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Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.

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Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.

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Kano Model
By the end of this session
you will be able to:

Improve product design
and marketing using the
Kano model

Purpose
Suppose you are planning to develop a product. One of the fundamental design questions to
consider is to decide which features to include and which features to leave out. Essentially a
designer needs to know what customers need. Understanding this allows designers to
respond to these needs by focusing their resources on what matters the most.
We all know from experience that we don’t view various features of a product equally. Some
are very important while others are cosmetic. Some features are nice to have, but their lack
won’t be a great concern.
Considering that customers are different and have different requirements, it is easy to see
why some products fail. In a competitive market, a product that does not satisfy its target
customer has little chance to survive.
Hence, designers and marketers need to know how to choose between features while
developing and promoting a product. There is a powerful technique you can use for this
purpose known as the Kano Model.
This model was developed by Prof. Noriaki Kano in the 1980s as a way to classify customer
satisfaction when using a product or service (Kano 1984).

Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.

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In this session, you will learnError!
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Kano of
Analysis
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using a number of examples, case studies and exercises.
Objective
By the end of this session you will be able to: Improve product design and marketing using
the Kano model
Process
First you will be introduced to the theory behind the Kano model and will go through an
exercise to practice using the model. You will then learn how to collect customer feedback
systematically and use the Kano model to make conclusions on how to improve your product
design and marketing.
Relay Experience
Do you know anything about the Kano model? Have you ever used any specific technique
when deciding on the features of a product during the design process?
Relay Application
How important is it to know what customers think of your products? How important is it to
know which features to include and which features to leave out?

Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.

. Error! No text of specified style in document.|5 Slide 2 Error! No text of specified style in document. it is best to use a handy graph that captures the relationship between “customer satisfaction” and “feature presence”. Each category is then linked to a particular customer behaviour. What is the Kano Model Feature Presence Customer Satisfied Customer Satisfaction Not Implemented Fully Implemented Customer Dissatisfied In the Kano model. To see how the model works. Here is what the graph looks like: Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. features are divided into several categories.

Example A: Phone  You are a smartphone designer and want to analyse the importance of various features in order to maximise customer satisfaction. A While going through this part. We will then refer back to these examples at each step so you can see how the model works in practice. To Tutor: Ask a volunteer to read the example on the slide. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.|6 Slide 3 Error! No text of specified style in document. let’s use a number of examples. Error! No text of specified style in document. .

Error! No text of specified style in document. Example B: Airline  You work for an airline and want to improve the booking and ticketing system to increase customer satisfaction. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. B To Tutor: Ask another volunteer to read the example on the slide. .|7 Slide 4 Error! No text of specified style in document.

|8 Slide 5 Error! No text of specified style in document. Error! No text of specified style in document. . Example C: Car  C You work for a car manufacturer who is planning to release a fully electric car to the market and want to include features that lead to most sales. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. To Tutor: Ask another volunteer to read the example on the slide.

Error! No text of specified style in document.|9 Slide 6 Error! No text of specified style in document. These features are also known as: Must-be. What does this graph suggest? The must-have features are those that customers expect to see in a product and these features must work. Must-Have Features Customer Satisfied Not Implemented Fully Implemented Customer Dissatisfied To Tutor: Start by introducing the must-have features. threshold or mandatory features. Show the slide animation to reveal the must-have graph. . basic. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. They are taken for granted.

Must-Have Features Making a phone call with clear voice transmission Airline’s guarantees customers a seat on a flight once they have purchased a ticket Travelling between two locations by using only the energy stored in the battery to reduce CO2 emissions To Tutor: Ask each question. Error! No text of specified style in document. . [DISCUSSION] How do customers view a must-have feature? To Tutor: Encourage a discussion and then show the next slide to expand. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Can you suggest a must-have feature for a smartphone? Making a phone call with clear voice transmission. Can you suggest a must-have feature for an airline? Airline’s guarantees customers a seat on a flight once they have purchased a ticket. Show the corresponding example in the slide to expand and then move to the next.| 10 Slide 7 Error! No text of specified style in document. expect answers and discuss. Can you suggest a must-have feature for an electric car? Travelling between two locations by using only the energy stored in the battery to reduce CO2 emissions.

