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Statistical Summary

2013 Academic Year


engineering.pitt.edu/statistics

Swanson School of
Engineering
Statistical
Summary
For the
2013
Academic Year

University of Pittsburgh

Contents:
University Overview ...................................................................... 1
History ............................................................................................ 3
Organizational Chart .................................................................... 6
Departments and Degree-Granting Programs ......................... 13
Special Academic Programs ....................................................... 16
Research Facilities, Centers ........................................................ 26
and Laboratories
Academic Record ......................................................................... 55
Student Awards and Honors ........................................... 55
Enrollment ....................................................................... 63
Co-op Companies ............................................................ 68
Student Placement/Employment ...................................... 73
Fees and Tuition.............................................................. 73
Degrees Conferred .......................................................... 74
Graduate Roster: 2012-2013 .......................................... 75
Faculty .......................................................................................... 82
Faculty Headcount .......................................................... 82
Faculty Profiles ............................................................... 83
Faculty Research Interests ............................................ 134
Research Expenditures .................................................. 152
Publications .................................................................. 153
Awards and Honors ...................................................... 232
Distinguished Lectureships ........................................... 235
External Programs .................................................................... 236
Alumni Relations: .......................................................... 236
Alumni Profile ................................................. 236
2013 Distinguished Alumni ............................ 237
Development: ................................................................ 241
External Support ............................................. 241
Major Gifts ..................................................... 241
Endowment Support ........................................ 242
Swanson School of Engineering Board of Visitors ................. 243
Visiting Committee and Advisory Boards ............................... 244
School Directory ........................................................................ 249

The University of Pittsburgh


The University of Pittsburgh of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education is a
nonsectarian, coeducational, state-related, public research university. It is internationally
respected as a center for learning and research. The University was founded in a log cabin near
the confluence of Pittsburgh's three rivers in 1787 as a small, private school named the Pittsburgh
Academy, renamed in 1819 as the Western University of Pennsylvania, and then renamed again
in 1908 as the University of Pittsburgh. The University became state-related in 1966.
Since its founding 226 years ago, the University of Pittsburgh has established itself as the most
comprehensive educational complex in the region. It provides a wide range of academic programs
and services for the Pittsburgh metropolitan areas population of 2.4 million. With an enrollment
of nearly 35,000 students, the University is one of the largest institutions of higher education in
Pennsylvania. Supporting the needs and interests of the University are more than 13,300 faculty,
research associates, and staff. University-related spending is $1.74 billion annually, making an
important economic impact on the area economy.
The University comprises five campuses. The 132-acre Pittsburgh Campus is located in Oakland,
which is the city of Pittsburgh's cultural and medical center. The Universitys four regional
campuses are located in western Pennsylvania - in Johnstown, Greensburg, Titusville, and
Bradford. More than 100 academic, research, and administrative buildings, and residence halls
are located on the Pittsburgh Campus. Pitts University Library System is the 22nd-largest
academic library system in North America. In FY 2012, the Universitys 25 libraries and
collections surpassed 6.6 million volumes.
The Pittsburgh Campus is comprised of 16 undergraduate, graduate, and professional schools.
These schools include the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences; the College of General Studies;
the University Honors College; the Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business and College of
Business Administration; the Schools of Education, Law, Social Work, Information Sciences, and
the Swanson School of Engineering; the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, and
the Universitys six schools of the health sciences. These schools include the Graduate School of
Public Health and the Schools of Dental Medicine, Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Medicine,
Nursing, and Pharmacy. Overall, the University offers more than 456 distinct degree programs,
augmented by numerous dual, joint, and cooperative degree program options. In fiscal year 2012,
the University conferred 8,949 degrees.
The University of Pittsburgh is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and
Schools and additionally by various specialized accrediting agencies. It is a member of the
Association of American Universities, which is an organization that comprises 62 leading
doctorate-granting research institutions in the United States and Canada.
The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), affiliated with the University of
Pittsburghs schools of the health sciences, is the premier health care system in western
Pennsylvania. Comprised of teaching hospitals and research centers, UPMC operates more than
20 academic, community, and specialty hospitals and 400 outpatient sites.
Numerous athletic events, organizations, and cultural happenings energize student life at the
University throughout the year. There are 19 men and womens varsity teams at the University. In
2013, the University joined the Atlantic Coast Conference, a national leader in a broad range of
intercollegiate sports.

The University continues to make great strides in offering quality education, research, and public
service locally and internationally. Admissions to Pitt has become more selective in recent years
with 52% of first-year students graduating in the top 10% of their high school classes, as
compared to 22% in 1996. The University has moved into the top 10 American higher education
institutions in terms of federal funding, as reported by the National Science Foundation. Pitt also
ranks among the top five universities nationally in annual research support awarded by the
National Institutes of Health.

The Swanson School of Engineering


Since 1846, the University of Pittsburghs Swanson School of Engineering has developed innovative processes and
designs that have shaped our state, our country, and our world. Swanson School faculty and students are on the
forefront of developing solutions to create a better future and continue its founding commitment to industrial,
electrical, and mining engineering, the fields the world relies on for its energy and raw materials. The Swanson
School also focuses on our health, our planet, and the ingenuity that keeps us competitive with recognized programs
in bioengineering, sustainability, and energy. Nanotechnology, manufacturing, and product innovation are also
critical strategic initiatives.
The Swanson School of Engineering prepares graduates through actual experience to enter exciting careers in
advanced research and industry. Students find their place in the workforce through our established co-op program
and working partnerships with engineerings top companies. Our faculty and staff represent countries around the
world and are internationally recognized for providing excellent educational programs, for conducting cutting edge
research, and for creating the partnerships that shape the industry. International experience in engineering is a core
component of the academic curriculum, with study abroad programs offered in South America, Europe, and Asia.
The mission of the Swanson School of Engineering is to produce highly-qualified engineers and useful creative
research and technology through academic excellence. The faculty and staff at the Swanson School of Engineering
are recognized for providing excellent educational programs, for conducting leading edge research, and for creating
innovative industrial partnerships.

History
The University of Pittsburghs Swanson School of Engineering has a long and distinguished history. The earliest
engineering courses at Pitt were established in response to the growth of Western Pennsylvania during the early
industrial revolution, with the first degrees of Engineer awarded in 1846, thereby establishing Pitt as the nations
sixth earliest engineering program.
The involvement of Pittsburgh industry in the years surrounding the Civil War transformed a regional industrial base
into one with strong international significance, and the University responded to the need. In 1868, specialized
degrees in Civil and Mechanical Engineering were initiated, with Mining Engineering following in 1869, and
Electrical Engineering in 1890. In 1909, the Department of Metallurgical Engineering was established, followed by
the Department of Chemical Engineering and the worlds first Department of Petroleum Engineering in 1910. Also
in that year, the School created one of the nations first undergraduate Cooperative Education Programs. Pitt
Engineerings tradition of innovative programming resulted in the establishment of one of the nations first
Industrial Engineering Departments in 1921. The most recent department, Bioengineering, was established in 1998.
Among the many prominent individuals associated with the early history of the School were Samuel Pierpont
Langley and Reginald A. Fessenden. Langley, who is credited with developing the engineering science of
aerodynamics during his 24 years at Pitt, designed the first heavier-than-air craft capable of flight and greatly
influenced the Wright Brothers. Fessenden, brought to Pittsburgh by George Westinghouse as the first electrical
engineering department head, obtained more than 300 patents. Through his pioneering studies with voice
transmission, he is now credited with being the Father of Radio and made the first broadcast of the human voice in
1906.
Throughout the 20th century the School of Engineering continued its growth, and moved to a new Engineering Hall
in the 1950s. This was also accompanied by the institution of new programs such as international education to
strengthen the academic experience of engineering students. As the student population continued to grow, the
University developed plans for a larger facility and commissioned the construction of Benedum Hall of Engineering,
in honor of a grant from the Benedum Foundation. Benedum Hall was completed in 1971. The 1990s saw the
emergence of new centers of excellence which promoted cross-disciplinary infrastructure between departments, as

well as the launch of the new bioengineering program and the Center for Biotechnology and Bioengineering at the
Pittsburgh Technology Center, on the former site of the Jones & Laughlin Steel Mill Complex in nearby Hazelwood.

Engineering 21st-Century Success


In 2007, the School became the Swanson School of Engineering after a landmark event: John A. Swanson (PhD
66), founder of ANSYS Inc., made the largest individual philanthropic commitment in the history of the University
of Pittsburgh at that time. As a result of his remarkable generosity, the Board of Trustees presented a formal
resolution on February 29, 2008 and announced the changing of the schools name to the John A. Swanson School
of Engineering. His gift, along with that of John C. Jack Mascaro (BSCE '66, MSCE '80), founder and president
of Mascaro Construction Company, enabled a multi-year transformation of Benedum Hall into a building with more
open labs and smart classroom space, enabling greater collaboration between faculty and students.
A new three-story annex that connects to Benedum Hall was completed in 2009 and is home to the Mascaro Center
for Sustainable Innovation as well as labs, classrooms and the new Bevier Library. In 2012 the Swanson School
received a $22 million grant from the Richard King Mellon Foundation - one of the largest private foundation grants
in Pitts history. The gift will accelerate the research and education efforts of the Center for Energy, create new
faculty positions and graduate fellowships, and establish a fund for spurring innovative research on a newly
designated Energy Floor in Benedum Hall.
Later in 2012 the Swanson School exceeded its $180 million campaign goal and announced that over $200 million
had been reached. The goal was part of the University of Pittsburghs comprehensive $2 billion campaign, which
was also reached in 2012. The funds will enable the full transformation of the Swanson School of Engineering, both
physically and academically, and establish it as one of the leading engineering programs in the world.
In 2013 the Swanson School led a University effort to create a joint institute with one of Chinas premier
engineering schools. The Sichuan University Pittsburgh Institute will enroll its first class in fall 2014. Pitt is one of
only five U.S. universities to have entered into a large-scale partnership agreement with a university in China; the
others are Carnegie Mellon University, Duke University, New York University, and the University of Michigan.
Sichuan University will initially invest nearly $40 million to support the construction and equipping of a new
100,000-square-foot building to house the institute on its campus. With emphases on advanced sustainable
manufacturing and educational innovation, the institute will initially offer three undergraduate degree programs:
industrial engineering, mechanical engineering, and materials science and engineering. Students in the institute will
be recruited from the United States, China, and possibly other countries, with the first class in fall 2014 expected to
comprise 100 students. Within seven years, enrollment is projected to grow to a final total of 1,600.
Students will spend the first two years of the program immersed in the Pitt curriculum in China with the option of
transferring to Pitts main campus during their third year in the program. Students who transfer to Pitt directly after
their sophomore year will earn a bachelors degree from both Sichuan University and Pitt, and all students will
receive an institute certificate upon completion of their studies. Qualified students will also be able to continue their
graduate studies at Pitt.

Deans of Engineering
Daniel Carhart

1882 - 1908

Frederick L. Bishop

1910 1927

Elmer A. Holbrook

1927 1950

G. Raymond Fitterer

1951 1963

Harold E. Hoelscher

1965 1973

Max L. Williams

1973 1985

Charles A. Sorber

1986 1993

H.K. Chang

1994 1996

Gerald D. Holder

1996

CHERYLPAUL

DirectorofEngineering
StudentServices

KRISTINELALLEY

Directorof
International
EngineeringInitiatives

MAUREENBARCIC

DirectorofCooperative
Education

ALAINEALLEN

DirectorofInvesting
NowandEXCEL

PAULKOVACH

DANIELBUDNY

*ReportsDirectlytotheOfficeofInstitutionalAdvancement

DirectorofMarketing
andCommunications

AssociateProfessor
AcademicDirectorof
FreshmanEngineering
Program

MATTHEWWEINSTEIN*

RADISAVVIDIC

SYLVANUSWOSU

STEVENLITTLE

GENAKOVALCIK

DegreesGranted:BS:472

MS:176
PhD:58

GraduateEnrollment:981

UndergraduateEnrollment:2625

ERICBECKMAN

BOPAYABIDANDA

RAMABAZAZ

Directorof
Administration

MINKINGCHYU

MechanicalEngineeringand
MaterialsScience
LeightonE.andMaryN.Orr
ChairProfessorandChair

NANCYDONALDSON

CATHYVARGO

IndustrialEngineering
ErnestE.RothProfessor
andChair

Administrative
Coordinator

AssistanttotheDean

CoDirectorofMascaro
CenterforSustainable
Innovation

WILLIAMSTANCHINA

ElectricalandComputer
Engineering
ProfessorandChair

CoDirectorofMascaro
CenterforSustainable
Innovation

CivilandEnvironmental
Engineering
WilliamKeplerWhiteford
ProfessorandChair

SeniorExecutiveDirector
ofDevelopmentand
AlumniRelations

SANJEEVSHROFF

LARRYSHUMAN

ChemicalandPetroleum
Engineering
CNGFacultyFellow
AssociateProfessorandChair

AssociateProfessor
AssociateDeanfor
Diversity

Bioengineering
DistinguishedProfessor
andGeraldMcGinnis
Chair

DistinguishedService
Professor
SeniorAssociateDeanfor
AcademicAffairs

GERALDHOLDER

U.S.SteelDeanofEngineering

SWANSONSCHOOLOFENGINEERING

BRIANVIDIC

DirectorofInformation
Technology

DONSHIELDS

ExecutiveDirectorof
CenterforEnergy

SCHOHNSHANNON

AssistantDean

DAVIDVORP

WilliamKeplerWhiteford
Professor
AssociateDeanforResearch

AARONBATISTA

STEVEN
ABRAMOWITCH

XINYANTRACYCUI

Associate
Professor

RICHARDDEBSKI

Associate
Professor

PARTHAROY

RAKIECHAM

Associate
Professor

LANCEDAVIDSON

WilliamKepler
Whiteford
AssociateProfessor

TAMERIBRAHIM

Graduate
Academic
Administrator

NICHOLASMANCE

DANIELGEALEY

LISANICKEL

Administrative
Coordinator

LINDSAYRODZWICZ

CoulterProgram
Administrator

GLENNPETERSON

DOUGLASWEBER

Financial
Administrator

Department
Administrator

GELSYTORRESOVIEDO

Assistant
Professor

Associate
Professor

SPANDANMAITI

Assistant
Professor

Assistant
Professor

Assistant
Professor

AssociateProfessor
BicentennialAlumni
FacultyFellow

Associate
Professor

PATRICKLOUGHLIN

PRASHANTKUMTA

Professor

TINKANHUNG

WilliamKepler
Whiteford
Professor

HARVEYBOROVETZ

EdwardR.
WeidleinChair
Professor

Distinguished
Professor
RobertL.Hardesty
Professor

Professor

ZACHARYSTRICKLER

Personnel
Coordinator

KURTBESCHORNER

YADONGWANG

WilliamKepler
Whiteford
Professor

ALICIAWELSH

Undergraduate
Academic
Administrator

ALANHIRSCHMAN

PRATAPKHANWILKAR

Professor
DirectorofCoulter
Program

DegreesGranted:BS:54
MS:9
PhD:10

Research
Assistant
Professor

SAVIOWOO

Distinguished
University
Professor

JUSTINWEINBAUM

GraduateEnrollment:167

UndergraduateEnrollment:254

DAVIDVORP

AssociateDean
forResearch
WilliamKepler
Whiteford
Professor

Professor
Executive
DirectorofCMI

GEORGESTETTEN

Research
Assistant
Professor

JOHNPATZER,II

Associate
Professor
Directorof
Undergraduate
Program

WILLIAMFEDERSPIEL

Directorof
GraduateProgram

WilliamKepler
Whiteford
Professor

MARKREDFERN

ViceProvostfor
Research
WilliamKepler
Whiteford
Professor

SANJEEVSHROFF

DistinguishedProfessorand
GeraldMcGinnisChair

BIOENGINEERING

SWANSONSCHOOLOFENGINEERING

Assistant
Professor

AssociateProfessor
WilliamKepler
WhitefordFaculty
Fellow

DIGAO

Associate
Professor

SACHINVELANKAR

Associate
Professor

JULIEdITRI

AssociateProfessor
B.P.America
FacultyFellow

ROBERTPARKER

MATTDETZEL

ANGELADILLON

RITALECCIA

Academic
Administrator

CHRISTOPHERWILMER

GIANNIS
MPOURMPAKIS

UnitOpsLab
Manager

Assistant
Professor

Assistant
Professor

Executive
Assistanttothe
Chairman

LEILI

Assistant
Professor

CHERYLBODNAR

Assistant
Professor

J.KARLJOHNSON

JOHNKEITH

Assistant
Professor

IPSITABANERJEE

ERICBECKMAN

ANNABALAZS

MOHAMMADATAAI

GeorgeM.Bevier
Professor

Robertv.d.Luft
Professor

Professor

WillamKepler
Whiteford
Professor

STEVENLITTLE

ROBERTMANIET

SeniorResearch
Technician

PATRICIAPARK

Business
Administrator

ROBERTTOPLAK

Assistant
Chairman

Professor
BADIEMORSI

GEORGEKLINZING

JOSEPHMCCARTHY

ROBERTENICK

JUDITHYANG

NickolasA.
DeCecco
Professor

HEIDIPECK

PittsburghCoal
Conference
Organizer

ADRIANSTARKE

Administrator

DegreesGranted:BS:74
MS:22
PhD:9

GraduateEnrollment:63

UndergraduateEnrollment:370

GTZVESER

NickolasA.
DeCecco
Professor

WilliamKepler
Whiteford
Professor
andViceChairFor
Education

BayerProfessor
andViceChair
forResearch

WilliamKepler
Whiteford
Professor

CNGFacultyFellow
AssociateProfessorandChair

CHEMICALANDPETROLEUMENGINEERING

SWANSONSCHOOLOFENGINEERING

KENTHARRIES

Associate
Professor
JEENSHANGLIN

Associate
Professor
MORTEZATORKAMANI

DANIELBUDNY

Associate
Professor

ANTHONY
IANNACCHIONE

Associate
Professor

PIERVINCENZORIZZO

JULIE
VANDENBOSSCHE

Assoiciate
Professor

Associate
Professor

Associate
Professor

Administrator
ERINGOLEN

AMYKAPP

Department
Administrator

VIKASKHANNA

ANDREWBUNGER

BRYANNASNYDER

FREDTYLKA

CHARLESHAGER

Assistant
Professor

KYLEBIBBY

Assistant
Professor

Assistant
Professor

JORGEABAD

StudentServices
Coordinator

TechnologyLead

SeniorMachinist

LEONARDCASSON

Associate
Professor
Academic
Coordinator

XULIANG

Assistant
Professor

Professor
LUISE.VALLEJO

Professor

RADISAVVIDIC

WilliamKeplerWhiteford
ProfessorandChair

CIVILANDENVIRONMENTALENGINEERING

SWANSONSCHOOLOFENGINEERING

QIANGYU

Assistant
Professor

JOHNBRIGHAM

Assistant
Professor

DegreesGranted:BS:85
MS:26

PhD:9

GraduateEnrollment:175

UndergraduateEnrollment:274

NAWEI

Assistant
Professor

MELISSABILEC

Assistant
Professor

10

AssociateProfessor
PaulE.LegoFaculty
Fellow

PENGCHEN

Associate
Professor

GEORGEKUSIC

AssociateProfessor
WilliamKepler
WhitefordFaculty
Fellow

ZHIHONGMAO

Associate
Professor

GREGORYREED

Associate
Professor

MINHEEYUN

Associate
Professor

LUISCHAPARRO

Associate
Professor

AMROELJAROUDI

Associate
Professor

GUANGYONGLI

Associate
Professor

KARTIKMOHANRAM

Associate
Professor

JUNYANG

HAILI

Assistant
Professor

YIRANCHEN

Assistant
Professor

ERVINSEJDIC

Assistant
Professor

THOMAS
MCDERMOTT

Assistant
Professor

STEVEJACOBS

Assistant
Professor

STEVENLEVITAN

JohnA.Jurenko
Professor
Directorof
Computer
Engineering
GraduateProgram

Graduate
Administrator
SANDRAWEISBERG

Undergraduate
Administrator
MICHELETHOMAS

SUZANDOLFI

Department
Administrator

IRVINJONES,JR.

ALEXANDERJONES

MAHMOUDELNOKALI

DegreesGranted:BS:92
MS:31
PhD:10

GraduateEnrollment:167

UndergraduateEnrollment:373

Assistant
Professor
andElectrical
Engineering
Undergraduate
Coordinator
AssociateProfessor
andDirectorof
Computer
Engineering
Undergraduate
Program

AssociateProfessor,
AssociateChairof
Electrical
Engineering,and
Graduate
Coordinator

Professor
CHINGCHUNGLI

Professor
HONGKOOKIM

WILLIAMSTANCHINA

Professor
andChair

ELECTRICALANDCOMPUTERENGINEERING

SWANSONSCHOOLOFENGINEERING

11
Associate
Professor
BRYANNORMAN

Associate
Professor

LISAMAILLART

RAVISHANKAR

AssociateProfessor
WilliamKepler
WhitefordFaculty
Fellow

JOELHAIGHT

Associate
Professor

MARYBESTERFIELD
SACRE

AssociateProfessor
FultonC.Noss
FacultyFellow

Graduate
Administrator
ANNEMARIE
VRANESEVIC

RACHAELHEISER

MINERVAPILACHOWSKI

Department
Administrator

KARENBURSIC

Undergraduate
Administrator

OLEGPROKOPYEV

Associate
Professor

JEFFREYKHAROUFEH

Associate
Professor

JAYANTRAJGOPAL

LARRYSHUMAN

Assistant
Professor
Directorof
Undergraduate
Program

Professor
Directorof
Graduate
Program

Distinguished
ServiceProfessor
SeniorAssociate
Deanfor
AcademicAffairs

BOPAYABIDANDA

ErnestE.RothProfessor
andChair

INDUSTRIALENGINEERING

PAULLEU

Assistant
Professor

DegreesGranted:BS:51
MS:24
PhD:6

GraduateEnrollment:138

UndergraduateEnrollment:242

YOUNGJAECHUN

Assistant
Professor

ANDREWSCHAEFER

Professor
WellingtonC.Carl
FacultyFellow

SWANSONSCHOOLOFENGINEERING

NATASAVIDIC

Assistant
Professor

12

IANNETTLESHIP

Associate
Professor

JEFFREYVIPPERMAN

Associate
Professor

JORGWIEZOREK

JUNGKUNLEE

Associate
Professor

PATRICKSMOLINSKI

Associate
Professor

LISAWEILAND

SYLVANUSWOSU

AssociateProfessor
AssociateDeanof
DiversityAffairs

Associate
Professor

DANIELCOLE

Associate
Professor

SUNGKWONCHO

Associate
Professor

GUOFENGWANG

Assistant
Professor

NITINSHARMA

Assistant
Professor

Assistant
Professor

PEYMANGIVI

JamesT.MacLeod
Professor
CoDirectorof
CMSPhDProgram

PAOLOZUNINO

Assistant
Professor

ALBERTTO

Assistant
Professor

MARKKIMBER

GIOVANNIGALDI

LeightonE.and
MaryN.Orr
Professor

MARKUSCHMIELUS

Assistant
Professor

ANTHONYDEARDO

AssociateProfessor
InterimDirectorof
NuclearEngineering
Program

Professor

WILLIAMCLARK

Professor

JOHNBARNARD

WilliamKepler
Whiteford
Professor
Directorof
BAMPRI
SCOTTMAO

WilliamKepler
Whiteford
Professor

Professor
ANNEROBERTSON

LAURASCHAEFER

Professor
BoardofVisitors
Fellow

Graduate
Administrator
CAROLYNCHUHA

COLEVANORMER

HEATHERMANNS

Undergraduate
Administrator

SHANNONKELLY

Assistanttothe
Chair

DegreesGranted:BS:116
MS:64
PhD:14

GraduateEnrollment:257

KELLYWODNICKI

Administrator

UndergraduateEnrollment:503

GERALDMEIER

WilliamKepler
Whiteford
Professor

Research
Specialist

ISAACGARCIA

Research
Professor

WILLIAMSLAUGHTER

Associate
Professor
Directorof
Undergraduate
Program

QINGMINGWANG

Professor
WilliamKepler
WhitefordFaculty
Fellow
Directorof
GraduateProgram

BRIANGLEESON

HarryS.Tack
Chair
Professor
Directorof
CenterforEnergy

MINKINGCHYU

LeightonE.andMaryN.Orr
ChairProfessorandChair

MECHANICALENGINEERINGANDMATERIALSSCIENCE

SWANSONSCHOOLOFENGINEERING

Departments and
Degree-Granting Programs
Bioengineering
Degrees Offered: BS, MS, and PhD in Bioengineering
Areas of Specialization:
Bioengineering research at the University of Pittsburgh incorporates the application of engineering and
biologic principles, methods, and technology in two broad areas: scientific inquires into fundamental
biological and biophysical phenomena; development of instrumentation, materials, devices, and
systems relative to application in the biological sciences and medicine. Active, externally funded areas
of research include: computer processing of biologically derived signals; computer analysis of
radiographic, ultrasonic, and nuclear magnetic resonance images; gene therapy and adult stem cells;
development of prostheses, artificial organs, and implantable sensors; ultrasound; neural tissue
engineering; structure, function, and interactions of individual biological macromolecules; cell
migration; development of medically related instrumentation; mathematical modeling of physiological
systems; tissue engineering and regenerative medicine; biomaterials and biocompatibility;
musculoskeletal biomechanics and sports medicine; cardiovascular biomechanics; bladder
biomechanics; rehabilitation biomechanics; ergonomics and occupational biomechanics. Further
details regarding individual research programs can be found on the websites of Laboratories and
Groups directed by our faculty and of their Affiliate Institutions and Departments
Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
Degrees Offered: BS, MS, PhD in Chemical Engineering; MS in Petroleum Engineering
Areas of Specialization:
Active areas of research in the Department include Biological and Biomedical Systems; Energy and
Sustainability; and Materials Modeling and Design. Additional research areas exist in programs that
have exploited opportunities at the interface between disciplines. The Departments recognized
research activities impact the following boundaries between established disciplines:
Biotechnology/Environment; Biology/Engineering; Energy/Environment; Polymer Chemistry/Physics;
and Catalysis/Chemistry/Materials; Catalysis/Energy; Catalysis/Environment.
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Degrees Offered: BS, MS, and PhD in Civil Engineering
Areas of Specialization:
Solid mechanics; structural mechanics; structural engineering; mechanics of fluids; geotechnical
engineering; hydraulics; hydrology; water resources engineering; civil engineering design; construction
management; environmental engineering

13

Electrical and Computer Engineering


Degrees Offered: BS, MS, PhD in Electrical Engineering
BS, MS, PhD in Computer Engineering (joint with Computer Science Department) MBA/MSECE
Areas of Specialization:
Biomedical devices and signal processing; electric power systems and smart grid; power electronics;
nano-photonics and nanoelectronics; green computing with nanoscale technologies; radio frequency
technologies and RFID; low power computingarchitectures and circuit techniques; optoelectronic
sensors, lasers, and ultra-fast optoelectroncs; digital signal and image processing; pattern recognition;
heterogeneous system simulation.
Industrial Engineering
Degrees Offered: BS, MS, and PhD in Industrial Engineering
Areas of Specialization:
Operations research; manufacturing systems; information systems; engineering management;
computational optimization; automatic data collection technologies; medical decision making; activity
based costing; mathematical programming; scheduling, production and inventory control; computeraided design; computer-aided manufacturing; manufacturing technologies for bio-medical products;
simulation; stochastic models; robotics; total quality management; health systems applications;
engineering education; project management, and product development; wireless systems.
Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science
Degrees Offered: BS, MS, and Ph.D.
Areas of Specialization:
Kinematics; dynamics; thermodynamics; heat transfer; fluid mechanics; mechanical measurements;
mechanical design; vibrations; acoustics; mechanical and thermal systems; stress analysis; energy
utilization; fuel cells; advanced energy technology; solid mechanics; continuum mechanics;
biomechanics; micro-electrical-mechanical systems; nanotechnology sciences; manufacturing and
controls; ceramics; metallurgy; materials science engineering.

Interdisciplinary Programs
Bioengineering
Joint MD/PhD (Bioengineering) Program
Dual BS Degree Program in Bioengineering & Chemical Engineering
Joint MBA/MS (Bioengineering Program)
Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
Degrees Offered: MBA/MSChE in Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

14

Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degrees Offered: MBA/MSCEE in Civil and Environmental Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Degrees Offered: MBA/MSECE, PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Industrial Engineering
Degrees Offered: MBA/MSIE in Industrial Engineering
Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science
Degrees Offered: MBA/MSMSE

Undergraduate Programs
Computer Engineering
Degrees Offered: BS in Computer Engineering (with Arts and Sciences)
Areas of Specialization:
VLSI design; digital system design; computer architecture; embedded systems; software engineering;
microprocessor systems; operating systems; optoelectronic information processing; digital design;
VHDL design and tools development; parallel processing; programming languages.
Engineering Physics
Degrees Offered: BS in Engineering Physics
Areas of Specialization:
Electronics, electromagnetic materials, modern physics, optics, applied thermodynamics.

15

Swanson School of Engineering


Special Academic Programs
First Year Engineering Academic Program Integrated Curriculum
The School of Engineerings First Year Engineering Academic Program consists of a welldesigned series of integrated courses in mathematics, chemistry, physics and engineering. All
engineering first year students pursue this common, integrated core, which includes an honors component
for the most academically gifted students. The two specially designed engineering courses (ENGR 0011
and 0012) not only introduce students to basic engineering skills and problem formulation and solving
methodologies, but also provide an overview of the various engineering disciplines. A unique aspect of
the program is the integration of instructors from the English Writing Center and the School of
Engineering Bevier Library staff into the first year coursework. As a result, students complete two major
writing projects: a first semester paper describing in-depth an area of engineering that the student is
interested in as a possible major and a second semester paper that is part of the professionally run Annual
Freshman Engineering Conference, in which all first year engineering students participate. This later
paper must be on a relevant engineering topic and include a discussion about sustainability. Student
papers are arranged into sessions chaired by professional engineers. Session chairs meet with the students
during the semester, critiquing the developing papers and offering suggestions for improvement.
First year engineering students also participate in a two-term engineering seminar (ENGR 0081
and 0082), conducted in part by upper class peer advisors. These seminars provide general information on
the transition to college, the improvement of study skills, and an overview of the various engineering
fields. Moreover, students are given several opportunities to visit the various programs to discuss with
faculty their anticipated program of study.
In addition to these opportunities, the First Year Engineering Program office provides career and
academic advising, workshops, and assistance with the Engineering Living Learning Community which is
located in Forbes Hall. Special programming is also conducted in Sutherland Hall, the LLC for first year
honors students.
Honors Options
A selected number of outstanding students are offered the opportunity to take ENGR 0711 instead
of ENGR 0011 during the Fall Term. This accelerated course covers the two-course sequence in one
term, enabling students to choose from two special courses in the Spring Term:
ENGR 0712 provides an opportunity to learn mathematical modeling and research
methodologies with one of the Schools most distinguished faculty
ENGR 0715 provides students with an opportunity to apply engineering methodologies in
a service learning environment with local organizations.
ENGR 0715 Engineering Applications for Society is a unique, rewarding learning experience for
first year engineering students who have completed the prerequisite ENGR 0711 Honors Engineering
Analysis and Computing Fall semester course. The course provides a Service Learning experience
through which students learn and develop valuable skills necessary to succeed as an engineer by solving a
real problem of value to a local community organization.
The goal for this course is to create a win-win experience for both the students and the
community organizations. In return for their participation in the students educational process, the

16

community organizations benefit by having a problem of value addressed or solved by the students.
Not only are the students rewarded by the satisfaction of solving a real problem of value to their
community, but through this experience they learn many personal and professional skills that cannot be
learned in a traditional engineering curriculum. In particular, they learn that solving problems as an
engineering professional truly involves more than the equations learned in classrooms where the answers
can be found at the end of a book.
International Programs
The Swanson School of Engineering has been one of the first engineering programs in the
country to recognize the increasingly international dimensions of engineering practice. To us, this not
only means that a large proportion of our graduates must be prepared for overseas assignments, some of
which may be of long duration, but it also means that a substantial portion of engineering work will
continue to be sent offshore to technically competent engineering graduates who demand salaries that are
considerably less than current US salaries. The implication is clear US engineering education will have
to change if our graduates are to remain competitive in the market place and bring value beyond their
technical skills.
Consequently, a major long-range objective has been to create a broad, coordinated program of
international opportunities for our students that enable them to learn to work as engineers in cross-cultural
environments. This suggests creating a variety of courses and exchanges, including some in which Pitt
engineering students join international students in design projects working both virtually and on-site.
Swanson School students have the option to choose to study abroad for a semester, a summer, or as part
of a short-term program (of four weeks or less), as well as to participate in an international research
experience, internship, or service learning project.
Much of our success is due to the Swanson School partnering with the International Business
Center and the College of Business Administration. We have also worked closely with the University
Center for International Studies (UCIS), its area studies centers, and especially the Universitys Study
Abroad Office. These partnerships have resulted in several successful initiatives, several of which are
outlined below:
The Plus3 Program - The Plus 3 program is for rising sophomores. It builds upon material
covered in Managing Complex Environments for CBA students and ENGR 0012 for engineering
students. The School of Engineering has participated actively for the past several years, sending both
faculty and students abroad. The three-credit course begins with four preparatory class sessions in March
and April, followed by a two-week study trip in early May, then ends with each student team presenting a
final report in early September. During the two-week trip, business and engineering students work in
teams as they make a number of company visits and prepare a report on a particular industry. Pitt
students also have an opportunity to interact with local students, hear guest lectures and make several
cultural visits while in the host country. Each trip is led by a faculty member accompanied by a support
staff from Engineering, the College of Business Administration, or the University Center for International
Studies (UCIS). The Plus3 program aims to cultivate interest in foreign language study and future study
abroad. This is particularly important for engineering students, as the discipline has traditionally been less
well-represented due to time constraints imposed by strict curriculum requirements. The Plus3 model has
been so successful that the University of Pittsburgh has adopted it to create Integrated Field Trips
Abroad, now a component of courses across the university curriculum. The Plus3 Program received the
2005 Institute for International Educations Heiskell Award for innovation in study abroad.

17

Engineering for a Better Environment Brazil this short-term program is offered to students
who have an interest in renewable energy. The program, which is offered as a three credit course at Pitt,
introduces students to various forms of green energy in Brazil.
Engineering in the Americas Before Columbus: Cusco, Peru this short-term program is
offered to students with an interest in structures. The program, offered as a three credit course at Pitt,
brings students to Cusco, Peru to study sites from the Incan culture and to work directly with a local
community to address a technical issue relating to structures.
Engineering in the Americas Before Columbus: Belize - this short-term program, developed as
an alternative to the Cusco, Peru location, is offered to students with an interest in structures. The
program, offered as a three credit course at Pitt, brings students to Belize to study sites from the Maya
culture and to work directly with a local community to address a technical issue relating to structures.
Engineering of the Renaissance: Pitt in Florence this four week, six credit program focuses
on exploring various sites of significance to the development of the European Renaissance. By visiting
the actual places where the great minds of the Renaissance- including da Vinci, Galileo, and othersactually conducted their research and studies, students are introduced to the important principles of
engineering and physics that were developed during this period.
Undergraduate Student Exchange with the Universidad De Montevideo this three credit,
two-week course on Global Supply Networks and Manufacturing Cultures in Latin America was
developed in collaboration with colleagues at the Universidad De Montevideo. It provides participants
with an understanding of international supply chain operations with a special focus on Latin American
and Uruguay. The two-week study visit to Uruguay enables students to place their understanding of those
concepts within an international, cross-cultural context. As part of our agreement with the Universidad de
Montevideo, we accept their students as part of an exchange, where they can study at Pitt for a full
academic semester.
INNOVATE (International Technology, Innovation and Leadership Conference) this
program was created by Rice University and IAESTE in 2004. The Swanson School joined (in 2012) as a
sponsor and created a special course, ENGR 1600, in conjunction with the INNOVATE Symposium.
This ten-day study trip for a large group of US students and several international students in early March
visited several countries in Asia. The Symposium addressed how technology has driven globalization and
business decision-making. The ENGR 1600 course was taught as a collaborative effort between Pitt and
Rice University using video conferencing. It was divided into three sections: the pre- and post-trip phases
and the actual trip. Prior to the trip, the course focused on topics related to Asian countries and
globalization, with guest speakers drawn from Asian Studies alumni with expertise in Asia. These
lectures provided the basis for comparative discussion and analysis. Topics included: leadership,
technology trends, history and politics, economics, contemporary culture and demographics, and specific
analysis of different business sectors. After returning, students documented their experience, through an
end-of-semester formal paper and presentation at the annual Alumni Dinner.
Internship and Exchange opportunities in Germany The University signed an exchange
agreement the UAS-7 Consortium seven Germany universities (Berlin School of Economics, Bremen
University of Applied Sciences, Cologne University of Applied Sciences, Hamburg University of Applied
Sciences, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Mnster University of Applied Sciences, Osenabrck
University of Applied Sciences) whose core academic strength is their engineering/technical degree
programs. The agreement allows for the exchange of students from the UAS-7 universities and the
University of Pittsburgh for study and internship experience.

18

As part of this exchange agreement, SSOE undergraduate students can be selected to participate
in the UAS-7 Consortiums Study and Internship Program (SIP) in Germany Program. Selected
students spend the fall semester taking courses at one of the Universities of Applied Sciences, and spend
the spring semester doing a full-time internship at a German organization that is arranged by their host
university. Students in the SIP program receive substantial funding from Germany to participate in this
program.
FIPSE-CAPES Program (Brazil) - In AY 2007-2008, an agreement was signed for the
federally-funded FIPSE-CAPES program: US-Brazil Partnership in Sustainability and Innovative Design
(S&ID) between the SSOE and two Brazilian institutions, the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) and
the Federal University of Espirito Santo (UFES). This agreement allows for the exchange of SSOE
students and UNICAMP and UFES students for study, as well as a provision for key faculty to develop
curricular projects that focus on issues of sustainability, product realization, and innovative design.
In AY 2010-2011, a new FIPSE CAPES agreement was signed for the project Bilateral
Development on Aeronautic Skills between U.S. and Brazil between the SSOE and two new Brazilian
institutions, the Federal University of Itajuba (UNIFEI) and the Federal University of Parana (UFPR).
This agreement has allowed the exchange of students and faculty, as well the development of innovative
shared curricula. To date, 17 Swanson School of Engineering students have participated in both of our
FIPSE CAPES programs.
Energy Today Energy Tomorrow: Australia. This 12-week, 12-credit certificate program
involves course work in the Swanson School of Engineering and the University of New South Wales
(UNSW). Students also conduct independent research with a faculty member and write a paper on a topic
related to their research and an area covered in the academic program. Course content at Swanson School
of Engineering consists of power generation and energy efficiency. Courses at UNSW cover the
following topics: world energy, energy and sustainable development, energy and the built environment,
emerging energy technologies, and renewable energy. The Australian component of the program begins
in Darwin for three days, and then students will travel to Sydney and be based at the main UNSW
campus. There will be a brief stop-over in Melbourne. The last week of the course is in Cairns.
Students who complete the full program two Pitt courses, the UNSW summer program and
submit an acceptable paper will receive the Certificate in Energy Today Energy Tomorrow.
Engineering the German Way: Munich. This 3-week, 4-credit program is offered in
conjunction with the Munich University of Applied Sciences in May. This intensive term highlights the
German approach to engineering from various perspectives. Academic course modules include R&D
management, introduction to production and manufacturing systems, digital factory layout and factory
simulation, product ergonomics, cooperation between unions and employers and the impact of technology
laws in Europe on manufacturing. The program is designed to split time between the classroom and
integrated field experiences at various industry locations around Munich. Each technical component of
the course is combined with a factory tour to gain deeper insights.
Globex (Beijing, China) - this 4-week (spent in China), 6-credit program provides the
opportunity to study two of a variety of engineering courses including Cell and Tissue Transport, Nano
materials and Nanotechnology, Cross Cultural Design for Service, Mechanics of Solids, Manufacturing
Engineering, Biomaterials and Biocompatibility, or Photovoltaics: Solar Energy. The courses are taught
through a combination of classroom lectures, projects, and presentations in a very exciting and modern
society. This is a joint study abroad program with Peking University (PKU).

19

The French Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Normandy, France. This two-week, 3-credit program is
based in Rouen, France and is run in partnership with ESIGELEC, a French graduate school of electrical
engineering. The French have the most complete implementation of the nuclear fuel cycle of any country
in the world. AREVA, a French public multinational industrial conglomerate, is mainly known for
nuclear power. Their interests in the nuclear power includes mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel
fabrication, the design and construction of nuclear power plants, the service of nuclear power plants,
used/spent nuclear fuel storage, the reprocessing of used/spent nuclear fuel, the fabrication and utilization
of mixed oxide fuel. The French agency CEA, Commissatiat l'Energie Atomique, conducts research on
advanced fuel cycles, advanced applications of nuclear power, applications of radioactivity, and the longterm disposal of radioactive waste. This course will acquaint the student with the nuclear fuel cycle via
the implementation of the French nuclear fuel cycle. The course will provide introductory material on the
nuclear fuel cycle in the classroom at the University. Then the students will travel to France to interact
with nuclear engineering academics, engineers and scientist working in the area, and tour facilities in
France.
Semester-Long Engineering Exchanges. The Swanson School of Engineering has agreements
with over 45 engineering schools from around the world. These institutions provide at a minimum some
instruction in English. Exchanges allow Swanson School of Engineering students the opportunity to
pursue a full-semester of coursework in their academic major at a foreign institution.
Student Organizations
Engineers Without Borders - is a non-profit, humanitarian organization dedicated to
improving the quality of life in developing communities via small engineering projects. EWB
addresses problems of health, sanitation, economy, technology, or education by partnering with
the community to design an appropriate and sustainable solution. The University of Pittsburgh
student chapter is currently completing an international project that involved assessment, design
and implement of a sustainable fish farm to provide a source of protein and trade for the
community of Makili, Mali, West Africa. Student members and professional mentors from the
Pitt chapter traveled to Makili in order to complete assessment and implementation phases of this
project.
Engineers for a Sustainable World - is a non-profit organization of technically-minded
individuals working on improving solving sustainability challenges through technical design
projects and educational initiatives. ESW's members and student chapters work on their
campuses, in local communities, and internationally. The University of Pittsburgh chapter has a
strong record of collaboration with local communities, including rainwater catchment systems for
the local neighborhood of Oakland, designing green renovations for the town of Vandergrift, and
a current project to revitalize a pond and community center in the town of McKeesport. The
chapter also proposes and implements multiple smaller on-campus projects every year, including
Pitt's inter-dorm energy reduction competition and a rain garden at the Petersen Events Center.
Engineers for Sustainable Medical Development (ESMD) - is a multi-disciplinary,
multi-school student-run organization comprised of students in the fields of engineering, premedicine, and business. ESMD is directed toward providing students with the skills and resources
necessary to design and implement novel, low-cost healthcare technology and processes suitable
for markets on a global scale. Currently a student design team is working on design of a portable
ocular microscopy mount in conjunction with a larger project at the Ear and Eye Institute that is
funded by the Coulter Program. ESMD holds weekly workshops to teach skills such as
SolidWorks design, soldering, and working with microprocessors. ESMD volunteers also help to
refurbish wheelchairs weekly at Global Links, an NGO with operations and contacts throughout
Central America. EMSD is working with Global Links to create an international immersion

20

experience that would provide EMSD members with an opportunity to work directly with health
care providers in developing countries.
Cooperative Education Program (Co-Op)
The co-op program had a strong year. The year ended with a total of 878 active students,
including 847 undergraduates and 31 graduate level co-ops. This number represents an increase from the
prior years 812 students, demonstrating 8% growth. New placements for the year rose 18.5%, from 308
new placements in 2011-2012, to 365 students in 2012-2013. Our company participation rose to over 250
employers. The program also showed an increase in the diversity of our student participants. Our postgraduate survey of BS level students entering the workforce reported that 49% of the co-ops received fulltime offers from their companies, and 85% of those students accepted. The average starting salary for a
co-op who graduated and entered the work force was $60,593. The average GPA of a graduate who
participated in co-op was 3.345. The report shows 95% placement of the co-op engineering graduates,
based on a 98% response rate. There was 100% placement among the computer science co-op graduates,
computer engineering graduates and chemical engineering graduates who responded to the survey.
Our Co-op Employer of the Year for 2012 was Siemens Energy, a long-time supporter of the
Swanson School of Engineering and co-op program. Their very well organized, meaningful and
successful program has benefitted a number of our students, with several going to work full-time with
Siemens upon graduation. We are looking forward to expanding our Siemens relationship and
congratulate them for this honor.
Our Co-op Student of the Year was Lauren Sakerka. Lauren spent four semesters with BASF in
Monaca, Pa and made significant contributions in the plant, particularly in terms of process cycle time
analysis and review. She developed an analysis tool that when implemented, will save the company
significant dollars. Lauren was also active on the safety committee and on campus was the budget
manager for a project in Mali through Engineers without Borders.
Our goals for the 2013-2014 year will be to increase our number of student and employer
participants while retaining the quality of our program. We particularly look to expand the program in the
areas of bioengineering and chemical engineering due to the expansion of student participation from those
areas.
Sustainable Engineering Undergraduate Research Program through Mascaro Center for
Sustainable Innovation
The Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation (MCSI) is a center of excellence in sustainable
engineering focusing on the design of sustainable neighborhoods. MCSI encourages and nurtures new
collaborative projects based on strong and innovative research, translating the fundamental science of
sustainability into real products processes. Our goal is to create innovations that positively impact the
environment and improve quality of life. Our research includes projects on greening the built
environment, increasing sustainable use of water, and designing distributed power systems.
MCSI currently offers two summer undergraduate research programs- International Research
Experience for Students (IRES) and Undergraduate Research Program (URP). IRES, funded by the
National Science Foundation, is a program that creates an innovative research experience in sustainable
design for a select group of undergraduate engineering students. The students participate in a 12-week
summer internship as a part of a research team. The teams are co-led by faculty from the University of
Pittsburgh and faculty from Brazil. They spend four preparatory weeks in Pittsburgh before traveling to
Brazil to spend the four weeks in residence at UNICAMP in Brazil. They return to spend the final four
weeks in Pittsburgh.

21

Undergraduate Research Program (URP) is an internally supported program aimed at providing


talented students with creative opportunities that go beyond the engineering classroom curriculum and
enables students to develop their own ideas and work independently on hands-on research projects in
sustainable engineering with advice and guidance from a faculty mentor.
Pre-College and Undergraduate Diversity Programs
The Swanson School of Engineering implements programming that promotes and supports the
academic excellence of high achieving pre-college and undergraduate students from groups traditionally
underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. INVESTING
NOW is the pre-college diversity program and Pitt EXCEL is the undergraduate diversity program.
These two initiatives provide a continuous pipeline for students from groups traditionally
underrepresented to prepare for, enter and graduate from the University of Pittsburgh as STEM majors.
INVESTING NOW
Created in 1988, INVESTING NOW is a college preparatory program designed to stimulate,
support and recognize the high academic performance of pre-college students from groups that are
underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) majors and careers. The
purpose of the program is to ensure that participants are well prepared for matriculation at the University
of Pittsburgh. The primary goals are to 1) create a pipeline for well-prepared students to enter college and
pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors; 2) encourage and support students
enrollment and achievement in advanced mathematics and science courses; 3) ensure that the participants
make informed college choices; 4) support and encourage parents in their roles as advocates for their
children; and 5) coordinate partnerships between the University of Pittsburghs Swanson School of
Engineering and local and regional schools.
INVESTING NOW recruitment, which focuses on eighth grade students, takes place in the spring
of each academic year. However, membership involves a student commitment to attend year-round
programming from ninth through twelfth grade. Some of the student activities include academic
advising, tutoring, hands-on science and engineering workshops, college planning sessions, summer
enrichment classes and SAT preparation. Approximately 226 students, including the 2013 graduates and
the newly admitted eighth grade students, participated in the INVESTING NOW program during the
2012-2013 academic year.
In 2013, 27 INVESTING NOW students graduated from high school. 15% of those students
currently attend the University of Pittsburgh main campus. 100% of the graduating class enrolled in
college for 2013-2014. In addition, 85% of the students are majoring in science, technology, engineering
or mathematics fields at various colleges and universities.
Pitt EXCEL Program
Pitt EXCEL is a comprehensive program committed to the recruitment, retention and graduation
of academically excellent undergraduates, particularly individuals from groups traditionally
underrepresented in the field. Program activities include academic counseling, tutor and study sessions,
engineering research and mentoring opportunities, graduate school preparation and career development
workshops, as well as a two-week intensive chemistry, math, physics and study skills review session for
pre-freshmen entitled the Summer Engineering Academy. Brief descriptions of the major programs
sponsored by Pitt EXCEL are highlighted below:

22

Summer Research Internship (SRI)


Each year, selected Pitt EXCEL students participate in a nine-week Summer Research Internship
(SRI) Program. Students are assigned to faculty mentors who lead research teams. Each student meets
regularly with Pitt EXCEL academic counselors to review daily journals, discuss progress, and
collaboratively discover innovative solutions to engineering problems. The primary objective is for
students to develop a positive relationship with a role model in their discipline of engineering. Additional
objectives for facilitating a mentoring partnership include: personal and career guidance; access to the
professional community; and guidance that will ease the transition from school to work or undergraduate
to graduate school. There were nine students and nine faculty mentors involved in the 2013 Summer
Research Internship Program.
Summer Engineering Academy
The Summer Engineering Academy is a two-week residential program for incoming engineering
students that enables them to make a smooth transition from high school to college. During the program,
students learn essential study skills for college and receive an intensive review of chemistry, math and
physics concepts, with an introduction to engineering problem solving. There were 26 incoming first
year engineering students who participated in the 2013 Summer Engineering Academy class; this number
included fourteen females and twelve males.
Undergraduate Enrollment
The School continues to have measurable success in the education of students from groups
traditionally underrepresented in the field of engineering. Figures from the beginning of academic year
2012-2013 indicate that there are approximately 173 ethnically underrepresented (African American,
Hispanic and Native American) students enrolled, representing 7.0% (173/2468) of the undergraduate
student body in the School and 2.2% (55/2468) multiracial undergraduate students. Female students
represent 23.3% (576/2468) of the undergraduate student body.
Undergraduate Graduation
30 ethnically underrepresented students (28 African Americans, one Hispanic, and one Native
American) graduated from the Swanson School of Engineering during the 2012-2013 school year,
representing 6.4% (30/472) of the graduates for the year. Three multi-racial students graduated,
representing 0.6% (3/472) of the graduates. In addition, 100 women graduated during the year,
representing 21.2% (100/472) of all graduates.
Diversity Graduate Engineering Initiatives
The Engineering Office of Diversity (EOD) also administers the Diversity Graduate Engineering
Initiatives to recruit traditionally underrepresented students into graduate engineering education through
partnerships with student organizations, graduate research experience, and Diversity graduate fellowships
and scholarships.

23

Graduate Diversity Fellowships:


The EOD has implemented an aggressive strategy to recruit underrepresented graduate students,
expand college visits and widen fellowship opportunities. With the support of the Office of the Dean, the
Office of the Provost, and the Office of the Chancellor, the University of Pittsburgh is a member in the
National GEM (Graduate Engineering Minority) Consortium. The GEM Consortium program awards
fellowships designed to offer opportunities for undergraduate students to obtain M.S. and PhD degrees in
engineering through a program of paid summer internships and graduate financial assistance. One GEM
Fellow is continuing her work in Bioengineering.
Nine K. Leroy Irvis Fellows are continuing their studies in 2013-14; six in Bioengineering, two in
Mechanical Engineering, and one in Industrial engineering. Two K. Leroy Irvis fellowships have been
given for 2013-2014; one to a Bioengineering student and one to an Electrical and Computer Engineering
student. One Irvis fellow graduated with an MS from Mechanical Engineering summer 2013. The Deans
Graduate Diversity TA continues to be a positive incentive to departments that make best efforts in the
recruitment of students from diverse backgrounds. Eight terms have been given for the 2013-14 year to
departments: Bioengineering received 3; Chemical and Petroleum Engineering received 2; Electrical and
Computer Engineering received 1; and Industrial Engineering received 2.
Statistical Performance Measures
Graduate Enrollment and Graduation: The School of Engineering has had success in increasing
the numbers of female and underrepresented students enrolled in its MS and PhD programs. There were
127 female MS students in 2012-13, an increase of 21. The number of female PhD candidates increased
from 90 in 2011-2012 to 95 in 2012-13. The number of underrepresented MS students enrolled decreased
from 17 in 2011-12 to 16 in 2012-13. The number of underrepresented PhD candidates decreased from 17
in 2011-12 to 16 in 2012-13.
Of 58 PhD degrees conferred between August 2012 to April 2013, 10 were upon women
(17%). One PhD degrees was awarded to an underrepresented student in 2012-13 (1.7%). Of the 176
Master Degrees awarded in 2012-13, 39 were awarded to women (22%). Six were awarded to
underrepresented students (6%).
PhD Enrollment and Degree
SCHOOL
TOTAL
WOMEN
URS
PHD PHD PHD
(E) (D) (E)

PHD
(D)

PHD
(E)

MS Enrollment and Degree


SCHOOL
TOTAL
WOMEN
URS

PHD
MS
MS
(D) MS (E) MS (D) (E) MS (D) (E) MS(D)

2000-01

198

43

34

10

315

100

50

14

2001-02

206

32

49

321

108

53

21

11

2002-03

221

30

52

362

138

52

22

2003-04

237

33

58

17

341

127

73

28

14

13

2004-05

258

36

75

17

304

135

56

27

15

14

2005-06

274

49

92

10

14

270

116

51

27

19

2006-07

276

44

92

12

14

276

92

52

16

16

2007-08

288

37

92

12

12

272

117

48

29

13

2008-09

321

48

96

18

14

314

93

64

20

19

2009-10

349

52

99

21

18

402

132

73

35

18

2010-11

389

57

102

22

17

426

165

86

28

17

2011-12

387

50

90

14

475

189

106

50

17

11

2012-13

413

58

95

10

16

523

176

127

39

16

24

George M. Bevier Engineering Library


The George M. Bevier Engineering Library provides access to books and journals both in print
and electronically, in addition to a wide variety of databases to serve the teaching and research needs of
following disciplines: engineering, physics and astronomy, mathematics, geology and planetary sciences,
and statistics. The Library is named in honor of George M. Bevier (BSE, 43) a pioneering geologist,
geophysicist and engineer. Library patrons can access the collection of the University Library System's
Digital Library via PITTCat+, an on-line catalog. Specifically, the University Library System also
provides access to many remote resources for the University of Pittsburgh faculty, students, and staff,
including Compendex, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Knovel and thousands of electronic journals from
publishers, including the American Chemical Society, the Institute of Physics, Elsevier and Wiley.
PITTCat+ and other databases are available through the ULS website at http://www.library.pitt.edu/
The University of Pittsburgh is a member of the Association of Research Libraries with extended
memberships in several other library consortia which include PALCI and NERL.

25

Research Facilities, Centers and Institutes


The strength and diversity of the Swanson School of Engineerings research centers and
institutes reflect the inter-relationship and often complementary nature of faculty research activities.
The concept of centers and institutes within the University and the Swanson School of Engineering
takes advantage of this natural grouping process, thereby producing synergistic interactions that
enhance the faculty research capabilities. Consequently, the scope of research that can be addressed by
any group of faculty is expanded significantly. The students who participate in center and institute
research have a unique opportunity to be involved in important projects throughout their graduate
experience. Furthermore, centers and institutes represent an attractive opportunity for corporate and
agency sponsorship of both basic and applied research. There are a number of centers and institutes
that exist in the University and the Swanson School of Engineering and several that are in various
developmental stages. The following are brief descriptions of existing centers and institutes.
The Michael L. Benedum Hall of Engineering
Students enrolled in the University of Pittsburghs Swanson School of Engineering receive
their education in the Michael L. Benedum Hall of Engineering which houses most of the Swanson
School of Engineerings administrative offices, classrooms, and research laboratories. The building
complex is named in honor of Michael L. Benedum, a pioneer in the oil industry and co-founder of the
Benedum Trees Oil Company. A grant from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation enabled
the University to purchase land on the Oakland Campus, and the Michael L. Benedum Hall of
Engineering was dedicated in 1971. Typically referred to as Benedum Engineering Hall, it consists of a
15-floor Tower, a 2-story Auditorium and the 3-story Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation
(MCSI) annex. The MCSI annex was constructed under an $8.5M gift from Engineering alumnus Jack
C. Mascaro (BSCE 66, MSCE 80), founder of Mascaro Construction, and was dedicated in 2009 as
part of a $150M renovation of Benedum Engineering Hall. This total renovation, begun in 2008 and
scheduled for completion in 2015, provides students and faculty with modern, world-class facilities for
teaching and research activities. The School was named the Swanson School of Engineering in 2007 in
honor of Engineering alumnus John A. Swanson (PhDME 66), founder of ANSYS, Inc., following his
$41.3M gift of to the University and numerous previous gifts to the School.

Interdisciplinary University of Pittsburgh Centers


Involved with the Swanson School of Engineering
Biomedical Science Tower 3 (BST3)
In the fall of 2005, the University of Pittsburgh formally opened the newly constructed, stateof-the-art Biomedical Science Tower 3 (BST3), adjoining research facilities and UPMC clinical
facilities as well as the medical schools Scaife Hall. BST3, one of the most advanced research facilities
of its kind, houses more than 50 laboratories occupied by approximately 500 scientists, graduate
students, technicians, and support staff. Among the programs housed in BST3 are:
Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC)
Center for Vaccine Research in Biodefense and Emerging Infections

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Department of Computational Biology


Department of Neurobiology
Department of Structural Biology
Developmental Biology Drug Discovery Institute
Pittsburgh Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases (PIND)
Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Center
Regional Biocontainment Laboratory

The Department of Bioengineering occupies approximately 5,500 of BST3s 331,000 square


feet, in close proximity to other research groups. The 10-story structure was built to stand as a national
model for how modern laboratory space should promote interaction among scientists, foster more
fruitful collaborations, and adapt to ever-changing research demands and priorities. Bioengineering
research at BST3 includes applications of microtechnologies to explore cell polarity during vertebrate
cell differentiation, cell and tissue mechanics during vertebrate development, biomaterials for neural
prostheses and tissue regeneration, and unraveling how neural circuits transform sensory inputs into
motor commands. The three laboratories conducting this work are summarized below.
Neural Tissue Electrode Interface and Neural Tissue Engineering Laboratory (NTE)
This laboratory is under the direction of Tracy Cui, PhD. The primary research focus is on the
interactions between neural tissue and smart biomaterials and biosensors. Research projects include
neural prostheses biocompatibility, central nervous system biochemical sensing and drug delivery,
neural stem cells and neural tissue engineering. The NTE lab provides a cross-discipline interface that
brings bioengineer, neurobiologist, stem cell biologist and neurosurgeon together for rapid scientific
discovery and therapeutic advancement. Multi-disciplinary research and training experiences are
offered to graduate students, postdoctoral researchers and undergraduate students. The facility has all
essential equipment to carry out biomaterial fabrication, electrochemistry, cell culture, animal surgery,
in vitro and in vivo neurophysiology, histology and fluorescent imaging.
Morphogenesis and Developmental Mechanics Laboratory
This laboratory is directed by Lance Davidson, PhD, and seeks to understand the rules and
principles of self-assembly used by embryos during early development and to apply those principles to
direct the self-assembly of engineered tissues. This research uses a number of techniques ranging from
classical embryology to cell and molecular biology to cell and tissue biomechanics. The laboratory is
equipped with a range of imaging tools from stereo-dissecting microscopes to laser scanning confocal
microscopes. The group develops custom cell biological protocols and biophysical and biomechanical
devices such as microaspirators, uniaxial unconstrained compression devises, and microstretchers to
characterize the mechanical properties of small extremely soft biomaterials and to investigate the roles
of mechanics during embryogenesis. Ongoing collaborations across a range of disciplines is seeking to
extend systems biology approaches to investigate both chemical and mechanical processes driving
development and to apply this knowledge to forward-engineer the patterning and shaping of novel 3D
tissue structures.
Sensory-Motor Integration Laboratory
This laboratory is under the direction of Aaron Batista, PhD. The lab's research goal is to
design next-generation neural prostheses that can allow paralyzed individuals to control computers and
robotic arms. The laboratory provides a cross-disciplinary training experience (neurophysiology,
engineering, and computational analysis) for graduate students, undergrads, and postdocs. The lab
features two state-of-the-art experimental rigs. During experiments, monkeys are placed into an

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immersive virtual reality environment. Via a multielectrode array, the animals' intentions are decoded
from neural signals in motor cortex, and are used to steer a computer cursor to a specified goal.
Equipment includes a 100-channel electrode amplifier, custom-built Labview-based software for
rendering the visual stimuli and recording data, and trackers for the animals' arms and eyes. Students
are involved in designing novel brain-computer interface algorithms, testing them experimentally, and
conducting multidimensional statistical analyses. Currently, we are identifying the principles that will
make neural prostheses accurate, reliable, and comfortable for the user.
Center for Assistive Technologies
The Center for Assistive Technologies in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences is
comprised of rehabilitation engineers, physical and occupational therapists, and technicians which
closely collaborate with a regional and national network of physicians, vocational counselors,
educators, physical and occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, rehabilitation
technicians, consumers, and advocates in the provision of assistive technological services. Rosemarie
Cooper, MPT, ATP, is Director of the Center for Assistive Technologies.
Center for Bioengineering
The Center for Bioengineering was founded in 1987 to foster the application of the
University's growing portfolio of research expertise in the areas of biotechnology and bioengineering.
Its mission includes the encouragement of the development of cross-disciplinary research teams by
providing laboratory space and interdisciplinary educational programs. The Center site is located one
mile from the main University of Pittsburgh campus. The Department of Bioengineering occupies
about 12,600 sq. ft. of research space. The following bioengineering laboratories are currently housed
at the Center: Musculoskeletal Research Center, MSRC, (Dr. Savio Woo), Cardiovascular Systems
Laboratory (Dr. Sanjeev Shroff), Bioengineering Methods and Applications Laboratory and
BioTransport Laboratory (Dr. Jack Patzer), Vascular Bioengineering Laboratory (Dr. David Vorp),
Cell Migration Laboratory (Dr. Partha Roy), Computational Biomechanics Laboratory (Dr. Spandan
Maiti) , Orthopaedic Robotics Laboratory (Drs. Volker Musahl and Richard Debski) and Molecular
Biological and Biophysical Core Facilities (Department). All of these laboratories are described further
below.
Bioengineering Methods and Applications Laboratory
This facility enables students to participate in an undergraduate laboratory course that
integrates the knowledge and skills from three core Bioengineering courses including: Biotransport
Phenomena; Mechanical Principles of Biologic Systems; and Biothermodynamics. Equipment utilized
in the laboratory includes an ATS 1101 Materials Testing Device, adult and pediatric blood
oxygenation flow loops incorporating Biomedicus blood pumps, two ABL5 Blood Gas Analyzers, and
several dialysis systems. The laboratory is designed to accommodate 24 students in a session.
Bio Transport Laboratory
This laboratory is under the direction of Jack Patzer, PhD and focuses on research related
to the application of BioThemodynamics and BioTransport Phenomena (principles of heat,
momentum, and mass transport) to understanding the properties of physiological systems,
medical devices, and bioreactor engineering. Current investigations involve the application bound
solute dialysis (BSD) as a detoxification approach to support patients with liver failure, use of
ischemia protective polymers (IPP) to mitigate ischemia/reperfusion injury in organ harvest and
transplant, and wound perfusion/skin regeneration for patients with severe burns. Major

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equipment includes a Sun workstation for finite element analysis of fluid dynamics,
spectrophotometers for colorimetric composition analysis, plate reader for colorimetric
composition analysis, blood-gas analyzer, table-top refrigerated centrifuge, cell incubators, and
Prisma dialysis machines. Other equipment includes multiple roller pumps, gas mass flow
controllers, oscilloscope, electrochemistry controllers and analyzers.
Cardiovascular Systems Laboratory
This laboratory is under the direction of Sanjeev Shroff, PhD and focuses on research related
to cardiovascular mechano-energetics and structure-function relationships. This research utilizes a
variety of biophysical, cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, and imaging techniques. The facility
has: 1) setups for biophysical measurements at isolated heart, isolated muscle, and single cell levels
(mechanics and intracellular calcium transients), 2) a cell-culture room (incubator, laminar flow hood,
centrifuge, microscope), and 3) a wet lab which has equipment necessary to do protein biochemistry
and molecular biology research.
Cell Migration Laboratory
This research laboratory is under the direction of Partha Roy, PhD and offers graduate and
undergraduate students the ability to participate in research related to molecular mechanisms of cell
migration with emphasis in tumor metastasis. This research utilizes a variety of cell biology, molecular
biology, biochemistry and imaging techniques. The facility has: 1) a cell-culture room that is equipped
with tissue culture incubators, laminar flow hood, centrifuge and a microscope, 2) a wet lab which has
equipment necessary to do protein biochemistry and molecular biology research, and 3) a microscopy
room that houses an IX-71 Olympus research grade inverted microscope and image acquisition system.
Molecular Biological and Biophysical Core Facility
This core facility has: 1) gel-imaging station, spectrophotometer, high speed centrifuge,
ultracentrifuge, -80o C freezer, environmental shaker, and incubator for microbiological research, 2)
cold room, sterilizer and labware washer, 3) an atomic force microscope and an fluorescence
microscope (Olympus IX70), which can be integrated to carry out simultaneous nanometer resolution
AFM imaging and optical fluorescence imaging, 4) a cell-culture room that is equipped with tissue
culture incubators, laminar flow hood, centrifuge and a microscope, and 4) a wet lab which has
equipment necessary to for biochemistry and molecular biology research.
Orthopaedic Robotics Laboratory (ORL)
The mission of the Orthopaedic Robotics Laboratory is the prevention of degenerative joint
disease by improving diagnostic, repair, and rehabilitation procedures for musculoskeletal injuries
using state-of-the-art robotic technology. Diarthrodial joint function is elucidated and the roles of the
bony and soft tissues assessed. The technology in the laboratory includes novel robotic systems and the
lab serves as a multi-disciplinary CORE facility with collaboration promoted between investigators.
Co-Directors of the ORL are Richard E. Debski, Ph.D. and Volker Musahl, M.D.
Vascular Bioengineering Laboratory
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/vorplab/
The research focus of this laboratory under the guidance of David A. Vorp PhD is to find
solutions to pathologies of tubular tissue and organs, using computational and experimental
biomechanics, image analysis, cellular and molecular biology, and tissue engineering techniques. The

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lab has state-of-the-art facilities to perform biomechanical testing (tensile testing, peel testing,
indentation testing, and perfusion testing of intact tubular segments). The lab has up to date
computational capabilities with several high-end workstations for 3D reconstruction, finite element
analysis, computational fluid dynamics analysis and fluidstructure interaction analysis. There is a
tissue culture hood and equipment to stimulate (biomechanical, biochemical, or hypoxic) cells cultures
/constructs, and facilities to study gene and protein expression by PCR, Western blotting, ELISA, and
other assays using fluorescence, luminescence or colorimetric techniques. The laboratory also has
facilities for cryosectioning tissues and grafts for histological analysis; stain tissue/grafts/cells for
histological, immunofluorescence, or immunocytochemical imaging, and a microscope for the imaging
of both histological and fluorescently stained samples.
Human Engineering Research Laboratories (HERL)
www.herl.pitt.edu
The Human Engineering Research Laboratories (HERL) is a joint effort between the
University of Pittsburgh, the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, and UPMC Health System. HERL
occupies approximately 40,000 square feet of laboratory and office space in the Bakery Square office
and research complex in Pittsburghs East End. Under the direction of Rory Cooper, PhD, HERLs
Founder and Director, and Michael Boninger, MD, HERLs Medical Director and Director of the
University of Pittsburghs Model Center on Spinal Cord Injury (UPCM-SCI), HERL is dedicated to
wheelchair and mobility research, specifically by improving the mobility and function of people with
disabilities through advanced engineering in clinical research and medical rehabilitation. The
laboratory, which was designated as a VA Center of Excellence for Wheelchair and Associated
Rehabilitation Engineering (WARE), also studies such topics as athletics in rehabilitation, assistive
housing and living spaces, the efficiency and effect of wheelchair transfers, clinician training, and force
and vibration on a wheelchair users ride comfort. Besides its general research and office space,
HERL houses a wheelchair-testing laboratory, a fully equipped machine shop, an ultrasound
laboratory, and a robotics laboratory. HERL is partners with the Quality of Life Technology Center,
funded by the National Science Foundation, and hosts various educational programs such as the
Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU), Experiential Learning for Veterans in Assistive
Technology and Engineering (ELeVATE), and the Fabrication of Assistive Technology (FATe)
Program for Wounded Warriors.
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine
www.mirm.pitt.edu
To realize the vast potential of tissue engineering and other techniques aimed at repairing
damaged or diseased tissues and organs, the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC
Health System have established the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine. The McGowan
Institute serves as a single base of operations for the Universitys leading scientists and clinical faculty
working to develop tissue engineering, cellular therapies, surgical techniques, and artificial and
biohybrid organ devices. The Institute mission includes the development of innovative clinical
protocols as well as the pursuit of rapid commercial transfer of its technologies related to regenerative
medicine. Regenerative medicine is an emerging field that approaches the repair or replacement of
tissues and organs by incorporating the use of cells, genes, or other biological building blocks along
with bioengineered materials and technologies. Space allocated for the McGowan Institute totals
approximately 47,000 square feet of labs, offices and conference rooms in two buildings: the
McGowan Building (MGOWN) and the Bridgeside Point 2 (BSP2) Building. MCGOWN houses
approximately 20,000 square feet of MIRM labs and offices, including the Center for Preclinical
Studies, laboratories, prototype machine shop, offices, and conference rooms. The other operations are

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centered in BSP2. Some of the Swanson School of Engineering-based laboratories within the Institute
are described below.
Medical Devices Laboratory
The Medical Devices Laboratory, under the direction of William Federspiel, PhD, occupies
approximately 2300 sq. ft. and provides space for the development and testing of hollow fiber
membrane-based cardiovascular devices related to mass transfer including several artificial lungs
projects (acute, implantable, and extracorporeal), extracorporeal hemofiltration and hemoadsorption
devices, and biohybrid artificial alveolar capillary modules. Expertise exists in handling and assembling
membrane fiber components and devices, and functional testing of oxygenators, artificial lungs,
polymer hollow fiber membrane or porous bead modules and other cardiovascular devices requiring
perfusion loop testing in aqueous solution or blood. Additionally, the lab is equipped with necessary
equipment for chemical modification of polymer samples and subsequent incorporation of
biomolecules through covalent coupling. The lab includes over 200 linear feet of wet-lab bench space
with nine desks and two chemical fume hoods. One area is equipped with a drainage sink and wallmounted stand for performance testing with fluid circuits, including blood circuits. Two additional sink
areas are available at the end of bench space, each with de-ionized water hook ups. Central air and
central vacuum are provided to each bench.
Flow Visualization Laboratory
The Flow Visualization Laboratory occupies ~342 square feet and is under the direction of Dr.
William Federspiel. It is well equipped with optical instruments, imaging systems, and apparatus for
performing advanced flow visualization (qualitative and quantitative flow measurement, multiscale
flow visualization) by using particle image velocimetry (PIV).
Medical Device Prototype Laboratory
A fully equipped Prototype Machine housed in ~500 square feet adjacent to the Medical
Devices laboratory. This facility is under the direction of Dr. William Federspiel and is staffed by 2
fabricators/designers.
Brown Laboratory
The Brown Laboratory is a newly established space housed within the BSP2 of the McGowan
Institute for Regenerative Medicine. The focus of the laboratory is on the role of the host immune
response to implantable biomaterials. The phenotype and function of host innate immune cells is of
particular interest, and has been shown to be a predictor of the success of biomaterials based strategies
for tissue reconstruction. The Brown Laboratory also participates in new biomaterials development
and identification of biomaterials for clinical applications. The Brown Laboratory is equipped for both
in vitro cell culture and assessment of samples from in vivo experimentation.
Musculoskeletal Research Center (MSRC)
www.pitt.edu/~msrc
The MSRC, which is located at the Center for Bioengineering, offers diverse multidisciplinary
research and educational opportunities. Graduate and undergraduate students conduct research toward
their degrees in the Department of Bioengineering or any of the traditional engineering disciplines. The
MSRC encourages collaboration between clinical and basic scientists in the study of the
musculoskeletal system. Education is the primary goal of the MSRC. Students work with bioengineers,

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orthopaedic surgeons, biochemists, molecular biologists, and gene therapists, exploring innovative
orthopaedic applications of basic science principles and technologies. Savio L-Y. Woo, PhD, DSc,
DEng is the Founding Director of the MSRC. Bioengineering faculty, Steven Abramowitch, PhD and
Patrick McMahon, MD maintain their primary laboratories within MSRC.
University of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center (U-PARC)
U-PARC, located 12 miles from the main campus is a multimillion-dollar, 55-building facility
housing scientific equipment and services available to the University community. Over 100
corporations, including a number of emerging high-technology companies, have offices at U-PARC.
The Manufacturing Assistance Center, described further below, currently makes its home at U-PARC.
In addition, several of the Swanson School of Engineerings research groups maintain laboratories or
experimental activities at this site. U-PARCs pilot plant services range from petroleum,
petrochemical, and chemical-based technologies to environmental, synthetic fuels, biotechnology, and
other emerging technologies.

