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Sentences type

http://www.englishpractice.com/grammar/conversion-compound-sentence-simplesentence/

A compound sentence can be converted into a simple sentence by reducing the number of
clauses to one.
Read the examples given below:
Compound: He got up and walked away.
Simple: Getting up, he walked away.
Here we reduce the clause he got up into the participial phrase getting up.
More examples are given below:
Compound: He must return the money, or he will be punished.
Simple: He must return the money to escape punishment.
Here we reduce the clause or he will be punished into the infinitive phrase to escape
punishment.
Compound: They not only looted the shop but also set fire to it.
Simple: Besides looting the house, they also set fire to it.
Here the coordinate clause they not only looted the house is reduced to the prepositional
phrase besides looting the house.
Compound: He ran away and thus escaped punishment.
Simple: He ran away in order to escape punishment.
Here the clause thus escaped punishment is replaced by the infinitive phrase in order to
escape punishment.
Thus we have seen that compound sentences can be changed to simple sentences by reducing
clauses to participial, prepositional or infinitive phrases.

Exercise
Convert the following compound sentences into simple sentences
1.

You must run fast, otherwise you cannot catch the train.

2.

The rain stopped and we continued our journey.

3.

He is rich, yet he is unhappy.

4.

You must not repeat this, otherwise you will be punished.

Answers
1.

You must run fast in order to catch the train.

2.

The rain having stopped we continued our journey.

3.

Despite being rich he is unhappy.

4.

You must not repeat this in order to escape punishment.

http://www.englishpractice.com/grammar/forming-compound-sentence-joiningsimple-sentences/

A compound sentence has two or more coordinate clauses. Hence it can be formed only with
the help of coordinating conjunctions.
By using and, bothand, as well as and not onlybut also
These conjunctions merely add one statement to another.
The man got up. He walked away.
The man got up and walked away.
He had many supporters. He also had several detractors.
Not only had he many supporters but also several detractors.
John got a prize. Tom also got a prize.
John as well as Tom got a prize.
By using but, yet, nevertheless, whereas
These conjunctions add two contrasting statements.
He is ill. He is cheerful.
He is ill but he is cheerful.
He is rich. He is unhappy.
He is rich, yet unhappy.

He is very industrious. His brother is quite the reverse.


He is very industrious whereas his brother is quite the reverse.
By using or, eitheror, nor, neithernor, otherwise, else
These conjunctions are used when two alternative facts or statements have to be joined.
You can have tea. You can have coffee.
You can have tea or coffee.
He does not drink. He does not smoke.
He neither drinks nor smokes.
You must pay the fine. You will be punished.
You must pay the fine, otherwise you will be punished.

http://www.englishpractice.com/grammar/formation-complex-sentence/

A complex sentence has at least one main clause and one or moresubordinate clauses. The
subordinate clause may be a noun clause, an adjective clause or an adverb clause.
Forming a complex sentence with a noun clause
We need justice. That should be known to everybody.
That we need justice should be known to everybody. (Here the noun clause that we need
justice is the subject of the sentence.)
The above sentence can also be written with a preparatory it.
It should be known to everybody that we need justice. (Here the noun clause that we need
justice is used in apposition to it.)

More examples are given below.


He had been promoted. I told him that.
I told him that he had been promoted. (Here the noun clause that he had been promoted is
the object of the verb told.)
They proposed to do so. I was surprised at that.
I was surprised at what they supposed to do. (Here the noun clause what they proposed to
do is the object of the preposition at.)
Forming a complex sentence with an adjective clause
These clauses are usually connected by the relative clauses who, which and that.
The thief was caught. He had stolen the bicycle.
The thief who had stolen the bicycle was caught.
This is a great opportunity. It should not be lost.
This is a great opportunity which should not be lost.
This is an old building. It was built by my grand father.
This is an old building which was built by my grand father.

Forming a complex sentence with a relative adverb


These clauses are usually connected to the main clause by the relative adverbs when,
where and why.
This is the shop. The burglary was committed here.
This is the shop where the burglary was committed.
His father died. At that time he was a young boy.
At the time when his father died he was a young boy.
You didnt accept the offer. Could you tell me the reason?
Could you tell me the reason why you didnt accept the offer.

Forming a complex sentence with an adverb clause


An adverb clause is usually introduced by the subordinating conjunctions when, as, since,
till, where, if, though, unless, that, lest, whether, whereas etc.
I went to his office. He was not there.
When I went to his office he was not there.
There was little rain this year. The crops have dried up.
As he was little rain this year, the crops have dried up.
He has apologized. We will forget all about it.
Since he has apologized we will forget all about it.
You finish working. I will wait here.
I will wait here until you finish working.
There is heavy rainfall here. Grapes will not grow at such a place.
Grapes will not grow where there is heavy rainfall.
He is not educated. He has practical knowledge.
Though he is not educated, he has practical knowledge.
It may rain. Then the match will be cancelled.
If it rains, the match will be cancelled.

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