter 2000


General
10.2.1 Calibration, prerequisites

General

The calibration procedure may be described as comparing the direction of two sensors, the
reference sensor and the calibration sensor, while manually running the robot to its calibration
position, thus reducing the sensor difference to close to zero.
This procedure may be performed using a calibration kit with one sensor or two. Using one
sensor requires moving the sensor between its reference position on the robot base and the
calibration position for each axis respectively. Using a kit with two sensors enables letting the
reference sensor remain in its position on the base.
The article numbers of relevant equipment are specified in their instructions respectively.

Calibration order

The axes must be adjusted in increasing sequence, i.e. 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6.

Calibration movement direction

When calibrating, the axis must consistently be run towards the calibration position in the
same direction, in order to avoid position errors caused by backlash in gears etc. Positive
directions are shown in the figure below.
If the axis is run past the calibration position by mistake, it must be run back to its original
position before making a new attempt to run to the calibration position.

6+

4+

5+

3+
2+

1+
xx0200000089

176

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.1 Calibration, prerequisites

Using Levelmeter
2000

Using Levelmeter 2000 to perform the calibration requires firstly initializing the equipment.
How to perform this is detailed in "Initialization of Levelmeter 2000".

Location of sensors

The positions where the calibration sensor and reference sensor should be fitted during calibration, are specified in their instructions respectively.

3HAC 16261-1

177

10 Calibration
10.2.2 Fine calibration procedure on TPU

Preliminaries
10.2.2 Fine calibration procedure on TPU

General

The section below details how to use the Teach Pendant Unit (TPU) when performing a finecalibration of the robot. The way of fitting the calibration equipment to each axis is detailed
in "Fine calibration".

Procedure
Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Press the button "Miscellaneous".

xx0100000194

2.

Select the Service window by


pressing ENTER.
xx0100000200

3.

Select Calibration from the


View menu. The Calibration window appears.

xx0100000201

Explanation of status:
Synchronized: all axes are calibrated
and their positions are known. The unit
is ready for use.

178

Revolution Counter not updated: all


axes are fine-calibrated but one (or
more) of the axes has a counter that is
NOT updated. This axis, or these axes,
must therefore be updated as
described in Updating the revolution
counter.

Not calibrated: one (or more) of the axis


is NOT fine-calibrated. This axis, or
these axes, must therefore be fine-calibrated as described in "Fine calibration".

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.2 Fine calibration procedure on TPU

Step
4.

Action

Note/Illustration

Select the desired unit and choose


Fine Calibrate from the
Calib menu. A Warning window
appears.

xx0100000203

5.

Move the manipulator to its caliCalibration positions for the manipulator


bration position and press OK. The detailed in "Checking the calibration position".
Fine Calibrate window appears.

6.

Select the desired axis and press


Incl to include it (it will be
marked with an x) or press All to
select all axes.

7.

Press OK when all axes that are


to be updated are marked with an
x.
CANCEL returns to the Calibration
window.

8.

Press OK again to confirm and


start the update.
CANCEL returns to the Fine Calibration window.
An alert box is displayed during
calibration. The Status window
appears when the fine calibration
is complete. The revolution
counters are always updated at
the same time as the calibration is
performed.

xx0100000204

3HAC 16261-1

179

10 Calibration
10.2.3 Initialization of Levelmeter 2000

10.2.3 Initialization of Levelmeter 2000

General

Whenever Levelmeter 2000 is used for calibrating the robot, the equipment must first be
initialized as detailed below.
The Levelmeter 2000 is shown for reference below:
+

0000000
00000

Port/Sensor

oo
GON

Aoo mRAD mm/m DEG


"1/12" "1/10" "/REL" mm/REL

50

A
B

BATT

LEVELMETER 2000

+
ON/MODE

ZERO SELECT

ENTER

SEND/ESC

HOLD
WYLER

OUT

xx0200000083

Overview

Measuring unit

Selection pointer

Sensor connection

Shown below is an outline of how to initialize the Levelmeter 2000. Detailed procedures are
given further down.

Step

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Select the correct filter type. Detailed in Select filter type on page 180.

2.

Set the measuring unit.

Detailed in Measuring units on page 181.

3.

Install sensor.

Detailed in Installation of sensor on page 181.

4.

Calibrate the robot!

Detailed in the instruction for each axis respectively.

Select filter type


Step

180

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Press ON/MODE until the dot flashes under FILTER. Shown in the figure above!

2.

Press ENTER.

3.

The standard filter type no. 5 flashes.

4.

If type 5 does not flash, press ZERO/SELECT to


select filter type 5.

Default setting is filter type 5.

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.3 Initialization of Levelmeter 2000

Measuring units
Step

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Press ON/MODE until the dot flashes under UNIT .

Shown in the figure above!

2.

Press ENTER.

3.

Press ZERO/SELECT until mm/m flashes.


Two decimals (0.00) are shown on the display

4.

Press ENTER.

Installation of
sensor
Step

Result

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Connect the sensor to the Sensor connection point.

Shown in the figure above!

2.

Press ON/MODE .

3.

Press ON/MODE until the dot flashes under SENSOR .

4.

Press ENTER.

5.

Press ZERO/SELECT until a flashing "A" is shown.

6.

Press ENTER.
Wait until the "A" flashes again.

7.

Press ENTER.

The Levelmeter 2000 is now initialized and ready for service.

181

10 Calibration
10.2.4 Resetting of Levelmeter 2000

Fine calibration
10.2.4 Resetting of Levelmeter 2000

General

Before calibrating each axis, the equipment must first be reset as detailed below.
The Levelmeter 2000 is shown for reference below:
+

0000000
00000

Port/Sensor

oo
GON

Aoo mRAD mm/m DEG


"1/12" "1/10" "/REL" mm/REL

50

A
B

BATT

LEVELMETER 2000

+
ON/MODE

ZERO SELECT

ENTER

SEND/ESC

HOLD
WYLER

OUT

xx0200000083

Measuring unit

Selection pointer

Sensor connection

X
Y
B

xx0100000207

Level sensor (actual orientation specified in each instruction)

Reference sensor fixture, fitted on manipulator base

Attachment screws

Always secure the sensor to the reference plane using screws!

Always fit the sensor in the same direction when resetting it as when performing the calibration
for each axis!

182

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.4 Resetting of Levelmeter 2000

Always reset the sensor when using it in a new direction!

Initializing
Step

Result

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Press ON/MODE until the dot flashes under REL


ZERO .

Shown in the figure above!

2.

Press ENTER.

3.

Wait until + or - flashes.

4.

Press HOLD .

5.

Wait until + or - flashes.

6.

Press ENTER.

The Levelmeter 2000 is now reset and ready for service.

183

10 Calibration
10.2.5 Calibration, axis 1

10.2.5 Calibration, axis 1

General

Calibration sensor position

This section details how to perform the actual fine calibration of axis 1 using special calibration equipment.

Equipment

Article no.

Calibration tool axis 1

3HAC 13908-4

This illustration show the position of the calibration tool:

xx0200000090

Reference sensor
position

Calibration tool, axis 1

No reference sensor is used during calibration of axis 1.

Procedure
Step
1.

184

Action

Illustration

Manually run the robot to the calibration position, axis 1.

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.5 Calibration, axis 1

Step
2.

Action

Illustration

Fit the calibration tool over the tabs on


frame and base.
If the tool fits over both tabs simultaneously, axis 1 is correctly.
If not, proceed as detailed below!

A
C

B
xx0100000212

3HAC 16261-1

3.

Switch the operating mode selector to


MANUAL MODE AT REDUCED
SPEED.

4.

Manually run axis 1 in with the joystick


until the tool may be fitted over both
tabs.

5.

Update only axis 1.

A: Calibration tab, frame

B: Calibration tab, base

C: Calibration tool

Detailed in Fine calibration procedure on


TPU on page 178.

185

10 Calibration
10.2.6 Calibration, axis 2

10.2.6 Calibration, axis 2

General

Calibration sensor position

This section details how to perform the actual fine calibration of axis 2 using special calibration equipment.

Equipment

Art. no.

Note

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in section


Standard toolkit!

Sensor fixture

6808 0011-GM

For reference sensor on manipulator


base

Angle bracket

6808 0011-LP

For calibration sensor on manipulator


lower arm

Levelmaster 2000 calibration kit


with one sensor

6369 901-347

Levelmaster 2000 calibration kit


with two sensors

6369 901-348

Isopropanol

1177 1012-108

For cleaning the reference sensor fixture attachment point

This illustration show the position of the calibration tool:

xx0200000091

186

Calibration sensor, axis 2

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.6 Calibration, axis 2

Reference sensor
position

This illustration show the orientation of the reference sensor in relation to the manipulator
base:

2
3
4
5
6
xx0200000088

Reference sensor attachment point (center hole)

1-6

Orientation of the reference sensor in relation to the manipulator base (sticker facing
upwards)

Procedure
Step

Action

Illustration

1.

Clean the calibration surface with isopropanol . Art. no. specified above!

2.

Fit the angle bracket on the lower arm.


Art. no. specified above!
Adjust the angle of the bracket to make it level. NOTE that the M8 screw must be
replaced with an M6 x 25 and flat
washer when fitting the bracket!

3.

Remove the cover plate on the reference surface on the manipulator base.

4.

Clean the area where the reference sensor fix- Art. no. specified above!
ture goes with isopropanol .

5.

Fit the reference sensor fixture on the reference Art. no. specified above!
surface on the manipulator base.
Orientation specified above!
NOTE that the M8 screw must be
replaced with an M6 x 25 and flat
washer when fitting the bracket!

6.

Reset the levelmeter.

7.

Fit the calibration sensor on the sensor fixture. Shown in the figure above!
Carefully tighten the securing screws.

8.

Manually run axis 2 in with the joystick to the


Within 0.20 units
correct position as indicated by the levelmeter.

9.

Update only axis 2.

Shown in the figure above!

Detailed in Resetting of Levelmeter 2000 on page 182.

Detailed in Fine calibration procedure on TPU on page 178.

10. Remove the sensors.


11. Refit the cover plate on the calibration surface
on the rear of the manipulator lower arm.

3HAC 16261-1

187

10 Calibration
10.2.6 Calibration, axis 2

Step

Action

Illustration

12. Refit the cover plate on the reference surface


on the manipulator base.

188

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.7 Calibration, axis 3

10.2.7 Calibration, axis 3

General

Calibration sensor position

This section details how to perform the actual fine calibration of axis 3 using special calibration equipment.

Equipment

Art. no.

Info

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit!

Sensor fixture

6808 0011-GM

For reference sensor on manipulator


base

Sync adapter

3HAC 13908-1

Turning disk adapter for manipulator


model

Guide pin

2111 2021-399

To be used with "Sync adapter"

Levelmaster 2000 calibration kit with one sensor

6369 901-347

Levelmaster 2000 calibration kit with two sensors

6369 901-348

Sensor plate

3HAC 0392-1

One sensor plate is required for each


sensor

Sensor unit

6808 0011-GU

For fitting the calibration sensor plate to


the sync adapter

Isopropanol

1177 1012-108

For cleaning the reference sensor fixture


attachment point

This illustration show the position of the calibration tool:

xx0200000092

3HAC 16261-1

Calibration sensor, axis 3

189

10 Calibration
10.2.7 Calibration, axis 3

Reference sensor
position

This illustration show the orientation of the reference sensor in relation to the manipulator
base:

2
3
4
5
6
xx0200000088

Reference sensor attachment point (center hole)

1-6

Orientation of the reference sensor in relation to the manipulator base (sticker facing
upwards)

Procedure
Step

190

Action

Illustration/Info

1.

Run the program \SYSTEM\UTILITY\SERVICE\CALIBRAT\CAL7600 in the system and


select Calib: CAL3.
The robot moves to the position for calibration
of axis 3.

2.

Clean the manipulator turning disk with isopro- Art. no. specified above!
panol .

3.

Fit the Sync adapter and Sensor unit on the


turning disk.

4.

Clean the area where the reference sensor fix- Art. no. specified above!
ture goes with isopropanol .

5.

Fit the reference sensor fixture on the reference surface on the manipulator base.

Art. no. specified above!


Orientation specified above!
NOTE that the M8 screw must be
replaced with an M6 x 25 and flat
washer when fitting the bracket!

6.

Reset the levelmeter.

Detailed in Resetting of Levelmeter 2000 on page 182.

7.

Fit the calibration sensor on the sensor fixture. Shown in the figure above!
Carefully tighten the securing screws.

8.

Manually run axis 3 in with the joystick to the


Within 0.20 units
correct position as indicated by the level meter.

9.

Update only axis 3.

10.

Remove the sensors.

11.

Refit the cover plate on the reference surface


on the manipulator base.

Art. no. specified above!

Detailed in Fine calibration procedure on TPU on page 178.

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.8 Calibration, axis 4

10.2.8 Calibration, axis 4

General

This section details how to perform the actual fine calibration of axis 4 using special calibration equipment.

Equipment

Art. no.

Info

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in section "Standard toolkit"!

Sensor fixture

6808 0011-GM

For reference sensor on manipulator base

Sync adapter

3HAC 13908-1

Turning disk adapter for manipulator model

Guide pin

2111 2021-399

To be used with "Sync adapter"

Levelmaster 2000 calibra- 6369 901-347


tion kit with one sensor
Levelmaster 2000 calibra- 6369 901-348
tion kit with two sensors

3HAC 16261-1

Sensor plate

3HAC 0392-1

One sensor plate is required for each sensor

Sensor unit

6808 0011-GU

For fitting the calibration sensor plate to the


sync adapter

Isopropanol

1177 1012-108

For cleaning the reference sensor fixture


attachment point

191

10 Calibration
10.2.8 Calibration, axis 4

Calibration sensor position

This illustration show the position of the calibration tool:

xx0200000093

Reference sensor
position

Calibration sensor, axis 4

This illustration show the orientation of the reference sensor in relation to the manipulator
base:

2
3
4
5
6
xx0200000088

192

Reference sensor attachment point (center hole)

1-6

Orientation of the reference sensor in relation to the manipulator base (sticker facing
upwards)

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.8 Calibration, axis 4

Procedure
Step

Action

Illustration

1.

Run the program \SYSTEM\UTILITY\SERVICE\CALIBRAT\CAL7600 in the system and select


Calib: CAL4A.
The robot moves to the position for calibration of
axis 4.

2.

Clean the manipulator turning disk with isopropanol . Art. no. specified above!

3.

Fit the Sync adapter and Sensor unit on the turning Art. no. specified above!
disk.

4.

Clean the area where the reference sensor fixture


goes with isopropanol .

5.

Fit the reference sensor fixture on the reference sur- Art. no. specified above!
face on the manipulator base.
Orientation specified above!

6.

Reset the levelmeter.

Detailed in Resetting of Levelmeter 2000 on page 182.

7.

Fit the calibration sensor on the sensor fixture.


Carefully tighten the securing screws.

Shown in the figure above!

8.

Manually run axis 4 in with the joystick to the correct Within 0.40 units
position as indicated by the level meter.

9.

Update only axis 4.

Art. no. specified above!

Detailed in Fine calibration


procedure on TPU on page
178.

10. Remove the sensor.


11. Select Calib: CAL4B.
The robot moves to the position for calibration of
axis 4.
12. Update only axis 4.

Detailed in Fine calibration


procedure on TPU on page
178.

13. Refit the cover plate on the reference surface on the


manipulator base.

3HAC 16261-1

193

10 Calibration
10.2.9 Calibration, axis 5

10.2.9 Calibration, axis 5

General

Calibration sensor position

This section details how to perform the actual fine calibration of axis 5 using special calibration equipment.

Equipment

Art. no.

Info

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in section "Standard toolkit"!

Sensor fixture

6808 0011-GM

For reference sensor on manipulator base

Sync adapter

3HAC 13908-1

Turning disk adapter for manipulator


model

Guide pin

2111 2021-399

To be used with "Sync adapter"

Levelmaster 2000 calibration kit with one sensor

6369 901-347

Levelmaster 2000 calibration kit with two sensors

6369 901-348

Sensor plate

3HAC 0392-1

One sensor plate is required for each sensor

Sensor unit

6808 0011-GU

For fitting the calibration sensor plate to


the sync adapter

Isopropanol

1177 1012-108

For cleaning the reference sensor fixture


attachment point

This illustration show the position of the calibration tool:

xx0200000094

194

Calibration sensor, axis 5

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.9 Calibration, axis 5

Reference sensor
position

This illustration show the orientation of the reference sensor in relation to the manipulator
base:

2
3
4
5
6
xx0200000088

Reference sensor attachment point (center hole)

1-6

Orientation of the reference sensor in relation to the manipulator base (sticker facing
upwards)

Procedure
Step

Action

Illustration

1.

Run the program \SYSTEM\UTILITY\SERVICE\CALIBRAT\CAL7600 in the system and select Calib:


CAL5.
The robot will now move to the position for calibration
of axis 5.

2.

Clean the manipulator turning disk with isopropanol . Art. no. specified above!

3.

Fit the Sync adapter and Sensor unit on the turning


disk.

Art. no. specified above!

4.

Clean the area where the reference sensor fixture


goes with isopropanol .

Art. no. specified above!

5.

Fit the reference sensor fixture on the reference sur- Art. no. specified above!
face on the manipulator base.
Orientation specified above!

6.

Reset the levelmeter.

Detailed in Resetting of Levelmeter 2000 on page 182.

7.

Fit the calibration sensor on the sensor fixture.


Carefully tighten the securing screws.

Shown in the figure above!

8.

Manually run axis 5 in with the joystick to the correct Within 0.40 units
position as indicated by the level meter.

9.

Update only axis 5.

Detailed in Fine calibration


procedure on TPU on page
178.

10. Remove the sensors.


11. Refit the cover plate on the reference surface on the
manipulator base.

3HAC 16261-1

195

10 Calibration
10.2.10 Calibration, axis 6

10.2.10 Calibration, axis 6

General

This section details how to perform the actual fine calibration of axis 6 using special calibration equipment.

Equipment

Art. no.

Info

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in section "Standard toolkit"!

Sensor fixture

6808 0011-GM

For reference sensor on manipulator base

Sync adapter

3HAC 13908-1

Turning disk adapter for manipulator


model

Guide pin

2111 2021-399

To be used with "Sync adapter"

Levelmaster 2000 calibration 6369 901-347


kit with one sensor
Levelmaster 2000 calibration 6369 901-348
kit with two sensors

Calibration sensor position

Sensor plate

3HAC 0392-1

One sensor plate is required for each sensor

Sensor unit

6808 0011-GU

For fitting the calibration sensor plate to


the sync adapter

Isopropanol

1177 1012-108

For cleaning the reference sensor fixture


attachment point

This illustration show the position of the calibration tool:

xx0200000095

196

Calibration sensor, axis 6

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.2.10 Calibration, axis 6

Reference sensor
position

This illustration show the orientation of the reference sensor in relation to the manipulator
base:

2
3
4
5
6
xx0200000088

Reference sensor attachment point (center hole)

1-6

Orientation of the reference sensor in relation to the manipulator base (sticker facing
upwards)

Procedure
Step

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Illustration

1.

Calibrate axis 5 as detailed in "Calibration, axis 5".

2.

Reset the levelmeter.

Detailed in Resetting of Levelmeter 2000 on page 182.

3.

Fit the calibration sensor on the sensor fixture.


Carefully tighten the securing screws.

Shown in the figure above!

4.

Manually run axis 6 in with the joystick to the correct Within 0.40 units
position as indicated by the level meter.

5.

Update only axis 6.

6.

Remove the sensors.

7.

Refit the cover plate on the reference surface on the


manipulator base.

Detailed in Fine calibration


procedure on TPU on page
178.

197

10 Calibration
10.3.1 How to calibrate the robot system

Section 10.3: Calibration - Calibration Pendulum


General
10.3.1 How to calibrate the robot system

General

This section provides an overview of the procedure required when calibrating the robot system. Many of the steps in the procedure are detailed in other sections to which references are
given.

Procedure
Step

Additional information

Action

Illustration

1.

Install the robot.

Detailed in the "Installation Manual".

2.

Check that all required hardware is available Required hardware is specified in the
for calibrating the robot.
calibrating procedures for each axis.

3.

Connect the calibration equipment to the


robot controller and initialize it.

4.

Manually, run the robot axes to be calibrated Use the calibration scales fitted to
to a position close to the correct calibration each robot axis to locate this position.
position.

5.

Start the calibration program.

Detailed in Calibration procedure on


TPU on page 203.

6.

Calibrate each axis or several axes in a


sequence.

Detailed in each axis calibration


instruction.

7.

Verify that the calibration was successfully


carried out.

Detailed in Post calibration procedure


on page 214.

Specified in Initialization of calibration


pendulum on page 204.

In addition to the basic calibration procedure detailed above, a number of calibration related
actions may be performed:

Action

Detailed in section:

How to update the robot revolution counter without


performing a complete calibration

Updating the revolution counter on


page 174.

How to manually check the current calibration position Checking the calibration position on
page 202.
An alternative calibration position for axis 1 may be
defined

Alternative calibration position on


page 215.

How to perform the alternative calibration

Alternative calibrating on page 216.

How to change to a new offset value for the alternative New calibration offset, axis 1 on page
calibration position
218.

198

How to retrieve a new calibration offset for the alternative calibration position

Retrieving offset values on page 219.

How to change to a new calibration position

New calibration position, axis 1 on


page 217.

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.3.2 Calibration, prerequisites

10.3.2 Calibration, prerequisites

General

The calibration procedure may be described as comparing the direction of two sensors, the
reference sensor and the calibration sensor, while running the robot to its calibration position,
thus reducing the sensor difference to close to zero.
All article numbers of relevant equipment are specified in their instructions respectively.

Peripheral equipment

The robot must be free from any peripheral equipment during calibration. Fitted welding guns
and similar will cause erroneous calibration positions.

Calibration order

The axes must be adjusted in increasing sequence, i.e. 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6.

Calibration movement direction

When calibrating, the axis must consistently be run towards the calibration position in the
same direction, in order to avoid position errors caused by backlash in gears etc. Positive
directions are shown in the figure below.
This is normally handled by the robot calibration software.
NOTE The figure shows an IRB 7600, but the positive direction is the same for all robots!
6+

4+

5+

3+
2+

1+
xx0200000089

Location of sensors

The positions where the calibration sensor and reference sensor should be fitted during calibration, are specified in Calibration sensor mounting positions on page 206.

Location of calibration marks/


plates

Where to find the calibration sensor and reference sensor respectively during calibration in
Calibration scales on page 173.

3HAC 16261-1

199

10 Calibration
10.3.3 Calibration pendulum kit, contents

10.3.3 Calibration pendulum kit, contents

General

The calibration pendulum kit contains all required hardware to calibrate all robot models
(except IRB 6400R) using the calibration pendulum method.
These kits may be rented from ABB at this time, but not purchased.

Contents of calibration pendulum


kit 3HAC 15716-1

200

Qty

Contents

Art. no.

Inclinometer, Wyler
Zerotronic

3HAC 12837-7

Cable set Wyler

3HAC 15144-1

Leveltronic NT/41

3HAC 15732-1

Calibration pendulum

3HAC 4540-1

Turning disk adapter

3HAC 16423-1

May be turned both ways to fit IRB


140, IRB 1400, IRB 2400 and IRB
4400.
Includes all guide pins and attachment screws.
Also see illustration below!

Adapter, turning disk

3HAC 14034-1

Fits IRB 6600 and IRB 7600


Includes all guide pins and attachment screws.
Also see illustration below!

Batteries

For battery supply of "Leveltronic NT/


41"

Thread tap, M8

For repairing any damaged protective


cover attachment holes

Protective covers and


attachment screws

For replacing any damaged protective


covers

Location pin

3HAC 14137-1

58 mm long
For IRB 6600 and IRB 7600, axis 1

Location pin

3HAC 14137-2

68 mm long
For IRB 140, IRB 1400, IRB 2400 and
IRB 4400, axis 1

User documentation

Rem.

All required cables

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.3.3 Calibration pendulum kit, contents

Illustration, turning disk adapter

May be turned both ways to fit IRB 140, IRB 1400, IRB 2400 and IRB 4400.

A
B
C
D
C
xx0200000276

Illustration,
adapter turning
disk

Guide pin, 8 mm

Guide pin, 6 mm

Screw, M10

Screw, M6

Fits IRB 6600 and IRB 7600

xx0200000278

3HAC 16261-1

Locating shaft

Hand wheel

Turning disk, robot

201

10 Calibration
10.3.4 Checking the calibration position

Preliminaries
10.3.4 Checking the calibration position

General

Using the program CALxxxx in


the system software

Using the Jogging window on


the teach pendant

Check the calibration position before any programming of the robot system can begin. This
may be done in one of two ways:

Using the program CALxxxx in the system software (xxxx signifying the robot type;
IRB xxxx)

Using the Jogging window on the teach pendant

Step

Action

Button

1.

Run the program \SYSTEM\UTILITY\SERVICE\CALIBRAT\CALxxxx in the system and follow the instructions displayed on the teach
pendant.

2.

Switch to MOTORS OFF when the robot stops.


Check that the calibration marks for that particular
axis align correctly. If they do not, update the revolution counters.

3.

Check that resolver offset values in the system


parameters match those on the parameter disk
delivered with the robot or those established when
calibrating the robot (after a repair, etc).

Step

Action

Calibration marks shown in


Calibration scales on page
173.
Detailed in Updating the revolution counter on page 174.

Illustration

1.

Open the Jogging window.

2.

Choose running axis-by-axis.

xx0100000195

xx0100000196

202

3.

Manually, run the robot axis to a position where


the resolver offset value read, is equal to zero.

4.

Check that the calibration marks for that partic- Shown in Calibration scales on
ular axis align correctly. If they do not, update page 173.
the revolution counters !
Detailed in Updating the revolution
counter on page 174.

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.3.5 Calibration procedure on TPU

10.3.5 Calibration procedure on TPU

General

This section details how to use the Teach Pendant Unit (TPU) when calibrating the robot
using the calibration pendulum method.

Procedure
Step

Action

Illustration

1.

Press the "Program" button on the TPU.

2.

Select "Special", and then "Call service


routine".

3.

Start the program: "Calpendulum.rutin".

4.

Select the required calibration procedure


by pressing "START".

xx0300000009

xx0200000188

5.

Enter the value for your choice of which


robot axes to calibrate.
Press OK .

xx0200000190

Default value: All axes


In this example, axis 1 was selected.

3HAC 16261-1

6.

Press "0" to acknowledge the selection


made.
Press OK .

7.

Proceed to calibrate the individual robot


axes.

Detailed in the calibration instructions


for the robot axes.

203

10 Calibration
10.3.6 Initialization of calibration pendulum

10.3.6 Initialization of calibration pendulum

General

Whenever calibration pendulum is used for calibrating the robot, the equipment must first be
initialized as detailed below.
The Levelmeter 2000 is shown for reference below:
+

0000000
00000
oo
GON

Port/Sensor

Aoo mRAD mm/m DEG


"1/12" "1/10" "/REL" mm/REL

50

BATT

LEVELMETER 2000

+
ON/MODE

ZERO SELECT

Sensor A
ENTER

SEND/ESC

HOLD
WYLER

OUT

Sensor B

xx0200000126

Overview

Connect sensor A here

Connect sensor B here

Connect SIO 1 in controller here

Selection pointer

Measuring unit

Shown below is an outline of how to initialize the Levelmeter 2000. Detailed procedures are
specified in the manual supplied by the manufacturer.

Step

204

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Make sure the Levelmeter 2000 has reached normal


operating temperature before connecting it to anything.
Also switch the power on for a couple of minutes
before operating the unit.

2.

Connect the Levelmeter 2000 to the COM2 port in the Shown in the figure in seccontrol cabinet through the connector marked OUT . tion General on page 204.

3.

Connect sensors A and B.

4.

Calibrate the robot!

Detailed in Connection of
sensors on page 205.

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.3.6 Initialization of calibration pendulum

Address
Step

Action

Info/Illustration

Make sure the sensors have different


addresses. Any addresses will do, as long
as they differ from each other.

Detailed in the documentation supplied by sensor manufacturer.


Found in the calibration kit box.

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Connect the sensor to the Sensor connection points.

Marked A and B .
Shown in the figure in section General
on page 204.

2.

Press ON/MODE .

3.

Press ON/MODE until the dot flashes under


SENSOR .

4.

Press ENTER.

5.

Press ZERO/SELECT arrows until a flashing "A B" is shown.

6.

Press ENTER.
Wait until the "A B" flashes again.

7.

Press ENTER.

1.

Connection of
sensors
Step

Result

3HAC 16261-1

The Levelmeter 2000 is now initialized and ready for service.

205

10 Calibration
10.3.7 Calibration sensor mounting positions

Calibration
10.3.7 Calibration sensor mounting positions

Introduction

This section specifies the mounting positions and directions of all calibration sensors on all
robot systems using the Calibration Pendulum method.
Additional information on calibration, alternative calibration positions etc, may be found in
the Installation Manual.

Reference sensor

The illustrations below show the mounting position and direction for the reference sensor :

IRB 6600, IRB


7600

xx0200000183

206

Calibration pendulum in reference sensor position NOTE! The pendulum is only fitted
in one position at a time!