Swanson School of Engineering Centers and Laboratories


Basic Metals Processing Research Institute (BAMPRI)
The Basic Metals Processing Research Institute (BAMPRI) focuses on metallurgical research
of interest to the basic metals industry, especially steels. The objectives of BAMPRI are to compensate
for the reduction of in-house research & development by industry that has occurred in the past two
decades. BAMPRI develops and implements the latest product and processing technology for
producers, fabricators, and end-users. It also helps educate the future leaders in the metals industry by
offering undergraduate and graduate level courses in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and
Materials Science. Anthony J. DeArdo, PhD, is director of BAMPRI.
Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials (CCEMM)
The Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials (CCEMM), directed by
Prashant N. Kumta, PhD, and with faculty participation of Ipsita Banerjee, PhD and Spandan Maiti,
PhD,; allows graduate, post-doctoral associates, research scholars, visiting faculty, and undergraduate
students to participate in variety of novel and innovative materials for energy storage, generation, and
advanced materials for applied biomaterials research fields for tissue regeneration and stem cell
translation. Some of the current research activities include: (i) Bio-functionalization and degradation of
carbon nano-tubes for tissue engineering applications; (ii) Responsive biosensors for implants; (iii)
Development of novel biodegradable and biocompatible metallic implants for craniofacial and
orthopedic application; (iv) Nano-structured calcium phosphate based bone cements for bone
regeneration process; (v) Calcium phosphate nano-particles for targeted gene delivery; (vi)
Biocompatible and degradable polymers and calcium phosphate-polymer composites for controlled
delivery systems of proteins, peptides, drugs and gene; (vii) Functional inorganic-organic and metalorganic coatings for tissue regeneration; (viii) Advanced materials for a variety of Li-ion, Mg-ion, and
Na-ion, and fluoride battery chemistries; (ix) Advanced non-noble metal catalysts and reduced noble
metal containing systems for hydrogen generation and electrolysis, and fuel cells, and (x) Advanced
systems for supercapacitor applications. The lab has state of the art energy storage and biomaterials
syntheses and processing capabilities and is equipped with wide variety of materials characterization
tools (e.g. X-ray Diffractometer, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectrophotometer, Specific Surface

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Area Analyzer, Mercury Porosimeter, Helium Pycnometer, Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic


Absorbance Spectrometer, thermal analysis, Apparent-Tap Density Analyzer, electrochemical
potentiostats, fuel cell test systems, etc.). This lab also has cell culture rooms equipped with biosafety
cabinets, incubators, centrifuges, Fluorescence microscope, Optical plate reader, Atomic Fore
Microscopy, etc.
Center for Energy
www.energy.pitt.edu
The Center for Energy at the University of Pittsburgh, directed by Brian Gleeson, PhD, is
dedicated to improving energy technology and sustainability, with particular emphasis on energy
efficiency and reliability, advanced materials for demanding energy technologies, and energy
diversification. These areas of research focus, coupled with associated educational initiatives and
regional industrial collaborations, make the Center for Energy unique among other university energy
centers in the USA. As a University-wide endeavor, the Center for Energy leverages the energy-related
expertise of more than 90 faculty members from multiple disciplines, including all
engineering departments, chemistry, geology and physics. Indeed, the Center serves to promote and
facilitate multi-disciplinary research collaborations concerned with resolving the worlds current and
future energy-related challenges. A major goal and defining characteristic of the Center is to work
closely with the concentration of energy-related companies in this region and from around the globe.
To that end, the Center acts as an easily accessible entry point for industry in identifying energy-related
research expertise, form collaborations, and participate in research at the University. The Center is
housed in the newly renovated 8th floor of Benedum Hall, which includes laboratory space for
advanced materials for harsh environments and energy storage, catalysis, carbon management, and
electric power systems.
The Center for Simulation and Modeling
www.sam.pitt.edu
The Center for Simulation and Modeling (SAM) was established in October, 2008 as a
University-wide effort with major contributions from the Swanson School of Engineering and the
Faculty of Arts and Sciences. SAM grew out of the Center for Molecular and Materials Simulation
(CMMS), augmenting the original mission of CMMS to go beyond providing computing hardware to
establishing a center that provides support for high performance computing at all levels. SAM is
dedicated to supporting and facilitating computational-based research across campus. Faculty across
the University are using modeling and simulation to further their research. SAM serves as a catalyst for
multidisciplinary collaborations among professors, sponsors modeling-focused seminars, teaches
graduate-level modeling courses, and provides individual consultation in modeling to all researchers at
the University. J. Karl Johnson, PhD (Chemical and Petroleum Engineering) and Kenneth D. Jordan,
PhD (Department of Chemistry) are co-directors of SAM. There are more than 50 faculty associated
with SAM using simulation and modeling at the University. They come from a wide range of
disciplines, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, economics, engineering, health, and medicine.
Areas of research include: energy and sustainability, nanoscience and materials engineering, medicine
and biology, and economics and the social sciences.
Computational resources are available through SAM, which has a full-time technical director who
assists users with installation and parallelization of software. SAM provides in house high-performance
computing (HPC) resources allocated for shared use for campus researchers. The systems are housed in
the Universitys Computing Services and Systems Development (CSSD) data center and are
administered and maintained jointly with CSSD. The cluster compute nodes were purchased with funds
provided by the University and by faculty researchers.

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Center for National Preparedness


www.cnp.pitt.edu
The Center for National Preparedness (CNP) was established in the wake of the September 11
terrorist attacks to develop holistic and logical approaches to education, research, and training on issues
related to national preparedness. Under the direction of Ken Sochats, PhD, Carey Balaban, PhD, and
Margaret Potter, JD, the CNP has been formulated around four primary guiding principles for
Homeland Security: prevention, protection, response, and recovery. Prevention requires effective
diplomatic policies, border security, and surveillance systems, which must be a first priority prior to
catastrophic events. Protection provides the assurance of military vigilance, the health of the
American population, the security of critical infrastructure, and the continued operation of cyber
networks. Response focuses on employing properly trained and equipped professionals at the local,
state, and federal levels. Recovery emphasizes the importance of rapid restoration of key components
within critical infrastructure. CNP is uniquely positioned to use this multi-layered approach to provide
expertise to organizations that must deal with homeland preparedness. CNP is a broad,
multidisciplinary, collaborative enterprise that engages the Universitys scientists, engineers, policy
experts, and clinical faculty. Members of CNP possess expertise in biomedical research, public health,
medicine, national security policy, engineering, and information technology. The unifying theme of
our efforts is the application of systems (and systems of systems) approaches from the engineering
sciences to a new academic discipline of Homeland Security and National Preparedness Studies.
Center for Sustainable Transportation Infrastructure
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/SubSites/CSTI/CSTI.aspx
Since 2007 the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) has
strategically positioned itself to focus its research and educational efforts on the transportation
sector. The Center for Sustainable Transportation Infrastructure (CSTI) was formed to expand on
the successful research and education collaboration between the Pennsylvania Department of
Transportation (PennDOT) and the CEE Department. Co-directors Radisav Vidic, PhD and Mark
Magalotti, PE, conduct research for PennDOT through the University Department of General
Services (DGS) Agreement which provides a mechanism for individual research topics that are
investigated to assist PennDOT in improving the transportation system for the State of
Pennsylvania. CSTIs vision is to advance the state of transportation infrastructure through
collaborative, multi-disciplinary research and education efforts and dissemination of new
technologies and knowledge. CSTI is interested in fostering collaborative transportation research
throughout the Swanson School of Engineering, the University, industry, and other academic
institutions to expand its research program.
Engineering Education Research Center (EERC)
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/eerc/
Under the direction of Mary Besterfield-Sacre, PhD, the Engineering Education Research Center's
(EERC) mission is twofold: 1) enhance the teaching and learning of engineering within the Swanson
School of Engineering; and 2) expand engineering education research efforts at the University. The
Center strives to engage faculty in the integration of research-based practices to enhance their teaching,
as well as to engage faculty in utilizing research to better understand learning of engineering. In so
doing we strive to make the Swanson School a leader in engineering education research and classroom
practices.

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Manufacturing Assistance Center (MAC)


http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/mac/
The MAC is a working factory opened in November of 1994 at the University of Pittsburgh
Applied Research Center (U-PARC) as an initiative of the University of Pittsburgh, School of
Engineerings Industrial Engineering Department. It is comprised of a synergistic network of
laboratories encompassing machine tooling, computer aided design and manufacturing, metrology,
materials tracking, and human issues. The MACs mission is twofold: 1.) provide research and
educational support to the University of Pittsburgh and 2.) provide Southwestern Pennsylvania small
and mid-sized manufacturers with the tools necessary to compete in the global marketplace. With the
resources available in the MAC labs, area manufacturers can receive demonstrations on new equipment
and manufacturing processes, perform pilot manufacturing, and conduct limited production. In
addition to these services, the MAC also provides training on computer numerical control (CNC)
machining, computer aided design (CAD), computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and computer
integrated manufacturing (CIM), plus a variety of other concepts (e.g. materials requirements planning,
total quality management, team development, etc.) utilized in todays highly successful manufacturing
organizations. The MAC is directed by Dr. Bopaya Bidanda.
Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation (MCSI)
www.mascarocenter.pitt.edu
In 2003, through funding from the Heinz Endowments, the George Bevier Estate and John C.
Mascaro (Chairman of Mascaro Construction Company), the Swanson School of Engineering
established the Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation (MCSI) as a center of excellence that
focuses on innovative research, education and outreach to enable more sustainable communities.
MCSIs expertise includes the built environment, infrastructure and materials. Over the past
ten years, MCSI has supported over 46 research teams who are tackling diverse and challenging
sustainability issues comprising faculty from all six engineering departments. MCSI has also supported
over 138 undergraduate students for 12-week summer research projects in sustainable engineering and
MCSI faculty have developed 6 interdisciplinary courses for undergraduate and graduate students as
well as hosts the Engineering for Humanity Certificate. The Center boasts a strong community outreach
component including a biannual Engineering Sustainability conference where experts in the field gather
to explore the state-of-the-art in sustainability research.
Petersen Institute of NanoScience and Engineering (PINSE)
http://www.nano.pitt.edu/
The Gertrude E. and John M. Petersen Institute of NanoScience and Engineering (PINSE), directed by
George Klinzing, PhD, is an integrated, multidisciplinary organization that brings coherence to the
University's research efforts and resources in the fields of nanoscale science and engineering. The
Institute's vision is to solve large, complex scientific and engineering challenges by facilitating
interdisciplinary teams drawn from faculty in the Schools of Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and
Health Sciences, and to educate the next generation of scientists through world-class integrated
programs. PINSE provides research infrastructure for nanoscience research and fosters interactions
among diverse research groups both inside and outside of the University to encourage innovative and
interdisciplinary knowledge generation. The Institute serves industrial interests by forming partner
groups and seeking opportunities for sharing discoveries with the commercial sector. Through an open
seminar series and user meetings each semester, PINSE brings in leading researchers to present their
work on nanoscience in an interdisciplinary setting in an effort to promote dissemination of expertise

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throughout the user community. These research goals combine to form the three tenets of PINSE
Collaboration, Innovation, and Service. PINSE supports the Nanoscale Fabrication and
Characterization Facility (NFCF), a user facility located in Benedum Hall. This facility houses state-ofthe-art equipment with core-nano-level capability. There are several features which make the
capabilities of NFCF unique including 5 different types of Lithography (Optical, EBL, Dual Beam,
DipPen, and Imprint), a Field-Emission Microprobe (EPMA), and TEM.
RFID Center of Excellence
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/labs/rfid/
The RFID Center of Excellence, under the direction of Ervin Sejdic, PhD, is likely the most
well equipped RFID Research Center in the world. The Center is currently housed in two laboratories
within Benedum Hall. Equipment includes numerous Real Time Spectrum Analyzers, state of the art
Network Analyzers, numerous professional grade power meters, Spectrum Analyzers, LCR meters and
all the necessary bench support equipment including as RF amplifiers, power supplies, various
antennas, etc. The Center also houses two Anechoic Chambers and a GTEM Cell. Commercial RFID
readers and tags for all classical RF bands are available for use in standards and performance testing.
Radio Frequency (RF) technology is permeating most all aspects of everyday life well beyond
cellular telephones and pagers including the Internet of Things. The components to use RF in various
devices are relatively simple to use and they extend the functionality of common household, personal
and industrial, scientific and medical objects and equipment.
The RF Prototyping and Measurements facilities provide for testing and demonstration of
novel and unique applications of this technology. The devices available include commercially available
components and custom designed devices built within the Swanson School of Engineering of the
University of Pittsburgh. Examples include: implantable medical devices, low power communications,
and human interface systems.
This laboratory is the home of the PENI Tag. The PENI Tag technology is an enabling
technology that makes possible operational devices that are currently as small as 3 cubic millimeters in
size with no batteries or connecting wires. The design of the small Systems On a Chip devices (SOC)
requires the most modern computer workstations and software.
Chips are designed and simulated in this laboratory by a team of researchers. They are then
submitted for fabrication over the internet to a remote foundry. The completed chips are then tested
here.
The PENI Tag technology makes it possible to remotely provide power to operate a wide
range of devices and systems that are used for product identification, such as bar codes in the
supermarket, as well as sensing things such as temperature and humidity, and also to provide security
functions.
Devices designed by teams using this laboratory have been the subject of extensive media
coverage and have acquired the interest of technology and management persons of numerous major US
corporations.

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Swanson School of Engineering Laboratories


Applied Signal and System Analysis Laboratory
This laboratory provides research opportunities to undergraduate and graduate students in
bioengineering and related disciplines to conduct research in signal processing, systems analysis and
modeling in biomedical and electrical engineering. The lab is housed in Benedum Engineering Hall
and is directed by Patrick Loughlin, PhD. Current research activities include the analysis and modeling
of human postural control; design of vibrotactile feedback for balance; pulse propagation in dispersive
media; and propagation-invariant classification of underwater sounds.
Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy Laboratory
The Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy Laboratory is a unique, highly sophisticated research
facility for investigating the structure and chemistry of solids on an atomic scale. The installation
includes three units for field ion microscopy and atom probe analysis.
Automatic Data Collection Laboratory (ADC)/ Virtual Enterprise Lab
Industrial Engineerings ADC/Virtual Enterprise Laboratory is an educational and research
laboratory developed under a grant from the National Science Foundation, AIMUSA, and the Swanson
School of Engineering. This state-of-the-art laboratory is the most comprehensive and complete NSF
funded laboratory of its kind in the United States and focuses on information systems engineering and
software development. The facility is designed to aid the teaching of Automatic Data Capture concepts
and tools to undergraduate and graduate engineering students. Students gain hands-on skills and
perform research in such technologies as virtual enterprises, bar codes, wireless communications,
speech recognition, and smart cards. They are involved in projects in areas including E-Commerce and
web software development, automatic data collection for new product conformance testing, and supply
chain engineering. These labs are collocated as they make use of much of the same equipment even
though their research domains are distinct. Equipment includes barcode technology, magnetic stripe,
RF Data Capture, machine vision and voice technology. All software operates on ten networked
Pentium Computers. Some of the application software includes manufacturing execution and
warehouse management, inventory management, vision and voice inspection, personnel access,
barcode printing, barcode verification, magnetic strip encoding and decoding, and point of sale (POS)
Control.
Bioengineering Human Movement and Balance Laboratory
www.engineering.pitt.edu/hmbl
This research and teaching laboratory is under the direction of April Chambers, PhD (and in
collaboration with Dr. Rakie Cham and Dr. Mark Redfern, Vice-Provost for Research), and offers
graduate and undergraduate students the ability to participate in a variety of whole body biomechanics
research. The mission of the HMBL is fall and musculoskeletal injury prevention in healthy and clinical
young/elderly adult populations. HMBL researchers achieving these goals by gaining a thorough
understanding of the biomechanical and postural control principles that govern human movement,
balance during standing/walking, and performance of occupational tasks. More specifically, for a given
environment and task constraints, the multidimensional sensory, motor and biomechanical
requirements required to minimize the risk of falls and musculoskeletal injuries is examined. Current
research projects range from fall prevention following external disturbances such as slipping to

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ergonomic-related research. In conjunction with experimental studies, biomechanical computer


modeling is used to gain a greater understanding of the impact of environmental and human factors on
the risk of falls and injury. The HMBL is a full gait analysis facility specifically designed to conduct
locomotion studies related to postural control but also capable of capturing small finger movements
involved in typing. Three dimensional motions and foot forces as well as electromyographic data can
be collected during walking or other daily tasks including activities such as stopping, turning,
multitasking, etc. An eight meter vinyl tile walkway is instrumented with a 14-camera Vicon motion
capture system, 2 Bertec force plates, digital camcorders and an overhead harness safety system. Also,
the HMBL is equipped with a 16 channel Noraxon electromyography system, a 64 channel Delsys
electromyography and accelerometer system, a Biodex strength machine, a Biolog heart rate and skin
conductance monitor. The motion data is collected and synchronized with ground reaction forces
sampled and other biomechanical data. Thus, this system allows the collection of all gait variables
required to provide a complete description of whole body biomechanics. Motion capture is possible on
a level walkway, uneven walkway, ramp, uneven ramp, or stairs. We are also able elicit perturbations
of slips, stumbles, and trips on the uneven walkway. Modeling software is also available to simulate,
validate, and predict whole-body biomechanics.
The Human Movement Research Laboratory

(Bakery Square)

This laboratory, co-directed by Gelsy Torres-Oviedo, PhD, offers graduate and undergraduate
students the infrastructure to investigate human motor learning mechanisms during balance and
locomotor behaviors. The space for this facility is 700 square feet with a state-of-the-art 14-camera
motion analysis system for recording three-dimensional body kinematic data in real time. The
laboratory is also equipped with 2 force plates and an instrumented split-belt treadmill flushed with the
ground, allowing kinetic recordings from each foot while human subjects from all ages walk on the
treadmill. The facility also has a system for electromyographic recordings and instrumentation to
digitize up to 32 analogue signals. This laboratory is located in Bakery Square and it was developed as
a collaborative effort between the Department of Bioengineering and the Department of Physical
Therapy. This favors the collaborations for Dr. Torres-Oviedo's research group with colleagues in the
Department of Physical Therapy.
Bio Tissues and Complex Fluids Laboratory
The Bio Tissues and Complex Fluids Laboratory, directed by Anne Robertson, PhD, is
devoted to the characterization and experimental study of complex materials. Much of the work in this
laboratory focuses on understanding and quantifying the link between material behavior and structure.
These results are used for the development of constitutive equations to model these materials in a
predictive fashion. A second focus of the laboratory is the study of the motion and stability of particles
in viscous and viscoelastic fluids.
BioManufacturing and Vascular Device Laboratory
http://www.pitt.edu/~yjchun/home.html
This lab is directed by Dr. Youngjae Chun and its objective is to design, manufacture, and test
medical devices for treating vascular diseases. Primary research focuses on improving device
performance and developing more diverse biomedical applications for treating vascular diseases with a
focus on novel materials and manufacturing concepts. This lab also focuses on developing novel
artificial biomaterials such as fully biocompatible hybrid/composite materials made of metals,
polymers, and bio-species. Facilities include in-vitro pulsatile flow circuits with vascular disease
models, cell-tissue culture capabilities, and florescent microscopy with imaging system. Current

38

research is focused on the development of a novel in-vitro test apparatus for characterizing flow
alterations and monitoring local blood pressure distributions with the placement of endovascular
devices.
Biomedical Materials Laboratory
This laboratory, under the direction of Yadong Wang, PhD, works at the interface of chemistry,
materials, and medicine. The research focus is on creating biomaterials that present controlled
chemical, physical, and mechanical signals to the biological systems. The ultimate goal is to direct how
human bodies will interact with these materials in a therapeutic environment. The laboratory actively
engages in collaborative efforts to explore the applications of these materials in cardiovascular tissue
engineering, nerve regeneration, and controlled release of therapeutics. The major equipment of the
laboratory includes essential tools for chemical synthesis (inert atmosphere box, GPC, microwave
synthesis station) and cell biology (plate reader, microscope, RT PCR).
Current Frank cluster hardware:

200, 8-core Intel Nehalem, 12GB-48GB RAM


45, 12-core Intel Westmere, 12GB-48GB RAM
23, 48-core AMD Magny-cours, 48GB-256GB RAM
Total of 3244 CPU cores
16 NVIDIA C2050 general purpose GPU cards
Low-latency Infiniband interconnect (most nodes)

Ceramics Processing Laboratory


The Ceramics Processing laboratory, under the direction of Ian Nettleship, PhD, includes glove
box facilities for chemical synthesis of powders and thin films. Powder preparation facilities allow for
mixing and milling of powders, Horiba CAPA-300 particle size analyzer, Quantachrome BET surface
area analysis, mini spray drier, Brookfield viscometer, uniaxial press and colloidal filtration
pressurization unit, cold isostatic press. Firing facilities include a high-temperature sintering dilatometer
and various tube and box furnaces for firing ceramics and melting glass at temperatures up to 1700C
in air.
Chemical Engineering Process Simulation Laboratory
The Chemical Engineering Process Simulation Laboratory brings the full complement of
commercial design software that is used throughout the world by practicing chemical engineers.
Students use software systems including AspenPlus, BJAC, Emission Master, BatchFrac, and the
Icarus Process Evaluator to blend their technical skills with applied designs. This marriage of theory
and practice at a level used by practicing engineers has significantly enhanced the ability of the
Departments graduates to quickly contribute in a professional setting. The Process Simulation
Laboratory is located in B72A Benedum Hall. It serves as a teaching lab and as a study area for the
students using the simulation software.
Cluster Computing Laboratory
The Cluster Computing Laboratory is under the direction of Alex Jones, PhD, and dedicated to
the development of new architectures that utilize commodity personal computers as the
processing/storage nodes. More efficient computer communication and coordination is facilitated
through a high-speed, intelligent network. Equipment includes a cluster of 16 Pentium III computers, a
cluster of 8 Pentium computers, a surface-mount soldering station for custom hardware development,

39

and a number of development workstations. Mentor Graphics has donated over $2M worth of
hardware development software for this Laboratory and for the teaching laboratories in the Computer
Engineering Program.
Computational Nanomechanics Laboratory
http://www.pitt.edu/~albertto/
The Computational Nanomechanics Lab, directed by Albert To, PhD, focuses on investigating
the mechanics of materials at the nanoscale using large-scale computer simulations. Current research
projects include 1) Thermomechanical behavior of carbon nanotube based and nano-bio materials, 2)
Atomistic-to-continuum themomechanical theory in solids, and 3) Multiscale method development.
The computational tools the lab employs include molecular dynamics simulations, first-principles
methods, Monte Carlo simulations, and finite element/meshfree methods. The computational resources
the Lab has access to include a brand new 800-core cluster (shared with other research groups at Pitt)
and a 24-core cluster. This 800-core cluster has 100 nodes each with two quad-core Intel Nehalem
CPUs. The computer nodes are connected via a high speed Infiniband network, which will deliver
exceptional performance for parallel calculations using large numbers of CPUs. The 24-core cluster
consists of 4 x 6-Core Intel Xeon E7450 processors with 12GB of memory. The cluster has SUSE
Linux Enterprise Server 10 installed along with MPICH, MPICH2 and Intel compiler ICC and IFC
version 10.1 with Math Kernel Library 10.0.1.014. The lab also has several brand-new desktop
computers, each having an Intel quadcore processor. The computers are well-equipped and are fully
integrated into the University of Pittsburgh high-speed network. In addition, the lab has access to the
state-of-the-art computing facilities at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (www.psc.edu).
Computational Optimization Laboratory
The Computational Optimization Laboratory contains state-of-the-art computing facilities
including several optimization software packages. The laboratory is used for applied research thrusts as
well as course instruction. Techniques employed include linear and mixed-integer programming,
network flows, nonlinear programming, stochastic programming, Markov decision processes, and
heuristic optimization. The applications include medical decision making, facility layout, energy
modeling, supply chain management and scheduling. The goals of this laboratory include applying
optimization techniques to industrial problems, developing new algorithms for solving speciallystructured problems, and teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels.
Computational Transport Phenomena Laboratory
http://cfd.engr.pitt.edu/
The primary objective of the Computational Transport Phenomena Laboratory, under the
direction of Peyman Givi, PhD, is to conduct theoretical research in fluid mechanics, combustion, heat
and mass transfer, applied mathematics, and numerical methods. The emphasis of current research in
this laboratory is on understanding physics rather than developing numerical algorithms.
Several areas of current investigations are turbulent mixing, chemically reacting flows, highspeed combustion and propulsion, transition and turbulence, nano-scale heat transfer,
magnetohydrodynamics, and plasma physics. The numerical methodologies in use consist of spectral
methods (collocation, Galerkin), variety of finite difference, finite volume and finite element schemes,
Lagrangian methods, and many hybrid methods such as spectral-finite element and spectral-finite
difference schemes. The laboratory is equipped with high-speed mini-supercomputers, graphic systems,
and state-of-the-art hardware and software for "flow visualization." Most computations require the use
of off-site supercomputers (mostly parallel platforms), for which high-speed links are available.

40

Computer Architecture Laboratory


The Computer Architecture Laboratory in Electrical and Computer Engineering and under the
direction of Jun Yang, PhD, is a research laboratory devised to investigate advanced computer
microarchitectures, computer system architecture, power/thermal management in computer systems,
multi-core microprocessors, memory systems, emerging memory technologies, interconnection
networks, 3D integration and hardware security. The lab is equipped with networked high-end multiprocessor Linux servers, over 10TB mass network storage and solid state drivers, testing motherboards,
and more than a dozen Windows and Linux workstations. The laboratory software consists of state-ofthe-art simulation tools from both public domains and in-house developed simulation warehouse. The
laboratory is sponsored by NSF, SSOE, and Intel Corporation.
Computer Lab for Innovation and Productivity (CLIP)
Under the direction of Bopaya Bidanda, PhD, the Computer Laboratory for Innovation and
Productivity (CLIP) is a state-of-the-art laboratory that provides IE students access to state-of-the-art
Industrial Engineering software. It allows them to work on projects and enable them to succeed and
excel when they join the global workforce. In addition to general University and School software, the
lab offers Computer Aided Design, Database, and Productivity Analysis software to students. The Lab
mirrors the Holzman Learning Center and allows students to work off-hours on homework and
projects.
Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
The Laboratory for Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition in the Department of Electrical
and Computer Engineering, headed by Chin-Chung Li, PhD, supports research in computer vision,
pattern recognition, machine learning, and image processing. Current research interests
include computer-aided classification of prostate cancer cell images, wavelet-based image superresolution, and applications of diffusion wavelet to multi-resolution information processing. The
laboratory is equipped with PC-based image processing and pattern recognition workstations with
associated cameras.
Design Studios
Industrial Engineerings Design Studios, directed by Bopaya Bidanda, PhD, provides students
with computer facilities that are available 24 hours a day with computers and printers and with full
Internet and e-mail access. The lab provides high-speed PC hardware and provides general University
and School software and includes specialized Industrial Engineering software. The laboratory and its
equipment are available to senior students participating in research projects and graduate students
participating in research projects in the areas of computational intelligence and operations research.
Energy Systems Laboratory
https://sites.google.com/site/energysystemslaboratory
The purpose of the Energy Systems Lab at the University of Pittsburgh, under the direction of
Laura Schaefer, PhD, is to investigate the multi-scale thermal-fluid behavior encountered during the
conversion and use of energy. The laboratory includes a National Instruments DAQPad-6020E
multifunction I/O device for USB connected to an SCXI system with multiple thermocouple, voltage,
and current terminal blocks, an Omega Engineering OMB-DAQ-55 data acquisition module, finegauge thermocouples with low noise connectors and electric ice points, Omega FP-5070 mini-flow

41

sensors, millivolt pressure transducers with full bridge design, heat flux sensors, digital meters, high
accuracy rotameters, a Sony DCR-TRV900 3 CCD digital video camera with frame-grabbing and
streaming video cards, a Leitz Epivert modular inverted microscope with swappable high-precision
objectives, and a number of computer workstations.
Environmental Fluids Mechanics Laboratory
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/efml/
The Fluids Laboratory, directed by Dr. Jorge D. Abad, is the center for experimental research
in fluid mechanics, sediment transport and morphodynamics at the University of Pittsburgh. Much of
the research in this laboratory examines the behavior complex fluids, such as turbulent mixing,
transport of contaminants, hydrodynamics and morphodynamics in open channel flows, highlyresolved turbulent modeling. Laboratory work focuses on the understanding of the link between flow
behavior and earth and environmental processes such as those found in rivers, lakes, ocean, and
landscape in general. In obtaining this goal, this laboratory develops and applies many cutting-edge
technologies to obtain precise, in situ measurements of fluid velocity, stress, pressure, temperature, and
salinity as well as sediment transport and morphodynamic measurements. These measurements are
compared with highly resolved numerical results to complement experimental results, and to predict the
flow and morphodynamic behavior of these physical processes.
Fiber Optics and Sensor Laboratory (FOSL)
The Fiber Optics and Sensor Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh, under the direction of
Kevin Chen, PhD, engages in interdisciplinary research in fiber optics and sensor applications for
structural health monitoring, energy, and bio-medical research. In FOSL, research and development
works are often carried out collaboratively with leading scientists and engineers across the globe and
across industries. Our research partners include Naval Research Laboratory (US), University of Sydney
(Australia), Institute of Photonics Technology (Jena, Germany), University of Toronto (Canada),
Corning Inc. (US), Siemens North America, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Lakeshore
Cryogenics Inc., etc. In FOSL, both passive fiber Bragg grating sensors and distributed feedback fiber
lasers are produced in houses using a 248-nm KrF excimer laser using the phase mask technique.
Sophisticate fiber sensor interrogation techniques have been developed for both point and distributed
sensing from DC to 300-kHz acoustic frequency for structural health monitoring, power generation
system managements, biomedical sensing, and etc. FOSL possess unique capabilities on hightemperature fiber sensors rated for above 800oC operation. Working with our collaborators, FOSL
researchers have wide access of air-hole microstructural fibers for sensing applications. FOSL is
equipped with multiple optical spectrum analyzer, fusion splicers, high-resolution tunable lasers,
broadband sources (to cover from 980 nm to 2000 nm). FOSL has board capabilities and expertise in
fiber grating sensors and distributed fiber sensing using both Rayleigh and Brillioun scattering
schemes. Working with industrial partners, our sensing expertise includes fiber sensing at both
cryogenic and high temperature environments for space, energy, and environmental monitoring.
Gas Turbine Heat Transfer Laboratory
Directed by Minking Chyu, the Gas Turbine Heat Transfer Laboratory is equipped with
advanced flow and heat transfer measurement facilities directed toward obtaining fundamental
understanding and design strategies of airfoil cooling in advanced gas turbine engines.
Major experimental systems available include a particle imaging velocimetry, a computerautomated liquid crystal thermographic system, a UV-induced phosphor fluorescent thermometric
imaging system, and a sublimation-based heat-mass analogous system. Specific projects currently

42

under way include optimal endwall cooling, shaped-hole film cooling, innovative turbulator heat
transfer enhancement, advanced concepts in trailing edge cooling, and instrumentation developments
for unsteady thermal and pressure sensing.
George A. Davidson, Jr. Unit Operations Laboratory
The Departments Unit Operations Laboratory was renamed to reflect the support of George A.
Davidson, Jr. in implementing a five-year development effort to enhance the existing Unit Operations
Laboratory. Managed by Matt Detzel and Rob Toplak, this development effort provided an opportunity for
our students to develop laboratory and process design skills and solve a multitude of design problems using
state-of-the-art apparatus and instrumentation. In 2009-2010, the Unit Operations Laboratory located in room
SB33 was completely renovated as part of Swanson Schools Benedum Hall Transformation Plan.
Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory
The Geotechnical Engineering laboratory, under the direction of Luis Vallejo, PhD, is
computer controlled. This includes static triaxial and direct shear apparatuses for both soils and
rocks, a ring shear apparatus, a gyratory compactor, a dynamic triaxial apparatus,
consolidometers, constant and variable head permeameters, a resonant column apparatus, an
ultrasonic velocity testing apparatus, and a shaking table. In addition the laboratory houses
standard equipment for Atterberg Limits determination, and grain size analysis.
Human Factors Engineering (HFE) Laboratory
The Human Factors Engineering (HFE) Laboratory, under the direction of Mary BesterfieldSacre, PhD, is a team-based teaching and research laboratory for undergraduate and graduate students.
The laboratory focuses on cognitive, ergonomic, and environmental aspects of human factors, and their
influence on productivity and quality. The lab has a wide array of hardware and software to include
Ergomaster for conducting ergonomic studies as well as Minitab, SPSS and NVivo7 for data analysis.
Innovative Medical Engineering Developments (iMED)
www.imedlab.org
The iMED lab, directed by Ervin Sejdic, PhD, was founded in 2011 and its vision is to become
an international leader in dynamical biomarkers indicative of age- and disease-related changes and their
contributions to functional decline under normal and pathological conditions. In particular, the mission
of the lab is to develop clinically relevant solutions by fostering innovation in computational
approaches and instrumentation that can be translated to bedside care. Given the vision and mission
behind the lab, our motto is: "Output and outcome." These two simple words fully describe the
essence of the lab. "Output" describes the first goal of the iMED lab: to conduct rigorous scientific
investigations whose results will be published in respected high impact journals. In order to achieve
this goal, we strive to conduct cutting-edge research projects which produce results with an immediate
impact. "Outcome" describes the second goal of the iMED lab: to conduct research projects that
matter to patients and the public. In other words, our research must make a difference in people's lives.
The research conducted in the iMED lab must lead to important and real-life relevant advances in
biomedical computational approaches and instrumentation. The iMED lab serves as a unique,
clinically oriented training ground for undergraduate students, graduate students and post-doctoral
fellows interested in computational tools and instrumentation. We work very closely alongside
numerous health and allied health professionals and scientists, including physicians, occupational
therapists, physical therapists, speech language pathologists, throughout all stages of research, from
problem formulation to grant application, from data collection to journal publication.

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John A. Jurenko Computer Architecture Laboratory


This laboratory in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, directed by Alex
Jones, PhD, provides the hardware and software necessary for students to design and build digital
circuits. It is used in two undergraduate laboratory courses where students are provided with an
understanding of the three-way relationship between the mathematical abstraction of logic as expressed
in Boolean algebra, schematics and simulations using CAD tools, and the physical realization of these
circuits in hardware. The facility contains 24 networked high-performance workstations, complete with
logic analyzers, oscilloscopes, and related equipment used to design, breadboard, and test digital
circuits. In addition, the laboratory contains complete support for both Altera and Xilinx Field
Programmable Gate Array system development. Finally, a full complement of software, including the
Mentor Graphics Design Tools and the Microsoft Visual Studio, is available which allows students to
simulate their designs and develop new hardware and software systems. This laboratory was created
through a generous gift from John A. Jurenko, a Pitt alumnus and friend of the University.
Keystone Mixed-Technology Microsystems Design Laboratory
http://kona.ee.pitt.edu/index.html
The Keystone Mixed-Technology Microsystems Design Laboratory, directed by Steve
Levitan, PhD, is used for the investigation of computer-aided design, simulation, and testing
techniques associated with the design and analysis of very large-scale integrated circuits (VLSI)
and research on computer-aided design of mixed technology micro and nano scale systems such
as optical mechanical electrical micro-systems (OMEMS) and optoelectronic integrated circuits
(OEICs). The laboratory equipment consists of a network of a dozen Linux and Windows desktop
workstations with access to a compute cluster of 16 multi-core nodes. In addition to access to the
commercial tools hosted by the department servers, a number of university based tools and other
utilities have been developed and maintained in-house.
Laboratory for Advanced Materials at Pittsburgh (LAMP)
http://www.pitt.edu/~pleu/Research/
The Laboratory for Advanced Materials at Pittsburgh (LAMP) under the direction of Paul
W. Leu, PhD, focuses on designing and understanding advanced materials by computational
modeling and experimental research. Simulations and experiments are used in a synergistic
manner to study the mechanical and electronic properties of nanomaterials and surfaces for
various applications. Facilities include chemical vapor deposition tube furnace for nanotube
synthesis and nanowire synthesis. Current research is focused on transparent conductors and
solar cells.
Laboratory for Nondestructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring studies
Established by Dr. Piervincenzo Rizzo in September 2006 upon his arrival at the University of
Pittsburgh. In September 2012 the laboratory was re-located in a totally renovated floor. The laboratory
consists of about 900 square feet of dust-free space, which contains the state-of-the-art equipment of
some of the most widely used NDT and SHM methods. The laboratory includes but it is not limited to:
1) Acoustic Emission Instrumentation: one Physical Acoustics Corporation 4-cahnnel PCI/DSP system
with waveform module including a notebook computer and AE-Win software; acoustic emission pico,
WD, and S14 AE-transducers;

44

2) Ultrasonic Testing Instrumentation: one Tektronix AFG3022 arbitrary function generator (2 output
channels); one Lecroy Waverunner 44Xi 4-channels oscilloscope (with PC incorporated running under
Windows XP); eight commercial broadband OlympusNDT-Panametrics Ultrasonic Transducers; one
OlympusNDT-Panametrics high power (max 400 Volts) signal generator; several immersion
transducers;
3) Modal Testing Instrumentation: 8-channel, line-powered, ICP sensor signal conditioner; four 1/4
in. pre-polarized condenser microphone, free-field, 4 mV/Pa, 4 to 80k Hz ( 2 dB); Modally Tuned
Impulse Hammer w/force sensor and tips, 0 to 100 lbf, 50 mV/lbf (11.2 mV/N); one 086D80 Miniature
Instrumented Impulse Hammer w/force tips, 0 to 50 lbf;
4) Two National Instrument-PXI 1042Q chassis with arbitrary function generator and multifunction
Data Acquisition System;
5) Infrared Thermography equipment: We have one FLIR Infrared Camera (~8k value), one Infrared
Video camera and accessories SLC400 (~50k value) for infrared thermography testing, and one FLIR
lower end (~2k value) infrared camera;
6) Optical testing equipment: One optical table, one Nd:YAG pulse laser, several posts, lenses, and
tools to conduct high-precision optical testing;
7) LCR meter, sensors, and general supplies to perform Electromechanical Impedance measurements;
8) Miscellaneous: unidirectional and omnidirectional acoustic Audio-Technica microphones; seven
personal computers, 2 laptops, piezoelectric transducers, hundreds of spherical particles of different size
and materials to assemble nonlinear medium to support the propagation of HNSWs.
Laser and Opto-Electronics Laboratories
In the Laser and Opto-Electronics Laboratories, directed by Hong-Koo Kim, PhD, facilities
exist for research in nonlinear optics, materials, and devices. As part of the Department of Electrical
Engineering, these laboratories emphasize facilities for maskmaking, lithography, dry-etching,
evaporation and sputtering of metals or insulators, diffusion alloying, and wire-bonding are available.
The structural and electrical characteristics of fabricated material and devices are evaluated using stateof-the-art test equipment. Semiconductor devices can be characterized at low temperatures in a
continuous flow cryostat, capable of reaching temperatures as low as 5 degrees Kelvin. These
laboratories contain argon, Nd:YAG (frequency doubled and tripled), carbon dioxide and Ti:sapphire
lasers.
Materials Micro-Characterization Laboratory (MMCL)
The MMCL is located on the 5th floor of Benedum Engineering Hall. The MMCL is part of
the Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Department, directed by C. Isaac Garcia, PhD. The
laboratory houses instrumentation for X-ray diffraction (XRD) and texture characterization. Scanning
electron microscopy (JEOL 6610V and Philips XL-30 FEG SEM) both systems with OIM for EBSD
analysis. Transmission electron microscopy TEM 200CX and FEI Tecnai G2 F20 S-Twin TMP
microscope and scanning probe/stylus microscopy (STM, AFM, Nanohardness), together with a range
of sample preparation equipment. This facility and its staff offer access to instrumentation and expertise
for the structural, compositional, and chemical characterization of materials down to near-atomic scale.
The XRD Laboratory has two XRD Diffraction systems located in this laboratory. A state- of- the- art
Empyrean XRD tube system the successor to PANalyticals well-proven XPert Tube is available. The
Empyrean tube has been designed and optimized for PANalytical's Empyrean diffractometers. In
addition, the new diffraction tube is fully compatible with all PANalyticals existing X'Pert PRO,
XPert Powder, CubiX PRO, CubiX FAST, CubiX3 and X'Pert diffractometer systems. The Empyrean
PANalytical offers non-destructive, cutting-edge characterization solutions for solids, fluids, thin films
or nanomaterials. The system provides detailed information on elemental and/or phase composition,
crystallographic texture, crystalline quality, and/or nanoparticle size distributions and shape. The

45

second unit is fully dedicated to teaching undergraduate students to study powder diffraction and
includes a platinum hot stage capable of temperatures up to 1100C as well as a vacuum furnace
capable of temperatures above 1000C. This diffractometer has a thin film attachment and Eulerian
cradle useful for the study of crystallographic textures and the determination of pole-figures. Computers
for on-line and off-line processing and analysis of diffraction data are also available in this laboratory.
The TEM Laboratory has tTwo 200kV transmission electron microscopes available. The JEOL
200CX has line resolution of 0.14 nm. The JEOL 200CX is equipped with a tungsten filament, capable
of conventional diffraction contrast imaging, selected area diffraction, and magnetic domain imaging
by Lorentz TEM. The TEM laboratory has a newly acquired FEI Tecnai G2 F20 S-Twin TMP
microscope. This system is a true multi-purpose, multi-user 200 kV instrument. This microscope is a
field emission gun transmission electron microscope. It combines high performance in all TEM,
energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) & scanning TEM (STEM) modes with ease of operation in a multi-user
materials research environment. The FEI Tecnai G2 F20 S-Twin analytical transmission electron
microscope permits analysis and characterization of the detailed microstructural and microchemical
changes in materials that control their properties and performance. The FEI Tecnai G2 F20 S-Twin
microscope will facilitate the study of material interfaces, observing microstructures, precipitates, and
quantifying elemental composition and distribution, investigating the limits of material structure and
properties whether working at sub-micron or sub-Angstrom scales. The Scanning Probe Microscopy
Laboratory has a Digital Instruments Dimension 3100 scanning probe microscope permits atomic
force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and magnetic force microscopy
(MFM) investigations in a single platform. Samples up to eight inches in diameter can be scanned in air
or fluids and automated stepping can be used to scan multiple areas of the sample without operator
intervention.
Mechanical Testing Laboratory
This facility directed by C. Isaac Garcia, PhD, includes two hydraulic MTS machines.
One has a high temperature capability for hot deformation simulation and the other is an MTS
880, 20,000-pound frame with hydraulic grips and temperature capability up to 1000C. Two
screw-driven machines are available, a 50,000-pound Instron TT and a 10,000-pound ATS
tabletop tester (this machine has fixtures for loading in tension, compression and bending). The
facility also includes several hardness testers, including one Brinell, two Rockwell, one Rockwell
Superficial, and one Vickers, plus a new Leco M-400 G microhardness tester. Two impact tested
are availableone with 100 foot-per-pound and the other with 265 foot-per-pound capacity. An
ultrasonic elastic modulus tester is also available.
Mechanics of Active Materials Laboratory
The Mechanics of Active Materials Laboratory focuses on the experiment- and physicsbased constitutive modeling of smart materials, with a strong secondary emphasis on applications.
A smart (or active) material is any material that can transform energy from one domain to
another, akin to how man-made motors transform electrical energy into mechanical work. Dr.
Lisa Weiland is the director of this laboratory, in which active materials such ferroelectric
ceramics, electroactive and photoactive polymers, and nastic materials are considered both
experimentally and computationally. Experimental studies focus on developing characterization
methods for novel materials for which there are no established procedures. Computational studies
generally focus on nano length scale active response as a means to anticipate macro length scale
response. The goal of research is to understand the multi-scale physics responsible for the 'smart'
behavior observed in these materials in order to expand viable engineering applications which
range from shape morphing structures and bio-sensors to a range of adaptive structures concepts
appropriate to sustainability challenges.

46

Metals Processing Laboratory


This laboratory, directed by C. Isaac Garcia, PhD, includes a cold rolling mill and various
muffle and recirculating air furnaces for heat treatment of metals and alloys. Metal melting and casting
facilities include air, inert atmosphere, and vacuum facilities. A special arc melting unit also provides a
facility for preparing buttons and rapidly solidified ribbons.
Micromechanics and Nano-science Laboratory
This mechanical engineering laboratory is a modern facility with cutting-edge technology
for the study of micromechanics and physics of micrometer and nanometer scaled structures and
materials. Directed by Scott X. Mao, PhD, the laboratory contains atomic force microscopes and
a nano-indentation testing facility, which provide a capability of measuring load vs. displacement
at scales of 10-9 Newton versus nanometer, nano-scaled adhesion, and micro-mechanical
behavior for advanced materials including semiconductors and biosystems.
Mircosensor and Microactuator Laboratory
http://www.pitt.edu/~qiw4
Directed by Qing-Ming Wang, PhD and with supports from federal funding agents, the
current and future research activities conducted in the two Labs can be grouped in following
closely related areas: 1) fabrication and property characterization of piezoelectric, pyroelectric
and ferroelectric thin films and thick films; 2) on-chip integrated microsensors and microactuators
that are based on piezoelectric AlN, ZnO and PZT thin film materials; 3) acoustic wave devices,
including thin film bulk acoustic wave devices for RF and microwave frequency control
application, and acoustic wave sensors; 4) piezoelectric and electrostrictive ceramics, and
polymers such as PZT, PMN-PT, PVDF and copolymers, electro active elastomers,
magnetostrictive materials, multiferroic materials, and other functional materials for transducers
and biomedical applications; 5) Fabrication and characterization of semiconductor nanowires,
nanoparticles, and multifunctional nanocomposites. The laboratories accommodate extensive
fabrication and characterization capabilities for functional materials and devices.
The Motor Learning Laboratory

(Bakery Square)

This laboratory, directed by Gelsy Torres-Oviedo, PhD, offers graduate and undergraduate
students the infrastructure to investigate human motor learning mechanisms during balance and
locomotor behaviors. The space for this facility is 700 square footage with a state-of-the-art 14-camera
motion analysis system for recording three-dimensional body kinematic data in real time. The
laboratory is also equipped with an instrumented split-belt treadmill and 2 force plates flushed with the
ground, allowing kinetic recordings from each foot while human subjects from all ages walk on the
treadmill or over ground. The facility also has a system for electromyographic recordings
and instrumentation to digitize up to 64 analogue signals. This laboratory is located in Bakery Square
and it is part of the Human Movement Research Laboratories, which were developed as a
collaborative effort between the Department of Bioengineering and the Department of Physical
Therapy. This favors the collaborations for Dr. Torres-Oviedo's research group with colleagues in the
Department of Physical Therapy.

47

Nanoelectronics and Device Laboratory (NEDL)


http://www.engr2.pitt.edu/nano/indi/yun.htm
Based in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the NEDL was
founded in 2005 under the direction of Minhee Yun, PhD. This lab focuses on:

the synthesis of nanostructure materials

the detection of chemical and biomolecules by using electrical signals such as


resistance and current changes

the fabrication of nanodevices for environmental and biomedical applications

development of electronics devices based on nanomateriasl

development of microfabrication techniques (MEMS, NEMS) for electric devices


The NEDL is equipped with cutting-edge fabrication and characterization instruments for
nanoelectronic devices. It also hosts delicate control and measurement systems for accurate
biochemical and molecular sensing and carbon-based nanomaterial (Graphene and Carbon
nanotubes) fabrication.
Nondestructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring Laboratory
http://www.pitt.edu/~pir3/index.html
The laboratory for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM)
studies is a new facility established in September 2006. The facility, under the direction of Jeffry
Vipperman, PhD, consists of about 750 square feet of dust-free space, which contains the stateof-the-art equipment in ultrasonic testing and acoustic emission (AE) technology. The laboratory
includes:
- Acoustic Emission Instrumentation: one Physical Acoustics Corporation 4-cahnnel
PCI/DSP system with waveform module including a notebook computer and AE-Win
software; acoustic emission pico, WD, and S14 AE-transducers.
- Ultrasonic Testing Instrumentation: one Tektronix AFG3022 arbitrary function generator
(2 output channels); one Lecroy Waverunner 44Xi 4-channels oscilloscope (with PC
incorporated running under Windows XP); four commercial broadband OlympusNDTPanametrics Ultrasonic Transducers; one OlympusNDT-Panametrics high power (max
400 Volts) signal generator.
- Modal Testing Instrumentation: 8-channel, line-powered, ICP sensor signal
conditioner; four 1/4 in. pre-polarized condenser microphone, free-field, 4 mV/Pa, 4 to
80k Hz ( 2 dB); Modally Tuned Impulse Hammer w/force sensor and tips, 0 to 100
lbf, 50 mV/lbf (11.2 mV/N); one 086D80 Miniature Instrumented Impulse Hammer
w/force tips, 0 to 50 lbf.
- Miscellaneous Equipment: one National Instrument-PXI 1042Q chassis with arbitrary
function generator and multifunction Data Acquisition System; one acoustic microphone
AT815b; three PC, 2 running under Windows XP and one running under Windows Vista
operative systems.
Optical Computing Systems Laboratory
The Optical Computing Systems Laboratory, directed by Steve Levitan, PhD, supports joint
research with Computer Science in guided wave optical computing, communications, and storage.
Equipment consists of two high speed sampling oscilloscopes: a Tek 11402 3GHz digitizing scope and
a Tek CSA803 50GHz Communications Signal Analyzer, as well as a Tek 1240 Logic Analyzer,
assorted bench equipment: supplies, function generators, etc. and facilities for PCB design and
prototyping of opto-electronic sub-systems.

48

Orthopaedic Engineering Laboratory


The Orthopaedic Engineering Laboratory, directed by Patrick Smolinski, PhD, is collaboration
between the Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Department and the Department of
Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. This lab performs computational simulation and
experimental evaluation of surgical procedures, injury modeling and assessment of biomechanical
functions. Other activities included the medical device development, tissues engineering,
characterization of tissue properties and quantitative anatomical description. The goal of this lab is the
advancement of othopaedic medicine through the application of engineering analysis.
Pavement Mechanics and Materials Laboratory
The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Pavement Mechanics and
Materials Laboratory has developed into an all-encompassing laboratory equipped to perform a full
range of tasks including the casting, curing and testing of everything from concrete specimens to fullscale pavements. The 2700 ft2 facility features the latest equipment in both destructive and nondestructive testing of portland cement concrete. Housed within the lab are two environmentally
controlled rooms. The 1007 ft3 room can be adjusted to replicate a wide range of environmental
conditions for curing portland cement concrete test specimens while the 630 ft3 room is maintained at a
constant temperature and humidity for determining the drying-shrinkage properties of concrete in
accordance with ASTM-157. The laboratory is equipped with everything needed for measuring basic
aggregate properties such as the gradation, absorption capacity and specific gravity, as well as, more
detailed characterizations such as determining wear resistance using the Los Angeles abrasion machine
or running a micro-deval test. A 5.5 ft2 concrete mixer and all other necessary tools for casting concrete
specimens are available along with equipment for measuring the properties of fresh concrete. A ball
mill is available for cement production as well as a jaw crusher for establishing aggregate gradations.
The laboratory is equipped to test the more basic properties of hardened concrete, such as, strength,
elastic modulus and Poissons ratio along with the more elaborate testing equipment needed for
measuring such things as the dynamic modulus, thermal coefficient or fracture toughness of concrete.
Some of the sample preparation equipment available in the laboratory includes a concrete saw, core
machine and a fume hood for sulfur capping. The laboratory houses a Baldwin compression machine
that can be used to apply loads up to 200,000 lbs as well as a 400,000 lb Test Mark compression
machine. A multitude of tests can also be performed using the 7-channel MTS TestStar Controller.
The controller can be used for performing dynamic testing using a closed-loop servo hydraulic test
machine. This system can be fed by either a 10 gpm or 60 gpm hydraulic pump. The lab also houses
an accelerated vehicle simulation loading frame for testing full-scale pavement sections. A family of
Campbell Scientific data loggers and accompanying multiplexer and interface hardware is also
available as well as a couple of high frequency data acquisitions systems.
Photonics Innovation and Research Laboratory (PIRL)
Researchers in PIRL under the direction of Kevin Chen, PhD, engage in interdisciplinary
research in optics science, nanomanufacturing, and applied photonics. PIRL has strong capabilities in
laser instrument developments and also superiorly equipped with state-of-the-art commercial laser
systems.
Photonics Instrumentation Developments: PIRL researchers have strong capabilities on
developing highly sophisticate laser instruments with unique characteristics not available in commercial
markets. Some examples include:

49

Fiber Lasers: our group have developed a number of high-power (1-50 nJ), femtosecond (30200 fs) fiber lasers for 1.0- (Yb), 1.5- (Er), and 1.9- m (Tm) doped fiber lasers capable of both
soliton and dissipative soliton outputs.
Femtosecond Solid State Lasers: Our group have developed (and currently equipped) with
ultra-short pulse (< 10 fs) Tunable, Ti-Sapphire laser with high output power.
Portable Solid State Lasers: Our group possesses unique capability on developing powerful
ultra-compact solid state lasers for homeland security, medicine, and remote sensing
applications. We have capability on developing compact YAG laser with >10 mJ and <1 ns
pulse output with weight less than 1000 gram.
PIRL scientists also developed a number of cutting-edge sensing instruments. The
instrumentation development is supported by state-of-the-art of simulation and CAD tools including
COMSOL, OPTIWAVE, ZEMAX, SOLIDWORK, ANSYS, ALLEGRO, and CANDENCE. We
developed customer software to for nonlinear fiber optics for high-power fiber laser design.
Scientific and engineering research in PIRL is also supported by state-of-the-art of commercial
equipment. These include:
High-power coherent ultrafast laser system for research on optics science and laser
manufacturing from nano-scale to macro-scale.
Sophisticate adaptive optical laser pulse and laser beam shaping tool for parallel laser
processing and precise laser matter interaction control at femtosecond time-scale and nanometer spatial scale.
Multi-axis high-precision motion control systems with better than 0.1- m bi-directional
repeatability (10-nm resolution) over 2 feet travel distance along all axes.
Fully automatic guided wave photonic measurement capability and lighwave chip bonding
capability.
Deep UV excimer laser systems (>1-J/pulse) at both 193-nm and 248-nm for laser processing.
Multiple high-power YAG laser (sub-ns) with frequency double and triple output for laser
induced breakdown spectroscopy, mid-IR generation, and spectroscopy studies.
Continuous wave Ti-sapphire laser system tunable from 700 nm to 1000 nm with 1-W output
power.
800-W VCSEL pump lasers with fast switching time.
>500-W diode pump lasers for fiber laser development
18-W single frequency diode pump laser (Coherent Verdi-18)
Sophisticate spectroscopy equipment including multiple spectrometers for UV, visible, nearIR, and mid-IR measurement (200-nm to 10- m). Si ICCD camera and InGaAs CCD camera
are available for weak signal and IR imaging applications.
Customer-developed time-domain measurement for sub-fs pulse measurement at 1- m, 1.5- m,
1.9- m, and 2.8- m.
Together with world-leading medical experts from UPMC, PIRL research engages in
endoscopic therapies and diagnostics research to determine cancer margins, to develop minimal
invasive cardiovascular surgical procedures, and to improve outcome of kidney disease treatment.
PIRL has unique expertise on development and applications of radioactive micro-sources (Fig.
3), which can be widely used for biomedical and homeland security applications.

50

The Shankar Research Group


http://www.shankarlab.pitt.edu/
The central themes of research at the Shankar Research Group, under the direction of Ravi
Shankar, PhD, are to characterize, control, and exploit physical phenomena that are operative at the
nanometer length-scale to engineer material systems with unprecedented properties. To this end, we
focus on understanding the fundamental mechanics of deformation at the nano-scale, elucidation of
kinetics of atomic transport in nanostructured domains and characterization of phase transformations in
nanomaterials. Current research thrusts focus on manufacturing and characterization of bulk
nanostructured metals with enhanced mechanical and functional properties, development of novel
manufacturing processes for creating tailored microstructures in metallic materials and examination of
hierarchical surface structures on polymeric materials. A recent research thrust focusses on approaches
for direct transduction of photonic energy into mechanical work using azobenzene-functionalized liquid
crystal polymers and development of mechanical designs for enhancing the photomechanical powerdensities that can be triggered. Facilities include sample preparation capabilities for electron
microscopy and micromechanical characterization, microhardness and tensile testing and capabilities
for the creation of ultra-fine grained multi-phase materials. Current research is focused on the
elucidation of microstructure evolution and behavior of multi-phase materials subjected to severe
thermo-mechanical deformation and investigations of development of environmentally benign
machining processes azobenzene-functionalized liquid crystal polymers and development of
mechanical designs for enhancing the photomechanical power-densities that can be triggered. Facilities
include sample preparation capabilities for electron microscopy and micromechanical characterization,
microhardness and tensile testing and capabilities for the creation of ultra-fine grained multi-phase
materials. Current research is focused on the elucidation of microstructure evolution and behavior of
multi-phase materials subjected to severe thermo-mechanical deformation and investigations of
development of environmentally benign machining processes.
Sound, Systems, and Structures Laboratory
This mechanical engineering laboratory, under the direction of Jeffry Vipperman, PhD, is
dedicated to development, modeling, and experimental characterization of active systems at the
micro (MEMS) and macro scales. The diverse range of projects typically blend the related fields
of acoustics, noise control, hearing loss prevention, vibrations, structural-acoustic interaction,
controls, and analog/digital signal processing. A 1,000 ft2 laboratory equipped with state of the
art equipment. Past and current applications include biological modeling and control,
development of automated classification systems, applied controls, and hearing loss prevention.
Structural Nanomaterials Laboratory
This lab is directed by Ravi Shankar, PhD and its objective is to characterize, control and
exploit physical phenomena that are operative at the nanometer length-scale to engineer material
systems with unprecedented properties. To this end, we focus on understanding the fundamental
mechanics of deformation at the nano-scale, elucidation of kinetics of atomic transport in
nanostructured domains and characterization of phase-transformations in nanomaterials. Facilities
include sample preparation capabilities for electron microscopy and micromechanical
characterization, microhardness and tensile testing and capabilities for the creation of ultra-fine
grained multi-phase materials. Current research is focused on the elucidation of microstructure
evolution and behavior of multi-phase materials subjected to severe thermo-mechanical
deformation and investigations of development of environmentally benign machining processes.

51

John A. Swanson Institute for Technical Excellence


John A. Swanson Center for Product Innovation (SCPI)
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/scpi/
The John A. Swanson Center for Product Innovation (SCPI), under the direction of Schohn L.
Shannon, PhD. and Andy Holmes, is housed within the SSOE and has been assisting industry and
education since 1999. SCPI was designed to give faculty, students, industry, and entrepreneurs access
to leading-edge rapid prototyping, additive manufacturing, automated machining and reverse
engineering technologies. Clients connect with a high quality, one-stop job shop that provides efficient
turnaround for product analysis and design, process design and development, rapid prototyping and
reverse engineering, small-lot product manufacturing, and additive manufacturing. SCPI is comprised
of three facilities the Rapid Prototyping and Reverse Engineering Laboratory, the SSOE Machining
Facility and the SSOE Electronics Shop all under the same SSOE-level administration to ensure close
coordination, integrated operations and sharing of resources.
The Rapid Prototyping and Reverse Engineering Laboratory provide faculty and students with
hands-access for development and production of functional prototypes. Additive manufacturing, rapid
protoyping, and reverse engineering technology in this facility includes a 3D Systems (VIPER)
Stereolithography (SLA) System, a Stratasys Dimension 1200EX Fused Deposition Modeler (FDM), a
BF-B 3000 FDM, a Zcorp 310 3D Printer, (2) MakerBot Replicator 2s; a Makerbot Replicator 2X, a
FARO Platinum Arm 3D Laser Scanner, a Minolta VIVID 910 Laser Camera Scanner, a Brown &
Sharpe (Gage 2000) Coordinate Measurement Touch Probe, a Renishaw Cyclone Contact Scanner and
a Master View Optical Gauging Machine. Additional technology in this facility includes a Kern HSE
25 Laser Cutting Table, a Haas TM1-P 4 Axis CNC Machining Center, a Haas TL-1 CNC Lathe, a
Hardinge Precision Toolroom Lathe, an MCP Vacuum Casting System, and a Morgan 15 Ton Injection
Molding Machine.
The SSOE Machining Facility Shop provides full-service conventional and CAD/CAM
machining, precision grinding, cutting, shearing, welding, and CNC lathing and milling for a wide
variety of materials. This facility prepares prototypes and custom-designed parts for every engineering
discipline in the SSOE as well as other entities within the University including the School of Medicine,
the School of Dental Medicine, and the Department of Physics. The SSOE Electronics Shop provides a
wide variety of electronics expertise to the SSOE including repair, laboratory support, and prototyping
encompassing design, wiring, motors, sensors, computer A-D and D-A interfacing, and data acquisition
and control using LabView and other software.
John A. Swanson Embedded Computing and Interfacing Laboratory
The John A. Swanson Embedded Computing and Interfacing Laboratory provides a variety of
the latest equipment and development software that allows students to design and test real-time
embedded computer systems. The laboratory is used in undergraduate and graduate ECE and COE
courses that focus on the interaction and interconnection of computers with real-world physical devices
and systems. The facility contains 16 sets of high speed networked workstations, oscilloscopes, and
other related equipment used for demonstration and experimentation. In addition, the laboratory
contains a set of nine Altera DE2 FPGA boards and a set of nine ARM Evaluator-7T boards. Each of
these system prototyping boards includes a complete suite of design software that allows students to
program, compile, simulate, analyze, and debug their designs. This laboratory was created through a
generous gift from John A. Swanson, a Pitt alumnus and friend of the University.

52

Thermal and Chemical Analysis Laboratory


The department has thermograyimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis
capabilities. DTA 7, differential thermal analyzer and a Theta high speed dilatometer are housed
in the MEMS department. This lab is under the direction of C. Isaac Garcia, PhD.
Thermal Science and Imaging Laboratory
The Thermal Science and Imaging Laboratory directed by Minking Chyu, PhD, is
equipped with advanced flow and heat transfer measurement facilities directed toward obtaining
fundamental understanding and design strategies for advanced thermal control systems. Major
equipment includes a subsonic wind tunnel, a particle imaging velocimetry, a computerautomated liquid crystal thermographic system, a UV-induced phosphor fluorescent thermometric
imaging system, and a sublimation-based heat-mass analogous system. Specific projects currently
underway include optimal endwall cooling, shaped-hole film cooling, and innovative turbulator
heat transfer enhancement, advanced concepts in trailing edge cooling, and instrumentation
developments for unsteady thermal and pressure sensing.
Vibration and Control Laboratory
The Vibration and Control Laboratory, under the direction of William W. Clark, PhD, is
devoted to the study of smart structures and microsystems. The primary focus is on the use of
smart materials in a variety of applications, including structural vibration control,
microelectromechanical systems (including sensors, actuators, resonators, and filters), and energy
harvesting. The laboratory is well equipped for experimental and analytical research. Equipment
includes computers and data acquisition hardware for simulation and real-time control of dynamic
electromechanical systems; a variety of modern transducers and instrumentation for sensing,
actuation, and measurement such as dynamic signal analyzers, shakers, high voltage power
supplies, and amplifiers, and a variety of basic instrumentation and sensors; and a work center for
constructing electronics and test rigs, with emphasis on piezoelectric systems.
The Visualization and Image Analysis (VIA) Laboratory
http://www.vialab.org/
This laboratory, directed by George Stetten, MD, PhD, is based at the University of Pittsburgh
in Benedum 434/435 and at Carnegie Mellon University in Newell Simon Hall A427. We are
developing new methods of displaying and analyzing images, primarily for medical applications. We
have introduced a new device called the Sonic FlashlightTM, for guiding invasive medical procedures,
and are currently developing similar technology using optical coherence tomography to guide eye
surgery. We have introduced FingerSight TM to allow visually impaired individuals to sense the visual
world with their fingertips, and ProbeSight to give ultrasound transducers the ability to incorporate
visual information from the surface of the patient. Finally, we are developing a new type of surgical
tool, the Hand Held Force Magnifier, which provides a magnified sense of forces at the tip of the tool
for microsurgery.
Watkins-Haggart Structural Engineering Laboratory
The Watkins-Haggart Structural Engineering Laboratory is the facility at the heart of the
experimental structural engineering research efforts at the University of Pittsburgh. This unique facility
is located in the sub-basement of Benedum Hall on the main campus of the University of Pittsburgh in

53

Oakland. The Lab is a 4000 ft2 (370 m2) high-bay testing facility with a massive reaction floor. The
high-bay testing area is serviced by a 10 ton radio controlled bridge crane and other heavy material
handling equipment. As a compliment to the reaction floor, the Lab also has an extremely versatile selfcontained reaction frame and the following major equipment:

200 kip (900 kN) servo-hydraulic universal testing machine (UTM) with 15 ft (4.5 m)
opening (customized MTS)
200 kip (900 kN) hydraulic UTM with 6 ft (2 m) opening (Baldwin)
124 kip (550 kN) servo-hydraulic material test frame (Satec)
20 kip (90 kN) servo-hydraulic fatigue rated UTM (MTS)
500 kip (2220 kN) hydraulic concrete cylinder frame (Gilson)
300 kip (1300 kN) reconfigurable test frame
50 kip (220) kN fatigue test capacity (MTS)
225 kip (1000 kN) in situ field testing capacity (Enerpac)

The laboratory maintains a number of computer controlled data acquisition systems that allow for the
automated reading and recording of over 130 discrete channels of instrumentation. The lab has fullscale nondestructive evaluation equipment and field-testing equipment suitable for a variety of in situ
test programs. Since 2004, the laboratory has specialized in conducting large scale fatigue testing at
load ranges up to 50,000 pounds (220 kN). To date, fatigue tests totaling over 120 million load cycles
have been conducted. The largest tests conducted by the Watkins-Haggart lab team where the 2006
tests of a pair of 90 foot long (28 m), 70 ton long prestressed girders recovered from the collapsed Lake
View Drive Bridge. The lab has also conducted extensive research for PennDOT, NCHRP and various
other public and private agencies.

54

Academic Record
This section contains an overview of enrollment, diversity, student awards, and degrees
conferred for the past academic year.

Student Awards and Honors


HONORS STUDENTS
Fall 2012 Top 2% Undergraduate Honors Students
Seniors
Alexa D. Becker
Benjamin J. Bucior
Eric A. Buescher
Michael R. Coury
Emily J. Crabb
Olivia A. Creasey
Hunter S. Eason

David J. Eckman
Joshua R. Hunt
Garrett M. Klein
Oren S. Lawit
Emmett A. Manzo
Christopher R. Murrett
Michael P. Nites

David W. Palm
Ian T. Steck
Marshall L. Steele
Brian M. Tackett
Raymond J. Van Ham
John White
Andrew C. Zmolek

Kevin T. Hough
Amy M. Howell
Donald E. Kline Jr.
Stephanie F. Lee

Eric D. Moe
Joshua B. Selling
Zane C. Spiering

Jacob M. Kiefer
Michael J. Krajcovic
Karin Rozendaal
Steven G. Sachs

Randy N. Stein
Donald J. Virostek
Anna K. Yoney

Juniors
Corey J. Blackwell
Robert J. Dumont
Jonathan D. Fako
Harrison M. Harker
2012 Graduates
Daniel P. Browe
Wayne D. Dailey
Laura A. Dempsey
Julianne D. Fatula

ACHIEVEMENT REWARDS FOR COLLEGE SCIENTISTS (ARCS) FOUNDATION


AWARD, to Berook Alemayehu, Denver M. Faulk, Jaime K. Gerhart, Megan A. Jamiolkowski,
and Robert M. Miller.
AMERICAN CONCRETE INSTITUTE 2012 ART LIVINGOOD SCHOLARSHIP, to Michael
E. Sweriduk.
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING, METALLURGICAL, AND PETROLEUM
ENGINEERS LEWIS W. AND ELIZABETH W. YOUNG SCHOLARSHIP, to Adam J. Madar.
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS 2012 FREEMAN FELLOWSHIP, to Ronald
R. Gutierrez.

55

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS


AND RESEARCH FOR TRANSFORMATION (SMART) SCHOLARSHIP, to Trevor J.
Thompson.
MICHAEL BAKER CORPORATION SCHOLARSHIP IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, for
meritorious civil engineering students, to Trevor W. Bublitz, Ryan P. Butler, Kristin R. Dauer,
Alexander J. Tadla, and Matthew K. Weschler.
ELIZABETH U. BARANGER EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AWARD, for outstanding
teaching by a graduate student, to Sharlene N. Flesher.
BASHIOUM AWARD IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, for participation in departmental
activities in chemical and petroleum engineering, to John M. Obeid.
RUSSELL VOHR BECKETT AND HAZEL LEY BECKETT SCHOLARSHIP IN
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING, for undergraduate students in electrical or
computer engineering, to Emily J. Crabb, Tyler A. DeGirolamo, Kyra F. Lee, Johlize M.
McNeil, Emily G. Redmond, Nathan R. Roberts, and Andrew W. Schultz.
PHYLLIS S. BERSON SCHOLARSHIP, to outstanding students in engineering, to Wilton T.
Snead, Randy N. Stein, and Ian A. Steck.
GEORGE M. BEVIER FELLOW, to Samuel T. Lopresti and Alexander Malkin.
GEORGE M. BEVIER FELLOWSHIP, to Jingming Chen, James R. Eles, David M. Gau, Jaime
K. Gerhart, Jonathan A. Gustafson, Timothy R. Jackson, Timothy J. Keane, Sanjeev B. Khanna,
Jason Lee, Samuel T. Lopresti, Jesse R. Lowe, Shalv P. Madhani, Alexander Malkin, Hikaru
Mamiya, Martha V. Merrill, Jessi L. Mischel, Matthew J. Oborski, Caitlin M. OConnell, Mitali
S. Patil, Nicholas P. Pavlovsky, and Jihang Wang.
BRASKEM AMERICA, INC. FELLOWSHIP AWARD, for a student in chemical and
petroleum engineering, to Michelle D. Najera.
PAUL R. AND ANN T. BRIDGES SCHOLARSHIP, for undergraduate students in civil and
environmental engineering from Western Pennsylvania concentrating in construction
management, to Stephen M. Bosela, Oliver C. Green, and Allyson J. Longardner.
DAVE BUNDY SCHOLARSHIP, to meritorious undergraduate students in engineering, to Eric
J. Amoroso, Christopher M. Dumm, Margaret E. Lucas, Philmore F. Scott, Zachary T. Smith,
and Christopher L. Williams.

56

SHIO-MING CHIANG UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP IN CHEMICAL AND


PETROLEUM ENGINEERING, to Matthew M. Abramson, Nathan D. Blandino, Benjamin L.
Carlson, David J. Kraemer, and Lauren M. Sakerka.
GEORGE H. CLAPP SCHOLARSHIP, for academic merit, to Katherine G. Birmingham,
Emmeline L. Blanchard, Eric A. Buescher, Kevin A. Day, Kelli N. Edwards, Stanislaw P.
Gawel, Michael H. Harr, Katelyn J. Loughery, and Michael J. Randazzo.
LON H. COLBORN SCHOLARSHIP, for a deserving student majoring in chemical and
petroleum engineering, to Shealyn E. Forshee.
WILLIAM R. COOK SCHOLARSHIP to a deserving student in chemical and petroleum
engineering, to Michael N. Rutigliano.
JAMES COULL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, for an outstanding graduate student in the
chemical and petroleum engineering department, to Hseen O. Baled.
HARVEY L. CUPP JR. SCHOLARSHIP, to deserving students in mechanical engineering, to
John R. Bates, Ryan N. Dohn, and Jaclyn C. Krogh.
JAMES AND MARGARET DEGNAN SCHOLARSHIP, to undergraduate students in
chemical and petroleum engineering, to Claire E. Barrett, Maura A. Beck, Katherine Cinibulk,
Laura A. Kingsley, and Gerald T. McFarlin.
RALPH W. DENISEVICZ MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, to an outstanding electrical
engineering student, to Kirsten M. Taing.
DICK QUASI SCHOLARSHIP, to Emma C. Cinibulk, Antonio C. Deshields, Jillian K. Gorski,
Emma M. Harbert, Meghana A. Patil, Christopher W. Stavrakos, Dhanalakshmi K. Thiyagarajan,
Elissa Warmbrand, and Jennifer L. Yeager.
ARTHUR C. DICK ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, for high-achieving students in engineering,
to Adam L. Dobson, and Raymond J. Van Ham.
PJ DICK INCORPORATED/TRUMBULL CORPORATION SCHOLARSHIP, to Katherine H.
Colwell, Renee M. Corbett, Nicole N. Dejean, Amanda C. Murau, and Sarah M. Watte.
GEORGE S. DIVELY SCHOLARSHIP, for academic achievement in engineering, to Jake R.
Bosin.
SAMUEL J. EASTON JR. MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, for an outstanding upperclassman in
electrical engineering, to Stephen Whaite.