Error! No text of specified style in document. It doesn’t matter what other features the product has or how cool it is. When achieved. customers will be indifferent about it. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. .| 11 Slide 8 Error! No text of specified style in document. When a must-have feature is fully implemented and is present in a product. Must-Have Features When achieved When not achieved To Tutor: Go through the following and expand on the current discussions. It is simply assumed that the product will function with that feature. the product is viewed as broken. When the features are not present. When not achieved. if it doesn’t have a must-have feature then it is not good enough and customer satisfaction will drop significantly.

| 12 Slide 9 Error! No text of specified style in document. . Error! No text of specified style in document. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. As a result. These features are also known as: One-dimensional or linear features What does this graph suggest? When there is a direct correlation between the level of implementation of a feature and customer satisfaction. Performance Features Customer Satisfied Not Implemented Fully Implemented Customer Dissatisfied To Tutor: Show the slide animation to reveal the performance graph. the feature is categorised as a performance feature. The aim is then to provide the maximum implementation of a feature at an attractive price. vendors usually end up competing on these features with each other.

| 13 Slide 10 Error! No text of specified style in document. Performance Features Speed of Internet access and its global availability on a phone Comfort seats and legroom Travel range of an electric vehicle after a full battery charge To Tutor: Ask each question. Can you suggest a performance feature for a smartphone? Speed of Internet access and its global availability on a phone. Can you suggest a performance feature for an airline? Comfort seats and legroom. expect answers and discuss. Show the corresponding example in the slide to expand and then move to the next. [DISCUSSION] How do customers view a performance feature? To Tutor: Encourage a discussion and then show the next slide to expand. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. . Error! No text of specified style in document. Can you suggest a performance feature for an electric car? Travel range of an electric vehicle after a full battery charge.

customers respond strongly to changes in the implementation and availability of a feature. Performance Features The more the better Depends on slope Price sensitive To Tutor: Go through the following and expand on the current discussions. Hence. Depends on Slope. . the more satisfied a customer will be. a car battery that lasts longer leads to more customer satisfaction since the customer can travel longer distances without the inconvenience of recharging. Error! No text of specified style in document. When customers enquire about features of a product. customers will respond strongly to data speeds and this is one of the primary features used to compare phones from different vendors. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. The more the better. If the slope is very gentle. Customers will aim to get more performance for less money and their behaviour is sensitive to price changes such as discounts or bundling. it is mostly performance features they refer to.| 14 Slide 11 Error! No text of specified style in document. customers are somewhat indifferent to big improvements on that feature. For example. Price sensitive. If the slope is steep. For example. Performance features have a direct effect on the price of a product. The slope of the performance graph indicates how strongly the implementation of a feature is related to customer satisfaction. a significant use of a smartphone is to access the Internet. The more you can provide for a feature.

When attractive features are wellimplemented. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.| 15 Slide 12 Error! No text of specified style in document. What does this graph suggest? Attractive features are those that are unexpected. customers get very excited as these features are totally surprising and novel. Error! No text of specified style in document. These features are also known as: Delight or excitement features. customers are usually indifferent. They may not even be aware of the possibility of their existence. . These are features that customers didn’t know they might need them. These features delight customers by offering more than they expect. but once presented they will be delighted to have them. Attractive Features Customer Satisfied Not Implemented Fully Implemented Customer Dissatisfied To Tutor: Show the slide animation to reveal the attractive graph. When attractive features are not present.

