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AKMS OF THE GLOVER INCORPORATION.

THE ANNALS
OF THE

GLOVER INCORPORATION
1300 1905

BY

GEORGE WILSON,

J.P.

SX-LORD PROVOST OP PERTH,


AND
DEACON OP THE GLOVER INCORPORATION

PERTH
R, A.

&

J.

1905

HAY

HO
//

85478S

PREFACE,
T

the Annual General Meeting of the Glover

Incorporation held at Michaelmas, 1904,

when

the attendance was unusually large, a remit

was made

Bye-Laws or

Acts,

to a

committee to consider existing

and report to next Michaelmas Meeting.

At the same time expression was given to the

desirability of

having a printed edition of the laws and customs hitherto


recognised in the Constitution, along with a brief sketch of
the history of the Craft.

The

following

pages

an

give

outline

of

the

annals

and progress of the Glover Incorporation, as contained


the records of the past.

continuous account of

They

its history.

aid of an archaeological expert,

no

literary merit,

imperfections, he sends

they

may

The
the

them

not meant to be a

Such a work, without the


would be

The

result probably disappointing.

for these notes

are

in

difficult,

and the

author, further, claims

and while conscious of

forth in the faint

their

hope that

be of interest to the Members.

chief object of the brochure

policy of

our

ancestors,

is

to give an

epitome of

showing how the present

IV.

flourishing position of the Glover Incorporation has been


attained.

Further, the information here recorded should

tend to stimulate us
valuable Trust.
for the general

all in

discharging the duties of this

Imitating the example of our forefathers

weal of the Members, using

never abusing them, discharging

and

integrity,

down

its

its benefits,

but

duties with prudence

our aim should be to hand the Incorporation

to posterity untarnished in

its

reputation and

still

more enriched.

The author begs here


to Mr. J. B. Bouick
services

and to

to Mr.

to

acknowledge

his

indebtedness

and Mr, Herbert Ferguson

David Marshall

for their

for revising the later dates

his publishers, Messrs. R. A.

&

J.

Hay.

SKETCH.
T may

suit

the purpose

progress of the
of the

city's

if

try to trace the

under three periods

Calling

history.

we

The

first

period

will

bring us to the close of the twelfth century;


the second
reign of

may

be termed the mediaeval period, from the

King William (surnamed the Lion) onwards to the

year 1780

and the third

date to the present day.

no data obtainable

is

the

modern period from the

Regarding the

first

period, there are

relative to the exact origin,

extent of the membership, though there

is

latter

nor to the

undoubted proof

that the Glovers were an organised Guild in the tenth

eleventh
in

the

centuries

Charters

Alexander

I.,

''science" or "craft" participating

granted

David

I.,

and

by

the

early

Scottish

Kings,

and particularly the Charter granted

by King William the Lion, dated 1210.

Contemporary

documents are equally obscure regarding the history of


incorporations

to

Evidently there

is

period.

Still,

the

close

of

the

sixteenth

century.

a wide blank in burghal records of that

such facts as are obtainable ought to prove

The

interesting.

the

of

traditions

deserve

past

be

to

cherished in veneration of our ancestors.

Many

fabulous statements have been circulated regarding

the origin of the

Some have

**

assigned

Skynner and Glover Calling "


it

to the antediluvian period

and Eve were clothed **with coats of


patriarchal age

when Rebekah covered

with "skins of the kids of goats"

is

order to supplant Esau of

in

coeval with that of the city.

of curing skins

the

pioneers

the

the hands of Jacob

doubt, however, that their antiquity as a craft


least

when Adam

skins," or to

There

All such stories are myths.

his birth-right.

in Perth.

In

all

is

no

in embryo, at

likelihood the art

came from the Romans, who, we know, were


of

civilization

During their

Britain.

in

occupation of this locality, and long before Perth could have


attained the status of '*a toune," mention
natives as Skynnermen, and

so

these were the progenitors of the

and Glovers

in Perth.

It is

well

may

it

two

*'

is

made

of the

be inferred that

sciences " of Skinners

known

that the natives of

southern Europe, notably the Moorish provinces of Spain,


also those of Asia Minor, excelled in that manufacture,

the

Roman

legions were

the native skynnermen

from that source.

drawn from

is

dabbled"

in

parts of the empire,

may have obtained primary knowledge

They may

also

proficiency from the Carthusian and


**

all

and as

commerce

have derived greater

Dominican monks, who

as well as in religion.

a fact that King James

I.

At

least

it

granted a Charter to the

Carthusian monks, empowering them to hold

"freedoms

and customs whatsoever,"

As a matter of

history extant to
Craft,

which

tell

weighing

there are no data of

the early story of the origin of the

enshrouded

is

fact,

for

skyns, hydes, barkit

in wool,

merchant wares, **wheither


or unbarkit."

**tron"

also

Taking

in oblivion.

we may

coeval with the growth of the city,

it

to be

form

at least

Before the middle of

an opinion of the Calling's progress.

the ninth century, twenty-six kings had reigned in succession.

Perth had grown in extent and in population, for after the


departure of the

ascendancy

Romans

the feudal system had attained the

in the country.

bondmen, and many of these

The

inhabitants were practically

fled to the

the tyranny such a system entailed.

towns to escape from

Several of the Scottish

Kings encouraged this immigration of feudal retainers to

Any bondman

counteract the policy of the turbulent chiefs.

except the

King's

lived for a year

who escaped from his feudal

and one day

in

a burgh without being

claimed by his master, became entitled

Thus the burghs gradually


lation.

the
in

The

Roman
course

to

his freedom.

increased in size and in popu-

small clusters of hamlets or huts,


period,

of

manufacturers,

became settlements of

time, developed
until

lord and

into

ultimately

traders

they

were

common

in

who,

artisans,

and wealthy
formed

into

Chartered Incorporations, endowed with peculiar rights and


privileges.

It

is

certainly to be

regretted that the origin

and early history of the Glovers, as well as of other


are involved in such obscurity.

It is plain,

crafts,

however, that in

4
the twelfth century the Skynners and Glovers had become

a prominent section of the community in

possession of

full

Both King David

extensive municipal privileges.

I.

and

predecessor Alexander favoured the erection of those

his

primitive towns, and held out inducements to tradesmen

and merchants from England and the Continent to


in

settle

them.
In the year 1210 William the Lion granted a Charter which

In 1556 Queen Mary

gave express privileges to the trades.

granted a Charter to the trades confirming their rights and

merchants

privileges equivalent with the

of

town

There

affairs.

is

in the

by King James VI.

also a Charter

confirming the Charters of Perth and

management

its

trades.

There are

records or copies of the three last mentioned Charters, but

those of King David and Alexander are


of these and

many

other documents, highly valuable from

an archaeological standpoint,
the ravages of King

Hammer

Edward

commonly

is
I.,

known

of the Scottish Nation."

When

and burghal documents he could procure.


in his

vow

etc.,

rolls

he had
all

so that

is

many

all

but

the national

Many

of these

of

Apart from those destroyed,


public documents,

were put on board a vessel for conveyance

This vessel

to

to destroy all traces of Scotland's

independence as a nation.

upwards of 100

attributed

in history as **the

conquered Scotland in 1296, he confiscated

were burnt,

The absence

lost.

parchments,
to

London.

said to have been wrecked on the voyage,

valuable manuscripts relating to the ancient

There

history of Perth and other burghs were lost.

The

annals

due

is

accommodation
deeds.

Nor

true

reason for the wide blank in our

want

method and proper

of

rather

to

at that

time for the preservation of such

are there any data to warrant the assumption

that our ancestors in those days possessed

beyond the Charters referred

to,

solicitous for the welfare

his Lieutenant or

title

deeds of

King Edward's

It is to

Lord Paramount of Scotland, he

credit that in his claim, as

'*

many documents

except the

such property as they then owned.

was

no

outrage as far as the Glovers are

proof, however, of this

concerned.

is

Gaurdine

of the people.

" of

He

caused

Scotland to assemble

all

the people of the land in convenient places, and in their

presence to read the laws which King David had enacted,

and

also

Thus, we
in

the additions and enactments of his successors.


see, the rights

and

privileges of the incorporations

The Charter

Perth were preserved and continued.

of

King William the Lion conferred peculiar privileges on


the

Incorporations

the

The ''Dyken" was


an

honour which

Glovers

also a

enjoying

member

continued

of the

down

to

Town

share.

Council,

He

1833.

exercised paternal and magisterial functions in


affecting

full

all

also

matters

the social and religious welfare of the families

connected with the Craft.

punishment

for

Fines, imprisonment, and corporal

contravention of the laws were

at his discretion.

imposed

Paternal vigilance over the moral and

physical well-being of the *'fials" and apprentices appears

The

to have been strictly practised.

boarded with

and

them

feed

masters,

their

"in

manner,"

to clothe

otherwise

the

Acts of disobedience, crime, or

any outward show of

gaming, cursing, or

**

dissipation,

who were bound

proper

indenture was cancelled.

were usually

latter

disrespect to superiors, especially masters," were brought

under review of the

**

indispensable, and for


"

Dyken "

Dyken."

many

Attendance at church was

years after the Reformation the

called a meeting of the

purpose of enquiring

among them,

in

their

**if

members

for the special

was any discord

existing

view of the Sacrament soon to be dispensed."

Dissipation and dishonesty were held in detestation.

In-

stances of this are referred to in the appendix, but

two

cases

may

was found

be given here.

In 1772 a freeman

guilty of stealing 14 skins

named

J.

Barlas

"under cloud of night"

from Patrick Stewart, and was deprived of his freedom,


while

members were prohibited from

him under a
his freedom.

like penalty."

The

*
'

**

corresponding with

But not only did Barlas

Dyken " handed him over

lose

to the Fiscal,

and the Baihe ordered him to be '*whipt round the toune


on his naked back between the hours of twelve and one
o'clock,

and then be banished the toune

other delinquent was

J.

Ritchie,

for ever."

The

a confirmed profligate,

found guilty of "selling his household furniture, wasting


his

money

in drink, ruining his family

to be a burden

and causing them

on the funds of the Calling."

The

*'

Dyken,"

with consent of the meeting, suspended him from voting

and from attending any meeting

twelve months "next

for

come."

to

The Charters

held by the Incorporations were

at first

highly conducive to the prosperity of trade in burghs, and


to

The

none more so than that of the Glovers.

was one of

One

monopoly and exclusion.

strict

principle

of

its

clauses ran thus, " All merchandis (merchants) and burrows


shall

own

enjoy their

liberties

and

so persons

privileges,

dwelling without burrows shall not use merchandice, nor


sell

any staple goods, and none but merchant guilds

shall

The

right

buy or

sell

within the liberties of the burrows."

to trade in Perth

was thus confined "

guild brethren " and the favoured

to

in

1560.