57

ELECTRONIC DESIGN AUTOMATION SOCIETY A. RICHARD NEWTON GRADUATE


SCHOLARSHIP, to Wujie Wen.
CHARLES CLAY ELMERS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FOR METTALURGICAL
ENGINEERING, for a junior, senior or graduate student majoring in metallurgical engineering,
to Jason J. Wolinsky.
ENGINEERING MINORITY SCHOLARSHIP, for achievements and leadership in engineering,
to Gabrielle F. Salazar.
FESSENDEN-TROTT SCHOLARSHIP, for outstanding scholastic merit and activities, to
Randy T. Catalogna, James R. Day, Justin M. Gray, Mark H. Russell, Abigail J. Slavinsky,
and Nicholas P. Stamatakis.
REGIS F. FILTZ SCHOLARSHIP, for qualified students from the Norwin School District,
Westmoreland County, or Western Pennsylvania, to Michael J. Cunningham.
FIRST YEAR DIVERSITY AWARD, to outstanding students, to Naseem R. Lee-Perkins,
Markus L. Lewis, Obhafuoso D. Olumese, Courtney M. Pepper, and Lesenia R. Santiago.
PAUL F. FULTON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, for academic achievement in chemical and
petroleum engineering, to Lisa A. Barkand, Ian L. Isoda, Olubanke I. Kayode, and Kerry M.
Rogy.
JAMES, JR. AND WILLIAM GARDNER SCHOLARSHIP, for an outstanding student in
engineering, to Felix D. Nguyen.
2012 GATES MILLENNIUM SCHOLARS, to Trenton A. Gilstrap and Jasmine A. Toney.
ALBERT E. AND OLGA GAZALIE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, for high academic
achievement in engineering at the undergraduate level, to Mary E. Biddle, Lisa A. Buono, and
Vincent P. DOttavio.
GENERAL MOTORS FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP FOR MINORITIES, for academic
achievement, to Lalithasree Chintam and Annmarie N. Grant.
GENERAL MOTORS FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP FOR WOMEN, for academic
achievement, to Kate M. Cloonan and Marlee R. Hartenstein.
DONALD M. HENDERSON ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP, to outstanding African
American students in engineering, to Hal T. Hamilton, Jr., Arri E. Manuel, Casey E. Rayburg,
and Ana A. Taylor.

58

INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS POWER AND ENERGY


SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIP PLUS INITIATIVE, to Matthew D. Cimino, Michael R. Doucette,
Patrick F. Eells, and Zachary T. Smith.
K. LEROY IRVIS FELLOWSHIP, to provide outstanding African American students the
opportunity to become involved in research in engineering, to Deanna C. Easley and Sossena
Wood.
JOHN A. JURENKO SCHOLARSHIP, for academic achievement by undergraduate electrical or
computer engineering students, to Sarah E. Higbee, Nicholas M. Moellers, Kyle C. Schoenstein
and Alexander R. Sieman.
WILLIAM J. KERSCHGENS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, to meritorious students enrolled
in engineering, to Kaushik Kannan, Joanna M. Male, and Skylar D. Wilcox.
ELMER J. AND CHARLOTTE MCMURRAY KIDNEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, for
academic achievement, to Devon L. Albert, Shannon L. Gorman, Antonia P. Maxey, and Karin
Rozendaal.
EDWARD AND ALICE KONDIS SCHOLARSHIP, for an outstanding sophomore, junior, or
senior student in engineering, to Eric M. Brichler.
FRANK W. KOZEL SCHOLARSHIP IN ENGINEERING, for a meritorious student, to Mary
B. Hassan.
KARL H. LEWIS IMPACT ALUMNI ENDOWED FUND, to Jann A. Grovogui.
ROBERT v.d. LUFT SCHOLARSHIP, for academic merit in engineering, to Zachary F. Merrill
and Elisha H. Sanger.
RICHARD J. MADDEN FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP, for undergraduate electrical or
computer engineering students, to Maxim Campolo, Thomas D. Nason, Arvind Prasadan, and
Zachary D. Sweigart.
ARTHUR MARIMPIETRI ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, for undergraduate engineering
students in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, to Roland K.
Beard and Mark R. Benkowski.
JOHN MAROUS STUDENT LEADERSHIP FUND, to Claudie Blignaut, Vanessa M. Edwards,
Alyssa M. Ferdetta, Partick G. ODonnell, and Victoria R. Paumier.

59

EDWIN B. McKINNEY STUDENT RESOURCE FUND, for undergraduate students in


electrical engineering, to Peter J. Stegman.
MERIT SCHOLARSHIP FUND, for engineering students, to Rachael Dalecki, David J.
Eckman, Erica C. Flinchbaugh, Sydney M. Gibson, Christopher R. Murrett, Lisa R. Volpatti, and
Jeffrey M. Weiss.
JOHN M. MILLIKEN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, for meritorious students from Allegheny
County, Pa., enrolled in engineering, to Peter J. Brendel, Karen Cheung, William J. Hinzman,
Steven V. Iasella, Jesse R. Minuto, Oscar T. Prom, Stephanie N. Schlebusch, Matthew W.
Schmidlin, and Erica L. Stevens.
FRANK E. MOSIER SCHOLARSHIP, for engineering honor students from Elk County or
Western Pennsylvania, to Meghan A. McCutcheon and Grace A. Meloy.
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP, to William
R. Barone, Jamie L. Haney, Katrina M. Knight, and Nicole J. Ostrowski,
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AND INNOVATION ACCELERATOR ERC
ELEVATOR PITCH COMPETITION, winner, to Da-Tren Chou.
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA AWARD, to Kelvin Luu.
OUTSTANDING SENIORS, to Daniela T. Aizpitarte, Michael L. Belair, Briana Binnie, Wayne
D. Dailey, Julianne D. Fatula, Julianne P. Friend, Oliver C. Green, Nathan A. Hunter, Arielle A.
Richter, and Joshua M. Zueger.
JOHN C. PAPP ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, for qualified students preferably from Riverview
High School, Oakmont, Pa., to, Rodney S. Andrews and Louis A. Miller.
THE PITTSBURGH FOUNDATION WAYNE RAWLEY SCHOLARSHIP, for outstanding
engineering students, to Stephen A. Albert, Alexa D. Becker, Akshay Hari, Michael G.
Malencia, Emmett A. Manzo, Paul E. Monroe, John M. Rovinsky, and Jeffrey M. Weiss.
THE PITTSBURGH FOUNDATION WELLINGTON C. CARL SCHOLARSHIP, for
outstanding performance at the undergraduate level, to Hunter S. Eason, Rafey A. Feroze,
Rebecca J. Gerth, Cullen C. Grover, Andrew W. Kittka, Caitlyn E. McCann, Nicole T. McClain,
Joshua E. Mealy, Ashley N. Nielsen, Phillip L. Olsen, Andrew J. Seel, Marshall L. Steele, and
Justin D. Wildemann.

60

PEX CLASS OF 1949 ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, to outstanding students in engineering, to


Brian C. DeWillie and Christopher A. Zimmerman.
PROFESSIONAL PROMISE AWARD IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, to Andrew C.
Zmolek.
ROBERT E. RUMCIK '68 SCHOLARSHIP, for academic merit in materials science and
engineering, to Matthew W. Andromalos and Kevin T. Hough.
CHARLES M. RUSSELL SCHOLARSHIP, to a sophomore, junior or senior in civil and
environmental engineering, to Preston O. Macready.
SCHLUMBERGER FOUNDATION, INC. FACULTY FOR THE FUTURE FELLOWSHIP, to
Shuang Wang.
GEORGE R. SHIARELLA SCHOLARSHIP, for high scholastic achievement in chemical and
petroleum engineering, to Benjamin J. Bucior and Joshua R. Maskrey.
EDWARD J. SLACK ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, for academic achievement by engineering
students, to Nathalia Both, Joseph R. Landry, Andrea L. Shoffstall, Cynthia Wong, and Brandon
R. White.
THE SOCIETY OF MINING ENGINEERS GEORGE V. WEISDACK MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP, to Blaise A. Bucha.
CRAIG STARESINICH SCHOLARSHIP, for an undergraduate student in engineering, to
Nicole M. Salamacha.
EDWARD B. AND GERALDINE J. STUART MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, for chemical
engineering students who show scholastic excellence and service to the community, University,
and department, to Stanislaw P. Gawel and Brian M. Tackett.
SAMUEL A. TAYLOR SCHOLARSHIP, for meritorious achievement in engineering, to
Joseph C. Hughes.
TEXACO FOUNDATION MINORITY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, for high achieving
minority students in engineering, to Ryan S. Bhagratti, Brittany A. Chambers, Jada M. Davis,
and Cassia Priebe.

61

MARGARET A. THOMAS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, to students who demonstrate high


scholastic aptitude, to Karen A. Kaminsky and Lisa R. Volpatti.
JOHN W. TIERNEY SCHOLARSHIP, for outstanding academic achievement and service to the
Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, to Louis A. Miller.
2012 UNIVERSITY COOP STUDENT OF THE YEAR, to Lauren M. Sakerka.
USX FELLOWS, to Matthew J. Korytowski, Raymond P. Kovacs Jr., and Mingshan Lin.
GEORGE WASHINGTON PRIZE, finalists, to engineering students who demonstrate qualities
of academic excellence, service and leadership, to Julianne D. Fatula and Robert W. Kosarowich.
GEORGE WASHINGTON PRIZE, winner, to an engineering student who demonstrates
qualities of academic excellence, service and leadership, to Michael J. Krajcovic.
EPHRAIM WERNER ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, for a student in chemical, materials
science, or metallurgical engineering, to David J. Kraemer.
WHITAKER INTERNATIONAL FELLOWSHIP AWARD, to Laura A. Dempsey and Danielle
M. Rager.
MARIE B. ZEIS SCHOLARSHIP, to a student in chemical or materials science engineering, to
Matthew J. Pincus.
JOSEPH E. ZUPANICK SCHOLARSHIP IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, for a deserving
engineering student, to Stephanie F. Lee.

62

63

0
1
10
2
51

8
23
2
562
2417

8
24
12
564
2468

183
219
414
29

8.0
23.4
6.0
562.8
2437.4

177.6
217.8
408.0
29.0

FTE
227.0
320.8
279.6
177.4

21
60
52
6

1
3
3
151
576

162
159
362
23

7
21
9
413
1892

23
124

12
13
21
5

Af.
F Am.
105
11
96
17
56
8
22
13

M
125
226
226
159

47

11

7
5
13
1

37
123

11
4
11
2

19
55

624

FullTime
149
53
105
7
2
105
85
83
35

312

17
936

17

Graduate
PartTotal
Time
7
156
8
61
57
162
1
8
0
2
43
148
31
116
127
210
21
56
0
0

748.8

6.8

FTE
151.8
56.2
127.8
7.4
2.0
122.2
97.4
133.8
43.4
0.0
0.0

714

14

M
107
44
122
7
1
125
82
173
39

222

16

Af.
F Am.
49
4
17
40
1
1
1
23
3
34
2
37
5
17

10

2
2

38

3
3
3
1

Af.
F Am. Hisp.
154
15
8
113
17
4
96
9
2
23
13
2
0
1
0
44
15
9
94
15
7
89
26
13
23
5
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
3
1
0
6
1
11
151
23
0
798 140
57

Total
PartTotal
Time
12
386
10
383
61
444
7
189
0
2
52
331
33
335
137
624
21
85
0
0
0
0
0
8
1
24
27
29
2
564
363
3404

M
232
270
348
166
1
287
241
535
62
0
0
7
21
23
413
4 2606

FullTime
374
373
383
182
2
279
302
487
64
0
0
8
23
2
562
3041

Graduate
Asian/
Am.
MultiPacific Indian/
Hisp. Islander Alaskan HAW Racial
4
20
1
3
2
2
1
6
1

HEADCOUNT ENROLLMENT BY SEX AND RACE

Undergraduate
Asian/
Am.
MultiPacific Indian/
Hisp. Islander Alaskan HAW Racial
4
31
4
2
12
7
2
5
4
2
9
8

Graduate Engr. Tech. Mgmt. Cert. (PT) = 0 (inc. in IE)


Graduate Mining Engr. Cert. (PT) = 6 (inc. in CE)
Graduate Nuclear Engr. Cert. (PT) = 4 (inc. in ME)

Dept./
Program
Bioeng
ChE & PetE
CEE
COE
CMS
EE
IE
ME
MSE
EnRes
MSEP
EngrPh
EngrSC
Special
Fresh.
TOTAL

9
2
10
0

174
217
404
29

Undergraduate
PartTotal
Time
5
230
2
322
4
282
6
181

Graduate Engr. Tech. Mgmt. Cert. (PT) = 0 (inc. in IE)


Graduate Mining Engr. Cert. (PT) = 6 (inc. in CE)
Graduate Nuclear Engr. Cert. (PT) = 4 (inc. in ME)

Dept./ Program
Bioeng
ChE & PetE
CEE
COE
CMS
EE
IE
ME
MSE
EnRes
MSEP
EngrPh
EngrSC
Special
Fresh.
TOTAL

FullTime
225
320
278
175

HEADCOUNT ENROLLMENT

FALL TERM 2012

Total
Asian/
Am.
MultiPacific Indian/
Islander Alaskan HAW Racial
51
1
0
7
14
0
0
8
11
0
1
4
9
0
0
8
0
0
0
0
14
1
0
5
7
0
0
0
14
1
0
6
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
37
0
0
19
161
3
1
59

FTE
378.8
377.0
407.4
184.8
2.0
299.8
315.2
541.8
72.4
0.0
0.0
8.0
23.4
12.8
562.8
3186.2

FALL TERM
HEADCOUNT ENROLLMENT
Undergraduate
Dept./
Program

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Bioeng

134

147

149

149

153

178

197

230

ChE

130

152

176

190

237

263

308

322

CEE

263

271

278

273

278

294

280

282

COE

160

148

153

140

147

141

166

181

EE

226

212

179

171

176

192

183

183

IE

157

163

166

172

171

175

205

219

ME

330

313

321

315

338

363

385

414

MSE

38

30

23

24

28

17

19

29

EngrPh

21

20

15

14

16

11

24

EngrSc
Special
Fresh.
TOTAL

10

12

472

493

527

559

560

546

555

564

1,935

1,952

1,997

2,014

2,104

2,191

2,323

2,468

Graduate
Dept./
Program

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

ChE & PetE

52

40

45

49

46

64

74

61

CEE

71

68

69

93

118

154

134

162

Pub Wks

COE

CMS

EE

95

86

81

109

126

128

144

148

IE

74

73

78

82

95

86

84

116

ME

77

88

90

119

140

159

199

210

20

26

30

35

44

44

56

56

Bioeng

140

160

142

150

146

147

145

156

EnRes

MSEP

Special

15

23

22

31

28

21

17

544

552

562

663

751

815

862

936

Mining
MSE

TOTAL

64

65

167
334
15
133

IE

ME

MSE

Bioeng

20
3
403

1855

EngrSC

Special

Fresh.

TOTAL

2468

564

12

24

230

29

414

219

183

( 6 in-state; 0 out-of-state) (inc. in CE)

0 (inc. in IE)

613

161

Graduate Nuclear Engr. Cert. (PT) = 4 in-state (inc. in ME)

Graduate Mining Engr. Cert. (PT) =

Graduate Engr. Tech. Mgmt. Cert. (PT) =

EngrPh

97

14

80

52

45

181

434

16

59

27

148

31

63

79

502

97

29

62

85

85

83

51

156

56

210

116

148

10

162

61

936

17

138

EE

37

282

10

Total

MSEP

144

COE

40

322

In-State

242

CEE

72

Total

Graduate
Out-of-State

EnRes

250

ChE & PetE

Undergraduate
In-State Out-of-State

FALL TERM 2012


IN-STATE/OUT-OF-STATE

2289

403

19

20

192

42

482

198

201

145

321

260

In-State

1115

161

10

194

43

142

137

130

46

123

123

Total
Out-of-State

3404

564

29

24

386

85

624

335

331

191

444

383

Total

SWANSON SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING


HEADCOUNT ENROLLMENT BY SEX
FALL TERM 2012

UNDERGRADUATE

23.3%

76.7%

Female

Male

Female

Male

GRADUATE

23.7%

76.3%

66

SWANSON SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING


HEADCOUNT ENROLLMENT BY RACE
FALL TERM 2012

UNDERGRADUATE
0.1%
5.0%

1.9%

0.0%
2.2%

5.0%

85.8%
Caucasian & International
African American
Hispanic
Asian/Pacific Islander
American Indian/Alaskan
Hawaiian
Multi-racial

GRADUATE
4.1%
1.1%
1.7%

0.1%

0.1%
0.4%

92.5%

67

Caucasian & International


African American
Hispanic
Asian/Pacific Islander
American Indian/Alaskan
Hawaiian
Multi-racial

Engineering Cooperative Education Program


Participating Companies 2012 - 2013
4 Moms/Pittsburgh, PA
ABB Inc/Cleveland, OH
Accenture, Inc./Greentree, PA
Acutronic USA Inc/Blawnox, PA
Advanced Acoustics/Uniontown, Pa
AECOM/Pittsburgh, Pa
Aerotech/Blawnox, PA
AIG Advanced Integration
Group/McKees Rocks, PA
Air Products & Chemicals/Allentown, PA
AK Steel/Butler, PA
AKJ Industries/Ft. Myers, FL
All Facilities Energy/Pittsburgh, Pa
Alliance Coal/Lexington, KY
American Bridge Corporation
American Contracting & Environmental
Services/Laurel, MD
Ansaldo ST
ANSYS, Inc./Canonsburg, PA
Appleton Papers/Wisconsin
Arcadis/Seven Fields, PA
Areva T & D/Charleroi, PA
Areva/Cranberry Twp, Pa*
Ariel/Mt. Vernon, OH
ATI/Allegheny Ludlum/Brackenridge, PA
ATI Powder Metals
Atlantis Technologies
BASF/Monaca, Pa & Evans City, PA
Bayer Material Science/Pittsburgh PA
Bayer/Medrad/Indianola, Pa
Becton Dickinson/Fairless Lakes, NJ
Bentley Systems/Exton, PA
Bettcher/Vermilion, Ohio*
Bimbo Bakeries/Philadelphia, PA
Black Box/Lawrence, Pa*
BMW/Spartanburg, SC
BNY Mellon/Pittsburgh, Pa & NYC*
Bombardier/West Mifflin, PA
BoozAllenHamilton/Washington, DC
Boston Scientific/Spencer, Indiana
Brayman Construction/Saxonburg, PA
Brush GM/Turtle Creek, Pa
Bunting Graphics/Verona, PA
C3 Controls/Beaver, Pa
Cal-Bay Systems/Sanrafall, Ca
Cameron Measurement Systems/Pgh, Pa

Carbon Steel Inspection/Pgh, Pa


Centacor/Malvern, PA
Cervis/Cranberry Twp, Pa
ChemAdvisor
ChemRisk
CIA/Washington, DC
City Brewing Company/Latrobe, Pa*
Civil & Environmental Consultants
Cleaveland/Price/Irwin, Pa*
Cleveland Construction/Cleveland, Oh*
Cohera Medical/Homestead, Pa
Columbia Gas/Canonsburg, Pa*
Compunetix/Monroeville, PA
Connors Group/Greensburg, Pa
Constellium Rolled
Products/Ravenswood, WV
Corna/Kokosing/Columbus, OH
Crane Company/TX, CA,IL, OH
Crayola/Easton, PA
C.S. Davidson/York, Pa
Curtiss-Wright EMD
Diebold/Canton, Ohio*
Disney World/Orlando, FL
Dokken Engineering/San Diego, CA*
Dow Chemical/Midland, MI
Draeger/Pittsburgh, Pa*
E.I. Dupont/Newark, DE
Eaton Electric/PA, WI,NY,NC, IL
Ellwood Group, Inc.
Emerson Process
Management/Pittsburgh, Pa
Emerson Climate Technologies/Sidney,
Ohio*
Energy Management
Consultants/Carlisle, PA
EMS Environmental/Bethlehem, Pa
Equitable Resources/Pittsburgh, Pa
Estee Lauder/Long Island, NY
Ethicon Endo- Surgery/Cincinnati, OH
Ethicon/Somerville, NJ*
EverPower Wind Holdings/Pittsburgh, Pa
Excela Heath Care /Greensburg, Pa
ExxonMobil/Fairfax, Va
FDA/Medical Device/Washington, DC
Federated Investors/Pgh, Pa

68

FedEx Ground Corporate


FedEx Ground Facilities
First Energy Corporation/Akron, Ohio
First Energy Nuclear Corporation
GAI Consultants
Genco Supply Chain Solutions
G.E. Aviation/Cincinnati Ohio
G.E. Converteam/Pittsburgh, Pa
G.E. Infrastructure/Erie, PA
G.E. Power/SC
General Cable/Altoona, Pa
Giant Eagle, Inc.
Glatfelter/Chillicothe, Ohio
GlaxoSmithKline/Philadelphia, Pa
Great Lakes Construction/Hinckley, Ohio
Groundwater & Environmental
Services/Exton, Pa
Grunley Construction/Maryland
Gulfstream Aerospace/Savannah, Ga*
Hankook Tire/Akron, Ohio
Heinz North America
Hendrickson Intl/Canton, Ohio
Heraeus/New Castle, Pa
Hershey Chocolates USA/Hershey, Pa
Highmark/Pittsburgh, Pa*
Honda of America/Marysville, Ohio
Human Engineering Research Lab
IBACOS, Inc
Immunetrics/Pgh, Pa
Independence Excavating/Independence,
Ohio*
Industrial Scientific/Oakdale, PA
Infineum/Linden, NJ*
Intel Corp/Folsom, CA
Inteligistics/Pittsburgh, Pa
Invensys/Pittsburgh, Pa*
IQ Inc.*
Jacobs/Morristown, NJ*
James Construction/Carnegie, PA
JB Fay/Pittsburgh, Pa*
Joy Mining&Manufacturing/Franklin, Pa
K & M Wireless*
Kennametal Inc./Latrobe, Pa
Kensey Nash/Valley Forge, Pa*
KB Systems/Philadelphia, Pa
KI SheetMetal/Pittsburgh, Pa
Kiewit Construction Company/NJ
L-3 Communications/Greenville, TX
Langan Engineering/Elmwood Park, NJ*
Lanxess
Libertas Copper/Leetsdale, Pa*

Lidestri Foods, Rochester, NY


Linde/Germany
Logistics Management Institute/McLean,
VA
Lord Corporation/Erie, Pa
Lubrizol Corporation/Wyckliffe, Ohio
Lutron/Coopersburg, Pa
Marathon Oil/Findlay, Ohio
Mascaro Construction
Massaro Construction
McCormick-Taylor/Harrisburg, PA
McNeil Consumer Healthcare/Ft.
Washington, PA
McNeil Consumer Healthcare/Lititz, PA
Media Friends/Philadelphia, Pa*
Metalor/Export, Pa*
Metso Minerals/Canonsburg, Pa
Michael Baker Corporation/Coraopolis,
Pa
Mine Safety Appliances / Cranberry PA
Mine Safety Appliances / Murrysville PA
Morris Knowles & Associates/Delmont,
PA
MS Consultants/Pittsburgh, Pa*
Munnin Group/Pittsburgh, Pa
NASA/Glenn Research/Cleveland, Ohio
NASA/Johnson Space Center/Houston,
TX
National Security Agency/MD
Naval Surface Warfare
Center/Philadelphia, PA/Bethesda, MD
NetApp/Cranberry Twp, Pa*
NIOSH/South Park, Pa
Norfolk Southern/Norfolk, VA
Nova Chemicals/Monaca, PA
ODonnell Consulting/Bridgeville, Pa
OmNova Solutions/Akron, Ohio
P.J. Dick Corporation
PA Dept of Transportation / Bridgeville
PA Turnpike Commission/Harrisburg*
PCC Airfoils/Minerva, Ohio*
PCL Civil Constructors/Issaquah, WA*
Pentek/Pgh, Pa
Pepco Holdings/Newark, DE
Philips Medical/Cleveland, Ohio
Philips Respironics/Murrysville, Pa*
Philips/Boston, MA
Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Authority
PKMJ Technical Services/Moon Twp, PA
Plextronics/Pgh, Pa
Polyone/Manitowoc, WI*

69

Polyone/Washington, PA
PTC Alliance/Wexford, Pa
QinetiQ-NA
Raudenbush Engineering
Reserved Environmental Services
Richard Goettle, Inc./Pgh, Pa
Robinson Fans/Zelienople, PA
Rockwell Automation/Cleveland, Ohio*
Rogers Corporation/Woodstock, CT
Ross Distributors/Carlisle, PA
RTI International Metals/Niles, Ohio*
Sabra Wang*
Sams Club/Fayetteville, AK
Savvior Technology Solutions
Schlumberger/Tx*
Schneider Lab/Pittsburgh, Pa*
Schroeder Industries LLC/Leetsdale, PA
Sebastian & Sons/
Siemens Power Generation/Penn Hall, PA
SmithMicro Systems/Cranberry Twp, PA
Solae/Memphis, TN*
Teamus Construction/Carnegie, PA
Tetratech NUS
ThermoAnalytics, Inc./Calumet, MI*
Timesys Corporation/Pittsburgh, Pa
Toyota/Ann Arbor, Michigan
Trumbull Corporation/Pittsburgh, PA
Tucker Automation/N. Versailles, Pa*
Turner Construction/Pittsburgh, Pa
Ulliman Schutte/Miamisburg, Ohio
United Airlines/Houston, TX*
Universal Electric
Universal Stainless/Bridgeville, PA
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/Pgh, Pa
United Parcel Service/New Stanton PA
UPS Professional Service/NewStanton,PA
USAirways
Valspar /Rochester, PA
Venture Engineering
Verizon Wireless/Bridgeville, PA
VoCollect/Monroeville, PA
Volvo Construction
Equipment/Shippensburg, PA
Walgreens/Carnegie, Pa
Walsh Construction/Canonsburg, Pa*
Westinghouse Electric Co./Cranberry
Twp, PA
Westinghouse Energy Center
Westinghouse Specialty
Metals/Blairsville, Pa
Whiting Turner/Baltimore, MD

ZollLifecor/Blawnox, PA

Graduate Level Employers


Advanced Micro Devices/Ft. Collins, Co
Ansys/Canonsburg, Pa
Broadcom/San Diego, Ca
Century Link/Monroe, La
Code Force/Alpharetta, GA
Dck Worldwide/Pgh, Pa
Fusion 10
Grant Street Group/Pgh, Pa
Management Science Associates/Pgh, Pa
Rizzo and Associates
Samsung/Richardson, TX
Siemens Energy/Penn Hall, Pa
Source Fire/Cranberry Twp, Pa
Tech Team
Uniscite/Greenville, SC
UPMC, Pgh, Pa

70

Denotes new employer for 20122013

71

25

50

75

100

125

150

175

200

225

Mecha ni ca l Engi neeri ng


Indus tri a l Engi neeri ng
Ci vi l Engi neeri ng
El ectri ca l Engi neeri ng
Chemi ca l Engi neeri ng
Computer Engi neeri ng
Ma teri a l s S ci ence
Computer S ci ence
Engr Phys i cs /Sci ence
Bi oengi neeri ng
Chemi s try
CE Technol ogy
EE Technol ogy
ME Technol ogy
Informa ti on Technol ogy
Phys i cs

2008-2009
156
105
108
80
89
73
9
11
2
5
3
0
4
5
1
1
652

2009-2010
156
103
106
73
93
81
12
16
1
10
4
0
2
4
1
0
662

2010-2011
184
104
133
85
105
78
5
23
4
14
2
0
0
3
0
0
740

2011-2012
201
127
134
86
110
81
4
23
4
22
0
0
1
3
1
0
797

2012-2013
217
128
142
86
118
86
6
28
6
23
0
1
1
3
2
0
847

2012-2013

2011-12

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

Five-year Co-op Par6cipa6on

Co-op Undergraduate Students 2012-2013

72

10

MS - ECE Engi neeri ng


MS - I ndus tri a l Engi neeri ng
MS - B i oengi neeri ng
MS - Chemi ca l Engi neeri ng
MS - Ci vi l Engi neeri ng
MS - I nforma ti on S ci ence
MS - Mecha ni ca l Engr.
PhD - Ci vi l Engi neeri ng
PhD - ECE Engi neeri ng
PhD - B i oengi neeri ng
PhD - Chemi ca l Engi neeri ng
PhD - I ndus tri a l Engi neeri ng
PhD - Ma teri a l s S ci ence
PhD - Mecha ni ca l Engi neeri ng
TOTAL

2010-2011
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
3

2011-12 2012-13
3
5
0
0
1
1
0
3
1
0
0
0
0
0
14

3
9
0
0
2
7
3
1
6
0
0
0
0
0
31

Co-op Graduate Students 2012-2013

2012-2013

2011-2012

2010-2011

Five-year Co-op
Par8cipa8on*

SWANSON SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING


2012 Student Placement
Department
Bioengineering

89%

Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

95%

Civil and Environmental Engineering

97%

Computer Engineering

100%

Electrical Engineering

97%

Engineering Physics

100%

Industrial Engineering

100%

Materials Science and Engineering


Mechanical Engineering

100%
95%

2012-13 Tuition Rates


Term

Credit

$8,390

$699

Out-of-State Undergraduate

$13,888

$1,157

In-State Graduate

$11,098

$1,054

Out-of-State Graduate

$18,172

$1,721

Full Time

Part Time

$85

$0

$175

$100

Security, Safety &


Transportation Fee:

$90

$90

Student Activity Fee:


Undergraduate
Graduate

$80
$20

$24
$10

In-State Undergraduate

Fees and Expenses

Student Health Fee:


Computing & Network
Service Fee

73

Degrees and Certificates Conferred


(School year ending April)
Department/Program
BACCALAUREATE
Bioengineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Physics
Engineering Science
Industrial Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
TOTAL
CERTIFICATE
Civil Engineering and Architectural Studies
Energy Resource Utilization
Engineering for Humanity
Fessenden Honors in Engineering
Health Systems Engineering
International Engineering Studies
Mining Engineering
Nuclear Engineering
Product Realization
Supply Chain Management
Sustainable Engineering
MASTER OF SCIENCE
Bioengineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Industrial Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering
Petroleum Engineering
TOTAL
CERTIFICATE
Clinical Cardiovascular
Electric Power Engineering
Engineering and Technology Management
Medical Product Innovation
Mining Engineering
Nuclear Engineering
DOCTORATE
Bioengineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Industrial Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
TOTAL

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

34
35
61
63
56
5
0
34
13
64
365

37
34
71
46
56
7
0
46
5
69
371

35
26
76
30
58
5
0
43
11
101
385

42
51
90
49
75
6
0
43
14
105
475

51
50
72
40
42
6
0
45
3
93
402

38
50
75
40
50
0
0
54
8
81
396

39
54
95
32
55
2
0
44
4
109
434

48
75
77
41
57
3
0
47
7
111
466

54
74
85
40
52
6
1
51
8
101
472

1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0

1
0
0
3
0
5
0
0
0
0
0

2
0
0
1
0
3
0
11
0
0
0

2
0
0
6
0
0
1
25
1
0
0

0
0
0
4
0
2
0
38
1
0
0

0
0
0
2
0
3
4
61
0
0
5

0
0
1
5
0
3
5
70
1
0
1

1
0
0
4
0
3
6
64
1
2
2

14
9
20
0
31
25
6
18
0
0
123

18
9
29
0
18
24
5
13
0
0
116

15
3
14
0
23
22
4
11
0
0
92

16
2
26
2
18
24
6
23
0
0
117

18
1
18
0
15
20
3
18
0
0
93

11
2
17
0
30
36
8
28
0
0
132

17
4
42
1
27
33
5
35
0
1
165

9
1
39
0
50
35
6
43
0
6
189

9
15
26
0
31
24
9
53
2
7
176

1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
2

0
0
0
0
0
2

0
0
0
0
4
15

0
0
2
0
3
21

0
0
0
0
1
18

4
7
7
0
8
2
6
7
41

10
8
5
0
7
7
4
8
49

14
9
3
0
6
4
4
4
44

13
10
2
0
4
7
0
1
37

20
5
0
0
8
7
3
5
48

21
5
1
0
11
2
3
9
52

23
5
10
0
8
5
1
5
57

15
7
6
1
7
6
4
4
50

10
9
9
1
9
6
7
7
58

74

Graduate Roster: 2012-13


August - 2012

Mechanical Engineering

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Emanuel Stylianos Alexander


Brady Andrew Baker
Mary Elizabeth Biddle
William M. Buono
Brendan K. Flynn
Corey T. Forster
Daniel Alan Franzetta, Jr.
Gary R. Greiser
Tyler A. Karloski
Michel Edouard Kernizan
Kevin Kotek
Mohamed A. Koubaa
Joseph C. Laughlin
Mackey Taylor Lutz
Robert E. Meinert
Nathan P. Morelli
Ryan M. Petrina
Meggie Claire Piotrowski
James Clarence Smoyer
Nicholas Brian Vukmer
Urban Mark Weinheimer
Patrick D. Zarnas

Bioengineering
Adedolapo Adetokunboh Junaid
Anna K. Yoney
Chemical Engineering
Eric Michael Penrod
Civil Engineering
Amira Aouni
Patrick Albert Costello
Jesse Ten-Chen Hsia
Frank Joseph Jupena
Klodian Pepaj
Computer Engineering
Christopher L. Coffey
Krystal Monique Heath
Timothy Adam Kostreva
Jeremy M. Nelson
Jared J. Schmidt
Jonathan J. Witsberger

CERTIFICATE
Civil Engineering and
Architectural Studies
None

Electrical Engineering
Charles Frederick Brand
Benjamin Jay Dunkelberger
Dmitry Kalika
Andrey I. Kostromskoy
James Joseph Perkins, Jr.
John E. Selker
Vernon Matthew Smith
Blaine E. Steigerwalt III
Hezi Y. Touaf
Robert Benjamin Zaczek

CERTIFICATE
Energy Resources Utilization
None

CERTIFICATE
Nuclear Engineering
Brady Andrew Baker
Gary R. Greiser
Kevin Kotek
Joseph C. Laughlin
Robert E. Meinert
Ryan M. Petrina
Meggie Claire Piotrowski
James Clarence Smoyer
Nicholas Brian Vukmer
Urban Mark Weinheimer
CERTIFICATE
Product Realization
None
MASTER OF SCIENCE
Bioengineering
Soroush Khanlou
Chemical Engineering
Tianhan Jiang
Lilian Mukyala Celia Ngobi
Jiani Niu
Shu-Che Peng
Civil Engineering
Jason M. Machuga
Marie A. Sydlik

CERTIFICATE
Fessenden Honors in Engineering

Computer Engineering

None

None

CERTIFICATE
International Engineering Studies

Electrical Engineering

Engineering Physics

James Matthew Chastek


Emmanuel J. Taylor

None
None

Industrial Engineering
Industrial Engineering
Jordan B. Perkins
John F. Schott

Pei-Shan Hsieh
Jithesh Louis
Michael Steven Norrell

Materials Science and Engineering

Materials Science and Engineering

Matthew Scott Dahar


Joseph W. Quinn

Jessica Louise Coughlin


Mechanical Engineering
75

Montana Zane Adams


Nicholas M. Bisceglia
Steven James Boehmer
Ryan Joseph Burda
Matthew P. Eager
Corey Michael Faddish
Erin Ruth Georgeadis
Jonathan Hollis
Ella Danielle Kaiser
Bradley Wayne Kauffman
Ryan Mark Kerr
Jesse Malecki
Robert P. Moeslein
Patipong Prabhawong
Michael James Reho
Thomas M. Sutherland

Industrial Engineering

Petroleum Engineering

December -2012

Tianhan Jiang
William James McLendon

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Sheng-I Chen
Rona Colosimo Pepmeier
Materials Science and Engineering

Civil Engineering
Xiaojun Liang
Xiahan Sang
Michael N. Task
Zhongfan Zhang
Mechanical Engineering
Seyed Mehdi Bostandoost Nik
Sin Chien Siw

Bioengineering
CERTIFICATE
Nuclear Engineering
Montana Zane Adams
Nicholas M. Bisceglia
Ryan Joseph Burda
Hassan Mohamed
Michael J. Reho
Ryan Timothy Vanston
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Bioengineering
Chien-Wen Chen
Bahar Fata
Husam A. Katnani
Hannah H. Lee
Ashish A. Parikh
Sagi Perel
Kalidasan Thambiayya
Chemical Engineering
Adel F. Alenzi
Richard Hollis Miller
Mariela Del Valle Sanoja
Laurent Sehabiague
Civil Engineering
Abdelatee Abdalla Eljadei
Electrical Engineering
Benjamin W. McMillen
Ralph A. Sprang

Craig Russell Stevenson


Kevin Matthew Struzynski
Michael Christopher Tam
Ross Elliott Trinch
Samantha C. Warman
Nicole Lynn Wieszczyk

John M. Ohodnicki
Chemical Engineering
Lindney Ndunjei Akonwie
David Christopher Beach
Benjamin L. Carlson
Tara Lynn Celli
Raymond Andrew Chessa
Rachel Jeannette Clark
Erik L. Dirkmaat
David Dress
Andrew Thomas Flowers
Cassandra Lynn Gallaschun
Peter Niels Garland
Tyler Gaskill
Amy Elizabeth Geisler
Berlyn Jo Hubler
Patrick E. Ireland
Nathan Alexander Jackson
Lucianne Yvette Keenan
Christopher M. Keller
Mary Elizabeth Kellett
Yifei Li
Amanda Lynn Lyle
Bradley Wayne Lyons
John L. Lyons
Matthew P. Maione
Brett Robert Meeder
Marc-Antoine Milord
Monica Suzanne Nicola
Elizabeth Christiana Pavone
Sean D. Rosenberg
Bartholomew Philip Rothrauff
Lauren M. Sakerka
Randy Nicholas Stein
76

Ryan Edward Bachman


Stephen M. Bosela
Jude Andrew Champion II
Kristin Rebekah Dauer
Todd Brandon DeMico
Oyinkansola Adewamidele Dina
Zachary Alexander Dowdell
John Ferragonio, Jr.
Gary Gehringer
Matthew Ryan Gilfillan
Lisa M. Hanlon
John Ikekhuame Izevbigie
James T. Kerins
Joshua Andrew Killian
Joel J. Kohler
Christina Maria Kossis
Ryan Joseph Kossol
Michael C. Krieg
Steven E. Lipe
Allyson J. Longardner
Anthony Carmen May
Brian P. McGlynn
David Andrew Noll
Michael Paul Quarantillo
Daniel Kevin Ramsey
Zachary D. Rinker
Samuel Michael Scalzo
Jacob A. Sharick
Casey William Sigmund
Benjamin A. Stormer
Gregory S. Turko
Michael James Veltri
Zachary W. Wally
Yingqian Wang
Gary J. Zurawski
Computer Engineering
Nathan M. Brubaker
Jon Papandreas Chmura
Michael Ross Fehr
Yuxin Liu
Yan Lu
Matthew D. Schechtman
Sean W. Schellinger
Michael Sobczak
Eric Turner
Donald J. Virostek
Shatara C. Washington
Jacob Charles Zielinski

Electrical Engineering
Gregory John Bee
Seth Montgomery Scott Bush
Khiya Jeannette Canadiate
Bryan W. Cannon
Joshua M. Cohen
Daniel P. Duffy
Chad J. Englert
Craig William Fraser
Joseph M. Korenic III
Robert Jordan Kurkiewicz
Steven Leonard Merkiel
Timothy John Olczak
Nathan Roberts
Hamed Safaeian
Hannah Elizabeth Patricia Westbrook
Amber Nicole Wright

Ian P. Connelly
Brenden Counihan
Joshua Ryan Cygan
Erin Jocelyn Dansey
Philip M. Dowling
Mohammed Tahir Elkhatib
Noah W. Erin
Joseph T. Fortunato
Ian G. French
Francis Jerome Healy, Jr.
Robert J. Hough
Elie M. Mansour
Peter M. Mickley
Alex R. Rieber
Geoffrey E. Southworth
Maxwell Joseph Tamasy
Trevor James Thompson
Daniel W. Walsh

Philip M. Dowling
Mohammed Tahir Elkhatib
Craig William Fraser
Francis Jerome Healy, Jr.
John L. Lyons
Brett Robert Meeder
Peter M. Mickley
Jesse S. Randall
Michael Christopher Tam
Maxwell Joseph Tamasy

Engineering Physics

Metallurgical Engineering

Berlyn Jo Hubler

Sean C. O'Brien
Jesse S. Randall

None

MASTER OF SCIENCE

CERTIFICATE
Civil Engineering and
Architectural Studies

Bioengineering

None

Chemical Engineering

CERTIFICATE
Energy Resources Utilization

CERTIFICATE
Fessenden Honors in Engineering

Christian D Basile
Alexander J. Boardman
Pattarapa Boon-Im
Jiaming Cheng
Yungchieh Lai
Shu Li
Tianzhou Wu

None

Civil Engineering

CERTIFICATE
International Engineering Studies

Janet Ann Connor


Mary Frances Crawford
Ce Gao
Craig Jason Kasper
Julia Kay Mercer
Jacob Charles Neubert
Aydin Alyari Tabrizi
Michael Ross Volkwein
Shuo Wang
Lai Wei

Industrial Engineering
Benjamin Berk
Gabrielle Hope Curione
Patrice Nicole Davalt
Evgeniya Y. Dmitrieva
Monica Sue Faris
Jennifer Ann Forster
Sean Lawrence McParland Glenn
Andrew C. Juba
Kelsey Alexandra Kennedy
Jose Carlos Kuroki Ramirez
Kaitlyn Ann Mayowski
John Joseph Migliozzi
Kevin James Muir
Samuel Robert O'Donnell
Kyle Piatt
Cassia Priebe
Karin Rozendaal
Ryan D. Snee
Edward S. Spotts III
Megan Lynn Ubinger
Declan William Christopher Wilson
Matthew Joseph Yandura

None

Karin Rozendaal
CERTIFICATE
Mining Engineering
Casey William Sigmund
Gary J. Zurawski

CERTIFICATE
Product Realization
None
CERTIFICATE
Sustainable Engineering

None

Materials Science and Engineering


Joseph John Sopcisak

CERTIFICATE
Nuclear Engineering

Computer Engineering
None

Mechanical Engineering
Robert Mark Anderson, Jr.
Mark R. Benkowski
Isaac A. Bond
Charles V. Cantrell
Jeffrey Carson

Robert Mark Anderson, Jr.


David Christopher Beach
Mark R. Benkowski
Bryan W. Cannon
Brenden Counihan
Joshua Ryan Cygan
Erin Jocelyn Dansey
77

Electrical Engineering
Jeffrey Michael Brinkhus
Xiang Chen
Nicholas Cormas, Jr.
Jean-Marc Paul Coulomb

Benoit De Courreges D'ustou


Adam N. Eccles
Christopher David Gill
Changfeng Liu
Brandon D. Marzec
Adam Richard Sparacino
Daniel K. Stough
Nathan Zellars
Qinhao Zhang
Industrial Engineering
Osama A. Alotaik
Robert Christopher Coburn
Farhad Ghiasabadi
Pin-Hsien Huang
Ye Huang
Matthew J. Minda
Divya Nachiappan
Xiukai Ning
William Richard Obaker
Cheng Quan
Yunchang Wang
Heyang Zhang
Xinyu Zhao
Materials Science and Engineering
Peter Joseph Kozlowski
Elliot James Long
Bradley Scott Lutz
Lauren Rochelle Weichel
Mechanical Engineering
Autumn Michelle Adamiak
Julie Marie Anspach
Christopher D. Boyd
Vivek Dason
Bryan Nathan Friedman
Changle Guo
Jonathan Paul Holuta
Robert E. Kennedy
Thomas Leo Meikle V
Wesley Forrest Mitchell
Adam G. Redling
Nicholas Edward Salkeld
Lauren Carroll Smith
Daniel David Uniatowski

CERTIFICATE
Mining Engineering

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
None
Bioengineering
CERTIFICATE
Nuclear Engineering
Autumn Michelle Adamiak
Benjamin R. Doolittle
Bryan Nathan Friedman
Brian J. LoPresti
William Richard Obaker
Lauren Carroll Smith
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Bioengineering
Devin Max Nelson
Chemical Engineering
Hseen Baled
Sam N. Rothstein
Jiamin Wu
Dazun Xing
Bo Zhang
Civil Engineering
Shih-Hsiang Chien
Tyler Woods Davis
Yinghua Feng
Briana Niblick
Scott Owen Shrake
Electrical Engineering
Samuel J. Dickerson
Ang Li
Yi Xu
Industrial Engineering
Murat Kurt
Nur Ozge Ozaltin
Materials Science and Engineering

Nuclear Engineering

None

Benjamin R. Doolittle
Venugopal M.P. Nair

Mechanical Engineering

Petroleum Engineering

April 2013

Michael K. Ikeda
Daniel R. McAdams

Marwan Mohammad Aladmawi


Bryan Richard Bauer
Alexander J. Boardman
78

Suyesh Acharya
Korey Atherton
Janelle Lynn Bickta
Devin Thomas Blake
Erica Brunngraber
Lalithasree Chintam
Olivia Annette Creasey
Matthew Robert Crilley
Michael Joseph Cunningham
Antonia Eugenia Curtin
Anthony Thomas DeAngelo
Brian Charles DeWillie
Rafey Feroze
Jonathan E. Foster
Piaget Jicole Francois
Rebecca Jeanne Gerth
Sydney Michelle Gibson
Elizabeth L. Gilson
Cullen Christopher Grover
Emma Michelle Harbert
Claire Hoelmer
Ryan G. Koch
Sandy Chen Liu
Nicole T. McClain
Tyler James McKim
Joshua Eugene Mealy
Zachary F. Merrill
Sean Robert Moore
Patrick Aloysius Murawski
Samuel Edgar Nardone
Ashley Nielsen
Emily Louisa Ofstun
Phillip L. Olsen
Shawn E. O'Neill
Aimee Nicole Pickering
Kathrine Port
Sonya Rose Puterbaugh
Michelle Ann Schafman
Andrea Lynn Shoffstall
Wilton Thomas Snead
Elizabeth C. Stahl
Marshall Ligon Steele
Olivia Grace Telford
Huong Thi Lan Tran
Adam W. Veenis
Michael David Watson
Michelle Lynn Weaver
Jeffrey Michael Weiss
Justin David Wildemann
Erica Cathleen Wilson
Christopher Allen Zimmerman

Chemical Engineering
Lisa Anne Barkand
Nathan Douglas Blandino
Katherine Lee Brown
Andrew Richard Decker
Adam Lee Dobson
Stanislaw Peter Joseph Gawel XXV
Nicholas W. Graf
Justin Matthew Gray
Ashley Nicole Guntrum
Benjamin Loren Hursh
Brandon John Iskra
Brett T. Karan
Andrew W. Kittka
Christopher John Kolesar
David Jerome Kraemer
James Rodney Landreneau
John Khalil Maalouf
Bradley E. Maletto
Renee S. Millard
Lisa Griffin Miller
Louis Anthony Miller II
John Michael Obeid
Nicholas Michael Perri
Manon Whitney Pilardi
Charles R. Ringel
Matthew Dalton Simson
Adam John Sloan
Michael S. Tirone
Andrew John Tomovich
Ryan Daniel Trees
Srimanth Venigalla
Chris Vergos
Lisa R. Volpatti
Skylar D. Wilcox
Andrew Charles Zmolek
Civil Engineering
Chelsey I. Ackerman
Angela J. Anderson
Eric Lynn Banks
Nicholas Alan Bayer
Bruk M. Berhanu
Brian M. Bieber
Eric M. Brichler
Ryan Paul Butler
Jessica L. Carr
Andrew Michael Cerrito
Ronald J. Comber
Joshua Sean Cumberland
Dylan P. Davis
Kevin Christopher Dorian
Ryan Raymond Ernst
Tzur Frenkel
Cory James Hadden-Leggett
Maxwell Joseph Hegedus
Jacob M. Helman
Daniel Patrick Kennevan

John Zachary Kurtik


Joseph Blake Loftus
Preston O. Macready
Adam James Madar
Mark A. Mancini
Bradley Brooks McShane
Caitlin Theresa Mehall
Peter J. Mudar III
Ruth Wanjiru Muthoga
Derrick Thomas Pepper
Daniel Ryan Pfister
David F. Roberts
Nicholas A. Rosky
Andreas Johann Schermaier
Matthew S. Schmitt
Allan Raymond Smith
Thomas Smith
James Arthur Sommer II
Daniel Ryan Stauffer
Abigail Lynn Stein
Matthew D. Tamrowski
Zachary Turner Visgarda
Tyler Jordan Washburn
Kyle Scott Yeater
Nicholas Adam Zyroll

John F. Dawson
Michael D. Derrick
Chet N. Gnegy
Marc Fouad Jaroudi
Lawrence J. Lee
Bobby James Lemmon
Meng Li
Khory Scott Lion
Justin Edward Lis
Michael James McDonald
Daniel Halligan Miller
Eric Moreland
Grant T. Nafziger
Syeda Rubab Raisa
Kyle Charles Schoenstein
Andrew Polk Schrader
Yevgeniy Soroka
Anthony Vincent Sperdute
Thomas James Wyant, Jr.
Engineering Physics
Nicole Rae Downing
Jacob Lawrence Hughes
Joseph Russell Landry
Matthew Ryan Paterson

Computer Engineering
Engineering Science
Ayse Artiklar
Christopher A. Barracato
Sunsharay Shavonna Chestnut
Tyler A. DeGirolamo
Caleb Brett Dusenbery
Frank E. Dyska
Derek C. Fredrickson
Jason Edward Gerlowski
Shawn K. Hanna
Eric M. Heirendt
Amanda Mary Johanns
Antonio J. Kang
William N. Massimini
Stephon Marquis McCoy
Edward Thomas Morgans
Thomas David Nason
Michael David Neiderhauser
Kent W. Nixon
Zachary David Sweigart
Alexander L. Thorne
Dominic Joseph Visco
David Yu
Electrical Engineering
Stephen A. Albert
Christopher James Ausefski
Alexander Michael Ball
Dylan Patrick Blosser
Ibrahim E. Chebib
Karen Cheung
Bert Cos
79

Nelson Hua
Industrial Engineering
Olorunseye Opeyemi Alomaja
Tyler M. Balson
Patrick D. Bertolino
Derrick Paul Bransby
Peter J. Brendel
Katherine A. Brown
Edward J. Cartwright
Myles Travis Cooney
Matthew M. D'Emidio
Matthew David Didonato
Vincent Paul D'Ottavio
Daniel R. Fitzgerald
Hilary Genevieve Gill
Dana Margaret Huttlin
Cameron S. Keelan
Chelsea T. Kirch
Garrett Michael Klein
Angela Marie Litvin
Nicholas R. Lubic
Todd Ryan Mellett
William James Owens
Michael Joseph Pesce
Alexandria Leigh Phillips
Steven W. Plate
Evan M. Rago
Kari L. Schneider
Quan Hoang Truong

Materials Science and Engineering


Thomas Walker Daniels
Nicholas Scott Ferry
Timothy Michael Hoye
Jonathon R. Krimm
Temitope Adewekun Oluwafemi

Eric J. Uzarski
Chelsey F. Wain
Shaojie Wang
Matthew Thomas Wilson
Jason Joseph Wolinsky
Adam Richard Wood
Alisha Ashley Yorke
Metallurgical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering
None
Zachary A. Aaron
William John Airgood
Bader Abdullah Al Nifay
Michael T. Albaugh
Faith Rose Beck
Alexander Bradley Bohr
Sara E. Bolha
Ryan M. Bowser
Justin J. Boyle
Michael L. Brenner
Dylan W. Chamberlain
Ryan Matthew Cheberenchick
Megan Elizabeth DeGraaf
Ohiremen L. Dibua
Matthew D. Diehl
Kevin John Dolan
Alan S. Dum
Sean Mark Egan
Samuel L. Eichelberger
Kenoye Kelvin Joseph Eke, Jr.
Jonathan F. Ewing
Jason Hull Frantz
Andrew D. Galbally
Andrew Bernardon Gentilcore
Cody Joe Godding
Justin David Halm
Luke S. Hochendoner
Brooke Anne Hodel
Stacey M. Horvitz
Steven Vincent Karkenny
Peter Blake Lawson
Christopher Lippert
Kelly A. Macie
Michael G. Malencia
Emmett Anthony Manzo
Michael Joseph Massimino
Daniel Paul Mertz
Brent G. Miller
John Goggins Nalls, Jr.
James John Neidigh
Maxwell Philip Pless
Tyler Michael Ruhl
Chiranjiv Shah
Minao Shen
Ethan Edward Shirey
Matthew E. Siegfried
John M. Slivka, Jr.
Matthew John Solakian
Daniel E. Stein

CERTIFICATE
Civil Engineering and
Architectural Studies
Chong Hu
CERTIFICATE
Engineering for Humanity
None
CERTIFICATE
Energy Resources Utilization
None
CERTIFICATE
Fessenden Honors in Engineering

Andrew Richard Decker


Megan Elizabeth DeGraaf
Matthew D. Diehl
Kevin John Dolan
Samuel L. Eichelberger
Kenoye Kelvin Joseph Eke, Jr.
Jason Hull Frantz
Andrew Bernardon Gentilcore
Nicholas W. Graf
Justin Matthew Gray
Justin David Halm
Luke S. Hochendoner
Stacey M. Horvitz
Brett T. Karan
John Zachary Kurtik
James Rodney Landreneau
Khory Scott Lion
Kelly A. Macie
John Goggins Nalls, Jr.
Tyler Michael Ruhl
Andrew Polk Schrader
Ethan Edward Shirey
Matthew E. Siegfried
John M. Slivka, Jr.
Matthew John Solakian
Daniel E. Stein
Eric J. Uzarski
Chelsey F. Wain
Matthew Thomas Wilson
Jason Joseph Wolinsky

Adam Lee Dobson


Sandy Chen Liu
Michael David Watson
Christopher Allen Zimmerman

CERTIFICATE
Product Realization

CERTIFICATE
International Engineering Studies

CERTIFICATE
Supply Chain Management

Stacey M. Horvitz
Christopher Lippert

Patrick D. Bertolino
Matthew M. D'Emidio

CERTIFICATE
Mining Engineering

CERTIFICATE
Sustainable Engineering

William John Airgood


Michael T. Albaugh
Adam James Madar
Emma A. Oti

Ryan Paul Butler

Christopher Lippert

MASTER OF SCIENCE
Bioengineering

CERTIFICATE
Nuclear Engineering
Zachary A. Aaron
Bader Abdullah Al Nifay
Alexander Bradley Bohr
Sara E. Bolha
Justin J. Boyle
Michael L. Brenner
Ryan Matthew Cheberenchick
80

Joshua M. Dudik
Samuel C. Dumpe
Bridget M. Endler
Allison Joy Luther
Richard Francis Murphy III
Matthew Vincent Panico
Kane Dearl Smith
Jonathon Chase Strauser

Chemical Engineering

Materials Science and Engineering

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

Yuan Li
Guangyu Lv
Kenneth F. Nadeau
Bohan Zhang

Kelly John Alderson, Jr.


Tammy Marie Lowe
Richard Eric Secola
Ziye Xiong

Bioengineering

Civil Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

Chemical Engineering

Michelle R. Acheson
Mengzhe Gu
Guoli Huang
Mirwais Isaqzai
Patrick Keenan
Matthew Paul Koczko
Melissa Suzanne Lieberman
Megan Maria Ponzo
Katherine Fitzgerald Quillin
Keith L. Schoon
Wenqi Shi
Douglas Philip Smith
Yuan Tao
Xuan Zheng

Michael Patrick Barry


Brandon Thomas Brown
Justine Lee Buchman
Michael A. Castellani
James Carson Clopton
Christopher A. Daggett
Mark G. Dorn
Nicholas John Duncan
Andrew S. Eastman
Andrew Charles Eidnier
Amy Eileen Freed
Ralph Edward Hardt, Jr.
Kevin Thomas Kelly
Michael Kristufek
Christopher Kupper
Alan M. Kuskil
Damian Mirizio
Hassan Mohamed
Rachel Solano
Mark J. Spirnak
Robert Charles Turner
Richard Edward Weber
Matthew J. Weir

None

Computer Engineering
None
Electrical Engineering
Jonathan Emil Baisch
Ismail Bayram
Kalhan Bhan
Nandeep Devendra
Brandon G. Diethorn
Yan Fang
Zhenlv Han
Jason Allen Harchick
Hanrui Huang
B. Alexander Huber
Jay L. Johnson
Ramana Naga Shishir Juluri
Bo Luan
Mumen Hussein Ramadan
Joseph Thomas Root
Yue Xu
Industrial Engineering
Tejas Nama Radhakrishna
Jessica S. Sanko
Nithin Krishna Tiruveedhi
Luke Paul Tresnicky
Darlene Kao Tzou
Baomin Wang
Jeffrey Keith Wilson
Shenqi Yang

Nicholas J. Amoroso
Fatima Naz Syed-Picard

Civil Engineering
William Overton Collinge
Alexander Trinovitch Dale
Yaneng Zhou
Computer Engineering
Vyasa Sai
Electrical Engineering
Osama A. S. Alkishriwo
Hussain Mohammad M. Bassi
Mircea-Florian Lupu
David John Perello
Industrial Engineering
Guvenc Degirmenci
Ya-Ping Wang

Petroleum Engineering

Materials Science and Engineering

Timothy Kudar Jarry


Jinhui Yu

Heather Meloy Gorr


Michael Aaron Helminiak
Hao Wang

CERTIFICATE
Engineering Technology
Management

Mechanical Engineering

None

Mahdi Mohebbi
Collin Christopher Otis
Yizhong Wang

CERTIFICATE
Mining Engineering
Jeffrey A. Maybee
CERTIFICATE
Nuclear Engineering
Justine Lee Buchman
James Carson Clopton
Junior Landu Matondo
Damian Mirizio
Rachel Solano
Richard Edward Weber

81

Swanson School of Engineering


Faculty Headcount*
Fall 2012
Tenured

Tenure
Stream

Non-Tenured

Joint
Appts.**

Total

Bio

18

26

76

ChE

16

19

CEE

10

16

EE

15

21

IE

10

15

MEMS

21

27

90

25

124

79

TOTAL

*Excludes Research, Visiting and Part-Time Faculty


**Joint appointments are part-time

82

Faculty Profiles
BIOENGINEERING
Steve Abramowitch
Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering (Primary), Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology,
and Reproductive Sciences (Secondary). PhD (Bioengineering), University of Pittsburgh (2004). Dr.
Abramowitch serves as the Co-Director of the Tissue Mechanics laboratory in the Musculoskeletal
Research Center. His research aims to elucidate the mechanisms of pelvic floor failure in women with
pelvic organ prolapse and enhance maternal tissue healing following obstetric injury utilizing functional
tissue engineering approaches.
Howard Aizenstein
Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Bioengineering; Director of the Geriatric Psychiatry Neuroimaging
Laboratory. PhD (Computer Science), 1993, and MD, 1995, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign. Dr. Aizensteins research interests focus on structural and functional brain MRI in elderly
individuals with cognitive impairment and mood disorders. His research projects integrate the fields of
neuroscience, computer science, software engineering and clinical aspects of neuroimaging and brain
mapping. Recent projects in the lab include developing automated neuroimage registration and
segmentation routines, surface modeling of brain structures, and time-series of functional MRI data. In
more clinically-oriented projects, imaging approaches are being used to investigate therapeutic response
to antidepressive drugs in late-life depression.
Alejandro Almarza
Assistant Professor, Department of Oral Biology and Bioengineering; Director of the TMJ laboratories.
PhD (Bioengineering), Rice University, 2005. Research interests include: Understanding the normal
biomechanical properties and joint mechanics/motion of the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) for
determining diseased states and to start elucidating the progress of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
(TMDs). Utilize novel tissue engineering techniques, such as 3D printing of nanostructured materials,
gene delivery therapies, and stem cells application, for bone and fibrocartilage tissue engineering
applications.
James Antaki
James F. Antaki, PhD is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering with a courtesy appointment in
Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, and adjunct appointments in the departments of
Surgery and Bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh. He received a BS in Mechanical and
Electrical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1985) and a PhD in Mechanical
Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh (1991). Over the past 22 years, Prof. Antaki has
conducted research in the field of prosthetic cardiovascular organs, and has contributed to the
development of several heart-assist devices used clinically, including the Heartmate-II, Novacor,
Ventrassist, TandemHeart, and Levacor. In 1997, his team completed the development of a novel
magnetically levitated turbodynamic blood pump, the Streamliner, which recorded the worlds first invivo implant of such a device, and was granted an IEEE Controls Systems Technology Award in 2001.
Dr. Antaki holds over 16 patents: related to artificial organs, harmonica technology, and other fields. His
current research involves the development of circulatory support systems for children, feedback-control
algorithms for optimizing cardiac recovery, a blood purification system for treating malaria, and a
system for performing aqueous immersion surgery. He is also developing methods to heighten the
involvement of physicians in process of innovation and design of new medical devices.