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.3.7 Calibration sensor mounting positions

Axis 1

The illustrations below show the mounting position and direction for the calibration sensor,
axis 1:

IRB 6600, IRB


7600

B
A
C
xx0200000177

Axis 2

Calibration pendulum NOTE! The pendulum is only fitted in one position at a time!

Calibration pendulum attachment screw

Locating pin

The illustrations below show the mounting position and direction for the calibration sensor,
axis 2:

IRB 6600, IRB


7600

xx0200000178

3HAC 16261-1

Calibration pendulum, axis 2

207

10 Calibration
10.3.7 Calibration sensor mounting positions

Axis 3

The illustrations below show the mounting position and direction for the calibration sensor,
axis 3:

IRB 6600, IRB


7600

xx0200000179

Calibration sensor, axis 3 NOTE! The pendulum is only fitted in one position at a time!

NOTE! The IRB 7600/2.3/500 version requires a slightly different sensor mounting position
than the other versions, the sensor being turned 90. This is shown in the figure below.

xx0300000016

Any special considerations to be taken when calibrating this robot version is detailed in section Calibrating axes 3-4, IRB 7600/2.3/500 on page 213.

208

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.3.7 Calibration sensor mounting positions

Axis 4

The illustrations below show the mounting position and direction for the calibration sensor,
axis 4:

IRB 6600, IRB


7600

xx0200000179

Calibration sensor, axis 4 NOTE! The pendulum is only fitted in one position at a time!

NOTE! The IRB 7600/2.3/500 version requires a slightly different sensor mounting position
than the other versions, the sensor being turned 90. This is shown in the figure below.

xx0300000016

Any special considerations to be taken when calibrating this robot version is detailed in section Calibrating axes 3-4, IRB 7600/2.3/500 on page 213.

3HAC 16261-1

209

10 Calibration
10.3.7 Calibration sensor mounting positions

Axis 5

The illustrations below show the mounting position and direction for the calibration sensor,
axis 5:

IRB 6600, IRB


7600

A
B
xx0200000180

Axis 6

Calibration sensor, axis 5 NOTE! The pendulum is only fitted in one position at a time!

Adapter, turning disk

The illustrations below show the mounting position and direction for the calibration sensor,
axis 6:

IRB 6600, IRB


7600

A
B
xx0200000180

210

Calibration sensor, axis 6 NOTE! The pendulum is only fitted in one position at a time!

Adapter, turning disk

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.3.8 Calibration, all axes

10.3.8 Calibration, all axes

General

This section is valid for all robot models using the calibration pendulum procedure except
IRB 6400R.
It details how to perform the actual fine calibration of each axis using special calibration
equipment. The position to fit calibration sensors differ between different models and different axes.

Sensor mounting
positions

Equipment

Article no.

Note

Calibration pendulum,
complete set

3HAC 15716-1

Contains all hardware required for calibration


of all robot versions except IRB 6400R.
The contents are specified in Calibration pendulum kit, contents on page 200.

Turning disk adapter

3HAC 16423-1

May be turned both ways to fit IRB 140, IRB


1400, IRB 2400 and IRB 4400.
Included in the complete set.

Adapter, turning disk

3HAC 14034-1

Fits IRB 6600 and IRB 7600


Included in the complete set.

Isopropanol

1177 1012-208

For cleaning the sensor attachment points

The position of the calibration sensors are shown in Calibration sensor mounting positions
on page 206.

Procedure
Step

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Illustration

1.

Run the robot manually to the calibration


position of the axis to be calibrated.

2.

Make a rough calibration.

3.

Turn the calibration equipment on, to allow


it to reach operating temperature and stabilize for a couple of minutes.

4.

Remove any protective covers from the reference sensor, calibration sensor and
locating pin attachment points.
The same calibration pendulum is used as
a "calibration sensor" and as a "reference
sensor" depending on its function at the
time. In the instruction below, the pendulum
will be called "calibration sensor" or reference sensor" depending on the function.

5.

Clean the reference sensor, calibration


sensor and locating pin attachment points
with isopropanol .

6.

Valid for axis 1 only!


Shown in Calibration sensor mounting
Fit the locating pin to the manipulator base. positions on page 206.
Make sure the attachment surface is clean
and free from any nicks and burrs.

Detailed in Updating the revolution


counter on page 174.

Art. no. specified in section General on


page 211.

211

10 Calibration
10.3.8 Calibration, all axes

Step
7.

Action

Illustration

Connect the measurement cable from the


calibration sensor to the Levelmeter 2000
unit.

0000000
00000

Port/Sensor

oo
GON

Aoo mRAD mm/m DEG


"1/12" "1/10" "/REL" mm/REL

50

E
D

BATT

LEVELMETER 2000

+
ON/MODE

ZERO SELECT

Sensor A
ENTER

SEND/ESC

HOLD
WYLER

OUT

Sensor B

xx0200000126

212

8.

Start the calibration program from the TPU,


and follow the instructions given, incl. fitting
the calibration sensor when requested.
NOTE! After fitting the sensor on the
manipulator as specified on the TPU, clicking OK will start manipulator movement!
Make sure no personnel is within the working range of the robot!

9.

Click OK .
A number of menus will flash by briefly on
the TPU, but no action is required on behalf
of the operator until a specific action is displayed.

10.

Confirm the position of all calibrated axes


when the calibration has been performed
satisfactorily.

11.

Disconnect all calibration equipment and


refit all protective covers.

A: Connect sensor A here

B: Connect sensor B here

C: Connect SIO 1 in controller


here

D: Measuring unit

E: Selection pointer

The position where to fit the reference


sensor and calibration sensor respectively, are shown in Calibration sensor
mounting positions on page 206.
NOTE that no additional tool is
required for fitting the calibration pendulum for axes 1-3!
Fitting the pendulum to the turning disk
requires an adapter (included in the
complete set). NOTE that there are
two adapters! Article number specified
in section General on page 211.
The way of handling the calibration
program prior to the actual calibration
of each axis is detailed in Calibration
procedure on TPU on page 203.

Detailed in Post calibration procedure


on page 214.

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.3.9 Calibrating axes 3-4, IRB 7600/2.3/500

10.3.9 Calibrating axes 3-4, IRB 7600/2.3/500

General

Due to the fact that the upper arm tube is slightly shorter on the version than on others, the
calibration sensor position on the upper arm is changed. This applies to calibrating axes 3 and
4 of the IRB 7600/2.3/500 only.

xx0300000020

Cable holder attachment point

Procedure
Step

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Remove any cable holders by unscrewing Shown in the figure in section General
their respective attachment screws.
on page 213.
This is to facilitate fitting the calibration
sensor.

2.

Perform the calibration procedure as with


any other version. The system software
automatically compensates for the sensor
being turned 90.

213

10 Calibration
10.4.1 Post calibration procedure

Section 10.4: After calibration


10.4.1 Post calibration procedure

General

Perform the following procedure after calibrating any manipulator axes. The procedure is
intended to verify that all calibration positions are correct.

Procedure
Step

214

Action

Illustration

1.

Run the calibration home position proDetailed in Checking the calibration


gram twice.
position on page 202.
Do not change the position of the manipulator axes after running the program!

2.

Check all calibration positions .

3.

Repeat the check as above.

4.

Adjust the calibration marks when the


calibration is done.

5.

The system parameters will be saved to


the storage memory at power off.

6.

Change the values on a new label and


stick it on top of the label located on the
lower arm.

7.

Remove any calibration equipment from


the manipulator.

Detailed in Checking the calibration


position on page 202.
Shown in Calibration scales on page
173.

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.5.1 Alternative calibration position

Section 10.5: Alternative calibration


10.5.1 Alternative calibration position

General

The manipulator may be calibrated in any of three positions.


The regular calibration instructions detailed for each axis are intended for calibration position
0, i.e. the normal position. Calibration instructions for positions Right (1) and Left (2) are
detailed in Alternative calibrating on page 216.

Illustration

The illustration shows the three available calibrating positions.

C
xx0100000258

3HAC 16261-1

Calibration position 2 +90, left (1.570796)

Calibration position 0

Calibration position 1 -90, right (-1.570796)

215

10 Calibration
10.5.2 Alternative calibrating

10.5.2 Alternative calibrating

General

The manipulator may be calibrated in any of three positions, shown in Alternative calibration
position on page 215.

Procedure
Step

216

Action

Illustration

1.

Calibrate the robot in position 0 for all axes.


Set an alternative calibration position before installation if the final
installation makes it impossible to reach the calibration 0 position.

2.

Run the calibration program CALxxx in the system\SYSTEM\UTILITY\SERVICE\CALIBRAT\.


(xxx = robot version, e.g. CAL6400)

3.

Select Normal position, and check the calibration marks for each
axis.

4.

Run the calibration program again and select the desired calibration position (Left or Right) as shown in Alternative calibration
position on page 215.

5.

Change to the new calibration offset for axis 1, as detailed in New


calibration offset, axis 1 on page 218.

6.

Note the new calibration offset on the label, located on the frame
to the left of motor axis 1 (remove the cover between axes 2 and
3). The new calibration offset values can be found as detailed in
Retrieving offset values on page 219.

7.

Change to the new calibration position on axis 1 as detailed in


New calibration position, axis 1 on page 217.

8.

Restart the robot by selecting Restart from the File menu.

9.

Move the sync marks for axis 1 on the base to the new position.

10.

The system parameters will be saved to the storage memory at


power off.

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.5.3 New calibration position, axis 1

10.5.3 New calibration position, axis 1

Procedure

Use this instruction to change to a new calibration position for axis 1 during definition of a
new calibration position.

Step

Action

Illustration

1.

Press the "Miscellaneous" button

2.

Select the System parameters window by pressing ENTER.

xx0100000194

xx0100000200.

3HAC 16261-1

3.

Select Manipulator from the Topics menu.

4.

Select Arm from the Types menu.

5.

Select axis 1.

6.

Change Cal pos to 1.570796 or -1.570796 depending on the


selected calibration position. The angle is measured in radians
as shown in Alternative calibration position on page 215.

217

10 Calibration
10.5.4 New calibration offset, axis 1

10.5.4 New calibration offset, axis 1

Procedure

Use this instruction when changing to a new calibration offset for axis 1 during definition of
a new calibration position.

Step
1.

Action

Illustration

Press the "Miscellaneous" button.

xx0100000194

2.

Select the Service window by


pressing ENTER.
xx0100000200

3.

Select Calibration from the View


menu.
The calibration window appears.

4.

Select Calibrate from the Calib


menu.

5.

Select axis 1 (no other axes).

6.

Confirm by pressing OK twice.

xx0100000201

218

3HAC 16261-1

10 Calibration
10.5.5 Retrieving offset values

10.5.5 Retrieving offset values

Procedure

Use this instruction when retrieving new offset values for axis 1 during definition of a new
calibration position.

Step

Action

Illustration

1.

Press the "Miscellaneous" button.

2.

Select the System parameters window by pressing ENTER.

xx0100000194

xx0100000200

3.

Select Motor from the Types menu.

4.

Select axis 1 and press ENTER.

5.

Note the Cal offset value.

xx0100000200

3HAC 16261-1

219

10 Calibration
10.5.5 Retrieving offset values

220

3HAC 16261-1

11 Decommissioning
11.0.1 Balancing device, IRB 7600 and IRB 6600/6650

Chapter 11: Decommissioning


11.0.1 Balancing device, IRB 7600 and IRB 6600/6650

General

This information is valid for all versions of IRB 6600/6650 as well as IRB 7600!
There is much energy stored in the balancing device. Therefore a special procedure is
required to dismantle it. The coil springs inside the balancing device exert a potentially lethal
force unless dismantled properly.

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

Note
The contents are defined in
section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Cutting torch

For opening housing and cutting coils

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in the
step-by-step instructions below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Do not under any circumstances, deal with the balancing device in any other way than that
detailed in the product documentation! For example, attempting to open the balancing device
is potentially lethal!

Procedure

The instruction below details how to cut open the balancing device housing and removing the
tension in the coil springs before opening the device.

Step

3HAC 16261-1

Action

Info/Illustration

1.

Remove the balancing device from the


manipulator.

Detailed in "Removal of balancing


device" in the Repair Manual.

2.

Place it on a workbench or similar. Make


sure it is clamped in position with a vice
or similar.

221

11 Decommissioning
11.0.1 Balancing device, IRB 7600 and IRB 6600/6650

Step
3.

Action

Info/Illustration

Open a hole in the side of the housing as Use a cutting torch.


shown in the figure.
500 mm

500 mm

xx0200000082

4.

222

Cut the coils of the three springs inside


the housing as specified below:
Outer spring: cut at least five (5)
coils!

Middle spring: cut at least four (4)


coils!

Inner spring: cut at least four (4)


coils!

5.

After double-checking the number of coils


cut, remove the end cover of the balancing device.

6.

Dismantle the balancing device and sort


its parts for the recycling plant.

Use a cutting torch.

3HAC 16261-1

Repair Manual, part 1


Industrial Robot
IRB 7600 - 500/2.3
IRB 7600 - 400/2.55
IRB 7600 - 150/3.5
M2000A



Repair Manual, part 1, IRB 7600, M2000A


3HAC 16263-1
Revision A

The information in this manual is subject to change without notice and


should not be construed as a commitment by ABB. ABB assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this manual.
In no event shall ABB be liable for incidental or consequential damages
arising from use of this manual and products described herein.
This manual and parts thereof must not be reproduced or copied without
ABBs written permission, and contents thereof must not be imparted to
a third party nor be used for any unauthorized purpose. Contravention
will be prosecuted.
Additional copies of this manual may be obtained from ABB at its then
current charge.

Copyright 2003 ABB All rights reserved.


ABB Automation Technology Products AB
Robotics
SE-721 68 Vsters
Sweden

Table of Contents

0.0.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
0.0.2 Product Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Chapter 1: Safety, service

1.0.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Section 1.1: General information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

1.1.1 Safety, service - General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6


1.1.2 Limitation of Liability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
1.1.3 Related information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Section 1.2: Safety risks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

1.2.1 Safety risks related to gripper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7


1.2.2 Safety risks related to tools/workpieces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
1.2.3 Safety risks related to pneumatic/hydraulic systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
1.2.4 Safety risks during operational disturbances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
1.2.5 Safety risks during installation and service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
1.2.6 Risks associated with live electric parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Section 1.3: Safety actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

1.3.1 Safety fence dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10


1.3.2 Fire extinguishing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
1.3.3 Emergency release of the manipulators arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
1.3.4 Brake testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
1.3.5 Risk of disabling function "Reduced speed 250 mm/s". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
1.3.6 Safe use of the Teach Pendant Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
1.3.7 Work inside the manipulators working range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Chapter 2: Reference information

13

2.0.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13


Section 2.1: Reference information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

2.1.1 Applicable Safety Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14


2.1.2 Screw joints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
2.1.3 Weight specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
2.1.4 Standard toolkit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
2.1.5 Special tools, IRB 6600/6650/7600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
2.1.6 Performing a leak-down test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
2.1.7 Lifting equipment and lifting instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Chapter 3: Repair activities, manipulator

23

3.0.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23


Section 3.1: Complete manipulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

3.1.1 Removal of cable harness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24


3.1.2 Refitting of cable harness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
3.1.3 Removal of complete arm system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
3.1.4 Refitting of complete arm system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Section 3.2: Upper arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40

3.2.1 Removal of turning disk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40


3.2.2 Refitting of turning disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
3.2.3 Removal of complete wrist unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
3.2.4 Refitting of complete wrist unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
3.2.5 Removal of complete upper arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
3.2.6 Refitting of complete upper arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Section 3.3: Lower arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56

3.3.1 Removal of complete lower arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56


3.3.2 Refitting of complete lower arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

3HAC 16263-1

Table of Contents

Section 3.4: Frame and base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

3.4.1 Removal of SMB related equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67


3.4.2 Refitting of SMB related equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
3.4.3 Removal of brake release unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
3.4.4 Refitting of brake release unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
3.4.5 Removal of balancing device. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
3.4.6 Refitting of balancing device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
3.4.7 Unloading the balancing device. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
3.4.8 Restoring the balancing device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Section 3.5: Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

3.5.1 Removal of motor, axis 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92


3.5.2 Refitting of motor, axis 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
3.5.3 Removal of motor, axis 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
3.5.4 Refitting of motor, axis 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
3.5.5 Removal of motor, axis 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
3.5.6 Refitting of motor, axis 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
3.5.7 Removal of motor, axis 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
3.5.8 Refitting of motor, axis 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
3.5.9 Removal of motor, axis 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
3.5.10 Refitting of motor, axis 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
3.5.11 Removal of motor, axis 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
3.5.12 Refitting of motor, axis 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Section 3.6: Gearboxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126

3.6.1 Removal of gearbox, axis 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126


3.6.2 Refitting of gearbox, axis 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
3.6.3 Removal of gearbox, axis 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
3.6.4 Refitting of gearbox, axis 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
3.6.5 Removal of gearbox, axis 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
3.6.6 Refitting of gearbox, axis 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
3.6.7 Removal of gearbox, axis 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
3.6.8 Refitting of gearbox, axis 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
3.6.9 Removal of gearbox, axis 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
3.6.10 Refitting of gearbox, axis 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
3.6.11 Removal of gearbox, axis 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
3.6.12 Refitting of gearbox, axis 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Chapter 4: Repair activities, controller cabinet

167

4.0.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167


Section 4.1: Complete controller cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168

4.1.1 Replacement of battery unit, controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168


4.1.2 Replacement of I/O and gateway units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
4.1.3 Replacement of bleeder resistor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
4.1.4 Putting the computer unit in the service position. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
4.1.5 Replacement of mass storage memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
4.1.6 Replacement of internal cooling fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
4.1.7 Replacement of drive units and rectifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
4.1.8 Replacement of system fan unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
4.1.9 Replacement of power supply unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
4.1.10 Replacement of Peltier Cooler power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Chapter 5: Appendix 1: Part List

193

5.0.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193


Section 5.1: Part List, Manipulator IRB 7600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194

5.1.1 Mechanical stop ax 1, 3HAC 12812-2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194


5.1.2 Base incl frame ax 1, 3HAC 12304-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195

ii

3HAC 16263-1

Table of Contents

5.1.3 Axis 3-4 400kg, 3HAC 13063-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195


5.1.4 Axis 3-4 500kg, 3HAC 13063-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
5.1.5 Axis 3-4 400kg Foundry, 3HAC 13063-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
5.1.6 Axis 3-4 500kg Foundry, 3HAC 13063-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
5.1.7 Wrist, 3HAC 10503-1, 3HAC 15992-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
5.1.8 Material set manipulator, 3HAC 13079-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203
5.1.9 Material set ax 1-2, 3HAC 13077-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204
5.1.10 Mtrl.set balancing device, 3HAC 13082-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
5.1.11 Arm extension set, 956 mm, 3HAC 12311-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
Chapter 6: Appendix 2: Foldouts

209

6.0.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209


6.0.2 Base incl. Frame. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
6.0.3 Frame-Lower arm 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
6.0.4 Frame-Lower arm 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
6.0.5 Upper arm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
6.0.6 Wrist complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219

3HAC 16263-1

iii

Table of Contents

iv

3HAC 16263-1

0.0.1 Overview

0.0.1 Overview

About This
Manual

This information product is a manual containing instructions for repairing the complete robot
system, mechanically as well as electrically.
It also contains the electrical circuit diagram of the manipulator as well as the controller.

Usage

This manual should be used during repair work.

Who Should Read


This Manual?

This manual is intended for:

Prerequisites

Organization of
Chapters

repair personnel in the user's organization.

repair personnel in other organizations.

The reader should...

be a trained repair craftsman

have the required knowledge of mechanical repair work OR

have the required knowledge of electrical repair work.

The information product is organized in the following chapters:

Chapter

Contents

Safety

Reference information

Manipulator

Controller

Appendix

References
Reference

Document Id

Circuit Diagrams, Manipulator

3HAC 13347-1

Circuit Diagrams, Controller

3HAC 14189-1

Revisions
Revision

Description

First revision

3HAC 16263-1

Various corrections in text and in figures due to reconstructions,


new spare part numbers, new tools, etc.

Manual completed with references to pagenumbers and numbering of sections (manipulator sections).

0.0.1 Overview

3HAC 16263-1

0.0.2 Product Documentation

0.0.2 Product Documentation

General

The complete product documentation kit for the robot, including controller, manipulator and
any hardware option, consists of the manuals listed below:

Installation and
Commissioning
Manual

The Installation and Commissioning Manual contains the following information:

Repair Manual

Maintenance
Manual

Safety, Service

Reference Information

Unpacking

On-site Installation

Electrical connections

Start-up

Installation of controller software

System directory structure

Calibration

If there is any, model specific information

The Repair Manual contains the following information:

Safety, Service

Reference Information

Remove/Refitting instructions for all manipulator details considered spare parts

Remove/Refitting instructions for all controller cabinet details considered spare parts

If there is any, model specific information

The Maintenance Manual contains the following information:

Safety, Service

Reference Information

Maintenance schedules

Instructions for all maintenance activities specified in the maintenance schedule, for
example cleaning, lubrication, inspection etc.

If there is any, model specific information

The information is generally divided into separate chapters for the manipulator and the controller, respectively.

Software manuals

The software documentation consists of a wide range of manuals, ranging from manuals for
basic understanding of the operating system to manuals for entering parameters during operation.
A complete listing of all available software manuals is available from ABB Robotics.

3HAC 16263-1

0.0.2 Product Documentation

Hardware option
manual

Each hardware option is supplied with its own documentation. Each document set contains
the types of information specified above:

Installation information

Repair information

Maintenance information

In addition, spare part information is supplied for the complete option.

3HAC 16263-1

1 Safety, service
1.0.1 Introduction

Chapter 1: Safety, service


1.0.1 Introduction

Definitions

This chapter details safety information for service personnel i.e. personnel performing installation, repair and maintenance work.

Sections

The chapter "Safety, service" is divided into the following sections:


1. General information contains lists of:
Safety, service -general
Limitation of liability
Referenced documents

2. Safety risks lists dangers relevant when servicing the robot system. The dangers are split into different categories:
Safety risks related to gripper/end effector
Safety risks related to tools/workpieces
Safety risks related to pneumatic/hydraulic systems
Safety risks during operational disturbances
Safety risks during installation and service
Risks associated with live electric parts

3. Safety actions details actions which may be taken to remedy or avoid dangers.
Safety fence dimensions
Fire extinguishing
Emergency release of the manipulators arm
Brake testing
Risk of disabling function "Reduced speed 250 mm/s"
Safe use of the Teach Pendant Unit enabling device
Work inside the manipulators working range

3HAC 16263-1

1 Safety, service
1.1.1 Safety, service - General

Section 1.1: General information


1.1.1 Safety, service - General

Validity and
responsibility

The information does not cover how to design, install and operate a complete system, nor
does it cover all peripheral equipment, which can influence the safety of the total system. To
protect personnel, the complete system must be designed and installed in accordance with the
safety requirements set forth in the standards and regulations of the country where the robot
is installed.
The users of ABB industrial robots are responsible for ensuring that the applicable safety laws
and regulations in the country concerned are observed and that the safety devices necessary
to protect people working with the robot system have been designed and installed correctly.
Personnel working with robots must be familiar with the operation and handling of the industrial robot, described in the applicable documents, e.g. Users Guide and Product Manual.

Connection of
external safety
devices

Apart from the built-in safety functions, the robot is also supplied with an interface for the
connection of external safety devices. Via this interface, an external safety function can interact with other machines and peripheral equipment. This means that control signals can act on
safety signals received from the peripheral equipment as well as from the robot.
In the Product Manual - Installation and Commissioning, instructions are provided for connecting safety devices between the robot and the peripheral equipment.

1.1.2 Limitation of Liability

General

Any information given in this information product regarding safety, must not be construed as
a warranty by ABB Robotics that the industrial robot will not cause injury or damage even if
all safety instructions have been complied with.

1.1.3 Related information

General

The list below specifies documents which contain useful information:

Documents

Type of information

Detailed in document

Installation of safety devices

Installation and Commissioning


Manual

Changing robot modes

Users Guide

Start-up

Restricting the working space

Installation and Commissioning


Manual

On-site installation Manipulator

Section

3HAC 16263-1

1 Safety, service
1.2.1 Safety risks related to gripper

Section 1.2: Safety risks


1.2.1 Safety risks related to gripper
Ensure that a gripper is prevented from dropping a workpiece, if such is used.

1.2.2 Safety risks related to tools/workpieces

Safe handling

It must be possible to turn off tools, such as milling cutters, etc., safely. Make sure that guards
remain closed until the cutters stop rotating.
It should be possible to release parts by manual operation (valves).

Safe design

Grippers/end effectors must be designed so that they retain workpieces in the event of a power
failure or a disturbance of the controller.

1.2.3 Safety risks related to pneumatic/hydraulic systems

General

Residual energy

Safe design

Special safety regulations apply to pneumatic and hydraulic systems.

Residual energy may be present in these systems so, after shutdown, particular care
must be taken.

The pressure in pneumatic and hydraulic systems must be released before starting to
repair them.

Gravity may cause any parts or objects held by these systems to drop.

Dump valves should be used in case of emergency.

Shot bolts should be used to prevent tools, etc., from falling due to gravity.

1.2.4 Safety risks during operational disturbances

General

Qualified personnel

Extraordinary
risks

3HAC 16263-1

The industrial robot is a flexible tool which can be used in many different industrial
applications.

All work must be carried out professionally and in accordance with the applicable
safety regulations.

Care must be taken at all times.

Remedial action must only be carried out by qualified personnel who are familiar with
the entire installation as well as the special risks associated with its different parts.

If the working process is interrupted, extra care must be taken due to risks other than those
associated with regular operation. Such an interruption may have to be rectified manually.

1 Safety, service
1.2.5 Safety risks during installation and service

1.2.5 Safety risks during installation and service

General risks during installation


and service

Nation/region
specific regulations

Non-voltage
related risks

To be observed
by the supplier of
the complete system

The instructions in the Product Manual - Installation and Commissioning must always
be followed.

Emergency stop buttons must be positioned in easily accessible places so that the
robot can be stopped quickly.

Those in charge of operations must make sure that safety instructions are available
for the installation in question.

Those who install the robot must have the appropriate training for the robot system in
question and in any safety matters associated with it.

To prevent injuries and damage during the installation of the robot system, the regulations
applicable in the country concerned and the instructions of ABB Robotics must be complied
with.

Safety zones, which have to be crossed before admittance, must be set up in front of
the robot's working space. Light beams or sensitive mats are suitable devices.

Turntables or the like should be used to keep the operator out of the robot's working
space.

The axes are affected by the force of gravity when the brakes are released. In addition
to the risk of being hit by moving robot parts, you run the risk of being crushed by the
tie rod.

Energy, stored in the robot for the purpose of counterbalancing certain axes, may be
released if the robot, or parts thereof, is dismantled.

When dismantling/assembling mechanical units, watch out for falling objects.

Be aware of stored heat energy in the controller.

Never use the robot as a ladder, i.e. do not climb on the robot motors or other parts
during service work. There is a serious risk of slipping because of the high temperature of the motors or oil spills that can occur on the robot.

The supplier of the complete system must ensure that all circuits used in the safety
function are interlocked in accordance with the applicable standards for that function.

The supplier of the complete system must ensure that all circuits used in the emergency stop function are interlocked in a safe manner, in accordance with the applicable standards for the emergency stop function.

1.2.6 Risks associated with live electric parts

Voltage related
risks, general

Voltage related
risks, controller

Although troubleshooting may, on occasion, have to be carried out while the power
supply is turned on, the robot must be turned off (by setting the mains switch to OFF)
when repairing faults, disconnecting electric leads and disconnecting or connecting
units.

The mains supply to the robot must be connected in such a way that it can be turned
off outside the robots working space.

A danger of high voltage is associated with the following parts:

Be aware of stored electrical energy (DC link) in the controller.

3HAC 16263-1

1 Safety, service
1.2.6 Risks associated with live electric parts

Units inside the controller, e.g. I/O modules, can be supplied with power from an external source.

The mains supply/mains switch

The power unit

The power supply unit for the computer system (230 VAC)

The rectifier unit (400-480 VAC and 700 VDC. Note: Capacitors!)

The drive unit (700 VDC)

The service outlets (115/230 VAC)

The power supply unit for tools, or special power supply units for the machining process

The external voltage connected to the control cabinet remains live even when the
robot is disconnected from the mains.

Additional connections

Voltage related
risks, manipulator

A danger of high voltage is associated with the manipulator in:

Voltage related
risks, tools, material handling
devices, etc

Tools, material handling devices, etc., may be live even if the robot system is in the OFF
position. Power supply cables which are in motion during the working process may be damaged.

3HAC 16263-1

The power supply for the motors (up to 800 VDC)

The user connections for tools or other parts of the installation (max. 230 VAC, see
Installation and Commissioning Manual)

1 Safety, service
1.3.1 Safety fence dimensions

Section 1.3: Safety actions


1.3.1 Safety fence dimensions

General

Fit a safety fence or enclosure around the robot to ensure a safe robot installation.

Dimensioning

Dimension the fence or enclosure to enable it to withstand the force created if the load being
handled by the robot is dropped or released at maximum speed. Determine the maximum
speed from the maximum velocities of the robot axes and from the position at which the robot
is working in the work cell (see Product Specification - Description, Robot Motion).
Also consider the maximum possible impact caused by a breaking or malfunctioning rotating
tool or other device fitted to the manipulator.