The

monks.

course, were expelled from the city

tude"

solely to the

freemen

latter,

of

by "the raskal multi-

Cargoes of vessels could only be offered

members of the

and the

privileged trades,

*'

stranger

merchant," in reloading his ship, could not purchase any

goods

for the

aries of the

purpose either within or without the bound-

The

burgh except from a burgess.

his searchers

examined the quality of

all

could undersell another under a penalty.

to

buy from

their

fials

Dyken " and

material in trade,

and fixed and regulated the price thereof.

master, or any of his

''

No merchant
Nor could any

or apprentices, solicit customers

masters.

Such a policy was not

in

accordance with our modern Cobdenite ideals of free trade,

and though

at first

it

proved

injurious to the growth of

beneficial,

commerce.

it

ultimately

It also

gave

became
rise to

many trade disputes and angry contentions between members


of rival communities.

There was,

for instance, a fierce

protracted contest between the burghs of Perth and

and

Dundee

respecting their privileges, rights in trade, and in municipal

precedence, which occupied the attention of the Scottish


Parliament, and probably led to the confirmation of the
trade and city Charters granted by King James VI. and
his

mother Queen Mary.

occur:
all

**

In the latter (1566) these words

Moreover by these presents we

ratify

and approve

other liberties and privileges given and granted by our

noble progenitors to the said tradesmen in times bye gone."

came under the

Again, eleven years later the rivalries


of Parliament, for

the

we

read, '*The

notice

Lord President read to

House and was much troubled

to

turbulent touns of Perth and Dundee."

compose these two


In 1581 King James,

notwithstanding the manifold trade dissention, in confirming


the privileges held by the Incorporations, uses these words,

**Witt ye because

we understanding

that our noble pro-

genitors Kings of Scotland having respect to the

weal

of

common

the

realm,

policy well

that

without

honest

common

craftsmen the

composed could not stand."

Thus

the jealousies and rivalries continued, and the Glovers were


participators in the strife.

The

minutes

from

1595

examples of their methods


others, while defending their

Deacon

of

Glovers

in

onwards
in

furnish

recognising the

own.

numerous
rights

of

In October, 1724, the

Dundee complained

that

some

members

*'came to Dundee, going

of our Incorporation

from shop to shop, seUing their gloves to the prejudice


of the

trade

the subject

Perth

in

offence

of the

shall

in

too,

each

of the

each

for

to

like

pounds

practices

and

Scots,

for

Glover Calling unforgiven.

trade laws w^ere equally strict

in the relations of

other.

consider

transgression

hundred

poor of the

terms of service, and

employee to

guilty

pay one

Under these Charters,

called

any member of the Calling

if

found

be

they

or

each

the use

ordained" that

should

he

again,
for

**

The meeting

there."

employer and

was "ordained" that **no

It

freeman of the Incorporation

engage

servant or

acquaint the master with

whom

fial

except he

first

another freeman's

he served," under a penalty of five pounds Scots.

Apart from such promiscuous entries

in the

minutes,

we

have no continuous records showing to what extent the


Glovers were conspicuous, or what part they, as an Incorporation,

took in the social,

political,

and

ecclesiastical

which they must have passed through

revolutions,

in the

eventful history of Perth.

The

genius of Sir Walter Scott has illuminated the dark-

ness of

mediaeval

the

period,

and given the Glovers a

world-wide fame in making the daughter of a Glover the


heroine of his romantic tale, **The Fair Maid of Perth."

But though

his vivid portrayal of these times

may

in

respects be historically accurate, the character of

the Glover

is

entirely imaginary.

So

also

is

many
Simon

the tradition

10

connected
its

with

the

House.

Maid's

Fair

Who

were

occupants at the period Sir Walter deals with,

impossible to determine

probably

it

may have been

it

is

a part

of the Blackfriars Monastery, and at the Reformation in

1560 was acquired by the managers of King James VI.


Hospital, from

whom

charter describes

it

the Glovers bought

as

*'

it

The

in 1629.

bounded betwixt the lands of James

common way and

Berne, Skinner, on the east, the King's

the

vennel leading to the place of the Predicatory Friars (now

termed Blackfriars Wynd) on the south and west, and the


garden of William Anderson, Skinner, on the north parts,
feu-duty, 34/- Scots."

The

description in the title deeds

here given indicates clearly that in the sixteenth century

some

of the Glovers at least were owners of property apart

There

from trade connexions.


"Glovers'
situated

Yaird"

the

seat

directly opposite

is

of

also the fact that

their

their booths stood in the Skinnergate,


gloves.

Though now considered

was

Maid's House, while

Fair

the

manufactures

the

where they sold their

part of the slums of Perth,

these lanes were then the main entrance to the city from

the Highlands.

There

is

thus ample reason to justify the

prominence given to the Glovers


ling narrative,

and

in Sir

Walter Scott's

thrill-

in the other traditions of that period of

our history.
In later years our records,

if

not

full in detail,

at least

indicate that the

Glovers took a share in some of the

struggles for civil

and

religious liberty in

Scotland.

We

II

cannot say

wha hae
at

any of them were

if

wi'

o'

the ranks of

**

Scots

Wallace bled" or with King Robert Bruce

Bannockburn, or

flooers

in

the

later,

forest

when on Flodden

were

a'

Field

wede awa'."

**the

There

is,

however, evidence that then, as now, patriotism, loyalty


to King and country, were cherished by

Calling to the hazard of their lives.


of Tibbermuir (1644) fourteen

were present.
It is

to our present roll of

In the

Glover apprentices,

under

In the disastrous battle

members of the Incorporation

*'

they were

my Lord

Reference

all safe."

membership shows that ten of our

brethren are in military service,

**

of the

Their names will be found in the appendix.

further recorded that

with honour.

members

**

killing

some with

distinction, all

times" of 1648 one of the

who had been an

ensign

lieutenant

Banff," presented the Incorporation with

the banner which belonged to his

company in the army of the

Covenanters, with the inscription, "Carrying for Religion,


King, Country, and Covenant," but what became of this
relic

is

nexion

unknown.
of

Another notable episode

persecution for

being recorded here.


reign of

conscience sake

in this
is

con-

worthy of

In the sixteenth century, during the

King James VI., a family, consisting of

father,

mother, and seven sons, fled from Holland, owing to the


persecution of Protestants in that country.
Perth, and were

They

settled in

welcomed by the Glover Incorporation.

Their family name of Barlandt was changed to Barland.

The author

of this interesting fact

is

Mr. James Barland,

12
Kinross,

who

family.

In the records of the Kirk Session (1684) there

now

is

member

the sole remanent

of that

names of Cecil Paton, spouse of John Cree

also appear the

Younger, Glover, and Janet Young, spouse of John Dow,


Glover,

who were

and imprisoned

fined

to the reformed faith.

Again,

it

for their

adherence

supposed that several

is

Glovers formed part of the Perth contingent at the battle


of Inverkeithing, and perished in opposing Oliver Cromwell's

march on
musical
in the

Perth.

air,

Of

this,

however, there

no proof.

termed ''The Glovers' March," was

beginning of last century.

when 300

is

It

was composed

in

print

in 1559,

of the inhabitants of Perth marched to Stirling

with ropes round their necks, to support the cause of the

This episode was long spoken

Reformation in Scotland.
of as the

march with

St. Johnston's ribbons.

Previous to

the great event of the Reformation (regrettable in the havoc


it

made

of so

many

valuable

Glovers, like the other

the

Romish

faith.

This

structures

Incorporations,
is

in

Perth),

the

were votaries to

seen in their conformity to the

prevailing ritual then in vogue in St. John's Church, where

the altar dedicated to St. Bartholomew was placed.


old manuscript referring to

Bartholomew was one of the


of St. John's.

There

is

It

was

it

says

**

The

richest of the

An

altar of St.

many

in existence in the reign of

shrines

James

III.

one feature which distinguishes the Glover from the

other trades in the religious observances of these times, viz.,

they do not seem to have countenanced such festivals or

13

Passion Play " or "St. Obert's Dance,"

"The

processions as

and other " mummeries

"

which were afterwards suppressed

by the Kirk Session, the Deacons, and the

haill

brethren of

the crafts.

Other and more rational forms of amusements became


popular with our Craft, and some of them had been long
practised

such

The

archery, etc.

King James

wappenschaws,

as

I.

latter

Its

was made compulsory

practice

obliged to practise archery

ground

provided for the purpose.

One

held their meetings.

of these

was placed

Every freeman on being married paid

many

Hammermen
to

be

sent

members

Crafts.

for

to

in

years

On

in

to

2/6, as his

one of these occasions

of wappenschawing a serious riot took place between

disorderly

was

Archery never seems to have been

bride's present, for a football.

of the

termed bow butts being

popular, but football was too frequently indulged


excess.

for

thirteen,

Gilten Arbour," where the Glovers for

**the

golf,

acquirement was introduced by

Every boy, on attaining the age of

time.

quoits,

football,

of the

some

Skinnermen and the

Lord Scone, then Lord Provost, had


"tak

order

with

the

riot."

The

Skinnermen were fined 500 merks, but the sentence on the

Hammermen

does not appear.

In pageantry the Glovers

formed an exception to the other Crafts in retaining preference for the display and dress of the Morris dancer.

have no record of
(see

its

We

introduction, but the minute of 1633

Appendix) proves beyond a doubt that the Glovers


14
excelled in this display.

Many

regarding the origin of the

enquiries have been

Morris dance.

It

made

originally

came from the Moors, and under various pronunciations


such as

Mor

Morrisk, Morrisco, and Morris

rice,

popular in France and England

was

mediaeval times.

in

very

The

natives of Herefordshire were celebrated for their perform-

ance of

It

it.

also alluded to in Shakespeare's play of

is

"King Henry IV," where the Dauphin

"And

let

show than

us do
if

it

we heard

the Morrice dance."

have introduced
England.

with no show of

it

The

King James

after his return

Glovers'

costly, each of the

from

dresses

now

busied with

of Scotland

I.

says,

and with more

fear,

that England were

France

of

is

said to

his long captivity in

must have been rather

"thirteen" being embellished with 252

small circular bells, arranged in 21 sets of 12 bells each,

thus giving a peculiar intonation to the movements of the

Of

performer.

the thirteen dresses once in the possession

of the Calling, only one remains, and


in texture,

and a large number of the

Reference

may

here be

of these by-gone days.

which, from

its

decayed

made
The

it

is

now

very fragile

bells are wanting.

to the other relics


oldest

surface,

is

we

possess

the Auditors' table,

looks as

if

it

had been

part of the fittings in the old "Glovers' Yaird" or in the

Fair Maid's House.


latter

It

certainly

place to our present

hall.

representing our patron saint,

St.

was removed from the

The two

large pictures

Bartholomew, have

in

recent years been greatly admired by visitors to our hall

MORRIS DANCER.

MORRIS DANCER.

15

One

is

late Dr. Milne, of St. John's


**a

The

of genuine antiquity, bearing the date of 1557.