83

Mohammad H. Ataai
William Kepler Whiteford Professor, Chemical & Petroleum Engineering and Bioengineering. PhD
(Chemical Engineering), Cornell University, 1986. Dr. Ataai's research interests include bioprocess
engineering, large-scale cell culture and fermentation, production and purification of viral vectors for
gene therapy applications, protein purification, metabolic engineering, cellular metabolism, and
physiology.
Stephen F. Badylak
Professor. Departments of Surgery and Bioengineering; Deputy Director of the McGowan Institute for
Regenerative Medicine. DVM, Purdue University; PhD (Anatomic Pathology), Purdue University,
1981, and graduated with highest honors with an MD from Indiana University Medical School, 1985.
Dr. Badylak has practiced both veterinary and human medicine. Dr. Badylak began his academic career
at Purdue University in 1983, and subsequently held a variety of positions including service as the
Director of the Hillenbrand Biomedical Engineering Center from 1995-1998. Dr. Badylak served as the
Head Team Physician for the Athletic Department for 16 years (1985-2001). Dr. Badylak holds over 50
U.S. patents, 200 patents worldwide, has authored more than 225 scientific publications and 20 book
chapters. He has served as the Chair of the Study Section for the Small Business Innovative Research
(SBIR) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and as chair of the Bioengineering, Technology, and
Surgical Sciences (BTSS) Study Section at NIH. Dr. Badylak is now a member of the College of
Scientific Reviewers for NIH. Dr. Badylak has either chaired or been a member of the Scientific
Advisory Board to several major medical device companies. Dr. Badylak is a Fellow of the American
Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, a charter member of the Tissue Engineering Society
International, and currently president of the Tissue Engineering Regenerative Medicine International
Society (TERMIS). He is also a member of the Society for Biomaterials. Dr. Badylak is the Associate
Editor for Tissue Engineering for the journal Cells, Tissues, Organs, and serves on the editorial board of
several other journals. Dr. Badylaks major research interests include: Tissue Engineering and
Regenerative Medicine; Biomaterials and Biomaterial/Tissue interactions; Developmental Biology and
its Relationship to Regenerative Medicine; Relationship of the Innate Immune Response to Tissue
Regeneration; Biomedical Engineering as it Relates to Device Development and Biomaterials; and
Clinical Translation of Regenerative Medicine.
Kyongtae Bae
Professor and Chairman of Radiology, Professor of Bioengineering. MD, University of Chicago; PhD
(Bioengineering), University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Bae is a radiologist and imaging scientist and has
extensive experience and publications in computer-aided diagnosis, image segmentation and
quantification from radiologic images. He is also the Director of the Imaging Biomarker Lab in the
Department of Radiology. In addition to clinical radiology practice in CT and MRI, Dr. Bae has an
interest in applying computer and image processing technology to advance clinical translational and
imaging biomarker research in a wide range of diseases including polycystic kidney disease, pulmonary
embolism, emphysema, osteoarthritis, lung cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, Parkinsons disease,
brain tumor perfusion, multiple sclerosis, spine, eye, and liver. Dr. Baes lab specializes in developing
and analyzing morphological and functional imaging biomarkers from CT, clinical and high-field MR
images. Dr. Bae joined the University of Pittsburgh in 2006 as a professor from the Mallinckrodt
Institute of Radiology at Washington University in St Louis, where he was a tenured associate professor
of radiology and bioengineering.
Carey Balaban
Professor, Otolaryngology, Neurobiology, Communication Sciences & Disorders and Bioengineering.
Director, Center for National Preparedness. PhD (Anatomy), University of Chicago, 1979. Anatomy,
neurophysiology and neurochemistry of vestibular function in normal and pathological conditions (e.g.,
disease and mild traumatic brain injury) are primary focus areas of Dr. Balabans research. He also

84

works in the psychophysics of pain and participates in translational applications of our basic research to
nascent neurotechnologies in cyber security, homeland security and national defense.
Ipsita Banerjee
Assistant Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering and Bioengineering, PhD (Chemical
Engineering) Rutgers University, 2005. She completed her postdoctoral research in biomedical
engineering from Harvard Medical School in 2008. Dr Banerjee's research interests include stem cell
differentiation, tissue engineering, systems biology, gene network modeling. She is particularly
interested in unraveling the gene regulatory network controlling the directed differentiation of embryonic
stem cells to pancreatic lineage.
Aaron Batista
Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering. PhD (Computation and Neural Systems), California
Institute of Technology, 1999. Between 1999 and 2007, Dr. Batista conducted postdoctoral research at
Stanford University. He studies the neural circuits that transform sensory inputs into motor commands.
The goal of this research is to improve neural prostheses: technologies that can restore motor function to
paralyzed individuals by extracting movement command signals from the cerebral cortex.
Elia Beniash
Associate Professor, Oral Biology and Bioengineering. PhD (Structural Biology and Chemistry), The
Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, 1998. Dr. Beniashs current research includes biogenic
mineralized materialssuch as those found in shells, bones, and teeth are produced by organisms
ranging from bacteria to higher plants and mammals. The main role of these biominerals is
mechanical reinforcement of tissues and organs.
Fernando E. Boada
Associate Professor, Radiology and Bioengineering. PhD (Physics), Case Western Reserve University,
1990. Dr. Boadas current research interests include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), signal
processing, physics and mathematics of medical imaging, sodium MRI, MRI of stroke and cancer and
functional MRI physics.
Michael L. Boninger
Professor and Chair in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Professor of
Rehabilitation Science & Technology and Bioengineering. He is the Associate Dean for Medical
Student Research in the School of Medicine. MD, Ohio State University, College of Medicine, 1989.
Specialty training in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan Medical Center. Dr.
Boninger is the Director of the University of Pittsburgh Model Center on Spinal Cord Injury (UPMCSCI), funded by NIDDR. In addition, he serves as the Medical Director of the Human Engineering
Research Laboratories a VA Center of Excellence. Dr. Boningers work focuses on upper extremity
repetitive strain injuries in individuals who rely on manual wheelchairs for mobility, using ultrasound to
quantify tendon and nerve injury and the response of tissue to stress, and effective methods for teaching
research.
Harvey S. Borovetz
Distinguished Professor and Chairman, Bioengineering, Robert L. Hardesty Professor of Surgery and
Professor Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. PhD (Bioengineering), Carnegie Mellon University,
1976. Dr. Borovetz' current research interests are focused on the design and clinical utilization of
cardiovascular organ replacements for both adult and pediatric patients. Since 1985, he has served as the
academic adviser to the University's clinical bioengineering program in mechanical circulatory support.
In 1999 and 2000, Dr. Borovetz was on half-time sabbatical at NIH, working in the Bioengineering
Research Group of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

85

David M. Brienza
Professor, Rehabilitation Science and Technology, Bioengineering and the McGowan Institute for
Regenerative Medicine; Director of the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center
on Telerehabilitation; Director of the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Spinal Cord Injury.
PhD (Electrical Engineering), University of Virginia, 1991. Dr. Brienza's areas of expertise are soft
tissue mechanics, wheelchair seating, pressure ulcer prevention, support surface technology, and
wheelchairs.
John Brigham
Assistant Professor, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Bioengineering. PhD (Civil
and Environmental Engineering), Cornell University, 2008. Dr. Brighams research interests include the
development of efficient computational methods for the representation of multiphysics and multiscale
systems, solution strategies for inverse problems associated with nondestructive and noninvasive testing,
and numerical modeling of biological systems. His recent work has focused on developing
computational strategies for the solution of inverse problems, which address the challenges in both the
numerical representation of complex systems and optimization approaches to inverse solutions.
Bryan Brown
Dr. Bryan Brown is a visiting assistant professor with the Department of Bioengineering at the
University of Pittsburgh. Prior to this he was a research associate in the Departments of Clinical
Sciences and Biomedical Engineering at Cornell University. Dr. Brown earned his B.S. with Honors and
his PhD in Bioengineering from the University of Pittsburgh. He received several fellowships: the
National Science Foundation/Japan Society for the Promotion of Science East Asia and Pacific Summer
Institutes Fellow, Institute for Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Womens Medical
University in Japan; the National Institutes of Health National Research Service Award (F31)
Predoctoral Fellow at the McGowan Institute; and a postdoctoral fellowship with the Departments of
Clinical Sciences and Biomedical Engineering at Cornell University. Dr. Browns research interests are
in the area of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, with a focus upon biomaterials development,
clinical applications, and investigation of the role of the host response in biomaterials based approaches
to tissue reconstruction.
Dev Chakraborty
Associate Professor, Department of Radiology and Bioengineering. PhD (Physics), University of
Rochester, 1977. Dr. Chakraborty's research interests include the measurement and optimization of
image quality in medical imaging, using both physical (image based) and psychophysical (human
observer based) methods. His special interest is in Free-Response Receiver Operating Characteristic
(FROC) methodology which seeks to extend observer performance methodology to more realistic
clinical tasks. He has related interests in digital mammography, Computer Aided Detection, dual energy
imaging, tomosynthesis and image processing.
Raki Cham
Associate Professor, Department of Bioengineering. PhD (Bioengineering), University of Pittsburgh,
2000. Dr. Chams research interests include the postural and biomechanical analysis of human
movement and occupational tasks towards the prevention of musculoskeletal injuries. She is particularly
interested in understanding the human factors (biomechanical, postural control and neurological) that
precipitate falls during gait.
April Chambers
Visiting Research Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering. PhD (Bioengineering), University
of Pittsburgh, 2011/2005. Dr. Chambers research expertise is in the field of human movement

86

biomechanics and falls prevention. Her research areas of interest include gait and postural control;
prosthetics; ergonomics; and long term fatigue in young and older adults.
Kevin C. Chan
Research Assistant Professor in Ophthalmology and Bioengineering, Faculty Member of Neuroimaging
Laboratory, and Faculty Member of Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition. PhD (Biomedical
Engineering), The University of Hong Kong, 2010. Since 2011, Dr. Chan has been directing an MRI
research program on structural, metabolic and functional imaging of the visual system in health and
disease at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Chans research focuses on the following areas: (1) Structurefunction relationship and longitudinal assessment of glaucomatous changes in the eye and the brain; (2)
Investigating the mechanistic processes of sensory substitution using structural and functional brain
imaging; (3) In vivo evaluation of microstructural reorganization and functional recovery during visual
brain plasticity and regeneration; (4) Development of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent
enabling visualization and quantification of the visual system; (5) Establishing animal and ex vivo
models for assessing the glaucomatous effect on the eye and the brain. These studies are mainly
conducted at the Neuroscience Imaging Center, which has a research laboratory located at the McGowan
Institute for Regenerative Medicine. The laboratory houses a 3-Tesla MRI scanner for human and
primate studies, a 9.4-Tesla MRI scanner for cat and rodent studies, and a physiology laboratory
dedicated to basic brain research.
Dr. Chan is a Junior Fellow of The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM)
and a 2009-2010 Fulbright Scholar. He has written 9 first-authored and 17 co-authored peer-reviewed
manuscripts, 1 invited review manuscript, and over 80 abstracts in the field of MRI and visual
neuroscience. He is a peer-reviewer for 12 visual science or MRI journals, and 6 international scientific
conferences since 2008, and is an associate editor of the Journal of Neuroscience and Neuroengineering.
He is recently identified a Distinguished reviewer of the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for
the year 2012 by the ISMRM, and is a participant of the Early Career Reviewer Program of the Center
for Scientific Review at NIH.
Constance Chu
Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery in the Division of Joint Replacement at the University of
Pittsburgh. MD, Harvard Medical School, 1992. Dr. Chu completed her residency training at University
of California at San Diego and her fellowship training at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard
Medical School. Clinically, she is actively interested in the topics of arthritis and cartilage injuries of the
knee, total knee replacement, knee arthroscopy and cartilage and chondrocyte transplantation. However,
presently Dr. Chu and her research team are focusing primarily on articular cartilage transplantation,
tissue engineered articular cartilage replacements and the role of antioxidants in the prevention of
arthritis.
Youngjae Chun
Assistant Professor in Industrial Engineering (secondary appointment in Bioengineering). PhD
(Mechanical Engineering), University of California, Los Angeles, 2009. Dr. Chuns primary research
focus is on designing, manufacturing, and testing of medical devices to treat vascular diseases using
smart materials through minimally invasive surgery. He also has an interest in the development of biohybrid composite biomaterials, implantable microsystems, and in-vitro experimental apparatus for
developing more diverse biomedical applications with a focus on novel materials and manufacturing
concepts.
Daniel Cole
Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science and Bioengineering.
PhD, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1998. Daniel Cole's research interests are in

87

the area of dynamic systems, measurement and control. His research is focused on how to characterize
systems at or near the nanoscale, describe their dynamics, measure such phenomena, and control them.
Jennifer L. Collinger
Assistant Professor in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Bioengineering, Research Biomedical
Engineer at the VA R&D Center of Excellence on Wheelchairs and Related Technology. PhD
(Bioengineering), University of Pittsburgh, 2009. Dr. Collingers doctoral work focused on the
prevention of upper limb injuries in manual wheelchair users. Her current research interests are related
to neurorehabilitation and brain-computer interface technology for individuals with motor impairments.
One research project is investigating the possibility of using real-time feedback of motor cortex activity
measured by magnetoencephalography (MEG) to increase motor cortex activity and motor function for
people with tetraplegia. Her brain-computer interface research projects involve using neural signals
recorded with implanted microelectrodes to control assistive devices for people with paralysis.
Gregory Cooper
Research Assistant Professor, Surgery, Oral Biology, and Bioengineering. PhD (Bioengineering),
University of Pittsburgh, 2006. Dr. Cooper has been involved in translational-related research based on
tissue engineering for the Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery. Currently he serves as
Director of the Pediatric Craniofacial Biology Laboratory at Childrens Hospital.
Rory A. Cooper
Distinguished Professor and Chairman (RST), Rehabilitation Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and
Bioengineering. PhD (Electrical and Computer Engineering), UC Santa Barbara, 1989. Dr. Cooper's
areas of interest are the design and testing of assistive devices for mobility impairment, and the influence
of disability of neuromotor control and biomechanics. He is also interested in the development of the
smart sensor and instrumentation for those applications.
Timothy E. Corcoran
Assistant Professor, Medicine and Bioengineering. PhD (Bioengineering) Carnegie Mellon University,
2000. Dr. Corcoran's research interests include aerosol drug delivery and respiratory fluid mechanics.
Dr. Corcoran specializes in using nuclear medicine techniques to assess drug delivery and to study
physiology in the lungs. Currently these techniques are being applied to study drugs for use after lung
transplantation and for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Dr. Corcoran also works in modeling the
respiratory system and in the design of aerosol drug delivery systems.
Xinyan (Tracy) Cui
Associate Professor, Bioengineering. PhD (Macromolecular Science and Engineering), University of
Michigan (2002); Research Scientist at Unilever Research US (2002-2003). Dr. Cui directs the
Laboratory of Neural Tissue Electrode Interface and Neural Tissue Engineering (NTE Lab). In the field
of Neural Interface, her interest lies in the characterization and improvement of the chronic neural
electrode-tissue interface from the biomaterials and biocompatibility perspective. In Neural Tissue
Engineering, her lab is interested in manipulating stem cell growth and differentiation with electrically
conductive and active materials. In addition, Dr. Cui is also interested in developing various biosensors
and drug delivery systems. Dr. Cui is the member of McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine and
Center for Neural Basis of Cognition.
Moni Kanchan Datta
Research Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering, PhD (Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering), Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India (2003). Dr. Dattas research interests
focus on bone tissue engineering and renewable energy science. In the field of bone tissue engineering,
his research is focused on alloy design of biodegradable metallic biomaterials as well as synthesis of the

88

desired alloy using different equilibrium and non-equilibrium processing techniques with novel
microstructure for orthopedic and craniofacial applications. On the other hand, Dr. Dattas research on
electrochemical science is devoted on electrochemical biosensor, and energy generation and storage for
application in portable electronic devices as well as hybrid electric vehicles.
Lance Davidson
Associate Professor. Department of Bioengineering. PhD (Biophysics) University of California at
Berkeley; Postdoctoral fellowship in Biology and Cell Biology at the University of Virginia in
Charlottesville (1996-2004); American Cancer Society Postdoctoral Fellow (1999-2002); Research
Assistant Professor in Biology at University of Virginia in Charlottesville (2005). Dr. Davidsons
research integrates cell biology of adhesion and cell motility with tissue architecture and mechanics in
order to understand the role of mechanics in morphogenesis: how forces are patterned, generated, and
transmitted to bring about formation of tissues in the early developing embryo. Dr. Davidson has
pioneered techniques using microsurgery, high resolution time-lapse confocal microscopy, and a variety
of biomechanical test apparatus to observe and measure cells and tissues during morphogenesis in the
frog embryo. Ongoing projects in the lab involve: 1) measuring forces generated either internally by
cells and tissue explants or after applied strain, 2) observing and learning to modulate cellular responses
to a heterogeneous tissue environment, and 3) investigating the role of cell signaling, the cytoskeleton,
and the extracellular matrix during morphogenesis.
Richard E. Debski
Associate Professor, Bioengineering. PhD (Mechanical Engineering), University of Pittsburgh, 1997.
Dr. Debski's research interests include the experimental and computational examination of shoulder and
knee biomechanics. His current research projects include improving clinic exams for the diagnosis of
shoulder instability; examining the contributions of the osteoarticular surfaces and muscles to joint
stability; and the biomechanics of knee injuries in miners. Robotic technology and finite element models
are used to address these issues. The goal of this research is to improve injury prevention
equipment/criteria, surgical procedures and rehabilitation protocols for injuries to the soft tissues at the
shoulder and knee.
Dan Ding
Assistant Professor, Rehabilitation Science & Technology and Bioengineering. PhD (Mechanical and
Automation Engineering), The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2001. Dr. Ding performs her research
in the Human Engineering Research Laboratories (HERL) and is particularly interested in assistive
device instrumentation, wheelchair modeling, rehabilitation robotics, and virtual reality.
Andrew Duncan
Dr. Andrew Duncan joined the University of Pittsburgh in 2012 as Assistant Professor in the Department
of Pathology, Division of Experimental Pathology, and as a Core Faculty member at the McGowan
Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Research in the Duncan lab focuses on liver development,
homeostasis and regeneration. One of the defining features of the liver is polyploidy. Hepatocytes are
either mononucleated or binucleated, and ploidy is determined by the number of nuclei per cell as well
as the ploidy of each nucleus. The functional role of hepatic polyploidization is unclear. Dr. Duncan
recently showed that regenerating polyploid hepatocytes undergo specialized cell divisions to form
aneuploid daughter cells, generating a high degree of genetic diversity within the liver. Active studies in
the lab involve elucidating mechanisms that control hepatic polyploidy and aneuploidy, as well as how
these processes affect human disease. Dr. Duncan graduated from the University of North Carolina at
Chapel with a B.S. in Biology in 1996. He attended graduate school at Duke University where he earned
a Ph.D. in 2005. Dr. Duncans graduate work focused on hematopoietic stem cell biology in Dr.
Tannishtha Reyas laboratory in the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology. From 2005 to
2011, Dr. Duncan was a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Markus Grompes lab in the Oregon Stem Cell

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Center, Oregon Health and Science University. As a NIH National Research Service Award Fellow, he
investigated liver regeneration.
Shawn Farrokhi
Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy (Primary), Department of Bioengineering
(Secondary). PhD (Biokinesiology), University of Southern California, 2009. The primary focus of Dr.
Farrokhis research is to better understand the causes of lower extremity dysfunction and joint pathology.
More specifically, he is interested in identifying the factors responsible for altered patellofemoral joint
mechanics in persons with patellofemoral pain and osteoarthritis. The ultimate goal of this line of
research would be to provide the opportunity for early diagnosis of osteoarthritis in those at risk for
developing the disease, so early intervention can be implemented more effectively.
William J. Federspiel
Professor, Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering, and Critical Care Medicine. PhD (Chemical
Engineering), University of Rochester, 1983. Dr. Federspiel directs research in the Medical Devices
Laboratory: Biotransport, Pulmonary and Cardiovascular, which is a component of the McGowan
Institute for Regenerative Medicine. The goal of work within the laboratory is the design, development
and modeling of novel biotransport, pulmonary and cardiovascular medical devices including respiratory
support catheters and paracorporeal assist lungs, and membrane and particle based blood purification
devices. The major research interests in the laboratory include respiratory and cardiovascular fluid
mechanics, mass transport, and microfabrication and fiber technology. Ultimately, the devices and
therapies developed in the laboratory will be translated for near term clinical use in critical care settings.
Thomas R. Friberg
Professor, Ophthalmology and Bioengineering; Director of Retina Service. MD, University of
Minnesota, 1978. Research interests are in the areas of diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration,
retinal detachment, and retinal vein occlusion.
Joseph M. Furman
Professor, Otolaryngology, Neurology, Bioengineering, and Physical Therapy. PhD (Bioengineering),
University of Pennsylvania, 1979; MD, University of Pennsylvania, 1977. Director, Division of Balance
Disorders, The Eye & Ear Institute. As a member of the Graduate Faculty and former Assistant Dean for
the MD/PhD Program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Carnegie Mellon University,
Dr. Furman has a long history of mentoring developing physician scientists. Dr. Furmans primary
research areas are vestibular processing and vestibulo-ocular function in the elderly.
Neeraj J. Gandhi
Associate Professor, Otolaryngology and Bioengineering.
Affiliations with Departments of
Bioengineering and Neuroscience, and Center for Neural Basis of Cognition. PhD (Bioengineering),
joint between University of California, San Francisco and the University of California, Berkeley, 1997.
He completed his postdoctoral research in neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine and in 2002
joined the balance disorders research group in the Department of Otolaryngology. Dr. Gandhis research
uses systems-level neurophysiological and modeling techniques to investigate the neural control of
movement with emphases on eye, eye-head, and eye-hand movements.
Jin Gao
Visiting Research Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering; PhD Chinese Academy of
Sciences, 2000; Postdoctoral fellows at University of California at Berkeley and Georgia Institute of
Technology/Emory University. Before joining the Department of Bioengineering, Dr. Gao was a
research scientist in Department of Biomedical Engineering, GT/Emory. His research focuses on
biologically-derived Nano cells for tissue engineering and anti-cancer therapy.

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Jrg C. Gerlach
Professor, Departments of Surgery and Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Professor of
Experimental Surgery, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany. Dr. Gerlachs biomedical research
projects focused on artificial organs (e.g. trachea replacement), hybrid organs (e.g. endothelial cell
seeded vascular prostheses), and on bio-artificial systems (liver support systems for extracorporeal organ
regeneration. Dr. Gerlach developed an extracorporeal liver support system, and the Modular Liver
Support (MLS) concept that integrates dialysis and detoxification into hybrid liver devices. His primary
research interests include maintenance and differentiation of cells in vitro for extracorporeal, temporary
clinical use as a hybrid organ; production of cells for transplantation in cell-based therapy; production of
regenerative mediators by cells in bioreactors for drug therapy and regenerative medicine applications.
His primary focus has been the use of liver cells, but he and members of his research groups in both
Berlin and Pittsburgh, are also using skin-, bone marrow-, embryonic, and stem cells.
Thomas W. Gilbert
Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery and Bioengineering, McGowan Institute for Regenerative
Medicine. PhD (Bioengineering), University of Pittsburgh, 2006. Dr. Gilberts primary research interest
is the development of regenerative medicine approaches for treatment of injuries and diseases of the
respiratory system, particularly the trachea and lungs. Dr. Gilbert is also involved in the development
tissue engineered strategies for treatment of congenital heart defects. His research generally covers the
areas of biologic scaffolds and extracellular matrix biology, cell mechanobiology, and soft tissue
biomechanics.
Robert J. Goitz
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering. MD, Johns Hopkins University School
of Medicine, 1992. Dr. Goitz research focuses on orthopaedic surgery, upper extremity, biomechanics,
and compressive neuropathies.
Angela M. Gronenborn
UPMC Rosalind Franklin Professor and Chair, Department of Structural Biology, Distinguished
Professor of Structural Biology and Professor of Bioengineering; PhD (Organic Chemistry), University
of Cologne, Cologne, Germany, 1978. Areas of interest: Structural biology of proteins and nucleic
acids: structure, dynamics, recognition, binding, and function. Her laboratory combines NMR
spectroscopy and other structural methods with Biophysics, Biochemistry, and Chemistry to investigate
cellular processes at the molecular and atomic levels in relation to human disease.
Qiuhong He
Assistant Professor, Radiology and Bioengineering. PhD, (Chemistry) University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill, 1990. Dr. Hes research focuses on magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of cancer.
Alan Hirschman
Professor of Bioengineering; Co-Director, Center for Medical Innovation, Swanson School of
Engineering. PhD (Electrical Engineering/Biomedical Engineering) 1978, Carnegie Mellon University.
Fellow of the AIMBE. Before coming to the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Hirschman retired from a
career of 31 years in engineering, management, and business development at MEDRAD, Inc, a
developer of medical devices within the Bayer family of companies. He is an inventor of many of
MEDRADs core technologies, with 40+ US patents issued. He currently serves on the Board of
Directors of Thermal Therapeutic Systems, Inc. Dr. Hirschmans current interest is in medical product
development and educating new product entrepreneurs.

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David Hostler
Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine and Bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh. PhD
(physiology) from Ohio University. His research interests are in human performance and the
physiological responses of public safety personnel working in protective clothing. He is a founding
faculty member and the director of the Emergency Responder Human Performance Lab. In that role, he
directs studies to understand the stresses associated with emergency response and develops interventions
to improve the health and safety of the nations first responders. Dr Hostler is an expert in the area of
emergency incident rehabilitation with 24 years of experience in public safety. He has completed the
Fireground Rehab Evaluation (FIRE) Trial and the Enhanced Firefighter Rehab Trial (EFFoRT). He is
the principle investigator for the SHIELD Trial examining the role of statin drugs and cardiovascular
stress in firefighters.
Johnny Huard
Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery, Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Bioengineering. Director of the
Stem Cell Research Center. PhD (Neurobiology) Laval University, 1993. Dr. Huards research interests
include gene therapy and tissue engineering based on muscle-derived stem cells to improve tissue
regeneration. Dr. Huard has been named the Henry J. Mankin Endowed Chair in Orthopaedic Surgery
Research and is also Deputy Director for cellular therapy at the McGowan Institute for Regenerative
Medicine (MIRM) and an Associate Director of the Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative (PTEI). Dr.
Huard is co-founder of Cook MyoSite, Inc., a biotechnology company.
Tin-Kan Hung
Professor of Bioengineering and Civil & Environmental Engineering. PhD (Mechanics and Hydraulics),
University of Iowa, 1966. Dr. Hungs research activities have been focused on computational fluid
mechanics, peristaltic flows, fluid mechanics of heart valves, pulsating blood flows in stenotic arteries
and curved arteries, fluid mechanics of intra-aortic/intra-vena-cava balloon pumping, three-dimensional
spiral flows, microcirculation, biomechanics of spinal cord injury, membrane oxygenation, flow
separation and vortices, unsteady flow with moving boundaries, and earthquake hydrodynamics.
Theodore Huppert
Assistant Professor, Radiology and Bioengineering. PhD (Biophysics), Harvard University, 2007. Dr.
Huppert develops his research in the Magnetic Resonance Research Center in the Physiology of the
BOLD Effect. His research focuses on improving the understanding of the underlying physiology and
biomechanical principles that govern the cerebral hemodynamic response to neuronal signals.
Tamer S. Ibrahim
Associate Professor, Bioengineering and Radiology; Scientific Director of the 7T Research Program, and
Director of the RF Research Facility. PhD (Electrical and Computer Engineering), the Ohio State
University, 2003. Dr. Ibrahims research activities have mainly focused on the electromagnetic fields
interactions with biological tissues of ultrahigh field human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and
wireless biological sensor applications. Using computational electromagnetics and electromagnetic field
theory, Dr. Ibrahims research group designs/constructs/implements radiofrequency (RF) coils/antenna
arrays and techniques for 7 tesla human/animal MRI applications, brain-machine interfaces, intelligent
highway systems, and aircraft radomes.
Hiroshi Ishikawa
Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology and Bioengineering; Director, Ocular Imaging Center, UPMC Eye
Center. MD, Mie University (Japan), 1989. Ophthalmology Residency, Mie University, 1993.
Glaucoma Fellowship, Mie University, 1994; Glaucoma Research Fellowship, New York Eye & Ear
Infirmary, New York Medical College, 1996. Dr. Ishikawa's research interests include ocular imaging,
image processing/analysis, and surgical simulator development.

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Lawrence Kagemann
Research Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology (Primary) and Bioengineering (Secondary): MS
(Biomedical Engineering) University of Miami, 1986. Larry joined the Medical School faculty in 2005,
and the engineering faculty in 2006. His current research interests are centered on functional and
structural imaging of the eye, including hemodynamic and metabolic measurements. He is currently
working with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, expanding the applications of Doppler and
spectral imaging for the assessment of blood flow and oximetry in the retina, and has pioneered the first
non-invasive direct measurement of aqueous outflow in the anterior segment of the eye.
Pawel Kalinski
Professor of Surgery, Immunology and Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Director of Research of
the Division of Surgical Oncology and the Director of Immunotransplantation Center of the University
of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. MD: Medical University of Warsaw, Poland, 1990. PhD (Immunology):
University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 1998. Dr. Kalinski aims to develop effective immune
therapies of cancer and chronic infections. The research his group focuses on: 1) Development of
therapeutic vaccines with selectively-enhanced Th1-, CTL-, and NK cell-activating properties; 2)
Modulation of chemokine receptor expression on immune cells; 3) Tumor-selective modulation of local
chemokine environments to enhance local homing of immune effector cells and reduce the accumulation
of regulatory/suppressive cells in tumor tissues; and 4) counteracting tumor-associated (or chronic
infection-associated) immune dysfunction. Dr. Kalinskis work led to several current clinical trials of
new cancer immunotherapies developed in collaboration with other members of the UPCI.
Marina V. Kameneva
Research Professor, Surgery and Bioengineering, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine,
University of Pittsburgh. PhD (Mechanical Engineering), School of Mathematics and Mechanics,
Moscow State University, Moscow (former Soviet Union). After emigration to the United States, Dr.
Kameneva joined the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh as a visiting scientist of the Artificial Heart
and Lung Program and was appointed as a Research Assistant Professor of Surgery in 1996, as a
Research Associate Professor of Surgery in 2000 and as Research Professor of Surgery and
Bioengineering in 2006. Dr. Kameneva's areas of expertise are biorheology, hemorheology, macro and
microhemodynamics, drag-reducing polymers and their potential biomedical applications, and
mechanical blood trauma in artificial organs. She is the author of over 100 peer reviewed publications as
well as several book chapters in the areas of Fluid Mechanics and Biomechanics. Currently, as Director
of the Hemorheology, Hemodynamics and Artificial Blood Research Laboratory, Dr. Kameneva is
working with her research team on a variety of projects ranging from the testing of new medical devices
to performing theoretical and experimental research related to the development of next generation
artificial organs including artificial blood. She is a PI and Co-PI of many Federal and Private
Foundation grants. She serves on the editorial board of the ASAIO Journal since 1996. Dr. Kameneva
is an elected fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering since 2002. She is
an invited speaker at many International Conferences and Symposia. Dr. Kameneva developed a
pioneering research program related to elucidation of the mechanisms behind the beneficial effects of
drag-reducing polymers on blood circulation. Her translational research related to potential clinical
applications of DRPs is a collaborative effort with Drs. Russell, Pacella, Villanueva, Antaki, Patzer,
Waters, Roy and many other researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and other academic and
industrial organizations. Dr. Kameneva is a world-recognized specialist in the fields of Fluid Mechanics
and Biomechanics, particularly, in hemodynamics and hemorheology.
John Kellam
Professor, Critical Care Medicine and Bioengineering. Transplant physician in anesthesiology at the
Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute and co-director at the Mechanisms and Novel Therapies for
Resuscitation and Acute Illness (MANTRA) Lab. MD from the Medical College of Ohio at Toledo.

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1988. Dr. Kellums research interests span various aspects of Critical Care Medicine but center in
critical care nephrology (including acid-base and renal replacement therapy), sepsis and multi-organ
failure (including blood purification), and clinical epidemiology.
Pratap Khanwilkar
Visiting Professor and Coulter Program Director in the Department of Bioengineering, and
an Executive-In-Residence, Office of Technology Management. PhD Bioengineering (Utah), MBA
(Utah). Dr. Khanwilkar is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering.
As a serial medical device entrepreneur, he has started 6 medtech product/service companies, of which 3
are revenue-generating, one of which is a public company. He has taken a next-generation implantable
LVAD from concept to First-In-Human feasibility trials to a FDA IDE-approved trial in the US, with 7
issued US patents and related international patents. Dr. Khanwilkars translational research interests are
to help identify and develop potential medical therapies within Pittsburgh/UPMC to provide clinical and
commercial benefit achieved through licenses and licensing revenues, start-ups including business
financing obtained and jobs created, and ultimately revenue generated and patients served with improved
outcomes. Dr. Khanwilkar has numerous publications, serves on boards of several non-profit scientific,
clinical, and economic development organizations, and has received numerous university, state, national
and international awards and recognition for his accomplishments in innovation and entrepreneurship.
Kang Kim
Assistant Professor, Medicine and Bioengineering. PhD (Acoustics), Pennsylvania State University,
2002. Dr. Kims research involves the development of multi-modal functional imaging research in the
Center for Ultrasound Molecular Imaging and Therapeutics; high resolution 3D ultrasound elasticity
imaging; ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging; photoacoustic molecular imaging.
Seong-Gi Kim
Professor, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering. PhD (Physical Chemistry), Washington
University, St. Louis, MO. Dr. Kims research focuses on the development of in vivo NMR techniques
which provide information on function, physiology, and anatomy. The three critical issues in fMRI are
being investigated: The physiological basis of fMRI, the spatial specificity of fMRI, and the temporal
resolution of fMRI.
Judith Klein-Seetharaman
Associate Professor, Structural Biology, Pharmacology, and Bioengineering.
PhD (Biological
Chemistry), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2000. Dr. Klein-Seetharamans research involves
deriving hypotheses on the relationship between protein sequences and their structure, dynamics, and
function; with particular emphasis on membrane proteins.
Prashant Kumta
Edward R. Weidlein Professor of Engineering. PhD (Materials Science and Engineering), University of
Arizona, 1990. Dr. Kumtas research interests cover the two broad areas of energy storage and
biomaterials. The main focus of research in both these areas is to develop novel low temperature
approaches and study the relationships of the process parameters, the ensuing microstructure and
crystallographic structure to the electrochemical activity in the former and biological response in the
latter.
Mitra Lavasani
Dr. Lavasani is a research assistant professor at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University
of Pittsburgh. She received her Bachelor of Science in Molecular Biology at San Jose State University
and her M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh under the mentorship of Dr.
Johnny Huard. At the SCRC, her multidisciplinary research explores the use of muscle-derived stem

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cells (MDSCs) transplantation to enhance axonal/glial regeneration and provide functional recovery to
peripheral nervous system (PNS) injuries in murine experimental models. Her proposed stem cell-based
therapy concept is based upon the ability of transplanted stem cells to transform into specific tissue cell
types or to participate in the recovery process by reducing axonal degeneration and scar formation, while
promoting myelination. Her models evaluate th potential for MDSCs to adopt a Schwann cell (PNS
supporting cell) phenotype in vitro and in vivo, and examine their plasticity in response to environmental
cues to support nerve fiber regeneration and re-myelination. Dr. Lavasani is also working on
characterizing the role of aging using murine experimental models of genetically engineered mice with
dramatically shortened lifespan with age-related pathologies. Her goal is to use wild type MDSCstransplantation to delay or ameliorate the pathologies associated with aging using the mouse models of
progeroid ERCC1-XPF-deficient mice.
Charles Laymon
Research Assistant Professor, Radiology and Bioengineering.
PhD (Physics) University of
Pennsylvania, 1989. Dr. Laymon's research interests include imaging instrumentation for clinical and
research applications, algorithm and methods development, and basic science research. A current
project is to develop image reconstruction methods that make better use of the available data in Positron
Emission Tomography (PET). The goal of this research is to eliminate certain classes of problems
observed in PET images and to increase overall accuracy.
Sanford Leuba
Associate Professor, Cell Biology and Physiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Hillman
Cancer Center, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. PhD (Biochemistry and Biophysics), Oregon
State University, 1993. Dr. Leubas current research interests are the study of fundamental mechanisms
of transcription, DNA repair, and replication in the context of chromatin as revealed by home-built
single-molecule approaches. Dr. Leuba was a National Cancer Institute (NCI) Scholar in residence at
the NCI in Bethesda, MD, from 1998 to 2002 and joined the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh
School of Medicine in 2002.
Steven Little
Assistant Professor and Bicentennial Alumni Faculty Fellow, Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering,
and Immunology. PhD (Chemical Engineering) MIT, 2005. Dr. Little completed his postdoctoral
research in Bioengineering from MIT in 2006. Dr Little's research interests include controlled drug
delivery, biomaterial design, and biomimetics. Dr. Littles group consists of post-doctoral associations,
graduate, masters, and numerous undergraduate students in a wide array of areas including
Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering, Pharmaceutical Science, Chemistry, Immunology, and Physics.
Specifically, Dr. Little has active research programs in biomimetic delivery (mimicking living systems
using synthetic formulations) for regenerative medicine as well as immunotherapeutics.
Yang Liu
Yang Liu, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Bioengineering. PhD (Biomedical Engineering),
Northwestern University, 2006. Dr. Liu is engaged in the translational research, primarily in the
emerging interdisciplinary field of biomedical optical imaging and spectroscopy from tissue to cellular
and molecular level, involving optics, physics, electrical engineering, medicine and biology. Her
research interest focuses on development of quantitative phase microscopy for cancer detection and
surveillance, multi-modal spectroscopy/imaging technologies and endoscope-compatible devices for
real-time, in vivo diagnosis of early cancer. The ultimate goal is to translate novel optical technologies
into clinical practice and patient care.

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Michael T. Lotze
Professor, Departments of Surgery, Immunology, and Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh School
of Medicine; Vice Chair of Research, Department of Surgery; Associate Director for Strategic
Partnerships, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute; Assistant Vice Chancellor, UPSHS. Bachelor of
Biomedical Sciences and MD, Northwestern University (Evanston, Chicago), 1973, 1974. Dr. Lotze's
primary area of research is in tumor immunology, particularly the role of cellular therapy using dendritic
cells and NK cells. His current research interests include the further identification of clinical biomarkers
and surrogates in the setting of chronic inflammatory disease, the analysis and application of biomedical
instrumentation including multicolor flow cytometry, high content imaging of intracellular signaling in
response to cytokines, and the role of autophagy, the nuclear protein high molecular group B1 [HMGB1]
and other Damage Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules [DAMPs] in tissue injury, repair, and cancer.
Patrick J. Loughlin
William Kepler Whiteford Professor of Bioengineering, and Electrical Engineering. PhD (Electrical
Engineering), University of Washington (Seattle), 1992. Dr. Loughlin's research interests are in timevarying signals and systems and non-stationary signal processing applications in biomedical engineering
and acoustics. His current research involves the analysis and modeling of human postural control;
design of vibrotactile feedback for balance; pulse propagation in dispersive media; and propagationinvariant classification of underwater sounds.
Arash Mahboobin
Visiting Research Assistant Professor, Bioengineering. PhD (Electrical Engineering), University of
Pittsburgh, 2007. Dr. Mahboobin's research interests are in computational biomechanics
(musculoskeletal modeling), human postural control, time-varying signals and systems, and hybridoptimization. His current research involves in developing muscle-actuated forward dynamic simulations
of gait and posture, and analysis and modeling of human postural control.
Spandan Maiti
Assistant Professor, Bioengineering. PhD (Aerospace Engineering), University of Illinois, 2002.
Research interests include computational mechanics and materials science, multiscale and multiphysics
techniques applied to physical and biological systems, deformation and failure response of biomimetic
materials, hierarchical materials and systems.
Zhi-Hong Mao
Associate Professor of Electrical/Computer Engineering and Bioengineering. PhD (Electrical and
Medical Engineering), Harvard University-Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Health
Sciences and Technology, 2005. Dr. Maos research interests include neural control and learning,
human-in-the-loop control systems, and networked control systems.
Kacey G. Marra
Associate Professor, Departments of Surgery and Bioengineering. PhD (Organic Chemistry), University
of Pittsburgh, 1996. Dr. Marra's current research interests include biomaterials and tissue engineering.
Dr. Marra is Co-Director of the Adipose Stem Cell Center, and as such, much of her research is focused
on adipose-derived stem cell behavior. Her research has a strong focus in nerve regeneration, and many
in her group both design novel polymeric nerve conduits as well as differentiate adult stem cells to
neural and glial progenitor cells. Of specific interest is the use of both polymer microspheres and
hydrogels for controlled drug and growth factor delivery.
James Menegazzi
Research Professor, Emergency Medicine and Bioengineering. PhD (Exercise Physiology), University
of Pittsburgh, 1987. Dr. Menegazzi is Director of the Research for the Center for Emergency Medicine

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and Editor-in-Chief of Prehospital Emergency Care. His pioneering basic science work involves the
development of protocols for improving cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Other research interests include
emergency medical services, heart arrest, induced hypothermia, reperfusion injury, resuscitation, and
ventricular fibrillation.
Mark Miller
Associate Research Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science and
Bioengineering. PhD (Applied Mechanics), University of Michigan, 1990. Director, Orthopaedic
Biomechanics Laboratory, Allegheny General Hospital. The Biomechanics Laboratory broadly supports
all areas of orthopaedic surgical intervention. Current topics of research include investigations of the
mechanical behavior of all structures in the human elbow and the relationship of carpal metacarpal
arthroplasty to radial and ulnar deviation strength.
Pamela Moalli
Associate Professor; Director of Fellowship in Urogynecology and Female Pelvic Medicine; Division of
Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and
Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Hospital and University of Pittsburgh; Investigator, MageeWomens Research Institute. Dr. Moalli graduated from the NIH sponsored Medical Scientist Training
Program at Northwestern University in 1994. She had earned a PhD in molecular and cellular biology
and a medical degree over a period of 8 years. Residency: Obstetrics and Gynecology at MageeWomens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh (1994-1998). From 1998 to 2000 she completed a
fellowship in Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery at the same institution. Dr. Moallis
NIH-supported research focuses on the effect of menopause on connective tissue remodeling in the
vagina and supportive tissues. In addition, Dr. Moalli studies mechanisms of maternal birth injury using
both rodent and nonhuman primate models. Finally, she is involved in several projects focusing on the
development of improved graft materials for use in reconstructive pelvic surgeries. Her research team is
highly interdisciplinary involving members of the Center for Biological Imaging, the Department of
Engineering, the Department of Regenerative Medicine and the Division of Urogynecology.
Michael Modo
Associate Professor in Radiology and Bioengeering, as well as core faculty in the McGowan Institute for
Regenerative Medicine. Mike Modo obtained a PhD in Neuroscience from King's College London
(United Kingdom) in 2001 and moved to the University of Pittsburgh in 2011. The main research
interests of the Regenerative Imaging Laboratory consist of four areas. Firstly, we aim to understand the
neuroanatomical basis of behavior. We are especially interested in how damage to the brain causes
changes in behaviors. For analysis, we use batteries of behavioral tests, as well as non-invasive imaging,
such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Secondly, we intend to repair brain damage by implantation
of neural stem cells and are also developing in situ tissue engineering strategies (i.e. combining multiple
types of cells with biomaterials). Thirdly, we are developing non-invasive imaging strategies that allow
us to visualize the location and survival of implanted cells, but will also afford the in vivo monitoring of
the replacement of brain tissue. Lastly, we plan to integrate the analysis of the cytoarchitectural
organization of the brain by histology with post-mortem MRI. The hope is that these research directions
will eventually lead to better therapies for patients with stroke, Huntington's, and Parkinson's disease.
Volker Musahl
Assistant Professor, Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering. MD, Albert-Ludwigs
University, Freiburg, Germany, 1998. Dr. Musahl specializes in sports medicine; he provides
comprehensive care of injuries to the knee, shoulder, elbow, hip, and ankle.

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Martin Oudega
Assistant Professor, Departments of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Neurobiology and
Bioengineering. PhD (Medical Biology), University of Leiden, Leiden, the Netherlands (1990). Dr.
Oudega completed postdoctoral fellowships in Neurobiology at the University of California at San
Diego, La Jolla, California and at the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis at the University of Miami School
of Medicine, Miami, Florida. He was an assistant professor in Neurological Surgery at the University of
Miami School of Medicine and in Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr.
Oudega was the director of the Animal Injury and Repair laboratory at the International Center for
Spinal Cord Injury at The Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, Maryland. Currently, Dr. Oudega is
directing the Spinal Cord Repair Laboratory that investigates the efficacy of cellular transplants, alone or
in combination with axon growth-supporting interventions, to elicit anatomical and/or functional
restoration after spinal cord injury. The overall goal of Dr. Oudegas laboratory is to develop spinal cord
repair strategies for translation into the clinic.
John F. Patzer II
Associate Professor, Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering. PhD (Chemical Engineering, Fluid
Mechanics), Stanford University, 1980. Dr. Patzer's research interests are in the application of transport
phenomena and reaction engineering in support of biomedical bioartificial organ development and
replacement. Dr. Patzer is active in development of both artificial (non-cell-based detoxification) and
bioartificial (hepatocyte-based) liver support systems for patients with acute liver failure. He is
collaborating with physicians at the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute in clinical evaluation of
bound solute dialysis (artificial liver) to support patients with acute renal failure post-transplant. Other
interests include renal failure therapies, artificial pancreas, and skin regeneration.
Jay W. Pettegrew
Professor and Director of Neurophysics Laboratory, (Psychiatry Department). MD, University of
Illinois, 1969. Dr. Pettegrews research interests are focused on using NMR and MRI technology,
specializing in the molecular events underlying normal brain development and aging and how these
events are altered in diseases such Alzheimers, autism schizophrenia and major depressive illness. He
also is investigating the molecular similarities and differences of dementia in Alzheimers, alcoholics
and schizophrenic subjects. These studies are designed to investigate the molecular specificity of the
findings. An imaging molecule has been designed by Dr. Pettegrew, which will image the earliest
molecular alterations that occurs in Alzheimer disease. This MRI based biomarker will allow the
detection of molecular changes in Alzheimers disease even decades before the onset of symptoms. Dr.
Pettegrew has been a NIH reviewer for over 20 years and has been a member NIH study section since
1984 and has chaired a study section. He has been continuously funded by NIH since 1985.
Julie A. Phillippi
Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (primary appointment) and Bioengineering (secondary
appointment). PhD (Biological Sciences), Carnegie Mellon University, 2005. Dr. Phillippis research
scope broadly encompasses cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) dynamics in cardiovascular diseases. One
focus of her work is the role of oxidative stress on ECM homeostasis in bicuspid aortic valve-associated
aortopathy. Of particular interest to Dr. Phillippi is the presence of local progenitor cells within distinct
microenvironments of the aorta and their contribution to the development and progression of
cardiovascular pathologies. Dr. Phillippis projects are carried out using human aortic tissue specimens
and cell populations isolated from surgical patients of the Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease at the
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Phillippi and her colleagues within the Thoracic Aortic
Disease Research Laboratory are working to characterize the influence of distinct cell populations within
the ascending aorta and the role of oxidative stress pathways on aortic wall architecture, strength and
propensity for aortic disease. Dr. Phillippi is affiliated faculty of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative
Medicine and the Center for Vascular Remodeling and Regeneration.

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Rosa Lynn Pinkus


Professor of Medicine/Neurosurgery; Associate Director, Center for Bioethics and Health Law and
Director, Consortium Ethics Program University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Pinkus earned her PhD (1975) from
the State University of New York at Buffalo and joined the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh
School of Medicine in 1980. She taught applied ethics for over thirty years in both the Schools of
Medicine and Engineering. Supported by funds from the Whitaker Foundation, she developed both the
required graduate and undergraduate courses in Bioethics in the Department. Rosa Lynn is lead author of
the book, Engineering Ethics: Balancing Cost, Risk and Schedules: Lessons Learned from the Space
Shuttle (Cambridge University Press, 1997) and co-author, with Mark Kuczewski, of An Ethics
Casebook for Hospitals: Practical Approaches to Everyday Ethics (Georgetown University Press, 1999).
Currently she serves as an ethics consultant for an NIH National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Phase I and Phase II Science Education Partnership Award entitled: If a Starfish can grow and Arm, Why
Cant I? This project extends Rosa Lynns commitment to applying state of the art professional ethics to
both the everyday practice of professionals and to the broader society.
Michael R. Pinsky
Professor of Critical Care Medicine, Bioengineering, Cardiovascular Disease, Anesthesiology and
Clinical & Translational Science. Program Director, NRSA Training Program. MD (Critical Care
Medicine), McGill University, Montreal, 1974. Current research interests: heart-lung interactions,
hemodynamic monitoring, left and right ventricular function, blood flow distribution, molecular
mechanisms in sepsis, complexity modeling of disease, management of shock, medical education, and
health services research.
Bruce R. Pitt
Professor and Chairman, Department of Environmental & Occupational Health, The Graduate School of
Public Health; Professor of Pharmacology and Bioengineering. PhD (Environmental Physiology), The
Johns Hopkins University, 1977. Dr. Pitts laboratory efforts are directed towards original studies on the
molecular and cellular biology of lung. To date, this work has focused primarily on the role of oxidants
and nitric oxide in affecting pulmonary endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell function. Isolated
primary cell cultures, genetically modified murine models and somatic gene transfer to lung have been
used as model systems to identify the role of partially reduced oxygen and nitrogen species in the
response of the lung to stress and injury.
Jiantao Pu
Assistant Professor, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering. PhD (Computer Science), Peking
University, 2002. Dr. Pu' research interests lie at the interface between computer science and
biomedicine with a special focus on biomedical image analysis, biomedical informatics, computer-aided
detection/diagnosis, computer graphics and vision, machine learning, and human-computer interaction.
His research goal is to develop innovative techniques that may lead to profound discoveries in both the
computing and biomedical fields and advance the understanding of underlying mechanism of various
biomedical problems through imaging.
Yongxian Qian
Assistant Professor in Radiology and Bioengineering, PhD (Biomedical engineering), Huazhong
University of Science and Technology, 2002. Dr. Qian's research interests include two main areas.
Technological development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences and image
reconstructions, with a special emphasis on fast imaging with spiral or parallel acquisitions at ultrashort
echo time (UTE), is the focus of the first research area. The second research area focuses on the clinical
applications of UTE MR imaging to the detection and treatment monitoring of knee osteoarthritis and
brain tumors via proton (1H) or sodium (23Na) imaging, and to the study on therepeutic mechnism of
Chinese acupuncture. One of the UTE pulse sequences has been patented in United States and used in

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multiple research projects such as the evaluation of degenerative or injured cartilages in the knee and
brain tumors. Dr. Qian and colleagues have developed and continue to develop novel MR imaging
techniques for clinical use.
Mark S. Redfern
Professor, Bioengineering, Otolaryngology, and Rehabilitation Science. Associate Dean for Research,
Swanson School of Engineering. PhD (Bioengineering), University of Michigan, 1988. Dr. Redfern's
research is focused in: human movement biomechanics, postural control, and ergonomics. The major
goal of his postural research is the prevention of falling injuries by investigating the factors that
influence balance, particularly in the elderly. He also studies vestibular disorders, their impact on
postural control, and methods of vestibular rehabilitation. His research approach is to develop an
understanding of the postural control system towards better identification of balance problems, and then
to use this knowledge to develop new interventions or rehabilitation methods. Dr. Redfern also does
applied research in fall prevention through design of the home and work environment. He consults with
industry on ergonomics and workplace design for the prevention of musculoskeletal injuries.
Anne Robertson
Associate Professor, Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering. PhD, University of
California Berkeley. Dr. Robertson is active in research and teaching in continuum mechanics, with
particular emphasis on Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid dynamics, cerebral vascular disease, and
constitutive modeling of soft biological tissues.
Partha Roy
Associate Professor, Bioengineering and Pathology. PhD (Biomedical Engineering) University of Texas
Southwestern Medical Center; Postdoctoral fellowships in Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School and
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Roys laboratory studies cell migration, tumor
metastasis, angiogenesis, phosphoinositide signaling and protein-protein interactions using various cell
biology, biochemistry, microscopic imaging and in vivo techniques.
J. Peter Rubin
Chief of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Associate Professor, Bioengineering.
MD, Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Rubin is a noted expert on adult stem cells derived from
fat tissue and body contouring surgery. He leads a program that is devising innovative strategies for the
use of adipose (fat)-derived stem cells to not only address problems of tissue regeneration but also other
diseases that benefit from stem cell-based therapies. In addition, Dr. Rubin is Director of the UPMC Life
after Weight Loss Program, a leading center for plastic surgery after weight loss. He is co-director of the
Adipose Stem Cell Center and co-director of the UPMC Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Center. His
laboratory research focuses on applications of adult adipose-derived stem cells for restoring damaged
tissues after trauma and cancer therapy. He currently is the lead investigator for clinical trials using
technologies designed to improve the lives of wounded military personnel.
Guy Salama
Guy Salama, PhD, is a Professor within the Department of Cell Biology and Physiology at the
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Dr. Salama holds a B.S. in Physics (1968) from the City
College of New York and a M.S. in Physics (1971) from the University of Pennsylvania. In 1997, he was
awarded his Ph.D. in Biophysics from the University of Pennsylvania. Currently, at the University of
Pittsburgh, Dr. Salama is actively involved in both academics and research, and has focused his efforts
on the elucidation of the mechanisms responsible for the initiation and termination of cardiac
arrhythmias. Within his laboratory, Dr. Salama has been diligently working toward the elucidation of the
mechanisms responsible for the initiation and termination of cardiac arrhythmias. An important step
towards that end is to better understand the electrophysiology and function of the normal mammalian

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heart. To achieve these goals, Dr. Salama and his research personnel have developed the use of voltagesensitive dyes and high temporal and spatial resolution optical techniques to map patterns of action
potential (AP) propagation and repolarization. Currently, these novel methods are being used to elucidate
the mechanisms that generate spatial heterogeneities of AP durations and the interplay between
dispersion of repolarization (DOR) and anisotropic conduction velocities (CV).
Joseph T. Samosky
Associate Professor, Departments of Anesthesiology and Bioengineering. PhD (Medical Engineering)
from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and
Technology (2002) with clinical education at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Samosky is the director of
the Simulation and Medical Technology R&D Center, an interdisciplinary research and education center
whose primary mission is to invent next-generation enabling technologies for simulation-based
healthcare training and new medical devices. His research focuses on user-centric design and
engineering of real-time interactive systems that enhance learning, improve patient care and enhance
patient safety. He has a strong interest in simulation, human-computer interfaces, sensor systems,
advanced perceptual display technologies (including augmented reality display), biomimetic materials,
3D fabrication techniques, and robotic systems, including actuators and embedded control systems. He
is the co-developer of the Combat Medic Training System (COMETS), an autonomous, tetherless,
humanoid robotic trauma patient that supports field training in casualty care. Dr. Samosky is an
enthusiastic advocate of hands-on engineering and design education and has mentored over 40
bioengineering students in senior design projects over the past three years. He is currently developing a
course and supporting laboratory space to enable students to explore and learn multidisciplinary,
prototype-based system design and engineering.
Andrew J. Schaefer
Wellington C. Carl Fellow, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering, Bioengineering and Medicine.
PhD (Industrial and Systems Engineering), Georgia Tech 2000. Dr. Schaefer's research interests are in
stochastic optimization. In particular, he is working in building physiologically accurate models of
disease progression in end-stage liver disease, HIV and sepsis. Furthermore, he is applying stochastic
optimization techniques to find best treatment plans for these diseases.
Gerald Schatten
Professor, Obstetrics, Gynecology, & Reproductive Sciences, and Bioengineering; Director, Pittsburgh
Development Center (PDC); Endowed Professor and Vice Chair of; Professor of Cell Biology &
Physiology. PhD (Cell & Developmental Biology), University of California, Berkeley, 1975. Dr.
Schatten explores the molecular biology of cell function-- in gametes, embryos, stem cells,
maternal/fetal efficacy of assisted reproduction technologies, the origins of developmental diseases, the
causes and prevention of adverse pregnancy outcomes and the potential of stem cells for treating human
disease. Among its other strengths, the PDC is emerging as a world center for the study of stem cells,
precursor cells with the ability to grow into any tissue and the ability to treat a variety of human diseases.
Joel S. Schuman
Eye and Ear Foundation Professor and Chair of Ophthalmology, Professor of Bioengineering; Director,
UPMC Eye Center. MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 1984. Ophthalmology Residency, Medical
College of Virginia, 1988; Glaucoma Fellowship, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear
Infirmary, 1990. Dr. Schuman is an inventor of optical coherence tomography, the most rapidly adopted
technology in ophthalmology.
Dr. Schumans research interests include technology
development, imaging of the eye, laser-tissue interactions, aqueous outflow, and clinical pharmacology.

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David E. Schmidt
Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology and Bioengineering. PhD (Computational Mechanics), Carnegie
Mellon University, 2009. Dr. Schmidts research interests include middle ear pressure regulation, Otis
Media, biodegradable metallic alloys and soft tissue mechanics. Research activities focus on
computational-based methods to characterize soft tissue biomechanics as an integrated component of
novel medical device development and clinical interventions for biomedical applications. A current
research focus is the development of a physiologically consistent mathematical model of trans middle
ear mucosa gas exchange that has the potential to explain physiologic processes under normal and
pathological conditions. Through such predictive modeling and simulation we seek to enhance our
understanding of middle ear pressure regulation, which is central to the advancement of Otis Media
clinical intervention. A second research area involves the establishment of design specifications and
performance requirements for a new class of bio-absorbable metallic trachea stenting devices.
Andrew B. Schwartz
Professor, Neurobiology and Bioengineering; Director of the Motorlab at The McGowan Institute for
Regenerative Medicine. PhD (Physiology), University of Minnesota, 1984. Dr. Schwartz research is
centered on two aspects of motor control cerebral mechanisms of volitional arm movement and cortical
control of neural prosthetics. He uses electrode arrays to record action potentials from populations of
individual neurons in motor cortical areas while monkeys perform tasks related to reaching and drawing.
A number of signal-processing and statistical analyses are performed on these data to extract movementrelated information from the recorded activity.
Charles Sfeir
Assistant Professor, Departments of Oral Medicine, Pathology, and Bioengineering. DDS (Dental
Surgery) The Universit Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg France, 1990.
PhD (Molecular
Biology/Biochemistry) Northwestern University, 1996. Dr. Sfeir is actively involved in research
focusing on two major topics: (1) Role of extracellular matrix in tissue engineering and
biomineralization (2) The use of bioceramic nanoparticles in non-viral DNA gene delivery.
Additionally, Dr. Sfeir and his research team in collaboration with Dr. Kumta, are focused on molecular
biology and are concentrating on the development of ceramic nano-particles for non-viral gene therapy
vectors mainly to be utilized in bone regeneration and other tissues.
Sanjeev G. Shroff
Professor and Gerald McGinnis Chair in Bioengineering, Professor of Medicine, Senior Investigator,
Magee-Womens Research Institute, and Core Faculty, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine.
PhD (Bioengineering), University of Pennsylvania, 1981. Dr. Shroff's research interests include three
main areas. An evaluation of the relationships between left ventricular mechano-energetic function and
underlying cellular processes, with a special emphasis on contractile and regulatory proteins, is the focus
of the first research area. Whole heart, isolated muscle, and single cell experiments are performed using
various animal models, including transgenic mice. The second research area focuses on the role of
pulsatile arterial load (vascular stiffness in particular) in cardiovascular function. One of the hypotheses
being investigated is that aberrant vascular stiffness changes are involved in the genesis of certain
cardiovascular pathologies (e.g., preeclampsia, isolated systolic hypertension in elderly). Novel
noninvasive measurement techniques are used to conduct longitudinal human studies, which are
complimented by in-vivo and in-vitro vascular and cardiac studies with animal models. The role of
regional contraction asynchrony in global ventricular mechanics and energetics is being investigated in
the third research area. Dr. Shroff and colleagues have developed and continue to develop novel,
simulation-based material (i.e., mathematical models of biological systems and associated "virtual
experiments") for education and engineering design.

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Ian A. Sigal
Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology and Bioengineering. PhD (Mechanical Engineering in Biomedical
Engineering Collaborative Program), 2006, University of Toronto; MASc (Aerospace Engineering),
2001, University of Toronto; BSc (Physics), 1999, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Dr.
Sigal joined the University of Pittsburgh on October 2010 and started the Laboratory of Ocular
Biomechanics (www.ocularbiomechanics.org). The main goal of the lab is to help understand the causes
and consequences of the differences in biomechanics between individuals. Current efforts are focused
on understanding glaucoma and, more specifically, why some people lose vision due to glaucoma while
others do not. This involves projects to predict and measure the short and long-term effects of altered
intraocular pressure and the ability of an eye to adapt to changing conditions.
Mark Simon
Dr. Simon is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation
Section. Previously Dr. Marc Simon was a Clinical Associate at the McGowan Institute for
Regenerative Medicine and was also an Attending Physician at the Heart Failure and Cardiac
Transplantation Section in the Cardiovascular Institute at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Simon
graduated from The University of Pennsylvania with a degree in Engineering and Bioengineering in
1994 and went on to receive his MD from the University of Maryland. He has completed Fellowships in
Cardiology and Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
in the Cardiovascular Institute. Dr. Marc Simon is finishing up his MS degree in Bioengineering and
Clinical Research also at the University of Pittsburgh and a NRSA Research Fellowship at the University
of Pittsburgh in the Departments of Bioengineering and Critical Care Medicine.
Richard C. Simpson
Assistant Professor. Departments of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences and Bioengineering. PhD
(Bioengineering), University of Michigan, 1997. Dr. Simpson's areas of expertise include assistive
technology for people with disabilities, human-computer interaction and rehabilitation robotics. His
research interests include modeling the interaction between users and assistive technology, smart
wheelchairs and cognitive orthotics.
Matthew Smith
Assistant Professor, Department of Ophthalmology and Bioengineering. PhD (Neural Science), New
York University, 2003. Between 2003 and 2010, Dr. Smith conducted postdoctoral research at Carnegie
Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Smith's research is aimed at understanding how
our visual perception of the world is constructed from the activity of populations of neurons. His
laboratory employs neurophysiological and computational approaches to this problem. He is also
interested in applications of his research to the problems of vision restoration and neural prosthetics.
Gwendolyn Sowa
Assistant Professor, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Bioengineering. PhD (Biochemistry),
University of Wisconsin at Madison, 1997; MD University of Wisconsin at Madison, 2000. Dr. Sowa is
currently conducting molecular level research on disc and spine deterioration and the mechanisms of
back pain. She is Co-Director of the Ferguson Laboratory for Orthopaedic Research, and has an active
research program investigating the role of mechanical forces in disc degeneration. Dr Sowa is an award
winning researcher and has presented her findings at international conferences and symposia.
Patrick J. Sparto
Associate Professor, Physical Therapy, Bioengineering, and Otolaryngology. PhD (Biomedical
Engineering), Ohio State University, 1998. Dr. Spartos primary research interests include the combined
effects of aging and vestibular disease on postural control in an effort to reduce the risk of falling in

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older adults. He is currently investigating how neuroimaging markers of brain decline affect mobility
performance in older adults.
George D. Stetten
William Kepler Whiteford Professor of Bioengineering and Research Professor, Robotics Institute. MD,
State University of New York, Health Science Center at Syracuse, 1991; PhD (Biomedical Engineering),
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1999. Dr. Stettens current research interests include
image-guided surgery using a device he invented called the Sonic Flashlight, and various adaptations of
the underlying principle of in-situ image guidance. In addition he is developing image analysis
techniques for automated identification and measurement of anatomical structures, based on a new
framework called Shells-and-Spheres. He is developing a technology called FingerSight for the vision
impaired, which involves fingertip video cameras linked to vibratory stimulators. He is also developing
a new type of surgical tool that magnifies the sense of touch, enabling the surgeon to feel forces during
delicate procedures. His teaching efforts include the development of a new open-standard testing
format, enabling instructors to create and score their own multiple choice exams, called LaTeX OpenFormat Testing (LOFT) and a student-built electronics instrumentation package called the PittKit.
Mingui Sun
Professor, Departments of Neurological Surgery, Bioengineering, and Electrical & Computer
Engineering. PhD (Electrical Engineering), University of Pittsburgh, 1989. Dr. Sun's research interests
include biomedical sensors and instruments, implantable devices, image and video processing,
neuroengineering, and electrophysiological signals such as EEG and MEG. His is currently investigating
implantable devices for the brain, telemedicine, brain-computer interface, and development of electronic
systems for overweight and obesity evaluation.
Juan Taboas
Assistant professor in Oral Biology at the School of Dental Medicine and the McGowan Institute for
Regenerative Medicine, secondary appointment in Bioengineering. PhD (Biomedical Engineering),
University of Michigan, 2004. Dr. Taboas works to create skeletal and craniofacial tissue regeneration
therapies through study of normal tissue development and degenerative disease progression in
engineered microtissue models. His laboratory is located in the McGowan Center for Craniofacial
Regeneration at the School of Dental Medicine. The lab investigates how the local cellular
microenvironment (e.g. growth factors, mechanical forces, and signaling molecules) regulates
mesenchymal stem cell and primary cell metabolism and differentiation into skeletal tissues. Work is
underway to create microstructured growth plate-like cartilage to treat growth plate injury, skeletal
dysplasia and complex bone. Dr. Taboas is interested in the role of growth factor gradients, G proteincoupled receptor signaling, and blood vessel derived factors on cartilage cell function. He is also
interested in biomedical device design, developing photo-patterning methods, polymeric scaffolds, and
microfluidic bioreactors to manipulate the cellular microenvironment and fabricate multiphasic tissues
for drug testing and therapy development. Dr. Taboas has a record of multi-disciplinary research,
collaboration, and training, including mentoring of bioengineering graduate students and residents.
Changfeng Tai
Dr. Tais research interests include: (a). Develop new strategies to treat overactive bladder symptoms by
combining electrical neuromodulation and pharmacological treatment. The goal of this project is to find
new treatments for overactive bladder symptoms that are less invasive and highly effective with minimal
side effect. (b). Design and develop novel neural prosthetic devices to restore urinary functions after
spinal cord injury. Research interests are focused on the control of bladder and sphincter using electrical
nerve stimulation. One of the goals for this research project is to restore the functions for urine storage
and elimination after spinal cord injury. Two urological problems need to be solved for people with
spinal cord injury: 1. how to inhibit the bladder overactivity during urine storage to prevent frequent

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incontinence; 2. how to inhibit tonic contraction of urethral sphincter during voiding to completely
eliminate urine; (c). Computer simulation and modeling analysis of electrical nerve stimulation. This
project is aimed at understanding the mechanisms and biophysics of nerve response to extracellular
electrical stimulation. It is focused on how to design the stimulation electrodes and stimulation
waveforms to either excite or block the nerve using electrical current. The results from this project could
significantly improve the design of neural prosthetic devices for restoring functions after neurological
disorders.
Tatum Tarin
Dr. Tatum Tarin is an assistant professor in the Department of Urology at the University of Pittsburgh
Medical Center. His sub specialty is urologic oncology. Prior to this he was a clinical instructor and chief
fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Dr. Tarin earned his bachelor of
science at Revelle College, University of California San Diego. He then achieved his medical degree at
the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He did an internship and residency in surgery as well as
a residency in urology at Stanford University Medical Center, where he became chief resident in
urology. Dr. Tarin is a member of the Society of Urology Oncology, the Endourological Society, the
American Urologic Association, and the Thai Physicians Association of America. He currently has six
patents pending. He has participated grants to study "Dynamic Urethral Slings" as well as "Pathology
Fundamentals for Urology Residents."
Scott Tashman
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery, Bioengineering, and Mechanical Engineering; Director,
Biodynamics Laboratory. PhD (Mechanical Engineering), Stanford University, 1992. Dr. Tashman has
developed unique instrumentation for analyzing in vivo, dynamic function of human joints. His research
focuses on the characterization, treatment and repair of joint soft tissue injuries and mechanical factors
that drive the development and progression of chronic musculoskeletal conditions such as osteoarthritis
and degenerative disk disease. Dr. Tashman's work crosses many bioengineering disciplines, including
kinematics/dynamics of human movement, medical imaging, musculoskeletal modeling and
instrumentation design. The Biodynamics Laboratory operates at the crossroads between the lab and the
clinic; most projects involve multidisciplinary teams of engineers, biologists and clinicians to address
pressing orthopaedic problems.
Kimimasa Tobita
Research Assistant Professor, Developmental Biology, Pediatrics, and Bioengineering at the University
of Pittsburgh; Director of Rangos Research Center Animal Imaging Core, Children's Hospital of
Pittsburgh of UPMC. MD, Tokushima University, School of Medicine, Japan, 1989. Dr. Tobita
completed general Pediatrics fellowship and worked as a clinical instructor/teaching assistant in the
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Heart Institute of Japan. He came to the United States in 1997 and
worked in the Department of Pediatrics as a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Rochester
in Rochester, NY and at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY. Dr. Tobita's research interests
include cardiomyocyte differentiation from muscle derived stem cells using 3D cardiac gel bioreactor,
development of tissue engineered cardiac muscle graft, cardiovascular physiology/biomechanics of fetal
circulation and congenital heart diseases, small animal imaging using high-resolution ultrasound, microCT/PET, and micro-MRI.
Gelsy Torres-Oviedo
Dr. Torres-Oviedo joined the Faculty in the Bioengineering Department at the University of Pittsburgh
in January 2012. She is also Faculty at the Centre for the Neural Basis of Cognition. Dr. Torres-Oviedo
obtained her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering in 2007 at The Georgia Institute of Technology and
Emory University. She trained as a postdoctoral fellow at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine until
December 2011. Dr. Torres-Oviedo's work is focused on motor adaptation of locomotion and balance

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control in humans considering both the plasticity of the brain and the role of biomechanics in movement.
She is particularly interested in the adaptability of muscle coordination during motor learning tasks,
especially in patients with cortical lesions. Dr. Torres-Oviedo is also very interested in understanding
factors that determine the generalization of motor learning acquired on devices, like robots or treadmills,
to natural movements. To quantify the human behavior Dr. Torres-Oviedo utilizes kinematic and kinetic
recordings, factorization analysis of electromyografic signals, and neurological testing. Results from her
research are of potential interest to clinicians and researchers in rehabilitation robotics interested in using
technological devices to improve movements in patients with motor disorders.
Rocky S. Tuan
Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering. PhD (1977) from Rockefeller University, NY.
Rocky Tuan, PhD, a world-renowned expert in stem cell biology and tissue engineering, has been
appointed the founding director of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicines newly established
Center for Cellular and Molecular Engineering in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. For more
than 30 years, Dr. Tuan has studied the workings of the musculoskeletal system and its diseases,
including cartilage development and repair, cell signaling and matrix biochemistry, stem cell biology,
nanotechnology, and many other orthopaedically relevant topics.
Robert Turner
Associate Professor, Neurobiology and Bioengineering. PhD (Cellular and Molecular Biology),
University of Washington, 1991. Dr. Turner earned his PhD at the University of Washington and
worked as a Post Doc at Emory University under the direction of Dr. Mahlon R. DeLong (Neurology and
Movement Disorders). Dr. Turners research focuses on the basal ganglia and cortex in health and
disease and neural interfaces (e.g., deep brain stimulation) for the treatment of movement disorders. He
studies the spiking activity of multiple single neurons in monkeys trained to perform operant movement
tasks in order to examine changes in the relationship between neuronal activity and behavior across the
induction of disease states and their manipulation by deep brain stimulation therapy. Using this
approach, Dr. Turners research seeks to understand the neuronal mechanisms that produce symptoms in
diseases such as Parkinsons disease and to improve the efficacy of neural interface therapies for those
diseases.
Elizabeth Tyler-Kabara
Assistant Professor, Neurological Surgery and Bioengineering. MD/PhD (Molecular Physiology and
Biophysics) Vanderbilt University, 1997. Specialized areas of interest: Cerebral palsy; spasticity;
dystonia; movement disorders; pediatric spinal disorders. Dr. Tyler-Kabara directs the Neural
Enhancement Laboratory in the Department of Neurological Surgery. Current research projects in this
laboratory include stem cell therapies in the treatment of both adult and pediatric traumatic brain injury.
Current collaborations with the department of Bioengineering include exploring various techniques for
improving neuronal electrode interfaces.
Alberto Vazquez
Visiting Assistant Professor, Radiology and Bioengineering. PhD (Biomedical Engineering), University
of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2005. Research interests of Dr. Vazquez include investigating the role and
properties of dynamic neuro-vascular and neuro-metabolic couplings in normal brain function, as well as
the impact of pathologies, such as stroke and neuro-degeneration, on these processes using optical (twophoton microscopy, fluorescence microscopy), magnetic resonance and electrophysiological methods.
Oleg I. Velikokhatnyi
Research Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering. PhD (Physics and Mathematics), Institute
of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Tomsk, Russia (1994). Dr. Velikokhatnyis primary research
interests are focused on developing and applying modern first-principles quantum mechanical and semi-

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empirical approaches to design of biodegradable materials with controllable corrosion rate for orthopedic
and craniofacial applications. His secondary research interests lie in a field of computational modeling
and design of the materials for alternative energy sources (Li-ion rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, water
electrolysis).
Jeffrey Vipperman
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering. PhD (Mechanical Engineering),
Duke University, 1997. Dr. Vipperman's research interests include active microsystems (MEMS),
adaptive structures and materials, acoustics, and automatic controls. He is the founder and director of
the Sound, Systems, and Structures Laboratory, which is well-equipped to conduct both experimental
and numerical studies.
Yoram Vodovotz
Professor of Surgery, Immunology, Clinical and Translational Science, and Communication Science and
Disorders; Visiting Professor of Computational Biology. His research interests include the biology of
acute inflammation in shock states, chronic inflammatory diseases, wound healing, malaria, and
restenosis. His work utilizes mathematical modeling to unify and gain insight into the biological
interactions that characterize these inflammatory conditions. As the Director of the Center for
Inflammation and Regenerative Modeling (CIRM; www.mirm.pitt.edu/cirm) at the McGowan Institute
for Regenerative Medicine, Dr. Vodovotz has been involved in the mathematical modeling of acute
inflammatory states (e.g. septic or hemorrhagic shock, wound healing), including cellular and
physiological elements, as part of a large, interdisciplinary collaborative team. He is also a co-founder
of Immunetrics, Inc., a company that is commercializing this mathematical modeling work.
David A. Vorp
Professor, Bioengineering and Surgery. PhD (Mechanical Engineering), University of Pittsburgh, 1992.
Dr. Vorp's research interests are in the area of vascular and urethral biomechanics and tissue
engineering. His current work focuses on the assessment of mechanical factors in the genesis and
progression of vascular diseases such as aortic aneurysms, atherosclerosis, vascular graft failure, etc.,
and in the development of tissue-engineered blood vessels. As part of the latter, Dr. Vorp's laboratory
has focused on the role of stem cells in vascular tissue engineering, including the effect of in-vitro
stimulation on stem cell differentiation. His group also investigates the effect of various diseases and
conditions on the biomechanical and functional properties of intact urethra ex-vivo.
William R. Wagner
Interim Director, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine; Professor, Surgery, Chemical
Engineering, and Bioengineering. PhD (Chemical Engineering), University of Texas at Austin, 1991.
The research interests of Dr. Wagners group are in the area of cardiovascular engineering with projects
that address medical device biocompatibility and design, tissue engineering, and imaging. The research
group is comprised of graduate students in Bioengineering as well as post-doctoral fellows and junior
faculty with backgrounds in surgery, engineering, and polymer chemistry. Projects span from in vitro to
clinical studies.
James H-C. Wang
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery, Mechanical Engineering & Materials Sciences, Physical
Medicine & Rehabilitation, and Bioengineering. PhD (Bioengineering) University of Cincinnati, 1996.
Postdoctoral Fellow in Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins, 1997, and Washington University at St.
Louis, 1998.
Dr. Wang is now the Director of the MechanoBiology Laboratory (MBL,
http://www.pitt.edu/~mechbio/) in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh
School of Medicine. One of his research focuses in the MBL is the cellular and molecular mechanisms
of tendinopathy, a prevalent tendon disorder that affects millions of Americans in the United States

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alone. Another research focus is the mechanobiology of tendon stem cells (TSCs) and the pathogenic
role of TSCs in the development of tendinopathy. Still another is the use of autologous platelet-rich
plasma (PRP), in combination with engineered tendon matrix (ETM) and stem cells, to repair injured
tendons. In the MBL, interdisciplinary approaches, including cell biology, molecular biology, tissue
engineering, and engineering mechanics, are applied to the investigations. New technologies such as cell
traction force microscopy (CTFM) and micropost force sensor array are currently used in determining
cellular function in terms of cell contractility and motility.
Yadong Wang
Associate Professor, Department of Bioengineering. PhD (Chemistry), Stanford University, 1999. Dr.
Wangs laboratory works at the interface of chemistry, materials, and medicine. The focus of his
research is to create biomaterials that present controlled chemical, physical, and mechanical signals to
the biological systems. The ultimate goal is to direct how human bodies will interact with these
materials in a therapeutic environment. His laboratory actively engages in collaborative efforts to
explore the applications of these materials in cardiovascular tissue engineering, nerve regeneration, and
controlled release of therapeutics.
Wei Wang
Assistant Professor, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Bioengineering. PhD (Biomedical
Engineering), Washington University in St. Louis, 2006; MD, Peking University Health Science Center,
1999. Dr. Wangs research at the University of Pittsburgh is based on his previous investigations in how
the brain controls arm and hand movement. He is also researching the use of VR simulation benefits in
rehabilitation after stroke or spinal cord injury.
Jonathan Waters
Professor, Anesthesiology and Bioengineering; Chief of Anesthesia Services at Magee Womens
Hospital, UPMC and Medical Director in the Blood Management Division of Biometrics, Inc. MD,
George Washington University; residency at New York University/Bellevue Hospital Center. Dr.
Waters research interests include: improving obstetrical outcomes integrating IT with simulation based
team training; red cell rheologic changes associated with anesthetic agents; endotoxin in allogeneic and
cell salvage blood; and the impact of amniotic fluid on blood coagulation function. He is a Founding
Member of the Society for the Advancement of Blood Management, for which he has also served as
president (2007-2009). Dr. Waters is also Chair of the Transfusion Review Committee at Magee
Womens Hospital.
Douglas Weber
Assistant Professor, Departments of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Bioengineering. PhD
(Bioengineering), Arizona State University, 2001. Dr. Weber completed two years of postdoctoral
training in the laboratory of Dr. Richard Stein at the University of Alberta in Edmonton Alberta, Canada.
In 2005, he joined the University of Pittsburgh, where he and his staff conduct fundamental research into
the role and nature of sensory feedback in motor control. Their mission is to advance rehabilitation
science and practice through scientific discovery and the development of neuroprosthetics for assisting
and restoring motor function after nervous system injury and limb loss. Current research projects
include: 1) the use of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to improve upper extremity function during
stroke rehab, and 2) the development of a somatosensory neural interface to provide proprioceptive
feedback for neuroprosthetic limbs.
Alan Wells
Thomas J Gill III Professor of Pathology, Professor of Bioengineering. MD, Brown University (1988);
DMSc, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden (1982). The Wells' Laboratory research program, in
close collaboration with its research partners, aims to understand cell migration in terms of how motility

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processes are regulated, and understand how this regulation of migration plays a role in physiologic and
pathologic situations. Dr. Wells is integrating the knowledge gained from our biochemical and
biophysical mechanistic studies into our investigations concerning conditions of dysregulated (tumor
invasion) and orchestrated (wound healing and organogenesis) cell motility. The latter aspects drive our
interest in bioengineering principles to develop organ regeneration. As part of understanding the
motility response, we are investigating both how this particular integrated cell response is selected from
among others and the metabolic consequences of motility. This integrative approach provides
reinforcing insights and novel avenues for exploration into the basic signaling pathways as well as
functioning of whole organism. As a model system, we explore motility signaling from the epidermal
growth factor receptor (EGFR) in adherent cells. EGFR plays a central role in the functioning in a wide
variety of both stromal and epithelial tissues, and is the prototype for other receptors with intrinsic
tyrosine kinase activity. Thus, these studies should have widespread implications.
Erik C. Wiener
Associate Professor, Radiology and Bioengineering. PhD (Biophysics), University of Pennsylvania,
1988. Dr. Wieners major area of research is in the molecular and cellular imaging of cancer. In
particular, he uses Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for use in understanding tumor biology and
physiology.
Savio L-Y. Woo
Distinguished University Professor and Founder and Director of the Musculoskeletal Research Center
(MSRC) in the Department of Bioengineering. PhD, University of Washington at Seattle, 1971; DSc
(Honorary), California State University at Chico, 1998; DEng (Honorary), Hong Kong Polytechnic
University, 2008. Dr. Woo has established interdisciplinary programs to provide educational and
research opportunities on the mechanical properties of soft tissues (tendons, ligaments and cartilage) and
the effects of growth, aging and healing on these properties. Dr. Woos research interests include the
effects of stress and motion on healing and repair of soft tissues; theoretical and experimental studies of
the nonlinear viscoelastic and mechanical properties of biological tissues; kinematics of synovial joints,
including the knee and shoulder, by developing a novel robotic universal force-moment sensor testing
system to assess the roles of various soft tissues; functional tissue engineering approaches involving the
use of gene therapy and bioscaffolds, i.e., porcine extracellular matrix (ECM), to improve the healing of
injured ligaments and tendons. In more recent years, Dr. Woos research has focused on the
development of biodegradable metallic materials to assist the healing of ligaments and tendons as well as
for implantable devices for orthopaedic applications.
Joanne Yeh
Associate Professor, Structural Biology and Bioengineering. PhD, University of California @ Berkeley,
1994. Professor Yehs research focuses on atomic resolution, X-ray structure determination of
membrane proteins, redox enzymes, and large multi protein complexes related to cellular regulation and
metabolism. Professor Yeh is the Director of the University of Pittsburgh SOM X-ray Crystallography
Facility and is the Director of the X-ray Crystallography Core for the Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein
Interactions, an NIH funded P50 Structural Biology Center for the study of HIV-related proteins and
early-entry events. In addition to her structure-function studies, Professor Yeh has developed various
methods related to macromolecular crystallography and biochemical characterization of membrane
proteins. In the area of bioengineering, the Yeh laboratory developed the coordinated biosensing
approach for producing highly specific and sensitive nanobiosensors, based on the three-dimensional
structures of enzymes and other proteins as detectors of target ligands and biomarkers of diseases.
Minhee Yun
Associate Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, and BioEngineeirng. PhD Arizona State
University, 1998. Dr. Yun's major research interests include biomedical sensors and devices,

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nanoelectronics, and biodevice materials. Dr. Yun is currently working on development of biomarker
detections based on nanomaterials such as nanowires and carbon-based materials; in particular, his is
focused on cardiovascular disease (CVD) cancer biomarker detections.
Xudong Zhang
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery, Mechanical Engineering, and Bioengineering. PhD,
University of Michigan, 1997. Dr. Zhang is the Director of Musculoskeletal Modeling Lab and Codirector of Sports Orthopaedic Research Lab. His primary research field is musculoskeletal system and
tissue biomechanics, wherein his work spans theory, experiment, and computation. His focus has been
on developing and validating biomechanical models and computer simulations for clinical as well as
industrial applications. Such applications include treatment efficacy and outcome evaluation, computerassisted orthopaedics and rehabilitation, digital design of human-machine systems, computer-aided
ergonomics, prosthetics and robotics.
Bin Zheng
Research Professor, Radiology and Bioengineering. PhD (Electrical Engineering), University of
Delaware, Newark, DE, 1993. Dr. Zhengs major area of the research is the development and evaluation
of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes of biomedical images. His current research interests and
projects include (1) developing interactive CAD schemes for mammograms using content-based image
retrieval (CBIR) approaches, (2) developing CAD schemes for the early detection of interstitial lung
diseases and pulmonary embolisms using CT images, (3) developing a new breast cancer risk prediction
model based on resonance-frequency electrical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) technology, and (4)
developing digital pathology system including the microscopic image scanner and CAD schemes to
improve accuracy and efficiency in diagnosis of chromosome and FISH (fluorescent in situ
hybridization) images.
Leming Zhou
Assistant Professor, Health Information Management in the School of Health and Rehabilitation
Sciences and Bioengineering in the Swanson School of Engineering. PhD (Physics and Computer
Science), George Washington University. Dr. Zhous research interests include mathematical modeling,
algorithm development, sequence alignment, high performance computing, and data mining.