Error! No text of specified style in document. expect answers and discuss. Show the corresponding example in the slide to expand and then move to the next. Can you suggest an attractive feature for an electric car? The ability of the car to self-drive to a car park. Can you suggest an attractive feature for a smartphone? Universal Internet access anywhere on the planet paid through one provider on a monthly basis. [DISCUSSION] How do customers view an attractive feature? To Tutor: Encourage a discussion and then show the next slide to expand. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.| 16 Slide 13 Error! No text of specified style in document. Can you suggest an attractive feature for an airline? Free access to an Internet enabled tablet computer for the duration of a flight. get recharged and then return back to the passenger when called To Tutor: Ask each question. Attractive Features Universal Internet access anywhere on the planet paid through one provider on a monthly basis Free access to an Internet enabled tablet computer for the duration of a flight The ability of the car to self-drive to a car park. . get recharged and then return back to the passenger when called up through a smart phone.

When achieved. When the attractive feature is not there. When not achieved. There is no linear relationship between implementation and satisfaction. . Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. leading to word-of-mouth advertisement. Attractive Features When achieved When not achieved To Tutor: Go through the following and expand on the current discussions.| 17 Slide 14 Error! No text of specified style in document. customer experience is not negatively affected. Satisfaction can go up significantly once a particular feature is implemented more than thought possible. Customers are usually eager to talk about attractive features of products to others. Error! No text of specified style in document.

Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.| 18 Slide 15 Error! No text of specified style in document. . These features are also known as: Unimportant features. What does this graph suggest? Customers are indifferent to these features no matter how much they are implemented. Indifferent Features Customer Satisfied Indifferent Not Implemented Fully Implemented Customer Dissatisfied To Tutor: Show the slide animation to reveal the indifferent graph. Their existence does not lead to customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Error! No text of specified style in document.

Type of plane used to travel with. Improving an indifferent feature does not increase customer satisfaction. Placement of the “start” button. Can you suggest an indifferent feature for an electric car? Placement of the “start” button. To Tutor: Ask each question. Indifferent Features Position of the SIM card.| 19 Slide 16 Error! No text of specified style in document. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Most customers don’t mind whether the start button is on the left or on the right of the steering wheel. Error! No text of specified style in document. Most customers are indifferent to where the SIM card slot is. [DISCUSSION] How do customers view an indifferent feature? When achieved or not achieved the customer’s behaviour does not change. expect answers and discuss. . Can you suggest an indifferent feature for an airline? Type of plane used to travel with. Most customers are indifferent to the choice of plane manufacturer used by the airline. Show the corresponding example in the slide to expand and then move to the next. Can you suggest an indifferent feature for a smartphone? Position of the SIM card.

Reverse Features Customer Satisfied Not Implemented Fully Implemented Customer Dissatisfied To Tutor: Show the slide animation to reveal the reverse graph. What does this graph suggest? When there is a high degree of implementation on these features. Error! No text of specified style in document. Some customers like inclusion of high-tech and novel features while others might actively aim to avoid them and consider these features as over-kill. These features are also known as: Undesired features. Reverse features proves that customers do not think the same. they actually reduce satisfaction. . Existence of these features is often seen as unnecessary and a customer is put off in buying the product thinking that they are paying for something they don’t need.| 20 Slide 17 Error! No text of specified style in document. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.

Many customers have their own tablets and portable game devices and my not be interested to pay a premium for inclusion of these displays. Error! No text of specified style in document. . Can you suggest a reverse feature for an airline? Free food for short flights. not to eat or buy food on-board rather than paying for an over-priced ticket that includes free food. Reverse Features A 20 Mega Pixel camera Free food for short flights Digital displays for backseats To Tutor: Ask each question. Can you suggest a reverse feature for an electric car? Digital displays for backseats. On the other hand a particular segment of customers (such as innovators or early adapters) might be interested in a super high-resolution camera on their phone. It is usually assumed that free food served on board leads to a great surcharge on the ticket price. customers may prefer to take their own food. Show the corresponding example in the slide to expand and then move to the next. Can you suggest a reverse feature for a smartphone? A 20 Mega Pixel camera. expect answers and discuss.| 21 Slide 18 Error! No text of specified style in document. For many customers this feature can be seen negatively as it fills up data storage quickly. much more than the price of the food itself. [DISCUSSION] How do customers view a reverse feature? Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. As a result.