1.3.2 Fire extinguishing


Use a CARBON DIOXIDE (CO 2 ) extinguisher in the event of a fire in the robot (manipulator
or controller)!

1.3.3 Emergency release of the manipulators arm

Description

In an emergency situation, any of the manipulators axes may be released manually by pushing the brake release buttons on the manipulator or on an optional external brake release unit.
How to release the brakes is detailed in section "Manually releasing the brakes".
The manipulator arm may be moved manually on smaller robot models, but larger models
may require using an overhead crane or similar.

Increased injury

Before releasing the brakes, make sure that the weight of the arms does not increase the
pressure on the trapped person, which may further increase any injury!

1.3.4 Brake testing

When to test

During operation the holding brakes of each axis motor wear normally. A test may be performed to determine whether the brake can still perform its function.

How to test

The function of each axis motor holding brakes may be checked as detailed below:
1. Run each manipulator axis to a position where the combined weight of the manipulator arm and any load is maximized (max. static load).
2. Switch the motor to the MOTORS OFF position with the Operating mode selector
on the controller.
3. Check that the axis maintains its position.
If the manipulator does not change position as the motors are switched off, then the brake
function is adequate.

10

3HAC 16263-1

1 Safety, service
1.3.5 Risk of disabling function "Reduced speed 250 mm/s"

1.3.5 Risk of disabling function "Reduced speed 250 mm/s"


Do not change "Transm gear ratio" or other kinematic parameters from the Teach Pendant Unit
or a PC. This will affect the safety function Reduced speed 250 mm/s.

1.3.6 Safe use of the Teach Pendant Unit


The enabling device is a push button located on the side of the Teach Pendant Unit (TPU)
which, when pressed halfway in, takes the system to MOTORS ON. When the enabling device
is released or pushed all the way in, the robot is taken to the MOTORS OFF state.
To ensure safe use of the Teach Pendant Unit, the following must be implemented:
The enabling device must never be rendered inoperative in any way.
During programming and testing, the enabling device must be released as soon as there is no
need for the robot to move.
The programmer must always bring the Teach Pendant Unit with him/her, when entering the
robots working space. This is to prevent anyone else taking control over the robot without the
programmer knowing.

1.3.7 Work inside the manipulators working range


If work must be carried out within the robots work envelope, the following points must be
observed:
- The operating mode selector on the controller must be in the manual mode position to render
the enabling device operative and to block operation from a computer link or remote control
panel.
- The robots speed is limited to max. 250 mm/s when the operating mode selector is in position
< 250 mm/s. This should be the normal position when entering the working space. The position
100% full speedmay only be used by trained personnel who are aware of the risks that this
entails.
- Pay attention to the rotating axes of the manipulator! Keep a distance to the axes in order not
to get entangled with hair or clothing. Also be aware of any danger that may be caused by
rotating tools or other devices mounted on the manipulator or inside the cell.
- Test the motor brake on each axis, according to section Brake testing on page 10.

3HAC 16263-1

11

1 Safety, service
1.3.7 Work inside the manipulators working range

12

3HAC 16263-1

2 Reference information
2.0.1 Introduction

Chapter 2: Reference information


2.0.1 Introduction

General

3HAC 16263-1

This chapter presents generic pieces of information, complementing the more specific information in the following chapters.

13

2 Reference information
2.1.1 Applicable Safety Standards

Section 2.1: Reference information


2.1.1 Applicable Safety Standards

Standards, general

Standards, robot
cell

14

The robot is designed in accordance with the requirements of:

EN 775 - Robot safety.

EN 292-1 - Basic terminology.

EN 292-2 - Technical principles.

EN 418 - Emergency stop.

EN 563 - Temperatures of surfaces.

EN 954-1 - Safety related parts of control systems.

EN 60204-1 - Electrical equipment of machines.

EN 1050 - Principles for risk assessment.

ANSI/RIA 15.06-1999 - Industrial robots, safety requirements.

DIN 19258 - Interbus-S, International Standard

The following standards are applicable when the robot is part of a robot cell:

EN 953 - Fixed and moveable guards

EN 811 - Safety distances to prevent danger zones being reached by the lower limbs.

EN 349 - Minimum gaps to avoid crushing of parts of the human body.

EN 294 - Safety distances to prevent danger zones being reached by the upper limbs.

EN 1088 - Interlocking devices

EN 999 - The positioning of protective equipment in respect of approach speeds of the


human body.

ISO 11 161 - Industrial automation systems - Safety of intergrated manufacturing systems.

3HAC 16263-1

2 Reference information
2.1.2 Screw joints

2.1.2 Screw joints

General

This section details how to tighten the various types of screw joints on the manipulator as well
as the controller.
The instructions and torque values are valid for screw joints comprising metallic materials
and do not apply to soft or brittle materials.
Any instructions given in the repair, maintenance or installation procedure description override any value or procedure given here, i.e. these instruction are only valid for standard type
screw joints.

UNBRAKO
screws

UNBRAKO is a special type of screw recommended by ABB in certain screw joints. It features special surface treatment (Gleitmo as described below), and is extremely resistant to
fatigue.
Whenever used, this is specified in the instructions and in such cases no other type of replacement screw is allowed. Using other types of screw will void any warranty and may potentially
cause serious damage or injury!

Gleitmo treated
screws

Gleitmo is a special surface treatment to reduce the friction when tightening the screw joint.
Screws treated with Gleitmo may be reused 3-4 times before the coating disappears. After this
the screw must be discarded and replaced with a new one.
When handling screws treated with Gleitmo, protective gloves of nitrile rubber type should
be used.

Screws lubricated
in other ways

Screws lubricated with Molycote 1000 (or another lubricant) should only be used when specified in the repair, maintenance or installation procedure descriptions.
In such cases, proceed as follows:
1. Lubricate the thread of the screw.
2. Lubricate between the plain washer and screw head.
3. Tighten to the torque specified in section "Tightening torque" below. Screw dimensions
of M8 or larger must be tightened with a torque wrench. Screw dimensions of M6 or
smaller may be tightened without a torque wrench if this is done by trained and qualified personnel.

3HAC 16263-1

Lubricant

Art. no.

Molycote 1000 (molybdenum disulphide grease)

1171 2016-618

15

2 Reference information
2.1.2 Screw joints

Tightening torque

Screws with slotted or cross


recess head

Below are tables specifying the torque values for different screw joint types:

Dimension

Tightening torque (Nm)


Class 4.8 "dry"

M2.5

0.25

M3

0.5

M4

1.2

M5

2.5

M6

5.0

Dimension

Tightening torque
(Nm)
Class 8.8 "dry"

Tightening torque
(Nm)
Class 10.9 "dry"

Tightening torque
(Nm)
Class 12.9 "dry"

M5

M6

10

M8

24

34

40

M10

47

67

80

M12

82

115

140

M16

200

290

340

Dimension

Tightening torque (Nm)


Class 10.9

Tightening torque (Nm)


Class 12.9

M8

28

34

M10

55

66

M12

96

115

M16

235

280

Screws with
hexagon socket
head, dry

Screws with
hexagon socket
head, lubricated

16

3HAC 16263-1

2 Reference information
2.1.3 Weight specifications

2.1.3 Weight specifications

Definition

In all repair and maintenance instructions, weights of the components handled are sometimes
specified. All components exceeding 22 kg (50 lbs) are high-lighted in this way.
ABB recommends the use of lifting equipment when handling components with a weight
exceeding 22 kg to avoid inflicting injury. A wide range of lifting tools and devices is available for each manipulator model.

Example

Below is an example of how a weight specification is presented:


The motor weighs 65 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

3HAC 16263-1

17

2 Reference information
2.1.4 Standard toolkit

2.1.4 Standard toolkit

General

All service (repairs, maintenance and installation) instructions contain lists of tools required
to perform the specified activity.
All special tools required are listed directly in the instructions while all the tools that are
considered standard are gathered in the Standard toolkit and defined in the table below.
In this way, the tools required are the sum of the Standard Toolkit and any tools listed in the
instruction.

Contents,
standard toolkit,
3HAC 15571-1

18

Qty

Art. no.

Tool

Rem.

Ring-open-end spanner 8-19mm

Socket head cap 5-17mm

Torx socket no:20-60

Box spanner set

Torque wrench 10-100Nm

Torque wrench 75-400Nm

Ratchet head for torque wrench 1/2

Hexagon-headed screw M10x100

Socket head cap no:14, socket 40mm bit L 100mm

Socket head cap no:14, socket 40mm bit L 20mm To be shorted to


12mm

Socket head cap no:6, socket 40mm bit L 145mm

3HAC 16263-1

2 Reference information
2.1.5 Special tools, IRB 6600/6650/7600

2.1.5 Special tools, IRB 6600/6650/7600

General

All service (repairs, maintenance and installation) instructions contain lists of tools required
to perform the specified activity. The required tools are a sum of standard tools, defined in
section Standard toolkit on page 18, and of special tools, listed directly in the instructions and
also gathered in the table below.

Special tools, IRB


6600/6650/7600

The table below is an overview of all the special tools required when performing service
activities on the IRB 6600/6650/7600. The tools are gathered in two kits: Basic Toolkit
(3HAC 15571-3) and Extended Toolkit (3HAC 15571-2).
The special tools are also listed directly in the current instructions.

3HAC 16263-1

Description

IRB 66X0/ IRB 7600/


Art. no.
Qty
Qty

Angel bracket

68080011-LP

Bolts (M16 x 60) for Mech stop axis 3

3HAB 3409-86

Bolts (M16 x 80) for Mech stop axis 3

3HAB 3409-89

Cal. tool

68080011-GM

Calibration bracket

3HAC 13908-9

Calibration tool ax1

3HAC 13908-4

CalPen (Calibration Pendulum)

3HAC 15716-1

Extension 300mm for bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Fixture lower arm

3HAC 13659-1

Fixture lower arm

3HAC 13660-1

Gearbox crank

3HAC 16488-1

Guide pins M12 x 150

3HAC 13056-2

Guide pins M12 x 200

3HAC 13056-3

Guide pins M12 x 250

3HAC 13056-4

Guide pins M8 x 100

3HAC 15520-1

Guide pins M8 x 150

3HAC 15520-2

Guide pins sealing

3HAC 14445-1

Guide pins sealing

3HAC 14446-1

Guide pins M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1

Guide pins M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2

Guide pins M16 x 150

3HAC 13120-2

Guide pins M16 x 200

3HAC 13120-3

Guide pins M16 x 250

3HAC 13120-4

Guide pins M16 x 300

3HAC 13120-5

Guide pins sealing ax 2, 3, 100mm

3HAC 14628-2

Guide pins sealing ax 2, 3, 80mm

3HAC 14628-1

Guide pins sealing ax 2, 3, 100mm

3HAC 14627-3

Guide pins sealing ax 2, 3, 80mm

3HAC 14627-2

Hydraulic cylinder

3HAC 11731-1

19

2 Reference information
2.1.5 Special tools, IRB 6600/6650/7600

Description

IRB 66X0/ IRB 7600/


Art. no.
Qty
Qty

Hydraulic pump 80Mpa

3HAC 13086-1

Hydraulic pump 80Mpa (Glycerin)

3HAC 13086-2

Levelmeter 2000 kit

6369901-348

Lifting device, base

3HAC 15560-1

Lifting device, manipulator

3HAC 15607-1

Lifting device, upper arm

3HAC 15994-1

Lifting device, upper arm

3HAC 15536-1

Lifting eye VLBG M12

3HAC 16131-1

Lifting eye M12

3HAC 14457-3

Lifting eye M16

3HAC 14457-4

Lifting tool (chain)

3HAC 15556-1

Lifting tool, gearbox ax 2

3HAC 13698-1

Lifting tool, gearbox ax 2

3HAC 12731-1

Lifting tool, lower arm

3HAC 14691-1

Lifting tool, motor ax 1, 4, 5

3HAC 14459-1

Lifting tool, motor ax 2, 3, 4

3HAC 15534-1

Lifting tool, wrist unit

3HAC 13605-1

Lifting tool, wrist unit

3HAC 12734-1

Measuring pin

3HAC 13908-5

Mech stop ax 3

3HAC 12708-1

Mech stop ax 3

3HAC 12708-2

Press tool, ax 2 bearing

3HAC 13527-1

Press tool, ax 2 bearing

3HAC 13453-1

Press tool, ax 2 shaft

3HAC 13452-1

Press tool, balancing device shaft

3HAC 17129-1

Press tool, balancing device

3HAC 15767-1

Puller tool, balancing device shaft

3HAC 12475-1

Removal tool, wheel unit

3HAC 15814-1

Removal tool, motor M10x

3HAC 14972-1

Removal tool, motor M12x

3HAC 14631-1

Removal tool, motor M12x

3HAC 14973-1

Rotation tool

3HAC 17105-1

Sensor plate

3HAC 0392-1

Support, base

3HAC 15535-1

Sync. adapter

3HAC 13908-1

Tool set balancing device

3HAC 15943-2

Tool set balancing device

3HAC 15943-1

Turn disk fixture

3HAC 68080011-GU

Washers for Mech stop axis 3

3HAA 1001-186

Note a) Calibration tools for IRB 6600/6650/7600 when CalPen is not used (standard).
Note b) Special tools that may be rent from ATRP/S.

20

3HAC 16263-1

2 Reference information
2.1.6 Performing a leak-down test

2.1.6 Performing a leak-down test

General

After refitting any motor and any gearbox, the integrity of all seals enclosing the gearbox oil
must be tested. This is done in a leak-down test.

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Leakdown tester

Note

3HAC 0207-1

Leak detection spray

Procedure
Step

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Finish the refitting procedure of the motor or


gear in question.

2.

Remove the topmost oil plug on the gear in Art. no. specified above!
question, and replace it with the leakdown
tester .
Adapters may be required, which are
included in the leakdown tester kit.

3.

Apply compressed air, and raise the pres- Recommended value: 0.2 - 0.25 bar
sure with the knob until the correct value is (20 - 25 kPa)
shown on the manometer.

4.

Disconnect the compressed air supply.

5.

Wait for approx. 8-10 minutes. No pressure If the compressed air is significantly
loss must be detected.
colder or warmer than the gearbox to
be tested, a slight pressure increase or
decrease respectively may occur. This
is quite normal.

6.

Was any pressure drop evident?


Localize the leak as detailed below.
Remove the leakdown tester, and refit the
oil plug. The test is complete.

7.

Spray suspected leak areas with leak


detection spray .
Bubbles indicate a leak.

8.

When the leak has been localized: take the


necessary measures to correct the leak.

Art. no. specified above!

21

2 Reference information
2.1.7 Lifting equipment and lifting instructions

2.1.7 Lifting equipment and lifting instructions

General

Many repair and maintenance activities require different pieces of lifting equipment, which
are specified in each activity instruction.
However, how to use each piece of lifting equipment is not detailed in the activity instruction,
but in the instruction delivered with each piece of lifting equipment.
This implies that the instructions delivered with the lifting equipment should be stored for
later reference.

22

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.0.1 Introduction

Chapter 3: Repair activities, manipulator


3.0.1 Introduction

Definitions

This chapter details all repair activities recommended for the manipulator, including for any
external units of the manipulator.
It is made up of separate units, each detailing a specific repair activity, e.g. Removal or Refitting of a certain component on the manipulator. Each unit contains all information required
to perform the activity, e.g. spare parts numbers, required special tools and materials.
The chapter is divided into:

3HAC 16263-1

Removal/refitting instructions for all the spare parts on the manipulator

Remaining instructions for all the spare parts in e.g. the manipulators external units, if
any.

23

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.1 Removal of cable harness

Section 3.1: Complete manipulator


3.1.1 Removal of cable harness

Location of cable
harness

The cable harness is located throughout the manipulator as shown in the figure below. The
brake release unit can be located at two alternative places, either at the rear of the base or at
the side of the frame. Depending on the location, the two types of harnesses are distinguished
some from each other!
Any differences are pointed out in the instructions!

E
J

B
K
A

D
1

L M
N

L M

xx0100000140

24

Alternative with brake release at frame

Alternative with brake release at base

Connector at manipulator base, R1.MP and R1.SMB

Connectors at motor 1; R2.FB1 and R2.MP1

Connectors at motor 2; R2.FB2 and R2.MP2

Connectors at serial measurement board; R1.SMB1-3, R1.SMB4-6, R1.SMB1.7,


R2.FB7 and R2.SMB. Battery connector X3 R1.G and R2.G. If brake release located
at the frame: also connectors X8, X9 and X10!

Connectors at motor 3; R2.FB3 and R2.MP3 and for signal lamp R2.H1 and R2.H2

Connectors at motor 4; R2.FB4 and R2.MP4

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.1 Removal of cable harness

Connectors at cable harness separation; R2.M5/6

Connectors at motor 5; R3.FB5 and R3.MP5

Connectors at motor 6; R3.FB6 and R3.MP6

Rear cover plate

Connector R1.MP

Connector R1.SMB

Connection of earth cable

Required equipment
Equipment, etc. Spare part no. Art. no.

Removal, cable
harness, axes 1-4

Note

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section


Standard toolkit on page 18!

Circuit Diagram

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual, part 2.

The procedure below details how to remove the lower cable harness.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The cable packs are sensitive to mechanical damage! They must be handled with care, especially the connectors, in order to avoid damaging them!

Step
1.

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

In order to facilitate refitting of cable harness, Axes 2 and 3 may be tilted slightly to
run the manipulator to the specified position improve access.
Run the manipulator to the specified position:
Axis 1: 0

Axis 2: 0

Axis 3: 0

Axis 4: 0

Axis 5: +90

Axis 6: no significance

2.

Remove the rear cover plate on the manipulator by unscrewing its attachment screws.

3.

Disconnect the earth cable.

4.

Disconnect connectors R1.MP and R1.SMB.

5.

Pull the cable and connectors up through the


center of the frame.

6.

Disconnect all connectors at motor 1 and


motor 2.

Shown in the figure Location of cable


harness on page 24!

Specified in the figure Location of


cable harness on page 24!

25

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.1 Removal of cable harness

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

7.

Open the SMB cover carefully.


Disconnect connector R1.G to enable removing the cover.

8.

Disconnect connectors R2.SMB, R1.SMB13, R1.SMB4-6. Disconnect X8, X9 and X10 if


brake release board in frame.

X8, X9, X10

R 2.S MB
R 1.S MB 1-3
R 1.S MB 4-6
R 1.G

R 2.G

xx0200000118.wmf

9.

Unscrew the four screws securing the cable


gland.

10. Remove the adapter plate from the harness


by removing its two attachment screws and
the velcro strap.
11. Remove the bracket securing the cables
inside the lower arm by unscrewing the nuts
from the stud bolts securing the clamp to the
lower arm.

This releases the cable harness


from the frame.
Note! Different manipulator versions are fitted with different plate
versions. Make sure the correct one
is used to avoid cable failure.

FB3 FB4

FB5 FB6

MP3
MP4
MP5

MP6

xx0100000142.wmf

12. Remove the upper bracket securing the


cables to the arm house by unscrewing its two MP6
attachment screws.

MP3

FB6
FB5

MP5
MP
FB3
FB4

xx0100000143.wmf

13. Disconnect connector R2.M5/6 at the rear


cable division point.

Shown in the figure Location of cable


harness on page 24!

14. Disconnect all connectors at motor 3 and


motor 4.

Specified in the figure Location of


cable harness on page 24!

15. Gently pull the cable harness out.

26

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.1 Removal of cable harness

Location of cable
harness, axes 5-6

The connectors on the upper arm harness are located as specified in the figure below.

D
B
C

xx0100000145

Removal, cable
harness, axes 5-6

Cable attachment, upper arm

Cable attachment, rear

Connectors at cable harness division; R2.M5/6

Connectors at motor 5; R3.FB5 and R3.MP5

Connectors at motor 6; R3.FB6 and R3.MP6

The procedure below details how to remove the upper arm cable harness.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Axis 5 must be oriented in the correct position (+90 ) to allow opening the motor 6 cover!

Step

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Remove the left hand side wrist cover by unscrewing


its attachment screws.

2.

Disconnect all connectors at motor 5 and motor 6.

Specified in the figure Location of cable harness, axes


5-6 on page 27!

27

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.1 Removal of cable harness

Step

28

Action

Note/Illustration

3.

Remove the plastic cover on the rear of the upper


arm, by removing the attachment screws.

4.

Remove the spiral plate by unscrewing the screw at


the bottom of the spiral cup.

5.

Remove eventual cable straps from the harness.

6.

Disconnect connector R2.M5/6 at the rear cable divi- Shown in the figure Location
sion point.
of cable harness, axes 5-6
on page 27!

7.

Remove the cable attachment inside the upper arm.

8.

Gently pull the cable harness out.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.2 Refitting of cable harness

3.1.2 Refitting of cable harness

Location of cable
harness

The cable harness is located throughout the manipulator as shown in the figure below. The
brake release unit can be located at two alternative places, either at the rear of the base or at
the side of the frame. Depending on the location, the two types of harnesses are distinguished
some from each other!
Any differences are pointed out in the instructions!

E
J

B
K
A

D
1

L M
N

L M

xx0100000140

3HAC 16263-1

Alternative with brake release at frame

Alternative with brake release at base

Connector at manipulator base, R1.MP and R1.SMB

Connectors at motor 1; R2.FB1 and R2.MP1

Connectors at motor 2; R2.FB2 and R2.MP2

Connectors at serial measurement board; R1.SMB1-3, R1.SMB4-6, R1.SMB1.7,


R2.FB7 and R2.SMB. Battery connector X3 R1.G and R2.G. If brake release located
at the frame: also connectors X8, X9 and X10!

Connectors at motor 3; R2.FB3 and R2.MP3 and for signal lamp R2.H1 and R2.H2

Connectors at motor 4; R2.FB4 and R2.MP4

Connectors at cable harness separation; R2.M5/6

Connectors at motor 5; R3.FB5 and R3.MP5

29

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.2 Refitting of cable harness

Connectors at motor 6; R3.FB6 and R3.MP6

Rear cover plate

Connector R1.MP

Connector R1.SMB

Connection of earth cable

Required equipment

Refitting, cable
harness, axes 1-4

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Cable harness, axes 1-4

3HAC 12782-1

Brake release at base.

Cable harness, axes 1-4

3HAC 14940-1

Brake release in frame.

Cable harness, axes 5-6

3HAC 11440-1

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Circuit Diagram

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual,


part 2.

The procedure below details how to refit the lower cable harness.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The cable packs are sensitive to mechanical damage! They must be handled with care, especially the connectors, in order to avoid damaging them!

Step
1.

30

Action

Note/Illustration

In order to facilitate refitting of cable harness, Axes 2 and 3 may be tilted slightly
run the manipulator to the specified position
to improve access.
Axis 1: 0 degrees

Axis 2: 0 degrees

Axis 3: 0 degrees

Axis 4: 0 degrees

Axis 5: +90 degrees

Axis 6: no significance

2.

Pull the cable and connectors down through


the center of the frame.

3.

Reconnect connectors R1.MP and R1.SMB at Shown in the figure Location of


the rear cover plate.
cable harness on page 29!

4.

Reconnect the earth cable.

5.

Refit the rear cover plate on the manipulator


with its attachment screws.

Make sure the cables are not


twisted with each other or with
eventual customer harnesses!

Shown in the figure Location of


cable harness on page 29!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.2 Refitting of cable harness

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

6.

Reconnect all connectors at motor 1 and


motor 2.

Specified in the figure Location of


cable harness on page 29!

7.

Secure the gland plate with four attachment


screws from inside the SMB recess.

MP2 MP1

MP4

SMB
MP3

MP5 MP6
xx0100000141.wmf

8.

Reconnect connectors R2.SMB, R1.SMB1-3,


R1.SMB4-6, R1.G. Reconnect X8, X9 and X10
if brake release board in frame.

X8, X9, X10

R 2.S MB
R 1.S MB1-3
R 1.S MB4-6
R 1.G

R 2.G

xx0200000118

9.

Secure the SMB cover with its attachment


screws.

10. Secure the correct adapter plate to the harness with its two attachment screws.

11.

Note! Different manipulator versions are fitted with different plate


versions. Make sure the correct one
is used to avoid cable failure.

Pull the cable harness through the lower arm.

12. Refit the bracket securing the cables inside


the lower arm.

FB3 FB4

FB5 FB6

MP3
MP4
MP5

MP6

xx0100000142

13. Refit the bracket securing the cables to the


arm house.
Make sure not to twist the harness!

MP6
MP3

FB6
FB5

MP5
MP
FB3
FB4

xx0100000143

14. Reconnect all connectors at motor 3 and


motor 4.

3HAC 16263-1

Specified in the figure Location of


cable harness on page 29!

31

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.2 Refitting of cable harness

Step

Location of cable
harness axes 5-6

Action

Note/Illustration

15.

Reconnect connector R2.M5/6 gently at the


Shown in the figure Location of
rear cable division point with two screws, M6. cable harness on page 29!
Be careful not to bend the attachment plate
M6, 2 pcs.
when fastening the screws!

16.

Secure the cable harness to the arm house


with a velcro strap.

17.

Recalibrate the robot after refitting the complete cable harness.

Detailed in "Calibration" in the


Installation Manual.

The connectors on the upper arm are located as specified in the figure below.

D
B
C

xx0100000145

Refitting, cable
harness, axes 5-6

Cable attachment, upper arm

Cable attachment, rear

Connectors at cable harness division; R2.M5/6

Connectors at motor 5; R3.FB5 and R3.MP5

Connectors at motor 6; R3.FB6 and R3.MP6

The procedure below details how to refit the upper cable harness.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!

32

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.2 Refitting of cable harness

- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The cable packs are sensitive to mechanical damage! They must be handled with care, especially the connectors, in order to avoid damaging them!

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

The manipulator is required to positioned in the following position:


Axis 4: 0 degrees

Axis 5: +90 degrees

Axis 6: no significance

2.

Gently insert the cable harness from the rear into the
upper arm.

3.

Pull the small spiral plate past motor 5.

4.

Route the cables outside the heat protection plate.

5.

Secure the small plate to the large plate. Secure the


spiral cup with its attachment screw in the bottom of
the cup.

6.

Secure any excess cable length tightly to the large Excess cable length may be
plate in the wrist housing, using cable straps.
present if upper arm length is
Use the attachment holes in the large plate intended not the maximum.
for the cable straps!

7.

Reconnect all connectors at motor 5 and motor 6.

8.

Secure the cable with the cable attachment inside


the upper arm.

9.

Refit the left hand side wrist cover with its attachment screws.

10.

Reconnect connector R2.M5/6 gently at the rear


cable division point with two screws, M6.
Be careful not to bend the attachment plate when
fastening the screws!

11.

Refit the plastic cover on the rear of the upper arm.

12.

Recalibrate the robot after refitting the complete


cable harness.

Specified in the figure Location of cable harness axes 56 on page 32!

Shown in the figure Location


of cable harness axes 5-6 on
page 32!
M6, 2 pcs.
Detailed in "Calibration" in
the Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

33

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.3 Removal of complete arm system

3.1.3 Removal of complete arm system

Location of complete arm system

The complete arm system is defined as the complete manipulator except for the base and
gearbox axis 1, i.e. the upper and lower arms, balancing device and frame. This is shown in
the figure below.

E
F

xx0100000150

34

Gearbox, axis 1

Motor, axis 1

Base attachment screws

Upper arm

Lower arm

Frame

Balancing device

Block for calibration

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.3 Removal of complete arm system

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Lifting device,
manipulator

3HAC 15607-1 Instruction 3HAC 15971-2


enclosed!

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

Other tools and procedures may be


required. See references to these procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

Removal, complete arm system

Note

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to lift and remove the complete arm system.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The complete arm system weighs 2000 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned
accordingly!

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Make sure the manipulator is positioned as shown in the figure to the


right.

Manually releasing the brakes is detailed in


"Manually releasing the brakes" in the
Installation Manual.

50

m
xx0100000103

3HAC 16263-1

2.

Drain the oil from the gearbox, axis 1. Detailed in section "Oil change, gearbox
axis 1" in the Maintenance Manual.

3.

Remove the motor, axis 1.

4.

Run the overhead crane to a position


above the manipulator.

Detailed in section Removal of motor, axis


1 on page 92.

35

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.3 Removal of complete arm system

Step

36

Action

Note/Illustration

5.

Fit the lifting device and adjust it as


detailed in enclosed instruction.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on


page 35!
Make sure the lift is done completely level!
How to adjust the lift is described in the
enclosed instruction to the lifting device!
Follow the instructions before continuing the lift!

6.

Remove the block for calibration from Shown in the figure Location of complete
the bottom of the frame.
arm system on page 34!

7.

Remove the arm system from the base Shown in the figure Location of complete
by unscrewing the 24 base attachment arm system on page 34!
screws.

8.

Lift the arm system and secure it in a


safe area.

Make sure all hooks and attachments


maintain in correct position while lifting the
manipulator!
Always move the manipulator at very low
speeds, making sure it does not tip.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.4 Refitting of complete arm system

3.1.4 Refitting of complete arm system

Location of complete arm system

The complete arm system is defined as the complete manipulator except for the base and
gearbox axis 1, i.e. the upper and lower arms, balancing device and frame. This is shown in
the figure below.