Chemical and Petroleum Engineering


Mohammad M. Ataai
Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering and Bioengineering, Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering),
Cornell University, 1986 - Dr. Ataais research interests include bioprocess engineering, large-scale cell
culture and fermentation, immobilized enzyme, protein purification, metabolic engineering, cellular
metabolism and physiology.
Anna C. Balazs
Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering and Robert von der Luft Professor of Chemical and
Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1981 - Dr. Balazs research
involves using statistical mechanics and computer simulations to model polymeric systems. Her current
research is focused on modeling the properties of polymer blends, the aggregation of associating
polymers, and polymer-surface interactions. She is also interested in the role of polymers in biophysics
and has investigated micelle formation, the controlled release of drugs through porous polymers, and the
binding of ligands to biopolymers.

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Ipsita Banerjee
Assistant Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D., Rutgers University, 2005 - Dr.
Banerjees research interests focus on the area of process systems engineering and optimization and their
applications in different chemical and bio-engineering problems. She is currently developing novel
methods for differentiating embryonic stem cells to the pancreatic lineage and applying systems
engineering principles in analyzing the regulatory network of the differentiating cell population. She is
also interested in reaction network modeling energy efficient combustion processes.
Eric J. Beckman
George M. Bevier Professor of Engineering and Co-Director, Mascaro Center for Sustainable
Innovation, Ph.D. (Polymer Science and Engineering), University of Massachusetts, 1988 - Dr.
Beckmans research focuses on molecular design to support (a) creation of greener chemical products
and (b) synthesis of materials to support biomedical research.
Cheryl A. Bodnar
Assistant Professor (Teaching Track), Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Ph.D. (Chemical
Engineering), University of Calgary, 2006 - Dr. Bodnars Research Interests relate to the incorporation
of active learning techniques in undergraduate classes (problem based learning, games and simulations,
etc.) as well as integration of innovation and entrepreneurship into the Chemical and Petroleum
Engineering curriculum. She is actively engaged in the development of a variety of informal science
education approaches with the goal of exciting and teaching K-12 students about regenerative medicine
and its potential.
Harvey S. Borovetz
Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Professor and Chairman, Department of
Bioengineering; Robert L. Hardesty Professor of Surgery; Ph.D. (Bioengineering), Carnegie Mellon
University, 1976 - Dr. Borovetz's current research interests are focused on the design and clinical
utilization of cardiovascular organ replacements for both adult and pediatric patients. Since 1986 Dr.
Borovetz has provided academic leadership to the University's clinical bioengineering program in
mechanical circulatory support.
Ioannis Bourmpakis (Giannis Mpourmpakis)
Assistant Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D. (Theoretical and Computational
Chemistry), University of Crete. 2006 - Dr. Mpourmakiss research expertise is interdisciplinary,
blending concepts and techniques from Chemistry, Physics, Materials Science and Chemical
Engineering.
Andrew Bunger
Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Ph.D. (Geological Engineering), University of
Minnesota, 2005 - Dr. Bungers research interests are hydraulic fracturing; Interaction between shale
formations and drilling fluids; Emplacement mechanics of magma intrusions; Fracture mechanics;
Poroelasticity; core discing.
Shiao-Hung Chiang
Professor Emeritus, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering), Carnegie
Mellon University, 1958 - Dr. Chiangs research covers a wide spectrum of topics ranging from the
study of basic mass transfer mechanisms to the development of a novel coal beneficiation process.
Julie L. dItri
Associate Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering), Northwestern
University, 1993 - Dr. dItris research program is that of using heterogeneous catalysis as a means of

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solving critical environmental problems. At one end of the spectrum this involves understanding and
developing catalytic processes for reducing emission of hazardous pollutants. At the other end of the
spectrum are projects aimed at development of entirely new catalytic processes which avoid use and
generation of environmentally hazardous materials.
Robert M. Enick
Bayer Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering), University of
Pittsburgh, 1985 Dr. Enick's research focuses on experimental investigations of carbon dioxide-based
supercritical fluid technology. Examples include: direct carbonation of metal-containing hazardous
waste; generation of microcellular foams using CO2; application of fluorinated thiols to metal surfaces
using liquid carbon dioxide; and increasing the viscosity of liquid carbon dioxide.
William J. Federspiel
W.K. Whiteford Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Bioengineering, and Surgery, Ph.D.
(Chemical Engineering), University of Rochester, 1983 - Dr. Federspiels research areas and interests
include biomedical fluid mechanics and mass transfer, cardiopulmonary bioengineering, artificial organs,
and tissue engineering. Dr. Federspiel directs research in the Artificial Lung Laboratory in the
McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine and has a secondary appointment in the Department of
Surgery at the School of Medicine. The ultimate goal of work within the laboratory is the development
of improved cardiovascular-related medical devices and therapies for patients.
Di Gao
Associate Professor and W.K. Whiteford Faculty Fellow, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D.
(Chemical Engineering) 2004, University of California at Berkeley Dr. Gaos research interests include
synthesis, assembly and characterization of novel nanostructures, and the integration of these
nanostructures into functional devices and systems for technological applications such as biomedical and
environmental sensors.
Gerald D. Holder
Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, and U.S. Steel Dean, Swanson School of Engineering,
Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering), University of Michigan, 1976 - Dr. Holders research interests include
high pressure phase behavior, and thermodynamic properties of gas hydrates and supercritical fluids.
J. Karl Johnson
W.K. Whiteford Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering),
Cornell University, 1992 - Dr. Johnsons current research interests are focused on molecular
thermodynamics, atomistic computer simulations, and theories of complex systems. The ultimate goal
of this work is to develop engineering models for industrially important materials and processes.
John A. Keith
Assistant Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D. (Chemistry), California Institute of
Technology, 2007 - Dr. Keiths research interests are Computational chemistry applied to catalysis,
energy, and Materials.
George E. Klinzing
W.K. Whiteford Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering),
Carnegie Mellon University, 1963 - Dr. Klinzings current research covers the fields of pneumatic
conveying, particulate systems and solids processing. Research has been concentrating on dense phase
pneumatic conveying probing the fundamental phenomena both experimentally with novel
instrumentation and theoretically with new models based on experimental findings.

112

Prashant Kumta
Edward R. Weidlein Chair Professor, Swanson School of Engineering and School of Dental Medicine,
Department of Bioengineering, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and
Materials Science, Department of Oral Biology, Ph.D. (Materials Science and Engineering), University
of Arizona, 1990 Dr. Kumtas research interests cover the two broad areas of Energy storage and
Biomaterials. The main focus of research in both these areas is to develop novel low temperature
approaches and study the relationships of the process parameters, the ensuing microstructure and
crystallographic structure to the electrochemical activity in the former and biological response in the
latter.
Lei Li
Assistant Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, PhD Macromolecular Science and
Engineering Center, University of Michigan, 2001. Professor Lis current research interest focuses on
polymer thin and ultrathin films at surfaces and interfaces. The key is to understand the polymer/polymer
and polymer/substrate interactions governing the various properties, e.g. mechanical, optical, electrical
and tribological properties, of polymer thin films. Based on this understanding, novel materials are
developed for applications in nanotechnology and bio-systems. Examples are: Relaxation and dynamics
of polymer thin films on various substrates; Mechanical properties of polymer thin films; Ultrathin
perfluorinated polymer films for anti-friction and anti-corrosion application in micro and nano devices;
Novel composite polymer thin films with low friction and wear for biomedical implants; Fabrication of
polymer thin films with low surface energy and enhanced anti-adhesion properties via photochemistry
approach.
J. Thomas Lindt
Professor Emeritus, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D., University of Delft, 1971 - Dr. Lindt is
internationally recognized as a leader in mathematical modeling of polymer processing operations and
supervises research programs associated with polymer processing. His research interests include
reactive processing of polymers, isolation of polymers from dilute solutions and emulsions, formation of
polymeric composites containing oriented graphitic particles/fibers, morphology development in
polymer blends, and rheology of polymer solutions in supercritical fluids associated with structure
development in microcellular foams.
Steven R. Little
Chairman, Associate Professor and CNG Faculty Fellow, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering,
Bioengineering, Immunology and Medicine, Ph.D. 2005, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2005
Dr. Littles research interests are focused on biomaterial design and controlled drug delivery in

the areas of smart immunotherapeutics and regenerative medicine.


Joseph J. McCarthy
W.K. Whiteford Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D., 1998, Northwestern University.
Dr. McCarthys research interests lie in the area of solids flow and transport phenomena in particulate
systems. Immediate concerns include flow and mixing of cohesive particles, breakup and fracture of
particle aggregates, and heat transfer in discrete and particulate media. One of the long range goals of
his work is the development of a more unified fundamental understanding of transport phenomena in
particle systems.
Badie I. Morsi
Professor and Director of Petroleum Engineering Program, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Sc.D.,
Institut National Polytecnique de Lorraine, 1982 - Dr. Morsis current research involves different aspects
of Chemical, Environmental, and Petroleum Engineering. In Chemical Engineering, he is leading an
extensive research effort in order to design and scale-up various multiphase reactors, such as bubble

113

columns, slurry bubble-columns, high-pressure/temperature stirred vessels, and trickle-bed reactors. His
research group is currently measuring the hydrodynamics and mass transfer characteristics in a number
of important chemical processes, including methanol synthesis, cyclohexane oxidation, propylene
polymerization, benzoic acid oxidation, and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. In Environmental Engineering,
he is primarily concerned with kinetic studies, modeling, and optimization of the regeneration step in a
two-step advanced dry-sorbent process for simultaneous removal of NOx and SOx from flue gas. In
Petroleum Engineering, he supervised a research on enhanced oil recovery using carbon dioxide.
Robert S. Parker

Associate Professor and B.P. America Faculty Fellow, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D.,
University of Delaware, 1999. The research focus of Professor Parker's group is process modeling and
control, with an interest in biomedical systems. Advanced controllers typically use, either explicitly or
implicitly, in response to setpoint changes and/or disturbances. Hence, the development of accurate,
potentially nonlinear, models of process behavior plays an important role in controller design. Specific
research interests include: cancer modeling and therapy; blood glucose control in diabetic patients;
analytical solutions to model-based optimal control problems; and empirical model identification and
validation.
John F. Patzer II
Associate Professor, Surgery, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering and Bioengineering, Ph.D.
(Chemical Engineering). Stanford University, 1980. Dr. Patzers research interests lie in the application
of reaction engineering and transport phenomena to biomedical engineering problems, particularly in the
artificial organ and organ assist arena. With a primary appointment in the Department of Surgery, Dr.
Patzer coordinates an active research program in preclinical and clinical development of liver assist
devices and biohybrid artificial liver systems in the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute. His other
research interests include artificial pancreas and kidney.
John W. Tierney
Professor Emeritus, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering), Northwestern
University, 1951 - Dr. Tierneys research interests are reactor engineering, process modeling and
simulation, and equilibrium staged separations. Much of Dr. Tierneys research is related to developing
sources other than petroleum for liquid transportation fuels.
Sachin Velankar
Associate Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering), University of
Delaware, 1999 Dr. Velankars research deals with polymer science and engineering, and is especially
focused on studying the rheological properties of complex polymeric fluids. The overall goal is to gain
insight into the interplay between processing, structure, and properties of polymeric materials, and to
exploit this insight to design better materials.
Gtz Veser
Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Dr. rer. nat. (Physical Chemistry)
Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max-Planck-Society, 1993 - Dr. Veser's research is in the field of catalytic
reaction engineering, where his interests range from the detailed modeling of catalytic reactions and
reactors, to the synthesis of novel catalysts, the development of catalytic microreactors, and the design of
integrated reactor concepts. His research thus attempts to integrate engineering aspects on all length
scales through well-designed experiments and numerical simulations. A current focus of his research is
on the catalytic partial oxidation of hydrocarbons at high-temperature millisecond contact-time
conditions.

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William R. Wagner
Professor, Surgery, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering and Bioengineering, Director of the McGowan
Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering), University of Texas at Austin, 1991
- Dr. Wagner's research addresses a variety of issues in artificial organ development ranging from
clinical studies to theoretical design work. Cardiovascular devices are of primary interest, particularly
the complications that result from blood interactions with artificial surfaces (e.g. thrombosis). Current
projects also fall into the area of cardiovascular tissue engineering, with a focus on material design to
orchestrate cellular growth or function.
Irving Wender
Distinguished University Research Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D. University of
Pittsburgh, 1950 - Dr. Wenders research interests include homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis
with these molecules. He is interested in catalytic reactions involved in the conversion of synthesis gas
to fuels and chemicals. An important area of research is in the conversion of coal and natural gas to
liquids and chemicals by indirect liquefaction (via gasification to synthesis gas) and by novel methods of
indirect liquefaction. Research has involved the use of solid superacids of zirconium and related anionmodified oxides as finely dispersed disposable and environmentally acceptable catalysts for cracking of
Fischer-Tropsch waxes.
Judy Yang
Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Ph.D., Physics (minor: materials
science and engineering), Cornell, 1993. Professor Yang's research interests include gas-metal reactions,
oxidation, high temperature corrosion, surface chemistry and physics, interfaces, catalysis, nanoparticles
and nanostructured materials, as well as the use and development of advanced electron microscopy
techniques, such as in situ, Z-contrast, and EELS. Her current focused research topic is the fundamental
kinetics of surface oxidation reactions of metallic systems by in situ high vacuum controlled
environment electron microscopy. Another area of interest is the determination of the supported structure
of nanoparticles that are used in heterogeneous catalysis, by Z-contrast, EDS and HREM.

Civil and Environmental Engineering


Jorge Abad
Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of Illinois, 2007 Dr.
Abads research interests are a combination of fundamental and applied topics. Fundamental topics
include the mechanics of sediment transport, the high-resolution description of hydrodynamics and
morphodynamics in subaerial and submarine meandering channels, the long-term prediction of river
morphodynamics, the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for environmental
flows, environmental hydrodynamics, and transport and mixing processes. Applied topics include river
restoration, bank protection using in-stream structures, development of geographic information systems
(GIS) tools for river management, and the development of CFD models for hydraulic structures (e.g.,
drop shafts and fish passage/canoe chutes).
Kyle Bibby
Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., Yale University, 2012 - Dr. Bibbys
interests center around understanding the presence, ecology, and diversity of microorganisms, such as
viruses and bacteria, in an environmental engineering context. Microorganisms are by far the most
abundant and genetically diverse biological entities on our planet and are at the core of many of societys
environmental challenges, including sustainable energy production, waste treatment, and
environmentally transmitted disease. In the Bibby Lab, emerging molecular biology techniques such as

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proteomics, genomics, metagenomics and transcriptomics are integrated with fundamental, quantitative
environmental engineering practice to develop new insights and solutions to these problems.
Melissa Bilec
Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 2007 - Dr.
Bilec's research and teaching interests encompass engineering issues related to sustainability, green
design, and construction. Her recent research efforts include not only creating a practical framework for
hybrid life cycle assessment modeling, including uncertainty and visualizations, but also modeling onsite construction processes and support services. She is conducting research related to green building
metrics to understand and evaluate high-performance buildings. Dr. Bilec has experience in funding and
managing sustainable transportation projects, including the Hot Metal Pedestrian Bridge project.
John Brigham
Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., Cornell University, 2008 Dr.
Brigham is interested in fundamental concepts in mechanics and computation which span a broad range of
applications, from assessing service life of civil, marine, or aircraft structures to diagnosing physiological changes
in biological structures. In particular, he is interested in the development of efficient computational methods for
the representation of multiphysics and multiscale systems, solution strategies for inverse problems associated with
nondestructive and noninvasive testing, and numerical modeling of biological systems

Daniel Budny
Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Academic Director, Freshman Programs,
Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1988 - Dr. Budnys research has focused on the development of
programs that assist entering freshman and academically disadvantaged engineering students, to succeed
during their first year. Dr. Budny has also been awarded the 1996 ASEE Dow Young Educator Award,
1998 ASEE Ronald Schmitz Outstanding Service Award and the 1992 FIE Ben Dasher Award. He
serves on the ASEE board of directors. He also served as the 1999 Frontiers in Education Conference
General Chair and proceedings editor for the 1995 and 1997-99 FIE Conferences.
Andrew Bunger
Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 2005 - Dr.
Bungers research has focused primarily on the basic mechanisms which determine how hydraulic
fractures grow through rocks by using experimental, analytical, and numerical methods. His study of
hydraulic fracturing application areas has included stimulation of unconventional gas and geothermal
reservoirs, preconditioning ore bodies to improve the effectiveness of cavingtype mining methods, and
modeling intrusion of magma in the Earths crust. His secondary research interest is the interaction
between shale formations and drilling fluids with the main application in wellbore stability during the
development of oil and gas wells.
Leonard W. Casson
Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1987 - Dr.
Cassons research emphasizes Adsorption, fate, transport and transformation of chemicals, particles and
environmental pathogens in unit operations and the natural environment. Recently focusing on security
and sustainability infrastructure of critical infrastructure systems. These issues include disinfection
issues, vulnerability assessment methodologies, analytical techniques and emergency response,
remediation and recovery plans applied to water treatment, storage and distribution systems and
wastewater collection and treatment systems.
Kent A. Harries
Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., McGill University, Montreal Canada,
1995. - Dr. Harries research interests include the seismic design and retrofit of building structures, the

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design and behavior of high-rise structures, the use of non-traditional materials (FRP, HPC, RPC) in
civil infrastructure, applications of full-scale structural testing and the history and philosophy of science
and technology.
Anthony Iannacchione
Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1997 Dr.
Iannacchione joined the University of Pittsburgh after a 33-year career with the U.S. Bureau of Mines and
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health where he conducted research on health, safety, and
environmental issues related to the U.S. Minerals Industry. His recent interests include strata control and mine
ventilation engineering, mining-induced seismic analysis, and major hazard risk assessment.

Vikas Khanna
Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of Ohio, 2009 - Dr.
Khanna's research and teaching interests are in the general areas of sustainability science and
engineering, industrial ecology, and role of environmental policy in engineering decision-making. The
primary goal of his research is to develop and apply tools and techniques for understanding the
sustainability of engineered products and processes. Current focus is on studying the life cycle
environmental impacts of advanced biofuels that can act as drop in replacements for fossil fuels,
environmental evaluation of nanotechnology, including life cycle energy impacts of carbon nanofibers
and polymer nanocomposite materials. He is also developing integrated multiscale economicenvironmental models for evaluating the role of environmental policies such as carbon tax and assessing
risks to complex industrial systems.
Xu Liang
Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1994 - Dr. Liang's
fundamental research interests include: (1) to discover and reveal fundamental laws that govern water
and energy cycles, and (2) to investigate how the water and energy cycles affect the health of our
environment and ecological systems, and how they influence the transport and cycling of nutrients and
pollutants at different scales, such as at local, regional, continental, and global scales. She is also very
interested in research topics leading to improving accuracies on weather forecasts, droughts and floods,
and on climate studies; scaling and data assimilation using in situ and remotely sensed measurements;
impacts of climate change on diseases re-occurrences and re-distributions, and on sustainable water
resources and environment; and applications of emerging information technology for sustainable
ecological system and water resources management.
Jeen-Shang Lin
Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, 1982 - Dr. Lin works in the areas of soil mechanics and soil dynamics. He has conducted
research in back analysis using existing field measurements, such as deriving in-situ soil properties based
upon strong motion records. He is currently interested in the coupling of continuous and discontinuous
analysis for both soils and rocks. He has also worked on computer simulation of various soil experiments
using particles.
Ronald D. Neufeld
Professor Emeritus, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1973 - Dr.
Neufeld's interests include environmental process fundamentals and design, with application to
environmental management of stormwater runoff and biological and advanced waste treatment systems.
Research activities encompass high rate oxidation for acid mine drainage, aluminum remediation from
acid rock discharge, aerobic fixed and suspended film biological systems, chemical pretreatment, PCB
dehalogenation, biotowers, bio-filtration, chromium recovery using activated carbon, synfuels and coke
plant integrated waste treatment, accumulation of metals and trace organics onto bioslimes, toxicities and

117

metabolic by-products from treatment systems, and environmental implications of the use of high-flyash
cellular concrete.
John F. Oyler
Adjunct Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University,
1972 - Dr. Oyler's professional interests are specialized in Civil Engineering Materials, Solid Mechanics,
and Structural Engineering. He worked for Dravo Corporation from 1953 to 1987, Daxus Corporation
from 1988 to 1991, and formed Oyler Consulting Services in 1991 as a sole proprietorship.
Piervincenzo Rizzo
Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of California San Diego,
2004 - Dr. Rizzo's academic and professional interests are in the fields of nondestructive
testing/evaluation, structural health monitoring, signal processing and automatic pattern recognition for
real-time prognosis of structures, and implementation of embedded sensor network for health monitoring
of civil, mechanical and aerospace structures. His recent works focused on the development of a rail flaw
detection system based on non-contact hybrid laser/air-coupled ultrasonic sensors to improve the
reliability and the speed inspection of current systems, and on the development of an on-board structural
health monitoring system for unmanned aerial vehicles wings based on integrated ultrasonic.
Janet E. Stout
Research Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh,
1992 - Dr. Stout's major interest is in the environmental microbiology of Legionnaires' disease and
Legionella pneumophila. Research in these areas includes the study of this and other waterborne
bacterial pathogens in building water distribution systems. Specific study involves molecular typing
techniques, biofilm formation, intracellular antimicrobial susceptibility testing and susceptibility to new
disinfection methods.
Morteza A.M. Torkamani
Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles,
1975 - Dr. Torkamani has been active in the following research projects: application of the finite element
method and component mode synthesis in response calculation of high rise buildings to wind and
earthquake loadings; measurements and interpretation of full-scale building response during and after
construction period; elastoplastic analysis of the plane stress and plain strain problems using a linear
yield surface and mixed hardening rule; dynamic analysis of tied arch bridges; and simulation of wind
flow patterns around bridge deck sections.
Luis E. Vallejo
Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1977 - Dr.
Vallejo's research interests are in the areas of shear strength of soft soils (muds) and stiff clays, the
mechanics of crack propagation and interaction in clays, the influence of cracks on the permeability of
clays, the liquefaction of sands, the mobilization mechanics of mudflows and debris flows, the freezing
and thawing of soils, the stability of natural slopes, the evolution mechanics of coastal slopes, and the
use of fractals in geotechnical engineering.
Julie M. Vandenbossche
Research Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of Minnesota,
2003, Research interests include the characterization of the material properties and performance of
portland cement concrete and transportation infrastructure systems with particular interests in the design,
analysis and rehabilitation of concrete pavements, pavement instrumentation and pavement modeling.

118

Radisav D. Vidic
William Kepler Whiteford Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., University of
Cincinnati, 1992 - Dr. Vidic's research interests include physical chemical processes for water,
wastewater, hazardous waste and air treatment, activated carbon applications in water and hazardous
waste treatment and for the control of mercury emissions from power plants and incinerators, improving
activated carbon performance by oxygen mediated polymerization of organic compounds, development
and evaluation of novel activated carbon-based adsorbents for the control of mercury emissions in flue
gases, novel disinfection technologies and sustainable water use.
Qiang Yu
Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 2007.
Dr. Yus research is focused on developing novel analysis and design methodologies with the aim of
improving structural safety, reliability and sustainability. His research interests include: mechanical
properties of concrete, composite materials, smart materials and hybrid structures; safety, reliability and
life-long performance of critical structures; fracture characteristics of energy-efficient and crash-worthy
materials; risk analysis of advanced structural materials under extreme conditions, and structural
capabilities of bio-inspired materials and sustainable materials

Computer Engineering
Yiran Chen
Assistant Professor, Computer Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., Purdue
University 2005. Dr. Chens research interests include: Nano-electronic devices (Silicon and nonSilicon), Nano-scale reconfigurable computing systems and sensor systems, Emerging memory and
sensing technologies, and Low- power circuit design and computer architecture.
Donald Chiarulli
Professor, Computer Science, Computer Engineering. Dr. Chiarulli's current research falls into three
areas; optoelectronic cache memory interface design, where the objective is to design, fabricate and test
a prototype cache memory which allows efficient digital data transfer between a three dimensional
optical memory and a general purpose computing system, computer aided design of free space
optoelectronic systems, where the goal is to produce a design and analysis prototyping tool for mixed
technology free space optoelectronic information processing systems, and optically integrated super
scalar processor design, where the aim is to provide a demonstration of the first optically integrated
super scalar processor, which uses optical buses between the functional units, to execute programs with
sub-instruction parallelism.
Bruce R. Childers
Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Ph.D., Computer Science, University of
Virginia, 2000. Dr. Childers research includes a novel system for the automatic design of applicationspecific processors, and custom VLIW/systolic architectures and low power embedded processors. His
general research interests include computer architecture, compilers and software development tools, and
embedded systems.
Steven P. Jacobs
Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Engineering, D.Sc. Electrical
Engineering, Washington University, 1996. Dr. Jacobs is primarily interested in undergraduate and
graduate education. His research interests include model-based estimation of signal parameters.

119

Steven P. Levitan
John A. Jurenko Professor of Computer Engineering, Ph.D., Computer Science, University of
Massachusetts, 1984. Dr. Levitans research interests include the design, modeling, simulation, and
verification of highly parallel systems, including sensing, computing, and communications functions. In
particular, his work is focused on parallel and optical computer architectures, VLSI systems, and mixedtechnology microsystems. His recent work is on computer aided design tools and methodologies for
mixed-signal multi-domain systems spanning software, digital and analog electronics, and optical
MEMS.
Hai (Helen) Li
Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Engineering, PhD Electrical and
Computer
Engineering,
Purdue
University,
2004.
Her
research
interests
include
architecture/circuit/device co-optimization for green computing systems, emerging memory design,
neuromorphic hardware, and 3D integration technology and design.
Rami Melhem
Professor, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Ph.D., Computer Science, University of
Pittsburgh, 1983. Dr. Melhams research interests include: parallel and distributed high-performance
computing, faulttolerant computing, multiprocessor interconnection networks, real-time systems and
optical computing.
Marlin H. Mickle
Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor, Computer Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D.,
University of Pittsburgh, 1967 - Dr. Mickles research areas include parallel computation, embedded
computing, high-speed computation. Current emphasis is on computer networks, RF communication and
sensor interfacing.
Daniel Moss
Professor and Chair of the Department of Computer Science, also Computer Engineering faculty, Ph.D.
Computer Science, University of Maryland, 1993. Dr. Mosse's research interests include computer
operating systems in general. The focus of the research is on green and real-time computing, including
power management, wireless and sensor networks, and scheduling resource allocation in distributed realtime systems.
John C. Ramirez
Senior Lecturer, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Ph.D. Computer Science, University of
Pittsburgh, 1995. Dr. Ramirez received his B.S. in Mathematics and Biochemistry from Duquesne
University in 1986. He received his M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Pittsburgh in
1989, and completed his Ph.D., also in Computer Science from the University of Pittsburgh, in 1995. His
dissertation is titled Flexible Fault-Tolerance Using Redundancy in Mesh Connected Processor Arrays.
His research interests include parallel processing and fault-tolerance in parallel systems. Dr. Ramirez is
also the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Computer Science Department.
Jun Yang
Associate Professor, Computer Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., University of
Arizona, 2002. Dr. Yangs research interests include but are not limited to: microarchitecture, memory
systems, emerging memory technologies, interconnection networks, low-power, thermal-aware
computing; chip multiprocessors and 3D processor architectures.

120

Taieb Znati
Professor, Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Ph.D., Computer Science, Michigan State
University, 1988. Dr. Znati's current research interests focus on the design of network protocols for realtime communications to support multimedia environments, the design and analysis of medium access
control protocols to support distributed real-time systems, and the investigation of fundamental design
issues related to distributed applications. He teaches courses in networking, distributed operating
systems and performance analysis.

Electrical and Computer Engineering


Luis F. Chaparro
Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley,
1980. Dr. Chaparros research interests include statistical signal processing, time-frequency analysis,
nonlinear image processing and multidimensional system theory. Author of Signals and Systems using
MATLAB, published by Elsevier in 2010.
Kevin P. Chen
Associate Professor and Paul E. Lego Faculty Fellow, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D.,
University of Toronto, 2002. Dr. Chens current research interests focus on photonic components and
application in communication and sensing, and 3-D nanofabrication using deep UV laser.
Yiran Chen
Assistant Professor, Computer Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., Purdue
University 2005. Dr. Chens research interests include: Nano-electronic devices (Silicon and nonSilicon), Nano-scale reconfigurable computing systems and sensor systems, Emerging memory and
sensing technologies, and Low-power circuit design and computer architecture.
Panos K. Chrysanthis
Associate Professor, Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D. (Computer and
Information Sciences), University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 1991. Dr. Chrysanthis' research interests
lie within the areas of database systems, distributed and mobile computing, operating systems and realtime systems.
Amro El-Jaroudi
Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., Northeastern University, 1988. Dr. EIJaroudis research areas focus on signal processing. Interests include speech processing, time-varying
spectral analysis, signal processing applications.
Mahmoud El Nokali
Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., McGill University, 1980. Dr. El
Nokali's current research interests focus on power electronics and semiconductor device modeling, with
specialemphasis on short-channel MOSFET, high electron mobility transistor (HEMT), HBT and
BiCMOS modeling.
Steven P. Jacobs
Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Engineering, D.Sc. Electrical
Engineering, Washington University, 1996. Dr. Jacobs is primarily interested in undergraduate and
graduate education. His research interests include model-based estimation of signal parameters.

121

Alex K. Jones
Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., Northwestern University 2002. Dr.
Jones interests focus on the area of electronic design automation. Specific interests include designing
and compiling hardware descriptions from high-level languages, automated System-on-a-Chip design,
hardware and software co-design methodologies, and hardware design automation for low-power.
Irvin R. Jones, Jr.
Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D. Computer Engineering, University of
Colorado at Boulder, 1998. Prof. Jones is the EE Program Undergraduate Coordinator. His recent
research has been in power systems and in systems engineering tools and also in intelligent systems,
autonomous navigation and control.
Hong Koo Kim
Professor Electrical and Computer Engineering Ph.D. (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Carnegie
Mellon University 1989. Dr. Kim's research interests are in developing photonic, integrated
optoelectronic, and microelectronic devices based on novel functional materials (mostly in micro or
nanoscale thin-film form) such as erbium-doped oxides, wide bandgap semiconductors, ferroelectric
films, and self-organized nanostructures. The scope of his research covers design, fabrication and
characterization of materials and devices, and study of device physics. His current research includes
development of photonic chips that show zero insertion-loss in transmission of optical signals, highsensitivity UV detectors based on wide bandgap semiconductors,ferroelectric-based nonvolatile
memories and guided-optic modulators, and ultra-compact systems-on-a-chip (SoC) based on selforganized nanochannel arrays of logic devices, memories, sensors and transducers.
George L. Kusic (P.E.)
Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 1967. Dr.
Kusic's research is in real time analog and digital control of power systems. He specializes in the
application of integrated circuit designs for controlling large electromechanical machinery such as
synchronous generators of earth-based utilities, as well as space power systems which share load
between batteries, solar panels and solar dynamic machinery.
Steven P. Levitan
John A. Jurenko Professor of Computer Engineering, Ph.D., Computer Science, University of
Massachusetts, 1984. Dr. Levitans research interests include the design, modeling, simulation, and
verification of highly parallel systems, including sensing, computing, and communications functions. In
particular, his work is focused on parallel and optical computer architectures, VLSI systems, and mixedtechnology microsystems. His recent work is on computer aided design tools and methodologies for
mixed-signal multi-domain systems spanning software, digital and analog electronics, and optical
MEMS.
Ching-Chung Li
Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1961.
Dr. Li's current research is focused on applications of multiwavelet transforms, multiridgelets and
curvelets to biomedical image processing and pattern recognition, super-resolution and multi-resolution
image fusion, as well as secure transmission of confidential images.
Guangyong Li
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering, PhD, Michigan State University (2006). Dr. Lis current
research interests include nanorobotics for deterministic fabrication of nanodevices; molecular
recognition for nanorobotics-enabled patch-clamping; modeling, simulation, and characterization of
nanostructured organic, inorganic, and hybrid solar cells.

122

Hai (Helen) Li
Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Engineering, PhD Electrical and
Computer
Engineering,
Purdue
University,
2004.
Her
research
interests
include
architecture/circuit/device co-optimization for green computing systems, emerging memory design,
neuromorphic hardware, and 3D integration technology and design.
Zhi-Hong Mao
Associate Professor and William Kepler Whiteford Faculty Fellow, Electrical and Computer
Engineering, PhD Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2005). Dr. Maos areas of research include
networked control systems and human-centered control systems.
Thomas E. McDermott (P.E.)
Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, PhD Electrical Engineering, Virginia
Polytechic Institute and State University, 1998. Dr. McDermott specializes in circuit simulation, electric
power distribution systems, distributed wind and solar integration, lightning protection, power quality
and power electronics applications.
Rami Melhem
Professor, Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh,
1983. Dr. Melhem's research includes parallel, fault-tolerant, real time and optical systems.
Marlin H. Mickle
Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Engineering, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh,
1967. Dr. Mickles research areas include parallel computation, embedded computing, and high-speed
computation. Current emphasis is on computer networks, RF communication and sensor interfacing.
Kartik Mohanram
Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Ph.D. in Computer Engineering, University
of Texas, Austin, 2003. Dr. Mohanram received the B.Tech. degree in Electrical Engineering from IIT,
Bombay in 1998, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Engineering from the University of
Texas, Austin in 2000 and 2003, respectively. His research interests span computer engineering and
systems, nano-electronics, and computational biology. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award,
the ACM/SIGDA Technical Leadership Award, and the A. Richard Newton Graduate Scholarship.
Gregory F. Reed
Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director, Power and Energy Initiative,
PhD, University of Pittsburgh, 1997. Dr. Reeds research interests include power transmission and
distribution and energy systems; smart grid technologies; power electronics and control technologies and
applications; storage technologies; and power generation and renewable energy resources. He joined the
Swanson School of Engineering faculty after 23 years of electric power industry experience.
Ervin Sejdi
Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, PhD, The University of Western Ontario
(2008).
Dr. Sejdis areas of research include biomedical and theoretical signal processing, assistive and medical
devices, and modeling of age- and disease-related declines of swallowing, gait and cognitive functions.

123

William Stanchina
Professor and Chairman, Electrical and Computer Engineering, PhD. University of Southern California
(1978). Dr. Stanchinas research interests include high-frequency compound semiconductor devices and
integrated circuits, and optoelectronic and quantum devices, novel sensors, and fabrication technologies.
Mingui Sun
Associate Professor, Neurological Surgery, Bioengineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering.
Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, 1989. Dr. Suns research interests include
neurophysiological signal and systems, biosensor design, brain-computer interface, bioelectronics, and
bioinformatics.
Jun Yang
Associate Professor, Computer Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D., University of
Arizona, 2002. Dr. Yangs research interests include but are not limited to: microarchitecture, memory
systems, emerging memory technologies, interconnection networks, low-power, thermal-aware
computing; chip multiprocessors and 3D processor architectures.
Minhee Yun
Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ph.D. Arizona State University (1998). Dr.
Yuns areas of interest include nano-structured materials such as nanowires and nanoparticles with an
emphasis on biosensor applications, nanoscale low-dimensional materials including electrical
phenomena and biocompatibility.

Industrial Engineering
Mary Besterfield-Sacre
Associate Professor in Industrial Engineering and Fulton C. Noss Faculty Fellow, Ph.D. (Industrial
Engineering), University of Pittsburgh, 1996 Dr. Besterfield-Sacres principal research interests are of
engineering assessment to include engineering education, product realization and entrepreneurship. Dr.
Sacre has worked on developing new methods to assess how students learn engineering. Dr. Sacre is the
Director of the Engineering Education Research Center.
Bopaya Bidanda
Professor and Ernest E. Roth Professor and Chairman in Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Industrial and
Management Systems Engineering), Pennsylvania State University, 1987 - Dr. Bidanda's research focus
includes Global Supply Networks, Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems and the New Product
Development, Time Compression Technologies such as Rapid Prototyping, Reverse Engineering, and
Rapid Manufacturing. He works closely with manufacturing industries in the area of re-engineering
cellular manufacturing, work measurement, automatic data collection, shop floor information systems
and, product development.
Karen M. Bursic
Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Industrial Engineering), University of Pittsburgh,
1990 - Dr. Bursic currently teaches courses in probability and statistics, engineering economics,
engineering computing, and engineering management. Her research interests include improving
engineering education, engineering economics, and project team management.

124

Youngjae Chun
Assistant Professor in Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Mechanical Engineering), University of California,
Los Angeles, 2009 Dr. Chuns primary research focus is on designing, manufacturing, and testing of
medical devices to treat vascular diseases using smart materials through minimally invasive surgery. He
also has an interest in the development of bio-hybrid composite biomaterials, implantable microsystems,
and in-vitro experimental apparatus for developing more diverse biomedical applications with a focus on
novel materials and manufacturing concepts.
David I. Cleland
Professor Emeritus, Ph.D. (Management), Ohio State University, 1962 - Dr. Cleland has had extensive
experience as a lecturer on Project Management and Strategic Management throughout the United States
and in foreign countries. He has authored or edited over 34 books and has served as a management
consultant, and as an expert witness on several major court cases. His primary research interests are in
the field of project management, and strategic management.
Joel M. Haight
Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (Industrial and
Systems Engineering), Auburn University, 1999. Dr. Haight teaches human factors engineering,
productivity analysis and graduate level courses in safety engineering. His principle research interests
and activities are in human factors engineering and ergonomics associated with improving the design
health care and industrial applications and process intervention effectiveness measures related to safety
and loss prevention. He also develops optimization models to determine safety-related resource
allocation in the oil and gas and mining industries. He will begin coordinating the professional masters
degree for the department.
Jeffrey P. Kharoufeh
Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Industrial Engineering and Operations Research),
Pennsylvania State University, 2001 Dr. Kharoufeh specializes in applied probability, stochastic
processes and queueing theory. His application areas include reliability theory and maintenance
optimization with a particular emphasis on energy and telecommunications systems.
Paul W. Leu
Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Mechanical Engineering), Stanford University, 2008
Dr. Leus research focuses on the computational and experimental characterization of advanced
materials. His primary areas of application include photovoltaics and superstrong materials. His
methodological interests are in electrodynamic simulations, combining optimization methods with
physical simulations, and nanomaterial synthesis and characterization.
K. Louis Luangkesorn
Research Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Industrial Engineering and Management
Science), Northwestern University, 2004. Dr. Luangkesorn's research focuses on the use of simulation
for making a choice between policy options. His primary areas of application are in emergency response
and health care. He also works in supply chain and logistics. His methodological interests include
ranking and selection, optimization via simulation, and experimental design.
Lisa M. Maillart
Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Industrial and Operations Engineering), University
of Michigan, 2001 Dr. Maillarts research focuses on sequential decision making under uncertainty.
Her primary areas of application include medical decision making and maintenance optimization. Her
methodological interests include Markov decision processes (MDPs), in particular partially observed
MDPs.

125

Mainak Mazumdar
Professor Emeritus, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Applied Statistics and Probability), Cornell
University, 1966 Dr. Mazumdars principal area of research is in the development of stochastic models
for the evaluation of reliability and production costs of electric power systems. These models have much
potential for application in the deregulated electric power industry. In collaboration with Professor J.
Rajgopal he has also been developing the system-based component rest plans for evaluating the
reliability of complex systems. This work requires amalgamation of ideas from statistics and probability
theory as well as linear and nonlinear programming
Bryan A. Norman
Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Industrial and Operations Engineering), University
of Michigan, 1995 - Dr. Norman's primary research interests include logistics and the application of
operations research models to production and logistics systems in manufacturing, healthcare and public
health settings. His research focuses primarily on three aspects of logistics. The first concerns the
development of mathematical models for scheduling resources (e.g., machines and equipment) and
personnel (e.g., equipment operators and medical staff) in both manufacturing and service organizations.
Second, he investigates process design and redesign and methods for achieving efficient facility design
and effective people, material, and information flows in a myriad of environments including
manufacturing facilities and hospitals. Third, he models manufacturing, retail, healthcare, and vaccine
supply chains to optimize their design and to enhance their operational effectiveness.
Oleg A. Prokopyev
Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Industrial and Systems Engineering), University of
Florida, 2006 Dr. Prokopyevs primary research interests are currently focused in the areas of
combinatorial optimization, integer programming, stochastic optimization, computational complexity,
applications of operations research in healthcare, bioinformatics and defense. Dr. Prokopyev is a
member of editorial boards of Journal of Global Optimization and journal Optimization Letters.
Jayant Rajgopal
Professor, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Industrial & Management Engineering), University of Iowa,
1985 - Dr. Rajgopal's primary focus area is operations research. His theoretical and methodological
interests are mostly in deterministic and continuous optimization (especially geometric programming).
His primary application areas of interest are (1) production and operations analysis (including such
topics as supply chain design & analysis, logistics, inventory control, scheduling, and lean
manufacturing), and (2) hospital, medical and healthcare delivery systems. He also has an interest in
data mining and applied statistics.
Andrew J. Schaefer
Professor, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Industrial and Systems Engineering), Georgia Institute of
Technology, 2000 - Dr. Schaefer's research interests include optimization under uncertainty and its
applications to medical decision making, logistics, and network design. In particular, he has investigated
the optimal timing of liver transplantation, the optimal treatment of AIDS and sepsis patients, supply
chain management, and airline crew scheduling. His theoretical interests include integer programming,
network flows, stochastic programming, Markov decision processes and simulation, with a particular
focus on stochastic integer programming. Dr. Schaefer also has a secondary appointment in the School
of Medicine.
M. Ravi Shankar
Associate Professor in Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Industrial Engineering), Purdue University, 2006
Dr. Shankars principal research interests are in the development of high-performance nanomaterials,

126

elucidation of deformation behavior at the nanometer-scale and characterization of the mechanics of


manufacturing processes. Dr. Shankar has secondary interests in the design and manufacture of
multifunctional biomaterials.
Larry J. Shuman
Professor, Industrial Engineering and Senior Associate Dean, School of Engineering, Ph.D. (Operations
Research), The Johns Hopkins University, 1969 - Dr. Shuman's research interests include operations
research with applications to improving engineering education and the planning of disaster response
systems. Recent studies funded by the NSF have focused on the development of methodologies and
models to assess engineering education outcomes, including the ability to predict student retention, firstterm probation, and measure the level of moral problem solving. During the Spring 2002 term Dr.
Shuman served as Academic Dean for the spring voyage of the Semester at Sea Program.
Natasa S. Vidic
Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering, PhD. (Industrial Engineering), University of Pittsburgh,
2008. Dr. Vidics research focuses on applying operations research models to production, especially
scheduling personnel in manufacturing as well as simulation modeling. Her research interests are also in
the area of engineering education. She teaches undergraduate courses in probability and statistics,
simulation modeling and engineering computing. She also teaches graduate statistics and data analysis.
Harvey Wolfe
Professor Emeritus, Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. (Operations Research), The Johns Hopkins University,
1964 - Dr. Wolfes primary area of interest is operations research, with particular specialization in the
services industries including health applications and the engineering education system. His primary
interest is in measurement and assessment. He has been working on flow and evaluation models for the
Undergraduate Engineering Education Process and is currently developing a work sampling approach to
behavioral assessment; in particular, teamwork. He has previously been active in the development of
simulation and control models for the evaluation and on-line control of hospital emergency rooms. As a
secondary interest, he teaches and conducts research in engineering ethics and entrepreneurship for
engineers.

Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science


John A. Barnard
Professor, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 1987 Dr. Barnards research interests include
processing/structure/property (magnetic, electronic, mechanical) relations in thin films, materials for
ultra-high density data storage, nano-tribology, adhesion, phase transformations, surface/interface
characterization, nanostructured and self-assembled materials, and hybrid (organic/inorganic) materials.
Sung Kwon Cho
Associate Professor, Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, Seoul National University, Korea, 1998. Dr. Cho
has been working on designing and fabricating micro-sensors/actuators using MEMS technologies for
biomedical applications, such as droplet-based lab-on-a-chip using an electrical control of surface
tension (electrowetting) and micro shear stress sensors to link real-time shear stress with cellular and
molecular responses of endothelial cells. Currently, his research direction is to develop micro/nano
devices that enable us to efficiently manipulate biomolecules (DNA and proteins), cells, functional
particles and micro/nano fluids, and to investigate underlying scientific/engineering phenomena in these
systems.

127

Minking K. Chyu
Leighton and Mary Orr Chair Professor and Chairman, Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, University of
Minnesota, 1986. Dr. Chyu's primary research area lies in thermal issues relating to gas turbine systems,
fuel cells and microtechnology. Major projects conducted to date include convective cooling of gas
turbine airfoils, thermal control of rotating machinery, laser-induced phosphor fluorescence imaging,
liquid crystal thermography, fuel cells, and hybrid energy technologies.
William W. Clark
Professor, Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1991.
Dr. Clark's area of interest is in "smart structures", a field devoted to enabling structures and machines to
interact with and adapt to their environments. Dr. Clark's current research projects are in morphing
materials and systems for structural control, smart insulation for buildings, and inertial measurement of
motion in sports and other applications.
Daniel G. Cole
Associate Professor and Interim Director of Nuclear Engineering, Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1998. Dr. Coles area of research is dynamic
systems, measurement and control with particular focus on instrumentation for nano-science and
engineering, and the control of energy and nuclear systems. His current research supervisory control of
small modular reactors is studying control system architectures for managing plant operations,
automating decision making, and the fault tolerance of such systems.
Anthony J. DeArdo
William Kepler Whiteford Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon
University, 1970 Dr. DeArdo's research involves composition-processing-microstructure-property
relations in structural materials, especially engineering alloys such as microalloyed steels, interstitial-free
steels, dual-phase steels, and stainless steels. Of particular interest in his work are thermomechanical
processing for microstructural control, texture development for improved formability, mechanical
property optimization, the machineability of bar steels and ameliorating embrittlement in a variety of
materials. These programs involve the use of hot deformation machines, computer interfacing, a broad
spectrum of metallographic techniques, and extensive mechanical testing. Professor DeArdo and his
colleague Dr. Garcia in the Basic Metal Processing Research Institute (BAMPRI) have received
international acclaim for the discovery of green steel which will influence the course of machineable
steel technology for years to come. They are also pioneering new electron metallographic techniques to
better define the meso-scale and nano-scale microstructure of advanced high strength steels.
Giovanni P. Galdi
Leighton E. and Mary N. Orr Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics, Laurea in Fisica,
University of Naples, Italy, 1971. Dr. Galdi's areas of interest are theoretical fluid dynamics, with special
regards to the Navier-Stokes equations and flow stability.
C. Isaac Garcia
Research Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1982 - Dr.
Garcias research interests and areas of expertise include Physical Metallurgy, Steels (HSLA,
Microalloyed, Interstitial Free, TRIP, Dual-Phase, Complex-Phase, TWIP, Martensitic, Ferritic and
Austenitic Stainless) and Superalloys; Thin Slab Casting processing and hot ductility performance of
modern steels . Development of high strength linepipe steels (plate and seamless processing). Grain
refinement of heavy section steels through Particle Stimulated Mechanisms (PSN). Microstructural
optimization through alloy design and thermomechanical processing of engineering materials, temper

128

embrittlement of steels, grain boundary engineering. Optimization of the recrystallization behavior


through alloy design, TMP and grain boundary engineering of HSLA steels during continuous and/or
batch annealing processes. Use of NDT/NDE systems to evaluate overall microstructure and predict
mechanical behavior performance. Optimization of the machinability performance of engineering steels
for automotive applications. Development of HSS rolls for the steel industry. Rapid solidification
studies and development of amorphous metallic materials. Dr. Garcia is also co-Director of the Ferrous
Physical Metallurgy Program.
Peyman Givi
James T. MacLeod Professor of Engineering, Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon
University, 1984. Dr. Givis areas of research interest include turbulence, combustion, thermal-fluids,
computational methods and stochastic processes. He is currently the Deputy Editor of AIAA Journal
and a member of the editorial boards of Computers & Fluids, Journal of Applied Fluid Mechanics, and
Open Aerospace Engineering Journal. He is also the Book Review Editor of AIAA Journal, an
Associate Editor of Journal of Combustion, and a past advisory board member of Progress in Energy and
Combustion Science. Professor Givi is Fellow of AIAA, APS and ASME.
Brian Gleeson
Harry S. Tack Chair in Materials Science and Director of Pitts Center for Energy. Ph.D. UCLA, 1989.
Dr. Gleesons primary research focus is on the thermodynamics and kinetics of gas/solid and solid/solid
reactions. Particular emphasis is on the high-temperature degradation of metallic alloys and coatings.
Related to this, current research interests include: (a) Active and passive high-temperature oxidation of
alloys and coatings; (b) deposition and characterization of metallic coatings; (c) diffusion and
thermodynamic treatments of both gas/solid and solid/solid interactions; and (d) structure/property
relationships of materials. Dr. Gleeson serves as Editor-in-Chief of the international journal Oxidation of
Metals.
Mingjian Hua
Assistant Research Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1994 Dr. Hua's research interests are in the areas of phase transformations and physical metallurgy. His
research activities have involved extensive application of advanced microscopy techniques, such as
transmission electron microscopy, STEM, quantitative metallography, and atom probe field ion
microscopy. He has worked on the precipitation, grain boundary segregation and properties of steels,
aluminum alloys, superalloys and intermetallics.
Mark Kimber
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Ph.D. Purdue University. Received the B.S.M.E and
M.S.M.E. degrees from Brigham Young University, Provo, UT in 2002 and 2004, respectively, and the
Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering in 2008 from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, where he
conducted thermal and fluidic studies of piezoelectric fans for use as low-power heat transfer
enhancement devices. He was the recipient of the Laura Winkelman Davidson Fellowship (2006-2007)
and the Graduate Student of the Year Award in the School of Mechanical Engineering (2008). His
current research interests as an Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh include energy
accountability and sustainability in electronic equipment, energy efficient and biomimetic methods of
propulsion, and innovative heat transfer methods pertaining to nuclear power generation.
Jung-Kun Lee
Assistant Professor, Dr. Lee is a materials scientist and his major research topics include sophisticated
processing and characterization of nanostructured materials and electronic materials for energy and
environmental applications. Specific emphasis is placed on 1) photovoltaic application of wide band-gap
nanoparticles, 2) material processing of electronic materials in forms of nanoparticles and thin films, 3)

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optical and magnetic properties of nanoparticles, 4) the surface modification using ion implantation and
chemical methods, 5) domain and strain engineering of ferroic materials.
Scott X. Mao
William Kepler Whiteford Professor, Ph.D. in mechanical behavior of materials, Tohuku University,
1988 - Professor Mao's research interests are in the areas of nanomechanical behavior and deformation
mechanism of materials, materials structure evolution under stress or deformation, materials science,
nanomechanics, and in-situ transmission electron microscope.
Gerald H. Meier
William Kepler Whiteford Professor in Materials Science and Engineering, Ph.D., Ohio State University,
1968 - His areas of research are high-temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, hot corrosion,
environmental effects on the mechanical properties of alloys, and metallic and ceramic coatings. Much
of his current research is focused on materials for advanced gas turbines and solid oxide fuel cells. Dr.
Meier is the author of more than 125 publications and is the co-author of the book, Introduction to the
High Temperature Oxidation of Metals and Alloys. His teaching areas include thermodynamics,
transport phenomena, materials science, and gas-metal reactions.
Mark C. Miller
Associate Research Professor, Mechanical Engineering, and Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery,
Ph.D. in Applied Mechanics, University of Michigan, 1990. Dr. Miller's research work focuses on
human motion and related health problems, quantification of the mechanical effects of orthopaedic
surgery and simulation of arm motion in daily activities and sports.
Ian Nettleship
Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Ph.D., Leeds University, UK, 1987 - Dr.
Nettleship's research activities involve two areas of ceramic processing science. The first is
microstructure-property relationships for highly porous ceramics. At present he is particularly interested
in the quantitative description of microstructure and how it affects the performance of these materials in
biomedical applications including perfusion bioreactors for human cell culturing and tissue formation.
His other area of research involves functionalization of both ceramic surfaces and porous ceramics with
antibacterial nanoparticles to protect against mycobacteria biofilm formation and associated infections.
Teaching interests include: ceramic materials, materials processing, thermal and mechanical properties
of materials.
Anne M. Robertson
Associate Professor, Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, 1992,
President's Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California at Berkeley, Department of Chemical
Engineering 1992-1994. Dr. Robertson's research interests are: (i) cerebral vascular disease; (ii)
constitutive modeling of soft biological tissues and (iii) Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid dynamics.
Laura A. Schaefer
Associate Professor, Bicentennial Board of Visitors Faculty Fellow, Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology, 2000. Dr. Schaefer's research areas of interest are energy systems,
cogeneration, fuel cell development, thermodynamic property modeling, and energy efficiency and
conservation.
Nitin Sharma
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Ph.D from University of Florida. Dr. Sharmas areas of
expertise is in robust control design of uncertain nonlinear systems. His current research projects
include intelligent and robust control of neuromuscular electrical stimulation; control of functional

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electrical stimulation for walking and arm/hand function restoration; and modeling, optimization, and
control of a hybrid walking system. He is a recipient of 2009 O. Hugo Schuck Award and Best Student
Paper Award in Robotics at the 2009 ASME Dynamic Systems and Controls Conference. He was also a
finalist for the Best Student Paper Award at the 2008 IEEE Multi-Conference on Systems and Control.
William S. Slaughter
Associate Professor and Undergraduate Director, Ph.D. in Engineering Science, Harvard University,
1991. Dr. Slaughter has varied interests in the area of theoretical solid mechanics. These include the
development of models to characterize sintering processes of powdered materials, the study of enhanced
strain-hardening associated with plastic deformation at very high strain gradients, fatigue and failure in
bioprosthetic heart valves, and lifetime prediction models for power generation applications.
Patrick Smolinski
Associate Professor, Ph.D. in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Northwestern University 1985. Dr.
Smolinski's research interest is in computational and experimental methods for problems in
biomechanics. This includes the study of tissue properties, surgical procedures, injury mechanics and
medical devices with particular emphasis on orthopaedic medicine.
Albert To
Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D from University of California,
Berkeley, 2005. Dr. Tos areas of research include Multiscale mechanics theory and methods, mechanics
of nano- and bio-materials, nonequilibrium thermomechanical processes, multifunctional materials,
wave propagation, dynamic fracture, inverse problems, and acoustic emission. His current research
projects include development of atomistic-continuum coupling method as well as the mechanics, design
and manufacturing of biomimetic structures.
Phuoc X. Tran
Adjunct Professor, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, 1985. Dr. Tran is currently employed at the
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). His research interests are in the areas of combustion,
laser ignition, laser ablation, nanomaterials, and nanofluids.
Jeffrey S. Vipperman
Associate Professor, Director of Sound, Systems, and Structures Laboratory, Ph.D. in Mechanical
Engineering, Duke University, 1997. Dr. Vipperman's research is in the area of active systems at the
micro (MEMS) and macro scales. In his research, the various related fields of acoustics, structural
acoustics, dynamics, vibrations, control theory, and analog and digital signal processing are unified in
order to achieve specific goals such as active control of noise, vibration, and biologic systems or signal
classification.
Guofeng Wang
Assistant Professor, Materials Science Engineering, Ph.D Major in Materials Science and Minor in
Computer Science from California Institute of Technology in 2002. Dr. Wangs expertise is with
developing multiscale simulation methods which range from electronic structure calculation, atomistic
modeling, and finite element analysis, and further applying these simulation methods to design,
characterize, and optimize a broad range of materials (such as, metals, semiconductors, polymers, and
nanostructures). His current research projects include (a) developing novel electro-catalysts for polymer
electrolyte membrane fuel cells, (b) simulating surface segregation phenomena in various alloy systems,
(c) modeling mechanical deformation process in nanomaterials, (d) investigating material failure
mechanisms in rechargeable Li-ion battery, and (e) studying the structure/property relation of dendritic
polymers.

131

Qing-Ming Wang
Professor and Graduate Director, Materials, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1998. Dr. Wangs
primary research interests are in microelectromechanical sensors and actuators; smart materials and
structures; piezoelectric/electrostrictive ceramics, thin films, polymers, and composites for
electromechanical transducers; bulk acoustic wave (BAW) devices and surface acoustic wave (SAW)
devices; semiconductor materials and active nanocomposites; biosensors. His recent research on
biosensors, nanomaterials and devices, sensors for harsh environments, and acoustic wave devices are
funded by National Science Foundation (NSF), Army Research Office (ARO), DOE, and industries.
James H-C Wang
Professor in Orthopaedic Surgery, Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Physical Medicine
and Rehabilitation, and Bioengineering. PhD in Bioengineering, University of Cincinnati, 1996.
Postdoctoral Fellow in Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins, 1997, and Washington University at St.
Louis, 1998. Dr. Wang is the Director of the MechanoBiology Laboratory (MBL:
http://www.pitt.edu/~mechbio/) in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of
Pittsburgh School of Medicine. His current research focuses on the tendon stem cell (TSC)-based
mechanisms of tendinopathy and the use of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP), in combination with
TSCs and engineered tendon matrix (ETM), to repair injured tendons. In addition, he applies cell traction
force microscopy (CTFM) to characterize cellular function in terms of cell contractility and motility.
His research is funded by the NIH and other funding sources. He is the author of over 250 scientific
papers, book chapters, and abstracts. In addition, Dr. Wang has served on study sections of the NIH and
NSF, and as an editorial board member and reviewer for many scientific journals. He has also served as
the President of the Society of Physical Regulation in Biology and Medicine (SPRBM).
Lisa Mauck Weiland
Associate Professor, Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2003. Dr.
Weilands research focuses on the experiment- and physics-based constitutive modeling of smart
materials, with a strong secondary emphasis on applications. She is the director of Mechanics of Active
Materials Laboratory, in which active materials such ferroelectric ceramics, electroactive polymers, and
nastic materials are considered both experimentally and computationally. The goal of research is to
understand the multi-scale physics responsible for the transduction behavior observed in active materials
in order to expand their viable engineering applications which range from shape morphing structures to
bio-sensors.
Jorg M. K. Wiezorek
Associate Professor, Materials Science and Metallurgy, Ph.D. Cambridge University, UK, 1994Professor Wiezorek's research expertise and interest center on the study of processing-structure-property
relationships in advanced materials systems. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based imaging,
quantitative diffraction and analytical spectroscopic methods, and other modern micro-characterization
techniques feature prominently in his approach to research. Combining experimental observation and
measurement down to atomic level detail with appropriate computer simulations, including density
functional theory based and continuum level multi-physics based calculations, with the principles and
practice of physical metallurgy and metal physics leads to the discovery of novel materials and materials
behaviors, explanations of the mechanical, magnetic and other physical properties of structural and
functional materials, with an emphasis on intermetallic and metallic systems. Current research thrusts
include: (1) Determination of the electronic structure of multi-component intermetallics by quantitative
electron diffraction and DFT; (2) Enhancing the degradation resistance of structural steels and alloys in
the extreme environments of nuclear and fossil-fuel power plants by surface modification and grainboundary-engineering; (3) Ultrafast (nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution) in-situ TEM imaging and
diffraction studies of rapid irreversible transient phenomena in pulsed laser processed metal and alloy
thin films.

132

Sylvanus Wosu
Associate Professor, Associate Dean for Diversity Affairs, Ph.D. in Engineering Physics, University of
Oklahoma, OK, 1988 with specialty in nuclear medical physics. Professor Wosus current research
interests are in the areas of impact physics and engineering of new advanced composite materials,
dynamic problems in composites failure, and energy containment and responses of dynamical systems.
Dr. Wosu is nationally and internationally known for his work in penetration mechanics of composite
materials. He established the dynamic impact and high speed imaging system at the University of
Pittsburgh Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science that is capable of simulating
low and high strain rate penetration loading and capturing the dynamic event at 2 million frames per
second. Special sample fixtures he developed are used to study perforation impact and single and multimode fracture tests and general characterization of materials failure. Professor Wosu is also interested in
the experimental investigation of the dynamic failures and crack propagation of cylindrical composite
storage tank with particular interests in the development of hydrogen storage tank, failure behaviors of
hydrogen-diffused porous composite materials, and the containment of the associated hydrogen
embrittlement. His other research interests include experimental nuclear medical physics, laser-based
medical physics research in Cerebral Metabolic Pathways of Oxygen, petrophysics and petroleum fluid
characterization of reservoirs. His engineering education research focuses on the Framework of Effective
Diversity Programs in Higher Education. His most recent published work was on a Model for Diversity
and Equity: Diversity in Graduate Engineering Education is the culmination of his over 20-year
experience as an advocate for diversity and inclusion in higher education.
Xudong Zhang
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery, Mechanical Engineering, and Bioengineering, Ph.D.,
University of Michigan, 1997. Dr. Zhangs primary research field is musculoskeletal biomechanics,
wherein his work spans theory, experiment, and computation. His focus has been on developing and
validating biomechanical models and computer simulations for clinical as well as industrial
applications. Such applications include treatment efficacy and outcome evaluation, computer-assisted
orthopaedics and rehabilitation, computer-aided design and digital manufacturing, prosthetics and
robotics.
Paolo Zunino
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Ph.D in Applied Mathematics at the Ecole Polytecnique
Fdrale de Lausanne, 2002. Dr. Zuninos expertise is focused in the development of mathematical
models and numerical approximation methods with application to engineering and life sciences. His
current research projects include: the study of nonstandard finite element schemes for flow and transport;
the application of such methods to forward and inverse problem formulations; computational modeling
of multiphase flow and transport problems through heterogeneous media; computational modeling of
fluid dynamics and drug release in biomedical devices. He has received the SIAM Outstanding Paper
Prize, awarded by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, on July 2004. The prize, first
awarded in 1999, is given to outstanding papers published in SIAM journals during the three years prior
to the year of the award.