their interests do not suddenly change after a certain implementation threshold. For example. they are not supremely satisfied when an undesired feature is missing (they just prefer it) or supremely dissatisfied when an undesired feature is fully implemented (they just rather not have it). .| 22 Error! text of specified style in document. Unlike attractive or must-have features. Error! No Reverse features have a linear inverseNo correlation between satisfaction and implementation. text of specified style in document. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.

the attractive graph will gradually shift towards the performance graph and then towards the must-have graph. Error! No text of specified style in document. Let’s say you have a product that has several attractive features. they become must-have features. They will be noticed only when they are missing. Those in turn become must-have features and suppliers will start to compete on price and brand alone. Hence. Today’s delight features will eventually turn into performance features and competitors start to compete on performance and price. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.| 23 Slide 19 Error! No text of specified style in document. a feature is developed to such an extent that further improvements will be inconsequential. Here is what we get. . those features that were once attractive will gradually turn into performance features and in turn and over time. [DISCUSSION] What’s really interesting about the Kano model is how different aspects of this model is affected by time. As a particular technology matures. What happens when in a few years time the technology becomes more mainstream? As time moves forward more technologies are developed and current technologies become established. Eventually. Another way to see this is that customer satisfaction will gradually deteriorate for a given feature as customers get used to it. To Tutor: Show the arrow in the slide to emphasise. The Kano Features Customer Satisfied Indifferent Not Implemented Fully Implemented Customer Dissatisfied Let’s put it all together. This can be seen on the graph. The features are unique and required significant research and investment to develop them.

the costlier it was and the more appeal it had. Error! No text of specified style in document. At first. they have been tube-based (CRT). In fact. flatness became a performance feature. you may find it hard to find a retailer that sells CRT TVs anymore. The flatter and lager a TV. For much of the history of TVs. as the technology became more established. Beginning in the 90s and mostly in the noughties manufacturers started to offer flat TVs and monitors. By the second decade of this century. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. the feature was extremely novel and expensive. . Over time.| 24 [STORY] Error! No text of specified style in document. The gradual technological progress has turned flatness from something very novel to something that is expected with specific consequences on customer behaviour. Let’s consider an example such as televisions. flat TV became a basic feature (must-have) and you can buy fairly large and thin TVs at a very reasonable price from an average local retailer.

What would a customer think of this product? When most of the features of a product fall under the must-have category. Consider a manual toothbrush. . Can you provide an example of such a product? To Tutor: Expect suggestions and then explain the following example. What would a customer think of this product? When a product’s features consist mainly of must-have and performance features. Suppose a product has mostly must-have and performance features. the product becomes a commodity. customers will look for discounts and bargains to see who gives the most for their money. Customers will aim to get the cheapest option that does the job. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Customer’s Perception Mostly Must-Have Mostly Must-Have & Performance Mostly Attractive Let’s consider a number of scenarios… Suppose a product has mostly must-have features. Error! No text of specified style in document. A customer is likely to buy a recognisable brand from a local supermarket based on availability and price. Show the image of the example in the slide. Most of the features are must-have and are well-established.| 25 Slide 20 Error! No text of specified style in document. Their behaviour is only influenced by the availability of the product and the brand value in their minds.