E
F

xx0100000150

3HAC 16263-1

Gearbox, axis 1

Motor, axis 1

Base attachment screws

Upper arm

Lower arm

Frame

Balancing device

Block for calibration

37

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.4 Refitting of complete arm system

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Lifting device, manipulator

3HAC 15607-1 Instruction 3HAC 15971-2


enclosed!

Guide pins, M12 x 130

Used to guide the complete


arm system when refitting.
Always use the guide pins
in pairs.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Other tools and procedures


may be required. See references to these procedures
in the step-by-step instructions below.

Refitting, complete arm system

Note

These procedures include


references to the tools
required.

The procedure below details how to lift and refit the complete arm system.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The complete arm system weighs 2000 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned
accordingly!

Step

38

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Fit and adjust the lifting device as


detailed in enclosed instruction.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 38!

2.

Lift the complete arm system and move Make sure all the hooks and attachments
it at very low speed, making sure it does maintain in correct position while lifting
not tip!
the manipulator!
Make sure the lift is done completely
level, adjust the length of the chains as
detailed in enclosed instruction!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.1.4 Refitting of complete arm system

Step
3.

Action

Note/Illustration

Fit two guide pins, M12 x 130, in the


frame attachment holes as shown in the
figure to the right.
Fit one guide pin next to the guiding hole
(for the spring pin in the gearbox) and the
other guide pin straight across the frame.

A
A
B
xx0300000070

The figure above shows the frame, with a


view from below.
Attachment holes for the guide
pins, M12.

Guiding hole for the spring pin


located in the gearbox, axis 1.

4.

Look through the empty mounting hole of This is a complex task to be performed
motor axis 1, to assist in aligning the
with outmost care in order to avoid injury
assembly during refitting of the arm sys- or damage!
tem.
The guiding pin in the gearbox must be
fitted to the guiding hole of the frame (B).
Lower the arm system with guidance
from the guide pins previously fitted to
the frame.

5.

Refit 22 of the 24 attachment screws


before the arm system is completely lowered.

6.

Remove the guide pins and secure the Shown in the figure Location of complete
arm system to the base with the 24 base arm system on page 37!
attachment screws and washers.
24 pcs, M12 x 110; 12.9 quality
UNBRAKO, tightening torque: 110 Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.

7.

Refit the block for calibration at the bot- Shown in the figure Required equipment
tom of the frame.
on page 38!

8.

Refit the motor, axis 1.

9.

Refill the gearbox axis 1 with lubricating Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis 1"
oil.
in the Maintenance Manual.

10. Recalibrate the robot.

Detailed in section Refitting of motor, axis


1 on page 95.

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation


Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

39

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.1 Removal of turning disk

Section 3.2: Upper arm


3.2.1 Removal of turning disk

Location of turning disk

The turning disk is located in the center of the wrist unit as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Wrist complete on page 219!

xx0100000129

Turning disk

Oil plug, draining

Oil plug, filling

Turning disk attachment screws, 33 pcs

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in the
step-by-step instructions below.

40

Note

These procedures include references to the tools required.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.1 Removal of turning disk

Removal, turning
disk

The procedure below details how to remove the turning disk.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.

Step

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Run the robot to a position where the oil plug,


draining of axis 6 gearbox faces downwards.

2.

Drain the oil from gearbox 6.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox


axis 6" in the Maintenance Manual.

3.

Remove the turning disk by unscrewing its 33


attachment screws .

Shown in the figure Location of


turning disk on page 40!

41

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.2 Refitting of turning disk

3.2.2 Refitting of turning disk

Location of turning disk

The turning disk is located in the center of the wrist unit as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Wrist complete on page 219!

xx0100000129

Turning disk

Oil plug, draining

Oil plug, filling

Turning disk attachment screws, 33 pcs

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Turning disk

3HAC 13193-1

Does not include o-ring!

O-ring

2152 2012-433 Must be replaced when


replacing the turning disk!

Grease

3HAB 3537-1

Used to lubricate the o-ring

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

42

These procedures include


references to the tools
required.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.2 Refitting of turning disk

Refitting, turning
disk

The procedure below details how to refit the turning disk.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Lubricate the turning disk o-ring with


grease.
Fit the o-ring to the rear of the turning
disk.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 42!

B
A

C
xx0100000130

A: O-ring, turning disk

B: Turning disk

C: Gear box, axis 6

2.

Secure the turning disk with 33 attachment screws.

M10 x 25, 12.9 quality UNBRAKO, tightening torque: 50 Nm.


Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.

3.

Refill the gearbox 6 with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis 6".

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

43

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.3 Removal of complete wrist unit

3.2.3 Removal of complete wrist unit

Location of wrist
unit

The wrist unit is located in the frontmost part of the upper arm as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Wrist complete on page 219!

B C

H
xx0100000147

Wrist unit

Wrist unit attachment screws and washers

Attachment, cable harness axis 5-6

Connectors at cable harness division; R2.M5/6

Turning disc

Cover, axis 5

Rear cover

View with cable harness mounted on robot

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined


in section Standard toolkit
on page 18!

Lifting tool, wrist unit

3HAC 12734-1

Other tools and procedures


may be required. See references to these procedures
in the step-by-step instructions below.

44

Note

These procedures include


references to the tools
required.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.3 Removal of complete wrist unit

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Circuit Diagram

Removal, wrist
unit

Note

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual, part 2.

The procedure below details how to remove the complete wrist unit.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The wrist unit weighs 200 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Remove all equipment fitted to the turning Shown in the figure Location of wrist
disk.
unit on page 44!

2.

Turn axis 4 to a position where the cover,


axis 5 faces upwards.

3.

Remove the cover, axis 5, by unscrewing


its attachment screws.

4.

Fit the Lifting tool, wrist unit to the two


holes on the sealing surface against the
cover, axis 5.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 44!


If required to fit the tool, cut any cable
ties securing the cables.

5.

Remove the rear cover by unscrewing its


attachments.

Shown in the figure Location of wrist


unit on page 44!

6.

Disconnect connector R2.M5/6 at the rear Shown in the figure Location of wrist
cable division point .
unit on page 44!

7.

Remove all cable attachment inside the


upper arm and on the rear of the robot.

8.

Slightly raise the wrist unit to unload the


screw joint, facilitating removing the
attachment screws.

9.

Remove the wrist unit attachment screws


and washers .

Shown in the figure Location of wrist


unit on page 44!

Do not remove the attachments from


the cabling!

10. Pull the cabling forwards through the upper Make sure the attachments do not get
arm tube.
stuck inside the tube!
11.

Remove the friction washer between the


wrist unit and the upper arm tube.

A new washer must always be used on


reassembly.

12. Lift the wrist unit down and place it on a


secure surface.

3HAC 16263-1

45

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.4 Refitting of complete wrist unit

3.2.4 Refitting of complete wrist unit

Location of wrist
unit

The wrist unit is located in the frontmost part of the upper arm as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Wrist complete on page 219!

B C

H
xx0100000147

Wrist unit

Wrist unit attachment screws and washers

Attachment, cable harness axes 5-6

Connectors at cable harness division; R2.M5/6

Turning disc

Cover, axis 5

Rear cover

View with cable harness mounted on robot

Required equipment

46

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Wrist unit

3HAC 16628-1

Includes all hardware except


attachment screws!

Friction washer

3HAC 11755-1

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Lifting tool, wrist unit

3HAC 12734-1

A new friction washer must


always be used on reassembly.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.4 Refitting of complete wrist unit

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in
the step-by-step
instructions below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

Refitting, wrist
unit

Note

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual, part


2.

The procedure below details how to refit the complete wrist unit.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The wrist unit weighs 200 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Remove the cover, axis 5 from the wrist unit to Art. no. specified in Required
be fitted. Fit the Lifting tool, wrist unit to the
equipment on page 46!
wrist unit.

2.

Lift the wrist unit and run it to its mounting position.

3.

Fit a new friction washer between the upper


arm assembly and the wrist unit.

4.

Gently pull the wrist unit cable harness through


the upper arm and out the rear.

5.

Secure the wrist unit with its attachment screws Screws: M12 x 50, UNBRAKO
and washers.
quality 12.9, tightening torque: 115
Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as
detailed in Screw joints on page 15
before fitting.

6.

Secure the cable harness with the cable attach- Make sure the cabling is not
ment inside the upper arm as well as on the
twisted!
rear of the upper arm.

7.

Remove the lifting tool, wrist unit and refit the


cover, axis 5 with its attachment screws.

8.

Refit any cable ties that were previously cut


during disassembly.

9.

Reconnect connector R2.M5/6 at the rear


cable division point.

10.

Refit the rear cover with its attachment screws. Shown in the figure Location of
wrist unit on page 46!

11.

Check the oil level at gearbox axis 5 and 6.

Art. no. specified in Required


equipment on page 46!

Shown in the figure Location of


wrist unit on page 46!

Shown in the figure Location of


wrist unit on page 46!

"Inspection oil level, gearbox axis


5 and 6" detailed in the Maintenance Manual.

47

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.4 Refitting of complete wrist unit

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

12.

Recalibrate the robot!

Detailed in "Calibration" in the


Installation Manual".

13.

Refit any equipment previously removed from


the turning disk.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

48

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.5 Removal of complete upper arm

3.2.5 Removal of complete upper arm

Location of upper
arm

The upper arm is located on top of the manipulator as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Upper arm on page 217!

G A

H
F
B

D
E
C
xx0100000148

Upper arm

Upper arm attachment screws

Connectors at cable harness division; R2.M5/6

Rear cable attachment

Oil plug, draining

Oil plug, filling

Attachment hole, M12

Sealing between lower arm and gearbox 3

Attachment holes for lifting device, upper arm

Attachment holes for lifting eye

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 16263-1

Note

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

49

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.5 Removal of complete upper arm

Equipment, etc.

Removal, upper
arm

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Lifting eye, M12

3HAC 14457-3

Lifting device, upper arm

3HAC 15536-1

Lifting tool (chain)

3HAC 15556-1

Hoisting block

Standard hoisting block,


capacity 200 kg

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

These procedures include


references to the tools
required.

The procedure below details how to remove the complete upper arm.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The complete upper arm weighs 450 kg without any additional equipment fitted! Use a suitable
lifting device to avoid injury to personnel!

Step

50

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Run the manipulator arm to a horizontal position.

2.

Fit the lifting eye to the attachment hole in the


wrist unit.

Shown in the figure Location of


upper arm on page 49!
Part no. is specified in Required
equipment on page 49!

3.

Fit one of the pieces included in the Lifting


device, upper arm to the Attachment holes for
lifting device, upper arm using the included
attachment screws.

Shown in the figure Location of


upper arm on page 49!
Part no. is specified in Required
equipment on page 49!

4.

Run the lifting chain from the rear lifting point


through the overhead crane hook, through the
hoisting block to the lifting eye in the front.

Part no. is specified in Required


equipment on page 49!

5.

Use the hoisting block to adjust the tension in the


chain in order to lift the upper arm completely
level.

6.

Drain the oil from gear box 3.

7.

Disconnect connector R2.M5/6 at the rear cable


division point as well as all remaining connections to the upper arm.

8.

Disconnect all connectors inside motors 3 and 4.

9.

Remove all brackets securing cabling to the


upper arm by unscrewing their attachment
screws respectively.

Detailed in section "Oil change,


gearbox axis 3" in the Maintenance Manual.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.5 Removal of complete upper arm

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

10. Raise the lifting equipment to take the weight of


the upper arm.
11.

Carefully remove the upper arm attachment


Shown in the figure Location of
screws .
upper arm on page 49!
Make sure that the upper arm is lifted in a com- 30 pcs.
pletely level position in all planes in order not to
damage the upper arm!

12. Lift the upper arm and place it on a secure surface.


13. Remove the sealing from the lower arm.

3HAC 16263-1

51

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.6 Refitting of complete upper arm

3.2.6 Refitting of complete upper arm

Location of upper
arm

The upper arm is located on top of the manipulator as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Upper arm on page 217!

G A

H
F
B

D
E
C
xx0100000148

52

Upper arm

Upper arm attachment screws

Connectors at cable harness division; R2.M5/6

Rear cable attachment

Oil plug, draining

Oil plug, filling

Attachment hole, M12

Sealing between lower arm and gearbox 3

Attachment holes for lifting device, upper arm

Attachment holes for lifting eye

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.6 Refitting of complete upper arm

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Sealing, axis 2/3

3HAC 11054-1

Always use a new sealing


when reassembling!

Washer

3HAC 11828-1

Replacement washer, gearbox


3 attachment, replaced if damaged.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Lifting eye, M12

3HAC 14457-3

Lifting device, upper


arm

3HAC 15536-1

Lifting tool (chain)

3HAC 15556-1

Hoisting block

Standard hoisting block, capacity 200 kg.

Guide pins, sealing


axis 2/3

3HAC 14627-2

80 mm.
For guiding "Sealing, axis 2/3".

Guide pins, sealing


axis 2/3

3HAC 14627-3

100 mm.
For guiding "Sealing, axis 2/3".

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in
the step-by-step
instructions below.

Refitting, upper
arm

Note

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to refit the complete upper arm.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The complete upper arm weighs 450 kg without any additional equipment fitted! Use a suitable
lifting device to avoid injury to personnel!

3HAC 16263-1

53

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.6 Refitting of complete upper arm

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Fit the two guide pins, sealing axis 2/3 in


two of the attachment screw holes on
gearbox 3, see figure beside.
Guide the new sealing, axis 2/3 into position with the guide pins, on gearbox 3.

Always use a new sealing when reassembling!


Art. no. is specified in Required equipment on page 53!

xx0200000125

54

A: Holes for guide pins on the


gearbox.

2.

Fit the lifting eye to the attachment hole in Shown in the figure Location of upper
the wrist unit.
arm on page 52!
Art. no. is specified in Required equipment on page 53!

3.

Fit one of the pieces included in the Lifting


device, upper arm to the Attachment
holes for lifting device, upper arm using
the included attachment screws.

Shown in the figure Location of upper


arm on page 52!
Art. no. is specified in Required equipment on page 53!

4.

Run the lifting chain from the rear lifting


point through the overhead crane hook,
through the hoisting block to the lifting
eye in the front.

Art. no. is specified in Required equipment on page 53!

5.

Use the hoisting block to adjust the tension in the chain in order to lift the upper
arm completely level.

6.

Lift the upper arm and run it to its mounting position.

7.

Fit the three washers to be placed


beneath the attachment screws.

Make sure the washers are not scarred


or pitted in the surface facing the screw
heads. If both washer sides are damaged, replace the washer. Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 53!

8.

Insert the attachment screws.


Do not remove the guide pins until the
attachment screws are drawn as detailed
below!

In some cases, removing the plastic


mechanical stops may be required
before fitting the upper arm.
If guide pins are removed before the
screws are tightened, the sealing can be
involuntarily moved into wrong position.

9.

Secure the lower arm to gearbox 3 with


the Upper arm attachment screws .

Shown in the figure Location of upper


arm on page 52!
30 pcs: M16 x 50.
Tightening torque: 300 Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.2.6 Refitting of complete upper arm

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

10.

Remove the guide pins and fit the two


remaining attachment screws. Tighten
them as detailed above!

11.

Refit any cabling removed during the


removal process.

12.

Reconnect all connectors inside motors 3


and 4.

13.

Reconnect connector R2.M5/6 gently at


the rear cable division point.
Be careful not to bend the attachment
plate when fastening the screws!

14.

Refill the gear box with oil.

Detailed in section "Oil change, gearbox


axis 3" in the Maintenance Manual.

15.

Recalibrate the robot!

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

55

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.1 Removal of complete lower arm

Section 3.3: Lower arm


3.3.1 Removal of complete lower arm

Location of lower
arm

The lower arm is located as shown in the figure below.


A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Frame-Lower arm 2 on page 215!

A
D

xx0100000149

56

Lower arm

Pivot point, axis 2

Front shaft, balancing device, including securing screw

Attachment for lifting eye, M12, balancing device

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.1 Removal of complete lower arm

Attachment
points, lower arm

The lower arm attachment points are located as shown in the figure below:

The figure (1) shows gearbox 3, but the location of sealing axis 2/3 in relation to the
gearbox is identical for axis 3.

The figure (2) shows a cut view through the lower arm pivot point in axis 2 (item B in
the figure above!).

201
A

B
(1)
(2)

404
401
202
204
406

402
403
D

405

409
E

xx0200000031

3HAC 16263-1

Gear box

Lower arm

Balancing device piston rod ear

Frame

Shaft hole

201

Sealing, axis 2/3

202

Attachment screw

204

Washer

401

Bearing

402

Thrust washer

403

Bushing

404

Retaining ring

405

Shaft

406

Protection plug

409

Protection washer

57

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.1 Removal of complete lower arm

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Lifting tool, lower arm

3HAC 14691-1

Press tool, axis 2 shaft

3HAC 13452-1

Lifting eye, M12

3HAC 14457-3

Used to lift the balancing


device.

Puller tool, balancing


device shaft

3HAC 12475-1

Used to pull out the shaft from


the balancing device front ear.

Hydraulic pump 80Mpa

3HAC 13086-1

To be used together with the


press tool, axis 2 shaft and the
puller tool.

Hydraulic pump 80Mpa


(Glycerin)

3HAC 13086-2

To be used together with the


press tool, axis 2 shaft and the
puller tool.

Retaining ring pliers

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

Removal, lower
arm

Note
Tool that may be rent from
ABB.

The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!
These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove the complete lower arm.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The lower arm weighs 225 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Do not under any circumstances, deal with the balancing device in any other way than that
detailed in the product documentation! For example, attempting to open the balancing device
is potentially lethal!

Step

58

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Remove the upper arm.

Detailed in section Removal of complete


upper arm on page 49.

2.

Disconnect and remove the cables from Detailed in section Removal of cable harinside the lower arm.
ness on page 24.
Release any cable attachments.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.1 Removal of complete lower arm

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

3.

Apply the lifting eye to the balancing


device and raise to unload the device.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 58.
Attachment shown in the figure Location
of lower arm on page 56.

4.

Unload the balancing device in order to Detailed in section Unloading the balancmake the piston rod and front ear adjust- ing device on page 88.
able when pulling the front shaft out.

5.

Remove the securing screw from the bal- Shown in the figure Location of lower
ancing device front shaft.
arm on page 56.

6.

Apply the shaft puller tool to the shaft


through the hole in the frame.
The shaft has a M20 thread diameter
and a 40 mm depth of thread, as shown
in the figure to the right.
Pull the shaft out using the puller tool and
the hydraulic pump.

40

16

xx0300000060

Note! The dimension of the shaft puller


tool is M20. Do not mix up with the shaft
press tool used when mounting the shaft.
Art. no. specified in Required equipment
on page 58.
7.

Lower the balancing device until it rests


safely against the bottom of the frame,
out of reach from the lower arm.

8.

Move the lower arm backwards to the


lowest position possible.

9.

Apply the lifting tool to the lower arm.

Art. no. is specified in Required equipment on page 58!

10.

Drain the oil from gearbox 2.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox 2" in the


Maintenance Manual.

11.

Raise the tool to unload the lower arm.

12.

Remove the protection plug .

Shown in the figure Attachment points,


lower arm on page 57!

13.

Remove the protection washer and the


retaining ring .

Shown in the figure Attachment points,


lower arm on page 57!
Use a pliers for the retaining ring.

xx0300000015

3HAC 16263-1

59

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.1 Removal of complete lower arm

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

14.

Apply the press (/puller) tool as shown in Art. no. is specified in Required equipthe figure to the right and mount the
ment on page 58!
hydraulic pump to it.

15.

Pull the shaft out.

16.

Remove the lower arm attachment


screws and washers that attaches the
lower arm to the gearbox 2.

17.

Lift the lower arm down and place it on a


secure surface.

18.

Remove the bearing and thrust washer


from the shaft hole in the lower arm.

19.

Remove the sealing from the lower arm. Shown in the figure Attachment points,
lower arm on page 57!
On reassembly a new sealing must be
used!

xx0300000010

60

Shown in the figure Attachment points,


lower arm on page 57!

Shown in the figure Attachment points,


lower arm on page 57!
On reassembly a new bearing must be
used!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.2 Refitting of complete lower arm

3.3.2 Refitting of complete lower arm

Location of lower
arm

The lower arm is located as shown in the figure below.


A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Frame-Lower arm 2 on page 215!

A
D

xx0100000149

3HAC 16263-1

Lower arm

Pivot point, axis 2

Shaft, balancing device, including securing screw

Attachment for lifting eye, M12, balancing device

61

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.2 Refitting of complete lower arm

Attachment
points, lower arm

The lower arm attachment points are located as shown in the figure below:

The figure (1) shows gearbox 3, but the location of sealing axis 2/3 in relation to the
gearbox is identical for axis 3.

The figure (2) shows a cut view through the lower arm pivot point in axis 2 (item B in
the figure above!).

201
A

B
(1)
(2)

404
401
202
204
406

402
403
D

405

409
E

xx0200000031

62

Gear box

Lower arm

Balancing device piston rod ear

Frame

Shaft hole

201

Sealing, axis 2/3

202

Attachment screw

204

Washer

401

Bearing

402

Thrust washer

403

Bushing

404

Retaining ring

405

Shaft

406

Protection plug

409

Protection washer

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.2 Refitting of complete lower arm

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Bearing

3HAC 4310-1

Sealing, axis 2/3

3HAC 11054-1 Always use a new sealing


when reassembling!

VK-cover

3HAA 2166-23

Always use a new bearing


when reassembling!

Mount on new lower arm or


replace if damaged.

Lifting tool, lower arm

3HAC 14691-1 Tool that may be rent from


ATRP/S.
Two guidings, 3HAC 14445-1,
that must be used for guiding
the sealing, axis 2/3, is accompanying the tool.

Guidings

3HAC 14445-1 For guiding the sealing, axis 2/


3.
2 pcs enclosed with the lifting
tool, lower arm.

Rotation tool, motor

3HAC 17105-1 Used to rotate the motor pinion


and gear if necessary, when
brakes are released.

Power supply

24 VDC, 1.5 A.
For releasing the brakes.

Press tool, axis 2 shaft

3HAC 13452-1

Press tool, axis 2 bearing

3HAC 13453-1

Hydraulic pump 80 Mpa

3HAC 13086-1 To be used together with the


press tools.

Hydraulic pump 80 Mpa


(glycerin)

3HAC 13086-2 To be used together with the


press tools.
Tool that may be rent from
ATRP/S.

Retaining ring pliers

Grease

3HAB 3537-1

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

3HAC 16263-1

Note

For lubricating shaft hole

These procedures include references to the tools required.

63

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.2 Refitting of complete lower arm

Refitting, lower
arm

The procedure below details how to refit the complete lower arm.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The lower arm weighs 225 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Fit a new VK-cover on new lower arm or Part no. specified in Required equipment
replace existing if damaged.
on page 63!

2.

Fit the two guidings in the attachment


holes of the lower arm.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 63!

xx0200000262

64

A: Attachment holes for the two


guidings.

3.

Fit the new sealing, axis 2/3 on the guid- Always use a new sealing when reasings.
sembling!
Art. no. specified in Required equipment
on page 63!

4.

Apply the lifting tool to the lower arm.

5.

Lift the lower arm and run it to its mounting position.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 63!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.2 Refitting of complete lower arm

Step
6.

Action

Note/Illustration

In case the holes of the lower arm and Connect power supply to connector
the ones of the gearbox axis 2 doesnt R2.MP2:
match, use power supply to release the
+ : pin 2
motor axis 2 brakes and rotate the pin - : pin 5
ion and gear with the rotation tool.

xx0200000165

The rotation tool (A) is used beneath the


motor cover, directly on the motor shaft
as shown in figure above!
Art. no. specified in Required equipment
on page 63!
7.

Secure the lower arm with 28 of the 30


attachment screws and washers in
gearbox 2.

8.

Remove the guidings and secure the


two remaining attachment screws as
detailed above!

9.

Apply grease to the shaft hole.

10.

Push the shaft in by hand.

30 pcs: M16 x 50; tightening torque: 300


Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.
Shown in the figure Attachment points,
lower arm on page 62!

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 63!

E
F

A B

xx0300000014

11.

3HAC 16263-1

Apply the press tool, axis 2 shaft.

A: Retaining ring

B: Protection washer

C: Bearing

D: Thrust washer

E: Shaft

F: Protection washer

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 63!

65

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.3.2 Refitting of complete lower arm

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

12.

Tighten the M16 nut.

Tightening torque: 20 Nm.

13.

Set the indicator to zero and press the Approx. force: 30-50 kN.
shaft in with the hydraulic cylinder of the
press tool.

14.

Increase the pressure of the glycerin


pump to 50 kN.

15.

Check the measurement dial readout.

Correct value: 2.45 mm 0.15 mm

16.

Remove the press tool, axis 2 shaft.

Release the pressure from the glycerin


pump first, then from the hydraulic cylinder (approximately 1/2 minute after), in
order to avoid movement of the shaft.

17.

Refit the thrust washer to the shaft.

Shown in the figure Attachment points,


lower arm on page 62!

18.

Apply grease to the location of the shaft


where the bearing is to be mounted.

19.

Press the bearing in with the press tool, Always use a new bearing when reasaxis 2 bearing.
sembling!
Art. no. specified in Required equipment
on page 63!

20.

Refit the protection washer and the


retaining ring.

Shown in the figure Attachment points,


lower arm on page 62!

21.

Refit the protection plug.

Shown in the figure Attachment points,


lower arm on page 62!

22.

Refit and restore the balancing device.

Detailed in section Refitting of balancing


device on page 83.

23.

Refit the upper arm.

Detailed in section Refitting of complete


upper arm on page 52.

24.

Perform a leak-down test.

Detailed in section Performing a leakdown test on page 21.

25.

Refill the gearbox with oil.

Detailed in section "Oil change, gearbox


axis 2" in the Maintenance Manual.

26.

Refit and reconnect all cables inside the Detailed in section Refitting of cable harlower arm.
ness on page 29.
Resecure any cable attachments.

27.

Recalibrate the robot!

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation


Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

66

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.1 Removal of SMB related equipment

Section 3.4: Frame and base


3.4.1 Removal of SMB related equipment

Location of SMB
related equipment

The SMB related equipment (SMB = serial measurement board) is located on the left hand
side of the frame as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Frame-Lower arm 1 on page 213!
Note that the manipulator is shown with the SMB cover already removed!

B C D GE F H
xx0100000138

Attachment screw, SMB battery cover

SMB battery cover

SMB battery

SMB cover

Attachment screw, SMB cover

SMB unit

Cable, battery/SMB board

Pins

Required equipment
Equipment, etc. Spare part. no. Art. no.

Removal, battery

Note

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

Circuit Diagram

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual, part 2.

The procedure below details how to remove the SMB battery.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!

3HAC 16263-1

67

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.1 Removal of SMB related equipment

- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Follow these instruction to prevent the unit to be damaged from ESD:
The unit is sensitive to electrostatic discharge. It will be destroyed if subjected to electrostatic
voltages.
Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through a special ESD wrist bracelet
or similar.

Step

Removal, SMB
unit

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Remove the SMB battery cover by


unscrewing its attachment screws .

Shown in the figure Location of SMB


related equipment on page 67!

2.

Disconnect the battery from the cable,


battery/SMB board .

Shown in the figure Location of SMB


related equipment on page 67!

3.

Remove the SMB battery.


Battery includes protection circuits.
Replace it only with the specified spare
part in the refitting instruction or with an
ABB approved eqvivalent.

Shown in the figure Location of SMB


related equipment on page 67!

The procedure below details how to remove the SMB unit.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Follow these instruction to prevent the unit to be damaged from ESD:
The unit is sensitive to electrostatic discharge. It will be destroyed if subjected to electrostatic
voltages.
Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through a special ESD wrist bracelet
or similar.

Step

68

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Remove the SMB battery.

Detailed in the previous procedure:


Removal, battery on page 67.

2.

Remove the SMB cover by unscrewing its Shown in the figure Location of SMB
attachment screws.
related equipment on page 67!
Pull the battery cable through the hole in the
SMB cover.

3.

Remove the two locknuts and washers from Shown in the figure Location of SMB
the pins securing the board.
related equipment on page 67!

4.

Gently disconnect the connectors from the


SMB unit when pulling the board out.

5.

Also disconnect the battery cable from the


SMB unit.

Connectors R1.SMB1-3, R1.SMB4-6


and R2.SMB

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.2 Refitting of SMB related equipment

3.4.2 Refitting of SMB related equipment

Location of SMB
related equipment

The SMB related equipment (SMB = serial measurement board) is located on the left hand
side of the frame as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Frame-Lower arm 1 on page 213!
Note that the manipulator is shown with the SMB cover already removed!

B C D GE F H
xx0100000138

Attachment screw, SMB battery cover

SMB battery cover

SMB battery

SMB cover

Attachment screw, SMB cover

SMB unit

Cable, battery/SMB board

Pins

Required equipment

3HAC 16263-1

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

SMB Unit

3HAC 16014-1

SMB Battery

3HAC 16831-1

Note
Battery includes protection circuits.
Replace it only with given spare
part no. or an ABB approved eqvivalent.

Cable, battery/SMB
board

3HAC 13151-1

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section


Standard toolkit on page 18!

Circuit Diagram

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual, part 2.