133

FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS


Fiscal Year 2013 Active Sponsored Research

Bioengineering
Steven Abramowitch
Tissue specific ECM Scaffold for the Fuctional Repair of the Vocal Lamina - Magee-Womens Research Institute & Foundation
Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health - Magee-Womens Research Institute & Foundation
Effects of Bazefoxifen/Conjugated Estrogens Complex on the Biomechanical Properties of the Pelvic-Floor and Pelvic Supportive
Connective Tissue Remodeling - Pfizer, Inc.
Rouzbeh Amini
Alteration in the Mitral Valve Stress and Mitral Valve Interstitial Cell Deformation Following Repair Surgeries - National Institutes of
Health
Stephen Badylak
Engineering a Functional Liver Graft for Treatment of End Stage Liver Disease - National Institutes of Health
Use of Autologous Inductive Biologic Scaffold Materials for the Treatment of Compartment Syndrome - Wake Forest University
Regenerative Medicine Strategies for Digit Reconstruction - GSR Sub - Wake Forest University
Development/Refinement of Preclinical Models and Ex-Vivo Test Methods - C R Bard Inc.
Development and Evaluation of Xenografts for Soft Tissue Reconstruction - C R Bard Inc.
Development and/or Refinement of In Vitro Methods which would Characterize and/or Predict the Host Response to a Test Article - C R
Bard Inc.
Development/Refinement of Preclinical Models and Ex-Vivo Test Methods - C R Bard Inc.
Aaron Batista
Differential Contributions of Frontal Lobe Areas - National Institutes of Health
Collaborative Research: Dissecting Brain-Computer Interfaces - Carnegie Mellon University
Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences - Burroughs Wellcome
Michael Boninger
Revolutionizing Prosthetics Program, Phase 3 - Johns Hopkins University
Harvey Borovetz
The Translational Research Partnership Program in Biomedical Engineering - Wallace H. Coulter Foundation
The Role of Angiogenesis in Perivascular Stem Cell-Mediated Cardiac Repair after Myocardial Infarction - American Heart Association
Harvey Borovetz, Prashant Kumta, Mark Redfern, Savio Woo, Charles Sfeir & William Wagner
NSF Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials - University of North Carolina
Harvey Borovetz & Howard Aizenstein
Pharmacologic MRI Predictors of Treatment Response in Late-Life Depression - National Institutes of Health
Harvey Borovetz & David Brienza
Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Telerehabilitation - U.S. Department of Education
Harvey Borovetz & Kyong Bae
Identifying CT Imaging Biomarkers Associated with Prognosis of Pulmonary Embolism - National Institutes of Health
Harvey Borovetz & Kang Kim
Ultrasound-induced Thermal Strain Imaging for Arterial Plaque Characterization - National Institutes of Health

134

Harvey Borovetz & Robert Hendricks


Interdisciplinary Visual Sciences (IVS) Training Program - National Institutes of Health
Harvey Borovetz & Steven Reis
Mathematical Brain Tumor Model for Therapy Response Evaluation - National Institutes of Health
Harvey Borovetz & Andrew Schwartz
Cortical Control of a Dextrous Prosthetic Hand - National Institutes of Health
Harvey Borovetz & Joel Schuman
Novel Glaucoma Diagnostics for Structure & Function - National Institutes of Health
Harvey Borovetz & Walter Schneider
Biological Accelerated Learning Technology (BALT) - U.S. Department of the Interior
Harvey Borovetz & Angus Thomson
Interdisciplinary Training in Transplantation Biology - National Institutes of Health
Harvey Borovetz & Alan Wells
Escape From Tumor Cell Dormancy - U.S. Army
All Human Microphysical Model of Metastasis Therapy - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Harvey Borovetz & James Wang
Development of Novel Bioengineered Tendon Graft Using Autologous Tissue Scaffold and Cells for Repair of Injured Tendons - Tissue
Genesis Institue, LLC
Harvey Borovetz & Arthur Levine
Health Research Formula Fund Award - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Harvey Borovetz & Joseph Samosky
Game Based and Sensor Enhanced Medical Simulation and Training - Carnegie Mellon University
Harvey Borovetz & Kalidasan Thambiayya
Decrease in Labile Intracellular Zinc (Zni) Contribute to LPS-Induced Apoptosis in Cultured Sheep Pulondary Artery Endothelial Cells (SPAEC)
- American Heart Association
Harvey Borovetz & Scott Tashman
In Vivo Arthrokinematics and Oseoarthritis After Lateral Meniscal Injury - Arthritis Foundation
Rakie Cham
Motion Capture System - National Institutes of Health
Effect of Anticholinergic Drugs and White Matter Hyperintensities on Balance and Gait - National Institutes of Health
Comparative Effectiveness between Microprocessor Controlled and Non-Microprocessor Controlled Prosthetic Knees - American Orthotic
and Prosthetic Association, Inc
Xinyan Tracy Cui
Career: Manipulating Stem Cells via Electroactive Conducting Polymers - National Science Foundation
Improving Chronic Neural Recording Performance through Biomaterial Strategies - National Institutes of Health
Neuroprosthetics and Solutions for Restoring Sensorimotor Function - U.S. Army
Ultra-Compliant Neural Probes with Stiff Biodegradable Needles - Carnegie Mellon University
Failure Mechanisms of Neural Electrodes - Georgia Institute of Technology
Phase II - Design of Novel Brain-like Materials for Neural Interfacing - TDA Research, Inc.
Reliable Spinal Nerve Interfaces for Sensorimotor Neuroprostheses - U.S. Navy
Reliable Cortical Interfaces - U.S. Navy

135

Lance Davidson
CAREER: Physical Shaping of Multicellular Mesenchymal Tissues - National Science Foundation
Long Term Spatiotemporal Control to Investigate Dynamics in Xenopus Laevis Embryonic Development - National Science Foundation
Biophysics of Development Buffering: Temperature as a Tool to Study How the Cytoskeleton Coordinates - National Institutes of Health
The Biomechanics of Morphogenesis in the Frog - National Institutes of Health
William Federspiel
Paracorporeal Ambulatory Assist Lung - National Institutes of Health
Neeraj Gandhi
Neural Integration of Eye and Head Movements - National Institutes of Health
Robert Gaunt
A Novel Sensory Neural Prosthesis using Active, Flexible Electronics - National Institutes of Health
Theordore Huppert
Characterization of Brain Noise Using Multimodal Mutual Information - National Institutes of Health
Tamer Ibrahim
Identifying CT Imaging Biomarkers Associated with Prognosis of Pulmonary Embolism - National Institutes of Health
Subject-Insensitvie and SNR Enhancing RF Arrays for High Field Parallel Human MRI - National Institutes of Health
A Distributed Wireless Neural Interface System - University of Texas at Dallas
Marina Kameneva
Multi Scale Model of Thrombosis in Artificial Circulation - Carnegie Mellon University
Pratap Khanwilkar
I-Corps: Bioresorbable Conduits for Nerve Regeneration - National Science Foundation
Kang Kim
Development of a Novel Multi-modal In Vivo Imaging System for Animal-to-Human Use - Sogang University
Seong-Gi Kim
Multimodal Neuroimaging Training Program - National Institutes of Health
Judith Klein
EARGER: Exploring the Biochmical Principle of Allostery for Algorithm Development - National Science Foundation
Prashant Kumta
Calcium Phosphate Aquagels: Novel Gene Delivery Systems - National Science Foundation
Novel Catalyst Supports for Water Electrolysis: Experimental and Theoretical Studies - National Science Foundation
Fundamental Experimental and Theoretical Studies on a Novel Family of Oxide Catalyst Supports for Water Electrolysis - U.S. Department
of Energy
Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Li-Ion Anode Systems - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Mg Battery Development - NETL/URS Corporation
Materials Science and Engineering - Energy Storage - NETL/URS Corporation
Resorbable Calcium Phosphate Putty for Bone Regeneration-BioE Sub - Innovation Works
Scott Lephart
Naval Special Warfare Tactical Athlete Program Human Performance and Injury Prevention Research Initiative - U.S. Navy

136

Patrick Loughlin
Modeling Sensory Integration and Attention in Postural Control of Older Adults - National Institutes of Health
Pittsburgh Older Americans Independence Center RC-4 Loughlin - National Institutes of Health
Subject-Specific Vibrotactile Feedback Strategy for Augmenting Postural Control in Older Adults - National Institutes of Health
Sonar Signal Analysis and Waveform Design for Enhanced Target Detection and Classification - U.S. Navy
Nonstationary Signal Processing Methods for Channel Characterization and Sonar Signal Classification in Varying and Uncertain
Environments - U.S. Navy
Sonar Signal Processing and Feature Extraction for Automatic Target Recognition in Clutter - U.S. Navy
Evaluation of Vibrotactile Balance Prosthesis in Patients with Vestibular Impairment - Pennsylvania Lions Hearing Research Foundation
Spandan Maiti
EAGER: Accurate and Efficient Surrogate Modeling Applied to Computational Mechanics - National Science Foundation
Pamela Moalli
Comprehensive Evaluation of Prolapse Meshes by an Interdisciplinary Research Team - Magee-Womens Research Institute & Foundation
Martin Oudega
Development of a Laminin-Based, a Cellular, Injectable Matrix for Spinal Cord Repair - Wings for Life Spinal Cord Research Foundation
Mark Redfern
CPS: Medium: Collaborative Research: Monitoring Human Performance with Wearable Accelerometers - National Science Foundation
RI:Medium:Collaborative Research: Trajectory Libraries for Locomotion on Rough Terrain - National Science Foundation
Pittsburgh Older American Independence Center RC-2 Cham - National Institutes of Health
Modeling Shoe-Floor Interface Properties to Predict Slips and Falls - Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Partha Roy
Profilin as a Target to Suppress Invasive Breast Cancer - National Institutes of Health
Spatial Segregation of Cell Functioning during Cell Motility - National Institutes of Health
Drag Reducing Polymer to Curb Beast Cancer Metastasis - U.S. Army
A Novel Target for Breast Cancer - Magee-Womens Research Institute & Foundation
J. Peter Rubin
Autologous Adipose Derived Stem Cell Therapy for Soft Tissue Reconstruction After Facial Trauma - Rubin GSR Sub - Wake Forest
University
Andrew Schwartz
Cortical Control of a Dextrous Prosthetic Hand - National Institutes of Health
Reliable Cortical Interfaces - U.S. Navy
Charles Sfeir
Cell-Based Scaffold-Less Three-Dimensional Construct, a Model for Dentinogenesis - National Institutes of Health
Sanjeev Shroff
Cardiovascular Bioengineering Training Program - National Institutes of Health
Mechanisms of Preeclampsia: Impact of Obesity Project III - Magee-Womens Research Institute & Foundation
Influence of Attention and Eye Movement Signals on Population Coding in Area V4 - National Institutes of Health
Gwendolyn Sowa
Mechanobiology in CAM: Differential Effects of Amplitude - National Institutes of Health

137

George Stetten
Holographic Sonic Flashlight for Guiding Interventional Procedures - National Institutes of Health
Microsurgical In-Situ Image Guidance with Optical Coherence Tomography - National Institutes of Health
UIGmicrosurgical Instruments that Magnify the Sense of Touch - Innovation Works
Rocky Tuan
Enhanced Tendon Healing through Growth Factor and Cell Therapies - Washington University in St. Louis
The Application of Adult Stem Cells and Native Tissue Matrices for Tissue Regeneration - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
David Vorp
ROS Mechanisms in BAV Aortopathy - National Institutes of Health
Autologous Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineered Vascular Grafts - National Institutes of Health
Biomedical Simulation of Evolving Aortic Aneurysms for Designing Intevention - Yale University
Identification of an Ideal Cell Source Based on Type and Donor for Stem Cell Based-Tissue Engineered Vascular Grafts - American Heart
Association
William Wagner
Biomechanical Optimization of TE Heart Valves - National Institutes of Health
Biodegradeable, Thermoresponsive Hydrogels to Treat Ischemic Cardiomyopathy - National Institutes of Health
Yadong Wang
Design and Application of Biocompatible Polycations - National Science Foundation
Biomimetic Design of Peripheral Nerve Guides - National Science Foundation
Compliant and Strong Small Arteries Engineered in Vitro - National Institutes of Health
Biodegradable Synthetic Vascular Graft - National Institutes of Health
Biomimetic Coacervates for Cardiac Repair and Regeneration - American Heart Association
Drug-Eluting Polymer Injection to Diminish Left Ventricular Scar Burden after Myocardial Infarction - Innovation Works
Douglas Weber
Multichannel Microstimulation of Primary Afferent Neurons to Restore Proprioceptive Feedback - National Institutes of Health
Reliable Spinal Nerve Interfaces for Sensorimotor Neuroprostheses - U.S. Navy
Savio Woo
Non Contact ACL Injuries in Females and In Vivo and Robotic Study - National Institutes of Health
Training in Biomechanics in Regenerative Medicine - National Institutes of Health
Bioscaffolds to Enhance ACL Healing After Primary Repair - ASIAM Institute for Research & Education

138

FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS


Fiscal Year 2013 Active Sponsored Research

Chemical and Petroleum Engineering


Mohammad Ataai
Maximizing Therapeutic DNA Process Productivity - National Science Foundation
Anna Balazs
Harnessing Light to Control the Autonomous Functionality of Soft Active Materials - National Science Foundation
CDI-Type-1: Developing Computational Models to Enable the Experimental Self-Assembly of Modified Carbon Nanotubes into Biomimetic
Synthetic Cellular Vesicles - National Science Foundation
CDI-Type I: Developing Computational Models to Guide the Design of Chemomechanically Responsive, Reconfigurable Surfaces - National
Science Foundation
Integrating Modeling and Experiments to Design Robust Self-Healing Materials - U.S. Department of Energy
Inducing Artificial Morphogenesis in Soft Synthetic Materials - U.S. Department of Energy
Polymer-Based Materials for Harvesting Solar Energy - University of Massachusetts
Chemomechanical Transduction: Utilizing Oscillatory Chemical Processes - Brandeis University
CMSE NSF IRG II Collaboration - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Using Applied Force to Control the Properties of Reconfigurable Materials - U.S. Army
Using Theory and Simulation to Design Active Materials with Sensory and Adaptive Capabilities - U.S. Air Force
Bio-Inspired Adaptive High-Aspect-Ratio Nano-and Micro-Structures Powered By Responsive Hydrogels: Synthesis and Medeling - Harvard
Medical School
Novel Materials Approaches for Prevention of Marine Biofouling - U.S. Navy
Ipsita Banerjee
Defining Mechanisms Controlling Stem Cell Fate During Differentiation - National Institutes of Health
Eric Beckman
Student and Junior Faculty Travel Support for Engineering Sustainability 2013: Innovation and the Triple Bottom Line - National Science
Foundation
Eric Beckman & Laura Schaefer
IGERT: Sustainability Initiative in Engineering - National Science Foundation
Robert Enick
EOS and Experimental High Temperature High Pressure Ultradeep Reservoir Fluid Density and Viscosity - NETL/URS Corporation
CO2 Capture Process using Phase-Switchable Absorbants - GE Global Research
Quantifying Complex Fluid-Phase Properties at High Pressure/High Temperature - NETL/URS Corporation
CO2 Soluble Surfactants for Improved Mobility Control - NETL/URS Corporation
Development of High Molecular Weight PDMS - NETL/URS Corporation
PDMS Characterization and Testing - NETL/URS Corporation
Quantifying Complex Fluid-Phase Properties a High Pressure/High Temperature - NETL/URS Corporation
Membrane Reactor Process for Conversion of Coal-Gas Components - NETL/URS Corporation
CO2 Thickeners to Improve the Performance of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO2 Fracturing - U.S. Department of Energy
Solubility & Foam-Forming Capabilities of Non-Ionic Surfactants - Huntsman LLC

139

Di Gao
CAREER: DNA Separation and Mutation Screening Based on the Elasticity of DNA Modules - National Science Foundation
High-Efficiency Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Ordered TiO2 Nanotube Arrays - National Science Foundation
Condensation and Icing at Superhydrophobic Surfaces - National Science Foundation
Rapid Tests for Chlamydia and Neglected Tropical Diseases - National Institutes of Health
Biomimetic Self-Adhesive Dry EEG Electrodes - National Institutes of Health
J. Karl Johnson
Ultra-Thin Oriented Carbon Nanotube Asymmetric Composite Membranes: Theory and Experiment - National Science Foundation
GOALI: Collaborative Research: Phase Behavior and Reactivity of a Hydgroscopic System - National Science Foundation
Ultra-Thin Oriented Carbon Nanotube Asymmetric Composite Membranes: Theory and Experiment (REU supplement) - National Science
Foundation
Enhancing the Sorption Capability for Chemical Agents and Toxic Industrial Compounds by Single Walled Carbon Nanotube using Alkali
Metal Doping - University of Virginia
Computational Design of Metal Organic Frameworks for Photocatalytic Reduction of CO2 - U.S. Department of Energy
Molecular Modeling of Ionic Liquids for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Solvents - NETL/URS Corporation
Reactive Force Field Development - NETL/URS Corporation
Lei Li
Understanding the mechanics of simultaneous oleophobic/hydrophilic behavior: When a nanometer-thick polymer coating meets an
attractive solid surface - National Science Foundation
Understand the Structure-Property Relationships of Comb-Like Polymer (CLP) Liquids with a Hydrocarbon Backbone and Fluorocarbon Side
Chains - Seagate Technology LLC
Tribological Modification of CVD-Grown Graphene with Nanometer-Thick Polymers - Taiho Kogyo Tribology Research Foundation
Understanding the Interaction between Talc and Perfluropolyether (PFPE) Lubricants at the Head-Media Interface (HDI) - Western Digital
Technologies, Inc.
Steven Little
CDI Type-I: Developing Computational Models to Enable the Experimental Self-Assembly of Modified Carbon Nanotubes into Biomimetic
Synthetic Cellular Vesicles - National Science Foundation
Immunization Strategies for Autologous HIV Immunology - National Institutes of Health
Regeneration of Periodontal Structures through the Recruitment of Regulatory Lymphocytes - National Institutes of Health
Treatment of Periodontitis via Recruitment of Regulatory Lymphocytes - National Institutes of Health
Immunization Strategies for Autologous HIV Immunotherapy - National Institutes of Health
Treatment of Periodontitis via Recruitment of Regulatory Lymphoycytes - National Institutes of Health
ARM IV Postdoctoral Fellowship - Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative
Treatments for Periodontitis that Restore Immunological Homeostasis - Wallace H. Coulter Foundation
Joseph McCarthy
Fluids-Inspired Granular Processing: Novel Methods of Mixing and Separation - National Science Foundation
REU Site: Particle-Based Functional Materials for Energy, Biomedicine, and Sustainability - National Science Foundation
An integrated Education in the Engineering of Functional Materials - U.S. Department of Education
Badie Morsi
Novel Liquid Solvents and Solid-Liquid Phase-Transition Solvents for the Absorption of CO2 - NETL/URS Corporation
Clean Coal Conference - Leonardo Technologies, Inc.
Development of Slurry Bubble Column Reactors for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis - National Institute of Clean-and-Low Carbon Energy
Base Catalyzed Coal Liquefaction Process - FRCP Ventures I, LLC
Sittichai Natesakhawat
Fundamental Research entitled Heterogeneous Catalysis of Photoactive Materials - NETL/URS Corporation
Nitrogen Rich Porous Nanocarbon Materials - NETL/URS Corporation

140

Robert Parker
REU Site: Engineering Tools for Decision Support in Systems Medicine - National Science Foundation
Engineering Personalized Cancer Chemotherapy Schedules - National Science Foundation
Engineering Education Systems Medicine: Modeling , Analysis, and Research, and Teaching - U.S. Department of Education
Model-Based Decision Support for Tight Glucose Control without Hypoglycemia - National Institutes of Health
Sachin Velankar
Particles at Polymer Interfaces: Interfacial Phenomena and Morphology Control in Immiscible Polymer Blends - National Science
Foundation
Particles at Polymer/Polymer Interfaces: Interfacial Phenomena and Morphology Control in Immiscible Polymer Blends - National Science
Foundation
EAGER: Thermoplastic Foams Stabilized with Interfacially-Active Particles - National Science Foundation
Buckling of Bilayer Laminates: A Novel Approach to Synthetic Papillae - U.S. Air Force
Gtz Veser
Towards Understanding Nanocomposite Materials: Multiscale Tailoring for Thermally Stable and Accessible Nanoparticles - National
Science Foundation
Chemical Looping Combustion: Syngas Production From Methane in a Periodically Operated Fixed-Bed Reactor - National Science
Foundation
Towards Assessing and Mitigating the Toxicity of Metal Nanoparticles - National Science Foundation
Multifunctional Nanomaterials for WGS Catalysis with Integrated Multicontaminant Removal - NETL/URS Corporation
Synthesis and Characterization of Nano-Structured Materials for CO2 and H2O Reforming - NETL/URS Corporation
Multifunctional Nanomaterials for Water-Gas-Shift Catalysis in Contaminated Fuel Streams - NETL/URS Corporation
ICMI Support for Oxygen Carrier Interaction Studies - NETL/URS Corporation
Catalytic Processes for Conversion of Coal-Gas - NETL/URS Corporation
Development of Catalysts for Coal-Gas Component Conversion - NETL/URS Corporation
Judith Yang
Silicon Carbide Nanocone and Heterostructure Formations Catalyzed by the Release of Carbon-Encapsulated Metal Nanoparticles National Science Foundation
Oxide Evolution Dynamics and Stability in Harsh Environments - National Science Foundation
The Reactivity and Structural Dynamics of Supported Metal Nanoclusters Using Electron Microsopy, In-situ X-ray Spectroscopy, Electronic
Structure Theories, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations - University of Illinois

141

FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS


Fiscal Year 2013 Active Sponsored Research

Civil and Environmental Engineering


Jorge Abad
Morphodynamics of Complex Meander Bends on Large Rivers - National Science Foundation
Morphodynamics of the Madeira River: An Amazonian Anabranching Mega-River Facing Imminent Disruption - National Science
Foundation
Enhancement of the Channel Evolution Model CONCEPTS for Predicting the Water Quality Benefits of Retention of Riverine Sediments by
Floodplains - U.S. Department of Agriculture
Center for Healthy Environments and Communities - Heinz Endowment
Marcellus Shale Baseline Study: Monitoring Bathymetric, Bedload Transport and Water Discharge Change at 10 Mile Creek - Duquesne
University
Kyle Bibby
Shift in The Microbial Ecology of Hospital Premise Plumbing Upon the Introduction of a Monochloramine Disinfection System - Alfred P.
Sloan Foundation
Melissa Bilec
EFRI: Barriers, Understanding, Integration - Life Cycle Development (BUILD) - National Science Foundation
Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Mode of Hysterectomy - National Institutes of Health
Evaluating Sustainable Disposla Options for Compostable Biopolymers - Arizona State University
CCLI Type I: Integrating Sustainability into the Civil Engineering Curriculum through Three Courses at the University of Pittsburgh - Arizona
State University
Energy Efficient Buildings Hub (EEB Hub) - Pennsylvania State University
John Brigham
Computational Methods for Optimized Reliability and Efficiency in Smart Structural Systems - National Science Foundation
Fundamental Advances in Inverse Mechanics Towards Self-Aware and Intrinsically Adaptable Structural Systems - U.S. Air Force
Experimentally Validated Numerical Models of Non-Isothermal Turbulent Mixing in High Temperature Reactors - UT-Battelle
Daniel Budny
On Engineering Education: The Role of the First Year - University of Notre Dame
William Harper
Sensing Soluble Organics with Microbial Fuel Cells Deploying in an Estuary - National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration
Kent Harries
Structural Evaluation of Slab Rehabilitation by the Method of Hydrodemolition and Latex Modified Overlay - Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania
Deterioration of J Bar Reinforcement in Abutments and Piers - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Updated Research for Collision Damage Repair of Precast/Prestressed Concrete - National Academy of Sciences
Small Modular Reactor, Civil Structural Design and Analysis - Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC
Strand Debonding for Pretensioned Girders - University of Cincinnati
Anthony Iannacchione
The Effects of Subsidence Resulting from Underground Bituminous Coal Mining on Surface Structures and Features and on Water
Resources: Fourth Act 54 Five-Year Report - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

142

Anthony Iannacchione & Jason Monnell


Develop Underground Mining Systems that Improve Coal Recovery while Reducing Environmental Impacts - Virginia Tech University
Vikas Khanna
Developing a Life Cycle Assessment Model for Evaluating Policy Implications of Biofuels - Arizona State University
Xu Liang
NOSS: Collaborative Research: Investigating Temporal Correlation For Power Efficient And Lossless Communication In Wireless Sensor
Networks - National Science Foundation
EAGER: Collaborative Research: From Data to Users: A Prototype Open Modeling Framework - National Science Foundation
Long-Term Solutions to Acid Producing Coal Mine Spoils using Industrial Waste - National Science Foundation
EAGER: Collaborative Research: Network Interface and Data Collection Based on Compressed Sensing in Large-Scale Wireless Sensor
Networking - National Science Foundation
The Role of Vegetation, Surface, and Subsurface Processes on Mega Drought and Its Implications to Climate Change - U.S. Department of
Energy
The Role of Surface/Subsurface Processes and Large Scale Variations on Drought Prediction - National Oceanic & Atmospheric
Administration
Improving Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Hydrologic Disaster Forecasting and Response by Assimilating and Fusing NASA and
other Data Sets - National Aeronautics & Space Administration
Assessment of Long-term Environmental Impacts of Beneficial Reuse of Alcoa's Alkaline Clay on Coal Refuse Pile - Alcoa
Jeen-Shang Lin
Geomechanical Strength, Deformability and Seismic Properties of Hydrate Bearing Sediments and Numerical Analysis - Constitutive Model
Development - NETL/URS Corporation
Joseph Marriott
Developing an Electricity-specific Mixed-unit Input-output Model for Life Cycle Assessment and Energy Policy Evaluation - National
Science Foundation
Piervincenzo Rizzo
Collaborative Research: Novel NDE/SHM Approach Based on Highly Nonlinear Dynamics - National Science Foundation
Collaborative Research: Novel NDE/SHM Approach Based on Highly Nonlinear Dynamics - National Science Foundation
Hazard Mitigation of Water Mains by Means of Immersed Active/Passive Inspection Systems - National Science Foundation
Collaborative Research: Highly Nonlinear Transducer Arrays for Structural Health Monitoring - National Science Foundation
Indirect Bridge Health Monitoring by Means of Moving Vehicles - Carnegie Mellon University
Highly Nonlinear Solitary Waves for Rail Buckling Prevention - U.S. Department of Transportation
Sensing Technology for Damage Assessment of Sign Supports and Cantilever Pole Structures - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Julie Vandenbossche
Development of Design Guide for Thin and Ultra-Thin concrete Overlays of Existing Asphalt Pavements - Minnesota Department of
Transportation
Gas Flow Shallow Gas Formations - NETL/URS Corporation
Evaluation of Bridge Cleaning Methods on Steel Structures - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Improved Performance of Jointed Plain Concrete Through a Better Awareness of Drying Shrinkage - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Establish Inputs for the New Rigid Component of the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) - Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania
Guidelines for the use of Waste Concrete Fines - National Academy of Sciences
Developing Recalibrated Concrete Performance Models for the DARWin-ME Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design - National Academy
of Sciences

143

Radisav Vidic
Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants - U.S. Department
of Energy
Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus expanded Chemical
Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management - Carnegie Mellon University
Sustainable Management of Flowback Water during Hydraulic Fracturing of Marcellus Shale for Natural Gas Production - U.S. Department
of Energy
The Marcellus Shale Research Network - Penn State University
Fate of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) in Flowback and Produced Waters from Shale Gas Development Sites NETL/URS Corporation
Developing a Methodology to Incorporate Transit, Pedestrian and Bicycle Design Features into Highway and Bridge - Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania
Program Development and Implementation Strategies - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Qiang Yu
NRC Faculty Development: Swanson School of Engineering - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Bridge Waterproofing Details - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

144

FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS


Fiscal Year 2013 Active Sponsored Research

Electrical and Computer Engineering


Peng Chen
CAREER: Multi-Functional, High Sensitivity Optical Sensors in Microstructures Fibers - National Science Foundation
Nuclear Nano-Engineering - National Science Foundation
Laser Manufacturing of Three-Dimensional Lightwave Circuits and Nano-Optical Devices - National Science Foundation
EAGER: Fiber Sensors Networks for Crude Oil Migration Monitoring in Ocean - National Science Foundation
Design for Robustness: A New Design Philosophy for the Next-Generation Non-Volatile Memories - National Science Foundation
Collaborative Research: Laseer Manufacturing of Three-Dimensional Lightwave Circuits and Nano-Optical Devices - National Science
Foundation
Process-Variation Aware Memristor Modeling and Design - National Science Foundation
SHF Small: Collaborative Research: STEMS: Statistic Eemerging Memory - National Science Foundation
Development of Metal Oxide Nanostructure-based Optical Sensors for Fossil Fuel Derived Gases Measurement at High Temperature - U.S.
Department of Energy
Fiber Optic Sensor Array for Cryogenic Feul Monitoring and Management - Lakeshore Cryotronics Inc.
Design for Manufacturing Methods for Memristor-Based Neuromorphic Computing Processors - U.S. Air Force
Ultrafast Fiber Laser Sampling and Plasma-Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to Combat WMD - Defense Threat
Reduction Agency
Fiber Optical Components for Harsh Environment Sensing - Penn State University
Memristor Crossbar Based Neuromorphic Hardware Systems - Hewlett Packard
Amro El-Jaroudi
Speaker Independent Continuous Density HMM Research - Vocollect Inc.
Alexander Jones
EFRI: Barriers, Understanding, Integrating - Life Cycle Development (BUILD) - National Science Foundation
CRI: Ci-P: Planning for an Innovative Dual-Path Computer Architecture Modeling Infrestructure for Highly Productive System Simulation
and Emulation - National Science Foundation
SHF: Medium: Compiler and Chip Multiprocessor Co-design for Scalable Efficient Data Access and Communication - National Science
Foundation
Collaborative Research: Planning Grant: I/UCRC for Nexys: Next Generation Electronic System Design - National Science Foundation
Hong Koo Kim
Single-Electron-Level Ballistic Transport Devices - National Science Foundation
Electrical Pumping of Graphene by 2D Electron Gas Injection - U.S. Navy
Solar Nano: Optical Testing of Metal Nano-Optic Structures for Solar Cells - Innovation Works
SAVD Prototype Development and Demonstration of Scalable Manufacturing - SAVD Solar, Inc.
George Kusic
Monitoring of Shipboard Energy Storage Systems and Utilization of dc/ac Converters from Distributed Storage to Augment Ships Power U.S. Navy
Steven Levitan
Multi-Yield RFCM Investigations and Development - Dynetics Inc.
A Portable Lab-On-Chip Cytometer for CD4/CD8 Lymphocyte Counts - Technology Collaborative
Guangyong Li
CPS-Small: Collaborative Research: Automated and Robust Nano-Assembly with Atomic Force Micsrocopes - National Science Foundation
Development of Highly Sensitive and High-Resolution Kelvin Probe Microscopy for in situ Characterization of Organic Photovoltaic Cells National Science Foundation

145

Hai Li
CAREER STT-RAM Based Memory Hierarchy and Management in Embedded Systems - National Science Foundation
SMURFS: Statistical Modeling, Simulation and Robust Design Techniquies for Memristors - National Science Foundation
Zhi-Hong Mao
CAREER: Evaluating Capabilities of Neural Control in Human-Machine Interaction - National Science Foundation
CSR: Medium: Collaborative Research: Static Pipelining, an Approach for Ultra-Low Power Embedded Processors - National Science
Foundation
A Unified Sensor System for Ubiquitous Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity - National Institutes of Health
Development and Evaluation of a Novel Wireless EEG Monitoring Sensor - University of Cincinnati
Marlin Mickle
Ortho-Tag Development and Sensor Electronics for pH - Ortho-tag Inc.
Kartik Mohanram
SHF: Small: Collaborative Research: Modeling, Simulation, and Design for Performance and Reliability in Carbon-based Electronics National Science Foundation
SHF: Small: Lookahead Logic Circuits for Perfomance, Power, and Reliability - National Science Foundation
CAREER: Design Optimization for Robustness to Single Event Effects - National Science Foundation
John Pittner
An Exploratory and Radically Different Approach for Control of a Tandem Hot Metal Strip Rolling Process for Product Quality Improvement
- University of Central Florida
Gregory Reed
Developing an Electricity-Specific Mixed-Unit Input-Output Model for Life Cycle Assessment and Energy Policy Evaluation - National
Science Foundation
Keystone Smart Grid Fellowship Program - Lehigh University
Fundamental Research Entitled: The Next Generation Power Converter: System Level Modeling - NETL/URS Corporation
Nanocomposite Magnet Technology for High Frequency MW Scale Power Converters - Carnegie Mellon University
National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study - ABB Inc.
Interfaces of Electric Power and Energy Research Commercialization - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Smart Grid Interface Control Methodology Development for Integrated Resource Management - Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC
Medium Voltage Direct Current (MVDC) Technology Development - ABB Inc.
MEP (Manufacturing Extension Partnership Technology Transfer Project) - Catalyst Connection
Ervin Sejdic
Remote Sensing for Bridge Scour Projects - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
William Stanchina
Hexaboride-Based Nanostructures for Heterostructure Quantum Devices in Post-Si Electronics - Semiconductor Research Corporation
Douglas Weber
Reliable Spinal Nerve Interfaces for Sensorimotor Neuroprosthesis - U.S. Navy
Jun Yang
CAREER-EHS: Thermal-Aware Task Scheduling for Embedded Planar and 3D Chip Multiprocessors - National Science Foundation
Minhee Yun
Multifunctional Biomedical Nanosensors Based on Single Nanocomposite Nanowires - National Science Foundation
Hybrid Graphene-PVDF Piezo-Flutter Device for Scalable Energy Harvesting System - National Science Foundation
Extremely Low Noise Carbon Nanotubes for Peltier and Photo-detector Device Applications - Sungkyunkwan University
Large Area Graphene Synthesis and Its Applications - University of Texas at Dallas

146

FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS


Fiscal Year 2013 Active Sponsored Research

Industrial Engineering
Mary Besterfield-Sacre & Larry Shuman
Assessing Technical Entrepreneurship Learning in Engineering Education - National Science Foundation
Assessing the Spectrum of International Undergraduate Engineering Educational Experiences - National Science Foundation
Bopaya Bidanda
Crooked Cross Cuts for Linear and Nonlinear Mixed Integer Programming - U.S. Navy
VERC - U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Meat Processing Feasibility Study - Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
William Cook
Experimental Modules for Combinatorial Optimization and Mixed-Integer Programming - U.S. Navy
Frank Giarratani
Industry Studies Transition - Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
Industry Studies IIIA and IIIB--Secretariat and Services - Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
Jeffrey Kharoufeh
NECO: A mathematical Framework for the Performance Evaluation of Large-Scale Sensor Networks - National Science Foundation
Adaptive Maintenance Planning Based Based on Evolving Residual Life Distributions - National Science Foundation
Effective Management of Operating and Maintenance Activities for Wind Turbines - National Science Foundation
Analysis and Optimization of Telephone Systems at VA Pittsburgh Health Systems - U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Paul Leu
Nanosphere Coatings on Silicon Thin Film Photovoltaics - National Science Foundation
NUE: Flipping Learning Models to Illuminate Nanomanufacturing and Nanomates for Photovoltaics - National Science Foundation
Lisa Maillart
Optimizing Implanted Cardiac Device Follow-Up Care - National Science Foundation
Markov Decision Process Models for Optimizing Vaccine Administration - National Science Foundation
Optimizing of Remote Monitoring Technologies Project - U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Ravi Shankar
Self-Assembling Ductile and Tough Bulk Nanostructured Alloys of High Thermal-Stability - National Science Foundation
REU: Self-Assembling Ductile and Tough Bulk Nanostructured Alloys of High Thermal-Stability - National Science Foundation
GOALI/Collaborative Research: Engineered Surface Microstructures by Machining - National Science Foundation
Foundation
Deformation Mechanics and Microstructure Evolution During Microforming of Metals - National Science Foundation
Bryan Norman
Evaluation of Candidate Vaccine Technologies Using Computational Models - Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
HERMES Graphical User Interface Development and India Work - Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Bryan Norman & Bopaya Biidanda
Development of Staffing, Cost, and Inventory Models for Endoscope Reprocessing and Prosthetics - U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

147

Oleg Prokopyev
Novel Optimization-based Biclustering Algorithms for Biomedical Data Analysis - National Science Foundation
New Theory and Methods in Stochastic Mixed Integer Programming - U.S. Air Force
CEMOR: Computing Equipment for Military Operations Research at the University of Pittsburgh - U.S. Air Force
Multilevel Extension of Assignments Problems - U.S. Air Force
Denis Saure
Repetitive Combinatorial Optimization with Learning - National Science Foundation
NRC Faculty Development, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Andrew Schaefer
Career: Next-Generation Research and Education in Therapeutic Optimization - National Science Foundation
Optimizing Flu Shot Design Under Uncertainity - National Science Foundation
The Optimal Timing of Kidney Exchanges: A Markov Game Approach - National Science Foundation
Subproject for Institution # 0004514 - National Institutes of Health
University of Pittsburgh Clinical and Translational Institute - National Institutes of Health
The Optimal Timing of Transplantation in Pediatric Acute Liver Failure - National Institutes of Health
A Multi-Center Group to Study Acute Liver Failure in Children - New York University
Andrew Schaefer, Oleg Prokopyev & Jayant Rajgopal
VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System Veterans Engineering Resources Center (VERC) - U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
The Optimal Management of Intensive Care and Inpatient Units and Operating Room Scheduling Pilot - U.S. Department of Veterans
Affairs
Larry Shuman
FIPSE CAPES Project: Sustainable Energy and Aeronautical Engineering Program - Florida State University
University of Pittsburgh Undergraduate Scholarship Proposal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
Commission
Larry Shuman & Mary Besterfield-Sacre
Collaborative Research: Improving Engineering Students' Learning Strategies Through Models and Modeling - National Science
Foundation
US-Brazil Partnership in Sustainability and Innovative Design (S&ID) - U.S. Department of Education
Juan Pablo Vielma Centeno
Collaborative Research: Fundamentals of Convex Mixed Integer Nonlinear Programming - National Science Foundation

148

FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS


Fiscal Year 2013 Active Sponsored Research

Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science


Sung Kwon Cho
EXP-SA: Collaborative Research: Ultratrace Detection of Explosives Enabled by an Integrated Microfluidic Nanosensing System - National
Science Foundation
Swimming Medbot in Human Body Propelled by Oscilliating Bubbles - National Science Foundation
Bubble Detachement on Micro/Nano Sturctured Solid Surfaces in Energy Application - American Chemical Society
Minking Chyu
Nanofluids for Enhanced Thermal Energy Transport - NETL/URS Corporation
Development of Nanoparticles Enhanced Drilling Fluids - NETL/URS Corporation
Experimental Testing of Advanced Airfoil Cooling Concepts - NETL/URS Corporation
NRC Faculty Development - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Experimental Heat Transfer Characterization of Trapezoidal Internal U-Duct and Innovative Trailing Edge Cooling - Siemens
Internal and Transpiration Cooling - Advanced Energy Systems - Turbine Thermal Management - NETL/URS Corporation
Trailing Edge Cooling - Advanced Energy Systems - Turbine Thermal Management - NETL/URS Corporation
Utilization of NRC Nuclear Regulatory Research computer Codes in Research and Course Development - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
Commission
Trailing Edge Cooling (Turbine Thermal Management Field Work) - NETL/URS Corporation
Internal and Transpiration Cooling (Turbine Thermal Management Field Work Proposal) - NETL/URS Corporation
William Clark
Fabrication of MEMS Sensors - Telecardia, Inc.
Daniel Cole
GOALI: Nanoscale Hysteresis Modeling and Control in Precision Equipment - National Science Foundation
Dynamic Maskless Holographic Lithography - National Science Foundation
NRC Faculty Development, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials - Task Order 1 - Bayer Material Science, LLC
Course Development to Support Masters of Science Degree Program in Nuclear Engineering - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Nuclear Energy University Programs - General Scientific Infrastructure - U.S. Department of Energy
Advanced I&C for Automated Decison Making in Nuclear Power Plants - UT-Battelle, LLC
River DREAM Proof of Principle: Evaluation of Device Dynamics - Bayer Material Science, LLC
Larry Foulke
Fellowship and Scholarship Support - University of Pittsburgh - U.S. Department of Energy
Giovanni Galdi
Mathematical Analysis of Some Fundamental Problems in Solid-Liquid Interaction - National Science Foundation
Peyman Givi
Data Management and Visualization in Petascale Turbulent Combustion Simulation - National Science Foundation
Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Combusion via the Filtered Density Function - National Aeronautics & Space Administration
Center for Hypersonic Combined Cycle Flow Physics - University of Virginia/U.S. Air Force
LES of Sandia Half-Scaled Dump Combustor - NETL/URS Corporation
Quantum Speedup for Turbulent Combustion Simulations - U.S. Air Force

149

Brian Gleeson
Oxide Evolution Dynamics and Stability in Harsh Environments - National Science Foundation
Controlling Protective Scale Formation Development of Novel Pt-Free y-Ni+y-NIAl-Based Coatings by Optimizing Minor-Element Effects U.S. Navy
Protective-Scale Evolution and Stability in Complex Environments - NETL/URS Corporation
University Management Support of Regional University Alliance - NETL/URS Corporation
Degradation of TBC Systems in Environments Relevant to Advanced Gas Tubines for IGCC Systems - U.S. Department of Energy
Diffusion Barrier Coatings - Advanced Energy Systems - Turbine Thermal Management - NETL/URS Corporation
Oxidation Analyses and Structure-Function Predictions of A1xNiyFe1-x-y Alloys - NETL/URS Corporation
Bond Coat and Extreme Temperature Coatings - NETL/URS Corporation
Diffusion Barrier Coatings (Turbine Thermal Management Field Work Proposal) - NETL/URS Corporation
Mark Kimber
NRC Faculty Development - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Utilization of NRC Nuclear Regulatory Research Computer Codes in Research and Course Development - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
Commission
Experimentally Validated Numerical Models of Non-Isothermal Turbulent Mixing in High Temperature Reactors - UT-Battelle
Jung-Kun Lee
Electron Injection in Nanostructured Materials: New Paradigm of Transparent Conducting Oxides - National Science Foundation
Solid State Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Using Tunable Surface Plasmons of Core-Shell Particles - National Science Foundation
NRC Faculty Development, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Utilization of NRC Nuclear Regulatory Research Computer Codes in Research and Course Development - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
Commission
Study on the Performance and High-Temperatue Stability of Electrode Materials for Akali Meta Thermal-to-Electric Conversion Devices Korean Institute of Energy Research (KIER)
Scott Mao
Intergerated Nano-Mechanic Experiment and Atomistic Simulation on Moisture-Induced Interfacial Embrittlement - National Science
Foundation
Nanoscale Characterization of Nanostructured Thin Film with Ultrahigh Strength and Ductility - National Science Foundation
Gerald Meier
Effects of Steam and Oxyfuel Environments on Alloy/Coating Degradation - NETL/URS Corporation
Investigation of the Transitions between Deposit-Induced Degradation Regimes and the Influence of Alloying Elements in coatings and
Structural Alloys - U.S. Navy
Strengthening and Oxidation Protection of Nb- and Ta-base Alloys for Ultra-High Temperature Applications - NETL/URS Corporation
Effects of Deposits Relevant to Oxyfuel Environments on Alloy/Coating Degradation - NETL/URS Corporation
Fundamental Examination of Deposit Compositions Associated with Fireside Corrosion - NETL/URS Corporation
Effect of Surface Reactivity of H2O and CO2 Molecules on the Durability of High Temperature Materials - U.S. Navy
Oxy-Combustion Environment Characterization-Fireside Corrosion - NETL/URS Corporation
Mark Miller
Upper Extremity Biomechanics: Lesser Tuberosity Fixation - Allegheny General Hospital
Elbow Biomechanics: Radial Head Replacement, mUCL Augmentation and Elbow Control - Allegheny General Hospital
The Effects of Platelet Rich Plasma on Cartilage with in Vitro Loading - Allegheny General Hospital
Ian Nettleship
Manufacturing the Microstructural Niche for Liver Bioreactors - National Science Foundation
Nanoparticle Control of Microbial Development on Ceramic Surfaces - National Science Foundation
Innovative In Vivo-Like Model for Vascular Tissue Engineering - National Institutes of Health
Anne Robertson
The Link between Hemodynamics and Wall Structure in Cerebral Aneurysms - National Institutes of Health

150

Laura Schaefer
EFRI: Barriers, Understanding, Integrating - Life Cycle Development (BUILD) - National Science Foundation
Gaining a Deeper Understanding of Small-Scale Phenomenon in Heat Pipes - National Science Foundation
Energy Efficient Buildings Hub (EEB Hub) - Pennsylvania State University
William Slaughter
Airfoil Life Predictions - NETL/URS Corporation
Albert To
A New Atomistic to Continuum Thermomechanical Model that Enables a Novel Averaging Method for Molecular Dynamics Solution National Science Foundation
NRC Faculty Development: Swanson School of Engineering - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Diffusion and Mechanical Modeling of Metal Dusting Process - Air Products
Jeffrey Vipperman
Finite Element Modeling of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury - National Science Foundation
REU Supplement: Finite Element Modeling of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury - National Science Foundation
Noise Classifier Support for Improved Military Noise Monitoring - U.S. Army
Industrial Muffler Modeling and Testing - Miratech Holdings, LLC
Guofeng Wang
SISGR: Theoretically Relating the Surface Composition of Pt Alloys to Their Performance as the Electrocatalysts of Low-Temperature Fuel
Cells - U.S. Department of Energy
Nanosegregated Cathode Catalysts with Ultra-low Platinum Content - UChicago Argonne, LLC
Qing-Ming Wang
Field-Assisted Manufacturing of Multifunctional ZnO Nanowire-Polymer Nanocomposites - National Science Foundation
Collaborative Research: High Temperature Acoustic Wave Sensor Based on the Oxyborate Crystals - National Science Foundation
High Temperature Acoustic Wave Sensors Based on Oxyborate Crystals - National Science Foundation
Passive Wireless Acoustic Wave Sensors for Monitoring CO2 Emissions for Geological Sequestration Sites - U.S. Department of Energy
Lisa Weiland
CAREER: High Performance, Mechanically Robust Ionomeric Sensors - National Science Foundation
Conference Supplement - CAREER: High Performance, Mechanically Robust Ionomeric Sensors - National Science Foundation
Jorg Wiezorek
Electron Microscopy of Pulsed Laser Induced Rapid Solidification and Transient Solid State Phenomena in Nano-Scale Metal and Alloy Thin
Films - National Science Foundation
Electron Density Determination, bonding and Properties of Tetragonal Ferromagnetic Intermetalics - U.S. Department of Energy
NRC Graduate Fellowship Program, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

151

Research Expenditures
Fiscal Year 2013

Federal
Government

State &
Local
Government

Private/
Non-Profit
Organizations

Business
& Industry

Total

Bioengineering

8,522,759

42,166

678,376

179,600

9,422,901

Chemical

6,807,959

40,000

13,373

139,383

7,000,715

Civil & Environmental

1,844,657

183,750

136,918

4,420

2,169,745

Electrical & Computer

2,376,513

339,211

44,093

321,965

3,081,782

Industrial

2,267,972

19,829

222,018

6,265,751

94,525

92,859

(2,246,075)

3,200

Department

MEMS
Dean's Office
Total

$25,839,536

$624,956

$1,192,503

2,509,819
6,453,135
(2,242,875)

$738,227

$28,395,222

Research Related

12,836,812

Research Other

$45,931,689

Total Expenditures

$87,163,723

2% 4%

3%

91%

Federal Government
State & Local Governments
Private/Non-Profit Organization
Business & Industry

152

Faculty Publications
Department of Bioengineering
Abel, E., Kane-Gill, S., Seybert, A., & Kellum, J. (2012). Direct thrombin inhibitors for
management of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in patients receiving renal replacement
therapy: Comparison of clinical outcomes. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, (69), 19.
Aghayev, A., Furlan, A., Patil, A., Park, B., & Bae, K. (2013). The rate of resolution of clot
burden measured by pulmonary CT angiography in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.
American Journal of Roentgenology, 200(4), 791-7.
Agrawal, V., Siu, B., Chao, H., Hirschi, K., Raborn, E., Johnson, S., Tottey, S., Hurley, K.,
Medberry, C., & Badylak, S. (2012). Partial characterization of the Sox2+ cell population in an
adult murine model of digit amputation. Tissue Engineering Part A, 18(13-14), 1454-63.
Ahlden, M., Samuelsson, K., Musahl, V., & Karlsson, J. (2013). Rotatory knee laxity. Clinical
Journal of Sports Medicine, 32(1), 37-46.
Alexander, P., Song, Y., Taboas, J., Chen, F., Melvin, G., Manner, P., & Tuan, R. (2013).
Development of a spring-loaded impact device to deliver injurious mechanical impacts to the
articular cartilage surface. Cartilage, 14(1): 52-62.
Alexander, P., Wang, X., Song, Y., Taboas, J., Chen, F., Levin, M., McCarron, J., Melvin, G.,
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Zimmerlin, L., Rubin, J., Pfeifer, M., Moore, L., Donnenberg, V., & Donnenberg, A. (2013).
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Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering


Akonwie, L.N., Kazachkin, D.V., Luebke, D.R., and dItri, J.L.; Effect of Catalyst PreReduction Temperature on the Reaction of 1, 2-Dichloroethane and H2 Catalyzed by SiO2Supported PtCu Bimetallic, Applied Catalysis A: General, 415-416 59-69 (2012).
Baled, H., Enick, R.M.; Wu, Y., McHugh, M., Burgess, W., Tapriyal, D., Morreale, B.;
Prediction of hydrocarbon densities at extreme conditions using volume-translated SRK and PR
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Balmert, S.C., and Little, S.R.; Biomimetic Delivery with Micro and Nanoparticles, Advanced
Materials, 24(28):3757-3778, PMID: 22528985,Impact Factor = 13.877, (2012).
Bartlow, P., Tiwari N., Beitle, R.R., and Ataai, M.M.; Evaluation of Escherichia coli proteins
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performance, Biotech Prog, 28, 137145, (2012).
Beckman, E.J., Supercritical and near-critical CO2 processing, Green Technologies in Food
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Bhavsar, S. and Veser, G.; Chemical Looping A Novel Process for Syngas Generation, ACS
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Bhavsar, S. and Veser, G.; Ni-, Fe-, and bimetallic FeNi-CeO2 oxygen carriers for application in
Chemical Looping Combustion, ACS Fuel Chemistry Preprints, 60(1), (2012).
Bucior, B.J., Chen, D-L., Liu, J., and Johnson, J.K.; Porous Carbon Nanotube Membranes for
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Perturbed-Chain SAFT Equation Correlated to High Temperature, High Pressure Density Data,
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Engineering Chemistry Research,


10.1021/ie301727k, (2012).

Volume:

51

Issue:

51,

(16721-16733)

DOI:

Buxton, G.A. and Balazs, A.C.; Modeling Mixtures of Nanorods and Polymers: Determining
Structure-Property Relationship for Polymeric Nanocomposites, Polymer Science: A
Comprehensive Reference K. Matyjaszewski and M. Mller, Eds., Elsevier, Vol 7, Chapter 14,
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Cao, L., Wu, J., and Gao, D.; Reynolds Number Dependence of Drag Reduction and Interfacial
Slip Over Superhydrophobic Surfaces, Adv. Sci. Eng. Med. 4, 345349 (2012).
Chemmangattuvalappil N., Task.K., Banerjee I.; An integer optimization algorithm for robust
identification of non-linear gene regulatory networks:, BMC Systems Biology, 6:119. PMID:
22937832 (2012).
Chen, D-L., Al-Saidi, W.A., Johnson, J.K.; The role of van der Waals interactions in the
adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, 24, 424211
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Chen, I.C., Kuksenok, O, Yashin, V.V., Balazs, A. C. and Van Vliet. K.J.; Mechanical
resuscitation of chemical oscillations in Belousov-Zhabotinsky gels, Advanced Functional
Materials, 22, 535-2541, Impact Factor = 10.179, (2012).
Cummings, S., Enick, R.M., Rogers, S., Heenan, R., Eastoe, J.; Amphiphiles for Supercritical
CO2, Biochimie, 94(1), 94-100, (2012).
Cummings, S., Xing, D., Enick, R.M., Rogers, S., Heenan, R. and Eastoe, J.; Design Principles
for Supercritical CO2 Surfactant Viscosifiers, Soft Matter, Volume: 8 Issue: 26, 3044-3055, DOI:
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Dayal, P, Kuksenok, O., Bhattacharya, A., and Balazs, A.C.; Chemically-mediated
Communication in Self-oscillating, Biomimetic Cilia, J. Mat. Chem, 22, 241-250, Impact Factor
= 5.968, (2012).
Desai, U.V., Xu, C., Wu, J., and Gao, D.; Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells based on
Ordered ZnO Nanowire Arrays, Nanotechnology, 23, 205401(2012).
Dilek, C., Hong, L., Enick, R.M., Gulari, E., Manke, C.W.; Sustainable Debinding and recovery
of CO2-Soluble Binders, Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, Volume: 51 Issue: 26,
9101-9105, DOI: 10.1021/ie202608t, (2012).
Dhodapkar, S.V., Zaltash, A, Klinzing, G.E.; Cover Story A Primer on Gas-Solids Fluidization,
Chemical Engineering, 38-47, (2012).
Duan, Y., Zhang, B., Sorescu, D.C., Johnson, J.K., Majzoub, E.H., Luebke, D.R.; Density
functional theory studies on the electronic, structural, phonon dynamical and thermo-stability
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325501 (2012).

179

Eghtesad, S., Jhunjhunwala, S., Little, S.R., Clemens, P.R.; Local rapamycin treatment decreases
immunity induced by vector-mediated dystrophin cDNA expression in adult mdx skeletal muscle,
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= N/A, (2012).
Epstein, I., Vanag, V, Balazs, A.C., Kuksenok, O, Dayal, P., Bhattacharya, A.; Chemical
Oscillators in Structured Media, Accounts of Chemical Research, 45, 2160-2168. Impact Factor =
21.640, (2012).
Hajra, S., Shi, D., Vargas, W.L., and McCarthy, J.J.; Limiting Granular Segregation in FreeSurface Dominated Flows, Physical Review E, 86, 061318 (2012).
He, X., Aizenberg, M., Kuksenok, O., Zarzar, L., Shastri, A., Friedlander, R.S., Balazs, A.C.,
Aizenberg, J.; Synthetic homeostatic materials with chemo-mechano-chemical self-regulation
Nature, 487, 214-218. Impact Factor = 36.280, (2012).
Ho, T., Clermont, G., and Parker, R.S.; Modeling Neutrophil Dynamics in Sepsis and Cancer
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Jaramillo M., Singh S., Velankar S., Kumta P.N., Banerjee I.; Inducing endoderm
differentiation by modulating mechanical properties of soft substrates, Tissue Engineering and
Regenerative Medicine, doi: 10.1002. PMID: 23008262, (2012).
Jaramillo M., Banerjee I.; Endothelial Cell Co-Culture Mediates Maturation of Human
Embryonic Stem Cell to Pancreatic Insulin Producing Cells in a Directed Differentiation
Approach, J Vis Expt., 27, doi: 10.3791/ 3759. PMID: 22491132, (2012).
Jhunjhunwala, S, Raimondi, G., Glowacki, A. J., Hall, S.H., Maskarenic, D., Thorne, S. H.,
Thomson, A.W., Little, S.R.; Bio-Inspired Controlled Release of CCL-22 Recruits Regulatory Tcells in vivo, Advanced Materials, 24, 47354738, DOI:10.1002/adma.201202513). PMID:
22821823 Impact Factor = 13.877 (2012).
Jhunjhunwala, S., Balmert, S.C., Raimondi, G., Dons, E., Nichols, E., Thomson, S., Little, S.R.;
Controlled Release Formulations of IL-2, TGF-1 and Rapamycin for the Induction of
Regulatory T Cells, Journal of Controlled Release, 159(1), 78-84, PMID: 22285546 Impact
Factor = 6.499, (2012).
Kang, Y., Tong, X., Luo, L., Starr, D., Zhou, G. and Yang, J.C.; In situ UHV-TEM Studies of
Initial Stage Cu-Ni Alloy Oxidation, Microscopy and Microanalysis (M&M), July 29-August 2,
2012, Phoenix, AZ, USA
Kolmakov, G.V., Emrick, T., Russell, T.P., Crosby A.J., and Balazs, A.C.; Design of a Repairand-go System for Site-specific Healing at the Nanoscale, Self-Healing at the Nanoscale:
Mechanisms and Key Concepts of Natural and Artificial Systems, V. Amendola, Ed., Taylor and
Francis, Chapter 13, 313-332, (2012).
Kolmakov, G., Schaefer, A., Aronson, I. and Balazs, A.C.; Designing Mechano-responsive
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4.39, (2012).

180

Kratz, K., Narasimhan, A., Tangirala, R., Moon, S.C., Revanur, R., Kundu, S., Kim, H.S., Crosby,
A.J. Russell, T.P., Emrick, T., Kolmakov, G. and Balazs, A.C.; Probing and repairing damaged
surfaces with nanoparticle-containing microcapsules, Nature Nanotechnology, 7, 87-90, Impact
Factor = 27.270, (2012).
Lai, Y., Liang, S., Cao, A., and Veser, G.; Stabilizing Metal Nanocatalysts via Alloying, Proc.
ICC-15, Germany, 2012.
Li, J., Rothstein, S.N., Little, S.R., Edenborn, H.N., Meyer, T.Y.; The Effect of Monomer Order
on the Hydrolysiss of Biodegradable Poly (Lactic-co-Glycolic acid) Repeating Sequence
Copolymers, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 134(39), 16352-9, DOI:
10.1021/ja306866w). PMID: 22950719 Impact Factor = 9.907, (2012).
Li L., Wang Y., Gallaschun C., Risch T., and Sun J.; Why can a nanometer-thick polymer coated
surface be more wettable to water than to oil?, Journal of Materials Chemistry, 22(33), 1671916722, IF = 5.97, (2012).
Li, L., France, M., Zhang, Z., and Yang, J.C.; Directly counting number of atoms in Au
nanoparticles supported on gamma-alumina by quantitative-STEM, Microscopy and
Microanalysis (M&M), July 29-August 2, 2012, Phoenix, AZ, USA
Liang, S. and Veser, G.; Mixed lanthana/ceria nanorod-supported gold catalysts for water-gasshift, Catal. Lett. 8, 936-945, (2012).
Little, S.R.; Re-orienting our View of Particle-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines,
Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 109(4), 999-1000, PMID: 22308523 Impact
Factor = 9.681, (2012).
Luo, L.L., Kang, Y.H., Yang, J.C., Zhou, G.W.; Effect of oxygen gas pressure on the
orientations of Cu2O nuclei during the oxidation of Cu(100), (110) and (111), Surface Science,
606, 1790-1797 (2012).
Luo, L.L., Kang, Y.H., Yang, J.C., Zhou, G.W.; Influence of the surface morphology on the
early stages of oxidation of copper, Applied Surface Science, 259, 791-798 (2012).
Luo, L.L., Kang, Y.H., Yang, J.C., Zhou, G.W.; Effect of Au composition on the orientations of
oxide nuclei during the oxidation of Cu-Au alloys, Journal of Applied Physics, 111, 083533
(2012).
Luo, L., Li, L., Ciston, J., Stach, E.A., Yang, J.C. and Zhou, G.; Direct atomic-scale
visualization of the oxidation of Cu surfaces via in situ environmental TEM, Microscopy and
Microanalysis (M&M), July 29-August 2, 2012, Phoenix, AZ, USA
Ma, Y., Bhattacharya, A., Kuksenok, O., Perchak, D., and Balazs, A.C.; Modeling the Transport
of Nanoparticle-filled Binary Fluids through Micropores, Langmuir, 28, 11410-11421. Impact
Factor = 4.186, (2012).
Mandeltort, L., Choudhury, P., Johnson, J.K., and Yates, Jr., J.T.; Methyl Radical Reactivity on
the Basal Plane of Graphite, Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 116, 18347-18357 (2012).

181

Mandeltort, L., Choudhury, P., Johnson, J.K., and Yates, Jr., J.T.; Reaction of the Basal Plane of
Graphite with the Methyl Radical, Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 3, 1680-1683 (2012).
Maresov, E., Kolmakov, G.V., Yashin, V.V., Van Vliet, K. and Balazs, A.C.; Modeling the
Making and Breaking of Bonds as an Elastic Microcapsule Moves over a Compliant Substrate",
Soft Matter, 8, 77-85. Impact Factor = 4.39, (2012).
Mathew S., Jaramillo M., Zhang X., Zhang L-A., Banerjee I.; Analysis of Alternate
Pathways of Endoderm Induction of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Identifies Context Specific
Differences, BMC Systems Biology, 15; 6:154, (2012).
Meade, J., Khan, S., Ataai, M.M., Domach, M.; Use of Flux Pre-Analysis to Enable 13-C Tracer
Studies in Pyruvate Kinase-Deficient Escherichia coli, Biotechnol. J., 7, 449460 (2012).
Miller, M.B., Bing, W., Luebke, D.R., Enick, R.M.; Solid CO2-philes as Potential Phase-Change
Physical Solvents for CO2, JSCF, 61, 212-220, (2012).
Nagarkar, S.P. and Velankar, S.S.; Morphology and rheology of ternary fluid/fluid/solid
systems, Soft Matter, 8, 84648477, (2012).
Najera, M., Grace, H., Bhavsar, S., and Veser, G.; Iron/Ceria-Based Carrier Materials for
Chemical Looping Dry Reforming, ACS Fuel Chemistry Preprints, 60(1), (2012).
Pahk, J.B., Klinzing, G.E.; Frictional force measurement between a single plug and the pipe wall
in dense phase pneumatic conveying, Powder Tech., Vol. 222, 58-64, (2012).
Peleg, O., Savin, T., Kolmakov, G.V., Salib, I. G., Balazs, A.C., Kroger, M., Vogel, V.;Fibers
with Integrated Mechano-Chemical Switches: Minimalistic Design Principles Derived from
Fibronectin, Biophysical Journal, 103, 1909-1918, Impact Factor = 3.653, (2012).
Perry, R.J., Wood, B.R., Genovese, S., OBrien, M.J., Westendorf, T., Meketa, M.L., Farnum, R.,
McDermott, J., Sultanova, I., Perry, T.M., Vipperla, R-K., Wichmann, L.A., Enick, R.M., Hong,
L., Tapriyal, D.; CO2 Capture Using Phase-Changing Sorbents, Energy & Fuels, Volume: 26
Issue: 4, 2528-2538, DOI: 10.1021/ef300079w, (2012).
Rabinovich, E., Freund, N., Kalman, H., Klinzing, G.E.; Friction Forces on Plugs of Coarse
Particles Moving Upward in a Vertical Column, Powder Tech., 143-150, (2012).
Rothstein, S.N., Kay, J., Little, S.R.; A Retrospective Mathematical Analysis ofControlled
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Sehabiague, L., Oukaci, R. and Morsi, B.I.; Simulation of a Commercial-Scale Slurry Bubble
Column Reactor for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis using Cobalt Catalyst, Proceedings of the 29th
International Pittsburgh Coal Conference, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA, October 15-18, 2012.
Song, S.O., Hogg, J., Peng, Z.Y., Parker, R.S., Kellum, J.A., Clermont, G.; Ensemble Models of
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182

Tapriyal. D.; Fan, X.; Heintz, Y., Morsi, B.I., Beckman, E., Heintz, Y.; Enick, R.M., Sane, A.;
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highly sheared emulsions of polyethylene terephthalate in saturated liquid tetrahydrofuran,
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Task, K., Jaramillo M., Banerjee, I.; Population Based Model of Human Embryonic Stem Cell
(hESC) Differentation during Endoderm Induction, PLoS One 7, e32975, PMID: 22427920,
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Release of Biologics from Porous Hollow Fibers, Journal of Biomedical MaterialsResearch, Part
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Uffalussy, K., Stevenson, C., Ewing, C., and Veser, G.; Nanoencapsulated PEI@SiO2 for CO2
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Wang Y.; Sun J. and Li L.; What is the role of the interfacial interaction in the slow relaxation of
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Wolf, M.T., Daly, K.A., Brennan, E.B., Johnson, S.A., Carruthers, C., DAmore, A.,
Nagarkar, S.P., Velankar, S.S., Badylak, S.F.; Extracellular Matrix Hydrogels Prepared
from Porcine Dermis and UrinaryBladder: Structure, Mechanics and In Vivo Remodeling,
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Wolf, M.T., Daly, K.A., Brennan, E.B., Johnson, S.A., Carruthers, C., DAmore, A., Nagarkar,
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Wu, J., Gao, L., and Gao, D.; Multistage Magnetic Separation of Microspheres Enabled by
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Xing, D. and Enick, R.M., et al.; CO2-soluble, Water-soluble Surfactants for Improved Mobility
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Xu, C., Wu, J., Desai, U.V., and Gao, D.; High-efficiency Solid-state Dye-sensitized Solar Cells
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Xu, C. and Gao, D.; Two-stage Hydrothermal Growth of Long ZnO Nanowires for Efficient
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Yang, J.C., Small, M.W., Grieshaber, R.V., and Nuzzo, R.G.; Recent developments and
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Yang, J.C., Zhou, G.; In situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy studies of the
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Yashin, V.V., Suzuki, S., Yoshida, R., and Balazs, A.C.; Controlling the Dynamic Behavior of
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Yoon, J.A., Kamada, J., Koynov, K., Mohin, J., Nicola, R., Zhang, Y. Balazs, A.C., Kowalewski,
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Zhang, B., Duan, Y., and Johnson, J.K.; Density Functional Theory Study of CO2 Capture with
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184

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Brantley, S.L., Wilderman, C., Abad, J.D., Workshop Discusses Database for Marcellus Water
Issues, EOS, 93 (34), pp. 328, 2012.
Motta, D., Abad, J. D., Langendoen, E. J., Garcia, M. H. The effects of floodplain soil
heterogeneity on meander planform shape, Water Resources Research, 48, W09518, 17 pp.,
2012.
Guneralp, I., Abad, J. D., Zolezzi, G., Hooke, J. Advances and challenges in meandering
channels research, Geomorphology, 163-164: 1-9, 2012.
Motta, D., Abad, J. D., Langendoen, E. J. and Garcia, M. H. A simplified 2D model for longterm meander migration with physically-based bank evolution, Geomorphology, 163-164: 10-25,
2012.
Frias, C., Abad, J. D. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the ripple-dune amalgamation process,
implications for free surface and coherent flow structure interactions. Third International
Symposium on Shallow Flows, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA, June 4-6, 2012.
Frias, C., Abad, J. D. Numerical flow field characterization of the ripple-dune amalgamation
process. River Flow 2012, September 5-7, San Jose, Costa Rica, 2012.
Abad, J. D., Peralta, B., Paredes, J., Frias, C., Gutierrez, R., Montoro, H. The meandering
Ucayali River, a cyclic adaptation of cutoff and planform migration. River Flow 2012. September
5-7, San Jose, Costa Rica, 2012.
Frias, C., Abad, J. D. Caracterization numerica del campo de flujo en el proceso de
amalgamiento rizo-duna. XXIV Congreso Latinoamericano de Hidraulica, San Jose, Costa Rica.,
September 9-12, 2012.
Bryk, A., Best, J., Abad, J. D., Garcia, M. H. The influence of channel-skewed bedforms on
secondary flows in high curvature meander bends. Third International Symposium on Shallow
Flows, University of Iowa City, IA, USA, June 4-6, 2012.
Arjmand, S., Abad, J. D., Liang, X. Coupled flow and contaminant transport models for toxic
elements associated with the Marcellus Shale flowback and produced water; its application to
human exposure and risk assessment. Computational Methods in Water Resources, June 17-21,
Urbana, IL. USA, 2012.
Frias, C., Abad, J. D. Numerical flow field characterization of the ripple-dune amalgamation
process. Computational Methods in Water Resources, June 17-21, Urbana, IL, USA, 2012.
Simon, C. A., Langendoen, E., Abad, J. D. Coupling 1D and 2D hydrodynamic equations for
stream and floodplain interaction. Computational Methods in Water Resources, June 17-21,
Urbana, IL, USA, 2012.
Abad, J. D., Motta, D., Langendoen, E. J., Fernandez, R., Oberg, N., Garcia, M. H. Restoration
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WaterQUEST-2012 State of the Monongahela River Research Symposium, Pittsburgh, PA, USA,
November 8, 2012, 2012.
Arjmand, S., Abad, J. D., Liang, X. "Application of a Coupled Flow and Contaminant Transport
Model to Investigate the Environmental and Health Effects of Unconventional Gas Drilling
Activities in Southwestern Pennsylvania", ShaleGas-2012 Health Effects of Shale Gas Extraction,
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Abad, J. D., Peralta, B., Paredes, B., Frias, C., Gutierrez, R. R., Montoro, H. Cyclic adaptation of
a large meandering channel, from cutoff to planform migration. American Association of
Geographers, AAG Annual Meeting, New York, New York, USA. February 24-28, 2012.
Abad, J. D. Experiments in meandering and anabranching channels. AGU session on Advances
in Experimental Earth Surface Processes, AGU Fall, San Francisco, Dec. 2012.
Abad, J. D. Inland ENC Harmonization Group (IEHG) Meeting, organized by Peruvian
Navy.http://www.hydro-international.com/news/id5879Fluvial_Hydrography_Workshop_in_Peru.html, Iquitos, Peru, November 12, 2012.
Abad, J. D. Mediciones de campo y aplicacin de modelos numricos en hidrologa fluvial en los
ros de la amazonia peruana. Lima, Peru, November 09, 2012, In Spanish.
Abad, J. D. Hydrodynamics and Morphodynamics of Kinoshita Meandering Channels, Saint
Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, October 19, 2012.
Abad, J. D. The Marcellus Shale Research Network: organizing, collecting and interpreting
water data to track potential impacts of Marcellus Shale Activity, Society for Advancing
Hispanics, Chicanos, and Native Americans into Science, Seattle, WA, October 12, 2012.
Abad, J. D. CREAR: Ciencia y Tecnologia para el conocimiento de la Amazonia, Iquitos,
Peru, June 2012.
Abad, J. D. Secondary flows in submarine meandering channels and its importance for
subaqueous bed morphodynamics. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of
Pittsburgh, PA, USA, March 28, 2012.
Abad, J. D. Secondary flows in submarine meandering channels and its importance for
subaqueous bed morphodynamics. Workshop on Environmental and extreme multiphase flows,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA (http://conferences.dce.ufl.edu/flow/), March 14,
2012.
Abad, J. D. CREAR y sus trabajos de investigacin para entender la dinmica de los ros de la
Amazonia peruana. Dept. of Fluid Mechanics, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos,
Lima, Peru, March 09, 2012.
Abad, J. D. CREAR y sus trabajos de investigacin para entender la dinmica de los ros de la
Amazonia peruana. Dept. of Civil Engineering, National University of Engineering, Lima, Peru,
March 08, 2012.

186

Yamamoto, N., Bibby, K., Qian, J., Hospodsky, D., Rismani-Yazdi, H., Nazaroff, W., Peccia, J.
Particle size distributions and seasonal concentrations of allergenic and pathogenic fungi in
outdoor air ISME J. 2012. 6, 18011811.
Yates, M.D., Kiely, P.D., Call, D.F., Rismani-Yazdi, H., Bibby, K., Peccia, J., Regan, J.M.,
Logan, B.E. Convergent development of bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells ISME J.
2012. 6, 20022013.
Wong, K., Fong, T., Bibby, K., Molina, M. A Review of Enteric Viruses as Microbial Source
Tracking Tools Environment International. 2012. 45, 151-164.
Hospodky, D., Qian, J., Yamamoto, N., Nazaroff, W., Bibby, K., Rismani-Yazdi, H., Peccia, J.
Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria PLoS ONE.
7(4): e34867.doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0034867, 2012.
Aktas, C.B., Ryan, K.C., Sweriduk, M., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Critical Success Factors to Limit
Constructability Issues on a Net-Zero Energy Home. Journal of Green Building. 7(4), 100-115.
Collinge, W.C., Landis, A.E., Jones, A., Schaefer, L., Bilec, M.M. (2012). A Dynamic Life
Cycle Assessment Approach for Whole Building Evaluation. International Journal of Life Cycle
Assessment. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11367-012-0528-2
Deblois, J., Bilec, M.M., Schaefer, L.A. (2012) Design and Zonal Building Information
Modeling of a Roof Integrated Solar Chimney. Renewable Energy. 52(0), 241-250.
Xiaobo, X., Collinge, W., Landis, A.E., Bilec, M.M., Shrake, S. (2012). Regional Life Cycle
Assessment of Soybean Derived Biodiesel for Transportation Fleet. Energy Policy, 48, 295-303.
Campion, N., Thiel, C.L., DeBlois, J., Woods, N.C., Landis, A.E., Bilec, M.M. (2012) Life Cycle
Perspectives of Delivering an Infant in the US. Science of the Total Environment, 425, 191-198.
Rajagopalan, N., Bilec, M.M., Landis, A.E. (2012). Evaluation of Green Product Labeling
Systems with Life Cycle Assessment. International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 17(6), 753763, doi:10.1007/s11367-012-0416-9.
Aktas, C.B., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Service Life Predication of Residential Interior Finishes for
Life Cycle Assessment. International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 17 (3), 362-371,
doi:10.1007/s11367-011-0367-6.
Aktas, C.B., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Impact of Lifetime on U.S. Residential Building LCA
Results. International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 17(3), 337-349. doi: 10.1007/s11367011-0363-x.
Landis, A.E., Shrake, S.O., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Life Cycle Assessment to assess and improve
small service business operations. American Center for Life Cycle Assessment, Proceedings of
LCA XII, September 27-29, 2012, Tacoma, Washington.
Collinge, W.O., Deblois, J., Sweriduk, M., Landis, A.E., Jones, A.K., Schaefer, L.A., Bilec. M.M.
(2012). Measuring Whole-Building Performance with Dynamic Life-Cycle Assessment: A Case
Study of a Green University Building. International Symposium on LCA and Construction. June
10-12, 2012, Nantes, France.

187

Collinge, W.O., Landis, A.E., Jones, A.K., Schaefer, L.A., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Integrating
Indoor Environmental Quality Metrics in a Dynamic Life Cycle Assessment Framework For
Buildings. 2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology. May
16-18, 2012, Boston, Massachusetts.
Thiel, C.L., Campion, N., DeBlois, J., Woods, N.C., Landis, A.E., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Life
Cycle Assessment of Medical Procedures: Vaginal and Cesarean Section Births. 2012 IEEE
International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology. May 16-18, 2012, Boston,
Massachusetts.
Saunders, C.L., Landis, A.E. Jones, A.K., Schaefer, L.A., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Utilizing
Measured Energy Usage to Analyze Design Phase Energy Models. 2012 IEEE International
Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology. May 16-18, 2012, Boston, Massachusetts.
Bilec, M.M., Landis, A.E., Shrake, S.O., Thiel, C.,L., Woods, N.C. (2012). Life Cycle
Assessment in Healthcare: Focus on Hysterectomies. Presentation, American Center for Life
Cycle Assessment, September 27-29, 2012, Tacoma, Washington.
Landis, A.E., Shrake, S.O., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Life Cycle Assessment to assess and improve
small service business operations. Presentation, American Center for Life Cycle Assessment,
September 27-29, 2012, Tacoma, Washington.
Collinge, W.O., Deblois, J., Sweriduk, M., Landis, A.E., Jones, A.K., Schaefer, L.A., Bilec. M.M.
(2012). Measuring Whole-Building Performance with Dynamic Life-Cycle Assessment: A Case
Study of a Green University Building. Presentation, International Symposium on LCA and
Construction. June 10-12, 2012, Nantes, France.
Bilec, M.M., Dale, A.T., Vidic R.D. (2012). A Life-Cycle Approach To Environmental Impacts
of Marcellus Shale Gas. Presentation, 2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable
Systems and Technology. May 16-18, 2012, Boston, Massachusetts.
Collinge, W.O., Landis, A.E., Jones, A.K., Schaefer, L.A., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Integrating
Indoor Environmental Quality Metrics in a Dynamic Life Cycle Assessment Framework For
Buildings. Presentation, 2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and
Technology. May 16-18, 2012, Boston, Massachusetts.
Thiel, C.L., Campion, N., DeBlois, J., Woods, N.C., Landis, A.E., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Life
Cycle Assessment of Medical Procedures: Vaginal and Cesarean Section Births. Presentation,
2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology. May 16-18, 2012,
Boston, Massachusetts.
Saunders, C.L., Landis, A.E. Jones, A.K., Schaefer, L.A., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Utilizing
Measured Energy Usage to Analyze Design Phase Energy Models. Presentation, 2012 IEEE
International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology. May 16-18, 2012, Boston,
Massachusetts.
Aktas,C. and Bilec, M.M. (2012). Strategies to Reduce Disparity between Design and Service
Lifetimes of Building Products. Presentation, 4th International Conference on Sustainable
Enterprises of the Future, April 18-19, 2012, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

188

Landis, A.E. and Bilec, M.M. (2012). Life cycle Thinking in Healthcare and Supply Chain.
Invited speaker at Mayos Sustainability Symposium. Arizona State University, November, 8,
2012, Tempe, Arizona.
Bilec, M.M. and Landis, A.E. (2012). Going Green: Life Cycle Thinking in Healthcare. Invited
speaker at Sustainability Grand Rounds. University of Washington, Harborview Medical Center,
Environmental Sustainability Steering Committee, September 24, 2012, Seattle, Washington.
Bilec, M.M. (2012). Life Cycle Assessment of Street Lighting. Invited speaker at Pennsylvania
Society of Professional Engineers. September 13, 2012, Cranberry Pennsylvania.
Bilec, M.M. and Copley, N.C. (2012). Life Cycle Analysis of Delivering an Infant in the US.
Invited seminar at CleanMed. May 3, 2012. Denver, Colorado.
Bilec, M.M. (2012). From Buildings to Healthcare Understanding and Improving the Complex
Systems Using Environmental Life Cycle Assessment. Invited seminar at Arizona State
University, March 6, 2012, Tempe, Arizona.
Bilec, M.M. (2012). Sustainable Healthcare? Invited seminar for Green Design Institute at
Carnegie Mellon University. February 28, 2012, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Bilec, M.M. (2012). Green Buildings: Investment and Payback. Invited Panel Session.
Building Sustainable Neighborhoods: Powering Sustainable Development in Allegheny County.
February 13, 2012, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Shrake, S., Thiel, C., Landis, A., Bilec, M.M. (2012). Life Cycle Assessment as a Tool for
Improving Service Industry Sustainability. IEEE, Potentials. 30:1, 10-15.
Wu, J., Wang, Y., Simon, M.A., and Brigham, J.C., A New Approach to Kinematic Feature
Extraction from the Human Right Ventricle for Classification of Hypertension: a Feasibility
Study, Physics in Medicine and Biology, 57, 23, 7905-7922, 2012.
Wang, S. and Brigham, J.C., A Computational Framework for the Optimal Design of Morphing
Processes in Locally Activated Smart Material Structures, Smart Materials and Structures, 21,
10, 105016-105029, 2012.
Wang, S. and Brigham, J.C., An Efficient Computational Inverse Approach for Optimal Design
of Localized Activation and Actuation for Morphing SMP Structures, ASME 2012 Conference on
Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, Stone Mountain, GA, September,
2012.
Wang, M. and Brigham, J.C., Evaluation of Damage in a Continuum through a Multi-Objective
Optimization Inverse Approach, ASME 2012 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive
Structures and Intelligent Systems, Stone Mountain, GA, September, 2012.
Banyay, G.A., Rudnyi, E., and Brigham, J.C., Investigation of Transient Thermal Analysis
Computational Efficiency Improvements via Frequency Domain Methods, Proceedings of the
Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, July, 2012.

189

Wu, J., Wang, Y., Simon, M.A., and Brigham, J.C., Analysis of In Vivo Human Right Ventricle
Shape Change with and without Pulmonary Hypertension, 10th International Symposium on
Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Berlin, Germany, April, 2012.
Wang, S. and Brigham, J.C., An Efficient Computational Inverse Approach for Optimal Design
of Localized Activation and Actuation for Morphing SMP Structures, International Conference
on Inverse Problems and Related Topics 2012, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China, October, 2012.
Wang, S. and Brigham, J.C., A Computational Approach for Optimal Design of Smart Material
Morphing Structures Through Adaptable Activation, 2012 Joint Conference of the Engineering
Mechanics Institute and the 11th ASCE Joint Specialty Conference on Probabilistic Mechanics and
Structural Reliability, Notre Dame, IN, June, 2012.
Wang, M. and Brigham, J.C., A Multi-Objective Optimization-Based Approach to
Nondestructive Evaluation of Damage in a Continuum, 2012 Joint Conference of the Engineering
Mechanics Institute and the 11th ASCE Joint Specialty Conference on Probabilistic Mechanics and
Structural Reliability, Notre Dame, IN, June, 2012.
Iannacchione, A.T., Vandenbossche, J.M., and Brigham, J.C., The Marcellus Shale Gas Play and
the Gas Migration/Stray Gas Problem, ARMA/UNGI Unconventional Geomechanics Workshop,
American Rock Mechanics Symposium, Chicago, IL, June, 2012.
Wu, J., Wang, Y., Simon, M.A., and Brigham, J.C., A Novel Approach for Anatomically
Consistent Analysis of Organ-Level Shape and Kinematics, 10th International Symposium on
Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Berlin, Germany, April, 2012.
Brigham, J.C., From Concrete to the Cardiovascular System: Computational Mechanics for
Engineering Inverse Problems, Engineering Physics Department, University of WisconsinMadison, Madison, WI, November, 2012.
Brigham, J.C., Concepts and Challenges in Computational Inverse Mechanics for Optimal
Design and Quantitative Evaluation of Multiphysics Systems, School of Civil and Environmental
Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, September, 2012.
Budny, Dan and Khanna, Raghav, Designing a Service Learning Project for Freshman
Engineers,
15th International Conference on Interactive Collaborative Learning and 41st
International Conference on Engineering Pedagogy, Villach, Austria 26-28 September 2012.
Newborg, B., Larkin, T., Budny, Dan., Can We Talk? Discerning and Engaging Discourse
Differences Across Disciplines, Proceedings American Society for Engineering Education 2012
Annual Conference, San Antonio, TX, June 10 13, 2012.
Budny, D.D., Developing an International Senior Design Experience, Proceedings 2012 North
Central Sectional Meeting of the American Society for Engineering Education, Ohio Northern
University, Ada, Ohio, March 23-24, 2012.
Deanna Kelly and Dan Budny, Review of the University of Pittsburgh Resident Hall System,
Proceedings 2012 First Year Engineering Experience Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, August 9 - 10,
2012.