As you saw with reverse features. People start talking about it and competitors rush in to replicate the features. The Kano model and the data collection method explained in the next section can help you identify the presence of different types of customers. To Tutor: Expect suggestions and then explain the following example. You can then apply segmentation analysis to see how each set views a particular feature. Suppose a product has mostly attractive features. Customers are price-sensitive so internet providers must constantly consider discounts and bundling to attract customers. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Internet access is now a well-established technology and many features are must-haves. Internet providers compete on offering a faster speed. You may then need to decide if you should design variations of your products so that one variation appeals more to one type of customer. Consider broadband providers. Can you provide an example of such a product? To Tutor: Expect suggestions and then explain the following example. Being able to see live digital content superimposed on your normal view can add to several exciting applications some of which can be totally unexpected for customers. while another appeals more to another type. customers can respond differently to different features. Error! No Can you provide an example Error! of suchNo a product? text of specified style in document. What would a customer think of this product? When a product includes a range of attractive features it becomes a sensation.| 26 text of specified style in document. consistent access and unlimited data. Show the image of the example in the slide. Hence. [DISCUSSION] Do you think all customers view features similarly or do you think that some might view a feature as must-have while others might view it as a performance feature? The Kano model also tells us that customers don’t think the same. Speed and consistent access are performance features. Consider wearable computing. Show the image of the example in the slide. .

Surprise your customers. Do not match all performance features.| 27 Slide 21 Error! No text of specified style in document. You need to be selective when it comes to inclusion of features. These companies become complacent and stop evolving until it is too late to recover. . Identify important performance features for your specific target segment and focus your energy resources on those areas. This can then lead to word-of-mouth advertisement. but only do so once you have provided all the basic must-have features. Kano Model & Design Do not match all performance features Offer variety Surprise your customers Avoid complacency Understand your customers To Tutor: Go through the following subjects one at a time. Encourage delegates to share any related stories they know so that this part of Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Having included a set of must-have and performance features. Error! No text of specified style in document. Read the statements and ask the delegates what it means. you need to identify your target market first before you can decide what features to include or exclude. they fail to see that today’s novelty is tomorrow’s performance feature and a bit later it is taken for granted. History tells us that time and again companies hit upon a great product and come to dominate the markets. Since customers respond differently and since your resources are limited. You don’t need to match every performance feature offered by your competitors in the market. Offer an unexpected feature. Avoid complacency. use creative thinking techniques to brainstorm ideas on how to provide a novel and surprising experience. [STORY] To Tutor: Explain the following story as an example on dangers of complacency. Use this storytelling as an opportunity to get the delegates more excited about the topic and its importance. Encourage a discussion and use the following to expand. Unfortunately. Offer variety. Think of attractive features as those that make you stand out from the competition.

Error! the course becomes more memorable. Customers no longer viewed instant photography as a novel feature. It was taken for granted that photos were taken instantly (using digital cameras) and with the added excitements that the new digital photography provided. Polaroid should have re-branded itself to focus on the next exciting development in photography. Instead. this worked very well for them as it differentiated them from their competitors. Polaroid was very slow in understanding this transition. By the time you have copied their attractive features. the word Polaroid had come to represent instant photography. established in 1937. Over time their products made them very successful and rich. they considered it as a basic must-have feature which was provided by digital cameras. they carried on with their old brand and even tried to make digital cameras to enter the new markets. you cannot gain any competitive advantage by copying the features of another product. not one that produced attractive and delightful cameras that other manufactures were releasing to the market. In a competitive market. digital photography was introduced and developed rapidly. they would become performance features that you need to compete on. [BLANK SCREEEN] [RECAP] To Tutor: Ask questions to test delegates’ knowledge about what they have learned so far. they will no longer delight any customer. However. Through years of advertisement. you usually don’t get a second chance. The critical point is that you cannot look at your competitors to see what you need to do. Customers saw Polaroid as a company who provided cameras with basic features. Polaroid Corporation. To introduce attractive features. But their efforts were doomed from the outset because they failed to understand the association of their brand with something that was now seen as basic. Polaroid became a global brand. serves as astyle breakinbefore you move on toNo text of specified style in document. However. you need to fully understand your customers and their needs. . As a result they sold many cameras. especially in regard with their brand. introduced instant photography in 1948 and gradually became incredibly famous for their instant photography products. Polaroid brand no longer had the same exciting feel to it. Understand your customers. as technology progressed forward. However.| 28 Error! No This textalso of specified document. When instant photography was novel. How many categories of features are there in the Kano model? 5 Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. In short. Instead. focus on the needs of your customers and invent something new that they did not have before and no one else is providing them with. cover the rest of the content. once instant photography became established. Only then your customers are truly satisfied. Polaroid filed for bankruptcy in 2001.