69

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.2 Refitting of SMB related equipment

Refitting, battery

The procedure below details how to refit the SMB battery.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Follow these instruction to prevent the unit to be damaged from ESD:
The unit is sensitive to electrostatic discharge. It will be destroyed if subjected to electrostatic
voltages.
Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through a special ESD wrist bracelet
or similar.

Step

Refitting, SMB
board

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Refit the SMB battery and connect the


Art. no. is specified in Required equipcable, battery/SMB board to the battery. ment on page 69!
Shown in the figure Location of SMB
related equipment on page 69!

2.

Secure the SMB battery cover with its


attachment screws .

Shown in the figure Location of SMB


related equipment on page 69!

The procedure below details how to refit the SMB board.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Follow these instruction to prevent the unit to be damaged from ESD:
The unit is sensitive to electrostatic discharge. It will be destroyed if subjected to electrostatic
voltages.
Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through a special ESD wrist bracelet
or similar.

Step

70

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Connect the battery cable to the SMB


board.

2.

Fit the SMB unit onto the pins and con- Art. no. is specified Required equipment on
nect all connectors to the board.
page 69!
Shown in the figure Location of SMB
related equipment on page 69!
R1.SMB1-3, R1.SMB4-6 and R2.SMB

3.

Secure the SMB unit to the pins with


two locknuts and washers.

4.

Pull the battery cable through the hole Shown in the figure Location of SMB
in the SMB cover .
related equipment on page 69!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.2 Refitting of SMB related equipment

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

5.

Secure the SMB cover with its attach- Shown in the figure Location of SMB
ment screws .
related equipment on page 69!

6.

Refit the battery.

Detailed in the previous section Refitting,


battery on page 70.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

71

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.3 Removal of brake release unit

3.4.3 Removal of brake release unit

Different designs

Depending on the robot version, the brake release unit may be located either at the base or at
the frame. The following two figures show the different locations.
The early design includes a brake release unit with or without push buttons, located at the
base. The later design instead includes a brake release unit with push buttons, placed together
with the SMB unit on the left hand side of the frame.
The different designs are not compatible.

Location of brake
release unit, base

The early design includes a brake release unit with or without push buttons, located at the base
as shown in the figure below.

B
xx0200000127

72

Brake release circuit (brake release unit inside)

Attachment screws, brake release circuit, 4 pcs

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.3 Removal of brake release unit

Location of brake
release unit,
frame

The later design includes a brake release unit with push buttons, placed together with the
SMB unit on the left hand side of the frame as shown in the figure below.

D
xx0200000226

Brake release unit

Attachment screws, brake release unit (4 pcs)

Buttons

SMB battery pack

SMB cover

Attachment screws, SMB cover

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page
18!

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in
the step-by-step
instructions below.

3HAC 16263-1

Note

These procedures include references to the tools required.

73

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.3 Removal of brake release unit

Removal of brake
release unit,
located at base

The procedure below details how to remove the brake release circuit, located at the rear of the
base. See the figure Location of brake release unit, base on page 72.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.

Step

Removal of brake
release unit,
located on frame

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Remove the cover at the rear of the base.

2.

Unscrew the four attachment screws, brake release Shown in the figure Location
circuit on the outside of the base.
of brake release unit, base on
page 72!

3.

Disconnect the cable from the brake release circuit


and remove the circuit from the base.

The procedure below details how to remove the brake release unit, located on the side of the
frame. See the figure Location of brake release unit, frame on page 73.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Follow these instruction to prevent the unit to be damaged from ESD:
The unit is sensitive to electrostatic discharge. It will be destroyed if subjected to electrostatic
voltages.
Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through a special ESD wrist bracelet
or similar.

Step
1.

74

Action

Note/Illustration

Open the SMB cover by unscrewing the


attachment screws.
Let the battery stay connected, to avoid
the need of synchronization of the robot!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.3 Removal of brake release unit

Step
2.

Action

Note/Illustration

Disconnect the connectors X8, X9 and


X10 from the brake release unit.

A
2

C
xx0200000129

3HAC 16263-1

3.

Unscrew the four attachment screws,


brake release unit.

4.

Remove the brake release unit from the


plate.

A: Connector X8

B: Connector X9

C: Connector X10

Shown in the figure Location of brake


release unit, frame on page 73!

75

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.4 Refitting of brake release unit

3.4.4 Refitting of brake release unit

Different designs

Depending on the robot version, the brake release unit may be located either at the base or at
the frame. The following two figures show the different locations.
The early design includes a brake release unit with or without push buttons, located at the
base. The later design instead includes a brake release unit with push buttons, placed together
with the SMB unit on the left hand side of the frame.
The different designs are not compatible.

Location of brake
release unit, base

The early design includes a brake release unit with or without push buttons, located at the base
as shown in the figure below.

B
xx0200000127

76

Brake release circuit (brake release unit inside)

Attachment screws, brake release circuit, 4 pcs

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.4 Refitting of brake release unit

Location of brake
release unit,
frame

The later design instead includes a brake release unit with push buttons, placed together with
the SMB unit on the left hand side of the frame as shown in the figure below.

D
xx0200000226

Brake release unit

Attachment screws, brake release unit (4 pcs)

Buttons

SMB battery pack

SMB cover

Attachment screws, SMB cover

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Brake release circuit


3HAC 14219-1
without buttons, at base

Brake release at the base,


according to figure 1.
Includes brake release unit
3HAC 14228-1.

Brake release circuit


with buttons, at base

3HAC 12989-1

Brake release at the base,


according to figure 1.
Includes brake release unit
3HAC 16036-1.

Brake release unit with


buttons, at frame

3HAC 16036-1

Brake release unit at the


frame, according to figure 2.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 16263-1

Note

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

77

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.4 Refitting of brake release unit

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

Refitting of brake
release circuit,
located at base

Note
These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to refit the brake release circuit, located at the rear of the
base. See the figure Location of brake release unit, base on page 76.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.

Step

Refitting of brake
release unit,
located on frame

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Place the brake release circuit in the base of the Part no. specified in Required
robot.
equipment on page 77!
Shown in the figure Location of
brake release unit, base on page
76!

2.

Reconnect the cable to the brake release circuit.

3.

Fasten the attachment screws, brake release


circuit on the outside of the rear of the base.

4.

Refit the cover of the rear of the base.

Shown in the figure Location of


brake release unit, base on page
76!

The procedure below details how to refit the brake release unit, located on the side of the
frame. See the figure Location of brake release unit, frame on page 77.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Follow these instruction to prevent the unit to be damaged from ESD:
The unit is sensitive to electrostatic discharge. It will be destroyed if subjected to electrostatic
voltages.
Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through a special ESD wrist bracelet
or similar.

78

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.4 Refitting of brake release unit

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Fasten the brake release unit on the plate


with the attachment screws.

Shown in the figure Location of brake


release unit, frame on page 77!
Part no. specified in Required equipment on page 77!

2.

Connect the connectors X8, X9 and X10 to


the brake release unit.

A
2

C
xx0200000129

3.

A: Connector X8

B: Connector X9

C: Connector X10

Close the SMB cover with attachment screws. Eventual synchronization detailed in
If the battery has been disconnected the robot "Calibration" in the Installation and
Commissioning Manual.
must be synchronized.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

79

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.5 Removal of balancing device

3.4.5 Removal of balancing device

Location of balancing device

The balancing device is located on rear top of the frame as shown in the figure below.

F
G, H
K
A
C
N
B, L
D, M
E

xx0100000139

80

Balancing device

Bearing attachment

Attachment screws, bearing attachments

Rear cover

Attachment screws, rear cover

Hole through which shaft puller tool is to be inserted

Mounting hole, shaft puller tool

Balancing device front eye shaft, including securing screw and washer

Hole for lower arm locking screw, M16 x 90

Attachment hole for lifting eye, M12

Parallel pin (inside bearing attachment)

Support shaft inside (included in balancing device 3HAC 14675-1)

Plug

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.5 Removal of balancing device

Required equipment
Equipment, etc

Removal, balancing device

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Locking screw, lower arm

3HAB 3409-90

M16 x 90

Lifting eye, M12

3HAC 14457-3

Press tool, balancing


device

3HAC 15767-1

Shaft puller tool, balancing device

3HAC 12475-1

Hydraulic cylinder

3HAC 11731-1

To be used with press tool


3HAC 15767-1 and shaft
puller tool 3HAC 12475-1

Hydraulic pump

3HAC 13086-1

To be used with hydraulic


cylinder 3HAC 11731-1

Securing screw

9ADA 183-66

M12 x 35, 2 pcs required.


For securing the bearing
attachments to the balancing
device when lifting.

Guide pin, M16 x 300

3HAC 13120-5

Always use guide pins in


pairs

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

The procedure below details how to remove the balancing device.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The balancing device weighs 300 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step
1.

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

Run the lower arm to a position close to the calibration position.

81

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.5 Removal of balancing device

Step
2.

Action

Note/Illustration

Secure the lower arm to the frame by inserting


the locking screw into the hole (1).

xx0200000454

Art. no. specified in Required


equipment on page 81!

82

3.

Apply lifting eye, M12 to the balancing device Art. no. specified in Required
and raise to unload the device.
equipment on page 81!

4.

Unload the balancing device with the press tool


in order to make the piston rod and front ear
adjustable when pulling the shaft out.

Detailed in section Unloading the


balancing device on page 88
Art. no. specified in Required
equipment on page 81!

5.

Remove the securing screw and washer from


the shaft.

Shown in the figure Location of


balancing device on page 80!

6.

Apply shaft puller tool to the shaft through the


hole in the frame.
The shaft has a thread dimension of M20 and a
40 mm depth of thread, as shown in the figure
to the right.
40
16
Pull the shaft out using the puller tool and the xx0300000060
hydraulic cylinder and pump.
Note! The dimension of the shaft
puller tool is M20. Do not mix up
with the shaft press tool used when
mounting the shaft.
The hole in the frame is shown in
the figure Location of balancing
device on page 80!
Art. no. specified in Required
equipment on page 81!

7.

Restore the balancing device.

8.

Secure the two bearing attachments to the bal- Shown in the figure Location of
ancing device by replacing the plug on the out- balancing device on page 80!
side of each attachment, with a screw.
M12 x 35

9.

Remove the two bearing attachments from the Shown in the figure Location of
frame by unscrewing their four attachment
balancing device on page 80!
screws.
Make sure the parallel pins are not
lost!

10.

Fit two guide pins, through the upper holes of Art. no. specified in Required
the bearing attachments, to the frame.
equipment on page 81!

11.

Lift the balancing device gently backwards to a Note! Make sure not to burden the
secure area, allowing the bearing attachments guide pins with the weight of the
to slide on the guide pins.
balancing device!

Detailed in section Restoring the


balancing device on page 90

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.6 Refitting of balancing device

3.4.6 Refitting of balancing device

Location of balancing device

The balancing device is located on rear top of the frame as shown in the figure below.

F
G, H
K
A
C
N
B, L
D, M
E

xx0100000139

3HAC 16263-1

Balancing device

Bearing attachment

Attachment screws, bearing attachments

Rear cover

Attachment screws, rear cover

Hole through which shaft puller tool is to be inserted

Mounting hole, shaft puller tool

Balancing device front eye shaft, including securing screw and washer

Hole for lower arm locking screw, M16 x 90

Attachment hole for lifting eye, M12

Parallel pin (inside bearing attachment)

Support shaft inside (included in balancing device 3HAC 14675-1)

Plug

83

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.6 Refitting of balancing device

Required equipment
Equipment

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Balancing device

3HAC 14214-1

Includes balancing device 3HAC


14675-1!
Includes o-ring 3HAB 3772-44 (2
pcs)

O-ring, 2 pcs

3HAB 3772-44

Locking screw,
lower arm

3HAB 3409-90

M16 x 90

Securing screw

9ADA 183-66

M12 x 35, 2 pcs required


For securing the bearing attachments to the balancing device
when lifting

Bearing grease

3HAB 3537-1

For lubricating the o-rings and the


shaft

Grease

3HAA 1001-294 150 ml, Optimol PDO


For lubrication of spherical roller
bearing in ear, in case of new balancing device

Locking liquid

Loctite 243.
To apply to the securing screw in
the shaft.

Grease pump

To lubricate spherical roller bearing.

Guide pin, M16 x


300

3HAC 13120-5

Lifting eye, M12

3HAC 14457-3

Hydraulic pump

3HAC 13086-1

To be used with hydraulic cylinder


3HAC 11731-1.

Hydraulic cylinder

3HAC 11731-1

To be used with press tool 3HAC


15767-1 and shaft press tool
3HAC 17129-1.

Press tool, balancing device

3HAC 15767-1

Shaft press tool,


balancing device

3HAC 17129-1

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

Other tools and


procedures may be
required. See references to these procedures in the
step-by-step
instructions below.

84

Always use guide pins in pairs!

The contents are defined in section


Standard toolkit on page 18!
These procedures include references to the tools required.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.6 Refitting of balancing device

Refitting, balancing device

The procedure below details how to refit the balancing device.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Do not under any circumstances, deal with the balancing device in any other way than that
detailed in the product documentation! For example, attempting to open the balancing device
is potentially lethal!
The balancing device weighs 300 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Secure the lower arm to the frame by insert- Shown in the figure Location of baling the locking screw into the hole (1).
ancing device on page 83!

xx0200000454

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 84!

3HAC 16263-1

2.

Secure the bearing attachments to the balancing device with two screws, on the outside of the attachments.

M12 x 35.

3.

Refit the two parallel pins in the frame.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 84!

4.

Fit two guide pins in the upper holes in the


frame, where the bearing attachments are to
be attached.

5.

Fit the lifting eye to the balancing device.

6.

Lift the balancing device behind the manipu- Note! Make sure not to burden the
lator.
guide pins with the weight of the balBring the device forward, gliding the bearing ancing device!
attachments on to the guide pins (upper
holes).

7.

Remove the guide pins.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 84!

85

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.6 Refitting of balancing device

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

8.

Secure the rear of the balancing device by Shown in the figure Location of balfitting the two bearing attachments with their ancing device on page 83!
four attachment screws to the frame.
4 pcs, M16x90; 12.9 quality
UNBRAKO, tightening torque: 300
Nm 30 Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed
in Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.

9.

Remove the screws from outside of the bearing attachments and refit the plugs.

10.

Raise the balancing device to a position


where the front shaft may be inserted
through the piston shaft front eye.

11.

Unload the balancing device with the press


tool.
For an easier assembly of the shaft, the piston rod may be pressed out more than necessary and then pressed in when fitting the
shaft.

Detailed in section Unloading the


balancing device on page 88.
Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 84!

12.

Lubricate the shaft with grease.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 84!

13.

Apply the shaft press tool to the lubricated


shaft through the hole in the frame.
Fit the shaft using the press tool and the
hydraulic pump .

The shaft and the hole in the frame


are shown in the figure Location of
balancing device on page 83!
Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 84!
Note! Make sure the shaft is
pressed all the way to the bottom.

14.

Refit the securing screw and washer in to the M16x180, tightening torque: 50 Nm.
shaft using locking liquid.
Locking liquid specified in Required
equipment on page 84!

15.

When assembling a new device:


Lubricate the bearing in the ear with grease
through the lubricating nipple, with a grease
pump.
Fill until excessive grease pierces between
the shaft and the sealing spacer.

Art. no. and amount specified in


Required equipment on page 84!
Lubrication further detailed in "Lubrication, balancing device bearing" in
the Maintenance Manual.

16.

Restore the balancing device.

Detailed in section Restoring the balancing device on page 90.

17.

Remove the locking screw (1) that secures


the lower arm to the frame.

xx0200000454

86

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.6 Refitting of balancing device

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

87

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.7 Unloading the balancing device

3.4.7 Unloading the balancing device

Press tool and


hydraulic cylinder

This section implies that the lower arm is already secured according to the instruction for the
current repair activity, e.g removal of the balancing device.
The figure below shows the hydraulic cylinder mounted on the press tool.

A
C

1
0

D
xx0200000174

Bolt (4 pcs)

Hydraulic cylinder

Fix plate

Moving pin with marking

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

88

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Press tool, balancing


device

3HAC 15767-1

Hydraulic cylinder

3HAC 11731-1

Hydraulic pump

3HAC 13086-1 To be used with hydraulic cylinder, 3HAC 11731-1.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18.

To be used with press tool


3HAC 15767-1.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.7 Unloading the balancing device

Unloading the
balancing device

The procedure below details how to unload the balancing device, using the press tool 3HAC
15767-1. How to remove the press tool, is detailed in section Restoring the balancing device
on page 90.
Do not under any circumstances, deal with the balancing device in any other way than that
detailed in the product documentation! For example, attempting to open the balancing device
is potentially lethal!

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Remove the rear cover of the balancing


device, by unscrewing the attachment
screws (E).

xx0200000175

3HAC 16263-1

E: Rear cover attachment


screws (4 pcs)

2.

Remove the support shaft.

3.

Remove the o-ring.

4.

Mount the press tool, balancing device to


the rear of the balancing device with
enclosed bolts. Tighten them properly!

5.

Fit the hydraulic cylinder to the press tool. Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 88!
See the figure Press tool and hydraulic cylinder on page 88!

6.

Connect the hydraulic pump to the cylinder. Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 88!

7.

Increase the pressure and press until the


marking on the moving pin indicates the
correct position (flushed with the surface).

See the figure Press tool and hydraulic cylinder on page 88!
Do not apply more pressure than necessary, it could damage bearings and
sealings at the shaft.

8.

Turn the fix plate to position 1 in order to


lock the tool in loaded condition.

See the figure Press tool and hydraulic cylinder on page 88!

9.

Unload the hydraulic cylinder.

10.

The hydraulic cylinder may now be


removed from the tool, when necessary.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 88!


See the figure Press tool and hydraulic cylinder on page 88!

89

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.8 Restoring the balancing device

3.4.8 Restoring the balancing device

Press tool and


hydraulic cylinder

Restoration is done after repair work that has included the unloading of the balancing device.
The figure below shows the hydraulic cylinder mounted on the press tool.

A
C

1
0

D
xx0200000174

Bolt (4 pcs)

Hydraulic cylinder

Fix plate

Moving pin with marking

Required equipment
Equipment, etc. Spare part no. Art. no.

90

Note

Hydraulic cylinder

3HAC 11731-1 To be used with press tool 3HAC


15767-1.

Hydraulic pump

3HAC 13086-1 To be used with hydraulic cylinder,


3HAC 11731-1.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section


Standard toolkit on page 18.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.4.8 Restoring the balancing device

Restoring the balancing device

The procedure below details how to restore the balancing device, i.e. removing the press tool
3HAC 15767-1.
Do not under any circumstances, deal with the balancing device in any other way than that
detailed in the product documentation! For example, attempting to open the balancing device
is potentially lethal!

Step

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Refit the hydraulic cylinder to the press


tool, in case it has been removed.

Shown in the figure Press tool and


hydraulic cylinder on page 90!

2.

Press with the cylinder and the hydraulic


pump until the fix plate is movable again.
Turn the fix plate to position 0.

Shown in the figure Press tool and


hydraulic cylinder on page 90!
Do not apply more pressure than necessary, it could damage bearings and
sealings at the shaft.

3.

Unload the cylinder and make sure the


moving pin indicates that the tool has
returned to its starting position.

Shown in the figure Press tool and


hydraulic cylinder on page 90!

4.

Remove the hydraulic cylinder.

5.

Remove the press tool by unscrewing the


bolts.

6.

Lubricate and refit the o-ring at the rear of


the balancing device.

7.

Refit the support shaft and the lubricated o- Make sure the o-rings are seated propring.
erly!

8.

Refit the rear cover to the balancing device 4 pcs: M10x30, tightening torque: 50
with its attachment screws.
Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed in
Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.

Shown in the figure Press tool and


hydraulic cylinder on page 90!

91

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.1 Removal of motor, axis 1

Section 3.5: Motors


3.5.1 Removal of motor, axis 1

Location of motor

The motor axis 1 is located on the left hand side of the manipulator as shown in the figure
below:

xx0100000123

Motor, axis 1

Cable gland cover, motor axis 1

Cover for connector access

Motor attachment screws

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are


defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

Lifting tool, motor axis 1, 4, 5

3HAC 14459-1

Power supply

92

Note

24 VDC, 1.5 A.
For releasing the
brakes.

Extension, 300 mm for bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Removal tool, motor M12

3HAC 14973-1 Always use the removal


tools in pairs!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.1 Removal of motor, axis 1

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Other tools and procedures may


be required. See references to
these procedures in the step-bystep instructions below.
Circuit Diagram

Removal, motor

These procedures
include references to
the tools required.
3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual, part 2.

The procedure below details how to remove motor, axis 1.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The motor weighs 32 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Remove the Cover for connector access on top Shown in the figure Location of
of the motor by unscrewing its four attachment motor on page 92!
screws.

2.

Remove the cable gland cover at the cable exit Shown in the figure Location of
by unscrewing its two attachment screws.
motor on page 92!

xx0200000199

A: Cable gland cover

Make sure the gasket is not damaged!


3.

Disconnect all connectors beneath the motor


cover.

4.

Apply Lifting tool, motor axis 1, 4, 5 to the motor. Art. no. specified in Required
equipment on page 92!

5.

In order to release the brakes, connect the 24


VDC power supply:

Connect to connector R2.MP1


+: pin 2

6.

3HAC 16263-1

-: pin 5

Remove the motor by unscrewing its four attach- Art. no. specified in Required
ment screws and plain washers.
equipment on page 92!
If required, use the Extension 300mm for bits 1/
2.

93

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.1 Removal of motor, axis 1

Step

94

Action

Note/Illustration

7.

If required, press the motor out of position by fit- Art. no. specified in Required
ting Removal tool, motor to the motor attachequipment on page 92!
ment screw holes.
Always use the removal tools in
pairs!

8.

Lift the motor to get the pinion away from the


gear and disconnect the brake release voltage.

9.

Remove the motor by gently lifting it straight up.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.2 Refitting of motor, axis 1

3.5.2 Refitting of motor, axis 1

Location of motor

The motor axis 1 is located on the left hand side of the manipulator as shown in the figure
below.

xx0100000123

Motor, axis 1

Cable gland cover, motor axis 1

Cover for connector access

Motor attachment screws

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art no.

Note

Motor, axis 1

3HAC 14207-1

Includes motor 3HAC 14673-1.


Includes pinion 3HAC 11350-1.
Includes o-ring 2152 2012-430.

O-ring

2152 2012-430 Must be replaced when replacing motor!

Grease

3HAB 3537-1

Used to lubricate the o-ring.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Lifting tool, motor axis


1, 4, 5

3HAC 14459-1

Extension, 300 mm for


bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Power supply

3HAC 16263-1

24 VDC, max. 1,5 A.


For releasing the brakes.

95

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.2 Refitting of motor, axis 1

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art no.

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in the
step-by-step instructions below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

Refitting, motor

Note

3HAC 13347-1

Included in Repair Manual, part


2.

The procedure below details how to refit motor, axis 1.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The motor weighs 32 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Make sure the o-ring on the circumference of the Art no. specified in Required
motor is seated properly. Lightly lubricate the o- equipment on page 95!
ring with grease .

2.

Apply Lifting tool, motor axis 1, 4, 5 to the motor. Art no. specified in Required
equipment on page 95!

3.

In order to release the brake, connect the 24


VDC power supply:

Connect to connector R2.MP1


+: pin 2

96

-: pin 5

4.

Fit the motor, making sure the motor pinion is


properly mated to gearbox 1.

5.

Secure the motor with four attachment screws


M10 x 40, tightening torque: 50
and plain washers.
Nm.
If required, use the Extension 300mm for bits 1/2. Art no. specified in Required
equipment on page 95!

6.

Disconnect the brake release voltage.

7.

Reconnect all connectors beneath the motor


cover.

8.

Refit the cable gland cover at the cable exit with Make sure the cover is tightly
its two attachment screws.
sealed!

9.

Refit the cover for connector access of the motor Shown in the figure Location of
with its four attachment screws.
motor on page 95!
Make sure the cover is tightly
sealed!

Make sure the motor is turned


the right way, i.e. connections
forwards.
Make sure the motor pinion does
not get damaged!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.2 Refitting of motor, axis 1

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

10. Perform a leak-down test.

Detailed in section Performing a


leak-down test on page 21.

11.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox


axis 1" in the Maintenance Manual.

Refill the gearbox with oil.

12. Recalibrate the robot!

Detailed in "Calibration" in the


Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

97

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.3 Removal of motor, axis 2

3.5.3 Removal of motor, axis 2

Location of motor

The motor axis 2 is located on the left hand side of the manipulator as shown in the figure
below.

C
A

xx0100000124

Motor, axis 2

Cable gland cover, motor axis 2

Lock screw hole

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

98

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Lifting tool, motor axis 2,


3, 4

3HAC 15534-1

Power supply

24 VDC, 1.5 A.
For releasing the brakes.

Lock screw

M16 x 60 8.8.
For securing the lower arm.

Extension 300mm for


bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Removal tool, motor


M12

3HAC 14973-1 Always use the removal tools


in pairs!

Guide pin, M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1 For guiding the motor.

Guide pin, M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2 For guiding the motor.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.3 Removal of motor, axis 2

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

Removal, motor

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual,


part 2.

The procedure below details how to remove the motor, axis 2.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The motor weighs 32 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Run the manipulator to a position close


enough to its calibration position, to allow the
lock screw to be inserted into the lock screw
hole .

Detailed in "Calibration" in the


Installation Manual.
Shown in the figure Location of
motor on page 98!
Dimension specified in Required
equipment on page 98!

2.

Drain the oil from gearbox 2.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox


axis 2" in the Maintenance Manual.

3.

Lock the lower arm by inserting a lock screw


in the lock screw hole.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 98!


Dimension specified in Required
equipment on page 98!

4.

Remove the cover on top of the motor by


unscrewing its four attachment screws.

5.

Remove the cable gland cover at the cable


Shown in the figure Location of
exit by unscrewing its two attachment screws. motor on page 98!
Make sure the gasket is not damaged!

6.

Disconnect all connectors beneath the motor


cover.

7.

In order to release the brake, connect the 24


VDC power supply:

Connect to connector R2.MP2


+: pin 2

3HAC 16263-1

8.

Remove the motor by unscrewing its four


attachment screws and plain washers.

9.

Fit the two guide pins in two of the motor


attachment holes.

-: pin 5

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 98!

99

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.3 Removal of motor, axis 2

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

10. If required, press the motor out of position by


fitting Removal tool, motor to the motor
attachment screw holes.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 98!


Always use the removal tools in
pairs!

11. Fit the Lifting tool, motor axis 2, 3, 4 to the


motor.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 98!

12. Lift the motor to get the pinion away from the
gear and disconnect the brake release voltage.
13. Remove the motor by gently lifting it straight
out.

100

Make sure the motor pinion is not


damaged!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.4 Refitting of motor, axis 2

3.5.4 Refitting of motor, axis 2

Location of motor

The motor axis 2 is located on the left hand side of the manipulator as shown in the figure
below.

C
A

xx0100000124

Motor, axis 2

Cable gland cover, motor axis 2

Lock screw hole

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Motor, axis 2

3HAC 14209-1

Includes motor 3HAC 14673-1.


Includes pinion 3HAC 11632-1.
Includes o-ring 2152 2012-430.

O-ring

2152 2012-430 Must be replaced when replacing motor!

Grease

3HAB 3537-1

For lubricating the o-ring.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Guide pin, M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1

For guiding the motor.

Guide pin, M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2

For guiding the motor.

Lifting tool, motor axis


2, 3, 4

3HAC 15534-1

Extension 300 mm for


bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Power supply

3HAC 16263-1

24 VDC, 1.5 A.
For releasing the brakes.

101

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.4 Refitting of motor, axis 2

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Rotation tool, motor

Note

3HAC 17105-1

Used to rotate the motor pinion


when brakes are released.

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in
the step-by-step
instructions below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

Refitting, motor

3HAC 13347-1

Included in Repair Manual, part


2.

The procedure below details how to refit motor, axis 2.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The motor weighs 32 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Make sure the o-ring on the circumference of Art no. specified in Required equipthe motor is seated properly. Lightly lubricate ment on page 101!
the o-ring with grease .

2.

Fit the Lifting tool, motor axis 2, 3, 4 to the


motor.

3.

In order to release the brake, connect the 24 Connect to connector R2.MP2


VDC power supply:
+: pin 2

4.

Fit the two guide pins in two of the motor


attachment holes.

5.

Fit the motor, with guidance from the guide


Make sure the motor pinion does not
pins, making sure the motor pinion is properly get damaged!
mated to the gear of gearbox 2.
Make sure the motor is turned the
right direction, i.e. the cables facing
downwards.

Art no. specified in Required equipment on page 101!

102

-: pin 5

Art no. specified in Required equipment on page 101!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.4 Refitting of motor, axis 2

Step
6.

Action

Note/Illustration

If necessary, use the rotation tool in order to Art no. specified in Required equiprotate the motor pinion when mating it to the ment on page 101!
gear!

xx0200000165

The rotation tool (A) is used beneath


the motor cover, directly on the motor
shaft as shown in figure above.
7.

Remove the guide pins.

8.

Secure the motor with four attachment


screws and plain washers.
If required, use the Extension 300 mm for bits
1/2 .

9.

Disconnect the brake release voltage.

M10 x 40, tightening torque: 50 Nm.


Art no. specified in Required equipment on page 101!
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed in
Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.