190

William Oakes and Dan Budny, Workshop B - Service-Learning in Engineering, Technology


and Computing, 2012 First Year Engineering Experience Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, August 9 10, 2012.
Budny, D. Workshop - Improving First Year Engineering Student Retention/Success, 2012
North Central Sectional Meeting of the American Society for Engineering Education, Ohio
Northern University, Ada, Ohio, March 23-24, 2012.
Budny, D.D., Introduction to EXCELL, Stipes Publishing Co., Champaign, Ill, First Edition,
2012, pp.200.
Budny, D.D., Introduction to Engineering, Stipes Publishing Co., Champaign, Ill, Thirteenth
edition, 2012, pp.778.
States, S.J., Cyprich, G., Stoner., M., Wydra, F., Kuchta, J., Monnell, J. and Casson, L.W.,
Bromide in the Allegheny River: A Possible Link with Marcellus Shale Operations, Proceedings
of the Water Environment Federation Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA September 2012.
Casson, L. Bromide in the Allegheny River: A Possible Link with Marcellus Shale Operations,
Presented at the Third Annual Conference on the Health Effects of Shale Gas Extraction,
Pittsburgh, PA, November 9, 2012.
Cason, L. Bromide in the Allegheny River: A Possible Link with Marcellus Shale Operations,
Presented at the PWEA Marcellus Shale Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, March 2012.
Harries, K.A. and Dawood, M., 2012 Behavior and Performance of FRP-to-Steel Bond,
Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Vol. 2313/2012,
pp 181-188.
Harries, K.A., Zeno, G. and Shahrooz, B.M., 2012 Toward an Improved Understanding of Shear
Friction Behavior, ACI Structural Journal, Vol 109, No. 6, pp 835-844.
Sharma, B., Harries, K.A. and Ghavami, K. 2012 Methods of Determining Transverse
Mechanical Properties of Full-Culm Bamboo, Journal of Construction and Building Materials,
Vol 38, pp 627-637.
Harries, K.A., Shahrooz, B.M and Soltani, A. 2012 Flexural Crack Widths in Concrete Girders
Reinforced with High-Strength Reinforcement, ASCE Journal of Bridge Engineering, Vol 17, No.
5, pp 804-812.
Richard, M.J. and Harries, K.A. 2012. Experimental Buckling Capacity of Multi-culm Bamboo
Columns, Key Engineering Materials, Vol 517, pp 51-62.
Sharma, B. and Harries, K.A. 2012. Effect of Fiber Gradation on the Edge Bearing Strength on
Bamboo Culms, Key Engineering Materials, Vol 517, pp 63-70.
Harries, K.A. 2012 Patient J -Study takes close look at how J-bars hold up in PA., Roads and
Bridges, May 2012 pp 52-55.

191

Harries, K.A., Sharma, B. and Richard, M.J. 2012. Structural Use of Full Culm Bamboo: The
Path to Standardisation, International Journal of Architecture, Engineering and Construction. Vol.
1, No. 2. pp 66-75.
Soltani, A., Harries, K.A., Shahrooz, B.M., Russell, H.R. and Miller, R.A. 2012 Fatigue
Performance of High Strength Reinforcing Steel, ASCE Journal of Bridge Engineering, Vol. 17,
No. 3 pp 454-461.
Wang, W., Dai, J-G., Harries, K.A. and Bao, Q-H. 2012 Prestress Losses and Flexural Behavior
of Reinforced Concrete Beams Strengthened with Post-tensioned CFRP Sheets, ASCE Journal of
Composites for Construction, Vol. 16, No. 2. pp 207-216.
Kim, Y. and Harries, K.A., 2012 Predictive Response of Notched Steel Beams Repaired with
CFRP Strips Including Bond-Slip Behaviour. International Journal of Structural Stability and
Dynamics Special Issue on FRP and Steel Structures, Vol 12, No. 1, pp 1-21.
Harries, K.A. and Kasan, J.L. 2012. Assessment of Damaged Prestressed Adjacent Box Girder
Bridges: A Case Study, Proceedings of 14th International Conference on Structural Faults and
Repair Edinburgh, June 2012.
Gentry, R., Bakis, C., Harries, K.A., Brown, J. Prota, A. and Parretti, R. 2012. Development of
ASTM test methods for FRP composite materials: overview and transverse shear, Proceedings of
the 6th International Conference on FRP Composites in Civil Engineering (CICE 2012), Rome,
June 2012.
Dia, J-G, Wang, W. and Harries, K.A. 2012. Anchorage and long term losses of prestressed
externally bonded CFRP system, Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on FRP
Composites in Civil Engineering (CICE 2012), Rome, June 2012.
Harries, K.A., Hamilton, H.R., Kasan, J.L. and Tatar, J. 2012. Development of Standard Bond
Capacity Test for FRP Bonded to Concrete Substrate, Proceedings of the 6th International
Conference on FRP Composites in Civil Engineering (CICE 2012), Rome, June 2012.
Harries, K.A, Wang, W. and Dai, J-G. 2012. Capacity Development of Externally Bonded CFRP
Subject to Oscillating Loads During Resin Cure, Proceedings of the 3rd Asia-Pacific Conference
on FRP in Structures (APFIS 2012), Paper F1A01, Sapporo, February.
Sustainable Hazard Resistant Construction Using Indigenous Materials - Bamboo Construction in
Darjeeling and Sikkim, K. Harries, University of Edinburgh, July 2, 2012.
Murphy, M., Westman, E., Iannacchione, A., and Barczak, T. Relationship between Radiated
Seismic Energy and Explosive Pressure for Controlled Methane and Coal Dust Explosions in an
Underground Mine Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology, Vol. 28, 2012, pp. 278-286.
Iannacchione, A., Vandenbossche, J., and Brigham, J. The Marcellus Shale Gas Play and the
Gas Migration / Stray Gas Problem, Abstract in the Unconventional Resources Geomechanics
Workshop Handout, 46th U.S. Rock Mechanics / Geomechanics Symposium, Chicago, IL, June
22, 2012.
Iannacchione, A. Assessing the Coal Mine Water Resources: A Marcellus Shale Perspective,
Coal Mine Drainage for Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction, Proceedings and

192

Recommendations from a Roundtable on Feasibility and Challenges, ed. A. Curtright and K.


Giglio, RAND Infrastructure, Safety, and Environment Program, 2012, p. 5-6.
Iannacchione,A.Streams and Longwall Coal Mining Subsidence: A Pennsylvania Perspective,
SME Annual meeting, Seattle, WA, February 20, 2012.
Iannacchione, A. Updates on the Use of AMD for Hydraulic Fracturing, PA DEP Technical
Services Meeting, Williamsport, PA, March 22, 2012.
Iannacchione, A. The Marcellus Shale Gas Play and the Gas Migration / Stray Gas Problem,
Abstract in the Unconventional Resources Geomechanics Workshop Handout, 46th U.S. Rock
Mechanics / Geomechanics Symposium, Chicago, IL, June 22, 2012.
Vandenbossche, J. and Iannacchione, A. Updates on the Use of AMD for Hydraulic
Fracturing, PA DEP Technical Services Meeting, Williamsport, PA, March 22, 2012.
Iannacchione, A., Down-dip Barrier Research at the University of Pittsburgh, ARIES Annual
Meeting, Sept. 11, 2012, Morgantown, WV.
Vandenbossche, J., Iannacchione, A., and Janssen, D. Tools to Assess and Control Gas
Migration, Poster Session at the 2nd Annual Energy and Innovation Conference, NETL-DOE,
Southpointe, PA, November 28-29, 2012.
Iannacchione, A. Assessing the Coal Mine Water Resources: A Marcellus Shale Perspective,
Coal Mine Drainage for Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction, Proceedings and
Recommendations from a Roundtable on Feasibility and Challenges, Session 1, ed. A. Curtright
and K. Giglio, RAND Infrastructure, Safety, and Environment Program, Appendix A, p. 3-15.
Ferguson, C., Andrews, M., Fleming, D., Freiberg, M., Iannacchione, A., and Salazar, J.
Environment, Health, and Safety Oversight Committee (EHSOC) Review of the Sanford
Underground Laboratory (SURF), by EHSOC Committee, Lead, South Dakota, February 2012,
17 p.
Iannacchione, A. The Application of Risk Assessment Techniques to Review Potential Hazards
Associated with the Ross Shaft Refurbishment, Sanford Underground Research Facility - Major
Hazard Risk Assessment, Lead, South Dakota, June 7, 2012, 32 p.
Ferguson, C. Gibson, J., Fleming, D., Salazar, J., and Iannacchione, A. Environment, Health,
and Safety Oversight Committee (EHSOC) Review of the Sanford Underground Laboratory
(SURF), by EHSOC Committee, Lead, South Dakota, August 2012, 20 p.
L. Merugula, V. Khanna, and B.R. Bakshi. Reinforcing wind turbine blades- An environmental
life cycle evaluation, Environmental Science & Technology, 46(17): 9785-9792, 2012.
S.S. Chopra and V. Khanna. Toward a network perspective for understanding resilience and
sustainability in industrial symbiotic networks, IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable
Systems and Technology, Boston, MA, May 16-18, 2012.
M. G. Borkowski, G.G. Zaimes, and V. Khanna. Integrating LCA and thermodynamic analysis
for sustainability assessment of algal biofuels: Comparison of Renewable Diesel vs. Biodiesel,
IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, Boston, MA, May 16-18,
2012.

193

S. S. Chopra and V. Khanna. Resilience in complex economic networks: insights from graph
theory and input-output models, American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting,
Pittsburgh, PA, October 28-November 2, 2012.
M.G. Borkowski and V. Khanna. Evaluating environmental sustainability of microalgal biofuels:
a life cycle thermodynamic view, American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting,
Pittsburgh, PA, October 28-November 2, 2012.
G.G. Zaimes and V. Khanna. Assessing the critical role of natural capital in microalgal biofuel
production, American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA, October
28-November 2, 2012.
V. Khanna, L. Merugula and B. R. Bakshi. Environmental life cycle assessment of polymer
nanocomposites. Book Chapter in Handbook of Polymer Nanocomposites vol. 2 applications;
Ed. Fengge Gao, Woodhead Publishing Ltd., 2012.
Wen, Z., X. Liang, and S. Yang, A new multi-scale routing framework and its evaluation for land
surface modeling applications, Water Resour. Res., W08528, doi:10.1029/2011WR011337, (16
pages), 2012.
Davis, T.W., C-M. Kuo, X. Liang, and P-S Yu, Sap flow sensors: construction, quality control and
comparison, Sensors, 12, doi:10.3390/s120100954, 954-971, 2012.
Davis, T.W., X. Liang, C-M. Kuo, and Y. Liang, Analysis of power characteristics for sap flow,
soil moisture and soil water potential sensors in wireless sensor networking systems, IEEE Sensors
Journal, Vol. 12, No. 6, 1933-1945, 2012.
Davis, T., X. Liang, M. Navarro, D. Bhatnagar, and Y. Liang, An Experimental Study of WSN
Power Efficiency: MICAz networks with XMesh, in special issue of Smart Sensor Networks:
Theory and Practice -- International Journal of Distributed Sensor Networks,
doi:10.1155/2012/358238, (14 pages), 2012.
Salas, D., X. Liang, and Y. Liang, A systematic approach for hydrological model couplings, Int. J.
Communications, Network and System Sciences, 5, 343-352, 2012.
Wang, S., X. Liang, T. Adams, W. Teng, and Y. Liang, An assessment of the impacts of
multiscale precipitation data fusion on hydrological simulations, 26th Conference on Hydrology in
the 92nd American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, January 2226, 2012.
Liang, X., A new multiscale and mutli-direction flow network and routing framework and its
applications, Annual meeting, Atmospheric Sciences & Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG)
Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing, China, Dec. 26, 2012.
Liang, X., Undergraduate and graduate education in U.S.A., Sichuan University, June 18, 2012.
Liang, X., Hydrological modeling and its applications in water resources, Sichuan University,
June 18, 2012.

194

Liang, X., Collaborative Research: Investigating Temporal Correlation for Energy Efficient and
Lossless Communication in Wireless Sensor Networks, Project Final Technical Report to NSF, pp.
33, Nov. 30, 2012.
Liang, X., The Role of Surface, Subsurface and Vegetation Processes on Droughts, Annual
Technical Report to NOAA Climate Prediction Program for the Americas (CPPA), pp. 15, May
2012.
Liang, X., Impacts of vegetation, surface, and subsurface processes on mega drought and its
implications to climate change, Annual Technical Report to DOE Climate Change Prediction
Program (CCPP), pp. 17, April 2012.
Liang, Y., T. Adams, X. Liang, W. Teng and L. Chiu, Enhancing NOAA AWIPS DSS by Infusing
NASA Research Results for Drought and Other Disaster Management, NASA Project Final
Report, 116 pages (i.e., pp. 116), March 2012.
Zhou, Y., Zhang, W, Gamwo, I.K., Lin, J. S., Eastman, Harvey, Gill, Magdalena, and Whipple,
Gordon, Mechanical Specific Energy Versus Depth of Cut, Proceeding 46th US Rock Mechanics /
Geomechanics Symposium held in Chicago, June 2427, 2012.
Tien, Y.M., Lu, Y.C., Chang, H.H., and Chung, Y.C., Lin, J.-S and Lee, D.H., Uncertainty of
Volumetric Fraction Estimates Using 2-D Measurements, Proceeding 46th US Rock Mechanics /
Geomechanics Symposium held in Chicago, June 2427, 2012.
Mendoza J., Lin, J.-S, and Gamwo, I.K., Discrete Modeling of Void Porosity in Rock Cutting,
AIChE 2012 Annual Meeting, October 28 to November 2, 2012.
Zhou, Y., Lin, J. S., Zhang W., and Gamwo, I.K., On the Relationship Between Mechanical
Specific Energy and Rate of Penetration, , AIChE 2012 Annual Meeting, October 28 to November
2, 2012.
Development of a methodology for the evaluation of potential ramp management projects,
including a benefit/cost Tool by Mark J. Magalotti, Senior Lecturer University of Pittsburgh
and James Cullison P.E. Senior Engineer Larson Design Group, published December 2012 in the
ITE Journal.
Magalotti, M. Adaptive Traffic Signal Systems in Pennsylvania The planning, Design,
Construction and Operation of Systems, Session Coordinator and Moderator, December 2012
Transportation and Engineering Safety Conference, State College Pennsylvania.
Magalotti, M. SLOW DOWN Is Traffic Calming Needed in Your Community? Presented to
the PSATS' 90th Annual Educational Conference and Trade Show May 2012, Hershey
Pennsylvania.
Neufeld, R. D., Ropelewski, L., Acheson, M., Sewage as a Mixed Organic Substrate for
Desulfurization Bacteria, Proceedings of the 2012 Water Environment Federation Convention,
New Orleans (October, 2012).
Neufeld, R.D., Ropelewski, L., Sewage as a Mixed Organic Substrate for Desulfurization
Bacteria Presented at the 2012 Water Environment Conference, New Orleans (October, 2012).

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Neufeld, R.D., editor CONTEMPARY TECHNOLGIES FOR SHALE-GAS WATER AND


ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (167 pages) Water Environment Federation, Alexandria
Virginia (2012) ISBN 978-1-57278-272-3.
Tabrizi, A., Rizzo, P., and Ochs, M (2012). Electromechanical impedance method to assess
dental implant stability, Smart Materials and Structures, 21(11), 115022 doi:10.1088/09641726/21/11/115022 (8 pp).
Ni, X., Rizzo, P., Yang, J., Kathri, D., and Daraio, C. (2012). Monitoring the Hydration of
Cement using Highly Nonlinear Solitary Waves, NDT&E International, 52(November), 7685,
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ndteint.2012.05.003.
Ni, X., and Rizzo, P. (2012). Use of highly nonlinear solitary waves in NDT, Materials
Evaluation, 70(5), 561-569. Awarded the 2013 ASNT Outstanding Paper Award.
Zhu, X., and Rizzo, P. (2012). A Unified Approach for the Structural Health Monitoring of
Waveguides Structural Health Monitoring, an International Journal, 11(6), 629-642.
Ni, X., and Rizzo, P. (2012). Highly nonlinear solitary waves for the inspection of adhesive
joints, Experimental Mechanics, 52(9), 1493-1501.
Vandone, A., Rizzo, P., and Vanali, M. (2012). Two-Stage Algorithm for the Analysis of
Infrared Images, Research in Nondestructive Evaluation, 23(2), 69-88.
Cerda, F. Garrett, J., Bielak, J., Rizzo, P., Barrera, J., Zhuang Z., Chen, S. McCann, M., and
Kovaevi, J. (2012). Indirect structural health monitoring in bridges: scale experiments, The 6th
Intl. Conference on Bridge Maintenance, Safety and Management (IABMAS 2012), Cernobbio,
Lake Como, Italy, on July 8-12, 2012, 346 - 353.
Rizzo, P., Tabrizi, A., Berhanu, B., and Ochs, M. (2012). Nondestructive methods to assess
dental implant stability, Proc. of SPIEs 19th Annual Intl. Sympos. on Smart Structures and
Matls. Proc. SPIE 8344, 83441E; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.914793.
Vandone, A., Rizzo, P., and Vanali, M. (2012). Image Processing for the Laser Spot
Thermography of Composite Materials, Proceedings of SPIEs 19th Annual International
Symposium on Smart Structures and Materials Nondestructive Characterization for Composite
Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2012, edited by
Andrew L. Gyekenyesi, Tzu-Yang Yu, Peter J. Shull, Aaron A. Diaz, H. Felix Wu, Proc. of SPIE
Vol. 8347, 83471L 2012 SPIE CCC code: 0277-786X/12/$18 doi: 10.1117/12.914713,
Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8347 83471L-1.
Ni, X., and Rizzo, P. (2012). Recent Advancements on the NDE of structures by means of Highly
Nonlinear Solitary Waves, Proceedings of SPIEs 19th Annual International Symposium on
Smart Structures and Materials Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil,
Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2012, edited by Masayoshi Tomizuka, Chung-Bang Yun,
Jerome P. Lynch, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8345, 83450E, doi: 10.1117/12.914802, Proc. of SPIE Vol.
8345 83450E-1.
Rizzo, P., Pistone, E., Werntges, P., Han, J., and Ni, X. (2012). Inspection of Underwater
Metallic Plates by means of Laser Ultrasound, Intl. Symp. on Nondestructive Testing of Materials
and Structures, NDTMS-2011, 15-18 May 2011, Istanbul, Turkey, O. Bykztrk et al. (eds.),

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Nondestructive Testing of Materials and Structures, RILEM Bookseries 6, DOI 10.1007/978-94007-0723-8_96, 675-680.
Pistone, E., and Rizzo, P. (2012). Ultrasonic Waves for the Inspection of Underwater Waveguide
Structures, 164th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, JASA, 32(3), Pt. 2, 1933
(Invited paper).
Ni, X., Cai, L., and Rizzo, P. (2012). On the Use of Highly Nonlinear Solitary Waves for
Structural Materials Technology, NDE/NDT for Highways and Bridges: Structural Materials
Technology (SMT), 2012 Conference, New York City, August 2012.
Rizzo, P. (2012). Acoustic Emission in Composite: a review, EACS 2012 5th European Conf.
on Structural Control, Genoa, Italy 18-20 June 2012, Paper # 108.
Rizzo, P. (2012). Use of Highly Nonlinear Solitary Waves for NDE and Structural Health
Monitoring applications, University of Arizona, Tucson, February 3rd 2012.
Daraio, C., and Rizzo, P., Method and Apparatus for Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring
of Materials and Structures, U.S. Patent 8,327,709 B2 (date of patent 11 December 2012).
Caicedo, B., Ocampo, M., Vallejo, L.E., and Monroy, J. Hollow cylinder apparatus for testing
unbound granular materials of pavements. Int. J. of Road Materials and Pavement Design, 13(3)
pp. 455-479, 2012.
Kutschke, W. G., and Vallejo, L.E. (2012). Investigation of lateral stress relief using finite
elements and fracture mechanics.: a case history study of the Saxon Pit. J. of Geotechnical and
Geo-environmental Eng. (ASCE), 138(10), 1277-1283, 2012.
Vallejo, L.E., and Lobo-Guerrero, S. (2012). The shear strength of granular materials containing
dispersed oversized particles. Int. J. of Geotechnical Eng., 6 (3), 371-379, 2012.
Vallejo, L.E. Analysis of the failure of a rock slope in Tulum, Mexico. Revista Internacional de
Desastres Naturales,12 (1), 97-101, 2012.
Vallejo, L.E. (2012). Fractal evaluation of the level of alligator cracking in pavements.
Geomechanics and Engineering, 4(3), 219-227, 2012.
Vallejo, L.E. and Abu-Ali, S. The influence of crack roughness on the compression and shear
strengths of brittle fissured materials. Geo-Congress 2012, Oakland CA. ASCE Geotechnical
Special Publication 225. CD ROM, 2012.
Vallejo, L.E. (212). The influence of notches on the stability of soil and rock
slopes.Proceedings of the 11th Int. Symposium on Landslides and Engineered Slopes, Banff,
Canada, Vol. 1, 415-419, 2012.
Vallejo, L.E., and Liu, Z. The angle of repose of granular systems measured using hollow
cylinders. Proceedings of the 11th Int. Symposium on Landslides and Engineered Slopes, Banff,
Canada, Vol. 1, 937-942, 2012.

197

Kutschke, W.G., and Vallejo, L.E. A finite element analysis of the propagation of a toe crack in a
vertical slope. Proceedings of the 11th Int. Symposium on Landslides and Engineered Slopes,
Banff, Canada, Vol. 2, 1807-1812, 2012.
Caicedo, B., and Vallejo, L.E. Experimental study of the strength and crushing of unsaturated
spherical particles. Proceedings Second European Conference on Unsaturated Soils, Naples,
Italy, Vol. 1, 425-430. 2012.
Tang, S., and Vallejo, L.E. Investigation of the angle of repose of granular materials in liquids
with various densities and inclines. Proceedings of Science 2012, University of Pittsburgh (poster
presentation).
Vallejo, L.E. Pre-Columbian Engineering Invited Presentation, Society of Hispanic Professional
Engineers (SHPE) Conference 2012, Forth Worth, Texas, Nov. 15, 2012.
Vallejo, L.E. The effect of notches on the stability of rock slopes. Invited Lecture, Department
of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Bogota, Colombia, August 15,
2012.
Mu, F. and J. M. Vandenbossche, Establishing Effective Linear Temperature Gradients for
Bonded Concrete Overlays on Asphalt Pavements, Transportation Research Record: Journal of
the Transportation Research Board, No. 2305, TRB, National Research Council, 2012, pp. 24-31.
Nassiri, S. and J. M. Vandenbossche, Establishing Built-in Temperature Gradient for Jointed
Plain Concrete Pavements in Pennsylvania, International Journal of Pavement Research and
Technology, Vol. 5, No. 4, July 2012, pp. 245-256.
Nassiri, S., J. M. Vandenbossche, L. C. Ramirez, Evaluating the Continuously Reinforced
Concrete Pavements Performance Models of the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide,
International
Journal
of
Road
Materials
and
Pavement
Design,
DOI:10.1080/14680629.2012.688172, May 2012.
Mu, F., J. M. Vandenbossche, K. A. Gatti and J. Sherwood, An Evaluation of the JPCP Faulting
and Transverse Cracking Models of the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide,
International Journal of Road Materials and Pavement Design Vol. 13, Issue 1, March 2012, pp.
128-141.
Darter, M.I., S. Rao, L. Khazanovich, D. Tompkins, J. Harvey, J. Signore, J. M. Vandenbossche,
Long Life Composite Pavement Systems, Proceedings of the International Conference on LongLife Concrete Pavements, Seattle, WA, September 2012 (in press).
Nassiri, S. and J. M. Vandenbossche, Methodology for Establishing Permanent Curl/Warp
Temperature Gradients in Jointed Plain Concrete Pavements, 10th International Conference on
Concrete Pavements, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, July 2012.
Vandenbossche, J. M., M. Barman, Z. Li, T. Adams, Development of Innovative Techniques for
the Instrumentation of Composite Pavement Sections at MnROAD, 10th International Conference
on Concrete Pavements, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, July 2012.

198

Nassiri, S. and J. M. Vandenbossche, Methodology for Establishing Permanent Curl/Warp


Temperature Gradients in Jointed Plain Concrete Pavements, 10th International Conference on
Concrete Pavements, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, July 2012.
Li, Z. and J. M. Vandenbossche, "Defining the Failure Mode for Thin and Ultra-thin
Whitetopping with a 1.8 m x 1.8 m Joint Spacing," 10th International Conference on Concrete
Pavements, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, July 2012. Poster Presentation-included on CD-ROM
Conference Proceedings.
Dufalla, N., Z. Li and J. M. Vandenbossche, " Sensitivity Study of Enhanced Whitetopping
Design Procedures," 10th International Conference on Concrete Pavements, Quebec City, Quebec,
Canada, July 2012. Poster Presentation-included on CD-ROM Conference Proceedings.
Barman, M. and J. M. Vandenbossche, "Temperature Dependent HMA modulus in Whitetopping
Design Procedure," 10th International Conference on Concrete Pavements, Quebec City, Quebec,
Canada, July 2012. Poster Presentation-included on CD-ROM Conference Proceedings.
Mu, F. and J. M. Vandenbossche, "Mode I Interfacial Fracture Property between Concrete and
Asphalt," 10th International Conference on Concrete Pavements, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada,
July 2012. Poster Presentation-included on CD-ROM Conference Proceedings.
Janssen, D., N. Dufalla, and J. M. Vandenbossche, Characterizing Waste Concrete Fines for
Incorporation into Ready-Mixed Concrete, 2012 International Concrete Sustainability
Conference, Seattle, WA, May 2012.
Vandenbossche, J. M. M. Barman, Z. Li and T. Adams, Development of Innovative Techniques
for the Instrumentation of Composite Pavements, Transportation Research Board 91st Annual
Meeting, Washington, DC, January 2012.
Nassiri, S., F. Mu, J. M. Vandenbossche, and Z. Li, Comparison of Response to Environmental
Loads for Three Different Composite Pavement Sections, Transportation Research Board 91st
Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, January 2012. (Poster)
Li, Z. and J. M. Vandenbossche, Revised Bonded Whitetopping Design Procedure,
International conference on Long-Life Concrete Pavements, Advanced Concrete Pavement
Technology, Seattle, WA, September 2012. Invited Speaker.
Dufalla, N. Janssen and J. M. Vandenbossche, Characterizing Recycled Concrete Fines for ReUse, International conference on Long-Life Concrete Pavements, Advanced Concrete Pavement
Technology, Seattle, WA, September 2012. Invited Speaker.
J.M. Vandenbossche, J. M., Revised Bonded Whitetopping Design Procedure, International
conference on Long-Life Concrete Pavements, Advanced Concrete Pavement Technology, Seattle,
WA, September 2012. Invited Speaker.
Vandenbossche, J. M., Iannacchione, A. and D. Janssen, Tools to Assess and Control Gas
Migration, 2nd Annual Energy and Innovation Conference, South Pointe, PA, November 2012.
Invited Speaker.

199

Iannacchione, A. (Presenter), J. M. Vandenbossche and J. Brigham, The Marcellus Shale Gas


Play and the Gas Migration / Stray Gas Problem, ARMA/UNGI Unconventional Geomechanics
Workshop American Rock Mechanics Symposium, Chicago, IL, June 2012. Invited Speaker.
Vandenbossche, J. M., M. Barman, N. Dufalla, Z. Li and F. Mu, Pitt Bonded Concrete Over
Asphalt Design Procedure, American Concrete Paving Association Chapter/State Mid-year
Meeting, Kansas City, MO, May 2012. Invited Speaker.
Vandenbossche, J. M., M. Barman, N. Dufalla, Z. Li and F. Mu, Pitt Bonded Concrete Over
Asphalt Design Procedure, National Concrete Consortium, Oklahoma City, OK, April 2012.
Invited Speaker.
Vandenbossche, J. M., A. Iannacchione, D. Janssen, J. Brigham, V. Khanna, Gas Migration,
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Tech Services Meeting, Williamsport, PA,
March 2012. Invited Speaker.
Vandenbossche, J. M. M. Barman, N. Dufalla, Z. Li and F. Mu, 21st Century Whitetopping
Thickness Design, 51st Annual Concrete Paving Workshop, Mankato MN, March 2012. Invited
Speaker.
Vandenbossche, J. M., PennDOT Research Initiative Highlights: Premature JPCP Deterioration
& MEPDG Inputs, 14th Annual Pennsylvania Concrete Conference, Harrisburg, PA, January 19,
2012. Invited Speaker.
Vandenbossche, J. M., Important Considerations in Whitetopping Design, Transportation
Research Board 91st Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, January 2012. Invited Speaker.
Torres, H., J. Roesler, R. Rasmussen, and D. Harrington; J.M. Vandenbossche (technical author),
Guide to the Design of Concrete Overlays Using Existing Methodologies, Federal Highway
Administration, Manual Number DTFH61-06-H-00011, Washington, DC, October 2012. pp. 55.
Choudhury, M.R., Hsieh, M.K., Vidic, R.D. and Dzombak, D.A. Corrosion Management in
Power Plant Cooling Water Systems Using Tertiary Treated Municipal Wastewater as Makeup
Water, Corrosion Science, 61, 231-241, 2012.
Chien, S.-H., Chowdhury, I., Hsieh, M.K., Dzombak, D.A. and Vidic, R.D. Control of Biological
Growth in Recirculating Cooling Systems Using Treated Secondary Effluent as Makeup Water
with Monochloramine, Water Research, 46(19), 6508-6518, 2012.
Hsieh, M.K., Walker, M.E., Safari, I., Chien, S.H. Abbasian, J., Vidic, R.D. and Dzombak, D.A.
Ammonia stripping in open-recirculating cooling water systems, Environmental Progress &
Sustainable Energy, doi:10:1002/ep.11648, 2012.
Liu, W., Chien, S-H., Dzombak, D.A. and Vidic, R.D. Mineral scaling mitigation in cooling
systems using tertiary-treated municipal wastewater Water Research, 46(14), 4488-4498, 2012.
Chien, S.H., Hsieh, M.K., Li, H., Monnell, J., Dzombak, D.A. and Vidic, R.D. Pilot-scale cooling
tower to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategy for cooling system makeup
water, Review of Scientific Instruments 83(2), 024101, 2012.

200

Li, H., Dzombak, D.A. and Vidic, R.D. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) Based
Characterization of Mineral Deposition from Precipitation Reactions Industrial & Engineering
Chemistry Research, 51(7), 2821-2829, 2012.
Choudhury, M.R., Hsieh, M-K., Vidic, R.D., Dzombak, D.A. Development of an Instantaneous
Corrosion Rate Monitoring System for Metal and Metal Alloys in Recirculating Cooling Systems
Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 51:11, 4230-4239, 2012.
Barbot, E., Vidic, N.S., Gregory, K. and Vidic, R.D. Characterization of Marcellus Shale
Flowback/Produced Water in Pennsylvania Pardee Keynote Sessions (P4), Paper No. 135-9, 2012
GSA Annual Meeting and Exposition, Charlotte, NC, November 4-7, 2012.
Zhang, T., Barbot, E., Gregory, K.B. and Vidic, R.D. Fate of Radium in Marcellus Shale
Flowback Water, 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh,
PA, October 28 November 2, 2012.
Wolff, E., Zhu, S. and Vidic, R.D. Development of Membrane Distillation Technology for
Efficient Water Management in Gas Shale Plays 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers
Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA, October 28 November 2, 2012.
Chien, S.H., Dzombak, D. A. and Vidic. R. D. Impacts of advanced municipal wastewater
treatment processes on monochloramine effectiveness in recirculating cooling systems, WEFTEC
2012, Session 63, New Orleans, LA, September 29 - October 3, 2012.
Niblick, B., Theregowda, R., Dzombak, D., Vidic, R.D. and Landis, A. Evaluating Sustainability
Tools and Metrics for Application to Reuse of Treated Municipal Wastewater in Power Plant
Cooling Systems Proceedings from the LCA XII International Conference, September 25-27,
2012, Tacoma, WA.
Murali Mohan, A., Hartsock, A., Hammack, R.W., Vidic, R.D. and Gregory, K.B. Microbial
ecology and geochemistry of hydraulic fracturing fluid and flowback water from Devonian-aged
shale, American Chemical Society National Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, August 19-23, 2012.
Barbot, E., Vidic, N., Gregory, K., Vidic, R.D. Chemical characteristics of Marcellus Shale
flowback water in Pennsylvania, American Chemical Society National Meeting, Philadelphia,
PA, August 19-23, 2012.
Barbot, E. and Vidic, R.D. Potential for abandoned mine drainage as water supply for hydraulic
fracturing in the Marcellus Shale American Chemical Society National Meeting, Philadelphia,
PA, August 19-23, 2012.
Liu, W., Dzombak, D.A. and Vidic, R.D. Scaling control when using secondary-and tertiarytreated municipal wastewater as cooling water in thermoelectric power plants, PennTec 2012,
State College, PA, June 3-6, 2012.
Chien, S.H., Dzombak, D.A. and Vidic, R.D. Impact of TOC level in treated municipal
wastewater on biofouling control and biocidal effectiveness of common chemical disinfectants
PennTec 2012, June 3-6, 2012.
Chien, S.H., Dzombak, D.A. and Vidic, R.D. Can Monochloramine Be Used to Control
Biofouling in Recirculating Power Plant Cooling System Using Treated Municipal Wastewater?,

201

Proceeding of American Institute of Chemical Engineers Conference 2012, Houston, TX, April 14, 2012.
Liu, W., Dzombak, D.A. and Vidic, R.D. Feasibility study on scaling prediction with MINEQL+
when using secondary-treated municipal wastewater in cooling systems, American Chemical
Society 243rd National meeting 2012, San Diego, CA, March 25-29, 2012.
Theregowda, R. B., Dzombak, D. A., Vidic, R.D. and Landis, A. E. Life Cycle Cost and
Inventory Assessment for Reuse of Tertiary Treated Municipal Wastewater in Power Plant
Cooling Systems, 2012 WateReuse California Annual Conference, Sacramento, PA, organized by
WateReuse Association, March 25-27, 2012.
Liu, W., Chien, S.H., Choudhury, M.R., Dzombak, D.A. and Vidic, R.D. Pilot-scale tests on
using tertiary treated wastewater as makeup water for recirculating cooling system in power plants,
2012 WateReuse California Annual Conference, Sacramento, CA, March 25-27, 2012.
Choudhury, M.R., Hsieh, M.K., Vidic, R.D. and Dzombak, D.A. Pilot Scale Application of a
Rapid Instantaneous Corrosion Rate Monitoring System, CORROSION 2011, NACE's annual
conference, Salt Lake City, Utah, March 11-15, 2012.
Murali Mohan, A., Hartsock, A., Hammack, R.W., Vidic, R.D. and Gregory, K.B. Microbial
Community Changes with Time in Flowback Water Produced from Hydraulic Fracturing of
Devonian Black Shale for Natural Gas Production, American Society of Microbiology General
Meeting, San Francisco, California June 16-19, 2012.
Murali Mohan, A., Hartsock, A., Hammack, R.W., Vidic, R.D. and Gregory, K.B. Microbial
Ecology and Geochemistry of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid and Flowback Water from Devonianaged Shale, Environmental Research and Poster Session organized by Steinbrenner Institute,
Pittsburgh, PA, 8 May, 2012.
Zhang, T., Barbot, E., Gregory, K.B. and Vidic, R.D. Equilibrium and kinetics of Radium coprecipitation in Ba-Sr-SO4 system, American Institute of professional Geologists (AIPG),
Pittsburgh, PA, April 13-14, 2012.
Vidic, R.D. Water Quality, Quantity, and Management: Lessons from the Marcellus Shale
Region Top engineering technologies for gas industry, Ostrava, Czech Republic, October 24-25,
2012.
Vidic, R.D. Water Management for Unconventional Gas Resource Extraction 2012 Annual
Conference of the Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, Pittsburgh, PA, September 14,
2012.
Vidic, R.D. Flowback and Produced Water in Shale Gas Extraction: Water Quality and
Management Options Identification of Fundamental Interfacial and Transport Phenomena for the
Sustainable Deployment of Hydraulic Shale Fracturing Role of Chemicals Used, NSF
Workshop, Arlington, VA, May 14-15, 2012.
Vidic, R.D. Water Quality, Quantity and Management Strategies for Unconventional Shale
Plays Produced Water Management: Strategies for Compliance, Cost Reduction, and
Efficiencies, EUCI, Pittsburgh, PA, May 8-9, 2012.

202

Vidic, R.D. Water Quality, Quantity and Management: Lessons from the Marcellus Shale
Region Hydrofracking in Focus What Every Citizen Needs to Know, A Science and
Management Forum, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY, May 5, 2012.
Vidic, R.D. Environmental Challenges for Unconventional Shale Gas Extraction University of
Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, May 4, 2012.
Vidic, R.D. Use of Abandoned Mine Drainage for Hydraulic Fracturing SPE Workshop:
Reducing Environmental Impact of Unconventional Resource Development, San Antonio, TX,
April 23-25, 2012.
Vidic, R.D. Recycling and Reuse of Wastewater in Marcellus Shale Shale Gas Water
Management Initiative 2012, Pittsburgh, PA, March 28-29, 2012.
Dzombak, D.A., Vidic, R.D. and Landis, A.E. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power
Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for
Recirculating Water Quality Management Final Technical Report for Cooperative Agreement
Number: DE-NT0006550, US DOE NETL, September, 2012, 254pp.
Yu, Q., Baant, Z.P., and Wendner, R. (2012). Improved Algorithm for Efficient and Realistic
Creep Analysis of Large Creep-Sensitive Concrete Structures. ACI Structural Journal, 109(5),
pp. 665-675.
Baant, Z.P., Yu, Q., and Li., G-H. (2012). Excessive Long-Time Deflections of Prestressed Box
Girders. I: Record-Span Bridge in Palau and Other Paradigms. Journal of Structural Engineering,
ASCE, 138(6), PP. 676-686.
Baant, Z.P., Yu, Q., and Li., G-H. (2012). Excessive Long-Time Deflections of Prestressed Box
Girders. II: Numerical Analysis and Lessons Learned. Journal of Structural Engineering, ASCE,
138(6), PP. 687-696.
Baant, Z.P., Yu, Q., Hoover, C.G., and Kim, K.T. (2012). Non-uniqueness in softening damage
and cohesive fracture models for concrete or bone caused by ignoring the size effect. 20th
Analysis and Computation Specialty Conference, ASCE, Chicago, IL, United States, ISBN (print):
978-0-7844-1237-4
.
Baant, Z.P., Wendner, R., Hubler, M.H., and Yu, Q. (2012). Pervasive lifetime inadequacy of
long-span box girder bridges and lessons for multi-decade creep prediction. Life-Cycle and
Sustainability of Civil Infrastructure Systems Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on
life-Cycle Civil Engineering, IALCCE, Vienna, Austria, pp. 42-50.
Hoover, C.G., Baant, Z.P., Wendner, R., Vorel, J., Hubler, M.H.,Gattu, M., Kirane, K., Le, J.-L.,
and Yu, Q. (2012). Experimental investigation of transitional size effect and crack length effect
in concrete fracture. Life-Cycle and Sustainability of Civil Infrastructure Systems Proceedings
of the 3rd International Symposium on life-Cycle Civil Engineering, IALCCE, Vienna, Austria, pp.
1284-1290

203

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering


A.Abousamra, A.K. Jones and R. Melhem, Co-design of NoC and Cache Organization for
Reducing Access Latency in Chip Multiprocessors, IEEE Transactions on Parallel and
Distributed Computing, 23(6), 1038-1046, June 2012. Doi: 10.1109/TPDS.2011.238
A.Abousamra, R. Melhem and A.K. Jones, Deja Vu Switching for Multiplane NoCs,
ACM/IEEE International Symposium on Networks-on-Chip (NOCS), Copenhagen, Denmark, pp.
11-18, May 2012. Doi: 10.1109/NOCS.2012.9
O.A. Alkishriwo and L.F. Chaparro, A Discrete Linear Chirp Transform (DLCT) for Data
Compression, Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Information Science, Signal
Processing and their Applications, Montreal, Canada, pp. 1283-1288, July 2012. Doi:
10.1109/ISSPA.2012.6310490
O.A. Alkishriwo and L.F. Chaparro, Signal Compression using Discrete Linear Chirp
Transform (DLCT), Proceedings of the IEEE 20th European Signal Processing Conference
(EUSIPCO 2012), Bucharest, Romania, pp. 2128-2132, Aug. 27-31, 2012. URL:
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Y. Bai, C. Li, Y. Yue, W. Jia, J. Li, Z.-H. Mao and M. Sun, Designing a Wearable Computer for
Lifestyle Evaluation, Proceedings of the 38th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference
(NEBEC 2012), Philadelphia, PA, pp. 93-94, 2012. Doi: 10.1109/NEBC.2012.6206978
A. Barchowsky, J.P. Parvin, G.F. Reed, M. Korytowski and B.M. Grainger, A Comparative
Study of MPPT Methods for Distributed Photovoltaic Generation, IEEE Innovative Smart Grid
Technologies Conference, Washington, DC, pp. 1-7, Jan. 2012. Doi:10.1109/ISGT.2012.6175798
X. Bi, H. Li, Y. Chen and R. Pino, Spintronic Memristor Based Temperature Sensor Design with
CMOS Current Reference, Design, Automation & Test in Europe (DATE), pp. 1301-1306, Mar.
2012. Doi: 10.1109/DATE.2012.6176693
X. Bi, H. Li and J.-J. Kim, Analysis and Optimization of Thermal Effect on STT-RAM Based 3D Stacked Cache Design, IEEE Computer Society Annual Symposium on VLSI (ISVLSI), pp.
374-379, Aug. 2012. Doi: 10.1109/ISVLSI.2012.56
X. Bi, H. Li and X. Wang, STT-RAM Cell Design Considering CMOS and MTJ Temperature
Dependence, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics (TMAG), 48(11), 3821-3824, Nov. 2012. Doi:
10.1109/TMAG.2012.2200469
X. Bi, Z. Sun, H. Li and W. Wu, Probabilistic Design Methodology to Improve Run-time
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Y. Chen, H. Li, Y. Xie and D. Niu, Low Power Design of Emerging Memory Technologies,
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Y.-C. Chen, H. Li and W. Zhang, A Novel Peripheral Circuit for RRAM-based LUT, IEEE
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Y.-C. Chen, H. Li, W. Zhang and R. Pino, Three-dimensional High-density Interleaved Memory
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Y.-C. Chen, W. Wang, W. Zhang and H. Li, uBRAM-based Run-time Reconfigurable FPGA and
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W.O. Collinge, J. Deblois, M. Sweriduk, A.E. Landis, A.K. Jones, L.A. Schaefer and M.M. Bilec,
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M. Hu, H. Li, Q. Wu, G.S. Rose and Y. Chen, Memristor Crossbar Based Hardware Realization
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L. Jiang, Y. Zhang, B.R. Childers and J. Yang, "FPB: Fine-grained Power Budgeting to Improve
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R. Kerestes, G.F. Reed and A. Sparacino, Economic Analysis of Grid Level Energy Storage for
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R. Khanna, W. Stanchina and G. Reed, Effects of Parasitic Capacitances on Gallium Nitride


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H. Kim, D.S. Har, Z.H. Mao, M. Sun and H.N. Lee, Efficient Joint Source-channel Decoded
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G. Li, L. Liu, F. Wei, S. Xia and X. Qian, Recent Progress in Modeling, Simulation, and
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G. Li, B. Mao, F. Lan and L. Liu, Practical Aspects of Ambient Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy
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H. Li, R. Pino, Y. Chen, M. Hu and B. Liu, Statistical Memristor Modeling and Case Study in
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M. Li, B. Zhang, K.P. Chen. W. Snoke and A.P. Heberle, Noncircular Refractive Index Profile
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Y. Li, A. Abousamra, R. Melhem and A.K. Jones, Compiler-assisted Data Distribution and
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Y. Li, Y. Chen and A.K. Jones, "A Software Approach for Combating Asymmetries of NonVolatile Memories," International Symposium on Low Power Electronics and Design (ISLPED),
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Y. Li, Y. Chen, Y. Zhang and A.K. Jones, Combating Write Penalties using Software Dispatch
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Y. Li, R. Melhem and A.K. Jones, Leveraging Sharing in Second Level Translationlookaside Buffers for Chip Multiprocessors, IEEE Computer Architecture Letters, 11(1), JulyDec. 2012. Doi: 10.1109/L-CA.2011.35
Y. Li, R. Melhem and A.K. Jones Practically Private: Enabling High Performance CMPs through
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B. Liu, Y. Chen, B. Wysocki and T. Huang, The Circuit Realization of a Neuromorphic
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Xiaoyu Liu, Ravi Yalamanchili, Ajay Ogirala and Marlin H. Mickle, Using Volume Conduction to
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Xiaoyu Liu, Lee Berger, Ajay Ogirala and Marlin H. Mickle, A Touch Probe Method for
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M.F. Lupu, M. Sun and Z.H. Mao, Information Rate of Human Manual Control in Unstable Systems,
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J. Lutkenhaus, F.A. Farro, D. George, K. Ohlinger, H. Zhang, Z. Poole, K.P. Chen and Y. Lin,
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Y. Ma, J. Yang, L. Hui, Y. Li, Z.-H. Mao and M. Sun, Novel Hand Motion Tracking System,
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B. Mao, Q. Tao and G. Li, Quantitative Analysis of Resolution and Sensitivity of Kelvin Probe
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C. Meyer, A. Kushki, E. Sejdi, G. Berall and T. Chau, Quantitative Classification of Pediatric
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M. Miloevi, K.M. Valter McConville, E. Sejdi, K. Masani, M.J. Kyan and M.R. Popovi,
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A. Myrden, A. Kushki, E. Sejdi and T. Chau, Towards Increased Data Transmission Rate for a
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Ajay Ogirala, Shruti Mantravadi and Marlin H. Mickle, Radio Frequency Identification Systems
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Jesse S. Randall, Venugopal M.P. Nair, Larry R. Foulke, Steven P. Levitan, Daniel G. Cole,
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G.F. Reed, B.M. Grainger, A.R. Sparacino, R.J. Kerestes and M.J. Korytowski, Advancements in
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G.F. Reed, B.M. Grainger, A.R. Sparacino and Z.H. Mao, "Ship to Grid: Medium Voltage DC
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G.F. Reed, "DC Technologies: Solutions to Electric Power System Advancements," guest
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G.F. Reed, J. OConnor and S. Varadan, Power System Planning Analysis and Functional
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Vyasa Sai, Ajay Ogirala and Marlin H. Mickle, A Low-power Pulse Width Coding Scheme for
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Vyasa Sai, Ajay Ogirala and Marlin H. Mickle, Low-power Solutions for Wireless Passive
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Department of Industrial Engineering


Abolghasem, S., S. Basu, S. Shekhar, J. Cai, and M.R. Shankar, Mapping Subgrain Sizes
Resulting from Severe Simple Shear Deformation, Acta Materialia, Vol. 60, pp. 376-386, 2012.
Assi, T.M., K. Rookkapan, J. Rajgopal, V. Sornsrivichai, S.T. Brown, J. S. Welling, B.A.
Norman, D.L. Connor, S.I. Chen, R.B. Slayton, Y. Laosiritaworn, A.R. Wateska, S.R.
Wisniewski, and B.Y. Lee, How Influenza Vaccination Policy May Affect Vaccine Logistics,
Vaccine. Vol. 30, No. 30, 22 June 2012, 4517-4523.
Barber, J., M. Tronzo, C. Horvat, G. Clermont, J. Upperman, Y. Vodovotz, and I. Yotov, A
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and Modeling in Upper Division Classrooms: Impacting Conceptual Understanding and the
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Antonio, TX June 10-13, 2012.
Besterfield-Sacre, M.E., A. Robinson, N.O. zaltin, L.J.Shuman, A. M. Shartrand, and P.
Weilerstein (2012), Essential Factors Related To Entrepreneurial Knowledge in the Engineering
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June 10-13, 2012. Winner of the Best Paper Entrepreneurship Division.
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Catro, R.A., D.C. Angus, S.Y. Hong, C. Lee, L.A. Weissfeld, G. Clermont, and M.R. Rosengart,
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and Gregory P. Carman, A Novel Thin Film NITi (TFN) Device for Cerebral Aneurysm
Treatment, 8th European Solid Mechanics Conference, July 8-13, 2012, Graz, Austria.
Chun, Youngjae, Daniel Levi, K. P. Mohanchandra, Colin P. Kealey , Haithem Babiker, David H.
Frakes, Soojung C. Hur, Hsin-yun Chang, Michael C. Emmons, Po-Yu Lin, Allan W. Tulloch,
David A. Rigberg, Dino Di Carlo, Fernando Vinuela Jr, Fernando Vinuela, and Gregory P.
Carman, A Novel Flow-Diverting Thin Film Nitinol (TFN) Covered Microstent, The Industrial
and Systems Engineering Research Conference (ISERC), May 19-23, 2012, Orlando, FL.
Chun, Youngjae, Daniel Levi, K. P. Mohanchandra, Michael C. Fishbein, and Gregory P.
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and Systems Engineering Research Conference (ISERC), May 19-23, 2012, Orlando, FL.
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Haithem, Babiker, Colin Kealey, Youngjae Chun, Gregory P Carman, Daniel S Levi, and David
H Frakes, In-vitro Fluid Dynamic Investigation of a Novel Hyper Elastic-Thin Film Nitinol Stent
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Hawrylak, P. J., A. Ogirala, B. A. Norman, J. Rajgopal, and M. H. Mickle. "Enabling Real-Time
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Gmez, H., J. Mesquida, L. Hermus, P. Polanco, H.K. Kim, S. Zenker, A. Torres, R. Namas, Y.
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H. Kenea, J.S. Welling, D.L. Connor, A.R. Wateska, A. Jana, A.E. Wiringa, W.G. Van Panhuis,
and D.S. Burke, Impact of Introducing the Pneumococcal and Rotavirus Vaccines into the
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Luangkesorn, L., B.A. Norman, Y. Zhuang, M. Falbo, and J. Sysko, Designing Disease
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Scala, N. M., Rajgopal, J., Needy, K. L.; An Inventory Criticality Classification Method for
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Strain-Rate and Temperatures on Microstructure Evolution in High Rate Severe Plastic


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Shekhar, S., S. Abolghasem, S. Basu, J. Cai and M.R. Shankar, Effect of Severe Plastic
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Environment-Driven Degradation, Probability in the Engineering and Informational Sciences,
Vol. 26, No. 3, pp. 405-424.
Wang, Yu, L.K. Luangkesorn and L.J. Shuman, Modeling Emergency Medical Response to a
Mass Caualty Incident Using Agent Based Simulation, Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, 46
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Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science


Heather Meloy Gorr, Joshua M. Zueger, and John A. Barnard, 2012, Lysozyme Pattern
Formation in Evaporating Drops, Langmuir, Vol. 28, pp.40394042.
Heather Meloy Gorr, Joshua M. Zueger, and John A. Barnard, 2012, Characteristic Size for
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Sang Hyun Byun, Myung Gon Yoon and Sung Kwon Cho, Wireless EWOD (Electroweting-onDielectric) Device Using Planar Coils, The 16th International Conference on Miniaturized
Systems for Chemistry and Life Science (MicroTAS2012), Oct. 28-Nov. 1, 2012, Okinawa, Japan.
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Junqi Yuan and Sung Kwon Cho, 2012, Bio-inspired micro/mini propulsion at air-water
interface: a review, Journal of Mechanical Science and Technology, Vol. 26, No. 12, pp. 37613768.
Junqi Yuan and Sung Kwon Cho, Electrowetting climbing of inclined water surfaces, 65th
Annual Meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, November 18-20, San Diego, California.
Jian Feng and Sung Kwon Cho, Microscale underwater propulsion by oscillating air bubble
columns, 65th Annual Meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, November 18-20, San Diego,
California.
Chyu, M.K. Recent Advances in Turbine Heat Transfer with a View of Transition to Coal Gas
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Wang, Y., Li, Z., Qin, L., Chyu, M.K., and Wang, Q-M., Theoretical and Experimental Studies
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Siw, S.C., Chyu, M.K., and Alvin, M.A., Effects of Pin Detached Space on Heat Transfer in a
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Reddy, B.V.K., Barry, M., Li, J., Chyu, M.K., A Fluid-Thermo-Electric Coupled Field Analysis
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11-15, 2012, ASME Paper GT2012-69268.
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Mo, C., S. Jordan and W.W. Clark, Bimorph Piezoelectric Cymbal Design in Energy
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M. Schaefer, S. J. Dickerson, L. R. Foulke, D. G. Cole, and S. P. Levitan, Design of the UPANTHER Desktop Nuclear Plant Simulator, In Proc. ANS, Summer Meeting, 2012.
J. S. Randall, V. M. P. Nair, L. R. Foulke, S. P. Levitan, and D. G. Cole, Development of Reactor
Core Neutronics and Thermal Physics for the U-PANTHER Simulator, In Proc. ANS, Summer
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P.P. Suikkanen, C. Cayron, A.J. DeArdo and L.P. Karjalainen, Crystallographic Analysis of
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October 7-11, 2012, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
A.J. DeArdo et al., Effect of Bainite Transformation On Grain Boundary Character Distribution
And DBTT In High Strength Linepipe Steel. Materials Science and Technology (MS&T) 2012
October 7-11, 2012, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
A.J. DeArdo et al., A Study of the Martensite-Austenite Microconstituent in a High Strength Plate
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hydrostatic case. J. Math. Fluid Mech. 14 (2012), No. 4, 751770.
Galdi, Giovanni P.; Maremonti, Paolo; Zhou, Yong On the Navier-Stokes problem in exterior
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X. Liang, C.I. Garcia, and A.J. DeArdo, EFFECT OF BAINITE TRANSFORMATION ON
GRAIN BOUNDARY CHARACTER DISTRIBUTION AND DBTT IN HIGH STRENGTH
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876-884, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
C. I. Garcia, M. Hua, K. Cho, K. Redkin, A. J. DeArdo, THE ALLOY DESIGN AND
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N. Ansari, P.H. Pisciuneri, P.A. Strakey and P. Givi, ``Scalar Filtered Mass Density Function
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On the early stages of scale development on Ni-22Al-30Pt with and without Hf additions at
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ASME / SAE / ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference & Exhibit, Atlanta, GA, July 30- August 1,
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S.L. Yilmaz, P.H. Pisciuneri, and P. Givi, ``Towards Petascale LES/FDF Simulation,''
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M.B. Nik, P. Givi, C.K. Madnia and S.B. Pope, ``EPVS-FMDF for LES of High-Speed Turbulent
Flows,'' AIAA-2012-0117, 50th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting including the New Horizons
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Society, vol. 57(17), p. 401, 65th Annual Meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the
American Physical Society, San Diego, CA, November 18-20, 2012.
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Division of Fluid Dynamics of the American Physical Society, San Diego, CA, November 18-20,
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the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the American Physical Society, San Diego, CA, November 1820, 2012.
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163-173.

222

On the phase composition changes during high temperature oxidation of Pt-modified -NiAl at
1150C, G. Smoa, J. Jedliski, J.L. Poussard, B. Gleeson, G. Bonnet, M. Nocu, K. Kowalski,
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and without Hf addition, S. Hayashi and B. Gleeson, Oxidation of Metals, 77 (2012) 237-251.
A New Kinetics-Based Approach to Quantifying the Extent of Metastable Stable Phase
Transformation in Thermally-Grown Al2O3 Scales, W. Zhao, Z. Li, and B. Gleeson, Oxidation
of Metals, 79 (2013) 361-381. (On Springer website in 2012).
Steam Effects on the Oxidation Behavior of Al2O3-Scale Forming Ni-Based Alloys, W. Zhao,
and B. Gleeson, Oxidation of Metals, 79 (2013) 613-625. (On Springer website in 2012).
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piezoelectrically actuated oscillating cantilever, Experiments in Fluids, 53, pp. 1533-1543.
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piezoelectric air pump, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 55, pp. 2461-2471.
Landfried, D.T., Jana, A., and Kimber, M., Characterization of the Behavior of Confined
Laminar Round Jets, FEDSM2012-72257, Proceedings of the 2012 ASME Fluids Engineering
Division Summer Meeting, July 8-12, 2012, Puerto Rico, USA.
Eastman, A., Kiefer, J., and Kimber, M., Thrust Measurements and Flow Field Analysis of a
Piezoelectrically Actuated Oscillating Cantilever, FEDSM2012-72135, Proceedings of the 2012
ASME Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting, July 8-12, 2012, Puerto Rico, USA.
Park JS, Jung YS, Lee J.K, Structural change in polar nanoregion in alkali niobate added
Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)0.95Ti0.05O3 single crystal and its effect on ferroelectric properties, J. Appl.
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Lee J.K. and M. Nastasi, Ferroelectric Properties of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 Films Under Ion-Beam Induced
Strain. Journal of Applied Physics. 2012 Nov 20; 112 (10):104111.
Y.S. Jung, Y.H. Son, and J.K. Lee, 3-D Assembly of Flower-like Iron Oxide Particles Under
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Y.H. Son, J.K. Lee, Y. Soong, D. Martello, and M.K. Chyu, Use of Clay Particles as 2D Layer
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S. Lee, J.-H. Lee, G. Han, J.-K. Lee and H.S. Jung, Mesoporous TiO2 Nanowires as Bifunctional Materials for Dye-sensitized Solar Cells, Electrochimica Acta 74, 83-86 (2012).
M.J. Yang, Z.F. Di, and J.-K. Lee, Facile Control of Ultraphobicity and Superhydrophilicity in
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603 (2012).

223

J.H. Noh, H.S. Han, J.S. Kim, J.H. Park, S.B. Park, B. Ding, H.S. Jung, J.-K. Lee, and K.S.
Hong, Tin Doped Indium Oxide Core - TiO2 Shell Nanowires on Stainless Steel Mesh for
Flexible Photoelectrochemical Cells, Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 084104 (2012).
He Zheng, Jianbo Wang, Jian Yu Huang, Ajing Cao & Scott X. Mao. In-situ visualization of
birth and annihilation of grain boundary in Au nano-crysta. Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 109(22):
225501.
He Zheng, Yang Liu, Scott X. Mao, Jianbo Wang, Jian Yu Huang. Beam-assisted large
elongation of in situ formed Li2O nanowires , Sci. Rep., 2012, 542(2): 1-4.
J.W. Wang, X.H. Liu, S.X. Mao, J.Y. Huang. Microstructural Evolution of Tin Nanoparticles
during In Situ Sodium Insertion and Extraction, Nano Letters 12, 5897-5902 (2012).
J.W. Wang, X.H. Liu, K. J. Zhao, A. Palmer, E. Patten, D. Burton, S.X. Mao, Z.G. Suo, J.Y.
Huang. Sandwich-Lithiation and Longitudinal Crack in Amorphous Silicon Coated on Carbon
Nanofibers. ACS Nano 6, 9158-9167 (2012).
X.H. Liu, J.W. Wang, S. Huang, F.F. Fan, X. Huang, Y. Liu, S. Krylyuk, J. Yoo, S.A. Dayeh,
A.V. Davydov, S.X. Mao, S.T. Picraux, S.L. Zhang, J..Li, T. Zhu, J.Y. Huang. In situ atomicscale imaging of electrochemical lithiation in silicon, Nature Nanotechnology 7, 749-756 (2012).
Xiao Hua Liu, Jiang Wei Wang, Yang Liu, He Zheng, Akihiro Kushima, Shan Huang, Ting Zhu,
Scott X. Mao, Ju Li, Sulin Zhang, Wei Lu, James M. Tour, Jian Yu Huang In situ transmission
electron microscopy of electrochemical lithiation, delithiation and deformation of individual
graphene nanoribbons, Carbon, 2012, 50, 3836-3844.
Li Qiang Zhang, Xiao Hua Liu, Ya-Chuan Perng, Jea Cho, Jane P. Chang, Scott X. Mao, Zhi
Zhen Ye, Jian Yu Huang Direct observation of Sn crystal growth during the lithiation and
delithiation processes of SnO2 nanowires, Micron, 43, 1127-1133 (2012).
Yi Lu, Jiang-ping Tu,Qin-qin Xiong, Yan-qiang Qiao, Xiu-li Wang, Chang-dong Gu and Scott X.
Mao, Synthesis of dinickel phosphide (Ni2P) for fast lithium-ion transportation: a new class of
nanowires with exceptionally improved electrochemical performance as a negative electrode,
RSC Advances, 2, 34303436 (2012).
Yi Lu, Xiuli Wang, Yongjin Mai, Jiayuan Xiang, Heng Zhang, Lu Li, Changdong Gu, Jiangping
Tu and Scott X. Mao, Ni2P/Graphene Sheets as Anode Materials with Enhanced Electrochemical
Properties versus Lithium, J. Phys. Chem. C 2012, 116, 2221722225.
Yi Lu , Jiang-Ping Tu , Qin-Qin Xiong , Jia-Yuan Xiang , Yong-Jin Mai , Jun Zhang Yan-Qiang
Qiao , Xiu-Li Wang, Chang-Dong Gu , and Scott X. Mao, Controllable Synthesis of a
Monophase Nickel Phosphide/Carbon (Ni 5 P 4 /C) Composite Electrode via Wet-Chemistryand a
Solid-State Reaction for the Anode in Lithium Secondary Batteries, Adv. Funct. Mater. 2012, 22,
39273935.
Yi Lu, Jiangping Tu, Qinqin Xiong, Yanqiang Qiao, Jun Zhang, Changdong Gu, Xiuli Wang and
Scott X. Mao, Carbon-Decorated Single-Crystalline Ni2P Nanotubes Derived from Ni Nanowire
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224

M.A. Helminiak, N.M. Yanar, F.S. Pettit, T.A. Taylor, G.H. Meier, The Effect of Superalloy
Substrate on the Behaviour of High-purity Low-density Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier
Coatings, Materials at High Temperatures, 29, 264 (2012).
R. W. Jackson, J. P. Leonard, L. Niewolak , W.J. Quadakkers, R. Murray, S. Romani, G. J.
Tatlock, F. S. Pettit, and G. H. Meier, Analysis of the Reactive Element Effect on the Oxidation
of Ceria Doped Nickel, Oxid. Metals, 78, 197 (2012).
N. Mu, K.Y. Jung, N.M. Yanar, G.H. Meier, F.S. Pettit, G.R. Holcomb, Water Vapor Effects on
the Oxidation Behavior of Fe-Cr and Ni-Cr Alloys in Atmospheres Relevant to Oxy-fuel
Combustion, Oxid. Metals, 78, 221 (2012).
M.A. Helminiak, N.M. Yanar, F.S. Pettit, T.A. Taylor and G.H. Meier, Factors Affecting the
Microstructural Stability and Durability of Thermal Barrier Coatings Fabricated by Air Plasma
Spraying., Materials and Corrosion, 63, 929 (2012).
A. Finoli, N. Ostrowski, E. Schmelzer, I. Nettleship and J. Gerlach, Multiscale Porous Ceramics
Scaffolds for the in Vitro Culturing of Primary Human Cells, Advances in Applied Ceramics, 111
262-268 (2012).
I. Nettleship, Materials for Perfusion Bioreactors used in Regenerative Medicine, to be
published in Tissue Engineering Using Ceramic and Polymers: 2nd Edition, Eds. AR. Boccaccini
and P.X. Ma, Woodhead Publishers.
D Li*, AM Robertson, G Lin, M Lovell, Finite element modeling of cerebral angioplasty using a
structural multi-mechanism anisotropic damage model, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng., 92(5): 457474, (2012). doi: 10.1002/nme.4342.
AM Robertson, PN Watton, Editorial: Computational Fluid Dynamics in Aneurysm Research:
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published online on May 31, 2012, 10.3174/ajnr.A3192, (2012).
MR Hill*, X Duan*, GA Gibson, S Watkins, AM Robertson, A theoretical and non-destructive
experimental approach for direct inclusion of measured collagen orientation and recruitment into
mechanical models of the artery wall. J of Biomechanics, 45(5):762-771,
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PN Watton, H Ho, PJ Hunter and AM Robertson, Clinical Utility of Computational Modelling for
Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms- The Road from Virtual to Reality. Special Track: Modelling
and Simulation of Aneurysm Mechanics, 8th European Solid Mechanics Conference
(ESMC2012), Graz, Austria, July 9-13th, 2012.
MJ Durka* and AM Robertson, Is Aspect Ratio Sufficient to Classify Intra-Aneurysmal
Hemodynamics? Special Track: Modelling and Simulation of Aneurysm Mechanics, 8th
European Solid Mechanics Conference (ESMC2012), Graz, Austria, July 9-13th, 2012.
Kerzmann, T., and Schaefer, L., 2012, System Simulation of a Linear Concentrating Photovoltaic
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225

Kim, G., Kim, H.S., Lim, T.S., Schaefer, L., and Kim, J.T., 2012, Comparative Advantage of an
Exterior Shading Device in Thermal Performance for Residential Buildings, Energy and
Buildings, vol. 46, pp. 105-111, doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2011.10.040.
Collinge, W.O., DeBlois, J.C., Sweriduk, M.E., Landis, A.E., Jones, A.K., Schaefer, L.A., and
Bilec, M.M., 2012, Measuring Whole-Building Performance with Dynamic LCA: A Case Study
of a Green University Building, International Symposium on Life Cycle Assessment and
Construction, Nantes, France, R12095.
Collinge, W., Landis, A., Jones, A.K., Schaefer, L., and Bilec, M., 2012, Integrating Indoor
Environmental Quality Metrics in a Dynamic Life Cycle Assessment Framework For Buildings,
Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems & Technology
(ISSST), Boston, MA, doi: 10.1109/ISSST.2012.6227992.
Ikeda, M., and Schaefer, L., 2012, Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Thermal Multiphase Flows
with Dynamic Wall Interactions, ASME, International Mechanical Engineering Congress and
Exposition, IMECE2012-87405.
Saunders, C.L., Landis, A., Jones, A.K., Schaefer, L., and Bilec, M., 2012, Utilizing Measured
Energy Usage to Analyze Design Phase Energy Models, Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE
International Symposium on Sustainable Systems & Technology (ISSST), Boston, MA, doi:
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Schaefer, L., Ikeda, M., and Bao, J., 2012, The Lattice Boltzmann Equation Method for Complex
Flows, ASME, 10th International Conference on Nanochannels, Microchannels and
Minichannels, ICNMM2012-73049, Keynote Presentation.
Ikeda, M., and Schaefer, L., 2012, Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Thermal Multiphase Flows
with Dynamic Wall Interactions, 65th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics,
E3.01.
Chen, L., and Schaefer, L., 2012, "Hybrid Lattice-Boltzmann model for Thermally Coupled
Fluid-Solid Problem, 65th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics, E5.02.
Xu, L., and Schaefer, L., 2012, Numerical Study of the Boundary Conditions in Particulate
Suspensions with the Lattice Boltzmann Method, ASME, International Mechanical Engineering
Congress and Exposition, IMECE2012-93999.
Rao, P., and Schaefer, L., 2012, Higher Order Thermal Lattice Boltzmann Method based on
Hermite Series Expansion, 21st International Conference on Discrete Simulation of Fluid
Dynamics, Bangalore, India.
Fisher N, Kamalapurkar R, Sharma N, Dixon W. RISE-Based Control of an Uncertain Nonlinear
System With Time-Varying State Delays. IEEE Conference on Decision and Control; 2012 Dec
10-13; Maui, Hawaii 2012. p.3505-3507.
Sharma N, Stein R. Gait Planning and Double Support Phase Model for Functional Electrical
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226

U Celentano , M Cardosa, C Martins, C Ramirez, C Van Eck, P Smolinski, F Fu, Use of the
Transtibial Aimer via the Accessory Anteromedial Portal to Mark the Center of theAnatomic ACL
Footprint, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 20(1), 69-74, 2012.
Kato Y, Ingham S, Maeyama A, Lertwanich P, Wang JH, Mifume Y, Kramer S, Smolinski, P, Fu
F, Biomechanics of the Human Triple Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Knee Surgery, Sports
Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 28(2), 247-254, 2012.
Kato Y, Ingham S, Kramer S, Smolinski, P, Fu F, Biomechanical comparison of different graft
positions for Single-bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction., Knee Surgery, Sports
Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 21, 816-823, 2012.
P. Smolinski, M. O Farrell, K Bell, L. Gilbertson and F.H. Fu, Effect of ACL Reconstruction
Tunnels on Stress in the Distal Femur, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 21 (2),
839-845, 2012.
Muriuki MG, Mohagheh-Motlagh A, Smolinski PJ, Miller MC, Elbow helical axes of motion are
not the same in physiologic and kinetic joint simulators., J Biomech, 45(13):2289-2292, 2012.
JH Wang, Y Kato, SJM Ingham, A Maeyama, M Linde-Rosen, P Smolinski, F Fu, Measurement
of the End to End Distances between the Femoral and Tibial Insertion Sites of the during Knee
Flexion and Rotational Torque, Arthroscopy, 28(10), 1524-1532, 2012.
Zhou J, Tantisricharoenkul G, Chen L, Shi D, Linde-Rosen M, Smolinski P, Fu F, Kinematics of
single-bundle and double-bundle ACL reconstruction in medial meniscus-deficient knees using a
porcine model, 15th ESSKA Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, May 2-5, 2012 (Poster).
Yapici C, Keklikci K, Kim D, Shi D, Linde-Rosen M, Smolinski P, Fu F, Effects of anatomic and
nonanatomic partial anterior cruciate ligament augmentation on knee rotational stability in a
porcine model, 15th ESSKA Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, May 2-5, 2012 (Poster).
Kramer S, Smolinski P, Fu F, Finite element analysis of graft positions in ACL reconstruction,
15th ESSKA Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, May 2-5, 2012 (Poster).
Pinto M, Protta T, Tantisricharoenkul G, Linde-Rosen M, Smolinski P, Fu F, Biomechanic testing
of the porcine triple bundle anterior cruciate ligament, 15th ESSKA Congress, Geneva,
Switzerland, May 2-5, 2012 (Poster).
Asai S, Kim D, Hoshino Y, Moon C, Maeyama A, Linde-Rosen M, Smolinski P, Fu F, The Effect
of Coronal location of the tibial anteromedial tunnel in Anatomic Double Bundle Anterior
Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction on Knee Kinematics, 15th ESSKA Congress, Geneva,
Switzerland, May 2-5, 2012 (Poster).
Shi D, Zhou J, Linde-Rosen M, Tantisricharoenkul G, Yapici C, Smolinski P, Fu F, Does graft
fixation sequence in double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction effect the kinematics
of the knee?, 15th ESSKA Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, May 2-5, 2012 (Podium).
Chen L, Linde-Rosen M, Hwang S, Ozyurek S, Kramer, S, Smolinski P, Fu F, The effect of
medial meniscal horn injury on rotational stability of knee using a porcine model, 15th ESSKA
Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, May 2-5, 2012 (Podium).

227

Keklikci K,Yapici C, Kim D, Linde-Rosen M, Smolinski P, Fu F, Effect of notchplasy in


anatomic in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A biomechanical study in porcine knee, 15th
ESSKA Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, May 2-5, 2012 (Poster).
Kopf S, Martins C, Smolinski P, Fu F, The Morphology of the Medial Wall of the Lateral
Femoral Condyle, 15th ESSKA Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, May 2-5, 2012 (Poster).
Hwang S, Moon D, Kramer S, Martin A, Linde-Rosen M, Smolinski P, Fu F, Anterior cruciate
ligament femoral tunnel drilling anteromedial portal: 3-Dimensional plane drill angle affects
tunnel length relative to notchplasty, 15th ESSKA Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, May 2-5, 2012
(Poster).
Keklikci K,Yapici C, Kim D, Linde-Rosen M, Smolinski P, Fu F, Effect of Notchplasy in
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Biomechanical Study in Porcine Knees, Annual
Meeting of the Arthroscopic Association of North America, Orlando, FL, May 17-19, 2012
(Podium).
Pinto M, Protta T, Tantisricharoenkul G, Linde-Rosen M, Smolinski P, Fu F, Biomechanic
Testing of the Porcine Triple Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Annual Meeting of the
Arthroscopic Association of North America, Orlando, FL, May 17-19, 2012 (Poster).
Yapici C, Keklikci K, Kim D, Shi D, Linde-Rosen M, Smolinski P, Fu F, Anatomic Posterolateral
Bundle Augmentation on Knee Rotational Stability: A Biomechanical Study in Porcine Knees,
Annual Meeting of the Arthroscopic Association of North America, Orlando, FL, May 17-19,
2012 (Poster).
Kim D, Asai S, Moon CW, Hwang SC, Keklikci K, Linde-Rosen M, Smolinski P, Fu F, Double
Bundle and Single Tunnel Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction using Quadriceps Tendon,
Annual Meeting of the Arthroscopic Association of North America, Orlando, FL, May 17-19,
2012 (Poster).
Stormer BA, Piper NM, Yang X, Tao J, Fu Y, Kirca M, To A. Mechanical properties of SWNT Xjunctions through molecular dynamics simulation. International Journal of Smart and Nano
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Yang X, Han Z, Li Y, Chen D, Zhang P, To A. Heat welding of non-orthogonal X-junction of
single-walled carbon nanotubes. Physica E. 2012; 46:30-32.
Yang X, Zhang P, Han Z, Chen D, To A. Transformation of non-orthogonal X-junction of singlewalled carbon nanotubes into parallel junction by heating. Chemical Physics Letters. 2012;
547:42-46.
Yang Q, Biyikli E, Zhang P, Tian R, To A. Atom collocation method. Computer Methods in
Applied Mechanics and Engineering. 2012; 237:67-77.
Biyikli E, Liu J, To A. A fast method for generating atomistic models of arbitrary-shaped carbon
graphitic nanostructures. ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition;
2012 Nov 9-15; Houston, TX 2012.