Error! No text of specified style in document. The aim is to familiarise delegates further with the feature categories and what they mean before moving on to a more comprehensive exercise presented at the end of the session. If desired. Name one example: Attractive Another? Must-Have … Which feature leads to most customer excitement? Attractive feature Which feature do you need to match and compete for with your competitors? Performance features [PRACTICE][E320_Exercise_FeatureAnalysisUsingKanoModel][LOOK Features & Categories Form][PAIR][IF ODD: GROUP-3] AT WORKBOOK: To Tutor: This exercise helps delegates to apply the Kano model to a product produced by their company. you can provide a short break at this point. To Tutor: By now you have finished the first part of the session. . It focuses on a qualitative analysis. [SHOW SCREEN] Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.| 29 [RELAY] Error! No text of specified style in document. You can now move to the second part.

.| 30 Slide 22 Error! No text of specified style in document. TEA BREAK Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Error! No text of specified style in document.

The method consists of 5 main steps. Let’s explore these in more detail… Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. .| 31 Slide 23 Error! No text of specified style in document. Error! No text of specified style in document. How to Apply the Kano Model STEP 1 Identify Features STEP 2 Design a Survey STEP 3 Carry out a Survey STEP 4 Interpret the Data STEP 5 Analyse the Results The great power of the Kano Analysis lies in the quantitative method used to discover exactly what your customers think of your products or your design ideas.

Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Consider these examples. Your aim is to see how customers respond to the existence of these features. Error! No text of specified style in document. . STEP 1 Example Identify Features Feature Example Operating TV through mobile 1 phone Example Internet access through TV 2 The first step is to identify a list of features that needs analysis.| 32 Slide 24 Error! No text of specified style in document.

one functional form and one dysfunctional form. There are 5 possible answers for each question: • I like it • I expect it • I am neutral • I can tolerate it • I dislike it Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Error! No text of specified style in document. You will need two questions for each feature. STEP 2 Design a Survey Functional Form Possible Answers I like it I expect it Dysfunctional Form I am neutral I can tolerate it I dislike it Create a series of questions. The functional form of the question is about the existence of a feature while the dysfunctional form is about the lack of that feature. .| 33 Slide 25 Error! No text of specified style in document.

how would you feel? Let’s look at examples… To Tutor: Ask a volunteer to read through the examples. . how would you feel? Dysfunctional Form If you could not operate the functions of your TV through your mobile phone. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Example 1 STEP 2 Design a Survey Form Feature Functional Form If you could operate the functions of your TV through your mobile phone.| 34 Slide 26 Error! No text of specified style in document. Error! No text of specified style in document.

. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Error! No text of specified style in document.| 35 Slide 27 Error! No text of specified style in document. how would you feel? Dysfunctional Form If you could not access Internet through your TV and browse the net. Example 2 STEP 2 Design a Survey Form Feature Functional Form If you could access Internet through your TV and browse the net. how would you feel? To Tutor: Ask another volunteer to read through the examples.

how do you feel? X Dysfunctional Form I dislike it I like it If you could not operate I expect it the functions of your TV I am neutral through your mobile I can tolerate it phone. how do you feel? X I dislike it Next.| 36 Slide 28 Error! No text of specified style in document. . Error! No text of specified style in document. create the survey using a series of questions with the functional and dysfunctional forms and collect results. STEP 3 Carry out a Survey Example 1 Functional Form I like it If you could operate the I expect it functions of your TV I am neutral through your mobile I can tolerate it phone. Here is an example… Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.