10. Reconnect all connectors beneath the motor Connect in accordance with markcover.
ings on connectors.
11. Refit the cable gland cover at the cable exit
with its two attachment screws.

Make sure the cover is tightly sealed!


Shown in the figure Location of motor
on page 101!

12. Refit the cover on top of the motor with its


four attachment screws.

Make sure the cover is tightly sealed!

13. Remove the lock screw from the lock screw


hole .

Shown in the figure Location of motor


on page 101!

14. Perform a leak-down test.

Detailed in section Performing a


leak-down test on page 21.

15. Refill the gearbox with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis


2" in the Maintenance Manual.

16. Recalibrate the robot!

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

103

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.5 Removal of motor, axis 3

3.5.5 Removal of motor, axis 3

Location of motor

The motor axis 3 is located on the left hand side of the manipulator as shown in the figure
below.

xx0100000125

Motor, axis 3

Cable gland cover, motor axis 3

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

Lifting tool, motor axis


2, 3, 4

3HAC 15534-1

Power supply

104

Note

24 VDC, 1.5 A.
For releasing the brakes.

Extension 300mm for


bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Removal tool, motor


M12

3HAC 14973-1 Always use the removal tools in


pairs!

Guide pin, M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1 For guiding the motor.

Guide pin, M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2 For guiding the motor.

Mech stop axis 3

3HAC 12708-2 Used to fix axis 3 (one method


of three, see step one in the
removal procedure).
Use attachment screws 3HAB
3409-89 (M16 x 80).

Washers for Mech stop


axis 3

3HAA 1001186

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.5 Removal of motor, axis 3

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in
the step-by-step
instructions below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

Removal, motor

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual, part


2.

The procedure below details how to remove motor, axis 3.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The motor weighs 32 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Unload the manipulator upper arm by either:


Run the manipulator to a position
where the turning disk rests against
the foundation (recommended).

Use a fork lift to rest the upper arm


onto.

Use lifting slings and an overhead


crane to rest the upper arm.

B
A

Use a mechanical stop to rest the


xx0300000051
upper arm. Fit the mechanical stop in
Fit the mechanical stop to the third
the attachment hole (A) with tightenand final attachment hole (A), below
ing torque: 115 Nm.
the fixed stop (B) in the upper arm.
The upper arm must be positioned as horiSee the figure above!
zontal as possible!

3HAC 16263-1

2.

Drain the oil from gearbox 3.

3.

Remove any equipment hindering access to


motor 3.

4.

Remove the cover on top of the motor by


unscrewing its four attachment screws.

5.

Remove the cable gland cover at the cable


exit by unscrewing its two securing screws.

6.

Disconnect all connectors beneath the motor


cover.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox


axis 3" in the Maintenance Manual.

Shown in the figure Location of


motor on page 104!
Make sure the gasket is not damaged!

105

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.5 Removal of motor, axis 3

Step

106

Action

Note/Illustration

7.

In order to release the brake, connect the 24 Connect to connector R2.MP3


VDC power supply.
+: pin 2
Make sure the weight of the complete upper
-: pin 5
arm rests safely on the equipment chosen for
unloading the arm, before removing the
motor.

8.

Remove the motor by unscrewing its four


attachment screws and plain washers.

9.

Fit the two guide pins in two of the motor


attachment screw holes.

10.

If required, press the motor out of position by Art. no. specified in Required equipfitting removal tool, motor to the motor attach- ment on page 104!
ment screw holes.
Always use the removal tools in
pairs!

11.

Apply the Lifting tool, motor axis 2, 3, 4 to the Art. no. specified in Required equipmotor.
ment on page 104!

12.

Lift the motor to get the pinion away from the


gear and disconnect the brake release voltage.

13.

Remove the motor by gently lifting it straight


out.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 104!

Make sure the motor pinion is not


damaged!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.6 Refitting of motor, axis 3

3.5.6 Refitting of motor, axis 3

Location of motor

The motor axis 3 is located on the left hand side of the manipulator as shown in the figure
below.

xx0100000125

Motor, axis 3

Cable gland cover, motor axis 3

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Motor, axis 3

3HAC 14209-1

Includes motor 3HAC 14673-1.


Includes pinion 3HAC 11350-1.
Includes o-ring 2152 2012-430.

O-ring

2152 2012-430 Must be replaced when replacing


motor!

Grease

3HAB 3537-1

For lubricating the o-ring.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

Guide pin, M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1

For guiding the motor.

Guide pin, M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2

For guiding the motor.

Lifting tool, motor


axis 2, 3, 4

3HAC 15534-1

Extension 300 mm
for bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Power supply

24 VDC, max. 1.5 A.


For releasing the brakes.

Rotation tool, motor

3HAC 16263-1

3HAC 17105-1

Used to rotate the motor pinion


when brakes are released.

107

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.6 Refitting of motor, axis 3

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Other tools and procedures may be


required. See references to these procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

Refitting, motor

3HAC 13347-1

Included in the Repair Manual,


part 2.

The procedure below details how to refit motor, axis 3.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever mating motor and gearbox, misalignment of the gears may severely damage them.
Avoid this risk:
Fit the gearbox.
Turn the gears of the gearbox to the correct position using the gearbox crank. The part number
is specified in the table above!
Fit the motor.
The motor weighs 32 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Make sure the o-ring on the circumference of Art no. specified in Required equipthe motor is seated properly. Lightly lubricate ment on page 107!
the o-ring with grease .

2.

Fit the Lifting tool, motor axis 2, 3, 4 to the


motor.

3.

In order to release the brake, connect the 24 Connect to connector R2.MP3


VDC power supply:
+: pin 2

4.

Fit the two guide pins in two of the motor


attachment holes

5.

Fit the motor, with guidance from the guide


Make sure the motor pinion does
pins, making sure the motor pinion is properly not get damaged!
mated to the gear of gearbox 3.
Make sure the motor is turned the
right direction, i.e. the cables facing
forwards.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 107!

108

-: pin 5

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 107!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.6 Refitting of motor, axis 3

Step
6.

Action

Note/Illustration

If necessary, use the rotation tool in order to Art. no. specified in Required equiprotate the motor pinion when mating it to the ment on page 107!
gear!

xx0200000165

The rotation tool (A) is used


beneath the motor cover, directly on
the motor shaft as shown in figure
above.
7.

Remove the guide pins.

8.

Secure the motor with four attachment screws


and plain washers.
If required, use the Extension 300mm for bits
1/2 .

9.

Disconnect the brake release voltage.

10.

Reconnect all connectors beneath the motor


cover.

Connect in accordance with markings on connectors.

11.

Refit the cable gland cover at the cable exit


with its two attachment screws.

Make sure the cover is tightly


sealed!
Shown in the figure Location of
motor on page 107!

12.

Refit the cover on top of the motor with its four Make sure the cover is tightly
attachment screws.
sealed!

13.

Remove the equipment used to unload the


upper arm:
Run the manipulator to a normal position.

Fork lift

Lifting slings

Mechanical stop

M10 x 40, tightening torque: 50 Nm.


Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 107.
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as
detailed in Screw joints on page 15
before fitting.

14.

Perform a leak-down test.

Detailed in section Performing a


leak-down test on page 21.

15.

Refill the gearbox with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox


axis 3" in the Maintenance Manual.

16.

Recalibrate the robot!

Detailed in "Calibration" in the


Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

109

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.7 Removal of motor, axis 4

3.5.7 Removal of motor, axis 4

Location of motor

The motor axis 4 is located on the left hand side of the upper arm as shown in the figure below.

xx0100000126

Motor, axis 4

Cable gland cover, motor axis 4

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Lifting tool, motor axis


2, 3, 4

3HAC 15534-1 To be used when manipulator


arm is in a horizontal position.

Lifting tool, motor axis


1, 4, 5

3HAC 14459-1 To be used when manipulator


arm is in a vertical position.

Power supply

24 VDC, 1.5 A.
For releasing the brakes.

Extension 300mm for


bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Removal tool, motor


M12

3HAC 14973-1 Always use the removal tools in


pairs!

Guide pin, M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1 For guiding the motor.

Guide pin, M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2 For guiding the motor

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in the
step-by-step instructions below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

110

Note

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual, part


2.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.7 Removal of motor, axis 4

Removal, motor

The procedure below details how to remove motor, axis 4.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The motor weighs 22 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Two basic positions for the upper arm are possible:


Run the robot to a position where the upper
arm is pointed straight up. This position
enables the motor to be replaced without
draining the gear oil, which in turn saves
time.

Depending on which upper


arm position was selected,
two versions of lifting tools
are available. See below!

2.

Run the robot to a position where the upper


arm is close to horizontal. This position may
be selected when the gearbox is to be
replaced, i.e. when the gearbox oil has to be
drained anyway.

In horizontal position: avoid movement of the axis by


unloading the manipulator upper arm by either:
Run the manipulator to a position where the
turning disk rests against the foundation (recommended).

Use a fork lift to rest the upper arm onto.

Use lifting slings and an overhead crane to


rest the upper arm.

3.

Remove the cover on top of the motor by unscrewing


its four attachment screws.

4.

Remove the cable gland cover at the cable exit by


unscrewing its two attachment screws.

5.

Disconnect all connectors beneath the motor cover.

6.

In order to release the brake, connect the 24 VDC


power supply:

Shown in the figure Location


of motor on page 110!
Make sure the gasket is not
damaged!
Connect to connector
R2.MP3
+: pin 2

3HAC 16263-1

7.

Remove the motor by unscrewing its four attachment


screws and plain washers.

8.

Fit the two guide pins in two of the motor attachment


screw holes.

-: pin 5

111

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.7 Removal of motor, axis 4

Step
9.

Action

Note/Illustration

If required, press the motor out of position by fitting Art. no. specified in Required
Removal tool, motor to the motor attachment screw equipment on page 110!
holes.
Always use the removal tools
in pairs!

10. Apply the Lifting tool to the motor.

Two lifting tools are possible:


Lifting tool, motor axis
2, 3, 4 if the manipulator arm is in a horizontal position

Lifting tool, motor axis


1, 4, 5 if the manipulator arm is in a position close to vertical

Art. no. specified in Required


equipment on page 110!
11. Lift the motor to get the pinion away from the gear
and disconnect the brake release voltage.
12. Remove the motor by gently lifting it straight out.

112

Make sure the motor pinion is


not damaged!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.8 Refitting of motor, axis 4

3.5.8 Refitting of motor, axis 4

Location of motor

The motor axis 4 is located on the left hand side of the upper arm as shown in the figure below.

xx0100000126

Motor, axis 4

Cable gland cover, motor axis 4

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Motor, axis 4

3HAC 14210-1

Includes motor 3HAC 14673-2.


Includes pinion 3HAC 10122-17.
Includes o-ring 2152 2012-430.

O-ring

2152 2012-430 Must be replaced when replacing


motor!

Grease

3HAC 3537-1

Used to lubricate the o-ring.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

Lifting tool, motor axis


2, 3, 4

3HAC 15534-1

To be used when lifting when the


motor is in a horizontal position.

Lifting tool, motor axis


1, 4, 5

3HAC 14459-1

To be used when lifting when the


motor is in a vertical position.

Guide pin, M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1

Guide pin, M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2

Power supply

3HAC 16263-1

24 VDC, max. 1,5 A.


For releasing the brakes.

Rotation tool, motor

3HAC 17105-1

Extension 300 mm for


bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Used to rotate the motor pinion


when brakes are released.

113

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.8 Refitting of motor, axis 4

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Other tools and procedures may be


required. See references to these procedures in the step-bystep instructions
below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

Refitting, motor

3HAC 13347-1

Included in Repair Manual, part


2.

The procedure below details how to refit motor, axis 4.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The motor weighs 22 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Make sure the o-ring on the circumference Art. no. specified in Required equipof the motor is seated properly. Lightly lubri- ment on page 113!
cate the o-ring with grease .

2.

Apply the Lifting tool to the motor.

Two lifting tools are possible:


Lifting tool, motor axis 2, 3, 4
if the manipulator arm is in a
horizontal position

Lifting tool, motor axis 1, 4, 5


if the manipulator arm is in a
position close to vertical

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 113!


3.

In order to release the brakes, connect the


24 VDC power supply:

Connect to connector R2.MP4


+: pin 2

4.

Fit the two guide pins in two of the motor


attachment holes.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 113!

5.

Fit the motor, with guidance of the pins,


making sure the motor pinion is properly
mated to the gear of gearbox 4.

Make sure the motor pinion does not


get damaged!
Make sure the motor is turned the
right direction, i.e. the cables facing
downwards.

114

-: pin 5

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.8 Refitting of motor, axis 4

Step
6.

Action

Note/Illustration

If necessary, use the rotation tool in order to Art. no. specified in Required equiprotate the motor pinion when mating it to the ment on page 113!
gear!
A

xx0200000165

The rotation tool (A) is used beneath


the motor cover, directly on the motor
shaft as shown in figure above.
7.

Remove the guide pins.

8.

Secure the motor with four attachment


screws and plain washers.
If required, use the "Extension 300mm for
bits 1/2".

9.

Disconnect the brake release voltage.

10.

Reconnect all connectors beneath the motor


cover.

11.

Refit the cable gland cover at the cable exit Shown in the figure Location of motor
with its two attachment screws.
on page 113!

12.

Refit the cover on top of the motor with its


four attachment screws.

13.

Remove the equipment used to unload the


upper arm:
Run the manipulator to a normal
position.

Fork lift.

Lifting slings.

M10 x 80, tightening torque: 50 Nm.


Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 113!
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed in
Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.

Make sure the cover is tightly sealed!

14.

Perform a leak-down test.

Detailed in Performing a leak-down


test on page 21.

15.

Refill with oil if drained.

Detailed in "Oil change, axis 4 gearbox" in the Maintenance Manual.

16.

Recalibrate the robot!

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

115

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.9 Removal of motor, axis 5

3.5.9 Removal of motor, axis 5

Location of motor

The motor axis 5 is located in the rear of the wrist unit as shown in the figure below.
Notice that the left hand side cover already is removed in the figure!

xx0100000127

Motor, axis 5

Cable gland cover, motor axis 5

Heat protection plate

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Lifting tool, motor axis


1, 4, 5

3HAC 14459-1 For lifting the motor in a vertical


position

Power supply

24 VDC, 1.5 A.
For releasing the brakes.

Extension 300 mm for


bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Removal tool, motor


M12

3HAC 14973-1 Always use the removal tools in


pairs!

Guide pin, M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1 For guiding the motor.

Guide pin, M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2 For guiding the motor.

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in the
step-by-step instructions below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

116

Note

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual, part


2.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.9 Removal of motor, axis 5

Removal, motor

The procedure below details how to remove motor, axis 5.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The motor weighs 22 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Move the robot to a position where the motor in axis 5


is pointed straight up. This position enables the motor
to be replaced without draining the gear oil, which in
turn saves time.

2.

Remove the left hand side cover of the wrist unit by


unscrewing its six attachment screws.

The motor is accessible


behind the rear part of the
cover.

3.

Remove the heat protection plate by unscrewing its


two attachment screws.

Shown in the figure Location of motor on page 116!

4.

Remove the cover on top of the motor by unscrewing


its four attachment screws.

5.

Remove the cable gland cover at the cable exit by


unscrewing its two attachment screws.

6.

Disconnect all connectors beneath the motor cover.

7.

In order to release the brake, connect the 24 VDC


power supply :

Shown in the figure Location of motor on page 116!


Connect to connector
R3.MP5
+: pin 2

3HAC 16263-1

-: pin 5

8.

Remove the motor by unscrewing its four attachment Art. no. specified in
screws and plain washers.
Required equipment on
page 116!
If required, use the Extension 300 mm for bits 1/2 .

9.

Apply the lifting tool, motor axis 1, 4, 5 to the motor for Art. no. specified in
a vertical lift.
Required equipment on
page 116!

10.

Fit the two guide pins in two of the motor attachment Art. no. specified in
screw holes.
Required equipment on
page 116!

11.

If required, press the motor out of position by fitting


removal tool, motor to the motor attachment screw
holes.

12.

Lift the motor to get the pinion away from the gear and
disconnect the brake release voltage.

13.

Remove the motor by gently lifting it straight out.

Art. no. specified in


Required equipment on
page 116!
Always use the removal
tools in pairs and diagonally!

Make sure the motor pinion


is not damaged!

117

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.10 Refitting of motor, axis 5

3.5.10 Refitting of motor, axis 5

Location of motor

The motor axis 5 is located in the rear of the wrist unit as shown in the figure below.
Notice that the left hand side cover already is removed in the figure.

xx0100000127

Motor, axis 5

Cable gland cover, motor axis 5

Heat protection plate

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Motor, axis 5

3HAC 14725-1

Includes motor 3HAC 14673-2.


Includes pinion 3HAC 10122-17.
Includes o-ring 2152 2012-430.

O-ring

2152 2012-430 Must be replaced when replacing


motor!

Grease

3HAC 3537-1

For lubricating the o-ring.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

Guide pin, M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1

For guiding the motor.

Guide pin, M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2

For guiding the motor.

Lifting tool, motor


axis 1, 4, 5

3HAC 14459-1

For lifting the motor in a vertical


position.

Extension 300 mm
for bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Power supply

24 VDC, 1.5 A.
For releasing the brakes.

Rotation tool, motor

118

3HAC 17105-1

Used to rotate the motor pinion


when brakes are released.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.10 Refitting of motor, axis 5

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Other tools and procedures may be


required. See references to these procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

Refitting, motor

3HAC 13347-1

Included in Repair Manual, part


2.

The procedure below details how to refit motor, axis 5.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The motor weighs 22 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Make sure the o-ring on the circumfer- Art. no. specified in Required equipment
ence of the motor is seated properly.
on page 118!
Lightly lubricate the o-ring with grease .

2.

Apply the lifting tool to the motor.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 118!

3.

In order to release the brake, connect


the 24 VDC power supply :

Connect to connector R3.MP5


+: pin 2

3HAC 16263-1

-: pin 5

4.

Fit the two guide pins in two of the


motor attachment holes.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 118!

5.

Fit the motor, with guidance from the


pins, making sure the motor pinion is
properly mated to the gear of gearbox,
axis 5.

Make sure the motor pinion does not get


damaged!
Make sure the motor is turned the right
direction, i.e. the cables facing forward.

119

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.10 Refitting of motor, axis 5

Step
6.

Action

Note/Illustration

If necessary, use the rotation tool in


order to rotate the motor pinion when
mating it to the gear!

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 118!

xx0200000165

The rotation tool (A) is used beneath the


motor cover, directly on the motor shaft as
shown in figure above.
7.

Secure the motor with four attachment


screws and plain washers.
If required, use the "Extension 300 mm
for bits 1/2".

M10 x 40, 12.9 quality


Tightening torque: 50 Nm.
Art. no. specified in Required equipment
on page 118!
Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.

8.

Disconnect the brake release voltage.

9.

Reconnect all connectors beneath the


motor cover.

10.

Refit the cable gland cover at the cable Shown in the figure Location of motor on
exit with its two attachment screws.
page 118!

11.

Refit the cover on top of the motor with Make sure the cover is tightly sealed!
its four attachment screws.

12.

Refit the heat protection plate with its


two attachment screws.

13.

If cables are loose, place them correctly and tie them up with cable ties.

14.

Refit the left hand side cover of the


wrist unit with its six attachment
screws.

15.

Recalibrate the robot.

Shown in the figure Location of motor on


page 118!

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation


Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

120

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.11 Removal of motor, axis 6

3.5.11 Removal of motor, axis 6

Location of motor

The motor axis 6 is located in the center of the wrist unit as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Wrist complete on page 219.

xx0100000128

Motor, axis 6

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Power supply

24 VDC, 1.5 A.
For releasing the brakes.

Removal tool, motor M10

3HAC 14972-1 Always use the removal tools


in pairs!

Extension 300 mm for


bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

3HAC 16263-1

Note

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual,


part 2.

121

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.11 Removal of motor, axis 6

Removal, motor

The procedure below details how to remove motor, axis 6.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Two basic positions for the axis 6 are possible:


Art. no. is specified in
Move the robot to a position where the motor in Required equipment on
page 121!
axis 6 is pointed straight up. This position
enables the motor to be replaced without draining the gear oil, which in turn saves time.

Move the robot to a position where the motor in


axis 6 is close to horizontal. This position may
be selected when the gearbox is to be
replaced, i.e. when the gearbox oil has to be
drained anyway.

Move axis 6 to a vertical or horizontal position.


2.

In horizontal position: drain the oil from gearbox, axis 6. Detailed in "Oil change,
gearbox axis 6" in the
Maintenance Manual.

3.

Remove the rear motor cover by unscrewing its six


attachment screws.

4.

Disconnect all connectors beneath the cover.

5.

In order to release the brake, connect the 24 VDC


power supply :

Connect to connector
R3.MP6
+: pin 2

122

-: pin 5

6.

Remove the motor by unscrewing its four attachment


screws and plain washers.
If required, use the "Extension 300mm for bits 1/2".

Art. no. is specified in


Required equipment on
page 121!

7.

If required, press the motor out of position by fitting


Removal tool, motor to the motor attachment screw
holes.

Art. no. is specified in


Required equipment on
page 121!
Always use the removal
tools in pairs!

8.

Lift the motor to get the pinion away from the gear and
disconnect the brake release voltage.

9.

Remove the motor by gently lifting it straight out.

Make sure the motor pinion is not damaged!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.12 Refitting of motor, axis 6

3.5.12 Refitting of motor, axis 6

Location of motor

The motor axis 6 is located in the center of the wrist unit as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Wrist complete on page 219!

xx0100000128

Motor, axis 6

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Motor, axis 6

3HAC 14211-1

Includes motor 3HAC 14673-3


Includes pinion 3HAC 10122-19
Includes o-ring 2152 2012-430

O-ring

2152 2012-430 Must be replaced when replacing motor!

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

Guide pin, M8 x 100

3HAC 15520-1 For guiding the motor.

Guide pin, M8 x 150

3HAC 15520-2 For guiding the motor.

Extension, 300 mm for


bits 1/2"

3HAC 12342-1

Power supply

24 VDC, 1.5 A.
For releasing the brakes.

Grease

3HAC 16263-1

3HAB 3537-1

For lubricating the o-ring

123

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.12 Refitting of motor, axis 6

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Other tools and procedures may be


required. See references to these procedures in the step-bystep instructions
below.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

Circuit Diagram

Refitting, motor

3HAC 13347-1 Included in Repair Manual, part


2.

The procedure below details how to refit motor, axis 6.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Make sure the o-ring on the circumference of Art. no. specified in Required equipthe motor is seated properly. Lightly lubricate ment on page 123!
the o-ring with grease .

2.

In order to release the brake, connect the 24 Connect to connector R3.MP6


VDC power supply :
+: pin 2

124

-: pin 5

3.

Fit the two guide pins in two of the motor


attachment holes.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 123!

4.

Fit the motor, with guidance from the pins,


making sure the motor pinion is properly
mated to the gear of gearbox, axis 6.

Make sure the pinion on the motor


shaft is not damaged!

5.

Remove the guide pins.

6.

Secure the motor with four attachment


screws and plain washers.
If required, use the "Extension 300mm for
bits 1/2".

7.

Disconnect the brake release voltage.

8.

Reconnect all connectors beneath the motor


cover.

9.

Refit the cover on top of the motor with its six Make sure the cover is tightly sealed!
attachment screws.

10.

Perform a leak-down test (if gearbox


drained).

Detailed in Performing a leak-down


test on page 21.

11.

Refill the gearbox with oil, if drained.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis


6" in the Maintenance Manual.

M8 x 25, 12.9 quality, tightening


torque: 24 Nm.
Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 123!
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed in
Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.5.12 Refitting of motor, axis 6

Step
12.

Action

Note/Illustration

Recalibrate the robot.

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

125

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.1 Removal of gearbox, axis 1

Section 3.6: Gearboxes


3.6.1 Removal of gearbox, axis 1

Location of gearbox

The axis 1 gearbox is located between the frame and base as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Base incl. Frame on page 211!

D
B

C
A
E
xx0100000133

Gearbox, axis 1

Oil plug, filling

Attachment screws, gearbox to frame

Frame

Base

Attachment screws, base to gearbox (not shown in figure)

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

126

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Support, base

3HAC 15535-1

Lifting device, base

3HAC 15560-1

Lifting tool (chain)

3HAC 15556-1

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.1 Removal of gearbox, axis 1

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in the
step-by-step instructions below.

Removal, gearbox

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove gearbox, axis 1.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The gear box weighs 200 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

The base (without gearbox 1) weighs 310 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned
accordingly!

Step

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Remove motor 1.

Detailed in Removal of motor, axis 1


on page 92.

2.

Drain the oil from gearbox 1.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox, axis


1" in the Maintenance Manual.

3.

Disconnect all cabling in the rear of the


manipulator base and remove the cable
support plate underneath the inside of the
base.

4.

Pull the disconnected cabling up through


the center of gearbox 1.

5.

Attach lifting equipment to the manipulator Detailed in Removal of complete arm


in order to lift the complete arm system.
system on page 34.

6.

Remove the arm system from the base by


unscrewing the 24 attachment screws,
gearbox to frame .

7.

Remove the sync plate from the bottom of


the frame.

8.

Lift the arm system and secure it in a safe


area.

9.

Remove the manipulators attachment


screws to unfasten the base from the foundation.

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 126!

Detailed in Removal of complete arm


system on page 34.

127

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.1 Removal of gearbox, axis 1

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

10.

Attach the Lifting device, base and Lifting


tool , to the gearbox.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 126!

11.

Lift the manipulator base to allow fitting the Art. no. specified in Required equipSupport, base on each sides of the base. ment on page 126!

12.

Fit the Support, base.


Make sure the base remains in a stable
position before performing any work underneath the base!

13.

Remove the oil drain hose.

14.

Unscrew the 18 attachment screws, base


to gearbox, and plain washers.

A
B

xx0100000134

128

15.

Remove the cable guide in the center of


gearbox 1 by unscrewing its attachment
screws.

16.

Fit the Lifting device, base and the Lifting


tool (chain) to the gearbox.

17.

Lift the gearbox away.

A: Washers, 3 pcs

B: Gearbox 1 attachment
screws, 18 pcs

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 126!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.2 Refitting of gearbox, axis 1

3.6.2 Refitting of gearbox, axis 1

Location of gearbox

The axis 1 gearbox is located between the frame and base as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Base incl. Frame on page 211!

D
B

C
A
E
xx0100000133

Gearbox, axis 1

Oil plug, filling

Attachment screws, gearbox to frame

Frame

Base

Attachment screws, base to gearbox (not shown in figure)

Required equipment

3HAC 16263-1

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Gearbox, axis 1

3HAC 10828-1

Includes gearbox 3HAC 10828-2


Includes all o-rings and sealing
rings!

O-ring

3HAB 3772-54

Replace only when damaged!

O-ring

3HAB 3772-55

Replace only when damaged!

Sealing ring

3HAC 11581-4

Replace only when damaged!

Grease

3HAC 3537-1

For lubricating the o-rings

129

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.2 Refitting of gearbox, axis 1

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

Support, base

3HAC 15535-1

Lifting device, base

3HAC 15560-1

Lifting tool (chain)

3HAC 15556-1

Other tools may be


required as detailed
in sections to which
references are made!

Refitting, gearbox

The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to refit gearbox, axis 1.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The gear box weighs 200 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

The base (without gearbox 1) weighs 310 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned
accordingly!

Step
1.

130

Action

Note/Illustration

If the base is not supported with Support,


base as detailed in "Removal, gearbox, axis
1", this should be done first.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.2 Refitting of gearbox, axis 1

Step
2.

Action

Note/Illustration

Make sure the two o-rings on the circumfer- Art no. specified in Required equipence of the gearbox are seated properly in ment on page 129!
their grooves respectively. Lightly lubricate
the o-rings with grease .
Make sure the small o-ring around the oil
hole is fitted properly!

A
D
C
xx0200000055

A: Guide pin

C: O-ring 3HAB 3772-54

D: O-ring 3HAB 3772-55

E: Sealing ring 3HAC 115814

3.

Refit the cable guide in the center of gearbox


1 with its attachment screws.

4.

Fit the Lifting device, base and the Lifting


tool (chain) to the gearbox.

5.

Lift the gearbox to its mounting position in


the center of the base.

6.

Make sure the guide pin in the bottom face


of the gearbox is properly aligned with the
base.

7.

Secure the gearbox and the three washers 18 pcs, M16x90; 12.9 quality
with the 18 attachment screws, base to gear- UNBRAKO, tightening torque: 300
box .
Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed in
Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.

Art no. specified in Required equipment on page 129!

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 129!

A
B

xx0100000134

8.

3HAC 16263-1

A: Washers, 3 pcs

B: Attachment screws, base


to gearbox, 18 pcs

Refit the oil drain hose.

131

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.2 Refitting of gearbox, axis 1

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

9.

Secure the base to the mounting site.

Detailed in "Orienting and securing


the manipulator" in the Installation
Manual.

10.

Lift the arm system into position above the


gearbox.
Look through the empty mounting hole of
motor 1 to assist in aligning the assembly
during refitting of the arm system.

Detailed in Removal of complete arm


system on page 34.
This is a complex task to be performed with utmost care in order to
avoid injury or damage!

11.

Secure the arm system to the gearbox with


the 24 attachment screws, gearbox to frame
and plain washers.