West Church, declared

genuine picture of those mediaeval times," and

improbable that

it

Bartholomew

St.

in

may have adorned


John's for a

to be

it

is

not

the altar of

St.

short time,

it

and been

saved from the ravages of the rascal multitude in 1560.

The

other picture of the saint

The

but an excellent work of art.


1829,

is

comparatively modern,

is

artist's

name,

obscurely seen at the bottom, while on the back

of the picture

is

"August

jr

,"

the difference in

probably indicative of the time occupied by the

renovated by Mr.

them

J.

dates

artist in

Both pictures have been

completing his commission.

restored

Duff,

P.

lately

H. Cranston, whose masterly hand has

to their pristine colour.

It is

greatly to be

regretted that no trace of the identities of the painters can

be found in the minutes of the Incorporation, or in any

document
1604.

extant.

Next

in

Persian, containing the

arms emblazoned
silk.

The

silk,

the old flag, dated

ellipse, is

is

motto of the Calling and the coat of

in gold,

but the gold has corroded the

coat of arms

the inscription,

or beauty of a trade

it

with a centre square of blue

is

a pair of gloves displayed

on a shield surmounted by three


an

is

Originally beautiful in design and workmanship,

composed of fawn coloured

blue

precedence

is

**

The

stars.

perfect

On

the border, in

honour of a

craft

not in wealth, but in moral worth,

whereby virtue gains renown."

Under

this

banner

it is

said

the Craft assembled at the wappenschawings held on the


i6

North Inch.

St.

Bartholomew's tawse

original purpose in the

its

**

convicted

does

of acts

seem

it

application in the punish-

its

Even freemen

of dishonesty were not exempt.

Nor

to have been entirely confined to the use of

In 1621 one of the citizens,

the Glovers.

He was

named Francis

was charged with

assaulting

ordered to be taken to the

Grammar

Scott, with other '*sociates,"

a merchant.

In the minutes

and refractory apprentices.

fials

adapted to

still

olden tyme."

there are several allusions to

ment of

is

School and scourged with St. Bartholomew's tawse, "he


promising not to

commit the

offence

like

ostrich egg has been the subject of

ing
it

its

use and origin in the Craft.

said to

is

member who
probably

it

many

The

queries regard-

According to tradition,

have been brought from the East by some


fought in the ranks of the Crusaders.

was the

gift

of

some merchant

an ostrich egg being considered a rara

The

again."

only certain fact about

it

is

that

More

to the Calling

avis in those days.


it

hung

in the roof

of the Old Glovers' Hall for centuries, attached to a small


iron chain.

Not the

least interesting of

our

relics is the

green cloth, of date 1628, which covers the Auditors' table


already referred
parts,

it

is still

to.

serviceable.

took place in 1828.


in

Although faded and patched

the Appendix.

some

bicentenary celebration of

The minute regarding


The

in

it

will be

it

found

other relics consist of two black

velvet **mort cloths," in use last century at the burials of

the

members and

their

families,

which

in

those

days

^F^^dPiihSDjjjH
^^Ki^^^ml^!!'VmM^H l^^^H
PHHm|^^^^^^^^^^C||^^BV^;i^^^HL^^H

^^1

1
k

ST.

BARIHOLOMEW.

ST.

UAKIHOLOMEW,

17

copy of the Bible (1752

which there
pew.

is

pew

also an old

is

used by the Deacon at

edition),

Church of

Middle

the

divine service in

There

on Sundays.

frequently took place

John's,

St.

in

termed, until recently, the Deacon's

Behind the Deacon's chair are the names of four

donors to the funds of the Incorporation in the seventeenth

and eighteenth centuries

Among

(see

Appendix).

the simple decorations of the hall, in addition to

the two pictures of Saint Bartholomew,

House

of the old Fair Maid's

shows the

Another

Incorporation.

as

The design

is

a small picture

appeared 40 years ago.

it

arms and

of

coat

is

motto

of the

rather unique, with a very

quaint shaped escutcheon on which are a pair of gloves,

two glove
crest,

and shears as used by the

stretchers

ram

passant,

stag rampant on the

on the

is

left

top.

The

Craft.

and a goat rampant on the

these stand on a very pretty scroll, from which

ribbon with the motto, *'To


is

of

a brief description of our

many

God

only be

relics,

The

supporters are a

all

flows a

glory."

recalling the

right;

Such

memories

generations of Glovers.

In tracing the progress of the Incorporation, the most


interesting period to us

and

onwards,

for

it

that of the seventeenth century

is

was during those years that the

foundations of our present wealth were


if

laid.

Shrewd men,

not seer-like in their forecast of the future, the old

Glovers undoubtedly were.

They

did not hesitate entering

into speculations in land with apparently small capital for

such transactions.

Indeed,

it

is

a fact that from 1630 to

1849 the Incorporation was always largely in debt.

Manifold

i8

sums borrowed by

are the entries in the minute-book of

and bond

bill

and 4 per

at 4J

cent,

Nor did

interest.

there seem to be any difficulty in getting the necessary

many

capital; the fact that


parties

of the sums were offered by

shows that the Glovers were

in

good

But

credit.

such was the extent of their operations that in 1774 the


Incorporation

The

owed 44,414 merks,

or about 3^2467 sterling.

sequel has proved that the investments have yielded

ample

return,

though

it

was not

1847 that the harvest

till

ripened and the original bonded debt was cleared,

when

19

acres of St. Leonard's Land were sold to the Scottish Central

Railway

for their terminus.

Incorporation found

Then

it

was that the Glover

themselves comparatively in wealth,

16,245 being the purchase price of the acres so sold.


In the abstract of our

members

of

affairs, it is

not easy for the majority

to trace the development in connexion with the

various properties, and the returns they


description and enumeration of

them

now

will

yield.

brief

show how valuable

the investments of our forefathers have become.

Let us

take the properties generally in the order in which they

came

No

into our possession.

record exists of

become and

is

likely to

their possessions,
in

its

is

the "Glovers' Yaird."

The

original purchase.

remain extinct.

It

trade has

was the

first

of

and in church history an incident is recorded

connexion with

it

which may well keep

In the Secession of 1737-40,

was

First

its

memory

green.

when the Rev. William Wilson

interdicted from preaching in the

Middle Kirk, the

19

Deacon

way one Sabbath morning

led the

The Yaird was used

Yaird, where divine service was held.


as a place of worship from

when a church was

1740,

known

November,

Wilson U.P. Church.

as the

November,

1737, to

High

built in

to the Glovers'

Street, afterwards

tradition

was current

in Perth about sixty years ago that the prosperity of the

Glover Incorporation was due to the fervency of the prayers

Wm.

of the Rev.

Yaird

of the old

locus

The

Wilson on behalf of the Calling.


is

opposite the Fair Maid's

now

House

difficult

to

to

trace.

the south,

its

lay

It

eastern

boundary being the Castle Gable, Horse Cross, and part of

The

Mill Street.

site is

now

practically the eastern portion

of Messrs. Pullars' Dye-works, and an annual feu duty of


3^16

is

derived from

it.

Reference has already been made to the Fair Maid's House


as the old

Hall.

probably was at

It

Blackfriars' Monastery,
it,

falling at the

first

a part of the

Reformation, or before

whom

into the hands of the Hospital managers, from

Glovers bought

it.

In 1758

Murray

the Glovers

occupy

for
it

3^120

as tenants,

erection of a

new

Buildings

George

sold.

The fame

novel induced

though we

was

sold

to

the

Lord John

presumably continuing to
find

them proprietors

of

it

In that year the Incorporation began the

again in 1786.

in

it

on the

hall

Street,

site of

the present

Exchange

and the old house was again

given to Glovers through Sir Walter Scott's

them

to

buy back the property.

The Fair

Maid's House was converted into a cabinet-maker's work-

20
Falling into the state of decay

shop.

previously referred

Mr. Japp, Alyth,

to,

who

shown

in the picture

the house was ultimately sold to

rebuilt

Some

it.

into the possession of the municipality,

years later

and

it

passed

attracts the

still

curiosity of tourists.

The Lands of Pomarium or


bought
with

At that time

in 1642.

some arable

land,

surrounded the town.


of

the

the Orchard,

It

This property was

was evidently an orchard

it

outside

the

may have

which then

walls

formed part

originally

grounds of the Carthusian Monastery, the main

entrance to which stood opposite the

New Row.

With

the

gradual increase of the population Pomarium was rapidly


feued for building purposes, and mostly occupied by hand-

loom weavers.

The boundaries

of this property extend from

the north-west portion of King James VI. Hospital ground

along the east side of Leonard Street, both sides of Pomarium,

and Cross

Street.

rates are small,

Lands of
periods.
1646,

the

The

Compared with the other

owing

to the

Leonards.

feu-duties the

low value of land then current.

These

were bought

portion termed Leonard's

at

different

Ley dates from

and was bought from a member of the Calling.

disposition begins in the following terms

**

The

Disposition of

John Anderson, Glover, Burgess of Perth and Deacon of the


Glover Incorporation, with consent of his spouse, Euphan
Johnston, in favour of the brethren of the Glover Incorporation."

The

in 1742

from Sir James Campbell of Aberuchil, along with

other portions of the Leonards were purchased

21

The Glovers must have been

Wells Land or Wellshill.

very

anxious to acquire these estates, probably because they lay


adjacent to Leonard's Ley, for the committee was

merks rather than

to offer 24,000

The handsome

villa residences erected

excamb

access

getting

Town

to the

to

sterling.

^f 1,226

on Leonard Bank are

Another small portion was given

feued off Leonard's Hall.


in

Ultimately a

lose them.

purchase was effected at 22,000 merks, or

empowered

for the privilege of the feuars there

the

South

Inch

from

their

gardens.

Another portion, consisting of ig acres, was sold for the


railway terminus.

In 1885, 7f acres of St. Leonard's, that

portion immediately to the west of Glover Street, were sold


to Messrs

John Swan

& Sons

for

an auction mart.

The

obtained was 3^4,332 14s, plus a ground annual of

annum.

The

price obtained

from the

sale

price

5/-

was applied

per

to the

reduction of the bonded debt, which at that date exceeded


5^16,000.

Ley

is

Queen

The remainder

nearly

all

feued.

of Leonard's Hall

Thus Glover

Street, Friar Street,

Abbot

and Leonard's

Street, Priory Place,

Street,

and Wilson

Though a

Street,

amount

of

capital has been spent in the formation of those streets,

it

are laid out from these lands.

will

be seen from the abstract that there

revenue derived from the several subjects.

house of the Leonards can

still

be seen a

large

is

now

The

little

a large

old farm-

to the north

of St. Leonard's Bridge.

The Wells Land or

Wellshill

Estate

Tullylumb, north by west of the town.

is

contiguous

Three portions of

to
it

22

were

sold,

two of which now form part of Wellshill Cemetery.

The remaining

portion

is all

feued

The Farm of Tullylumb, bought

see abstract.

in 1682,

has within the

last

twenty years become a rather extensive suburb on the west


of the city, the revenue derived from the feu duties there

George Crescent, Rose Crescent,

being last year 3^566.