STEP 3 Carry out a Survey Example 2 Functional Form I like it If you could access I expect it Internet through your I am neutral TV and browse the net. I can tolerate it how do you feel? And here is another example… Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. I can tolerate it how do you feel? X Dysfunctional Form I dislike it I like it If you could not access I expect it Internet through your I am neutral TV and browse the net. I dislike it X .| 37 Slide 29 Error! No text of specified style in document. Error! No text of specified style in document.

use the Kano Chart to cross-reference the survey data and categorise the features based on customers’ responses. Slide 30 Interpret the Data STEP 4 Dysfunctional Question Attractive I Indifferent R Reverse Q Questionable Dislike A Tolerate Performance Neutral P Expect Must-Have Like M Functional Question Key Like Q A A A P Expect R I I I M Neutral R I I I M Tolerate R I I I M Dislike R R R R Q In step 4. Then show the results shown in the next slide. .| 38 Error! No text of specified style in document. Error! No text of specified style in document. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. To Tutor: Go back and forth between STEP 3 survey results shown in the previous two slides and this slide and ask the delegates to suggest the category the customer has voted for.

Here is the interpretation for the results collected from customers. STEP 4 Example Interpret the Data Feature Interpretation Operating TV Example through mobile 1 phone It is an attractive feature. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Example Internet access 2 through TV It is a performance feature. .| 39 Slide 31 Error! No text of specified style in document. Error! No text of specified style in document.

assume that several other features were also considered in the survey which led to the following set of results… To Tutor: Go through each row and ask the delegates to interpret the distribution of votes for that features. However. Performance Attractive Indifferent Reverse Questionable Analyse the Results Must-Have STEP 5 Operating TV through mobile phone 5% 5% 65% 23% 0% 2% Internet access through TV 10% 50% 7% 15% 2% 1% Small bezel 10% 41% 45% 2% 1% 1% HDMI Input 86% 8% 1% 3% 0% 2% Custom extendable port 6% 30% 17% 43% 3% 1% Feature In step 5.| 40 Slide 32 Error! No text of specified style in document. [DISCUSSION] As you can see in the votes table. To illustrate this table as an example. For example. This usually suggests that you are dealing with two sets of customers who have different needs and desires. you also have a set of customers who consider the small bezel simply as an exciting feature. They will tell their friends about it but are not put off from buying the product if the bezel was larger. one set of customers (who voted as performance) are sensitive to the way their TV looks and expect a certain look and feel that the small bezel provides. They are willing to pay more for this. In this case. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Show the red circle in the slide for that feature to reveal the correct interpretation. sometimes a feature can be part of two categories based on the vote counts. Calculate the percentage of each vote and generate a table such as the following for all the features that were considered. having a small bezel is both a performance feature and an attractive feature. Error! No text of specified style in document. count all the votes for each feature based on the survey data collected from a set of customers. . When you get to “small bezel” encourage a discussion and go through the following.

need to carryError! furtherNo text of specified style in document. . When your data shows that you might two of customers. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.| 41 Error! Nohave text ofsets specified style you in document. Consider providing multiple variations of your product where each variation targets a different segment. analysis to see how you can accommodate their needs.

the customer is delighted as it is unexpected. . Now. customers have voted this feature as attractive. let’s go back to the original examples and analyse the results. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd.| 42 Slide 33 Error! No text of specified style in document. In example 1. STEP 5 Analyse the Results Example 1 Operating TV Through Mobile Attractive Feature When discovered. When a customer discovers this feature he is delighted as it is unexpected. It makes the product stand out from the competition. It makes the product stand out from the competition. Error! No text of specified style in document. What does this mean? To Tutor: Expect suggestions and then show the content of the slide and explain the following.

customers have voted this feature as performance. . Aim to buy the cheapest.| 43 Slide 34 Error! No text of specified style in document. Customers actively look for this feature when buying and aim to buy the cheapest product that offers the easiest way to access the Internet. Need to compete strongly with competitors. In example 2. What does this mean? To Tutor: Expect suggestions and then show the content of the slide and explain the following. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Analyse the Results STEP 5 Example 2 Internet Access Through TV Performance Feature Customers actively look for this feature when buying. You will need to compete strongly with your competitors to maintain your market share. Error! No text of specified style in document.

