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CONTENTS AT A GLANCE

1. INTRODUCTION

2. MODELING
A. INTRODUCTION
B. SKETCH
C. DATUMS AND POINTS
D. CURVE
E. CURVE FROM CURVE
F. CURVE FROM BODIES
G. DESIGN FEATURE
H. ASSOCIATIVE COPY
I. COMBINE BODIES
J. TRIM
K. OFFSET AND SCALE
L. DETAIL FEATURE
M. SURFACE
N. MESH SURFACE
O. SWEEP
P. FLANGE SURFACE
Q. DIRECT MODELING
R. SHEET METAL FEATURE
S. EDIT CURVE
T. EDIT FEATURE
U. EDIT SURFACE
V. EDIT FACE
W. TOOLS
X. FORMAT
3. ASSEMBLY
A. INTRODUCTION
B. COMPONENTS MENU
C. EXPLODED VIEWS
D. SEQUENCING
E. CONTEXT CONTROL
F. ADVANCE ASSEMBLEIS
4. DRAFTING
A. INTRODUCTION
B. LAYOUT
C. DIMENSION
D. ANNOTATION
E. TABLES
F. EDITING

5. MANUFACTURING
A. INTRODUCTION
B. FACE MILLING
C. PLANER MILLING
D. CAVITY MILLING
E. Z-LEVEL MILLING
F. FIXED AND VARIABLE CONTOUR MILLING
G. DRILLING
H. LATHE
A. WIRE EDM
POST PROCESSING
INTRODUCTION
NX is an interactive Computer-Aided Design, Computer-Aided Manufacturing, and
Computer-Aided Engineering (CAD/CAM/CAE) system. The CAD functions automate the
normal engineering, design, and drafting capabilities found in today's manufacturing
companies. The CAM functions provide NC programming for modern machine tools using the
NX design model to describe the finished part. The CAE functions provide a number of
product, assembly, and part performance simulation abilities, across a broad range of
engineering disciplines.

NX functions are divided into "applications" of common capabilities. These
applications are supported by a prerequisite application called NX Gateway. Every NX user
must have NX Gateway; however, the other applications are optional and may be configured
to meet the needs of each individual user.

NX is a fully three-dimensional, double precision system that allows you to accurately
describe almost any geometric shape. By combining these shapes, you can design, analyze,
and create drawings of your products.

Once the design is complete, the Manufacturing application allows you to select the
geometry describing the part, enter manufacturing information such as cutter diameter, and
automatically generate a cutter location source file (CLSF), which can be used to drive most
NC machines.

Application Overview

Following are some of the main NX software applications.
Analysis
Assemblies
Drafting
Gateway
Geometric Tolerancing Module
High Quality Image
Knowledge Fusion
Manufacturing
Modeling
Open User Interface Styler
Programming Languages
Quality Control
Routing
Sheet Metal
Spreadsheet
Web Express
Wire Harness

Gateway
Gateway allows you to open existing part files, create new part files, save part files,
plot drawings and screen layouts, import and export various types of files, and other general
functions. It also provides consolidated view display operations, screen layout and layer
functions, WCS manipulation, object information and analysis, and access to online help.
Gateway is the prerequisite for all other interactive applications, and is the first
application you enter when you open NX. You can return to Gateway at any time from the
other applications in NX by selecting it from the Application pull-down menu.

Modeling

Solids Modeling
This general modeling application supports the creation of 2D and 3D wireframe
models, swept and revolved bodies, Boolean operations, and basic associative editing. A
solid modeling is the prerequisite for both Features Modeling and Free Form Modeling.
Features Modeling
This feature-based modeling application supports the creation and associative edit of
standard design features such as holes, slots, and pockets. It allows you to hollow out solid
models and create thin walled objects. A feature can be located relative to any other feature
or object and can be instanced to establish associative sets of features. Solids Modeling is a
prerequisite for this application.
Free-Form Modeling
This complex-shape modeling application supports the creation of complex surface
and solid models. Some of the available techniques are general sweeps along curves;
proportionally developed shapes using 1, 2 and 3 rail methods; lofted shapes using standard
conic methods; and meshes of points and curves. Solids Modeling is a prerequisite for this
application.
Sheet Metal Feature Modeling
This feature-based modeling application supports the creation of sheet metal specific
features such as flanges, ribs and cutouts that conform to the shape of their underlying
surfaces. These features can then be manipulated in the Sheet Metal Design application to
simulate forming and unforming the part. This practice allows you to incorporate design for
manufacturing concepts into your parts at design time. Solids Modeling and Sheet Metal
Design are prerequisites for this application.
User-Defined Features
This application provides an interactive means to capture and store families of parts
for easy retrieval and editing using the concept of a user-defined feature (UDF). It allows you
to take an existing associative solid model, created using the standard NX modeling tools,
and establish relationships between parameters, define feature variables, set default values,
and decide the general form the feature will take when started. Existing UDFs reside in a
library that can be accessed by anyone using the Features Modeling application.
Assemblies
This application supports "top-down" and "bottom-up" assembly modeling. It provides
for rapid traversals of the assembly hierarchy and allows direct access to the design model of
any component or sub-assembly. It supports the "design in context" approach in which
changes can be made to the design model of any component while working in the context of
the assembly.

Drafting
The Drafting application allows you to create engineering drawings from 3D models
created in a modeling application, or 2D design layouts created using the built-in curve/sketch
tools. Drafting supports automatic creation of drawing layouts, including orthographic view
projection, sectioning, auxiliary and detail views, and isometric drafting. View-dependent and
automatic hidden line editing are also supported.

Manufacturing
Basic Machining and Editing
This application supports the creation and editing of CLSFs for NC machining. It also
contains software to perform point-to-point and APT-like drive curve machining operations.
Mill
This application provides the capability to specify milling profile and milling pocket
operations interactively (2-axis and 2 1/2-axis machining).
Multi-Axis Mill
This application provides the capability to specify complex milling operations
interactively (3-axis to 5-axis machining).
Lathe
This application provides the capability to specify turning operations interactively
(roughing, finishing, drilling, grooving, and threading).
GPM/MDFG
The Graphics Post-processor application (GPM) supports the formatting of a tool path
to meet the input requirements of specific machine/controller combinations. The Machine
Data File Generator (MDFG) is a menu-driven program that generates the required MDFs

Starting NX on Windows
Using the Start Button
Click the Start button.
Select the NX application from the Programs item.
Using the NX Icon
Open the NX program group.
Double-click the NX icon.

Main Window
The figure below shows the basic components of the NX main window.
# Component Description
Title Bar The Graphics Window Title Bar displays the following information for the
current part file:
The name of the current displayed part
The name of the current work part
If the work part is read only
If the work part has been modified since it was last saved
Note: If a part is out-of-date due to out-of-date mating conditions or
WAVE-linked geometry, the system displays an exclamation point next
to the part name.
Menubar The Menubar is the horizontal menu of options displayed at the top of
the main window directly below the title bar. Menubar options are called
menu titles and each corresponds to an NX functional category. Each
menu title provides access to a pulldown menu of choices.
Graphics The Graphics Window is where you create, display, and modify parts.
Window
Toolbar Area Toolbars are a row of icons you can use to activate standard NX menu
items. NX comes with a large selection of toolbars, several of which are
displayed when you start NX.
Resource Bar The Resource Bar combines a number of pages in one common place
using very little user interface space. NX places all navigator windows in
the Resource Bar, as well as the History Palette, a training page, and the
Web Browser. By default, the system locates the Resource Bar on the
right side of the NX window. You can also locate it on the left side using
Preferences->User Interface.
Cue Line The Cue Line displays at the bottom or top of the main NX window. The
Cue area displays prompt messages about expected input by the current
option. These messages indicate the next action you need to take. You
can change the Cue/Status position using the Tools->Customize dialog.
Status Line The Status Line, located to the right of the Cue area, displays
information messages about the current option or the most recently
completed function. These messages do not require a response.
Progress The Progress Meter displays in the Cue Line when the system performs
Meter a time-consuming operation, such as loading a large assembly. The
meter shows the percentage of the operation that has been completed.
When the operation completes, the system displays the next appropriate
cue.