228

Fu Y, To A. New insights into thermal nonequilibrium processes via studying their underlying
atomic velocity distributions. ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and
Exposition; 2012 Nov 9-15; Houston, TX 2012.
Biyikli E, Liu J, To A. Modeling random complex-shaped carbon nanotube structures. ASME
International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition; 2012 Nov 9-15; Houston, TX
2012.
Yang Q, Biyikli E, Zhang P, Tian R, To A. Atom collocation method. ASME International
Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition; 2012 Nov 9-15; Houston, TX 2012.
Biyikli E, Liu J, Yang X, To A. A fast method for generating atomistic models of arbitrary-shaped
carbon graphitic nanostructures. 2012 Northwestern Summer Workshop in honor of Professor
Wing Kam Lius 60th Birthday; 2012 Jul 22-23; Evanston, IL 2012.
Bucci, B., Cole, D., Ludwick, S., Vipperman, J.S., A Nonlinear Control Algorithm for
Reducing Settling Time in High-Precision Point to Point Motion, IEEE Transactions on Control
System Technology, Issue 99, 10.1109/TCST.2012.2206812, Sep. 11, 2012.
Cvengros, B., D. Valente, E. Nykaza, J. Vipperman, Blast Noise Classification With Common
Sound Level Meter Metrics, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 132(2), pp. 822-31,
Aug 2012.
Wang, Chenzhi, Jae Bum Pahk, C. D. Balaban, J. Muthu, D. Vorp, J.S. Vipperman,
Biomechanical Assessment of the Bridging Vein Rupture of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain
Injury Using the Finite Element Human Head Model, IMECE2012-88739, Proceedings of
IMECE-12, Houston, TX, Nov 9-15, 2012.
Shelton, Christopher, and J.S. Vipperman, Ed Nykaza, Dan Valente, Six Noise Type Artificial
Neural Network Military Noise Classifier, ASME NCAD/Internoise Conference, Aug. 19-22,
2012.
High precision electronic charge density determination for L10-ordered g-TiAl by quantitative
convergent beam electron diffraction, X. Sang, A. Kulovits, G. Wang, and J. Wiezorek,
Philosophical Magazine, 92 (2012) 4408-4424.
Molecular and electronic structures of transition-metal macrocyclic complexes as related to
catalyzing oxygen reduction reactions: A density functional theory study, H. He, Y. Lei, C. Xiao,
D. Chu, R. Chen, and G. Wang, Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 116 (2012) 16038-16046.
Rational development of ternary alloy electrocatalysts, C. Wang, D. Li, M. Chi, J. Pearson, R.B.
Rankin, J. Greeley, Z. Duan, G. Wang, D. van der Vliet, K.L. More, N.M. Markovic, and V. R.
Stamenkovic, The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 3 (2012) 1668-1673.
Influence of surface segregation on the elastic property of Pt-Ni alloy nanowires, A. Datta, Z.
Duan and G. Wang, Computational Materials Science, 55, (2012) 81-84.
Qi Yu, Jing-Feng Li, Zhi-Xiang Zhu, Ying Xu, and Qing-Ming Wang Shift of morphotropic
phase boundary in high-performance [111]-oriented epitaxial Pb (Zr, Ti) O3thin films J. Appl.
Phys. 112, 014102 (2012).

229

Jia-Jun Zhou, Ke Wang, Fu Li, Jing-Feng Li, Xiao-Wen Zhang, and Qing-Ming Wang. High and
Frequency-Insensitive Converse Piezoelectric Coefficient Obtained in AgSbO3-Modified (Li, K,
Na)(Nb,Ta)O3 Lead-Free Piezoceramics, J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 15 (2012).
Jia-Jun Zhou; Jing-Feng Li, Li-Qian Cheng; Ke Wang; Xiao-Wen Zhang; Qing-Ming Wang A
small amount of BiFeO3 addition to (Li,K,Na)(Nb,Ta)O3 lead-free ceramics: Influence on phase
structure, microstructure and piezoelectric property Journal of the European Ceramic Society 32
(2012) 35753582.
Li-Qian Cheng; Jing-Feng Li; Jia-Jun Zhou; Ke Wang; Qing-Ming Wang Influence of Ball
Milling on Sintering Behavior and Electrical Properties of (Li,Na,K)NbO3 Lead-free
Piezoceramics, Journal of Materials Science, (2012) 47:69086914
Lifeng Qin, Yingying Sun, Qing-Ming Wang, Youliang Zhong, Ming Ou, Zhishui Jiang, and Wei
Tian, Fabrication and Characterization of Thick Film Piezoelectric Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT)
Ceramic Resonators, IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control,
Dec., 2012.
Yizhong Wang, Zheng Li, Lifeng Qin, Minking K. Chyu, and Qing-Ming Wang, Theoretical
and Experimental Studies of a Surface Acoustic Wave Flow Sensor, IEEE Transactions on
Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, vol. 59, no. 3, March 2012.
A.K. Kulovits, G. Facco, J.M.K. Wiezorek, Grain size determination in nano-scale
polycrystalline aggregates by precession illumination hollow cone dark field imaging in the
transmission electron microscope, Materials Characterization (2012) Vol. 63, 17-26.
Thomas LaGrange, Bryan W. Reed, Melissa Santala, Joseph McKeown, Andreas Kulovits, Jrg
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231

Faculty Awards and Honors


ROBERT O. AGBEDE AWARD FOR DIVERSITY, for significant contributions to enhance
and support diversity in engineering, to Steven Abramowitch.
AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NCRP ESTABLISHED INVESTIGATOR AWARD, to
Yadong Wang.
AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR ENGINEERING EDUCATION 2012 JOHN L. IMHOFF
GLOBAL EXCELLENCE AWARD, for industrial engineering, to Bopaya Bidanda.
AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR ENGINEERING EDUCATION 2012 SHARON KEILLOR
AWARD, for women in engineering education, to Mary Besterfield-Sacre.
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS 2011 WESLEY W. HORNER AWARD, to
Jorge D. Abad.
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS PITTSBURGH SECTION NAMED A
DIRECTOR BY THE SECTIONS BOARD OF DIRECTORS, to John C. Brigham.
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS
PROFESSOR OF THE YEAR, to Daniel D. Budny.

PITTSBURGH

SECTION

2011

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS STATE-OF-THE-ART OF CIVIL


ENGINEERING AWARD, to Kent A. Harries.
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS ADAPTIVE STRUCTURES AND
MATERIAL SYSTEMS 2012 BEST PAPER AWARD IN MECHANICS AND MATERIAL
SYSTEMS, to Lisa M. Weiland.
ASSOCIATION FOR IRON AND STEEL TECHNOLOGY 2012 ADOLF MARTENS
MEMORIAL STEEL LECTURE AWARD, to Anthony J. DeArdo.
ASSOCIATION OF COMPUTING MACHINERY DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD, to
Alexander K. Jones.
BAYER PROFESSORSHIP, to a faculty member in chemical and petroleum engineering, to
Robert M. Enick.
BICENTENNIAL ALUMNI FACULTY FELLOWSHIP, for outstanding productivity as a
junior member of the faculty, to Xinyan Cui.
BOARD OF VISITORS FACULTY AWARD, for outstanding research, teaching publications,
leadership, or meritorious recognition, to David Vorp.

232

BOARD OF VISITORS FACULTY FELLOWSHIP, for outstanding productivity as a junior


member of the faculty, to Laura Schaefer.
WELLINGTON C. CARL FACULTY FELLOWSHIP, for outstanding productivity as a junior
member of the faculty, to Lance Davidson.
2012 CARNEGIE SCIENCE AWARD FOR
EDUCATOR, to Melissa Bilec and Amy E. Landis.

UNIVERSITY/POST-SECONDARY

CLARION UNIVERSITY DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD, to Janet E. Stout.


CONSOLIDATED NATURAL GAS PROFESSORSHIP FELLOWSHIP, for outstanding
productivity as a junior member of the faculty, to Steven R. Little.
NICKOLAS A. DeCECCO PROFESSORSHIP, for outstanding productivity as a senior member
of the faculty, to Gtz Veser.
DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR OF BIOENGINEERING, to Sanjeev G. Shroff.
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE PROFESSOR OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, to Larry J.
Shuman.
CAMILLE AND HENRY DREYFUS FOUNDATION 2012 CAMILLE DREYFUS
TEACHER-SCHOLAR AWARD, to Steven R. Little.
ELECTRONIC DESIGN AUTOMATION
SCHOLARSHIP, to Yiran Chen.

SOCIETY

A.

RICHARD

NEWTON

ENGINEERS WITHOUT BORDERS USA PREMIER PROJECT AWARD, to Daniel D.


Budny.
INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS, 2012 MEDAL FOR
INNOVATIONS IN HEALTHCARE TECHNOLOGY, to Savio L-Y Woo.
INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION SOCIETIES 2012
GLOBAL AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN ENGINEERING, to Bopaya Bidanda.
INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR FIBER REINFORCED
CONSTRUCTION 2012 PRESIDENTS AWARD, to Kent A. Harries.

POLYMER

IN

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING 2012


ACHENBACH MEDAL, to Piervincenzo Rizzo.
PAUL E. LEGO FACULTY FELLOWSHIP, for outstanding productivity as a junior member of
the faculty, to Peng Chen.

233

JAMES T. MacLEOD FACULTY PROFESSORSHIP, for outstanding productivity as a senior


member of the faculty, to Peyman Givi.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MULTICULTURAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM
ADVOCATES 2012 NAMEPA OUTSTANDING MINORITY ENGINEERING PROGRAM
ADMINISTRATOR, to Sylvanus Wosu.
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN J. TINSLEY ODEN FACULTY FELLOW, to John C.
Brigham.
WATER ENVIRONMENT FEDERATION, elected fellow, to Ronald D. Neufeld.
WILLIAM KEPLER WHITEFORD FACULTY FELLOWSHIP, for outstanding productivity as
a junior member of the faculty, to Zhi-Hong Mao and Ravi Shankar.
WILLIAM KEPLER WHITEFORD PROFESSORSHIP, for outstanding productivity as a senior
member of the faculty, to George E. Klinzing, Gerald H. Meier, Andrew Schaefer, and Radisav
D. Vidic.

Faculty Honor Roll


2013 CHANCELLORS DISTINGUISHED TEACHING AWARD, to Steven R. Little and
Bryan A. Norman.

234

Distinguished Lectureships
The Bayer Distinguished Lectureship 2013
Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
Engineering Biology for Sustainable Development, July 25, 2013, Dr. Jay D. Keasling,
Professor, Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of California,
Berkeley.
Engineering Microbial Hydrocarbon Metabolism for Production of Advanced Fuels, July 26,
2013, Dr. Jay D. Keasling, Professor, Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering,
University of California, Berkeley.

235

EXTERNAL PROGRAMS
Alumni Relations

Alumni Profiles
Total Living Engineering Alumni (10/1/2013)
Bioengineering
Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Industrial Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Other Majors/specializations

786
3,771
4,608
622
6,112
3,470
1,484
5,843
619

TOTAL

27,314

Total Living Engineering Alumni by Gender


Female
Male

3,667
23,647

TOTAL

27,314

236

2013 Distinguished Alumni


In 1964, the Swanson School of Engineering initiated a program to honor the outstanding professional
achievements of its graduates. The annual Distinguished Alumni Awards Program continues to be the
highlight of the year in the Swanson School of Engineering, and offers the opportunity for alumni,
faculty, and students to come together in recognition of the meritorious activities in professional
engineering and the allied fields of science, industry, business, public service, and education. The
accomplishments of outstanding Pitt Engineering graduates have brought recognition to the University
and its academic departments, to the profession, and to the entire Pitt Engineering community.

Swanson School of Engineering Awardee


George W. Whetsell, BSIE 72, MSIE 73, MPH 75
Managing Partner
Prism Healthcare Partners, LTD
George W. Whetsell graduated magna cum laude from the University of Pittsburgh with a Bachelor of
Science in Industrial Engineering. He also received a Master of Science in Industrial Engineering and a
Master of Public Health in Health Sciences Research, both from the University. He received the Swanson
School of Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award for Industrial Engineering in 1996. George has
more than 37 years of healthcare consulting experience. He is a co-founder and Managing Partner of
Prism Healthcare Partners LTD. Prior to founding Prism, he was a co-founder of Wellspring Partners, the
third-largest healthcare consulting company in the U.S. before it was acquired. In addition to his roles
with Prism and Wellspring, Georges professional experience includes: Partner and National Director of
Healthcare Operations Improvement Consulting, KPMG; Partner and Director of Healthcare Services,
Mid-Atlantic Region, Ernst & Young. George is a fellow of the American College of Healthcare
Executives and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society. He is a senior member of
the Institute of Industrial Engineers and a member of the Healthcare Financial Management Association.
George also served as Lead Faculty for the American College of Healthcare Executives seminar
Reengineering Healthcare. George met Dianna, his wife of 39 years, at the University of Pittsburgh. He
has twin sons, Nathan and Benjamin, both graduates of the University of Michigan. Nathan is a computer
engineer with a masters degree from Stanford University, and Benjamin is a lawyer with a law degree
from Columbia Law School.

Departmental Awardees
Gina E. Bertocci, BSME 83, MSME 91, PhD BioE 97
Endowed Chair of Biomechanics
Professor, Bioengineering Department
University of Louisville
Dr. Bertocci earned her Bachelors and Masters Degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University

237

of Pittsburgh. She completed her PhD in Bioengineering in 1997 also from the University of Pittsburgh.
Upon receiving her PhD, she became a faculty member at the University of Pittsburghs Department of
Rehabilitation Science and Technology, with secondary appointments in Bioengineering and Pediatrics,
where she remained through 2004. In 2004, Dr. Bertocci joined the University of Louisville, where she is
a Professor in Bioengineering and Endowed Chair of Biomechanics. Dr. Bertocci is also the Director of
the Injury Risk Assessment and Prevention Laboratory, established in 1997. Dr. Bertoccis research
interests include the application of injury biomechanics to the early detection of child abuse and the study
of pediatric injury risk in falls. She also conducts research in the areas of wheelchair transportation safety
and accessibility, and more recently has developed an interest in the field of canine orthopedic
biomechanics. Dr. Bertocci has over 60 peer-reviewed journal papers and 120 conference proceedings.
Her research has been funded through agencies that include the National Institutes for Health, Center for
Disease Control, National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research, National Institute for
Justice, the Arthritis Foundation and Paralyzed Veterans of America.

Naichiu Joseph Lai, PhD CHE 73


Chairman and Co-founder
Fastgen Corporation
Naichiu Joseph Lai is Chairman and Co-founder of Fastgen Corporation. Fastgen is a start-up biomedical
technology company, based in California, involved in the development of diagnostic products for
screening TB and diseases. Dr. Lai was also founder and chairman (2000-2003) and director of BioForm
Medical Inc. until it was acquired in 2011 (now Merz Aesthetics). He received his PhD from University
of Pittsburgh and BS from Cornell University, both in Chemical Engineering. Coming to Pitt was a life
changing event as Dr. Lai did pioneer research in sensor development for real-time blood gas monitoring
under Professor C. C. Liu, and he has ever since been involved in the biosensors and medical technology
industry. Upon graduation, he continued biosensors development for real-time and bed-side monitoring at
General Electric Medical System Group and then at other companies. He has co-founded three other
companies, Criticare Systems Inc, Gaztech Inc, and Immtech International Inc. Criticare and Immtech
went public on Nasdaq in 1986 and 1996, and Gastech was acquired. At Criticare he led a team to
develop pulse-oximeter, non-invasive blood pressure monitor (NIBP), and IR anesthetic gas monitor
which are now the standard of care in hospitals and clinics around the world.

Tamas S. Tom Tanto, BSCE 67


President
Tanto International Golf
Tom Tanto is an icon in the golf industry world-wide. Shortly after graduating with a
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh in 1967, an
opportunity to build a local golf course in Murrysville, PA caught Toms interest.
Upon its completion, Tom founded Tanto Construction & Supply and the rest is history. He has built
and/or worked on over 350 golf courses around the world. From Augusta to Dubai to Moscow, he has
worked on 25 of the top 100 courses in the world. At Augusta National Golf Club he worked on course
projects for 12 consecutive years. Recently, he sold his company in the United States, but continued to
work as a consultant for the new owner of Tanto Irrigation, LLC. Meanwhile, he founded Tanto
International Golf Limited, and presently is involved with course projects in Dubai, Hungary, and Jordan.
Tom has worked on, and consulted with, many of the best-known golf course architects including Rees
Jones, Robert Trent Jones Jr., Tom Fazio, Greg Norman, Jack Nicklaus, and Arnold Palmer. He has
served as a consultant nationally and internationally for the Toro Company for the past 30 years.
Interestingly, Tamas Tom Tanto was born and raised in Hungary during World War II and the Soviet

238

occupation of Iron Curtain countries. He came to the United States in 1957 unable to speak English. He
settled in the South Hills of Pittsburgh with a family who directed him to the University of Pittsburgh. He
worked for a local engineering firm while attending college, and for Dravo Corporation after graduation.
Tom is owner and director of the Pittsburgh area course named Totteridge, a course that he built in 2000.
Golf Digest currently ranks Totteridge at 19th in the state and among the best in western Pennsylvania.
This formerly displaced immigrant feels blessed to be an American. He is proud of his career. Tom is
indebted to so many people including the School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh for giving
him a chance. He now wants to pay back. When he is not traveling around the world, Tom resides in a
150 year-old restored historical home near Greensburg, Pennsylvania with Susan, his wife of 47 years.
They have two children and four grandchildren.

Alvin L. Hillegass, BSEE 49


Retired President and Chief Executive Officer
Camp Hill Corporation
Retired Group Vice President-Steel
U.S. Steel
Alvin L. Al Hillegass played a key role in the iron and steel industry starting in his hometown of
McKeesport, PA at U.S. Steels former National Works. Mr. Hillegass graduated from McKeesport High
School in 1944 and received an athletic scholarship to Auburn University. However, like most his age he
was called to serve in World War II in the U.S. Navy. Following his navy service he enrolled at the
University of Pittsburgh where he earned his BSEE in 1949. He later earned a Masters in Business from
Indiana University. Mr. Hillegass had a 33 year career with U.S. Steel rising to the position of Group
Vice President-Steel, with overall responsibility for steel operations, sales, engineering and research.
Following a successful U.S. Steel career, Mr. Hillegass joined with Pat Campana to form Camp-Hill
Corp. that went on to purchase and restart three shut down pipe manufacturing facilities. All are still
operating today. They have subsequently been acquired as operating facilities by new owners. Mr.
Hillegass is now retired and continues investing in entrepreneurial projects.

Venkatesh Venki Padmanabhan, MSIE 87, PhD IE 91


Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer
English Indian Clays Limited
Dr. Venki Padmanabhan took over as Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer of English Indian
Clays Limited, a 50 year old minerals and starch intermediates, $80 million company in the $600 million
Karan Thapar Group in March of 2013. Prior to this he joined Royal Enfield (100 year old British single
brand, in India for more than 50 years, $200 million division of $1 billion Eicher Group) as Chief
Operating Officer in 2008 and rose to the position of Chief Executive Officer in 2011. During this time,
with two successful launches of the Classic and Thunderbird single cylinder UCE based motorcycles, the
company saw a three-fold increase in sales and twenty fold increase in profits. Royal Enfield now is a
brand reborn and thriving in India. Prior to joining Royal Enfield, Dr. Padmanabhan was brought to India
in 2007 as Managing Director to establish Chrysler Corporations first South East Asia Global Sourcing
Centre in Chennai from which region Chrysler today sources close to $1 billion in automotive parts. Dr.
Padmanabhan started his career at General Motors Warren Technical Center in 1989 where he served in
positions of increasing responsibility in advanced manufacturing research, product engineering and plant
manufacturing. In 1999 he got his first taste of Lean Manufacturing at GMs turn-of-the-century Buick
City Assembly Plant in Flint, Michigan assembling Buick Park Avenues and Pontiac Bonnevilles. During
2000-2004, he served as a Production Shift Leader in GMs first in 15 years, Greenfield Assembly Plant
at Lansing Grand River Assembly from where the Cadillac Brand was restored to its former glory with
the successful launch of the CTS, SRX and STS. In 2004 he joined Daimler Chryslers (DCX) Chrysler

239

Division to support the integration of Lean Manufacturing in its diverse operations and was part of the
team that got it to achieve double digit industry leading productivity improvements as reported by
Harbour and Associates. The Productivity improvements needs of the Mercedes Car Division of DCX
drew him to Stuttgart, Germany in 2006 where he worked at their Component, Powertrain and Assembly
plants around Germany. Throughout his career he has experienced the agony and ecstasy of struggling to
resuscitate fabled brands and businesses at General Motors, Chrysler, Mercedes and Royal Enfield. Dr.
Padmanabhan completed his graduate studies at the University of Pittsburgh (PhD IE 91, M.S. IE 87)
and undergraduate studies at Birla Institute of Technology, Ranchi ( B.Sc. ME 85.)

Tony Treser Jr., BSMEE 61


Retired President
Beaver Steel Services, Inc.
Tony Treser, Jr. graduated from the University of Pittsburgh in 1961 with a Bachelor of Science degree in
Metallurgical Engineering. Prior to and during his college career Mr. Treser was very involved in
swimming, and he received an Athletic scholarship to the University. Some of his swimming highlights
included winning two Pennsylvania State Championships in the 200 yard freestyle and the 150 yard
individual medley. He was also honored as an All American in the 200 yard free style event. He competed
against Olympian Frank Naus. He was the Eastern Collegiate champ and record holder in the 200 yard
individual medley.
Mr. Treser joined the Navy as an Educational Petty Officer and was promoted to Recruit Master of Arms.
He was named Honor Man of the Honor Company. He also had another swimming highlight while in the
Navy, breaking two swimming records including the 50 yard butterfly record that was previously held by
Olympian Reid Patterson. During his career Mr. Treser worked for many companies in varying capacities.
A few of the companies that he worked for included Weirton Steel, National Steel Service Center
Division, Production Steel Company of Detroit, J&L Steel, Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel, and Steubenville
Steel Works. His varying titles included Director of Quality Control, Plant Manager, Assistant Hot Mill
Metallurgist, General Superintendent of Metallurgy and Quality Control, and Technical Service
Metallurgist among many others. Mr. Treser went on to form Beaver Steel Services, Inc. in 1989 with his
two sons as partners. They built the business by providing service to their customers. Beaver Steel
Services, Inc. was a member of the Western Pennsylvania Family Business section of the Katz Graduate
School of Business in 1998, and was a runner-up for the Family Business of the Year in 2000. Mr. Treser
retired in 2003 and his son Tony still runs the business today. Mr. Treser has been married to his beautiful
wife Rose Marie for 54 years. They have raised seven children together and Mr. Treser has been able to
coach each of them in sports. He is also very involved in his church and with the University of Pittsburgh,
where he has been nominated for the Varsity Letter Club Awardee of Distinction several times.

240

Development
2012-2013 External Support
Through the generous support of alumni, friends, corporations and foundations, the Swanson
School of Engineering realized $26,669,896 in total support for the 2013 fiscal year.

FY13 Support

Alumni - 45%
Corporate - 6%
Founda6on -45%
Other - 4%

241

SWANSON SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING


ENDOWMENTS (Principal Only)
End of Fiscal Year (June 30)

120,000,000

Department
School

100,000,000

80,000,000

60,000,000

40,000,000

20,000,000

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

Book Value

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

40,353,181

41,092,319

36,235,873

41,602,595

49,103,429

56,409,165

68,244,024

88,575,046

DEPARTMENT

3,768,799

3,968,031

11,354,712

11,524,754

12,634,827

12,364,211

16,316,237

11,596,480

BOOK VALUE

44,121,980

45,060,350

47,590,585

53,127,349

61,738,256

68,773,376

84,560,261

100,171,526

MARKET VALUE

82,889,514

97,514,542

96,299,289

78,028,549

92,001,960

115,212,739

129,191,347

152,345,097

SCHOOL

242

2011

2012

2013

Advisory Groups
School of Engineering
Board of Visitors
TRUSTEE MEMBERS
*Roberta (Robbi) A. Luxbacher
Vice President, Industrial and
Wholesale
ExxonMobil Fuels Marketing Co.
John A. Swanson
President
Swanson Analysis Services, Inc.
*Stephen R. Tritch
Retired Chairman
Westinghouse Electric Company
*Thomas J. Usher
Chairman
Marathon Petroleum Corporation
REGULAR MEMBERS
*Robert O. Agbede
President and CEO
Chester Engineers
*David K. Bucklew
Vice President, Sales Americas
Region
Eaton Corporation
David L. Brown
Chief Market Strategist
Sabrient Systems
*Anthony Cugini
Director, National Energy
Technology Laboratory
Stephen W. Director
Provost
Northeastern University
*Wilson J. Farmerie
Retired Chairman
RedZone Robotics, Inc.
*John A. Jurenko
Retired Vice President
Adtran, Inc.

*Francis J. Kramer
President and CEO
II-VI Incorporated
Frank L. Lederman
Retired Vice President and CTO
Alcoa Inc.
*Nick J. Liparulo
Senior Vice President
Westinghouse Nuclear Services
*Robert H. Luffy
Former President and CEO
American Bridge Company

*Jack W. Shilling
Retired Executive Vice President,
Strategic Initiatives and Technology
and Chief Technology Officer
Allegheny Technologies
*Kenneth S. Smialek
Private Investor
*Humberto Vainieri
President
Vainieri Consulting
*Barry J. Wetzel
Retired President and CEO
Clark Screw Machine Products Co.

*Robert v.d. Luft


Retired Chairman
Entergy and Dupont Intl
*Richard J. Madden
Founder, Future Fund
*John C. Mascaro
Chairman
Mascaro Construction Company, LP
*James J. McCaffrey
Senior Vice President Sales
CONSOL Energy Sales Company
*Gerald E. McGinnis
Retired Chairman and Founder
Respironics Inc.
*Aloysius Ish T. McLaughlin, Jr.
Retired President and COO
Dick Corporation
*David L. Motley
Consultant
*John W. Pavia
Robert F. Savinell
George S. Dively Professor of
Engineering
CASE Western Reserve University

*Edward F. Kondis
Retired Vice President
Mobil Corporation
243

TRUSTEE EMERITUS
MEMBERS
#*George A. Davidson, Jr.
Retired Chairman, Dominion
#*Paul E. Lego
Executive Associates
#*Frank E. Mosier
Mosier Enterprises, Inc.

*Alumnus
+Former Trustee
#Trustee Emeritus

Departmental Visiting Committees


Bioengineering

Chemical and Petroleum


Engineering

Joe Argyros
Senior Vice-President, Operations
ALung Technologies, Inc.

Nick Liparulo, Chair


Vice President of Engineering Services
Westinghouse Electric Company

Scott Berceli, MD, PhD


Assistant Professor of Surgery
University of Florida
College of Medicine

Richard Baxendell
Director, Integrated Building Solutions
Public Sector Business
Bayer MaterialScience LLC

Eugene Eckstein, PhD


Professor and Chairman
Department of Biomedical Engineering
University of Memphis

Mark Dubnansky
Operations Manager
Manufacturing & Distribution
Springdale Plant
PPG Industries, Inc.

Alan D. Hirschman, PhD


Professor
Bioengineering Department
Swanson School of Engineering
University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Karl W. Haider


Innovation Manager
New Technologies Group
Bayer MaterialScience LLC

Dr. Mir Imran


Chairman, InCube Labs LLC
Chairman, Modulus, Inc.
Managing Director, InCub
Ventures LP

Dr. Bryan Morreale


Focus Area Lead
Materials Science & Engineering
U.S. D.O.E. National Energy Technology
Laboratory

Larry V. McIntire, PhD


Wallace H. Coulter Chair
The Wallace H. Coulter Department of
Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Tech and Emory University

Dr. Dale Keairns


Executive Advisor
Booz Allen Hamilton

Wolf W. von Maltzahn


Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Robert K. Reinhart
Director of Engineering
Controls Link, Inc.

John Watson, PhD


Director/Professor
Department of Bioengineering
University of California/San Diego

Christopher Roberts
Department Chair
Uthlaut Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering
Auburn University

Dr. Hal Wrigley


President
Knightsbridge Biofuels
Ecogy Biofuels

Dr. Jennifer Sinclair Curtis


Professor
Chemical Engineering
University of Florida

244

Larry C. Smith
Manager, Drafting & Design Operations
Manager, Ice Condenser Engineering
Westinghouse Electric Company

Margaret A. Pelcher
Principal Environmental
Charles M. Russell
Senior Vice President
Michael Baker Jr. Inc.

Mary T. Zeis
Associate Director - Retired
Sharon Woods Technical Center
The Procter & Gamble Company

Dan Slagle
President
Nichols & Slagle Engineering, Inc.

Civil and Environmental


Engineering

Lester Snyder, III


President and CEO
Joseph B. Fay Company

John M. Barsom
President
Barsom Consulting, Ltd.

Joseph Szczur
District Executive
PennDOT District 12-0

Victor Bertolina
President, Engineering
SAI Consulting Engineers, Inc.

Electrical and Computer


Engineering

Nick Burdette
HDR Engineering, Inc.

Mr. Graham Cable


Director, Information & Control Systems
Westinghouse Electric Company

Jeff Campbell
Vice President
Michael Baker Corp.

Dr. Kenneth F. Cooper


Retired; formerly Manager of Process and
Control Technology; Westinghouse Electric
Company

Mike Dufalla
JMT Engineering

Dr. Jeffrey Donne


Senior Manager
Robert Bosch, LLC North American R&D
Center

Arthur G. Hoffmann
Vice President
Gannett Fleming, Inc.
Werner C. Loehlein,
Chief, Water Management Branch
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Stephen Heilman, MD
Founder and CEO
Lifecor

John T. Lucey, Jr.


Executive Vice President
Heckmann Corporation

Mr. Tom Mino


CEO
Reflex Photonics Inc.

Robert H. Luffy (Retired)


President and CEO
American Bridge

Mr. John W. Pavia


SSOE Board of Visitors
Engineering Consultant
Retired: former General Manager
Engineering

Michael OConnor
Parsons Brinckerhoff

245

United States Steel Corp.

President and COO


II-VI Inc.

Mr. Michael Pietropola


Vice President of Network Core
Engineering and Planning
AT&T

Ms. Patricia Kelly Lee


President
Toolkit

Mr. Rich Stinson


President Power Distribution Americas
Eaton Corporation

Mr. William Mallin


General Counsel
Eckert Seamans

Industrial Engineering

Mr. Douglas R. Rabeneck


Retail Consulting Practice
Accenture

Ms. Tandy A. Bailey


District Industrial Engineering Manager
UPS

Mr. Stan C. Sliwoski - Emeritus


Senior Consultant
UPS Professional Services

Mr. Glenn M. Foglio


President
Graciano Corporation

Mr. Nishan Vartabedian


Executive Vice President (Retired)
Fidelity Investments

Mr. Richard C. Frank


General Manager - Business Development
Strategic Planning & Business Development
United States Steel Corporation Retired

Mr. J. (Buster) Weinzierl- Emeritus


R&D Coatings, Inc.

Mechanical Engineering and


Materials Science

Mr. Matthew A. Gardner


General Manager, North America
Propulsion & Controls
Locomotives and Equipment
Bombardier

Mr. James Kimbrell


Chief Technologist
L-3 Communications, Brashear Division

Mr. Roman Hlutkowsky - CHAIR


Principal
The Hlutkowsky Group
`
Mr. George Huber Emeritus
Professor of Public Health Practice
Associate Dean for Public Policy
Graduate School of Public Health

Mr. Wilson J. Farmerie


(Retired) Chairman
RedZone Robotics
Mr. Bernard Fedak
Project Executive
Aker Solutions Inc

Mr. John Innocenti


Senior Vice President and Chief Operating
Officer
UPMC Shadyside Hospital

Mr. David M. Kitch, PE


Consultant
David T. Marinaro, BSME
(Retired)

Ms. Caroline M. Kolman, P. E.


Managing Director
Healthcare Navigant

Mr. Fred Harnak


United States Steel Corporation
Research and Technology Center

Mr. Francis Kramer

246

Raymond J. Labuda
(Retired) Vice President of Tire Technology
Hankook Tire Company
John E. Goossen
Director
Science & Technology Department
Westinghouse Electric Company
Dr. David P. Hoydick
USX/US Steel Technical Center
Mr. Theodore (Ted) F. Lyon
Managing Director
Hatch
Dr. C. Edward Eckert
President
Apogee Technology, Inc.
Dr. Jack Shilling
(Retired) Executive Vice President
Strategic Initiatives and Technology
and Chief Technology Officer
Allegheny Technologies
Mr. R. Rumcik, President
Elwood Quality Steels Co.

247

Diversity
Advisory Committee
Berook Alemayehu, President
Engineering Diversity Graduate Students'
Association (EDGSA)

Dr. Leonard Casson, Chair


Civil and Environmental Engineering
Dr. Sylvanus Wosu (ex-officio)
Associate Dean for Diversity

Amy Howell
Scientists, Engineers and Mathematicians
for Service (SEMS)

Dr. Larry Shuman (ex-officio)


Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

University Members

Ms. Alaine Allen (ex-officio)


Director, PECAP EXCEL

Breanne Caution
OAFA

Ms. Cheryl Paul (ex-officio)


Director, Freshman Program

Carol W. Mohamed, Director


The Office of Affirmative Action, Diversity
and Inclusion

Dr. Steve Jacobs


Electrical and Computer Engineering

External Members
Mr. Brian Rider
Manager of Corporate Recruiting
PPG Industries

Dr. Badie Morsi


Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
Dr. Steven Abramowitch
Bioengineering

Mr. Charles Toran


Sci-Tek Environmental Services Co

Dr. Gerald Meier


Mechanical Engineering and
Material Science

Mr. Robert J. Wilson


Smith Barney

Dr. Paul Leu


Industrial Engineering
Student Organization Members
Marcus Jordan
President, NSBE
Christina ODonnell
President, SWE
Heather Meloy Gorr
President, EGSO
Jorge Torres
President SHPE

248

2013 Bioengineering Directory


Name
Abramowitch, Steven
Aizenstein, Howard
Alemayehu, Berook
Allen, Robert
Arazawa, David
Ataai, Mohammad
Badylak, Stephen
Balaban, Carey
Banerjee, Ipsita
Barone, William
Batista, Aaron
Beniash, Elia
Blose, Kory
Bly, Margie
Boninger, Michael
Borovetz, Harvey
Brienza, David
Brigham, Johnny
Browe, Daniel
Candiello, Joseph
Catt, Kasey
Cavanaugh, Brian
Chakraborty, Dev
Cham, Rakie
Chambers, April
Cinibulk, Emma
Cleary, Deborah
Cooper, Gregory
Cooper, Rory
Corcoran, Timothy
Damle, Sameer
Datta, Moni
Davidson, Lance
Deasy, Bridget
Debski, Richard
DeCenzo, Diann
DeWillie, Brian
Ding, Dan
Ding, Zhijie
Dziki, Jenna
Eason, Hunter
Evans, Caroline
Farraro, Kathryn
Farrokhi, Shawn
Fatykhov, Ilnar
Federspiel, William
Frankowski, Brian
Friberg, Thomas
Furman, Joseph
Gandhi, Neeraj
Gao, Jin
Gartner, Mark
Gealey, Dan
Gerlach, Jorg
Gilbert, Thomas
Godlove, Jason
Goitz, Robert
Gronenborn, Angela
Hamschin, Brandon
Haney, Jamie
Hermann, John
Horvath, Samantha
Hostler, David
Huard, Johnny

Office Address
CNBIO 409
STERL 253
BST3 4039
BENDM 421/422/425
MGOWN 210
BENDM 1249
BSP II 319
EEINS 107
BENDM 1249
CNBIO 330
BST3 4074
SALK 589
CNBIO 407B
BENDM 848
KAU 901
CNBIO 312
BAKSQ 401
BENDM 936
CNBIO 331
BENDM G-11
BST3 5065
BST3 5066
PRESB S4771
BENDM 404 office, BENDM 405/437/439 lab
BENDM 441
CNBIO 331
CNBIO 413
RANGO 7109
FRTOW 5042
MONF NW628
BENDM 1249
BENDM 1234
BST3 5059
BSP2 300
CNBIO 405
CNBIO 405
CNBIO 331
FRTOW 5044
CNBIO 237
BENDM 437/439
CNBIO 332
CNBIO 439/440
CNBIO 332
FRTOW 6076
BENDM 1234
MGOWN 210
EEINS 818
EEINS 500
EEINS 108
BENDM 421
Ension, Inc. 240 William Pitt Way, Pittsburgh, PA 15238
CNBIO 306
MGOWN 200
RANGO 3512
BST3 4039
KAU 911
BST3 1051
BENDM 1140
CNBIO 439/440
BST3 5065
BENDM 761/CMU A427 Newell Simon Hall
IROQU 400A
RANGO 4151

249

Phone
412.624.7924
412.383.5452
412.383.5394
717.880.2550
412.383.9998
412.624.9648
412.624.5252
412.624.5749
412.624.2071
412.648.2000
412.383.5394
412.648.0108
412.624.5321
412.383.7157
(412) 648-6975
412.624.4725
412.624.6383
412.624.9047
(412) 624-4830
(412) 624-9661
412.383.9460
412.605.1553
412.624.7227
412.624.9898
412.648.1943
412.624.5317
412.692.5384
(412) 383-6590
(412) 647-3730
412.624.9630
412.624.9630
412.383.5820
412.624.5500
412.648.1638
412.648.2000
412.648.1943
(412) 822-3691
412.624.7799
412.624.9261
(412) 648-2156
(412) 383-9786
412) 648-2000
412.383.6645
412.799.4995
412.383.9499
412) 383-9624
412.647.2214
412.647.2115
412.647.3076
(412) 624-7196
(412) 383-9598
412.624.1079
(412) 383-7150
412.692.6400
(412) 648-3379
412.605.3324
412.648.9959
412.624.7993
412) 333-9789
(412) 383-6672
412.624.9931
412.647.4113
412.692.7822

E-mail
sabram@engr.pitt.edu
aizen@pitt.edu
bea22@pitt.edu
raa32@pitt.edu
dta9@pitt.edu
ataai@engr.pitt.edu
badylaks@upmc.edu
cbalaban@pitt.edu
ipb1@pitt.edu
wbb8@pitt.edu
abatista@engr.pitt.edu
ebeniash@pitt.edu
blosekj@upmc.edu
mkb49@pitt.edu
boninger@pitt.edu
borovetzhs@upmc.edu
dbrienza@pitt.edu
brigham@pitt.edu
dpb20@pitt.edu
jec40@pitt.edu
kac200@pitt.edu
bmc66@pitt.edu
dpc10@pitt.edu
rcham@pitt.edu
ajcst49@pitt.edu
ecc14@pitt.edu
clearyda@upmc.edu
greg.cooper@chp.edu
rcooper@pitt.edu
corcorante@upmc.edu
ssd13@pitt.edu
mkd12@pitt.edu
ldavidson@engr.pitt.edu
bmdst10@pitt.edu
genesis1@pitt.edu
ddecenzo@pitt.edu
bcd14@pitt.edu
dad5@pitt.edu
zhd3@pitt.edu
jld141@pitt.edu
hse1@pitt.edu
csc18@pitt.edu
kff7@pitt.edu
farrokhi@pitt.edu
ilf3@pitt.edu
federspielwj@upmc.edu
frankowski8@upmc.edu
fribergtr@upmc.edu
furman@pitt.edu
neg8@pitt.edu
jig22@pitt.edu
mgartner@ension.com
dgealey@pitt.edu
jgerlach@pitt.edu
gilberttw@upmc.edu
jason.godlove@gmail.com
goitzrj@upmc
amg100@pitt.edu
bmh52@pitt.edu
jlh76@pitt.edu
jkh30@pitt.edu
sjh26@pitt.edu
hostlerdp@upmc.edu
jhuard@pitt.edu

Name
Hung, Tin-Kan
Huppert, Theodore
Ibrahim, Tamer
Ishikawa, Hiroshi
Jallah, Zegbeh
Jeffries, Eric
Jiang, Chang
Johnson, Noah
Joy, Marion
Kageman, Lawrence
Kameneva, Marina
Kellum, John
Khanna, Sanjeev
Khanwilkar, Pratap
Kim, Kang
Kim, Kwang
Knight, Katrina
Kolarcik, Christi
Kolling, Alicia
Krawiec, Jeffrey
Krishnamurth, Narayan
Kumta, Prashant
Kunjukunju, Sangeetha
Laymon, Charles
Ledgerwood, Aaron
Lee, Boeun
Lee, Randy
Leuba, Sanford
Li, Xia
Little, Steven
Liu, Yang
Lotze, Michael
Loughlin, Patrick
Ludwig, Daniel
Luther, Allison
Mahboobin, Arash
Maiti, Spandan
Mance, Nick
Mao, Zhi-Hong
Marra, Kacey
McCullough, Matthew
McMahon, Patrick
Menegazzi, James
Merrill, Zachary
Miller, Callie
Miller, Mark
Miller, Matthew
Moalli, Pamela
Musahl, Volker
Oudega, Martin
Owens, Grace
Pal, Siladitya
Parise, Erica
Park, Sungkyoo
Patzer, Jack
Peterson, Glenn
Pettegrew, Jay
Pickering, Aimee
Pinkus, Rose
Pinsky, Michael
Pitt, Bruce
Prinkey, Jarad
Pu, Jiantao
Radocay, Jamie
Ramanathan, Madhumati
Rao, Jayashree
Raval, Shailesh

Office Address
CNBIO 411
PRESB B800
BST3 1038
EEINS 835
CNBIO 330
BENDM 421/422/425
CNBIO 237
BENDM 421/422/425
CNBIO 237
EEINS 673
BRDG2 309
SCAIFE 6B
BST3 5065
BENDM 730
SCAIF S568
CNBIO 332
CNBIO 330
BST3 5065
BENDM 439
CNBIO 407B
BST3 b014
BENDM 849/416/418/428A

Phone
412.624.9896
412) 726-8459
412.383.6946
412.647.5645
412.648.1943
412) 325-5177
412) 624-6445
(412) 624-6445
(412) 624-6455
412.648.6409
(412) 624-5281
412) 647-6966
412) 624-9815
412.624.0403
(412) 624-5092
(412) 648-2000
(412) 624-6445
(412) 383-6672
(412) 624-8503
(412) 624-6445
412) 648-3379
(412) 648-0223
(412) 624-9661
412.647.0736
412) 624-9261
(412) 383-7994
412.624.8150
412.623.7788
412) 383-9459
412.624.9614
(412) 623-3751
412.623.5977
412.624.9685

PRESB B920
BENDM 437/439
BENDM 1245
BENDM 400
HCCLB 2.26G
BST3 5065
BENDM 440
FOBLD 0000
HLMNC G27A
BENDM 410/438
CNBIO 439/440
BENDM 437/439
BENDM 402
CNBIO 207
CNBIO 306B
BENDM 1131
BSTWR W1555
CNBIO 420/BENDM 1175A
CNBIO 331
IROQU 400A
CNBIO 331
BST3 5065
BENDM 536
CNBIO 331
MAGEE 0000
CSMR 200
BST W1452
BENDM 437/439
CNBIO 207
BENDM 437/439
BENDM 1245
CNBIO 309/BNDM 746
CNBIO 311
PPG 108A
CNBIO 332
MDART 300
SCAIF 606
FORBS 201
BENDM 405
FARP 132
BENDM 151
BENDM 414
CNBIO 333
BST3 b016

412.624.9261
412) 648-7634
412.624.4240
412.624.6445
412.624.9674
412.383.8924
412.624.0357
412) 383-1054
412.647.7992
412.648.1943
412) 624-8375
412) 624-9720
412.648.1943
412.621.1440
412.605.3265
412.383.6575
412) 624-7279
412) 383-9713
(412) 624-9898
412) 624-9661
(412) 624-9819
412.624.4705
(412) 967-6509
412.648.1943
412) 315-7193
412) 647-7125
(412) 624-8400
412.648.7364
412) 624-2571
412) 624-9801
412.624.3375
412.624.5321
412.624.3141

250

E-mail
tkhung@engr.pitt.edu
huppertt@upmc.edu
tsi2@pitt.edu
ishikawah@upmc.edu
zcj1@pitt.edu
emj12@pitt.edu
chj26@pitt.edu
noj2@pitt.edu
mej29@pitt.edu
kagemannl@upmc.edu
Kamenevamv@upmc.edu
kellumjja@ccm.upmc.edu
sbk13@pitt.edu
prk38@pitt.edu
kangkim@pitt.edu
kek68@pitt.edu
kmk144@pitt.edu
clekolarcik05@gmail.com
alk93@pitt.edu
krawiecjt@upmc.edu
nak54@pitt.edu
pkumta@pitt.edu
sak132@pitt.edu
laymoncm@upmc.edu
atl12@pitt.edu
bol11@pitt.edu
ral63@pitt.edu
leuba@pitt.edu
xial@pitt.edu
srlittle@pitt.edu
liuy@pitt.edu
lotzemt@upmc.edu
loughlin@pitt.edu
drl20@pitt.edu
arm19@pitt.edu
spm54@pitt.edu
ngm8@pitt.edu
maozh@engr.pitt.edu
marrak@upmc.edu
mjm188@pitt.edu
pmm24@pitt.edu
menegazz@pitt.edu
zfm1@pitt.edu
caj30@pitt.edu
mcmiller@wpahs.org
mbm35@pitt.edu
pmoalli@mail.magee.edu
vom2@pitt.edu
moudega@pitt.edu
geo2@pitt.edu
sip16@pitt.edu
edp20@pitt.edu
sup28@pitt.edu
patzer@pitt.edu
glennp@pitt.edu
pettergre@pitt.edu
anp79@pitt.edu
pinkus@pitt.edu
pinskyymr@upmc.edu
brucep@pitt.edu
jwpst18@pitt.edu
jip13@pitt.edu
jradocay@pitt.edu
mar168@pitt.edu
raoj@upmc.edu
sbr15@pitt.edu

Mark Redfern (Vice Provost)


Relwani, Karuna
Revanna Shivaprabhu, Vikas
Robertson, Anne
Rodzwicz, Lindsay
Roy, Abhijit
Roy, Partha
Rubin, J. Peter
Sadtler, Patrick
Saha, Partha
Samosky, Joseph
Schaefer, Andrew
Schatten, Gerald
Schuman, Joel
Schwartz, Andrew
Sfeir, Charles
Shannon, Schohn
Shroff, Sanjeev
Shuman, Larry (Dean)
Sigal, Ian
Simpson, Richard
Siviy, Christopher
Smith, Matthew
Smith, Stephen
Snead, Wilton
Snyder, Noah
Sowa, Gwendolyn
Sparto, Patrick
Stetten, George
Sun, Mingui
Tashman, Scott
Thunes, James
Tobita, Kimimasa
Tran, Huong
Tuan, Rocky
Turner, Robert
Van Roosmalen, Linda
Vargo, Cathy
Vazquez, Alberto
Velikokhatnyi, Oleg
Veon, William
Vijayraghavan, Deepthi
Vodovotz, Yoran
Vorp, David (Dean Research)
Wagner, William
Wang, James
Wang, Jihang
Wang, Wei
Wang, Yadong
Waters, Jonathan
Weaver, Cassandra
Weber, Douglas
Wells, Alan
Williamson, Joan
Woo, Savio L-Y
Yeh, Joanne
Yun, Minhee
Zhang, Lin
Zhang, Xudong
Zhao, Yujuan
Zheng, Bin
Zhou, Leming

Office Address
BENDM 323/763/764/EEINS 110
CNBIO 439/440
BENDM 761/CMU A427 Newell Simon Hall
BENDM 408
BENDM 302A
SALK 693A
CNBIO 308
SCIAF 0000
BST3 4039
BENDM 402
PROF 230
BENDM 1031
MAGEE 0000
EEINS 816
MGOWN 245.09
SALK 623
BENDM G16
CNBIO 307
BENDM 147
EEEI 930
FRTOW 5044
BENDM 437/439
EEI 914
CNBIO 439/440
BST3 5065
BST3 5065
KAU 202
FRTOW 6035
BENDM 407/434 VIA Lab/435 Dark Lab
PRESB B400
RVTECH 0000
CNBIO 207
RANCH 8121
CNBIO 333
BRDG2 221
BST3 4074
RST 1300
BENDM 109
MGOWN 159
BENDM 848
CNBIO 306
BST3 5065
BSTWR W944
CNBIO 412/333 lab/334 lab
BRDG2 300
BSTWR E1641
BENDM 761/CMU A427 Newell Simon Hall
KAU 202
BENDM 411/412/422/425
MAGEE 3510
BST3 5065
SCAIF S713
SCAIF S713
CNBIO 306
CNBIO 405
BST3 1041
BENDM 542
BST3 5063
CSMR 0000
BST3 b014
FARP 128
FRTOW 6021

251

Phone
(412) 624-0784
412) 841-1072
412.624.9775
412) 624-3495
(412) 648-8499
412) 624-7867
412.641.3723
(412) 383-5394
412) 624-9661
412.647.5330
412) 624-5045
412.641.1427
412.647.2205
412.383.7021
412.648.1949
412) 624-9866
412.624.2095
412.624.9815
412.864.2220
412.383.6593
412.624.9261
412.647.2313
412.383.9786
412.648.9722
412) 383-5820
412.648.1091
412.383.6729
412.624.7762
412) 648-9095
412.586.3950
412) 624-6445
412.692.9902
412) 980-5479
412.624.3962
412.383.5395
(412) 624-6933
412) 624-9809
412.383.6696
412.719.5928
412.624.7798/7799
412.648.9722
412.648.3758
412) 624-5319
(412) 624-5327
412.648.9102
412.624.9931
(412) 383-1359
(412) 624-7196
(412) 641-4260
(412) 383-6672
412) 624-4055
412) 647-8409
412.624.2328
412.648.2000
412) 648-9027
412.648.8989
(412) 648-9722
412.586.3940
(412) 624-6445
(412) 641-2568
412.383.6653

E-mail
redfernms@upmc.edu
knr13@pitt.edu
vir19@pitt.edu
rbertson@pitt.edu
rodzwicz@pitt.edu
abr20@pitt.edu
proy@engr.pitt.edu
jpr5@pitt.edu
psadtler@pitt.edu
sahap@pitt.edu
jts35@pitt.edu
shaefer@ie.pitt.edu
pdc@pdc.magee.edu
schumanjs@upmc.edu
abs21@pitt.edu
csfeir@pitt.edu
schohn@pitt.edu
sshroff@pitt.edu
shuman@pitt.edu
ias6@pitt.edu
ris20@pitt.edu
cjs142@pitt.edu
smithma@pitt.edu
shs46@pitt.edu
wts4@pitt.edu
nrs43@pitt.edu
gas26@pitt.edu
spartopj@upmc.edu
stetten@engr.pitt.edu
mrsun@neuronet.pitt.edu
tashman@pitt.edu
kimimasa.tobita@chp.edu
htt3@pitt.edu
tuanr@upmc.edu / rst13@pitt.edu
rturner@pitt.edu
lvanroos@pitt.edu
cavargo@pitt.edu
alv15@pitt.edu
olv3@pitt.edu
wjv3@pitt.edu
dsv1@pitt.edu
vodovotzy@upmc.edu
vorp@pitt.edu
wagnerwr@upmc.edu
wanghc@pitt.edu
jiw86@pitt.edu
wangw4@upmc.edu
yaw20@pitt.edu
watejhj@upmc.edu
clw38@pitt.edu
djw50@pitt.edu
wellsa@upmc.edu
jwi100@engr.pitt.edu
slyw@pitt.edu
jiyeh@pitt.edu
yunmh@engr.pitt.edu
liz37@pitt.edu
zhangx2@upmc.edu
yuz36@pitt.edu
zhengb@upmc.edu
lzhou1@pitt.edu

NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE

FAX

E-MAIL ADDRESS

CHEMICAL AND PETROLEUM ENGINEERING


(412)

(412)

Main Office/
Steven R. Little
Chair

1250 Benedum Hall

624-9614

624- 9639

srlittle@pitt.edu

Mohammad M. Ataai
Anna C. Balazs
Ipsita P. Banerjee
Eric J. Beckman
Cheryl Bodnar
Ioannis Bourmpakis
Andrew Bunger
Shiao-Hung Chiang
Julie dItri
Robert M. Enick
William Federspiel
Di Gao
J. Karl Johnson
John Keith
George E. Klinzing
Prashant Kumta
J. Thomas Lindt
Lei Li
Steven R. Little
Joseph McCarthy
Badie Morsi
John Murphy
Robert S. Parker
John F. Patzer
John W. Tierney
Sachin Velankar
Gtz Veser
William R. Wagner
Irving Wender
Judy Yang

1231 Benedum Hall


209 Benedum Hall
1242 Benedum Hall
153E Benedum Hall
1243 Benedum Hall
1232 Benedum Hall
710 Benedum Hall
1249 Benedum Hall
1236 Benedum Hall
807 Benedum Hall
1135 Benedum Hall
1235 Benedum Hall
1233 Benedum Hall
804 Benedum Hall
931 Benedum Hall
849 Benedum Hall
1249 Benedum Hall
1237 Benedum Hall
1250 Benedum Hall
1238 Benedum Hall
809 Benedum Hall
300 BRDG2
1241 Benedum Hall
306 CNBIO
1249Benedum Hall
1230 Benedum Hall
806 Benedum Hall
300 BRDG2
1249 Benedum Hall
208 Benedum Hall

624-9648
648-9250
624-2071
624-4828
624-3318
624-7034
624-9875
624-9636
624-9634
624-9649
624-9474
624-8488
624-5644
624-7016
624-0784
624-5014
624-9729
624-3691
624-9614
624-7362
624-9650
624-5250
624-7364
624-9819
624-9645
624-9930
624-1042
624-5327
624-9644
624-8613

624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-8069
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
383-8788
624-9639
624-9639
624-9639
235-5110
624-9639
624-9639

ataai@pitt.edu
balazs@pitt.edu
ipb1@pitt.edu
beckman@pitt.edu
bodnarca@pitt.edu
gmpourmp@pitt.edu
bunger@pitt.edu
shchiang@pitt.edu
jditri@pitt.edu
rme@pitt.edu
federspielwj@upmc.edu
gaod@pitt.edu
karlj@pitt.edu
jakeith@pitt.edu
klinzing@pitt.edu
pkumta@pitt.edu
jtlindt@pitt.edu
lel55@pitt.edu
srlittle@pitt.edu
jjmcc@pitt.edu
morsi@pitt.edu
jmurphy@pitt.edu
rparker@pitt.edu
patzer@pitt.edu
jwta@pitt.edu
velankar@pitt.edu
gveser@pitt.edu
wagnerwr@upmc.edu
wender@pitt.edu
judyyang@pitt.edu

252

NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE

FAX

E-MAIL ADDRESS

CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING


Main Office/
Radisav Vidic, Chair
Jorge Abad
Kyle Bibby
Melissa Bilec
John Brigham
Daniel D. Budny
Andrew Bunger
Leonard W. Casson
Kent A. Harries
Anthony Iannacchione
Vikas Khanna
Xu Liang
Jeen-Shang Lin
M. Magalotti
John F. Oyler
Piervincenzo Rizzo
Morteza Torkamani
Luis E. Vallejo
Julie M. Vandenbossche
Yu, Q.

742F Benedum Hall

(412)
624-1307

(412)
624-0135

vidic@pitt.edu

731 Benedum Hall


709 Benedum Hall
153G Benedum Hall
703 Benedum Hall
126 Benedum Hall
710 Benedum Hall
742C Benedum Hall
218 B Benedum Hall
218 F Benedum Hall
218G Benedum Hall
728 Benedum Hall
725 Benedum Hall
706 Benedum Hall
704 Benedum Hall
729 Benedum Hall
707 Benedum Hall
726 Benedum Hall
705 Benedum Hall
730 Benedum Hall

624-4399
624-9207
648-8075
624-9047
624-6474
624-9875
624-9868
624-9873
624-8289
624-9603
6249872
624-8158
624-9870
624-9871
624-9575
624-9881
624-9894
624-9879
624-9899

624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135
624-0135

jabad@pitt.edu
bibbykj@pitt.edu
mbilec@pitt.edu
brigham@pitt.edu
budny@pitt.edu
bunger@pitt.edu
casson@pitt.edu
kharries@pitt.edu
ati2@pitt.edu
khannav@pitt.edu
xulian@pitt.edu
jslin@pitt.edu
mjm25@pitt.edu
oyler1@pitt.edu
pir3@pitt.edu
torkmani@pitt.edu
vallejo@pitt.edu
jmv7@pitt.edu
qiy15@pitt.edu

253

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING


NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE

Chaparro, Luis

1134 Benedum

412-624-9665

412-624-8003

lfch@pitt.edu

Chen, Kevin

1136 Benedum

412-624-9675

412-624-8003

pec9@pitt.edu

Chen, Yiran

932 Benedum

412-624-5836

412-624-8003

yic52@pitt.edu

El-Jaroudi, Amro

939 Benedum

412-624-9621

412-624-8003

amro@pitt.edu

El Nokali, Mahmoud

1130 Benedum

412-624-9681

412-624-8003

men@pitt.edu

Jacobs, Steve

936 Benedum

412-624-9667

412-624-8003

spj1@pitt.edu

Jones, Alex

205 Benedum

412-624-9666

412-624-8003

akjones@pitt.edu

Jones, Irvin

1140E Benedum 412-624-9690

412-624-8003

irj4@pitt.edu

Kim, Hong-Koo

512 Benedum

412-624-9673

412-624-8003

hkk@pitt.edu

Kusic, George

1135 Benedum

412-624-9678

412-624-8003

gkusic@pitt.edu

Levitan, Steven

218C Benedum

412-648-9663

412-624-8003

levitan@pitt.edu

Li, C. C.

945 Benedum

412-624-9679

412-624-8003

ccl@pitt.edu

Li, Guangyong

506 Benedum

412-624-9663

412-624-8003

gul6@pitt.edu

Li, Helen

942 Benedum

412-648-9597

412-624-8003

hal66@pitt.edu

Mao, Zhi-Hong

1131 Benedum

412-624-9674

412-624-8003

zhm4@pitt.edu

McDermott, Thomas

935 Benedum

412-648-9585

412-624-8003

tem42@pitt.edu

Mickle, Marlin

326 Benedum

412-624-9682

412-624-8003

mickle@pitt.edu

Mohanram, Kartik

934 Benedum

412-624-0509

412-624-8003

kmram@pitt.edu

Reed, Gregory

941 Benedum

412-383-9862

412-624-8003

gfr3@pitt.edu

Sejdic, Ervin

933 Benedum

412-624-0508

412-624-8003

esejdic@pitt.edu

Stanchina, William

1140C Benedum 412-624-8002

412-624-8003

wes25@pitt.edu

Yang, Jun

930 Benedum

412-624-9088

412-624-8003

juy9@pitt.edu

Yun, Minhee

218E Benedum

412-648-8989

412-624-8003

miy16@pitt.edu

Adjunct Office

1133 Benedum

412-624-9672

412-624-8003

254

FAX

E-MAIL ADDRESS

NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE

FAX

E-MAIL

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Main Office
1048 Benedum Hall
Bopaya Bidanda, Chair 1049 Benedum Hall
Mary Besterfield-Sacre 1040 Benedum Hall
Karen M. Bursic
1044 Benedum Hall
David I. Cleland*
1178D Benedum Hall
Youngjae Chun
1041 Benedum Hall
Joel M. Haight
1043 Benedum Hall
Jeffrey P. Kharoufeh 1036 Benedum Hall
Paul Leu
1035 Benedum Hall
Louis Luangkesorn
1178B Benedum Hall
Lisa Maillart
1030 Benedum Hall
Mainak Mazumdar*
1039 Benedum Hall
Bryan A. Norman
1033 Benedum Hall
Oleg Prokopyev
1037 Benedum Hall
Jayant Rajgopal
1039 Benedum Hall
Andrew J. Schaefer
1031 Benedum Hall
Ravi Shankar
1034 Benedum Hall
Larry J. Shuman
152A Benedum Hall
Harvey Wolfe*
1178D Benedum Hall
Natasa Vidic
1032 Benedum Hall

(412) 624-9830
(412) 624-9830
(412) 624-9836
(412) 624-9837
(412) 648-8775
(412) 624-1193
(412) 624-9839
(412 624-9832
(412) 624-9834
(412) 624-9838
(412) 624-9845
(412) 624-9839
(412) 624-9841
(412) 624-9833
(412) 624-9840
(412) 624-5045
(412) 624-9835
(412) 624-9815
(412) 648-8775
(412) 624-9846

*Emeritus

255

(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-1108
(412) 624-9831
(412) 624-9831

minervap@.pitt.edu
bidanda@.pitt.edu
mbsacre@.pitt.edu
kbursic@.pitt.edu
dic@.pitt.edu
yjchun@pitt.edu
jhaight@pitt.edu
jkharouf@pitt.edu
pleu@pitt.edu
lol11@pitt.edu
lisa.maillart@.pitt.edu
mmazumd@.pitt.edu
banorman@.pitt.edu
oap@pitt.edu
rajgopal@.pitt.edu
schaefer@.pitt.edu
ravishm@pitt.edu
shuman@.pitt.edu
hwolfe@.pitt.edu
nav9@pitt.edu

NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE

FAX

E-MAIL ADDRESS

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS SCIENCE

Minking K. Chyu, Chair


John Barnard
Markus Chmielus
Sung -Kwon Cho
William Clark
Daniel Cole
Anthony DeArdo
Larry Foulke
Paolo Galdi
C. Isaac Garcia
Peyman Givi
Ming-Jian Hua
Mark Kimber
Jung-Kun Lee
Scott Mao
Gerald Meier
Mark C. Miller
Ian Nettleship
Anne Robertson
Laura Schaefer
David Schmidt
Nitin Sharma
William Slaughter
Patrick Smolinski
Albert To
Jeffrey Vipperman
Guofeng Wang
Qing-Ming Wang
Lisa Weiland
Jorg Wiezorek
Sylvanus Wosu
Doni Wulandana
Meltem Yanar
Paolo Zunino

636 F Benedum Hall


538A Benedum Hall
505 BendumHall
538G Benedum Hall
218G Benedum Hall
538F Benedum Hall
603 Benedum Hall
605 Benedum Hall
607 Benedum Hall
606 Benedum Hall
940 Benedum Hall
614 Benedum Hall
206 Benedum Hall
538H Benedum Hall
538D Benedum Hall
805 Benedum Hall
Benedum Hall
502 Benedum Hall
408 Benedum Hall
153F Benedum Hall
509 Benedum Hall
538C Benedum Hall
602 Benedum Hall
608 Benedum Hall
508 Benedum Hall
504 Benedum Hall
538B Benedum Hall
511 Benedum Hall
204 Benedum Hall
538I Benedum Hall
152 Benedum Hall
937 Benedum Hall
538J Benedum Hall
604 Benedum Hall

256

(412)
624-9783
624-4963
624-8176
624-9798
624-9794
624-3069
624-9737
624-9799
624-9789
624-9731
624-9605
624-8593
624-8111
648-3395
624-9602
624-9741
624-9755
624-9735
624-9775
624-9793
624-9755
624-9746
624-8479
624-9788
624-2052
624-1643
624-3325
624-4885
624-9031
624-0122
624-9842
624-3221
624-3091
624-9774

(412)
624-4846
624-8069
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-8069
624-4846
624-4846
624-8069
624-4846
624-8069
624-8069
624-8069
624-4846
624-8069
624-4846
624-8069
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-8069
624-4846
624-4846
624-4846
624-8069

mkchyu@pitt.edu
jbarnard@pitt.edu
chmielus@pitt.edu
skcho@pitt.edu
wclark@pitt.edu
dgcole@pitt.edu
deardo@pitt.edu
lrf4@pitt.edu
galdi@pitt.edu
cigarcia@pitt.edu
givi@pitt.edu
mjhua@pitt.edu
mlk53@pitt.edu
jul37@pitt.edu
sxm2@pitt.edu
ghmeier@pitt.edu
mcmllr@pitt.edu
nettles@pitt.edu
rbertson@pitt.edu
las149@pitt.edu
des53@pitt.edu
nis62@pitt.edu
wss@pitt.edu
patsmol@pitt.edu
albertto@pitt.edu
jsv@pitt.edu
guw8@pitt.edu
qiw4@pitt.edu
lmw36@pitt.edu
wiezorek@pitt.edu
snn2@pitt.edu
raw39@pitt.edu
nmy4@pitt.edu
paz13@pitt.edu

NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE

FAX

(412)

(412)

E-MAIL ADDRESS

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES
Deans Office
Gerald D. Holder, U.S. Steel Dean

109 Benedum Hall

624-9809

624-0412

dnldson@pitt.edu

Sr. Associate Dean for Academic


Affairs
Larry J. Shuman, Assoc. Dean

147 Benedum Hall

624-9815

624-1108

pjr10@pitt.edu

Associate Dean for Research


David A. Vorp, Assoc. Dean

123 Benedum Hall

624-8503

624-0412

mam266@pitt.edu

Schohn L. Shannon, Asst. Dean

106 Benedum Hall

624-9866

624-1108

schohn@pitt.edu

Associate Dean for Diversity


Sylvanus N. Wosu, Assoc. Dean

127 Benedum Hall

624-9842

624-2827

snn2@pitt.edu

Engineering Administration
Rama Bazaz, Director

151 Benedum Hall

624-9800

624-9808

jradocay@pitt.edu

Development & Alumni Relations


Matthew Weinstein, Sr. Executive
Director

104 Benedum Hall

624-6814

624-0412

maw28@pitt.edu

Information Technology
Brian A. Vidic, Director

148 Benedum Hall

624-8101

624-2027

vidicba@pitt.edu

Bioengineering
Sanjeev G. Shroff, Gerald McGinnis
Chair

306 CNBIO

624-2095

383-8788

sshroff@pitt.edu

Chemical and Petroleum Engineering


Steven R. Little, Chair

1249 Benedum Hall

624-9614

624-9639

srlittle@pitt.edu

Civil and Environmental Engineering


Radisav D. Vidic, Chair

742F Benedum Hall

624-9870

624-0135

vidic@pitt.edu

Electrical and Computer Engineering


William E. Stanchina, Chair

1140C Benedum Hall

624-8002

624-8003

wes25@pitt.edu

Industrial Engineering
Bopaya Bidanda, Chair

1049 Benedum Hall

624-9830

624-9831

bidanda@pitt.edu

Mechanical Engineering and Materials


Science
Minking Chyu, Chair

649 Benedum Hall

624-9780

624-4846

mkchyu@pitt.edu

Computer Engineering
Alex Jones, Director

1140 Benedum Hall

624-8708

624-8003

akjones@pitt.edu

Co-Operative Education
Maureen Barcic, Director

137 Benedum Hall

624-9826

624-2827

trs57@pitt.edu

Engineering Science
Minking Chyu, Director

649 Benedum Hall

624-9780

624-4846

mkchyu@pitt.edu

DEPARTMENTS

SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

257

NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE

FAX

E-MAIL ADDRESS

SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS (continued)


Freshman Engineering Program
Daniel D. Budny, Academic Director

126 Benedum Hall

624-9825

624-2827

fpoadmin@engr.pitt.edu

International Engineering Initiatives


Kristine Lalley, Director

133 Benedum Hall

624-3489

624-2827

krl33@pitt.edu

Pitt Engineering Career Access


Program (PECAP)
Alaine Allen, Director

121 Benedum Hall

624-0224

624-8869

allen@pitt.edu

Student Services
Cheryl Paul, Director

130 Benedum Hall

624-9825

624-2827

cheryl35@pitt.edu

Basic Metals Processing Research


Institute (BAMPRI)
Anthony J. DeArdo, Director

603 Benedum Hall

624-9737

624-8069

deardo@pitt.edu

Center for Bioengineering


Sanjeev G. Shroff, Director

306 CNBIO

624-2095

383-8788

sshroff@pitt.edu

Center for Complex Engineered


Multifunctional Materials (CCEMM)
Prashant N. Kumta, Director

302 Benedum Hall

648-0223

624-8069

pkumta@pitt.edu

Center for e-Design and


Realization
David A. Vorp, Director

123 Benedum Hall

624-8503

624-0412

mam266@pitt.edu

Center for Energy


Brian Gleeson, Director
Don Shields, Executive Director

636 Benedum Hall


802 Benedum Hall

624-9784
624-8120

624-4846
624-0412

bgleeson@pitt.edu
dcs23@pitt.edu

Engineering Education Research


Center
Mary Besterfield-Sacre, Director

1040 Benedum Hall

624-9836

624-9831

mbsacre@engr.pitt.edu

Manufacturing Assistance Center


(MAC)
Bopaya Bidanda, Co-Director
David I. Cleland, Co-Director

1049 Benedum Hall


1048 Benedum Hall

624-9830
624-9834

624-9831
624-9831

bidanda@pitt.edu
dic@engr.pitt.edu

Mascaro Center for Sustainable


Innovation
Eric J. Beckman, Co-Director
Gena M. Kovalcik, Co-Director

153 Benedum Hall


153 Benedum Hall

624-9698
624-9698

624-7820
624-7820

beckman@pitt.edu
gmk9@pitt.edu

Materials Micro-Characterization
Center (MMCC)
C. Isaac Garcia, Director

606 Benedum Hall

624-9731

624-8069

cigarcia@pitt.edu

123 Benedum Hall


325 Benedum Hall

624-8503
624-1177

624-0412
927-2632

mam266@pitt.edu
alh138@pitt.edu

ENGINEERING CENTERS

Center for Medical Innovation


David A. Vorp, Director
Alan D. Hirschman, Executive
Director

258

NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE

FAX

E-MAIL ADDRESS

ENGINEERING CENTERS (continued)


Center for Metal Cutting Fluids
Bopaya Bidanda, Director

1049 Benedum Hall

624-9830

624-9831

bidanda@pitt.edu

Center for Molecular and Materials


Simulation
J. Karl Johnson, Co-Director
Kenneth Jordan, Co-Director

1249 Benedum Hall


330 Eberly Hall

624-9631
624-8690

624-9639
624-8611

karlj@pitt.edu
jordan@pitt.edu

Musculoskeletal Research Center


Savio L.-Y. Woo

405 CNBIO

648-2000

648-2001

slyw@pitt.edu

Center for National Preparedness


Kenneth Sochats

502 UPLAC

624-9416

Petersen Institute of Nanoscience


and Engineering
George E. Klinzing, Director

931 Benedum Hall

624-0784

624-4618

klinzing@pitt.edu

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)


Center of Excellence
Ervin Sejdic, Director

1140 Benedum Hall

624-0508

624-8003

esejdic@pitt.edu

Center for Simulation and Modeling


J. Karl Johnson, Co-Director
Kenneth Jordan, Co-Director

1249 Benedum Hall


330 Eberly Hall

624-9631
624-8690

624-9639
624-8611

karlj@pitt.edu
jordan@pitt.edu

Center for Sustainable Transportation


Infrastructure
Radisav Vidic, Co-Director
Mark Magalotti, Co-Director

742F Benedum Hall


706 Benedum Hal

624-9870
624-8618

624-0135
624-0135

vidic@pitt.edu
mjm25@pitt.edu

Swanson Center for Micro and


Nano Systems
David A. Vorp, Director

123 Benedum Hall

624-8503

624-0412

mam266@pitt.edu

Swanson Center for Product


Innovation
David A. Vorp, Director

123 Benedum Hall

624-8503

624-0412

mam266@pitt.edu

John A. Swanson Institute for


Technical Excellence
David A. Vorp, Director

123 Benedum Hall

624-8503

624-0412

mam266@pitt.edu

260

sochats@pitt.edu

94297-0314