Collect large data. Formulate survey questions accurately. This helps you measure your confidence levels when differentiating between customer segments. Expand using the following. Always aim to collect a large dataset to end up with meaningful results. If you use a small set. Carry out statistical analysis. the results will only reflect what that limited set of customers think about your products and may not reflect the wider view. This can be very misleading when making conclusions. Carry out segmentation analysis. Consider formulating your features as benefits in your surveys so customers understand what a specific feature does for them. This will give you further insight into how that specific segment thinks and how you can accommodate their needs by offering product variations or specific marketing. consider focusing on the customer’s point of view. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. you can carry out further analysis by going back to the data to see how each segment has voted for various features. Final Notes Collect a large set of data  Carry out statistical analysis  Formulate survey questions accurately  Carry out segmentation analysis  Here are a few important points to consider when using the Kano model: To Tutor: Read each statement and ask delegates what it suggests and why it is important. instead he is interested to know “which” problem the feature solves. When formulating questions. A customer is not interested in “how”.| 44 Slide 35 Error! No text of specified style in document. Error! No text of specified style in document. . Once you have identified the existence of segments. You will need to carry out statistical analysis to measure variation of data or choose how each distribution of results lead to one or more feature category.

. How do you formulate the questions for a survey so you could identify which category it belongs to? If you could easily take your easel everywhere. Show the next slide and go through a number of possibilities. What does this suggest? There is a correlation between how easy it is to pack and move an easel and a customer’s satisfaction of using the product. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Scenario: You have recently introduced a new feature.| 45 [TRY] Scenario: Error! No text of specified style in document. how do you feel? What do you think is this feature? It is a performance feature. Your aim is to get the delegates think about the Kano model and see what it can do in realistic scenarios. [DISCUSSION] To Tutor: Ask the following question from the whole class and encourage a discussion. Consider the following feature of an easel. Error! No text of specified style in document. You will need to compete on performance and price on this feature with other competitors. called feature X. portability. What does this suggest? To Tutor: Expect and discuss. The customer will expect to pay more to get a better design. Your customers are not responding to this feature. how do you feel? If you could not easily take your easel everywhere.

so they become indifferent to it. Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. Possibility 2: It could be that the type of feature you are adding is a performance feature on a very slow slope. In this case. To Tutor: This is shown in the slide. white papers. Possibility 3: It could be that customers simply have not discovered the new feature. However. but not much to satisfy them greatly. etc. You can develop it more. In this exercise. case studies. It might benefit them a bit. Customer Satisfied X Not Implemented Fully Implemented Customer Dissatisfied Possibility 1: It could be that you have not fully implemented it and they are still indifferent to its current implementation. once fully realised they may very well respond to it. to help customers understand how to take advantage of new features to address their specific needs. but your customers don’t gain enormously from your improvements. Possibility 4: It could be that customers don’t understand the feature or don’t know how to use it. [DEMONSTRATE][E321_Exercise_KanoSurveyAndAnalysis][H43_Handout_KanoResultsFor m][GROUP] To Tutor: Use the instructions provided for this exercise to get the delegates go through a complete example on applying the Kano model to a product of their choice. . Error! No text of specified style in document.| 46 Slide 36 Error! No text of specified style in document. In this case you may need to consider providing help guides. you need to consider improving your marketing plan to increase customer awareness.

--Achievement By the end of this session you will be able to: Improve product design and marketing using the Kano model Have we achieved this? Relay Application Confirmed How do you plan to use the Kano model at work? Which areas and products can benefit it from it the most? Course Notes – Kano Model © Skills Converged Ltd. delegates will act both as designers and as customers so the fullinmodel can be Error! used toNo text of specified style in document.| 47 Error! No text of specified style document. . illustrate how each part is implemented in practice.