File Menu
The File pull-down menu includes commands that let you create, open, save, and close part
files, import and export part files, perform basic file and system management functions, and
exit NX. There are also options to set search directories, send jobs to a plotter, and set
customer defaults.
Option Description
New Creates a new part file.
Open Opens an existing part file.
Close Closes, saves, exits, or re-opens one or more opened parts.
Save Saves the current work part file under the same name whether modified or
not. If the work part is an assembly, saves any components that have
been modified. Also saves .jt files.
Save Work Saves only your current work part. This is useful when, for example, you
Part Only have made changes to only one component in a very large assembly.
Save As Creates a new file from an existing one and allows you to give it a new
filename.
Save All Saves all top-level open parts. This means those parts that do not have
parents in the session or have been modified. This includes parts that are
open but not displayed, but does not include partially open parts, such as
components.
Save Bookmark Saves a .bkm file that is an XML description of the current assembly and
defined Assemblies Navigator filters. Opening the bookmark causes the
assembly to load with the same load options and visible components that
were present when the bookmark was saved.
Options Specifies how and from where the system loads your part files and
specifies what specific actions take place each time you save a part.
Print Performs standard Windows printing. Available on Windows only.
Plot Creates generic plot data files that are submitted to one of any number of
plot queues on any number of plot servers in a TCP/IP.
Import Copies the contents of a file into your work part, or in the case of IGES,
STEP203, STEP214 and DXF, into a new part.
Export Exports NX data into the designated file type.
Interoperate Allows you to use NX, Product Vision, and Teamcenter together.
Utilities Options that are pertinent to all Open C and C++ operations, but not
classified by a specific feature.
Execute Open Runs Open GRIP, Debug GRIP and Open C and C++ API programs.
Properties Displays information about the currently displayed part.
Recently Displays the path and filename of the most recently opened parts.
Opened Parts
Exit Ends an NX session.
Edit Menu
The Edit menu offers a variety of tools that allow you to modify existing objects. You can undo
most immediately preceding operations, delete objects from a part file, and modify the layer,
color, font, width, grid count, and translucency of existing objects. You can also translate,
rotate, scale, and transform objects, make objects visible or invisible, as well as move objects
or their copies among the layers in a part file.
The following options are available from the Edit menu.
Option Description
Undo List Reverse, or "undo", one or more preceding operations.
Cut Cuts selected components or features and places them on the clipboard. If the
selected object cannot be cut, you will receive a message, "Incorrect object for
operation".
Copy Places a description of the selected component or feature onto the clipboard.
Note that the Copy operation may not provide enough information to perform a
paste without first completely loading the part that was copied.
Copy (Windows only) Allows you to copy a vector image of the contents of the NX
Display graphics window to the Windows clipboard on platforms running the Windows
Operating System.
Paste Pastes components or features that have been cut or copied to the clipboard. The
object will be pasted into a location, usually the work part, where it can then be
positioned correctly.
Delete Removes objects permanently from a part file.
Selection Displays a cascading menu which is a subset of the Selection Toolbar. Provides
flexible filtering tools to help you select the object you want.
Blank Cascades to a submenu to permit control of the display of objects, making them
visible or invisible.
Transform Translates, rotates, and scales objects or their copies.
Object Modifies the layer, color, font, width, grid count, translucency and shading status
Display of existing objects.
Properties Assigns, copies, edits, displays, and deletes object names and attributes.
Sketch... Affects the size of an object and the distance between the object and its
reference point.
Snap Point Allows you to specify a set of point inference types.

View Menu
View options manipulate the system's current working views. Features of the View options
can change parameters, perspective and scale, specify how the part are viewed, and create
shaded images of the view, and save or recall the image to a file and finally send the image to
a plotter.
Features that manipulate the view are: zoom, center, rotate, delete, save and select work
views, clipping planes and perspective or adjusting the center and scale of the view to fit the
entire part. Control the view display with dashes or hidden lines, setting silhouettes, smooth
edges, fog and direction of a light source in shaded images.
If you do not like what you have done while manipulating a view you can restore it to what it
was originally.
Option Description
Refresh Refreshes the view, redrawing lines and curves that may have
disappeared or become incomplete in the display as you performed
operations during your NX session.
Operation Options that permit editing of the view: zoom, center, rotate, delete,
save and select work views.
Orient Aligns the view based on system coordinates.
Visualization Specifies how objects in a view are enhanced with special features,
shading etc.
Toolbars Select toolbars to show, hide, create, insert or customize toolbars.
Information Window Displays the Information window, displaying information for the current
work part.
Current Dialog Hides or shows the current dialog.
Curvature Graphs Redisplays the Curvature Graph display. You can also use:
<Shift>+<Ctrl>+C.

Format Menu
Use the Format menu to control layers, layouts, groups, attributes, and patterns.
Option Description
Layer Settings Sets the global layer status. Applies to all views except drawing views that
do not have an individual layer mask.
Visible In View Controls the display status of layers for a specific view. The mask for each
view may be different and has priority over the global mask.
Layer Category Creates named groups of layers. This simplifies changing the visibility and
selection status of associated layers.
Move To Layer Removes objects from one layer and places them on another layer.
Copy To Layer Places a copy of an object on another layer, leaving the original.
Layout Defines how a set of views is displayed in the graphics display area.
Group Collects individual objects together as a group and handles them as a
single unit.
Database Assigns certain types of information to parts and geometry, including
Attributes solids, faces, and edges. You can assign attributes to the components of
assemblies, and use the information to generate a parts list.
Pattern Duplicates standard parts to add standard information such as borders,
lines, text and title blocks to your file, and to reduce the size of your current
part file.

Tools Menu
This topic discusses the options that are on the Tools pulldown menu. Other types of tools are
covered in the User Tools and Common Tools topics.
Option Description
Expression Provides options for creating and modifying expressions.
Visual Editor Provides a static graphical representation of a model with its
corresponding dimensions and expressions.
Spreadsheet This will start the spreadsheet application.
Overview
Smart Models The Smart Models cascade consists of Product Definition and Geometric
Tolerancing.
Material Properties Provides options for analyzing and modifying the material properties of
your part.
Part Navigator Provides options for the display of the Part Navigator, which displays
when you select View->Part Navigator.
Assembly Provides options for the display of the Assemblies Navigator.
Navigator
Collaborate Displays the list of available collaboration functions.
User-Defined To define standard feature as per users range.
Feature
Macro Create and record a macro.
Customize Control the visibility of the entire toolbar as well as the visibility of each
element in the toolbar.

WCS Menu
The WCS menu allows you to manipulate the current workview coordinate system (WCS).
You can select any existing or newly specified coordinate system from the WCS menu
options. You can create coordinate system objects that may be put to various uses. The WCS
is temporary unless you save it.
The WCS menu contains the following options:
Option Description
Origin... Defines a new WCS by redefining the origin of the current WCS.
Dynamics... Manipulates the location and orientation of the WCS. Supports the Undo
function.
Rotate... Describes a new WCS as a rotation of the current WCS about one of its axes
(XC, YC, ZC).
Orient... Specifies a new WCS using functions on the CSYS Constructor.
Change XC Changes the direction of the WCS's XC axes about the ZC axis.
Direction
Change YC Changes the direction of the WCS's YC axes about the ZC axis.
Direction
Display Toggles the display of the WCS on and off.
Save Creates and saves a coordinate system at the current WCS origin and
orientation. If you need a coordinate system for future reference, you can save
it, giving it a permanent status. You can delete any permanent coordinate
system, except the current WCS.