Tightening torque: 115 Nm.


Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed in
Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.

12.

Perform a leak-down test.

Detailed in Performing a leak-down


test on page 21.

13.

Refill the gear box with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis


1" in the Maintenance Manual.

14.

Recalibrate the robot.

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

132

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.3 Removal of gearbox, axis 2

3.6.3 Removal of gearbox, axis 2

Location of gearbox

The axis 2 gearbox is located in the lower arm rotational center as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Frame-Lower arm 1 on page 213!

F
I
E
C
(A)
B
D

xx0100000135

Gearbox, axis 2 (behind motor attachment not shown in figure )

Motor, axis 2

Oil plug, filling

Oil plug, draining

Front gearbox attachment screws

Attachment holes, fixture lower arm

Motor attachment

Sealing (between gearbox and lower arm, not shown in figure )

Hole for locking screw, lower arm, M16 x 60

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

3HAC 16263-1

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page
18!

Lifting tool, gearbox


axis 2

3HAC 12731-1

Fixture, lower arm

3HAC 13660-1

133

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.3 Removal of gearbox, axis 2

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Locking screw, lower


arm

M16 x 60 8.8.
Included in the fixture, lower
arm.

Guide pins, M16 x 300

3HAC 13120-5 For guiding the gearbox.


Always use the guide pins in
pairs.

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in
the step-by-step
instructions below.

Removal, gearbox

Note

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove gearbox, axis 2.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
The gearbox weighs 125 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Remove any equipment fitted to the turning disk.

2.

Run the robot to the calibration position. The


upper arm may be directed in three different
ways, shown in figure to the right.
The lowered position, as in figure A, is recommended as it gives the least load on the tool.

C
xx0200000260

3.

134

If the manipulator is fitted with moveable mechanical stops on axis 2 (not stock equipment), these
must be removed at this point.
The attachment holes of the mechanical stops are
used to attach the fixture, lower arm.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.3 Removal of gearbox, axis 2

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

4.

Secure the lower arm to the frame by inserting the Art. no. specified in Required
locking screw into the hole.
equipment on page 133!
Shown in the figure Location of
gearbox on page 133!

5.

Fit the fixture, lower arm to prevent the lower arm


from falling.
Make sure that both adjusters (B) on the
fixture are screwed back.

Align the fixture with the frame and lower


arm.

Tighten the four M16 bolts (C) on the


inside of the frame, in attachment holes,
with tightening torque: 220 Nm.

Screw in the two adjusters (B) until they


rest against the flats on the lower arm.
Tighten by hand.

Lock, using the two ring nuts (D).

Tighten the two M12 bolts (E) in the


attachment holes, fixture lower arm with
tightening torque: 91 Nm.

Art. no. specified in Required


equipment on page 133!
Attachment holes for the fixture
are shown in the figure Location
of gearbox on page 133!
Make sure the fixture is pressed
tightly against the lower arm
before securing with screws!

B D

C
xx0200000261

A: Locking screw, lower


arm

6.

Unload the balancing device shaft by using a spe- Detailed in Unloading the balcific press tool.
ancing device on page 88.

7.

Drain the gearbox, axis 2.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox


axis 2" in the Maintenance Manual.

8.

Remove the motor, axis 2.

Detailed in Removal of motor,


axis 2 on page 98.

9.

Remove the 30 rear gearbox attachment screws


(A) from inside the lower section of the lower arm.

A
xx0300000064

10. Remove the motor attachment by unscrewing the Shown in the figure Location of
front gearbox attachment screws.
gearbox on page 133!
11.

3HAC 16263-1

Fit the Lifting tool, gearbox axis 2 , to the motor


attachment and secure it with the hook on the
tool.
Remove the motor attachment.

Art. no. is specified in Required


equipment on page 133!

135

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.3 Removal of gearbox, axis 2

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

12.

Fit the Lifting tool, gearbox axis 2 , to the gearbox. Art. no. is specified in Required
equipment on page 133!

13.

Fit two guide pins in 180relation to each other


Art. no. is specified in Required
instead of the removed front attachment screws. equipment on page 133!

14.

If required, apply an M16 screw to the hole shown Art. no. is specified in Required
in the figure to press it free.
equipment on page 133!

A
xx0200000033

136

15.

Remove the gearbox using an overhead crane or


similar.

16.

Remove the sealing from the lower arm.

A: M16 holes for pressing the gearbox out

On reassembly a new sealing


must be used!
Art. no. is specified in the refitting instructions Required equipment on page 137!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.4 Refitting of gearbox, axis 2

3.6.4 Refitting of gearbox, axis 2

Location of gearbox

The axis 2 gearbox is located in the lower arm rotational center as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Frame-Lower arm 1 on page 213!

F
I
E
C
(A)
B
D

xx0100000135

Gearbox, axis 2 (behind motor attachment not shown in figure )

Motor, axis 2

Oil plug, filling

Oil plug, draining

Gearbox attachment screws

Attachment holes, fixture axis 2

Motor attachment

Sealing (between gear box and lower arm not shown in figure )

Hole for locking screw, lower arm, M16 x 60

Required equipment

3HAC 16263-1

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Gearbox, axis 2

3HAC 12641-1

Includes gearbox 3HAC 1012221


Includes all o-rings!

O-ring

3HAB 3772-51

Lubricating oil

3HAC 0860-1

Amount: 4450 ml

137

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.4 Refitting of gearbox, axis 2

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Sealing, axis 2/3

3HAC 11054-1 A new sealing must be used on


each assembly!

Grease

3HAB 3537-1

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Lifting tool, gearbox


axis 2

3HAC 12731-1

Guide pin, M16 x 150


mm

3HAC 13120-2 Guide are to be used in pairs.

Guide pin, M16 x 200

3HAC 13120-3 Guide are to be used in pairs.

Guide pin, sealing axis


2/3

3HAC 14627-2 80 mm.


For guiding "Sealing, axis 2/3".
Guide are to be used in pairs.

Guide pin, sealing axis


2/3

3HAC 14627-3 100 mm.


For guiding "Sealing, axis 2/3".
Guide are to be used in pairs.

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in the
step-by-step instructions below.

Refitting, gearbox

Note

For lubricating the o-ring

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to refit gearbox, axis 2.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The gearbox weighs 125 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

138

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.4 Refitting of gearbox, axis 2

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Fit the guide pins, sealing axis 2/3 on gearbox, axis 2.


Only the holes showed in figure beside are
allowed to be used to the guide pins!

xx0200000125

A: Holes for guide pins, sealing axis 2/3 on gearbox 2.

Always use a new sealing when


reassembling!
Art. no. is specified in Required
equipment on page 137!
2.

Fit the new Sealing, axis 2/3 on gearbox, axis


2, with guidance from the guide pins.

3.

Fit two guide pins, M16 180in relation to


each other in the attachment holes in the
frame.

4.

Fit the Lifting tool, gearbox axis 2 , to the gear- Art. no. is specified in Required
box.
equipment on page 137!

5.

Make sure the o-ring is fitted to the rear of the Art. no. is specified in Required
gearbox. Lightly grease the o-ring.
equipment on page 137!

Art. no. is specified in Required


equipment on page 137!

xx0100000136

3HAC 16263-1

A: O-ring, gearbox, axis 2

6.

Lift the gearbox to its mounting position.

7.

Fit the gearbox onto the guide pins and slide Make sure the gearbox is seated
it into position.
properly!

8.

Remove the lifting tool.

139

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.4 Refitting of gearbox, axis 2

Step
9.

Action

Note/Illustration

In a similar way, fit the lifting tool to the motor


flange. Lock the tool with the hook.
Lift it and slide it onto the guide pins.
Remove the lifting tool.

10. Insert and secure 18 of the 20 attachment


screws on the front of the motor attachment.
Remove the guide pins and tighten the
remaining two screws.

Tightening torque: 300 Nm.


Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed
in Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.

11. Remove the guide pins and tighten the


remaining two screws as above.
12. Insert and secure 28 of the 30 attachment
screws on the inside of the lower arm.

A
xx0300000064

Tightening torque: 300 Nm.


Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed
in Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.
13. Remove the guide pins, sealing axis 2/3 and
tighten the remaining two screws as above.
14. Refit the motor.

Detailed in Refitting of motor, axis 2


on page 101.

15. Perform a leak-down test.

Detailed in Performing a leak-down


test on page 21.

16. Refill the gear box with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox


axis 2" in the Maintenance Manual.

17. Restore the balancing device by removing the Detailed in Restoring the balancing
balancing device tools.
device on page 90.
18. Remove the fixture, lower arm.
19. Remove the locking screw, lower arm.
20. Refit any mechanical stops if such were
removed during disassembly.
21. Refit any equipment to the turning disc if such
was removed during assembly.
22. Recalibrate the robot.

140

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation Manual.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.4 Refitting of gearbox, axis 2

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

141

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.5 Removal of gearbox, axis 3

3.6.5 Removal of gearbox, axis 3

Location of gearbox

The axis 3 gearbox is located in the upper arm rotational center as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Upper arm on page 217!

A
H
C
F

E
G
D
xx0100000137

Gearbox, axis 3

Gearbox attachment screws

Oil plug, filling

Oil plug, draining

Motor, axis 3

Upper arm attachment screws

Motor attachment screws

Sealing, axis 2/3 between lower arm and gearbox 3

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

142

3HAC 15571-1

Note
The contents are defined in
section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.5 Removal of gearbox, axis 3

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Lifting eye, M16

3HAC 14457-4

Mechanical stop axis 3

3HAC 12708-2

Washer for Mechanical


stop axis 3

3HAA 1001-186

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in
the step-by-step
instructions below.

Removal, gearbox

Used to secure the upper arm.


Use attachment screws 3HAB
3409-89 (M16 x 60).

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove gearbox, axis 3.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The gearbox weighs 125 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Secure the upper arm in a horizontal position


using a mechanical stop.
Fit the mechanical stop and the washer to
the third and final attachment hole (A), below
the fixed mechanical stop (B) in the upper
arm, shown in the figure to the right.
Tightening torqure: 115 Nm.

B
A
xx0300000051

Art. no. is specified in Required


equipment on page 142.

3HAC 16263-1

2.

Remove the motor, axis 3.

Detailed in section Removal of motor,


axis 3 on page 104.
Note! When removing the motor axis
3, the brake on axis 3 is released.
Make sure the upper arm is secured
and enabled to move!

3.

Remove the upper arm.

Detailed in section Removal of complete upper arm on page 49.

143

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.5 Removal of gearbox, axis 3

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

4.

Remove the Sealing, axis 2/3 between gear- On reassembly a new sealing must
box and lower arm.
be used!
Art. no. is specified in Required
equipment on page 146, in the refitting instruction!

5.

Place the upper arm safety on a workbench,


in a fixture or similar.

6.

Remove the gearbox attachment screws .

7.

If required, apply an M16 screw to the holes


shown in the figure to press the gearbox free.

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 142!

A
xx0200000033

144

8.

Fit the Lifting eye, M16 to the gearbox.

9.

Remove the gearbox using an overhead


crane or similar.

A: M16 holed for pressing the


gearbox out

Art. no. is specified in Required


equipment on page 142!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.6 Refitting of gearbox, axis 3

3.6.6 Refitting of gearbox, axis 3

Location of gearbox

The axis 3 gearbox is located in the upper arm rotational center as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Upper arm on page 217!

A
H
C
F

E
G
D
xx0100000137

3HAC 16263-1

Gearbox, axis 3

Gearbox attachment screws

Oil plug, filling

Oil plug, draining

Motor, axis 3

Upper arm attachment screws

Motor attachment screws

Sealing, axis 2/3 between lower arm and gearbox 3

145

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.6 Refitting of gearbox, axis 3

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Gearbox, axis 3

3HAC 12641-1

Includes gearbox 3HAC 1012221.


Includes all o-rings!
Does not include "Sealing, axis 2/
3"!

Sealing, axis 2/3

3HAC 11054-1 A new sealing must be used on


each assembly!

O-ring

3HAB 3772-51

Grease

3HAB 3537-1

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

Lifting eye, M16

3HAC 14457-4

Guide pin, M16 x 250

3HAC 13120-4 Guide are to be used in pairs.

Guide pin, M16 x 300

3HAC 13120-5 Guide are to be used in pairs.

Guide pin, sealing


axis 2/3

3HAC 14627-2 80 mm.


For guiding "Sealing, axis 2/3".
Guide are to be used in pairs.

Guide pin, sealing


axis 2/3

3HAC 14627-3 100 mm.


For guiding "Sealing, axis 2/3".
Guide are to be used in pairs.

Other tools and procedures may be


required. See references to these procedures in the step-bystep instructions
below.

Refitting, gearbox

For lubricating the o-ring.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to refit gearbox, axis 2.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

The gearbox weighs 125 kg! All lifting equipment used must be dimensioned accordingly!

Step

146

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Turn the upper arm in such a position that


the gear mating surface faces upwards.

2.

Fit two guide pins 180in relation to each Art. no. is specified in Required equipother in the attachment holes of gearbox 3. ment on page 146!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.6 Refitting of gearbox, axis 3

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

3.

Fit the lifting eye, M16 to the gearbox.

Art. no. is specified in Required equipment on page 146!

4.

Make sure the o-ring is fitted to the rear of Art. no. is specified in Required equipthe gearbox. Apply grease to the o-ring to ment on page 146!
make sure it sticks in its groove during
A
assembly.

xx0100000136

5.

Lift the gearbox to its mounting position.

6.

Turn the gearbox to align the attachment


screw holes with those in the upper arm.

7.

Fit the gearbox onto the guide pins and


slide it into position.

8.

Remove the lifting tool.

9.

Secure the gearbox with 18 of the 20 gearbox attachment screws.


Remove the guide pins and tighten the
remaining two screws.

A: O-ring, gearbox axis 3

Make sure the gearbox and o-ring are


seated properly and correctly oriented!
20 pcs: M16 x 90; 12.9 quality
UNBRAKO, tightening torque: 300 Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed in
Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.

10. Refit the upper arm with a new sealing, axis Detailed in section Refitting of com2/3 .
plete upper arm on page 52.
Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 146!
11. Refit the motor.

Detailed in section Refitting of motor,


axis 3 on page 107.

12. Remove the mechanical stops that secures


the upper arm.
13. Recalibrate the robot!

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

147

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.7 Removal of gearbox, axis 4

3.6.7 Removal of gearbox, axis 4

Location of gearbox

The axis 4 gearbox is located at the rear of the upper arm as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Upper arm on page 217!

K
J

A
B
C

E
F
G

H
xx0100000144

148

Upper arm housing

Gearbox, axis 4

Cover, axis 4 gearbox

Attachment screws, cover axis 4

Oil plug, filling, secondary gearbox

Oil plug, draining, secondary gearbox

Gear, Z3

Gear attachment screws

Motor, axis 4

Motor flange

Oil plug, filling, primary gearbox (draining not shown in figure)

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.7 Removal of gearbox, axis 4

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

Note

3HAC 15571-1

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

Removal, gearbox

The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!
These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove gearbox, axis 4.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

Step

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Drain the gearbox oil from the primary gearbox Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox
through the oil plug, draining.
axis 4" in the Maintenance Manual .

2.

Drain the gearbox oil from the secondary gear- Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox
box through the oil plug, draining.
axis 4" in the Maintenance Manual .

3.

Remove the plastic housing from the cover, axis


4 gearbox.

4.

Remove the cover, axis 4 gearbox by unscrew- Shown in the figure Location of
ing its attachment screws.
gearbox on page 148!

5.

Loosen the gear attachment screws but do not Shown in the figure Location of
remove the gear Z3.
gearbox on page 148!

6.

Remove the motor, axis 4.

7.

Remove gear Z3 from the gearbox by unscrew- Shown in the figure Location of
ing the 15 gear attachment screws .
gearbox on page 148!
If required, insert screws into three holes in gear
Z3 to press it out.

8.

Remove the motor flange attachment screws


and plain washers.

Shown in the figure Location of


gearbox on page 148!

9.

Pull the motor flange and gearbox, axis 4 out


along with the friction washers.
If required, insert screws into two holes in the
gearbox to press it out.

M10.

Detailed in Removal of motor,


axis 4 on page 110.

149

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.8 Refitting of gearbox, axis 4

3.6.8 Refitting of gearbox, axis 4

Location of gearbox

The axis 4 gearbox is located at the rear of the upper arm as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Upper arm on page 217!

K
J

A
B
C

E
F
G

H
xx0100000144

150

Upper arm housing

Gearbox, axis 4

Cover, axis 4 gearbox

Attachment screws, cover axis 4

Oil plug, filling, secondary gearbox

Oil plug, draining, secondary gearbox

Gear, Z3

Gear attachment screws

Motor, axis 4

Motor flange

Oil plug, filling, primary gearbox (draining not shown in figure)

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.8 Refitting of gearbox, axis 4

Required equipment
Equipment, etc

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Gearbox, axis 4

3HAC 11384-3

Includes all o-rings!

Gear, Z3

3HAC 11488-1

O-ring

3HAB 3772-49 Replace only when damaged!

O-ring

3HAB 3772-50 Replace only when damaged!

Friction washer

3HAC 10122-27

Must be replaced at assembly!


2 pcs needed at assembly!

Gasket, cover axis 4

3HAC 11423-3

Grease

3HAB 3537-1

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Guide pin, M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1 Always use the guide pins in


pairs.
For refitting friction washers,
gearbox and motor flange.

Guide pin, M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2 Always use the guide pins in


pairs.
For refitting friction washers,
gearbox and motor flange.

Other tools and procedures may be


required. See references to these procedures in the step-bystep instructions
below.

Refitting, gearbox

For lubrication of gearbox,


motor and motor attachment
mating surfaces.

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to refit gearbox, axis 4.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.

Step

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Make sure the two o-rings on the cirArt no. is specified in Required equipment
cumference of the gearbox are seated on page 151!
properly in their grooves respectively.
Lightly lubricate the o-rings with grease.

2.

Lubricate the gearbox, motor and motor Art no. is specified in Required equipment
attachment mating surfaces with
on page 151!
grease.

151

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.8 Refitting of gearbox, axis 4

Step
3.

Action

Note/Illustration

Fit four guide pins symmetrically in the


attachment holes in the upper arm
housing.

xx0200000067

A: Attachment holes for guide


pins, M10

Art no. is specified in Required equipment


on page 151!

152

4.

Fit two new friction washers onto the


guide pins.

Art no. is specified in Required equipment


on page 151!
Note! Make sure the surface beneath the
friction washers is clean and dry!

5.

Push in the gearbox, axis 4, and the


motor flange .
If necessary, use screws in the attachment holes to press in the motor flange.

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox


on page 150!
Note! Make sure the motor flange is oriented correctly by observing the oil plugs
as shown in the figure Location of gearbox
on page 150!

6.

Remove the guide pins.

7.

Secure the motor flange to the upper


arm housing with its washers and
attachment screws.
Secure with locking liquid.

18 pcs: M10 x 40; tightening torque: 65


Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.

8.

Refit the motor, axis 4.

Detailed in Refitting of motor, axis 4 on


page 113.

9.

Refit gear Z3 to the gearbox with its


gear attachment screws .

Art. no. is specified in Required equipment


on page 151!
Shown in the figure Location of gearbox
on page 150!
9 pcs: M12 x 50; tightening torque: 115
Nm.
6 pcs: M16 x 60: tightening torque: 300
Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.

10.

Replace the gasket, cover axis 4 .

Art. no. is specified in Required equipment


on page 151!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.8 Refitting of gearbox, axis 4

Step
11.

Action

Note/Illustration

Refit the cover, axis 4 gearbox with its


attachment screws and secure with
locking liquid.

Tightening torque: 10 Nm.


Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.
Shown in the figure Location of gearbox
on page 150!
Art. no. is specified in Required equipment
on page 151!

12. Perform a leak-down test.

Detailed in Performing a leak-down test


on page 21.

13. Refill the primary gearbox with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis 4" in


the Maintenance Manual.

14. Refill the secondary gearbox with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis 4" in


the Maintenance Manual.

15. Recalibrate the robot.

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation


Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

153

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.9 Removal of gearbox, axis 5

3.6.9 Removal of gearbox, axis 5

Location of gearbox

The axis 5 gearbox is located in the wrist unit as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Wrist complete on page 219!

A N

H
G
xx0100000146

154

Wrist housing

Cover, axis 5 gearbox

Attachment screws, cover axis 5

Oil plug, secondary, filling

Oil plug, secondary, draining

Gear, Z3

Wheel unit

Attachment screws, gear Z3

Gearbox, axis 5

Oil plug, primary, filling (draining plug on the opposite side of the wrist housing, not
shown in figure)

VK-cover

Attachment screws, bearing washer, M6 x 16

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.9 Removal of gearbox, axis 5

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Lifting eye, M12

3HAC 14457-3 2 pcs required!


For lifting the gearbox.

Removal tool, wheel


unit

3HAC 15814-1 For removing and lifting the


wheel unit.

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in
the step-by-step
instructions below.

Removal, gearbox

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove gearbox, axis 5.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.

Step

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Drain the oil from the primary gearbox.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox, axis


5" in the Maintenance Manual.

2.

Drain the oil from the secondary gearbox.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox, axis


5" in the Maintenance Manual.

3.

Remove the motor, axis 5.

Detailed in Removal of motor, axis 5


on page 116.

4.

Remove the cover, axis 5 gearbox , by


unscrewing its attachment screws .

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 154!

5.

Remove gear Z3 from the gearbox by


unscrewing its attachment screws (let axis
6 turn to the stop).
If necessary, insert screws into the three
holes in gear Z3 to remove it.

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 154!


6 pcs: M16 x 60.
9 pcs: M12 x 50.

6.

Remove the wheel unit.

Detailed in following section:


Removal, wheel unit on page 156.

7.

Remove the gearbox, axis 5 , by unscrew- Shown in the figure Location of gearing its attachment screws and removing the box on page 154!
washers .
18 pcs: M10 x 40.

8.

Apply two lifting eyes to the gearbox, axis Art. no. is specified in Required equip5, in opposite positions.
ment on page 155!

9.

Remove the gearbox by gently lifting it


straight out.

155

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.9 Removal of gearbox, axis 5

Step
10.

Removal, wheel
unit

Action

Note/Illustration

Remove the friction washers, located


beneath the gearbox, from the wrist housing.

The procedure below details how to remove the wheel unit. Also see the figure above!

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Drain the oil from the secondary gearbox.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox, axis


5" in the Maintenance Manual .

2.

Remove the cover, axis 5 gearbox by


unscrewing its attachment screws .

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 154!

3.

Make a short cut in the centre of the VKcover and remove it from the wheel unit by
bending.

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 154!


Note! Avoid damaging screws or surfaces beneath, when removing the
cover!

4.

Unscrew the attachment screws, bearing


washer located beneath gear Z4.
Turn the gear Z4 in order to reach all the
srews.

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 154 and in the figure
below!
7 pcs: M6 x 16.

5.

Remove the attachment screws, gear Z4 .

xx0200000068

156

A: Gear Z4

B: Surface beneath VK-cover

C: VK-cover

D: Attachment screws, gear


Z4, 21 pcs: M16

E: Attachment screws, bearing washer, 7 pcs: M6

6.

Apply removal tool to the center hole of gear Art. no. is specified in Required
Z4 to press the wheel unit free.
equipment on page 155!

7.

Remove the wheel unit by gently lifting it


straight out.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.10 Refitting of gearbox, axis 5

3.6.10 Refitting of gearbox, axis 5

Location of gearbox

The axis 5 gearbox is located in the wrist unit as shown in the figure below:
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Wrist complete on page 219!

A N

H
G
xx0100000146

3HAC 16263-1

Wrist housing

Cover, axis 5 gearbox

Attachment screws, cover axis 5

Oil plug, secondary, filling

Oil plug, secondary, draining

Gear, Z3

Wheel unit

Attachment screws, gear Z3

Gearbox, axis 5

Oil plug, primary, filling (draining plug on the opposite side of the wrist housing, not
shown in figure)

VK-cover

Attachment screws, bearing washer, M6 x 16

157

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.10 Refitting of gearbox, axis 5

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Gearbox, axis 5

3HAC 11384-3

Includes gearbox 3HAC 11384-1


Includes all o-rings!

O-ring

3HAB 3772-49 Replace only when damaged!

O-ring

3HAB 3772-50 Replace only when damaged!

Friction washer

3HAC 10122-27

Must be replaced at assembly!


2 pcs needed at assembly!

Gear, Z3

3HAC 11488-1

VK-cover, 170 x 15

3HAA 2166-24 Must be replaced!

Gasket, cover

3HAC 11409-5

Grease

3HAC 3537-1

For lubricating the O-rings and


the packing box.

Locking liquid

3HAB 7116-1

LocTite 243

Isopropanol

1177 1012-208 To clean surface beneath VKcover

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in section Standard toolkit on page 18!

Lifting eye, M12

3HAC 14457-3 2 pcs required!


For lifting the gearbox.

Removal tool, wheel


unit

3HAC 15814-1 M12.


For lifting the wheel unit.

Guide pin, M10 x 100

3HAC 15521-1 For refitting gearbox.

Guide pin, M10 x 150

3HAC 15521-2 For refitting gearbox.

Other tools and procedures may be


required. See references to these procedures in the step-bystep instructions
below.

Refitting, gearbox

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to refit gearbox, axis 5.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

Step
1.

158

Action

Note/Illustration

Make sure the two o-rings on the cirArt. no. specified in Required equipment
cumference of the gearbox are seated on page 158!
properly in their grooves respectively.
Lightly lubricate the o-rings with grease .

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.10 Refitting of gearbox, axis 5

Step

3HAC 16263-1

Action

Note/Illustration

2.

Fit two guide pins in the housing.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 158!

3.

Refit the two new friction washers (2


pcs) in the wrist housing.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 158!
Note! Make sure the surface beneath the
friction washers is clean and dry!

4.

Apply two lifting eyes to the gearbox,


axis 5, in opposite positions.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 158!
Shown in the figure Location of gearbox
on page 157!

5.

Refit the gearbox, axis 5 to the wrist


housing, by gently lowering it straight
down, using the guide pins.

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox


on page 157!

6.

Remove the guide pins.

7.

Secure the gearbox with its attachment Shown in the figure Location of gearbox
screws and washers.
on page 157!
18 pcs: M10 x 40: tightening torque: 65
Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.

8.

Refit gear Z3 to the gearbox, axis 5 with Shown in the figure Location of gearbox
its attachment screws.
on page 157!
9 pcs: M12 x 50; 12.9 quality UNBRAKO,
tightening torque: 115 Nm.
6 pcs: M16 x 60: tightening torque: 300
Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.

9.

Refit wheel unit.

Detailed below in Refitting, wheel unit on


page 160.

10.

Replace the gasket.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment


on page 158!

11.

Refit the cover, axis 5 gearbox with its


attachment screws and secure with
locking liquid.

Tightening torque: 10 Nm.


Reused screws may be used, providing
they are lubricated as detailed in Screw
joints on page 15 before fitting.
Art. no. specified in Required equipment
on page 158!

12.

Refit the motor, axis 5.

Detailed in Refitting of motor, axis 5 on


page 118.

13.

Perform a leak-down test.

Detailed in Performing a leak-down test


on page 21.

14.

Refill the primary gearbox with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis 5" in


the Maintenance Manual.

15.

Refill the secondary gearbox with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis 5" in


the Maintenance Manual.

16.

Recalibrate the robot.

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation


Manual.

159

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.10 Refitting of gearbox, axis 5

Refitting, wheel
unit

The procedure below details how to refit the wheel unit. Also see the figure Location of
gearbox on page 157!
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Clean wheel unit and tube mating surfaces.

2.

Lubricate packing box with grease.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 158!

3.

Apply removal tool to the center hole of the


gear Z4.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 158!

4.

Refit wheel unit by gently lowering it straight


down.

5.

Gently knock on the wheel unit with a plastic


mallet, to press it all the way down.

6.

Fasten the bearing washer with its attachment


screws and secure with locking liquid .
Turn the gear Z4 in order to reach all the
screws.

Note! Make sure the bearing


reaches the bottom, before continuing the mounting!

xx0200000068

A: Gear Z4

B: Surface beneath VKcover

C: VK-cover

D: Attachment screws, gear


Z4

E: Attachment screws, bearing washer

7 pcs: M6 x 16; tightening torque 10


Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as
detailed in Screw joints on page 15
before fitting.
Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 158!
7.

160

Clean the surface beneath the VK-cover with Art. no. specified in Required equipisopropanol.
ment on page 158!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.10 Refitting of gearbox, axis 5

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

8.

Secure the wheel unit with attachment


screws, gear Z4.

21 pcs: M16 x 90; 12.9 quality


UNBRAKO, tightening torque: 300
Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as
detailed in Screw joints on page 15
before fitting.

9.

Refit the VK-cover.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 158!


Shown in the figure Location of
gearbox on page 157!

10. Replace the gasket.


11.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 158!

Refit the cover, axis 5 gearbox with its attach- Shown in the figure Location of
ment screws and secure with locking liquid. gearbox on page 157!
14 pcs; tightening torque: 10 Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as
detailed in Screw joints on page 15
before fitting.
Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 158!

12. Perform a leak-down test.

Detailed in Performing a leak-down


test on page 21.

13. Refill the secondary gearbox with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox


axis 5" in the Maintenance Manual.