Spens Crescent,

Tullylumb

Terrace,

Glasgow Road and Western Avenue

the

fronting

villas

(the latter in course of

formation) were originally part of Tullylumb Farm.

About

50 years ago two acres were sold to the Rev. A. Fleming,

along with one acre feued, forming thus the

site of

About forty acres of Tullylumb are

House.

Hamilton

still

in grass,

under a short lease to Mr. Roy of Craig Clowan, who has


been our tenant of the farm for over forty years; but the land
is

steadily acquired

for

feuing purposes,

as

the

city

is

extending in that direction.

The Lands of Soutar Houses


like

in the Parish of Cargill were,

Leonard's Ley, bought from a Glover Burgess named

James

Mellis, in 1740,

"in favour of the Deacon and Box-

masters of the Glover Incorporation."

have been a profitable investment


later the Glovers

was
(viz.,

It

does not seem to

at that time, for 14 years

found that the rental derived from the land

insufficient to

pay the

interest

on the purchase price

77 S), which of course had been borrowed.

In 1774

the property was sold to Mr. Wright of Lawton, an adjoining


proprietor, at an annual feu-duty of

From

^f 50.

the large revenues derived from the several properties

23
referred to,

it

once be apparent

will at

how

successful these

Four other

land speculations of our ancestors have proved.

may now

properties

the

be briefly referred to in connexion with

modern period of our

following subjects, viz.

These consist of the

history.

ist,

that imposing structure

known

as the Exchange Buildings^ No. 26 to 32 George Street

2nd, one

flat,

No. 36 George Street, half of which

the Glovers' Hall

now

is

3rd, a tenement in Skinnergate presently

attached to shop No. 36 George Street

and

Regarding the

estate of Seaside in the Carse of Gowrie.

Skinnergate property,

it

the

lastly,

was bought so recently

and

as 1846,

unless to preserve the amenity of the George Street property,

or to again possess a property near the historic booth sites

of the Glovers, which had


to

assign

reason

all

been disposed

of, it is difficult

purchase.

The Exchange

this

for

Buildings have rather a chequered history, having changed

ownership several times and been partly enlarged as well as


rebuilt.

and

In 1786 the Glovers resolved to build a

for that purpose secured a site in

The

60 feet of frontage.

two shops,
furnished,

and also

hall,

and

two

for

structure

flats,

and

some time used

for

it

costly, consisting of

hall

was

company

it

is

not clear that the

as a hall for their meetings.

for 3^2500.

Ere

fully

dramatic performances,

For some

change of policy the Glovers sold the main building


to a

hall,

George Street with

The

attics.

for public meetings, but

Calling ever used

was

new

in

long, part of the structure

found defective, and had to be taken down.

i8og

was

Ultimately the

24

company

and the Exchange Hall with

dissolved,

its

attach-

ments was bought by Mr. P. R. Drummond, the Glovers


still

Drummond

retaining their shops.

still

further enlarged

On

the property by building an hotel on the back ground.


his death the Glovers

bought back the whole property, but

sold the hotel a few years later, retaining the remainder of the
subjects as they

was bought
been the

in

now appear

Our present

in the assets.

hall

1821 at a cost of ^^242 10/-, and had previously

office

of the Sheriff Clerk of Perthshire.

Murray Paton was then

Sheriff Clerk,

James

and Boxmaster of the

Incorporation.

The Estate of
security,

Seaside,

though what

is

termed a gilt-edge

has never realised the forecast which led to

purchase, and

is

its

the sole cause for the present bonded debt.

This will be seen by reference to the financial position of the

When

Incorporation in 1849-50.

the Glovers sold the 19

acres of St. Leonard's, they paid off all bonded debt, investing

the residue in debentures of the Scottish Central Railway at

Public confidence in the stability of railway

5 per cent.

stocks at that time

was

limited, so that during a temporary

depression in the stock market the Calling resolved to realise


their debentures just

market.
tions,

when

was

in the

Misled by their previous success in land specula-

and

unable

to

exceptions the

agricultural

members approved

of ^30,000

the

forecast

afterwards took place in

The sum

the estate of Seaside

was asked

great

changes

that

with

two

subjects,

of the purchase of Seaside.

for

it,

but

it

was obtained

in

^5

1851 at 3^25,000.
selves in the

Thus the Incorporation involved them-

bonded

liabilities

which

still

Besides

remain.

the debt, considerable sums have been expended in renewals


of steadings and general uphold of the estate.

In the last

was reduced

to ^20,000,

re-valuation of property, Seaside


;f 5,000

less

than the original cost, and about

purchase at present rental.


last

Still,

20

years'

the annual rent for the

few years has improved, owing to the increased value

of the salmon fishings on the estate.

In the distant future

over 300 acres forming the foreshore of the river anent


Seaside

may

and so double the arable

yet be reclaimed,

extent.

The bonded debt

a subject

is

considered, with proposals for


are

now

practicable,

early date.

its

which has often been

extinction.

Two

of these

and should again be taken up

One was

to set aside the surplus of

at

an

income

over expenditure in each year as a sinking fund to the


extent of 3^200 per annum,

which would extinguish the

With

debt in about 40 years.

the increasing tendency of

our revenue this proposal would not


of annuities,

whole

estate.

and would

still

The other

affect the present rate

maintain the efficiency of the

alternative

was

that of debentures

by which money could be borrowed to pay

off

the whole of

the existing bonds at once, instalments of principal and


interest

on the amount borrowed

extinguish both in 30 to 40 years.

being

such

as

would

The debt would thus

be more steadily reduced, and with prudent management

26
the surplus of revenue over expenditure

more than

sufficient to

is

prove

likely to

pay the annual instalment.

The only

other alternative would be the sale of an equivalent portion

members would

of the property, which few

With about 40

care to sanction.

acres of land in the best part of the suburbs

highly adaptable for residences, and likely to be

all

taken up

now opportune

to deal with

the problem of the bonded debt in a more

satisfactory

in the near future, the time is

manner than we have hitherto done.


It

now

only remains to give an outline of the benefits and

privileges pertaining to the Calling,


to

minor

which

privileges,

such as casual aid in

in recent years

sufficient

and without reference


distress, or festivals

have been discontinued,

it

may be

to confine the remarks under this topic to the

"Annuity Fund" and the "Eleemosynary Roll."


from these two great
imaginary

than

benefits, the other privileges

real.

As

burgess

regards

Apart

were more

rights,

for

example, the free trade policy and the Reform Acts since
1832

have abolished

all

trade

monopolies, and

beyond

occasional inspections of the outlying properties, no freeman

burgess derives any pecuniary advantage from membership

except such as are really in destitute circumstances,

Burns terms

and

it,

For the

"in honest poverty."

also for the protection of orphans, the

Roll has long been available.

From

or,

as

relief of such,

Eleemosynary

a remote period the

Auditors met during the week following the Annual Elections

"to consider the cases of the poorer brethren/' and then

27

hand the

list

to the Boxmasters.

to speak, of Glovers' benefits


first

put in operation in 1828.

financial position at that time.

The

is

But the

**

blue ribbon," so

the Annuity Fund, which was

The following

figures

show the

The total income was 3^1,000.

Public Burdens,

5^ 17

76 II

Repairs and Upkeep,

and Incidents,
Eleemosynary Roll,
Sinking Fund,
...
Salaries

145

482 16

100

9
36 10
100

863

For Contingencies,
For Annuity Fund,

^1,000

The

annuitants eligible in that year were seven males

and two widows.


5 resident

members

60

at ^f 12,

16

2 non-resident at 8,

widows, resident, at 12,

24
jfioo

The scheme
provisions.

of

1828 was very specific and strict in

distinction

was made between the

its

resident

and the non-resident members, on the plea that the In-

no

benefit

attendance at meetings).

When

corporation

derived

from

their service

the Incorporation

{i.e,,

became

possessed of large capital in 1852, from the sources already


referred

to,

the largely increased revenue

was applied

to

28
the extension of the rights and privileges of

The

a revision of the Annuity Scheme.


resident

and

distinction between

members was

non-resident

members by

An

abolished.

eminent accountant, Mr. Ebenezer Scott, and others were

employed to prepare a table of


safely bear.

The

rates

was the

result

scheme, which, having been

which the funds would

substitution of the existing

in operation since,

out with wonderful accuracy in respect of

on

it.

reference to the abstract will

has developed since

it

was

first

amount paid has increased from

all

has wrought
claims falling

show how the fund

put in operation.
;f loo

The

in 1828 to 3^950 in

while the members eligible have increased from 7

1904,

males and 2 widows to 22 of the former and 12 of the

The revenue

at

Michaelmas

last

amounted

latter.

to 3^2,823 6s gd,

as against 3^1,000 in 1828.

considerable

amount of dubiety

exists

among members

concerning the Eleemosynary Roll allowances.


fore,

important to keep in mind that

word a

it is

in

members who

receive

there-

no sense of the

"poors' fund," being entirely ex gratia in

disqualifying such

It is,

its

its

allowances,

benefits

from

voting at meetings during the period they are in receipt


of such benefit,

From an

early period, however, the claims

of the necessitous poor of the Calling have been carefully

considered,

Aged

instances

of

which appear

spinsters, daughters of

members unprovided
certain cases

for,

in

the

appendix.

freemen Glovers, orphans of

"burials of poor brethren," and in

members' daughters who became necessitous

in

"

29

widowhood, such have always participated

When

the

in

members

mosynary

benefit.

in Perth, a

committee of their number, termed the

the majority of

Elee-

resided

" Auditors'

Committee," was annually appointed, their special function


being to revise the Eleemosynary Roll, consider

temporary

for

applicant

and

aid,

all

appeals

the allowance given to each

fix

they also examined and checked the Boxmaster's

The

accounts before his discharge.

Auditors' Orders

*'

always appeared in the abstract until recently, the duties


being

now

to

a large extent discharged by the

Committee, while a
Auditor.

It

the Annuity

advance
annuity
six

may

when

now

all

the Official

payments from

the Eleemosynary Roll are paid in

member

it is

is

be here mentioned that

Fund and

each

accountant

certified

District

expected to apply for his or her

is

due, and no

member can

obtain

more than

months' annuity in any case of arrear arising from failure

to apply

when the annuity

tions in connexion

should be known to

the law of Trusts,

becomes due.

Other

restric-

with the administration of pecuniary

benefits will be seen in the


It

first

it

Laws

all

the

is illegal

of the Incorporation.

members

that,

according to

to vote, divide, or apply

any

part of the funds belonging to the Incorporation as a bonus


or otherwise

among

existing members.

In 1852 a proposal

was tabled that each member get a bonus of ten pounds.


Opinion of

counsel

of such a proposal,

was obtained regarding the

when

it

was found

could not apply any portion of

its

legality

that the Incorporation

funds in such a manner.

30

Regarding the permanence or

may

it

may

stability of the

termed consolidated

safely be

in that respect.