Information Menu
Information is available from every NX application that produces geometric and part
relationship data.
Option Description
Object Displays information about geometric objects.
Point Obtains the absolute and work coordinates of an explicit or implicit point.
Spline Displays the Spline Analysis dialog.
B-Surface Displays the degrees, number of patches, and the control polygons and
patch boundaries of B-surfaces.
Feature Opens the Feature Browser dialog, which displays relevant information
about features created while generating a 3-D model.
Expression Defines relationships between the characteristics of the model.
Product Definition... Displays a set of customizable non-geometric attribute information that
can be directly associated with an NX model.
Geometric Identifies tolerance features or associated objects based on search
Tolerancing criteria.
Part Displays basic information for your part.
Assemblies Displays information about your assemblies.
Other Shows various types of information for your part that are not included in
the other Information options.
Custom MenuBar Assists in the review of menu customization derived from the Open
MenuScript product.
Analysis Menu
Provides the capability to calculate physical properties such as area, volume, and moments of
inertia for two- or three-dimensional figures. You can also analyze solid body objects or faces.
For example, you can obtain two-dimensional analysis of solid body faces, three-dimensional
analysis of solid bodies, and length and location information about an edge of a solid body.
Option Description
Distance Obtains the minimum distance between any two NX objects such as
points, curves, planes, bodies, edges, and/or faces.
Angle Obtains angle measurements between two curves, or between a line
and a plane or planar face.
Arc Length Finds the arc length of any collection of curves, planar or non-planar.
Minimum Radius Finds where the radius of curvature is smallest on a face on a solid or
sheet body.
Geometric Calculates and displays geometric properties of selected points on curve
Properties and/or faces.
Deviation Check continuity, tangency, and boundary alignment for faces and
curves based on Point/Slope Continuity.
Edge Deviation Allows you to perform deviation checking between the common edges of
multiple faces.
Dynamic Deviation Compare the deviation of the curve or surface you are editing with
respect to other geometrical elements, and provides you with graphical
and numerical feedback in real time.
Curve Performs curvature analysis on selected individual or multiple curves
and edges and verifies the curvature.
Face May select multiple faces for the display of temporary color analyses.
Section Analyze the shape and quality of free-form faces.
Grid Section Analyse the grid.
Draft Analyse the draft angle.
Examine Geometry Analyze a solid body, face, or edge for conditions of interest.
Simple Interference Determines whether two bodies intersect. You have the option to simply
highlight the interfering faces or to create a new solid body from the
interference.
Assembly Allows you to perform a clearance analysis for an assembly.
Clearance
Quick Stack Quick Stack preferences let you modify the number of simulations that
are run in an analysis, change default colors, or make other changes.
Area Using Curves Calculates and displays geometric properties of planar figures.
Measure Faces Allows you to calculate the Area and Perimeter values of one or more
faces
Measure Bodies Allows you to calculate mass properties data for one or more solid body
objects.
Mass Using Curves Analyzes a 3D object that is formed by translating or rotating a closed
& Sheets sequence of curves, or one that is enclosed by or composed of a set of
faces.
Assembly Weight Allows you to analyze and control weight and mass properties of an
Management assembly.
Units lb-in Specifies the units in which geometric information is displayed.
Show Hidden It shows the hidden analysis object.
Analysis Objects
Preferences Menu
Use Preferences to define the display parameters of new objects, names, layouts, and views.
You can set the layer, color, font, and width of created objects. You can also design layouts
and views, control the display of object and view names and borders, change the size of the
selection ball, specify the selection rectangle method, set chaining tolerance and method, and
design and activate a grid. Changes that you make using the Preferences menu override any
counterpart customer defaults for the same functions.
The Preferences dialog contains the following options:
Option Description
Object Sets preferences that define the layer, color, font, and width of new objects.
Does not affect existing objects.
User Interface Sets preferences that affect how NX works and interacts with your input.
Palettes Sets preferences that affect how NX palettes operate and display.
Selection Sets preferences that affect object selection.
Visualization Sets preferences that affect visualization, including display, color, line,
shading, performance, screen, perspective, and special effects.
Visualization Sets preferences that influence graphics performance.
Performance
3D Input Sets preferences for the behavior of a 3D Input device attached to the
Devices workstation.
Work Plane Sets preferences for the graphics window grid and the Work Plane Emphasis
mode.
Spreadsheet Sets preferences for the Default Spreadsheet Application. Enabled only on
Windows workstations.
Assemblies Setting the assembly preferences.
Knowledge Setting preference for Knowledge fusion.
Fusion
Sketch Setting sketch preferences.
Drafting Setting the Drafting preferences.
Annotation Setting the Drafting annotations.
Geometric Setting the Geometric Tolerancing preferences.
Tolerancing
Collaborate Collaborate lets you work with your co-workers, suppliers, or subject matter
experts in real time to address complex product development issues and
opportunities.
NX Gateway Configures how to import data from other applications. Especially useful when
creating or updating parts that originally came from I-DEAS or Solid Edge.
Measurement These measurement preferences are used by certain mass property and
Measure options including Measure Faces, Measure Bodies, Area using
Curves

Application Menu
The Application menu contains the following options:
Applicatio Description
n
Modeling Primarily a solid modeling system that provides the capabilities to help a design
engineer quickly perform conceptual design. In addition, you can incorporate
your requirements and design restrictions by defining mathematical
relationships between different parts of the design.
Shape Provides tools specifically tailored for Industrial Design applications. This
Studio includes basic tools for the initial concept stages, such as the creation and
visualization of virtual designs, and progresses ultimately through the
production of primary and secondary surfaces.
Drafting Allows you to create and maintain a variety of 3-D and 2-D drawings made from
Unigraphics NX models generated from within the Modeling application.
Manufacturi Allows you to interactively program and post process milling, drilling, turning,
ng and wire EDM tool paths.
Structures Allows you to predict the behavior of a physical model in a digital domain. There
are two major products under the Structures application: Scenario for FEA
(Finite Element Analysis) and Scenario for ANSYS.
Moldflow Used to analyze the flow of molten plastic in an injection mold. You construct a
Part Adviser finite element mesh on the part and describe the mold and plastic conditions.
The analysis package, which you can run repeatedly to determine optimum
conditions, produces both tabular and graphic results. This application saves
design, mold-making, and material costs.
Motion An integrated, associative CAE tool that allows you to simulate and evaluate the
large displacement complex motion of mechanical systems, and includes
support for static, kinematics and kinetic (dynamic) simulations, depending
upon the Motion product license you purchased.
Sheet Metal Focuses on design for ability to manufacture sheet metal parts. Enables the
creation of a Unigraphics NX CLSF, provides a fast and easy method to
interactively fit parts in a rectangular grid and create punch, laser, flame or mill
tool paths in sheet metal or a similar material. Sheet Metal Selections: Design,
Fabrication, Nesting, Punch Press, and Multi-Part Gridding
Routing Define assemblies that are placed around and through other Unigraphics NX
assemblies. For example, within an aircraft engine pipes and tubes are routed
from the fuel tanks to various injection points around the engine, or within an
automobile, wiring is required to supply power to the electric windows. Routing
Selections: Piping, Tubing, Steelwork, Conduit, Raceway, Wiring, and Base
Wire Enables electrical system designers to create a representation of electrical
Harness harnesses within the same 3D space used to describe the mechanical
assembly of the product. Harness locates all of the related electrical
components within the mechanical assembly to create a proposed harness path
centerline. The application then routes all required conductors from one end to
the other, allowing packaging design and harness installation drawings to be
created and maintained in the same environment.
Assemblies Assemblies is an integrated Unigraphics NX application that facilitates the
construction of assemblies of parts, the modeling of individual parts within the
context of the assembly, and the production of parts lists for assembly
drawings.
Knowledge The Unigraphics NX Knowledge Fusion application provides a graphical user
Fusion interface that allows you to apply engineering knowledge driven rules and
design intent to geometric models and assemblies in Unigraphics NX.
Gateway Gateway provides an interactive environment that allows you to open existing
part files, create new part files, save part files, plot drawings and screen
layouts, select applications, import and export various types of files, and other
general functions.
Open User Open User Interface Styler is a visual dialog box builder for Unigraphics NX
Interface users and third-party developers. Open User Interface Styler reduces
Styler development time and allows for rapid prototyping because of the visual builder
and automatic file generation, allows you to easily build Unigraphics NX dialogs
according to preset standards, and provides compatibility with MenuScript.
MasterFEM An alternative to Scenario for Structures for performing finite element analysis
(FEA). MasterFEM+ is a separately licensed and installed product based on I-
DEAS Simulation. It is intended for experienced FE analysts requiring more
sophisticated meshing tools and advanced analyses such as response
dynamics or multi-event durability. MasterFEM+ launches I-DEAS Simulation
and loads the current work part. You must have MasterFEM+ installed and
licensed on your machine.