14. Recalibrate the robot.

Detailed in "Calibration" in the


Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

3HAC 16263-1

161

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.11 Removal of gearbox, axis 6

3.6.11 Removal of gearbox, axis 6

Location of gearbox

The axis 6 gearbox is located in the center of the wrist unit as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Wrist complete on page 219!

E
C
B
D

xx0100000131

Gearbox, axis 6

Attachment screws, gearbox

Washers

Oil plug, filling

Oil plug, draining

O-ring (not shown in figure)

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

Removal tool, motor,


M10

3HAC 14972-1 Use the removal tool in pairs!

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

162

Note

These procedures include references to the tools required.

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.11 Removal of gearbox, axis 6

Removal, gearbox

The procedure below details how to remove gearbox, axis 6.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.
Whenever parting/mating motor and gearbox, the gears may be damaged if excessive force
is used!

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

1.

Drain the oil from gearbox, axis 6.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis


6" in the Maintenance Manual .

2.

Remove the turning disk.

Detailed in Removal of turning disk on


page 40.

3.

Remove the gearbox by unscrewing its 18 Shown in the figure Location of gearattachment screws and both washers.
box on page 162!

4.

If required, apply the removal tool, motor


M10 to the holes shown in the figure to
press it free.

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 162!

A
xx0200000032

A: M10 holes for pressing the


gearbox out

Be careful not to damage the motor


pinion when lifting out the gearbox!

3HAC 16263-1

163

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.12 Refitting of gearbox, axis 6

3.6.12 Refitting of gearbox, axis 6

Location of gearbox

The axis 6 gearbox is located in the center of the wrist unit as shown in the figure below.
A more detailed view of the component and its position may be found in the Foldout section
Wrist complete on page 219!

E
C
B
D

xx0100000131

Gearbox, axis 6

Attachment screws, gearbox

Washers

Oil plug, filling

Oil plug, draining

O-ring (not shown in figure)

Required equipment

164

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Gearbox, axis 6

3HAC 10122-22

Includes o-ring 3HAB 3772-49

Washers

3HAC 10122-13 Not included in gearbox!


Replace when damaged only!

O-ring

3HAB 3772-49

Must be replaced when replacing gearbox!

Grease

3HAB 3537-1

For lubricating o-ring.

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are defined in


section Standard toolkit on
page 18!

3HAC 16263-1

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.12 Refitting of gearbox, axis 6

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Other tools and procedures may be


required. See references to these procedures in the step-bystep instructions
below.

Refitting, gearbox

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to refit gearbox, axis 6.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
- Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the
motors or gears!
- Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
- Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. to secure the lower arm with fixtures if removing motor, axis 2.

Step
1.

Action

Note/Illustration

Make sure the o-ring is fitted to the rear of Art. no. specified in Required equipthe gearbox. Lightly lubricate the o-ring
ment on page 164!
with grease.

xx0100000132

3HAC 16263-1

A: O-ring, gearbox axis 6

2.

Insert the gearbox, axis 6 into the wrist


unit.

Art. no. specified in Required equipment on page 164!


Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 164!
Make sure the gears of the gearbox
mate with those of the motor!

3.

Fit the washers and secure the washers


and gearbox with the attachment screws.

Shown in the figure Location of gearbox on page 164!


18 pcs: M10 x 50; 12.9 quality
UNBRAKO, tightening torque: 65 Nm.
Reused screws may be used, providing they are lubricated as detailed in
Screw joints on page 15 before fitting.

4.

Refit the turning disk.

Detailed in Refitting of turning disk on


page 42.

165

3 Repair activities, manipulator


3.6.12 Refitting of gearbox, axis 6

Step

Action

Note/Illustration

5.

Perform a leak-down test .

Detailed in Performing a leak-down


test on page 21.

6.

Refill the gearbox with oil.

Detailed in "Oil change, gearbox axis


6" in the Maintenance Manual .

7.

Recalibrate the robot.

Detailed in "Calibration" in the Installation Manual.

When performing the first test run after a service activity (repair, installation or maintenance),
it is vital that:
- all the service tools and other foreign objects are removed from the manipulator!
- all normal safety equipment is installed properly, e.g. TPU enabling device.
- all personnel is standing at a safe distance from the manipulator, i.e. out of its reach behind
any safety fences, etc.
- special attention is paid to the function of the part previously serviced.

166

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.0.1 Introduction

Chapter 4: Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.0.1 Introduction

Definitions

This chapter details all repair activities recommended for the controller.
It is made up of separate units, each detailing a specific repair activity, e.g. Removal or Refitting of a certain component in the controller. Each unit contains all information required to
perform the activity, e.g. spare parts numbers, required special tools and materials.
The chapter is divided into:

3HAC 16263-1

Removal instructions for all components

Refitting instructions for all components

Remaining instructions

167

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.1 Replacement of battery unit, controller

Section 4.1: Complete controller cabinet


4.1.1 Replacement of battery unit, controller

Location of battery unit

The battery unit is located at the bottom of the controller.

X1

X1

X1

X1

X2

X2

X2

X2

X1

X2

X3

Rectifier
A0

xx0200000103

Battery unit

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art no.

Note

Battery unit

3HAC 5393-2

To be replaced as a complete
unit

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are defined in


section "Standard toolkit"!

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in the
step-by-step instructions below.

Removal, battery
unit

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove the battery unit.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

168

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.1 Replacement of battery unit, controller

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Remove the battery unit by unscrewing


its attachment screws (1).
X1

X1

X1

X2

X2

X1

X1

X2

X2

X2

X3

Rectifier
A0

xx0200000004

2. Pull the battery unit out.


3. Disconnect the three cables from the
battery unit.

xx0200000005

Refitting, battery
unit

The procedure below details how to refit the battery unit.

Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

3HAC 16263-1

Note/Illustration

1. Place the battery unit close to its position.

Art. no. is specified above!


See illustration above!

2. Reconnect the cables and push the unit into position.

See illustration above!

3. Secure it with the attachment screws.

See illustration above!

169

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.2 Replacement of I/O and gateway units

4.1.2 Replacement of I/O and gateway units

Location of I/O
and gateway units

The I/O and gateway units are located as shown in the figure below.

I/O-4

I/O-3
I/O-1

I/O-2

xx0200000009

I/O and gateway units located on the panel shutter on the left side of the cabinet.

Four available slots for I/O and gateway units

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

170

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Digital 24 VDC I/O

3HAB 7229-1

DSQC 328

Analog I/O

3HNE 00554-1

DSQC 355

AD Combi I/O

3HAB 7230-1

DSQC 327

Digital 120 VAC I/O

3HAB 7231-1

DSQC 320

Digital I/O with relays

3HAB 9669-1

DSQC 332

Gateway for Allen-Bradley, RIO

3HNE00025-1

DSQC 350

Gateway for Interbus-S

3HNE00006-1

DSQC 351

Gateway for Profibus DP, slave


unit

3HNE00009-1

DSQC 352

Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1

The contents are


defined in section
"Standard toolkit"!

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.2 Replacement of I/O and gateway units

Removal

The procedure below details how to remove an I/O or gateway board.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Disconnect any connectors from the unit. The actual number of connectors vary
Note which connector goes where, to facil- depending on type of unit.
itate reassembly.
2. Lift the unit until the upper claw, that holds
the unit to the rail, is released. Use:
a screwdriver when replacing I/O
units (position 2a in the figure).

2a

3a

2b

3b

by hand when replacing a gateway


unit (position 2b in the figure).

xx0200000010

3. With the upper claw released, tip the unit


away from the mounting rail and remove it
(positions 3a and 3b in the figure).

Refitting

The procedure below details how to refit an I/O or gateway board.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Hook the unit back onto the mounting rail and snap it gently
in position.
2. Reconnect all connectors disconnected during removal.

3HAC 16263-1

171

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.3 Replacement of bleeder resistor

4.1.3 Replacement of bleeder resistor

Location of
bleeder resistor

The bleeder resistor is located behind the air outlet device, as shown in the figure below.

xx0200000007

Bleeder resistor unit

Air outlet device

Required equipment

Removal

Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Bleeder resistor

3HAC 4560-5

Note

The procedure below details how to remove the bleeder resistor.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Remove the air outlet divice in the back of


the controller by loosening the six M5
screws (pos B).

172

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.3 Replacement of bleeder resistor

Step Action

Note/Illustration

2. Disconnect the cable secured on top of


the bleeder resistor unit (see position 1 in
the figure).

xx0200000015

3. Push down and pull out the bleeder resistor unit to release the bleeder resistor unit
from the enclosure. (see position 2 and 3
in the figure).

Refitting

The procedure below details how to refit the bleeder resistor.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Fit the bleeder resistor into position and secure it with


the spring.

Art. no. is specified above!


Also see the figure above!

2. Secure the cable disconnected during disassembly.


3. Refit the air outlet device.
4. Tightening the M5 screws.

3HAC 16263-1

173

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.4 Putting the computer unit in the service position

4.1.4 Putting the computer unit in the service position

Location of computer unit

The computer unit is located as shown in the figure below.

X1

X1

X1

X1

X2

X2

X2

X2

X1

X2

X3

Rectifier
A0

xx0200000105

Opening

Computer unit

The procedure below details how to open the computer unit.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the motors
or gears!
Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. securing the lower arm with fixtures before removing motor, axis 2.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Make sure the ESD-wrist band is worn


and connected to ground.
2. Turn the exenter to the left to release the See following figure.
computer unit.

174

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.4 Putting the computer unit in the service position

3. Push the locking device on the front of the


computer unit to the right (see position 1
in the figure).

4. Pull the computer unit out of the cabinet


until locked in its end position. Then swing
it to the left as shown in the figure.

xx0200000018

5. If work is to be performed on the computer


unit while in the service position, it must
be locked in this position. This is done by
placing the puck (located on the lower left
side) on the metal bar. Alternatively, the
computer unit may be lifted straight up
and placed on a work bench.

3HAC 16263-1

175

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.4 Putting the computer unit in the service position

Closing

The procedure below details how to close the computer unit.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the manipulator:
Motors and gears are HOT after running the robot! Burns may result from touching the motors
or gears!
Turn off all electric power, hydraulic and pneumatic pressure supplies to the robot!
Take any necessary measures to ensure that the manipulator does not collapse as parts are
removed, e.g. securing the lower arm with fixtures before removing motor, axis 2.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Swing the computer unit back into position and


secure it by swinging the exenter to th right.

176

See the figure above!


Also see the procedure above!

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.5 Replacement of mass storage memory

4.1.5 Replacement of mass storage memory

Location of mass
storage memory

The mass storage memory is located in the computer system, which is shown in the figure
below.

X1

X1

X1

X1

X2

X2

X2

X2

X1

X2

X3

Rectifier
A0

xx0200000105

Computer system

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Mass storage memory, 64 MB

3HAC 7519-2

Note

Mass storage memory, 128 MB 3HAC 7519-3


Standard toolkit

3HAC 15571-1 The contents are


defined in section
"Standard toolkit"!

Other tools and procedures may


be required. See references to
these procedures in the step-bystep instructions below.

Removal

These procedures
include references to
the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove the mass storage memory.
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Put the computer unit in service position.

3HAC 16263-1

Detailed in section "Putting the computer in the service position".

177

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.5 Replacement of mass storage memory

Step Action

Note/Illustration

2. Open the cover on the right side of the computer system by unsnapping the two snaps
(item 1 in the figure).

xx0200000019

3. Disconnect the connectors X1 and X2 from


the front of the mass storage memory (items
2 and 3 in the figure).

4. Remove the mass storage memory by


unscrewing its M4 attachment screws as
shown in the figure (item 1 in the figure).

Refitting

See figure above!

The procedure below details how to refit the mass storage memory.
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Fit the mass storage memory in position and Art. no. is specified above!
secure it with its M4 attachment screw (item
1 in the figure)
1

xx0200000019

2. Reconnect connectors X1 and X2 to the front See the figure above!


of the computer unit (items 2 and 3 in the figure).

178

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.5 Replacement of mass storage memory

Step Action

Note/Illustration

3. Close the cover on the right side of the computer unit and secure it with the snaps (item
1 in the figure).

4. Put the computer system back in regular


operation position.

3HAC 16263-1

Detailed in section "Putting the computer in the service position".

179

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.6 Replacement of internal cooling fan

4.1.6 Replacement of internal cooling fan

Location of internal cooling fan

The internal cooling fan is located in the computer system, which is shown in the figure
below.

X1

X1

X1

X1

X2

X2

X2

X2

X1

X2

X3

A0

xx0200000105

Computer system

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Internal cooling fan

3HAC 6655-1

Two fans required

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to these
procedures in the stepby-step instructions
below.

Removal

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove the internal cooling fan.
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Put the computer unit in service position.

180

Detailed in "Putting the computer in


the service position".

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.6 Replacement of internal cooling fan

Step Action

Note/Illustration

2. Disconnect the connector E5 or E6 respectively, depending on which fan is to be


replaced.
A

E
xx0200000020

3. Remove the internal cooling fan inwards by


gently pressing the locking tabs upwards.

Refitting

A: Upper fan

B: Lower fan

C: Locking tabs

D: Connector E5

E: Connector E6

See the figure above!

The procedure below details how to refit the internal cooling fan.
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

3HAC 16263-1

181

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.6 Replacement of internal cooling fan

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Tip the internal cooling fan with its top towards the cabinet wall and fit it into the hole (see the figure). Art. no.
specified above!

xx0200000021

A: Push direction

2. With the wall between the upper lock spring hooks, push See the figure above!
the fan unit up and in until the locking tab snaps to the
wall.
3. Reconnect the connector E5 or E6 respectively, depending on which fan was replaced.
4. Put the computer unit back in regular operation position. Detailed in "Putting the
computer in the service
position".

182

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.7 Replacement of drive units and rectifier

4.1.7 Replacement of drive units and rectifier

Location of drive
units and rectifier

The drive units and rectifier are located as shown in the figure below.

B
A

xx0200000007

Rectifier (drive unit)

Drive units

Power supply unit

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Drive unit (rectifier)

3HAB 8101-17

DSQC 545A

Drive unit, axes 1-6

3HAB 8101-18

DSQC 546A

Other tools and procedures may be required.


See references to
these procedures in the
step-by-step instructions below.

Removal

These procedures include references to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove the drive units.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!

3HAC 16263-1

183

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.7 Replacement of drive units and rectifier

Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Swing the panel shutter out of the way.


(pos A in figure).

2. Disconnect connectors X1 and X2,


four connectors each (see position 1 in
the figure).

X1

X1

X1

X1

X2

X2
X2

X2

1
X1

2
X2

X3

X2

A0
Rectifier

xx0200000013

3. Remove the power supply bar in front See figure above!


of the drive units (see position 2 in the
figure).
4. Lift the spring to release the drive unit
and pull it slightly outwards (see position 3 in the figure).

xx0200000014

5. Tip it out and remove it (see position 4 See figure above!


in the figure).

Refitting

The procedure below details how to refit the drive units.


Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

184

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.7 Replacement of drive units and rectifier

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Fit the unit into position and secure it with the spring.

Also see figure above!

2. Refit the power bar in front of the unit.


3. Reconnect all connectors X1 and X2.
4. Swing the power supply unit back into position.

3HAC 16263-1

Detailed in section
"Replacement of power
supply unit"

185

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.8 Replacement of system fan unit

4.1.8 Replacement of system fan unit

Location of system fan unit

The system fan unit is located under the bleeder resistor unit, in the back of the controller as
shown in the figure below.

xx0200000007

Air outlet device

Bleeder resistor unit

System fan unit

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

System fan unit

3HAC 15449-1

Other tools and procedures may be


required. See references to these
procedures in the step-by-step
instructions below.

Removal

Note
These procedures
include references
to the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove the system fan unit.
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

186

Note/Illustration

1. Remove the Air outlet device.

Pos. A in previous illustration.

2. Remove the bleeder resistor unit.

Detailed in
"Replacement of bleeder resistor".

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.8 Replacement of system fan unit

Step Action

Note/Illustration

3. Disconnect the cable (see position 1 in


the figure).

A0

Rectifier

xx0200000008

4. Pull the back of the system fan unit


upwards to free it and then tip it out of
the enclosure (see position 2 in the figure).

Refitting

The procedure below details how to refit the system fan unit.
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Fit the system fan unit into position and secure it (see
position 2 in the figure above).

Art. no. is specified above!

2. Reconnect the cable disconnected during disassembly


(see position 1 in the figure above).

3HAC 16263-1

3. Refit the bleeder resistor unit.

Detailed in section
"Replacement of bleeder
resistor".

4. Refit the Air outlet device.

Pos. A in previous illustration.

187

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.9 Replacement of power supply unit

4.1.9 Replacement of power supply unit

Location of power
supply unit

The power supply unit is located as shown in the figure below.

xx0200000011

Power supply unit

Power supply unit locking spring

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Note

Power supply unit

3HAB 4297-1

DSQC 506

Other tools and procedures


may be required. See references to these procedures in
the step-by-step instructions
below.

Removal

These procedures
include references to
the tools required.

The procedure below details how to remove the power supply unit.
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Push the locking spring to the right to free the panel Shown in previous figure!
shutter, and Swing it out of the way.

188

2. Remove the M5 Torx screw.

See pos. 2 in previous figure.

3. Disconnect the connectors.

See pos. 1 in previous figure.

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.9 Replacement of power supply unit

Step Action

Note/Illustration

4. Lift the unit straight up to release it from the hooks


in the back and remove it outwards.

Refitting

The procedure below details how to refit the power supply unit.
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supply to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Fit the power supply unit into position onto its hooks and Art. no. is specified above!
secure it with the attachment screw (see position 2 in the
section Removal).
2. Reconnect all connectors disconnected during removal. See position 1 in figure.
3. Swing the panel shutter back in possition and secure it
with the locking spring.

3HAC 16263-1

189

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.10 Replacement of Peltier Cooler power supply

4.1.10 Replacement of Peltier Cooler power supply

Location of power
supply unit

The Peltier cooler power supply unit is located as shown in the figure below.

1
2

Cover

M5 screw

Extended Power supply

Required equipment
Equipment, etc.

Spare part no. Art. no.

Extended Power supply

3HAB 13398-1

Other tools and procedures


may be required. See references to these procedures
in the step-by-step instructions below.

Removal

Note
These procedures include
references to the tools
required.

The procedure below details how to remove the power supply unit.
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supplies to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Remove the M5 Torx screw.

See pos. 2 in previous illustration.

2. Remove the cover

See pos. 1 in previous illustration.

3. Disconnect the wires.

190

3HAC 16263-1

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.10 Replacement of Peltier Cooler power supply

Step Action

Note/Illustration

4. Remove the Power supply from the mounting


rail.

Refitting

See pos. 3 in previous illustration.

The procedure below details how to refit the power supply unit.
Please observe the following before commencing any repair work on the controller:
Turn off all electric power supplies to the cabinet!
Many components inside the cabinet are sensitive to ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) and will
be destroyed if subjected to it! Before handling, make sure you are connected to earth through
a special ESD wrist bracelet or similar.

Step Action

Note/Illustration

1. Fit the power supply unit onto the mounting rail.


2. Reconnect the wires disconnected during removal.
3. Refit the cover and secure with M5 screws.

3HAC 16263-1

See pos. 1 and pos. 3. in


previous illustration.

191

4 Repair activities, controller cabinet


4.1.10 Replacement of Peltier Cooler power supply

192

3HAC 16263-1

5 Appendix 1: Part List


5.0.1 Introduction

Chapter 5: Appendix 1: Part List


5.0.1 Introduction

Definitions

This chapter is an appendix to the manual and contains part lists for the manipulator and
controller. The item numbers refers to Appendix 2: Foldouts.
The part list for the manipulator sometimes differ between robot version 500/2.3, and robot
versions 400/2.55 and 150/3.5.

3HAC 16263-1

193

5 Appendix 1: Part List


5.1.1 Mechanical stop ax 1, 3HAC 12812-2

Section 5.1: Part List, Manipulator IRB 7600

Item Qty

Art. number

Description

Note

3HAC 12812-2

Mechanical stop axis 1,


assembly

See

101

3HAC 12304-1

Base incl frame ax 1

See Base incl frame ax 1, 3HAC


12304-1 on page 195!

102

3HAC 13063-1

Axis 3-4 400kg

See Axis 3-4 400kg, 3HAC


13063-1 on page 195!

102

3HAC 13063-2

Axis 3-4 500kg

See Axis 3-4 500kg, 3HAC


13063-2 on page 196!

102

3HAC 13063-4

Axis 3-4 400 kg Foundry

102

3HAC 13063-5

Axis 3-4 500 kg Foundry

103

3HAC 10503-1

Wrist

See Wrist, 3HAC 10503-1,


3HAC 15992-1 on page 199!

103

3HAC 15992-1

Wrist Foundry

See Wrist, 3HAC 10503-1,


3HAC 15992-1 on page 199!

104

3HAC 14675-1

Balancing Device

105

3HAC 10523-1

Lower arm

106

3HAC 14940-1

Cable harness, man.


ax1-4

108

3HAC 13079-1

Material set manipulator

See Material set manipulator,


3HAC 13079-1 on page 203!

109

3HAC 13077-1

Material set ax 1-2

See Material set ax 1-2, 3HAC


13077-1 on page 204!

110

3HAC 13082-1

Mtrl.set balancing device See Mtrl.set balancing device,


3HAC 13082-1 on page 206!

111

3HAC 12311-1

Arm extension set


956mm

112

3HAC 12129-1

Cover plate

112

3HAC 12129-1

Cover plate

113

9ADA 618-56

Torx pan head screw

113

9ADA 618-56

Torx pan head screw

114

3HAC 13416-1

Protection cover

See Arm extension set, 956


mm, 3HAC 12311-1 on page
207!

M6x16

5.1.1 Mechanical stop ax 1, 3HAC 12812-2

194

Item Qty

Art. number

Description

5.1

3HAC 12812-1

Mechanical stop

5.2

9ABA 142-92

Spring pin, slotted

Dimension
10x30

3HAC 16263-1

5 Appendix 1: Part List


5.1.2 Base incl frame ax 1, 3HAC 12304-1

5.1.2 Base incl frame ax 1, 3HAC 12304-1

Item Qty

Art. number

Description

Note/Dimension

101.1 1

3HAC 10044-1

Base, machining

See Base, machining,


3HAC 10044-1 on page
195!

101.2 1

3HAC 12303-1

Frame incl ax 1 gearbox

See Frame incl ax 1 gearbox, 3HAC 12303-1 on


page 195!

101.3 3

3HAC 11732-1

Washer

T=3

101.4 18

3HAB 7700-89

Hex socket head cap screw

M16x90

101.5 1

3HAC 11529-1

Rubber lined clip D=28

101.6 1

3HAC 14453-1

Hose with flange

101.7 1

3HAC 14453-2

Plug

101.8 1

3HAC 4428-2

Hose Clip

101.9 1

9ADA 618-56

Torx pan head screw

M6x16

Base, machining,
3HAC 10044-1
Item

Frame incl ax 1
gearbox, 3HAC
12303-1

Art. number

Description

101.1.1 1

3HAC 10044-2

Base, casting

101.1.2 5

3HAC 4836-7

Protection plug

101.1.3 1

3HAC 1383-2

Protection Cover compl.

101.1.4 1

3HAC 14024-1

Protection screw

Item

Qty

Qty Art. number

Description

Note

Note

101.2.1 1

3HAC 15865-1

Frame machining

101.2.2 1

3HAC 10828-1

RV 500C-219,95 assembly

101.2.3 24

3HAB 7700-77

Hex socket head cap screw

M12x110

101.2.4 24

3HAA 1001-134

Washer

13x19x1,5

5.1.3 Axis 3-4 400kg, 3HAC 13063-1

3HAC 16263-1

Item Qty

Art. number

Description

Note

102.1 1

3HAC 13076-1

Material set ax 4

See Material set ax 4,


3HAC 13076-1 on page
196!

102.2 1

3HAC 10509-1

Tube shaft 2,55

See Tube shaft 2,55,


3HAC 10509-1 on page
198!

195

5 Appendix 1: Part List


5.1.4 Axis 3-4 500kg, 3HAC 13063-2

102.3 1

3HAC 13062-1

Axis 3

See Axis 3, 3HAC 13062-1


on page 199!

5.1.4 Axis 3-4 500kg, 3HAC 13063-2

Item Qty

Art. number

Description

Note

102.1 1

3HAC 13076-1

Material set ax 4

See Material set ax 4, 3HAC


13076-1 on page 196!

102.2 1

3HAC 10509-5

Tube shaft 2,55

See Tube shaft 2,55, 3HAC


10509-5 on page 198!

102.3 1

3HAC 13062-1

Axis 3

See Axis 3, 3HAC 13062-1 on


page 199!

5.1.5 Axis 3-4 400kg Foundry, 3HAC 13063-4

Item Qty

Art. number

Description

Note

102.1 1

3HAC 13076-1

Material set ax 4

See Material set ax 4, 3HAC


13076-1 on page 196!

102.2 1

3HAC 15932-1

Tube shaft 2,55 foundry

102.3 1

3HAC 13062-1

Axis 3

See Axis 3, 3HAC 13062-1 on


page 199!

5.1.6 Axis 3-4 500kg Foundry, 3HAC 13063-5

Item Qty

Art. number

Description

Note

102.1 1

3HAC 13076-1

Material set ax 4

See Material set ax 4, 3HAC


13076-1 on page 196!

102.2 1

3HAC 15932-2

Tube shaft 2,55 foundry

102.3 1

3HAC 13062-1

Axis 3

See Axis 3, 3HAC 13062-1 on


page 199!

Material set ax 4,
3HAC 13076-1

196

Item

Qty

Art. number

Description

102.1.1

3HAC 11523-1

Gear Z4 / 4

102.1.2

3HAC 14725-1

Rot ac motor incl pinion

See Rot ac motor incl pinion, 3HAC 14725-1 on


page 197!

102.1.3

3HAB 3409-50

Hex socket head cap


screw

M10x40

102.1.4

3HAB 4233-1

Washer

102.1.5

3HAC 11499-1

Motor flange, machin.

Note/Dimension

3HAC 16263-1

5 Appendix 1: Part List


5.1.6 Axis 3-4 500kg Foundry, 3HAC 13063-5

Rot ac motor incl


pinion, 3HAC
14725-1

3HAC 16263-1

102.1.6

18

3HAB 3409-60

Hex socket head cap


screw

102.1.7

3HAC 10122-12 Washer, RV 125 F,


axis4,5

T=3

102.1.8

3HAC 12642-1

RV 125F incl. gear

See RV 125F incl. gear,


3HAC 12642-1 on page
198!

102.1.9

3HAC 12640-1

Cover ax 4 incl. sealing

See Cover ax 4 incl. sealing, 3HAC 12640-1 on


page 198!

102.1.10 10

3HAC 11409-6

Shoulder Screw

M6x8x8

102.1.12 2

3HAC 13564-1

Damper axis 4

102.1.13 2

3HAA 1001-17

Stop, Axis 4, Casting

102.1.14 2

3HAC 11925-1

Mechanical stop head

102.1.15 4

3HAB 3409-81

Hex socket head cap


screw

M16x35

102.1.16 2

3HAA 1001-98

Gasket

T=1

102.1.17 8

9ADA 183-37

Hex socket head cap


screw

M8x25

102.1.18 8

9ADA 312-7

Plain washer

8,4x16x1,6

102.1.19 2

3HAA 2103-21

Taper roller bearing

170x230x38

102.1.20 1

2216 261-18

Sealing

170x200x15

102.1.21 1

3HAB 3772-27

O-ring

170x5

102.1.22 1

3HAC 3774-7

Spacer ring

102.1.23 1

3HAC 11461-1

Sealing

102.1.24 1

3HAC 12060-1

Thrust washer

102.1.25 1

9ABA 135-45

Retaining ring, shaft

102.1.26 1

3HAC 11928-1

Protective ring housing

102.1.27 1

3HAC 12126-1

Set of shims

102.1.28 2

2522 122-1

Magnetic plug

R1/4"

102.1.29 2

3HAC 16721-1

Magnetic plug

R1/2"

102.1.30 900 ml

3HAC 16843-1

Lubricating oil, RMO 150

102.1.31 3850 ml 1171 2016-604

Lubricating oil

102.1.32 1

9ABA 107-56

Parallel pin

102.1.33 2

3HAC 10122-27 Friction washer

102.1.34 1 ml

3HAB 7116-1

Locking liquid

102.1.35 30 g

3HAB 3537-1

Bearing grease

Item

Qty Art. number

Description

102.1.2.1 1

3HAC 14673-2

102.1.2.2 1

3HAC 10122-17 Pinion RV 125F-97,909

102.1.2.3 0

2152 2012-430

M10x80

170

10x20
T=0,5

Dimension

Rotational ac motor M2
O-ring

89,5x3

197

5 Appendix 1: Part List


5.1.6 Axis 3-4 500kg Foundry, 3HAC 13063-5

RV 125F incl.
gear, 3HAC
12642-1

RV 125F-97,909
assembly, 3HAC
11384-3

Cover ax 4 incl.
sealing, 3HAC
12640-1

Item

Qty Art. number

Description

Note/Dimension

102.1.8.1 1

3HAC 11384-3

RV 125F-97,909 assembly See RV 125F-97,909


assembly, 3HAC 11384-3
on page 198!