It

with careful management yet reach a higher ratio

of payments, for the revenue of the estate

The

but steadily increasing.

ground

gradually

is still

forty acres of valuable feuing

Tullylumb, which at no distant period will

at

may

built upon,
its

Annuity Fund,

safely realise six to eight times

Then

present arable value.

tion will have reached

its

all

be

more than

the revenue of the Incorpora-

maximum.

and most urgent duty of the Calling

is

Meantime the
to devise

first

and adopt

a method by which the bonded debt will yearly decrease


until

it

is

unencumbered

as

done much for us


our duty

extinguished,

totally

now

was

it

we

1852.

Our

revenue

forefathers

its origin,

so discreetly guided in

so eventful in

its policy,

we may well

its

left

have

sowed

With a

our inheritance.

to safeguard

is

the

are reaping the benefits they

heritage so ancient in

results, surely

in

and

progress,

and so fortunate

cherish in veneration the

in its

memory

of the old Glovers.

Actuated by their

spirit in the

enjoyment of our rights and

privileges, the stability of the Incorporation

be our burgess
of 1604, for

ideal, so

it is still

should always

endorsing the motto on the old flag

true that

**The Perfect Honour of a Craft or the Beauty of


A Trade

is

not

in

Wealth but

in

WHEREBY Virtue gains Renown,"

Moral Worth,

31

NAMES OF DEACONS, POSITOURS, BOXMASTERS,


FROM 1593.
Note.
century.

The term Boxmaster does not appear in the minutes


The name given

till

the seventeenth

to the treasurer in the earlier periods

was

Positour,

(probably derived from the Latin word positus^ ponoy to place or set aside

who

takes charge of valuable documents or money).

oldest minute

There

is

book

is

an index showing names of

also a quaint preface to the minute

book

On

officers,

one

the front page of the

but

it

is

incomplete.

in the following terms

"this BUIK BEGVINE on the FOVRT day of MAI ANNO ANE THOVSAND
FIVE HVNDRKTH FOVRSCOIR AND THIRTEIN ZEIRS, ALEXANDER
BROVNE BEING DYKIN OF THE SKYNNERIS FOR THE PRESENT."
Deacon.
1596.

Positours.

I60I.

George Johnston,

1607.

P. Grant,

1608.

G. Johnston,

to 1626 indistinct.

1626.

John Drummond,

1632.

W. Duncan,

1638.

George Johnston,

??

John Kemard.

John Lamb.

Names

16

George Wilsone.

Charles Wilson.
-

John Anderson.

John Kemard.

William Sibald.

not clear John Wilsone,

David Wilson.

Wm.
Blank
1708.

Thomas

Clerk.

John Dow.

Patrick Grant,

Mortimer.

Lammond Brown.

till

Borland, or

Barland, or Bar-

James Mortimer.

landt,

1714.

George Borland,

1717.

John Crookshank,

1718.

John Mortimer,

1719.

Henry Brown,

John Borland.
Patrick

Meek,

CTait

32
Deacon.
1720.

aerL

Positours.

John Faichney,

Wm.

Barlass and J. Inglis,

James Sibbald
do.

I72I.

do.

J. Inglis.

1722.

do.

Leonard Robertson and John

....

do.

1723.

do.

John Caw and Wm. Faichney,

do.

Caw,

1724.

do.

Charles Wilson,

do.

1725-

do.

Charles Wilson,

do.

1726.

Brown,

Robert Duncan and James


Faichney,

do.

1727.

William Bennet,

James Faichney,

1729.

William Borland,

A. Menzies and Jas. Borland,

I730.

John Caw,

Alex. Blyth and John Miller,

do.

I73I.

James Faichney,

John

do.

do.

Miller,

M'Ewan

do.

1732.

do.

Geo. Johnston and A.

1733.

do.

A. M'Ewan,

do.

1734.

do.

Geo. Wilson and R. Gardner,

do.

Robert Gardner,

do.

1735.

Charles W^ilson,

Deacon.
1737.

John

Miller,

John Mellis and Wm. Borland,

do.

1736.

Boxmasters.
-

'

James

do.

James Mortimer,

1739.

do.

David Grant,

I740.

do-

John Paton,

I74I.

do.

Andrew Kippen,

M'Ewan,

do.

Clerk.

James Sibbald.

Mellis,

1738.

do.

do.

do.
do.

do.

Wm.

1742.

Alex.

Thos. Blair and

1743-

Robt. Gardiner,

William Paton,

do.

1744.

Charles Wilson,

T. Robertson and

Wm. Wills,

do.

William Wilson,

do.

1745.
1746.

do.

John Borland,

1747.

do.

1748.

do.

James Buist and John Meek,

1750I75I-

1752.

do.

do.

do.

do.

....

do.

do.
do.

Gilbert Craigdully and Pat.

Andrew Kippen,
Thos. Robertson,

do.

do.

Rintoul,
1749.

Paton,

do.
do.

John Grant and John Stewart,

do.

John Stewart,

do.

....

Joseph Forrester and James


Borland,

do,

33
Deacon.

Boxmasters.

1753-

Thos. Robertson,

1754.

John Meek,

1755-

do.

Borland,

Wm.

....

John Proudfoot,

Paton, Jr.,

T. Borland and John Perrie,

do.

John Perrie,

do.

do.

1758.

Joseph Forrester,

1759.

do.

Robt. Gray,

1760.

do.

Patrick Stewart and

1762.

do.

1763.

Alex. Robertson,

1764.

do.

Cowans,
Patrick Rintoul,

William Bennet and Robert

Gray,

1761.

do.

1767.

do.

...
....
...

Thomas

Patrick Rintoul,

1770.

Robert Gray,

do.

Robert
do.

do.

1775.

Patrick Grant,

1776.

do.

Jas.
-

do.

do.

do.
do.

Arkley and Jas. Gardner,

do.
do.

R.M'Ewanand Henry Young,


Henry Young,

...

do.

do.

Paton and Pat. Barland,

do.

Patrick Barland,

Wm.

do.

do.
do.

James Gardner.

Jas.

Thomas Robertson,
Thomas Stewart,
Thomas Robertson
Thomas Stewart,

do.

do.

do.

Thos. Robertson and Patrick

do.

1774.

....
....

Daniel M*Leish,

Patrick Stewart,

Steuart and Daniel

Grant,

1780.

do.

do.

M'Leish,

1779.

Ebenezer Kippen and Thos.

1769.

1778.

do.

Johnston,

1777.

do.

Daniel

Robert Young,

1773-

do.

Rough and
M'Ewan,
Daniel M'Ewan,
Joseph Young and

William Bennet,

1772.

David

...
...

David

1768.

1771.

D. Grant.

David Cowans,

Young,

1766.

do.

Robert Gray,

do.

Patrick Miller.

1757.

1765.

James Sibbald.

A. Robertson and John Proud-

foot,

1756.

Clerk.

Joseph Forrester and James

Blair

John Dow,

....

and John Dow,

do.
do.

do.

(interim).
-

Pat. Greig

and John Grant,

do.

34

....

Deacon.
I78I.

Patrick Stewart,

(interim),
-

1786.

John Grant,

1788.

John Dow,

1789.

Thomas Johnston,

1790.

Joseph Grant,

Wm.

Brydie,

do.

Jas. Arkley,

do.

John Perie and John Cowans,

do.

do.

do.

do.

Robt. Gray and Jas. Barland,

I79I.

John

1792.

John Cowans,

1794.

David Forrester,

1796.

do.

John Stewart.

Perie, Jr.,

do.

....

Thomas Robertson and John


Young,

1798.

do.

D. Forrester and

John Rutherford,

Joseph Grant,

D. Rough and

do.

1782.

CUrk.

Boxmasters.

Thomas Robertson

Wm.

John Taylor and

Robert Gray,

do.

1803.

James Barland,

i8o4.

John Young,

1805.

Thomas Luke,

Sr.,

do.

Geo. Wilson and Jas. Murray,

do.

Prap,

do.

John Scott and John Young,

do.

A. Gray and George Murie,

do.

Thos. Luke and Peter Archer,

do.

George Johnston,

do.

James Archer,

John

Miller.

1806.

do.

William Gregor,

1807.

do.

John Barland,

1808.

do.

R. Buist,

1809.

do.

Andrew

1810.

John Young,

1811.

do.

1812.

do.

do.

do.

1813.

do.

do.

do.

1814.

1815.

James Barland,
do.

John Young,

Jr.,

Andrew

do.

Joseph Grant,

do.

Andrew Gray,

do.

do.

do.

Buist,

do.
do.

Wm.

Glen Johnston,
-

John Young,

James Murdoch,

1820.

1821.

do.

William Prop,

George Young,

do.

Wm, Glen Johnston,

do.

do.

Buist,

Thomas Murie,

1816.

1818.

....

James Barland,

1817.

1819.

do.
do.

do.

do.
-

James M. Patton,

do.
do.

1822.

do.

James Wilson,

do.

1823.

do.

Jas.

Wm.

do.

1824.

Robert Buist,

1825.

do.

1826.

Andrew

Johnston,

do.

S. Johnston,

Robert Murie,
Buist,

James Murdoch,

do.
-

do.

Jr.

35
Deacon.
1827.
1

828.

Andrew

Boxmaster.

Buist,

George Young,

1829.

do.

1830.

John Young,

Jr.,

1831.

do.

1832.

James Murdoch,

1833-

do.

1834.

John Young,

James Murdoch,

Robert Grant,

Jr.,

Robert Murie,

CUrk.

John

Miller.

George Gray.

James Squire,

do.

Peter Archer,

do.

do.

do.

1835.
1836.

do.

William Luke,

do.

James Bennet,

do.

James Wilson,

do.

do.

do.

do.

do.

1837.

do.

do.

do.

1838.

do.

do.

do.

1839.

do.

do.

1840.

William Luke,

1841.

do.

1842.

do.

1843.

James Murdoch,

do.

John Murdoch,

do.

William Johnston,

do.

John Murdoch,

do.

do.

do.

1844.

do.

1845.

do.

Forrester Squire,

1846

do.

Robert Buist,

1847.

Forrester Squire,

1848.

Robert Buist,

do.

do.

do.
do.

do.

do.

William Murdoch,

do.

do.

do.

do.

1850.

do.

do.

do.

1851.

do.

do.

do.

1849.

1852.

John Murdoch,

Gavin Martin,

1853.

do.

do.

1854.

do.

George Murie,

1855.

do.

1856.

George Murie,

do.

do.
-

do.

do.

do.

Robert Buist,

do.

1857.

do.

James A. Murdoch,

do.

1858.

do.

Robert Buist,

do.

1859.

Wm.

Murdoch,

do.

i860.

do.

do.

1861.

do.

Andrew

1862.

Forrester Squire,

Jr.,

do.
do.
Buist,

William Murdoch,

do.

do.

1863.

do.

do.

do.

1864.

do.

do.

do.