Window Menu
The Window menu contains the following options:
Option Description
New Window Opens a new graphics window. See Using Multiple Graphics Windows.
Cascade Displays multiple graphics windows in a cascading fashion.
Tile Horizontally Displays multiple graphics windows side by side horizontally.
Tile Vertically Displays multiple graphics windows vertically.
Window List Displays the parts that are currently open and were previously displayed in
the current NX session.
More Displays the Change Displayed Part dialog which helps you to locate part
files that are not accessible on the Window List if you have more than 10
parts open.

Help Overview
You can view NX Help using a web browser. The web browser must support Java for the
search to work. We recommend the following browsers and viewers:
Internet Explorer 6.0
Netscape 6.2 and higher
Mozilla version 1.3.1 and 1.4.1 (UNIX) and Mozilla 1.4.1 (Windows)
Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0
Macromedia Flash 5 Plugin
NX Help provides quick access to information via:
Table of Contents
Index
Text search
Help and Context Sensitive Help are also available on the Resource Bar.

View Popup Menu
The View Popup menu makes certain View options available.
To open the View Popup menu:
Place the cursor in the Graphics Window and press MB3. The location of the cursor
determines the view in which the system performs some options. For other options, the
system automatically applies them to all views, or you can make them activie in any view
by moving the cursor.
Option Description
Apply Applies changes made in the current dialog. Synchronized with the Apply
option on the current dialog. The dialog remains displayed after you click
Apply.
Back Displays the previous dialog. Also synchronized with the current dialog.
Cancel Cancels the current operation and closes the dialog. Synchronized with its
counterpart on the current dialog.
Refresh Updates the Graphics Window by eliminating holes left by blanked or
deleted objects. It also removes temporarily displayed items such as
asterisks and conehead vectors.
Fit Fits the model in the view where you position the cursor. Applies the fit
percentage set in Preferences->Visualization->Screen.
Zoom Activates Zoom mode.
Zoom In/Out Activates Zoom In/Out mode.
Rotate Activates Rotate mode.
Pan Activates Pan mode.
Update Display Updates the display by cleaning up the Graphics Window. Updates the
WCS, curves and edges, sketcher and relative positioning dimensions,
degree of freedom indicators, datum planes, and planes. Update Display
also performs the tasks of the Refresh option, such as erasing temporary
displays and redrawing the screen. It also affects the display of names,
and is dependent on settings in Preferences->Visualization-
>Names/Borders. Rotations cause Update Display to redisplay silhouette
curves of faces and hidden edges of solids.
Restore Restores the original view immediately following most operations.
Display Mode Specifies the shading mode for the selected view. You can set the mode to
one of five options: Wireframe, Shaded, Partially Shaded, Face Analysis,
and Studio.
Hidden Edges Specifies how hidden edges display in the selected view. You can use one
of four options: Visible, Invisible, Dashed, and Gray Thin.
Expand Expands a specified view to a full display area and makes it the work view.
Available when multiple views are present.
Orient View Modifies the orientation of a specified view to a pre-defined view. Changes
only the alignment of the view, not the view name.
Replace View Switches from a specified view to a pre-defined view.
Undo Cancels the previous operation.

View Popup Optional Functions
You can add the following additional functions to the View Popup Menu:
Option Description
Select Work Selects the view in which the cursor is positioned as the work view.
View
Fit All Calculates the extents of the model and the corresponding scale for all views.
Origin Changes the center of the view to the cursor position. This operation takes
place in the view in which the cursor is positioned.
Navigate Toggles ON the Free Navigation mode.
Half Scale Cuts the view scale in half on the view in which the cursor is positioned.

Custom Views Dialogs
The Custom Views dialogs accessed from the View Orient and View Replace dialogs provide
an easy way to manage your user-defined and NX-provided views.
To display the Custom Views dialog from the View Orient dialog:
Click MB3 and select Orient View->Custom Views.
To display the Custom Views dialog from the View Replace dialog:
Click MB3 and select Replace View->Custom Views.
To display a predefined view provided by NX, use one of the eight icons at the top. To
display a customer-defined view, use the options in the list box.

View Options
The 'Orient View' dialog has three options: Fit, Current, and Saved. These options determine
how to orient and scale the current view. By default, View Orient and View Replace are set to
Fit. The following table describes each option.
Option Description
Fit NX orients the view and fits it to the current view bounds. This is the default setting
for both 'View Orient' or 'View Replace' operations.
Current NX orients the view but does not change the scale like the 'Fit' option. Instead, the
system maintains the current view scale. Therefore, the new orientation has the
same scale as the previous orientation.
Saved NX orients the view and sets the view scale based on the view scale and view
origin saved with that orientation.

Object-Specific Popup Menu
The object-specific popup menu is available with many operations, is faster than using a
toolbar or menu bar, and displays only relevant options.
To open an object-specific popup menu:
Move the cursor over an object. It does not matter if the object has been selected or not.
Click MB3. This displays a popup menu specific to that object.
The following table defines the contents of the Object-Specific Popup menu for different
object types.
Object Type Menu Contents
Features Edit Parameters, Suppress, Copy, Delete, Properties.
Components Blank, Isolate, Edit Object Display, Replace Reference Set, Make Work
Part, Make Display Part, Open by Proximity, Delete, Substitute, Mate,
Reposition, Properties
General Objects Edit Parameters, Suppress, Copy, Delete, Properties.
Radial Pop-ups Overview
When you open a pop-up menu with MB3, you have access to radial pop-up menus as well.
When you press MB3, depending on your selection, a radial pop-up displays up to eight
icons that surround the cursor location. These icons are available for frequently used
functions and options, and you can choose them just as you would from a menu. Use Radial
Pop-ups for quicker access to desired bit maps.

Radial Pop-Ups
The radial pop-up is designed to provide rapid access to the most frequently used MB3
options. All of the options on the radial are a short mouse movement away and common
items are located in the same place on all radials. This allows intuitive use of the radial pop-
up over time as you learn the direction of movement that corresponds to the required option.
The bit maps are consistent with the toolbars so if you are familiar with the NX toolbar bit
maps, you will find the radial useful as an alternative to going to a toolbar option to make a
setting change.

Toolbars
Toolbars are a row of icons you can use to launch standard NX menu items. NX comes with a
large selection of toolbars, several of which are displayed when you start NX. Most toolbars
are initially docked.
Showing and Hiding Toolbars
Using the Toolbar Popup Menu
To view the list of available toolbars:
Place the cursor in the toolbar docking area.
Press MB3. The popup menu lists all the currently loaded toolbars. The list contains
system and user toolbars. A checkmark indicates that the toolbar is currently displayed.
To show a toolbar:
Click the checkbox beside the toolbar that you want to show.
To hide a toolbar:
Clear the checkbox beside the toolbar that you want to hide.
Using the Customize Dialog
To customize a toolbar's visibility and content, see Tools->Customize.

