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Quality Tools in the Classroom

Metro Technology Centers


August 2006

Introduction
Denise Kennemer

If you dont measure it, you dont


value it.
If you dont measure it you cant
improve it.

Our Objectives
To help students take more
responsibility for their learning
To involve all faculty in improving
learning outcomes
To focus on active learning
To increase effective use of
technology in the classroom

Our Strategy
Quality in the Classroom in-service
Years 1 and 2:

Trained 75% of faculty and administrators


SMART Board for attendance at QiC
Additional in-service as required
Best Practice Presentations by teachers at in-service

Year 3:
Trained remaining faculty
Add-on incentive for demonstrating use of three tools

Recognition at district-wide activities


District quality awards at year end celebration

Quality Tool:
The Data Center
Josie Scott

Data Centers
A great
communication tool
for students and
faculty
Helps students to
take ownership of
their education
Shows class
achievements

Data Centers-What is on Them?


Mission Statement
Goals
A quick reminder for
students

Character Trait for


the Month
Plus Delta results
Job opportunities

Data Centers-What is on Them?


Graphs
Comparing test
grades of previous
classes with current
Attendance graph
L to J graphs

Photos
Calendar
Kept up to date with
changes

Communication

Quality Tool:
Individual Data Folder
Toni Brinkley

Benefits of a Data Folder


Helps students to be responsible and
accountable
Promotes communication between
instructor and student
Maintains the student's awareness of
grades and attendance
Allows students reflection

Professional Data Folder


Criteria

Practical Nursing Program


Metro Technology Centers

Student Name:_______________________________Date:__________________
Data Folder Check
Criteria Jan- July 2006
Character Traits Improvements____
Current Personal Goals _________
Weekly Journaling ______________
HOSA Activities_________________
Attendance Records __________
Each course records ________
Total Points:________________ /30 points
Total Professional grade 100 percentile (in Professional Development Course)
Students Attendance is worth 50%
Professionalism -25%
Data Folder-25%

Data Folder
Table of Contents

Grade Graph

Components of a Mission
Statement for Class

Why do we have a mission statement?


The mission statement gives meaning to our program. When we know why we exist, we can be better
at choosing how we will work and what we choose to do.
What is a mission statement?
A programs mission statement answers the question, What is our purpose? or Why do we exist? or
What does this program exist to do? or Why are we here? or What is this organization attempting to
accomplish?
Describe a mission statement
The mission statement should communicate the essential aim of the program in a concise and
memorable way. It should be one sentence if possible and able to be spoken in one breath.
What are the elements of a mission statement?
Who we are (name)
What we do
For whom we do it
Where we do it
How we do it what values we hold
Examples of mission statements:
Computer Repair Technology
Practical Nursing
Mission statements answer these questions.
What are we here to do?
For whom will we do it?
Where will we do it?
How will we do it? What values do we hold?

Mission Statement Example


As a medical assisting team, our
mission is to gain knowledge of the
medical field by consistently
accomplishing our goals for the wellbeing of our patients.

Mission Statement Process

Divide into groups to answer the four questions above (3 minutes for each
question then pass to next group).
Discuss each question, eliminate duplicates and/or combine similar items.
Vote on two favorites on each page.

Use colored adhesive dots for multi-voting.

Discuss what consensus means and explain how we will come to consensus on one
mission statement for the program.

Review what makes up a good mission statement (distribute handout).


Each group writes a mission statement.
Each group presents its mission statement to the entire class.
Consensus
One representative from each group meets to create one mission statement
from the four.
Group reviews mission statement to tweak if necessary and comes to
consensus on one final version.
Individuals sign their names to the final mission statement.
Evaluate using plus/delta.