36
Deacon.
1865.

Boxmasttr,

Forrester Squire,

June, 1865, P. F. Squire,

William Murdoch,

Robert Stuart in

Clerk,

George Gray.

lieu of

Wm.

Murdoch.
1866.

Robt. Stuart,

do.

George Wilson,

do.

1867.

do.

do.

do.

1868.

do.

do.

do.

1869.

do.

do.

1870-98.

1898- 1900.
1900.

1901-5.

John Murdoch,

Dr. A. Buist,

do.

do.

William Macleish.

do.

do.

George Murdoch,

Geo. Wilson,
do.

do.

D. Marshall.

do.

Members of the Incorporation who Fought for King


AND Country at the Battle of Tibbermuir, 1664.
Thomas Dundee.

Henry

Alexander Kinnaird.

Alexander Hutton.

Paul.

Alexander Nairne.

Patrick Inglis.

George Auchenlick,

Andrew Mortimer.

William Gull.

Robert Lamb.

James Masone.

Andrew Anderson, Ensign.

Alexander Drummond, Lieutenant.

Donations and Legacies.


1681.

James Gorrie doted ;^ioo

Scots.

1689.
Christian Anderson, Spouse of John Cree, doted 500 Merki.
1714.

James Martin, Glover, doted 200 Merks.


1770.

Margret

Inglis, Fifteen Guineas.

37

EXTRACTS FROM OLD MINUTES.


23rd October, 1605.

Masters

abusing their apprentices to

pay ten pounds Scots of unlaw toties quoties unforgiven.


Apprentices abusing their masters to be lashed with
St.

22nd

Bartholomew's whips.

June,

1606.

Fials

who

fee

themselves with two

masters at once shall be fined forty shillings Scots, or

be lashed with St. Bartholomew's whips.

loth April, 1618.

Fials,

boys, or apprentices abusing one

another to pay 20/- Scots for the

first

offence

and 6

Scots for every other offence, or be lashed with St.

Bartholomew's whips, as to the Deacon shall appear


proper.

13th May, 1618.

Fials,

boys, or apprentices

them

gentlemen to entice
masters to be fined

10/-

Bartholomew's whips.
Act to pay ^ Scots

to

who go

after

purchase from their

Scots or be lashed with St.

Masters

who

toties quoties.

contravene this


38

MEMORANDUM OF

HIS MAJESTY'S CORONATION.

Which day our dread Sovereign, Charles


of England, France, and Ireland being

15th June, 1633.

King

I.,

**

accompanied with the Nobalitie of Scotland ryding


before and the Nobalitie of England ryding behind

him

"

desired out of his

own

city of the

July,

and come to

House, the
ings),

site

gracious favour to

burgh of Perth upon the 8th day of


his

own

lodging (formerly Gowrie

now occupied by

went down to the gardine

chair being sett

visit his

the County Build-

thereof. His Majestie*s

upon the wall next

where upon was ane


birks

upon the which

entry.

Wheiropun

flat

for

to the river Tay,

stage of timber

dead with

His Majestie's welcome and

thirteen of our brethren of this

our calling of Glovers, with green caps, silver strings,


reid ribbons, white shoes, with bells about their leigs,

sobering raper in their hands, and

all

other abulziment,

danced our sword dance with many


and

upon

allafallajessa,

five

being under and five above

their shoulders, three of

their feet, drinking

difficult knotts

them dancing through

wine and breaking of glasses about

them (which, God be

praised, wis acted without hurt

or skaith to any), which drew us to great charges

amounting to the sum of 350 merks

remembered
lie

(i.e.,

yet

not to be

grudged), because wee was gracious-

accepted be our Sovereign and both estates to our

honour and great commendation.

39
24th December, 1730.

This day,

in

a general Court, about

the affair of the Incorporation, by a great pluralty of


votes the brethren statue and ordain that after this

date

freeman's daughters marrying any person of

all

good reputation and

of ane honest character shall be

entered freeman of the Incorporation upon the same


footing as an apprentice of the Calling, viz., for paying

100 merks Scots to the Calling, and eight pounds

Scots

in lieu of the dinner.

Glover's Yard, 17th November,

made by Colin Brown,

1737.

*'

Application was

late Provost of Perth, desiring

the favour of the Calling to allow the liberty of the

House and Yaird

The

Gospel."
grant

the

to Rev.

Wm.

Wilson to preach the

general Court accordingly consent to

request,

and

order

favour

this

to

be

registered in their books.

4th October, 1760. Meeting resolved '*that for the future

no entertainments publicly be held or payed out of the


funds,

either at

Michaelmas or through the year,

except a dinner on Saturday after the Election yearly,


to

which

all

the brethren of ye Calling

is

to be called."

CONVENER COURT.
April, 1774.

An

offer of

500 bolls of meal at 14/-

p. boll.

Glover share 80 bolls to be sold to member at iid


p. peck.

Agree to take other 500 bolls

if

other trades

40

combine.

Again

and

in 1775 to take like

share of the Convener Court's purchase at 13/6 p. boll.

20th September,

1774. Which ^^Y the brethren of the

Glover Calling of Perth, Patrick Stewart, present

Deacon, represented that

different persons

married to Glovers' daughters, and

Guild brethren or tradesmen entered


tions in this place, are insisting

who

who

are

are either

in other corpora-

on being entered as

freemen of this Corporation on footing of the Act of


24th December,

respecting the

1730,

Whereupon

freemen's daughters.

erately considering the matter,

privileges

of

the Calling, delib-

and finding that such

procedure will be found pernicious and evidently very


hurtful to the community, therefore the Calling rescind

and

nullify the said

Act

for

now and

for ever,

hereby further enact and ordain that none


shall

and they
in future

be admitted a freeman of said Incorporation

upon the terms and footing of the foresaid Act, except


they be operative Glovers and of good fame and not

connected with the Guildry nor any other trades


this place or

anywhere

else.

And even

in

they must

have a discharge on their indenture, or a proper


certificate of their

time honestly.

moral character and serving their

And

if

any operative Glover

shall

marry a freeman's daughter, and not serving as an


apprentice to this Calling, shall pay the same dues as

41

an apprentice,

viz.,

one hundred merks Scots and eight

pounds Scots to the Calling with the other ordinary

And

dues.

further,

it is

enacted and agreed that such

of the freemen's daughters as are already married to

unfreemen are by

this

Act

freemen of this Incorporation.

from

excluded
It is also

being

understood

that such freemen's daughters as shall be hereafter

married to operative Glovers giving the said privilege


shall only be

1777.

Duke of
in

such as have kept their virginity.

AthoU made an Honorary Member

bringing troops to the service

of

for zeal

the State in

suppression of the Rebellion in the Colonies (America).

9th February, 1778.

In a General Meeting of the Incorpora-

tion, " being willing to testify to their loyalty to

His

Majesty, hereby authorise the Deacon to procure two


volunteers to be enlisted upon the expense of the

Incorporation.

And

to testify their regard to

Grace the Duke of Atholl

in his spirited

His

measures for

the service of his country, do hereby agree that the

two volunteers

shall be delivered over to

gratis to serve in the

His Grace

Regiment of Atholl Highlanders

presently raising by him."

The meeting,
Duke

**

considering that His Grace the

of Atholl has on different occasions of late

shown a

particular regard to this Burgh, especially

42
to

have

Incorporation,

this

unanimously received

and admitted the Most Noble Prince John Duke of


Atholl

be

to

freeman of this Incorporation

of

Glovers, and to the haill liberties and privileges as


is

The Clerk and

enjoyed by any other freeman."

the Deacon to wait upon His Grace and present the

same

to

him

in the

name

of the Incorporation.

**N0 POPERY."
2gth

June,

1779.

proposed to be introduced in

Bill

In a special meet-

Parliament for tolerating popery.


ing of the Calling

(in

the reign of George

III.).

" Afraid of the melancholy consequences

must ensue upon the passing of such a

that

Bill in the

progress of that religion, fraughted with the most

impious

avows such
being so
*terroir,'

civil

and

openly

to the simplicity of the Gospel,

Popery

and

absurdities

favourable to

superstition,

tyranny,

so subversive of morality

society,

and

all

productive

of

among men

in

so

along has propagated by

fire

and sword and persecution, that such can have no


legal

toleration

themselves

duty

to

in

their

in

Scotland."

their

King,

allegiance

agree

to

The
to

means.

God and

join

porations in opposing the Bill by

Calling

all

other

find

their

Incor-

constitutional

"

43

"Which
1779.

20th October,

the

of

day

in

Members within the Glovers'

Thomas

Stewart,

present

Deacon,

among them

there

Hall,

if

the

that

told

occasion of the meeting was to enquire

be

meeting

a general

any discord

before the Sacrament which

is

soon

to be dispensed in this place."

(This meeting was continued for

1783.

*'

many

years).

In a general meeting of the Calling, they having

taking into consideration the present scarcity of meal

County, and that the poor cannot

in this part of the

get meal to purchase, unanimously resolve to purchase

100 bolls of corn for the poor of the Trade, to be

ground into meal.

1784.

"The
that

into

consideration

serious

not only the freemen but their servants and

were getting into a most

apprentices

gaming

practice of
at

taking

meeting,

cards,

dice,

at all

pitch

abominable

hours of the day by playing

stone,

quiots,

and the

Trade found

resolve that any freeman of the Glover

gaming

in

neglecting
his

that
their

freedom

for

offending be loose

Servants
charged."

working

manner

during

business,

shall

years.
all

at

title

the

working
be

like,

hours,

deprived

of

That any apprentice so


to be

made

Leadside

a freeman.
to

be

dis-

44
6th

"The
1784.

February,

Deacon represented

the

to

meeting that he had been repeatedly abused and


sulted by the said
in his

tion
is

own

in-

Ritchie, both in public and

James

house, which being taken into considera-

by the meeting, they

in respect that

directly contrary to their bye-laws,

that the said

such conduct

were of opinion

James Richie was unworthy of being

continued in their Society, and do hereby expel him

from the same, and from

all benefits, privileges,

and

annuities thereof in all time coming."

1788.

"The

meeting so hereby enact and declare that any

person or persons

who

shall receive charity in

money

or otherwise from the Calling, and at their death

any property without lawful children

shall leave
life

in

at the time, the said property shall in the first

place

go and be applied

towards

paying for the

advances made by the Incorporation."

1792.

"The

meeting appoint the Deacon and Bailie Grant

to inspect the situations of the different seats in the

West and

the Middle Kirks,

and

to

report.

The

meeting agreed that their wright immediately enclose


the seats in the Middle Kirk from each other, and

make a proper
holding
seat."

his

recess

Bible

in

the

Deacon's

seat

for

and the cloth that covers the

45
1793*

"The

meeting having taking into consideration the

alarming prospect of scarcity of grain, resolve to


purchase oats from foreign parts or otherwise to the
extent of five hundred pounds sterling, the freight
to be included.