Docking and Undocking Toolbars
A toolbar is either docked or undocked. A docked toolbar resides in the container area along
the border of the Main Window. An undocked toolbar can be positioned anywhere on your
desktop.
Undocking a Toolbar
To undock a toolbar:
Position the cursor over the grip handle of the docked toolbar.
Use MB1 to drag the toolbar where you want and release. The toolbar becomes a free-
floating icon palette that you can move anywhere on the desktop.
Docking a Toolbar
To dock a toolbar:
Place the cursor in a toolbar's title area.
Use MB1 to drag the toolbar into the top margin of the Main Window and release.
The toolbar snaps into the top margin area.
Moving an Undocked Toolbar
To move an undocked toolbar without docking it:
Press and hold <Ctrl> while you move the toolbar.
Closing an Undocked Toolbar
On Windows, to close an undocked toolbar:
Click the "x" in the upper right corner.
Saving the Toolbar Layout
Each time you exit NX, it saves any adjustments that you make to the menu bars and
toolbars' layout and content. You can change this behavior if you want.
If you do not want NX to save any changes:
Select Preferences->User Interface. This displays the User Interface Preferences dialog.
Clear the Save Layout At Exit checkbox.

Customizing Dialog Overview
Customize the main menu bar and the toolbars to make the interface easier for you to use.
Showing and hiding items is as easy as dragging and dropping.
Drag and drop a menu item to a toolbar
Drag and drop a toolbar item to a menu bar
Show and hide toolbar and menu bar items
Show and hide entire toolbars
Create cascade menus on the menu bar or toolbar
Remove menu items
Create your own custom buttons.

Resource Bar Overview
A Resource Bar combines a number of pages in one common place using very little user
interface space. NX places all navigator windows, a History palette, an integrated web
browser, and a parts template in the Resource Bar. By default, the system locates the
Resource Bar on the right side of the NX window. You can also locate it on the left side using
Preferences->User Interface. The Resource Bar divides into three main types of items.
Navigators, Palettes, Integrated Browser Windows

Creating a New Part
To create a new part:
Select File->New. This displays the New Part File dialog.
In the "Look in:" field, select the folder where you want to create your new part.
In the Filename field, type in the name of the new part.
Click Inches or Millimeters, indicating the unit of measure for the new part.
Optionally select Non-Master Part. This creates a simple master model assembly without
using an Assemblies license. If you select this checkbox, when you click OK, the system
displays the Select Part dialog, allowing you to select the master part that you want.
Click OK.

Opening an Existing Part
To open an existing part:

Using Drag and Drop
You can drag and drop part files from Windows Explorer or any other valid file list to the NX
Graphics Window. NX intelligently handles each part file and takes the most appropriate
action. Use it to open a file, create a non-master drawing from a template, or add a
component from the native file system on Windows or Unix.
To drag and drop a part file:
Select a part file in Windows Explorer or another valid list of files.
Drag and drop the file into the NX Graphics Window.

Using the Open Part File Dialog
Select File->Open.
This opens the Open Part File dialog. This dialog displays a preview image of the
selected part file. Use it to view part files without first opening them in an NX session,
avoiding opening the wrong part file. This feature is available only in Windows for
parts saved in NX. To disable file previewing, clear the Preview checkbox.
Double-click the file you want to open, or Select a file from the Files list box and click OK,
or if you know the filename, place the cursor in the File name field and enter the part
name, and click OK.

Selecting an Application
To select an application:
Open or create a part.
Select Application from the main menu bar.
Basic Mouse Operations
The following table describes several ways to use the mouse to interact with NX dialogs and
windows.
MB1 = Left mouse button
MB2 = Middle mouse button
MB3 = Right mouse button

To Press
Select menus and select options in MB1
dialogs
Perform equivalent of OK button MB2
Cancel <Alt> MB2
Display Cut/Copy/Paste popup menu MB3 in a text entry field
Select contiguous items. <Shift> MB1 in a list box
Select or de-select non-contiguous items. <Ctrl> MB1 in a list box
Zoom while the point under the cursor Simply spin the mouse wheel.
remains static.
Launch the View Popup Click MB3 on the graphics area but not on the
model, or click ctrl-MB3 anywhere in the graphics
area.
Launch an object-specific popup. Click MB3 over the object.
Invoke the Default Action for an object. Double-click MB1 over the object.
Rotate a view. Press and drag MB2 in the view.
Pan a view. Press and drag MB2+MB3, or Shift+MB2, in the
view.
Zoom into a view. Press and drag MB2+MB1, or Ctrl+MB2, in the
view.

Basic Keyboard Operations
You can perform most actions with both the mouse and keyboard. This allows you to select
the appropriate input device for each task or the device with which you are most comfortable.
Although the mouse is the primary means of interaction, you can also perform most interface
actions from the keyboard.

Using Menu Accelerators
Some pulldown menus display a <Ctrl> symbol or other symbol followed by a
character to the right of a menu option. These are called Menu Accelerators. A Menu
Accelerator is a key combination that starts a function without you having to display
the pulldown menu.
File-New Ctrl+N
File-Open Ctrl+O
File-Save Ctrl+S
File-Save As Ctrl+Shift+A
File-Plot Ctrl+P
File-Execute UG/Open-Grip Ctrl+G
File-Execute UG/Open-Debug Grip Ctrl+Shift+G
File-Execute UG/Open-User Function Ctrl+U
Edit-Undo List-1 Enter Modeling Ctrl+Z
Edit-Redo Ctrl+Y
Edit-Cut Ctrl+X
Edit-Copy Ctrl+C
Edit-Paste Ctrl+V
Edit-Delete Ctrl+D
Edit-Selection-Select All Ctrl+A
Edit-Show and Hide-Hide Ctrl+B
Edit- Show and Hide –Invert Show and Hidden Ctrl+Shift+B
Edit- Show and Hide -Show Ctrl+Shift+K
Edit- Show and Hide -Show All of Part Ctrl+Shift+U
Edit-Transform Ctrl+T
Edit-Object Display Ctrl+J
View-Refresh F5
View-Operation-Fit Ctrl+F
View-Operation-Zoom Ctrl+Shift+Z
View-Operation-Rotate Ctrl+R
View-Visualization-Create Quick Image Ctrl+Shift+Q
View-Visualization-High Quality Image Ctrl+Shift+H
View-Information Window F4
View-Current Dialog F3
View-Curvature Graphs Ctrl+Shift+C
Format-Layer Settings... Ctrl+L
Format-Visible in View... Ctrl+Shift+V
Format-Layout-New... Ctrl+Shift+N
Format-Layout-Open... Ctrl+Shift+O
Format-Layout-Fit All Views Ctrl+Shift+F
Tools-Expression... Ctrl+E
Tools-Macro-Start Record... Ctrl+Shift+R
Tools-Macro-Playback... Ctrl+Shift+P
Tools-Macro-Step... Ctrl+Shift+S
Information-Object... Ctrl+I
Preferences-Object... Ctrl+Shift+J
Preferences-Selection... Ctrl+Shift+T
Application-Modeling... Ctrl+M
Application-Drafting... Ctrl+Shift+D
Application-Manufacturing... Ctrl+Alt+M
Application-Assemblies Ctrl+Alt+W
Application-Gateway Ctrl+W
Help-On Context F1
Refresh F5
Fit Ctrl+F
Zoom F6
Rotate F7
Orient View-Trimetric Home
Orient View-Isometric End
Snap View F8
Common dialog box options

Dialog boxes are organized into groups. Common options in typical dialog box groups are
summarized below.

Rail Clip buttons

Consistent options appear on the Rail Clip or on the dialog box title bar when the dialog
box is not clipped to the Dialog Rail.

Rail Clip buttons

Move Left Moves the dialog box along the Dialog Rail to predefined
positions.
Move Right

Clips or unclips the dialog box to the Rail Clip.
When a dialog box is clipped, you can position it by sliding the
Clip Rail Clip along the Dialog Rail or by clicking the arrows to
move the Rail Clip to predefined locations.
Unclip
When it is unclipped, the dialog box floats, and you can
position it anywhere on the screen by dragging its title bar.