Quality Tool:
Reflection Journal
Bonnie Logan

Reflection Journal
Purposes:
Encourages students to think and articulate
their thoughts
Makes learning personal
Supports self-exploration and self-discovery
Focuses student attention on values, attitudes,
and ethical issues
Supports key learning processes of
negotiation, collaboration and reflection
Improves writing and communication skills

Making The Journal Work


Be clear with students about the learning
purposes
Sometimes a prompt helps the student
get started
Students may also draw or diagram to
keep a record of their ideas
Teacher may choose to dialogue with
the student regarding what they have
written

Reflection Journal/Thought
What it does not do:

What it does:

*Not a diary
*Not a list of the days
activities

*A tool for reflecting,


thinking, and
articulating
*Place to create
perspective
*Place to consider
actions and their
application to life

Reflection Journal/Writing
What it does not do:
*Will not camouflage
haste and rambling
*Cannot substitute for
poor study habits and
sloppy thinking
*Wont replace editing
and development on
polished essays

What it does:
*A place to practice
writing
*Challenges writers to
expand on their ideas
*Place to experiment
with ideas and writing
*Helps writer to stay
flexible
*Builds confidence

Reflection
Not Just for Students
A valuable practice for teachers also
A key element for National Board
Certification entries
Article to review: Techniques, April
2006, Mirror, Mirror on the Wall by
Douna Easley, Pp. 36-37

Quality Tool:
Benchmarking
Deborah Kamphaus

Benchmarking

BENCHMARKING

Learning through comparing data

Value
Opportunities for improvement
Performance targets

Types of benchmarking
Performance and/or competitive
Process

Classroom Use
Attendance (week, month)
Exam or Course Averages
Satisfaction (scale 5 -1)
Participation (class or professional organizations)

Comparative Data
2004

2005

NCLEX
PN PASS RATE

# CANDIADATES
TESTED

#
PASSED

PASS
RATE

National

49,284

44,040

89%

Oklahoma

1,160

1,065

92%

Metro Tech

30

27

90%

NCLEX
PN PASS RATE

# CANDIADATES
TESTED

#
PASSED

PASS
RATE

National

52,213

47,390

89%

Oklahoma

1,260

1,146

91%

Metro Tech

50

45

90%

Competitive Benchmarking

Quality Tool:
PDSA
Plan-Do-Study-Act
Vicki Bushey

Objectives:
Define PDSA.
Explain the process of the PDSA.
View a completed PDSA.
Implement a PDSA plan using a PDSA
worksheet.

Define PDSA:
A process of continual improvement
The PDSA cycle repeats itself
continuously
PDSA:

PLAN (Plan the change)


DO (Try the change on a small scale)
STUDY (Observe the results)
ACT (Act on what is learned)

PDSA Process:
Ask:
Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How
Make predictions about the possible outcome and
decide which changes will make the most
improvement
Initiate action plan
Collect data
Analyze results
Make modifications and re-implement plan

PDSA Worksheet:
Plan:
What is the objective of this
improvement cycle? (Why)
Predictions:
Plan for change: (who, what,
when, where)
Plan for collection of data: (who,
what, when, where)

PDSA Worksheet:
Do:

Carry out the plan


Adjust plan if necessary
Record any deviations from the plan

Study:

Analyze results with predictions


List the new knowledge gained

Act:

Implement or revise plan as needed


to accomplish desired results

Plan for next cycle:

The Fishbone Diagram


Pam Ashley

Fishbone Diagram
(AKA: Cause and Effect Diagram)
What is it?
A quality tool used to determine the
cause or causes of a problem.
A quality tool that can be used for notetaking.

When Should You Use It?


Use the fishbone diagram to identify
and analyze the root cause or causes
of a problem. It can be used in
conjunction with the 5 Whys.
When results are below the performance
projection line.
Use the fishbone to create an action plan.

Todays Example: Back Pain from Heavy School Bags

Fishbone Diagram

Classroom Example of One Cause:


Low A&P Test Scores
Environment Information will be submitted to Director
Lighting

too dark

Noise

Too many people talking


Irritating microphone

Adjust microphone
Length of time

Too long - loses peoples attention

Suggest A&P class in another


building that could accommodate 120
students with larger desk and
personal seating space

Constant air blowing

Adjust microphone

Not able to take food and drink


Cold
Seating

Too close
Not wide enough; desk-top too small

Quality Tool:
The Plus-Delta
Danielle Hylton

PLUS DELTA

Strengths of a group Opportunities for


activity or lesson
improvement of a
group activity or
Participants name
lesson
things they liked or
thought was
Participants name
effective
things that did not
work well or need to
be changed

PLUS DELTA
Works well for groups of 5 to 50 people
Use ideas to improve future activities or
lessons-quick and simple
Participants may state anything they
did or did not like
List may include items that can or
cannot be changed

Questions?

Thank you for joining us today!


Contact us at:
405/605-4470