Cowan,

Bailie

office-bearers,

The meeting appoint


Deacon

Stewart,

correspond

to

in

Bailie Grant,

with

along
different

the

quarters

about the business, and carry this resolution into


effect."

4th January, 1794.

"The

meeting having taken into con-

and public

sideration the gallantry

Graham

Balgowan

of

Thomas

spirit of

Toulon, as stated in the

at

despatches from Lord Musgrave, and being desirous


of showing their sense of his services by the highest

regard

in

their

power.

Do

hereby vote

him the

freedom of the Incorporation, and ordered their


solution to be intimated to

re-

him by the Deacon."

COPY OF LETTER FROM THOMAS GRAHAM, ESQ. OF BALGOWAN.


"

On my

arrival here late last night I found

of 4th inst.

letter

intimating the resolution of the

Glover Incorporation on that day.


flattered

that

me

your

by their approbation of

receive the freedom

feel

highly

conduct,

and

which they have done

the honour of voting me, with


(Signed)

my

much

gratitude."

THOS. GRAHAM.


46

in

Meeting resolved to join other Incorporations

^*

July, 1803.

the

presenting

City,

making

Majesty,

offer

humble address

that in case of

the actual appearance of an

His

to

invasion or

enemy on the

coast,

may

they will give their personal service that

be

thought advisable."
5th December, 1803.

The

Lord Lieutenant of the County

addressed a letter to

what the Glovers

ment of

certain

the

Incorporation

towards the equip-

will contribute

volunteer

corps

The meeting agreed

Perthshire.

enquiring

now

raising

in

to contribute 25/-

Scots on each hundred pounds Scots of rental.

PART OF THE DUES OF COURT.


October,

1810.

"

It

was stated

to the meeting that

by

immemorial usage every freeman at his entry had

Deacon a

to deliver to the

thereof to pay a certain

gloves
it

but as no

sum

as the price of

sum was taxed

The meeting

freemen at entry pay

5/-

same or an

enact that in

to the

such

as the value thereof,

often proved difficult to recover the

adequate sum.

his

pair of gloves, or in lieu

Deacon

future

in lieu

of

gloves."

14th January, 1828.

Green Cloth.

Celebration
"At

of 2nd Centenary of the

Perth, and within the Glovers'

Hall there, 31 members being present.

The Deacon

47

and several of the members called the attention of


the brethren to a

number of important and

interest-

ing events that have taken place in the history and


of the

transactions

Incorporation

two

during the

hundred years that had elapsed since this now ancient


cloth

had

first

The meeting

covered their table.

hereby express their satisfaction at these details, and


take this opportunity of expressing the high respect

and grateful

memory

with which they cherish the

feelings

of their departed brethren,

who

long period had managed the Calling's


so

much

during that
affairs

integrity, prudence, independence,

sense as has been the

with

and good

means under Providence

of

raising this Incorporation to its present highly pros-

perous and flourishing


'*

And

the brethren sincerely hope that

descendents meet
to

at

same pleasure

will find the

the present

of

put on record that

is

when

their

the lapse of another century

the occasion

celebrate

(which

state.

it

in

meeting

should be so kept),

reviewing the actions

of the present and future generation of the Glovers*

Calling as

is

now enjoyed by

this

meeting

in

re-

viewing the history of their worthy ancestors."

8th March, 1815.

Laws.
meeting

Petition

The Deacon
to

consider

against the alteration of


stated

the

Corn

that he had called the

propriety

of

sending

48
petition to Parliament against any alteration of the

present Corn Laws, which being considered by the

meeting, they resolved to petition both

Water Supply

Parliament against any such alteration.

The meeting appointed

for Perth.

Houses of

the Deacon and

Bailie

Luke

Town

Council and other trades to consider what

as a

Committee

may be adopted

measures

confer

to

with

the

obtaining a proper

for

supply of pure water for Perth.

nth December. Seats

in

"The Deacon

Churches.

to the meeting that the Tov/n Council

the enlarging or rebuilding

of

the

had

stated

in

view

West Church,

providing the several Incorporations would agree to

be at the expense of seating their proportion of seats

new Church, and

in the

Sherriff

be referred to the
fix

the situa-

Incorporations' seats equally

which proposal appeared

eligible,

1831.

it

and the architect employed to

tions of the different

fair

that

to the meeting a

one."

Petition
1831.

to the

King

in favour of the

Reform

Bill,

At Perth, and within the Glovers' Hall thereof,

the following resolution being moved, was unanimously

adopted
regret

First,

that this Incorporation view with

and the utmost anxiety and alarm the rejection

by the House of Lords of that excellent plan of

Reform brought

in

by His Majesty's Ministers, ap-

49

proved of by the

Commons House

of Parliament,

and supported by the prayers and heartfelt wishes of


the great majority of the people.

warm

Second, that feeling

interest in the happiness

and prosperity of

the country, attachment to the laws, and conciliation


of the realm, resolve to present an address to His

Majesty,

beseeching

Ministers in

office,

him

to

continue

his

present

and to adopt such constitutional

measures for carrying through Parliament triumphantly


this great plan of

Reform

also, that

a petition be

presented to Earl Grey and His Majesty's Ministers


not to feel disconcerted by the treatment the Bill

has received in the House of Lords.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE
OF THE

(5Iover incorporation

ot

Ipertb

Appointed to consider as to Voting by Proxy


AND REVISAL of EXISTING ByE-LaWS.

The Committee
to

have carefully considered the remit made

them by the Michaelmas Meeting

of the Incorporation

held on 5th October, 1904, which remit

is

as follows:

" Major Buist called attention to this matter and

moved

number of members who

**

that in view of the large

**

non-resident and unable to attend meetings,

it

is

desirable

" that voting by proxy should be allowed, and that


'*

are

remitted to a Committee to enquire whether there

it

is

be

any

''obstacle to this being enacted as a Bye-law or Act of the

" Incorporation either with or without the authority of the


" Court, and
"existing

further that

Bye-laws

"what amendments

or

this

Acts

Committee consider the

of the

Incorporation, and

or additions seem desirable, and to

"report on whole subject of these remits to next Michael-

"mas
"

Meeting, and this was seconded by Captain K. L.

Buist,

and

after

some discussion agreed

to.


51
**

**

It

was agreed that the Committee

Wm.

Deacon, the Boxmaster,

**of the District

shall consist of the

Blair, Perth,

and members

Committee."

The Committee now beg


I.

Enquiries were

to report as follows

VOTING

BY PROXY.

made regarding

the

practice of other

Trade Incorporations

in

Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Perth,

was found that

in

no case had voting by proxy been

and

it

established or been in use, and that the

Court had not

been asked to sanction such a method of voting.

by proxy

is

fore requires the

authority of

custom or usage to establish

would be necessary
it

common

not recognised at

law,

and

Voting
it

Contract or long

Statute

In such circumstances

it.

for the Incorporation either to

unanimously or try an application to the Court

sanction,

but

it

adopt
for its

rule

or sanction such a funda-

Besides the Committee are not satisfied

that voting by proxy

is

a good thing in

the whole they agreed to report

meantime

it

seems very doubtful whether the Court

would approve of such a


mental change.

there-

to adopt

that

it

itself,

and upon

was inexpedient

it.

ACTS OR BYE-LAWS.

At present these are contained

in

a separate book

chronological order as extracted from the

in

Minutes from

1593 to the present time, but this book contains no index.

52

There

however, also a Dictionary or Abridgement of

is,

the Acts from 1593 to 1794 arranged alphabetically.

The

Committee examined both books and found that the most


of the Acts have
effect

now become

obsolete or ceased to have

following upon the Act of Parliament of 1846 abolish-

ing the exclusive privileges of trading in Burghs and the

subsequent Act of the Corporation of 30th April,

1847,

resolving that no Freeman's apprentices should thereafter

be admitted.

These, in conjunction with the decay of the

Trades of Skinners and Glovers


all

acts

or

rules

regarding Masters,

Tradesmen,

Watersidemen,

in Perth,

rendered useless
Apprentices,

Fials,

Punishments, Gloves,

Other Acts have also ceased through non-

Leather, &c.

usage, such as attendances at Burials, Church,

&c.

Skins,

Acts which are

more or

still

less in force

considered by the Committee, viz.


4th October, 1648.
elected on

Deacon

and Courts,

were specially

and other

Officers to be

Wednesday after Michaelmas.


Bowing at Election times.

Boxmaster's Accounts to be

13th January, 1677.

4th October, 1680.


in

4th October, 1707.

Deacon
5th

given

on Saturday before Elections.

until

January,

No

Freeman

to

be on Leet for

he has served twice as Boxmaster.

1765,

and

30th

September,

1780.

Eleemosynaries not to vote,


loth October, 1767.

Minors

excluded from Voting at

Election.

26th September, 1774, and 9th March, 1825.

Law

not to be admitted.

Sons

in


53

Minors expunged from

14th September, 1789.

qualified

Roll.

9th October, 1700.

Medicines and

Medical attendance

for poor.

23rd October, 1793.

Acts

as to Calling's funds to be

confirmed by a second Meeting,


7th October, 1795.

Cheques

Deacon

to be signed by

along with Boxmaster.

Boxmaster to deposit

27th September, 1802

funds

in

Bank Account and not have more than ;^50 on


hand

at

any time.

20th September,

1820.

Deacon

to call

Meetings on

Requisition.

29th December, 1828.

The Committee were

of opinion that

to continue the Acts as to

that a

member should be

eligible as

Annuity Scheme.
Bowing

at

it

was unnecessary

Election times or

twice a Boxmaster before being

Deacon, and as regards voting by minors,

it

was

considered right to modify the rule to the extent of allowing

members over

the

case

The

of at

Committee

18 years of age to vote as

least

was done

one other Incorporation

further

considered

the

in

Perth.

Bye-laws and

Standing Orders of other Incorporations, and

especially

those of the Wright Incorporation of Perth, and

commend

in

now

re-

the Incorporation to adopt Bye-laws and Regu-

lations of the following tenor, viz.

(The following Bye-laws are given as revised and adopted


at

Meeting of Incorporation on 4th October, 1905.)

54
I.

There

I.

each

year

Meetings,

MEETINGS

shall be

but

may

two

AND PROCEDURE.

fixed meetings of the Incorporation

other

meetings, to

be

called

be convened by the Deacon

when

Ordinary
required,

and there may be Special Meetings called on requisition or


otherwise as aftermentioned.
2.