Resets dialog box input values to the default values. When
Reset editing a feature, the default values are the values used when
the feature was created.

Shows or hides all dialog box groups that are currently
Hide Collapsed Groups
collapsed.
Show Collapsed Groups This simplifies the display of the dialog box.

Close Closes the dialog box.

Type group
In many dialog boxes, the first group is Type.

Select a type first, as what you select here may change the groups and options in the
dialog box.
This group has a list of options. Often, there are also buttons for some or all of the available
options.

Section group
Several modeling commands, including Extrude and Revolve, use a section group to
prompt you to define a section. You can either select existing curves or create a new
sketch as part of the command.

• Typically, the Select Curve option is highlighted in orange, prompting
you to select existing curves or edges.
Select a Curve Rule Selection Intent option on the Selection Bar to help you select
curves.

• In the same dialog box group, another option, Sketch Section is
highlighted in green indicating that this will be the default action if you press Enter
or the middle mouse button. This button opens the Sketcher to enable you to
create a new sketch.
The Cue line states that you can also select a planar face to create a sketch.
To select all the edges of a face to define the section, set the Curve Rule option on the
Selection Bar to Face Edges before selecting the face.

Geometry selection group
The following are typical options for dialog box groups that prompt for geometry selection.

Geometry selection group options

When you are prompted to select a point, you can do so in one of
three ways:
• Select a point using the default Inferred Point method.
• Click the arrow to select another point selection method
Specify Point from the list.
• Click Point Constructor to open the Point dialog box.
Point Constructor
Note that the active Snap Point options on the Selection Bar affect
how the cursor snaps to different types of points.
See also: Point Constructor dialog box

When you are prompted to select a vector, you can do so in one of
Specify Vector three ways:
• Select a vector using the default Inferred Vector method.
Vector Constructor
• Click the arrow to select another vector selection method
from the list.
Reverse Direction
• Click Vector Constructor to display the Vector dialog box.
To reverse the direction of a vector, click Reverse Direction or
double-click the vector conehead.
See also: Vector dialog box

When you are prompted to select a plane, you can do so in one of
three ways:
• Select a vector using the default Inferred Plane method.
• Click the arrow to select another plane selection method
Specify Plane from the list.

Plane Constructor • Click Plane Constructor to display the general Plane
dialog box.
In each case, watch the Cue line for specific prompts.
See also: Plane Constructor dialog box

This button is used to select geometry in cases where multiple
types of geometry can be selected.

Parameter entry options

Parameter entry options

• Use the down arrow to select a previous value from the list, make an
associative measurement, create an expression, enter a math function, or
select from other options.

Click the right mouse button in input boxes to find Copy and Paste options.

Geometry sets
Some commands allow you to select multiple sets of faces or edges and apply different
values to each set.

Set options

Add New Set Creates a new set of geometry to apply a different value.

This is an expanding list showing the value selected for each set.
List
Selecting a row of the list highlights the selected set geometry in
orange and the other sets in the other selection color, cyan. This
example shows two sets of edges selected with different radius
values for the Edge Blend command.
Preview group

Preview group options

Provides a default dynamic preview before completing the
Preview command.

Shows the actual result that will be produced when the command is
Show Result completed.

Reverts to the default display.
Undo Result

Confirmation buttons
Confirmation buttons are placed at the bottom of dialog boxes.

Confirmation buttons

Completes the command and closes the dialog box. (This button will
OK be green if it is the default action after all required selections are
completed.)

Apply Completes the command and keeps the dialog box open.

Cancel Cancels the command and closes the dialog box.

Dialog box preferences
You can control the number of decimals displayed in dialog boxes. Choose
Preferences→User Interface and click the General tab.

Displayed Decimal Places

Dialog Box Sets the default number of decimal places displayed in input boxes.
Overview of Solid Modeling
NX Modeling provides a solid modeling system to enable rapid conceptual design. You can
create and edit complex, realistic, solid models interactively. You can change and update
solid bodies by directly editing their dimensions or by using other construction techniques.

Start with a Sketch
Use the Sketcher to freehand a sketch, and dimension an "outline" of curves. You can then
sweep the sketch using Extrude or Revolved Body to create a solid or sheet body. You can
later refine the sketch to precisely represent the object of interest by editing the dimensions
and by creating relationships between geometric objects. Editing a dimension of the sketch
not only modifies the geometry of the sketch, but also the body created from the sketch.

Creating and Editing Features
Use features in your models such as holes, slots and grooves. You can then directly edit
the dimensions of the feature and locate the feature with dimensions.
For example, a Hole is defined by its diameter and length. You can directly edit all of these
parameters by entering new values.

Associativity
Associativity is a term that is used to indicate geometric relationships between individual
portions of a model. These relationships are established as the designer uses various
functions for model creation. In an associative model, constraints and relationships are
captured automatically as the model is developed.
For example, in an associative model, a through hole is associated with the faces that the
hole penetrates. If the model is later changed so that one or both of those faces moves, the
hole updates automatically due to its association with the faces.

Positioning a Feature
You can position a feature relative to the geometry on your model by using positioning
dimensions. The feature is then associated with that geometry and will maintain those
associations whenever you edit the model. You can also edit the position of the feature by
changing the values of the positioning dimensions.

Reference Features
You can create reference features, such as Datum Planes, Datum Axes and Datum CSYS,
which you can use as reference geometry when needed, or as construction devices for
other features.
Any feature created using a reference feature is associated to that reference feature and
retains that association during edits to the model.
You can use a datum plane as a reference plane in constructing sketches, creating
features, and positioning features.
You can use a datum axis to create datum planes, to place items concentrically, or to
create radial patterns.

Expressions
Expressions let you incorporate your requirements and design restrictions by defining
mathematical relationships between different parts of the design. For example, you can
define the height of a boss as three times its diameter, so that when the diameter changes,
the height changes also.

Boolean Operations
Modeling provides the following Boolean operators: Unite, Subtract, and Intersect. Unite
combines bodies, for example, uniting two rectangular blocks to form a T-shaped solid
body. Subtract removes one body from another, for example, removing a cylinder from a
block to form a hole. Intersect creates a solid body from material shared by two solid
bodies. These operations can also be used with free form features called sheets.

Undo
You can return a design to a previous state any number of times using the Undo function.
You do not have to take a great deal of time making sure each operation is absolutely
correct, because a mistake can be easily undone. This freedom to easily change the model
lets you cease worrying about getting it wrong, and frees you to explore more possibilities
to get it right.

Additional Capabilities
Other NX applications can operate directly on solid objects created within Modeling without
any translation of the solid body. For example, you can perform drafting, engineering
analysis, and NC machining functions by accessing the appropriate application.
Using Modeling, you can design a complete, unambiguous, three dimensional model to
describe an object. You can extract a wide range of physical properties from the solid
bodies, including mass properties.
Shading and hidden line capabilities help you visualize complex assemblies. You can
identify interferences automatically, eliminating the need to attempt to do so manually.
Hidden edge views can later be generated and placed on drawings. Fully associative
dimensioned drawings can be created from solid models using the appropriate options of
the Drafting application. If the solid model is edited later, the drawing and dimensions are
updated automatically.

Parent/Child Relationships
If a feature depends on another object for its existence, it is a child or dependent of that
object. The object, in turn, is a parent of its child feature. For example, if a HOLLOW (1) is
created in a BLOCK (0), the block is the parent and the hollow is its child.
A parent can have more than one child, and a child can have more than one parent. A
feature that is a child can also be a parent of other features. To see all of the parent-child
relationships between the features in your work part, open the Part Navigator.

Updating Models
A model can be updated either automatically or manually. Automatic updates are
performed only on those features affected by an appropriate change (an edit operation or
the creation of certain types of features). If you wish, you can delay the automatic update
for edit operations by using the delayed Update on edit option.

Sketcher Overview
The Sketcher is an NX application that you use to create 2-dimensional geometry within a
part. Each sketch is a named collection of 2D curves and points residing on a plane that
you specify. You can use sketches to address a wide variety of design needs. For example,
you might create:
• Detailed part features by sweeping, extruding, or revolving a sketch into a
solid or a sheet body.
• Large-scale 2D concept layouts with hundreds, or even thousands, of
sketch curves.
• Construction geometry, such as a path of motion, or a clearance arc, that is
not meant to define a part feature.
Sketch Constraints
Sketcher tools let you fully capture your design intent through geometric and dimensional
relationships that we refer to collectively as constraints. Use constraints to create
parameter-driven designs that you can update easily and predictably. Sketcher evaluates
constraints as you work to ensure that they are complete and do not conflict. A fully
constrained sketch has as many constraints as there are degrees of freedom in the sketch,
so that there can be no ambiguity in the final shape. While it is not required, UGS
recommends that you fully constrain sketches that define feature profiles.
Sketcher also offers you the flexibility to create as many, or as few, constraints as your
design requires. That means you can use Sketcher to create wireframe drawings that can
serve a wide variety of up-front design purposes, and are not meant for down-stream
processing. For example you might create 2D layout sketches for products such as digital
cameras, printers, or other devices in which you focus on:
• Product structure
• Component layout
• Basic component shape
Or you might create construction geometry including:
• Area/volume restrictions in a part
• Range/arc of free motion
• Part labels or logos
• Layout of grille holes
Sketches like these typically require few, if any, constraints. Sketcher's Create Inferred
Constraints and Inferred Constraint Settings commands make it easy to mix
constrained and unconstrained geometry in a single sketch.

Sketch in Place/Sketch on Path
When you create a sketch, you can define its plane and orientation using one of two
methods:
Sketch in Place
Sketch on an existing planar face, or on a new or existing sketch plane. Key considerations
that will guide your selection are:
• Does the sketch you are creating define the base feature for the part? If so, create an
appropriate datum plane or datum coordinate system on which to sketch.
• Is the sketch adding to an existing base feature? If so, select an existing datum plane
or part face, or create a new datum plane with an appropriate relationship to existing
datum planes or part geometry.
Sketch on Path
This is a specialized type of constrained sketch that you use to create a profile for a
Variational Sweep feature. You can also use Sketch on Path to position a sketch for
features like Extrude and Revolve. For all commands, you select the target path and define
a sketch plane location on that path.

Note that you can use the Reattach command to easily switch a sketch from the Sketch in
Place method to Sketch on Path, and vice versa.

The Sketch Process
Here are the steps typically involved in a Sketcher session:
1. Select a sketch plane and horizontal axis, and optionally rename the sketch.
2. Choose your constraint recognition and creation options.
3. Create the sketch. Depending on your settings, Sketcher creates many
constraints automatically.
4. Add, modify, or delete constraints.
5. Drag the shape or modify dimension parameters.
6. Exit Sketcher.

Sketcher toolbar Overview

After you define the sketch plane, Sketcher toolbar options become available.
Sketcher Toolbar Options
Deactivates the sketch and exits. You can also press Ctrl+Q to exit
Finish Sketch Sketcher.
When you are editing an external sketch, this list displays all of the
Sket external sketches in the work part. You can
ch Name
• Rename an external sketch. Note that you cannot rename a
sketch that is internal to an Extrude, Revolve, or Variational
Sweep feature.
• Open an external sketch for Edit.
Orients the view so that you are looking directly down on the sketch
Orient View to plane.
Sketch
Orients the view to the current modeling view. This is the view of the part
Orient View to when you started Sketcher.
Model
Lets you attach a sketch to a different planar face, datum plane, or path.
Reattach You can also use this option to change the orientation reference of the
sketch, or to change the location of a Sketch on Path along the path.
This list lets you create, edit, delete, and redefine sketch positioning
Sketch dimensions.
Positioning
Dimension Options
In most cases, this option delays evaluation of sketch constraints until
Delay you choose Evaluate Sketch. That is, 1) when you create curves, NX
Evaluation does not show constraints, and 2) when you assign constraints, NX does
not update the geometry until you select the Evaluate Sketch option.
Note that this option does not delay evaluation when you drag curves, or
when you use the Quick Trim or Quick Extend commands.
Causes NX to evaluate the current sketch. This option is active only
Evaluate when Delay Evaluation is on.
Sketch
Updates the model to reflect changes you have made to your sketch.
Update Model The model updates automatically if an update is pending and you leave
the Sketch Task Environment.
Switches the display of Sketcher objects between the color(s) specified
Display Object in Object Display Properties and 2) the Sketcher Colors. See Colors in
Color Sketcher for more information.
Use his command to create lines with constraint inferencing.

This option lets you create a series of connected lines and/or arcs in string mode;
that is, the end of the last curve becomes the beginning of the next curve. For
example, here's a pipe vise profile which you can easily create in one series of mouse
clicks with Profile:

Lets you create an arc using either of two methods:

Lets you create circles using one of two methods

This option lets you create new lines from existing lines using any of the following
methods:
To offset a line from a base line, click MB1 on the base, and click MB1 again to place the
new line.

Use this command to trim a curve to the closest physical or virtual intersection in
either direction. You can:
• Trim multiple curves by pressing the left mouse button and dragging.
• Preview which portion of a curve NX will trim by passing the cursor over the
curve.

Creates a corner by extending and/or trimming two input curves to a common
intersection. If the Create Inferred Constraints option is on, NX creates a coincident
constraint at the intersection.

Use this command to create a fillet between two or three curves. You can

Sketch Curve Options
Creates a string of lines and arcs, or single curves.
Profile
Creates a single, unchained line.
Line
Creates an arc using one of the following methods: Arc by 3 Points, Arc
Arc by Center and Endpoints
Creates a circle using either one of two methods:
Circle Circle by Three Points, Circle by Center and Radius

Constructs a line Parallel to another line at a distance, Midway between
Derived two parallel lines, Angle bisector between two lines.
Lines
Trims one or more curves.
Quick Trim
Extends geometry to curve intersections.
Quick Extend
Creates a corner
Creates a rectangle.
Rectangle
Creates a fillet between two curves.
Fillet
Studio Spline Uses the Modeling Studio Spline function to let you dynamically create
non-associative splines using either points or poles.
Creates a spline using the Modeling spline dialog.
Spline
Generates NX curves from the True Type fonts in your native Windows
Text font library.
Point Options Lets you create Point, Associative Point.
Conic Options Lets you create Ellipse, General Conic.

1. Sketcher toolbar 7. Snap Point options
2. Sketch Curve toolbar 8. Command dialog box
3. Selection Bar 9. Datum CSYS
4. Status line 10. Curves in this sketch (green)
5. Sketch Constraints toolbar 11. Dynamic input box
6. Sketch Operations toolbar

Sketch Constraints Toolbar Overview
The Sketch Constraints toolbar provides options that let you:
• Create dimensional and geometric constraints. These constraints are rules that
control sketch objects.
• Control the visibility of constraint symbols.
• Select constraint management options.
You can customize the Sketch Constraints toolbar to display all constraint options.
The Dimensions and Constraints options are also found on the Insert pull-down menu. All
other Constraints options are found on the Tools-> Constraints pull-down menu.
Sketch Constraint
Options
Sketch Dimensions let you define dimensional constraints for
sketch curves.
Dimensions
Lets you define on-screen geometric rules for sketch curves.
Constraints
The system analyzes the geometry in the active sketch and
Automatic Constraints applies selected constraint types where possible.
Displays all of the constraints on the screen with constraint
Show All Constraints symbols.
Removes the display of on-screen constraint symbols.
Show No Constraints
Opens the Show/Remove Constraints dialog. This dialog displays
Show/Remove the geometric constraints associated with selected sketch
Constraints geometry. You can also remove specified constraints, or list
information about all geometric constraints.
Dynamically displays the effect of varying a given dimension over
Animate Dimension a specified range.
Lets you convert curves or sketch dimensions to or from active to
Convert To/From reference.
Reference
Lets you change from one solution to another where more than
Alternate Solution one solution is possible when a constraint is applied.
Lets you control which constraint types to infer during curve
Infer Constraint creation.
Settings