One

of said fixed meetings, called

Meeting, shall be held on the

At

first

the Michaelmas

Wednesday

in October.

meeting the election of Office-Bearers and Com-

this

mittees will be

made and other

business of which notice has

been given as aftermentioned disposed

The

of.

other fixed

meeting, called the Audit Meeting, shall be held in Sep-

tember on a Saturday not

less

than twenty-one days before

the date of the Michaelmas Meeting, at which (ist)

The

Boxmaster's accounts shall be examined and remitted to the


Auditors

(2nd) Nominations shall be

ment of Office-Bearers
motion

for the

The Agenda
settled

3.

and

made

for ensuing year

Michaelmas Meeting

for the appoint(3rd) Notices of

shall be given in

(4th)

of Business for the Michaelmas Meeting to be

Any

(5th)

The Deacon

other ordinary business disposed

shall be

the Incorporation

bound

of.

to call a Special Meeting of

upon receiving a written

requisition,

properly dated and addressed to him, and subscribed by

seven or more members of the Incorporation, specifying the

purpose for which the meeting

is

desired,

and that within

ten days of the receipt thereof, and in case of his delay or

55
refusal to

summon such meeting

within such period, the

Clerk shall be bound to call the same on being satisfied of


the requisition having been

made

to the Deacon.

In the

event of the death of the Deacon, the Clerk shall, on his

own

initiative call a

meeting of the Incorporation within a

fortnight of that event.

4.

tion

Only those candidates who have been put


by being duly proposed and seconded

Meeting shall be eligible for election to


election.

at

must vouch to the

nomina-

the Audit

on the day of

office

Any member nominating a candidate

in his absence

in

for

any

office

satisfaction of the Incor-

poration that the nominee will take

otherwise the

office,

nomination will not be accepted


5.

All Ordinary

shall be called

and Special Meetings of the Incorporation

by notice or circular issued by the Clerk and

delivered by the Officer to those

members

resident within

the bounds of the Burgh of Perth at least twenty-four hours


before the hour of meeting, which shall in general be halfpast seven o'clock in the evening.

The

circular shall specify

the business to be brought before the meeting so far as

known.

Such members resident beyond the bounds of the

burgh as desire
tion

may have

to be notified of

notices posted to

the notices are issued to the

them

members

burgh on signifying to the Clerk


such notices sent to them.

meetings of the Incorporaat the

same time

resident within the

in writing their desire to

The

as

have

notices of the Michaelmas

56

Meeting with programme of business shall be issued to


all

members

in the

United Kingdom not

The

days before the meeting.

named

to the Advisory

members

non-resident

(hitherto

the District Committee) not less than seven days

before the meeting.

attend

than fourteen

notices of the Audit Meeting

members and

shall be issued to resident

Committee representing

less

This Committee

any Ordinary

or

Special

may

also be invited to

whenever the

Meeting

Deacon considers the business of such importance


render this expedient.

as to

The Michaelmas and Audit Meetings

shall as a rule be held at 12 o'clock noon.

6.

At

preside,

man

all

meetings of the Incorporation the Deacon shall

and

in his

absence the meeting shall choose a Chair-

pro tempore.

At

all

quorum, and the Chairman

such meetings seven shall be a


shall

have a deliberate vote, and

also, in case of equality, a casting vote.

All

members

of the

Incorporation of the age of 18 and upwards shall be entitled


to vote at all meetings of the Incorporation.

7.

At

all

meetings of the Incorporation the minutes of the

previous meeting shall be read.

No

discussion shall be

allowed on the minutes except on the question whether they


are a correct record of the matters transacted.
8.

No

motion, not directly arising out of the discussion

regularly before the Incorporation, shall be taken up without

notice given at the previous meeting, unless with consent of

three-fourths of the

members

present.

57
g.

It shall

be competent for any

tion intending to submit a

motion

member

of the Incorpora-

for its consideration either

(a)

to give notice thereof at any meeting of the Incorporation,

or

(6)

to send notice thereof in writing to the Deacon,

unless the Incorporation or the Deacon, as the case

and

may

be,

otherwise determine, a meeting for the consideration of such

motion shall be held within one month from the date of such
If the

notice.

proposer does not attend, or declines to bring

forward his motion,

member

to insist

had given notice

shall be

on the motion

competent

in the

shall

11.

any other

same manner

shall

as

if

he

more than once on any

speak

question (save in explanation), except the

who

for

at the previous meeting.

No member

10.

it

have the right of

mover

of a motion,

reply.

Every member of the Incorporation

shall,

in

all

meetings of the Incorporation, carry and behave himself with

decency and propriety, avoiding


language, and

all

all

improper or unbecoming

noisy or violent altercation and debate,

addressing what he has to state on the subject before the


meeting, to the Deacon in an orderly manner, and abstaining

from personalities and unnecessary

reflections

hurt the feelings of others, and shall pay


the orders of the Deacon

when

all

tending to

due deference to

his interference

is

found

necessary to preserve regularity and order in the meetings,

and give him every assistance


same.

in preserving

and restoring the

58

When

12.

a motion and one or more amendments have

been duly proposed and seconded, the

last

amendment

shall

be put against that immediately preceding, and then the one

which
on

is

till

carried shall be put against the preceding,

and so

there remains only one amendment, betwixt which

and the

original

motion the vote shall be taken by a show of

hands or by calling the

may

the meeting

roll as

prefer,

and

the result shall be declared by the Chairman of the meeting.

13.

No one

is

from any resolution

entitled to enter dissent

except at the meeting at which

it

was passed, nor

is

any one

motion to rescind a resolution

entitled to give notice of a

at

the meeting at which such resolution was passed.

14.

The

Committees as they see


duties to

may

Incorporation

be

fit,

exercised

and

or

appoint and maintain such


shall assign the

performed by

particular they shall annually at the

powers and

them,

and

Michaelmas Meeting

appoint the Advisory Committee, hereinbefore referred


consist of not

in

more than seven members

to,

to

resident in Scot-

land, excluding Perth.

15.

of the

Report or
past

Summary

of the Minutes or proceedings

year shall each

year immediately after the

Michaelmas Meeting be printed and a copy sent to each

member

of the Incorporation.

shall also be sent to each

Michaelmas Meeting.

A print of the year's Accounts

member unable

to be present at the


59

II. ENTRANTS.

The persons who may be admitted members

i6.

Incorporation are sons of

members only

in

of the

accordance with

former Acts and long usage.


17.

Applicants for membership must be at least fourteen

years

of

Each

age.

applicant

must

appear

personally

before a meeting of the Incorporation and by production

of Extract Entry from the register of births or otherwise


satisfy

the meeting of his relationship and age, and on

admission must promise to be a faithful brother.


18.

The dues

of entry payable by the respective applicants

before being admitted shall be as follows

Under 25 years of age,


25 and under 30,

30 and under
35 and under

35,

...

10

...

20

...

100

50

40,

40 and upwards,

Besides 14s for stamp duty and dues of court.

III. OFFICE-BEARERS.
ig.

The

Office-Bearers shall consist of Deacon, Boxmaster,

Clerk and Officer to be elected annually at the Michaelmas


Meeting,

all

of

whom

must either be resident or have a place

of business in the Burgh of Perth.

The Deacon, Boxmaster and

Officer

must be members

of the Incorporation, and no one shall be eligible for the


Offices of

Deacon and Boxmaster who has not been

at least

6o
seven years a member.

The

Office-Bearers shall be paid

may from time

such salaries or allowances as


fixed at the
20. In the

to time be

Michaelmas Meetings.
event of the death or resignation of any Office-

Bearer an Ordinary or Special Meeting shall be convened to


fill

the vacancy until next Michaelmas Meeting.

21.

The Deacon

generally supervise
tion,

and give

as the
all

head of the Incorporation

shall

matters pertaining to the Incorpora-

special attention to the feuing operations of

the Incorporation.
22.

The Boxmaster must

missions to the satisfaction of


extent of

He must

3^500.

security for his

find

intro-

the Incorporation to

keep

regular

Cash

the

Book

containing his whole transactions from day to day, which

must be regularly balanced monthly and produced


Incorporation

when

required.

He

to the

shall also keep a ledger

and other necessary books, and prepare Abstract of Accounts


for the
in

Auditor

and

his

Accounts so audited shall be given

on the Saturday before the Michaelmas Meeting.


23. All

monies exceeding ^0 received by the Boxmaster

on behalf of the Incorporation shall at

Deacon be paid by him


the Union
as the

Bank

into a Deposit or

this

sight of the

Cash Account with

of Scotland, Limited, or such other

Incorporation

may from time

Deposit Receipts must be in the

name

to

time

of the

Bank

appoint.

Deacon and

6i

Boxmaster, and Cheques on the current Bank Account must


be signed by the Deacon and Boxmaster.
shall not retain in his

hands

The Boxmaster

any time more than 50

at

belonging to the Incorporation.

The Clerk

24.

shall attend all meetings of the Incorpora-

and Committees, keep

tion

Minutes of the proceedings,

conduct the correspondence, and perform such other duties


as shall be required of

The

25.

him from time

to time.

Officer shall be Hall Keeper, attend all meetings

of the Incorporation or Committees, distribute the notices

convening
directions

meetings
of

the

and

Deacon

generally
in

all

give

effect

to

the

matters concerning the

Incorporation.

IV. ELEEMOSYNARY ALLOWANCES AND ANNUITIES.


26.

Allowances as hitherto shall ex gratia be made to

members

in

need and to orphans and daughters of Glovers

requiring assistance, but that only to such extent as

may

from time to time be determined by the Incorporation or


exceptional circumstances by the

No member
entitled

in

Deacon and Boxmaster.

while in receipt of such allowance shall be

to vote.

Widows

of

members may

also

when

necessary be granted allowances during any suspension of


the Annuities after provided.
27.

Medical Officer shall be appointed and paid by the

Incorporation for

the benefit of such local and resident


62

members

as

may

desire his services, and medicines shall be

supplied on his prescription.


28.

Members 50 years

of age

and upwards and who have

been twenty years members and widows of members shall be


entitled to such annuities as the state of the funds will permit,

which annuities are

at present as follows

Members 50 years of age and 20 years a member, ;20 per ann.


Members 55 years of age,
2^^
,,
Members 60 years of age,
;"3o
,,

Widows
all

of members,

;^3o

which annuities are payable quarterly

in

,,

advance, by

equal instalments, on the ist October, ist January, ist April,

and

ist July, or half-yearly,

in

advance, at the terms of

The widows

Martinmas and Whitsunday.

are entitled to such annuity, but

entering into another marriage.

it

of all

members

shall be forfeited

The

on their

rate of annuities shall

not be increased unless and until an investigation has been

made

into the state of the affairs of the Incorporation

competent

person,

by a

and a report received warranting an

increase.

29.

No

claim shall be allowed on the annuity fund

made within

six

months

after its

if

becoming due, and no

greater arrear than six months' allowance shall be paid

the Incorporation, should the


for the proper

of existence.

payments or

member

fail

not

by

entitled neglect to call

to produce the usual evidence

63

v. MOTIONS AFFECTING LAWS.

No

30.

Laws

alteration or repeal of these

shall be

made

Laws, and no new

unless at a Michaelmas Meeting on

notice given at the Audit Meeting, and

upon a resolution

supported by at least three-fourths of the members present

and

entitled to vote thereon.

31.

and

That the foregoing are the Laws of the Incorporation,

all

previous Acts and

Laws

are hereby repealed.

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Wilson^ Qeorge
The annals of the
Glover Incorporation

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CARDS OR

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