Sketch Operations Toolbar Overview
The Sketch Operations toolbar provides a set of tools that let you perform various operations
on sketch objects.
Sketch Operations Options
Lets you mirror sketch geometry through any existing line in your
Mirror sketch.
Lets you associatively offset curves you have extracted with the
Offset Extracted Curves Project option.
Uses the Modeling Edit Curve function to let you modify existing
Edit Curve curves.
Lets you add or remove curves from a sweep or guide string.
Edit Defining String
Lets you add most existing curves to your sketch.
Add Existing Curves
Lets you add external curves by projecting them to the sketch.
Project

Sketch Plane Options Overview
To create a sketch, you must associate the sketch feature to a planar object. You can select a
face or datum plane from the graphics window. If you specify a plane of the WCS, the
sketcher automatically creates a fixed datum plane and fixed datum axes in the plane you
specify. When you create a sketch, these and additional Sketch Plane options display in the
upper left corner of the graphics window.
Reference Direction
You specify a reference direction for all sketch plane options (except WCS plane options) by
selecting a face, edge, datum axis, or datum plane to set the reference direction. The
reference axis points in the direction of the end point closest to the selection point when you
pick a line or edge. Parallel symbols temporarily display to illustrate the reference direction.
Sketch Plane Options
This option lets you select a planar face or datum plane as the sketch
plane.
Sketch Plane
The WCS plane options let you define either the XC-YC, YC-ZC, or
XC-YC Plane XC-ZC plane as the sketch plane. The XC-YC plane is the default.

YC-ZC Plane

XC-ZC Plane
Provides modeling datum plane options. A set of option boxes displays
Datum Plane on the graphics window in the upper left hand corner. If you have
preselected a face or plane, you can drag the handle to create a sketch
plane that is offset to the selected face or plane.
Lets you create an associative datum coordinate system using the
Datum CSYS CSYS Constructor dialog, which you can then use to define your sketch
plane.
Accepts the sketch plane definition, dismisses the sketch plane
OK options, and Sketcher Task Environment options become available.
MB2 always accelerates OK.
Cancels plane creation and exits the Sketcher Task Environment when
Cancel there is no active sketch. If there is an active sketch and you choose
Task->New and then Cancel, only plane creation is cancelled - you do
not exit the Sketcher Task Environment.
ESC always accelerates Cancel.

Colors in Sketcher
Colors in the Sketcher have special definitions, to help identify elements of your sketch. The
following table shows what the system default colors mean.
General Color Usage in Sketcher
Cyan Sketch curves have this color when the sketch is deactivated.
Pure Curves that are part of an active sketch are by default colored pure cyan.
Cyan
Pure Sketch dimensions that do not cause a conflict with other dimension constraints are
White colored pure white.
Green Curves that are not part of a sketch are by default colored green.
Pure Sketch geometry and any dimensional constraints associated with it that are over
Yellow constrained are colored pure yellow. This occurs when you apply more constraints
to a curve or vertex than are needed to control it.
Degree of Freedom Arrows, which indicate vertex points that are under constrained,
are colored pure yellow.
Pink If constraints you add conflict with other constraints, the conflicting dimensions and
curves are changed to pink. This visual feedback indicates that the sketch cannot
be solved given the current constraints.
Gray Sketch geometry or dimensions that you convert from active to reference using
Convert To/From Reference change to gray and only curves change to gray
phantom lines.
Degree-of-Freedom (DOF) arrows mark points on a sketch that are free to move. These
arrows assist you in constraining a sketch by showing you the directions you need to
constrain for each point. When you constrain a point, NX removes the DOF arrow. When all
of the arrows are gone, the sketch is fully constrained. There are three types of degree-of-
freedoms: positional, rotational, and radius. This example shows positional constraints:
Three Positional DOF Arrows
This point is free to move in the X direction.

This point is free to move in the Y direction.

This point is free to move in both the X and Y directions. In some cases, the point is free
to move in either X or Y directions but is limited by a constraint. For example, a point with
a Point on Curve constraint on a line is only allowed to move along the line.

Note that constraining a sketch is optional. You can still use an underconstrained sketch to
define a feature. You constrain a sketch when you need greater control of the design. Also,
applying one constraint can remove several DOF arrows.

Geometry Degree-Of-Freedom Arrows
In the Sketcher, a curve's location and shape are mathematically determined by analyzing
the constraints (rules) placed on the sketch curves. The degree-of-freedom arrow
provides visual feedback about the constraint status of a sketch curve. Each sketch curve
type has different degree-of-freedom arrows when initially created.
Curve Degree of Freedoms Description

Points have two degree of freedoms.

Lines have four degree of freedoms: two at
each endpoint.

Circles have three degree of freedoms: two at
the center and one for the radius.
Arcs have five degree of freedoms: two at the
center, one for the radius, and two for the start
and end angle.

Ellipses have five degree of freedoms: two at
the center, one for its orientation, and two for
the major and minor radii.

Partial Ellipses have seven degree of
freedoms: two at the center, one for its
orientation, two for the major and minor radii,
and two for the starting and ending angle.

Conics have six degree of freedoms: two at
each of its endpoints and two at its anchor
point.

Spline by poles has four degree of freedoms:
two at each of its endpoints.

Splines through points have two degree of
freedoms at each of its defining points.

Geometric Constraint Types
The following geometric constraints are available

Constraint Type Description

Defines fixed characteristics for geometry, depending on the
Fixed type of geometry selected, as follows:
Point - fixes the location.
Line - fixes the angle.
Line, Arc or elliptical arc endpoint - fixes the location of the
endpoint.
Arc center, elliptical arc center, circle center, or ellipse center -
fixes the location of the center.
Arc or circle - fixes the radius and the location of the center.
When constraining sketches, there is a difference
between fixing an arc by fixing the curve itself, and fixing
an arc's center point. Which of these you choose may
make the difference between whether or not the sketch
can be correctly (and easily) constrained.
Elliptical arc or Ellipse - fixes the radii and the location of the
center.
Spline control point - fixes the location of the control point.

Creates sufficient fixed constraints to completely define the
Fully Fixed position and orientation of sketch geometry in one step.

Defines two or more points as having the same location.
Coincident

Defines two or more circular and elliptical arcs as having the
Concentric same center

Defines two or more lines as lying on or passing through the
same straight line.
Collinear

Defines the location of a point as lying on a curve.
Point on Curve

Defines the location of a point as lying on an extracted string.
Point on String (This is the only constraint that can be applied to an extracted
string.) You must select the point first.
When you select a curve segment of the extracted
string, a Quick Pick dialog appears for you to choose
either the curve, extracted curve, or string.

Defines the location of a point as equidistant to the two end
points of a line or a circular arc.
Midpoint
For the Midpoint constraint, select the curve anywhere
other than at its endpoints.

Defines a line as horizontal.
Horizontal

Defines a line as vertical.
Vertical

Defines two or more lines or ellipses as being parallel to each
Parallel other.

Defines two lines or ellipses as being perpendicular to each
Perpendicular other.

Defines two objects as being tangent to each other.
Tangent

Defines two or more lines as being the same length.
Equal Length
Defines two or more arcs as having the same radius.
Equal Radius

Defines a line as having a constant length.
Constant Length

Defines a line as having a constant angle.
Constant Angle

Defines two objects as being mirror images of each other.
Mirror

Defines a spline, selected at a defining point, and another
Slope of Curve object as being tangent to each other at the selected point.

A spline will scale proportionally to keep its original shape
Scale, Uniform when both of its endpoints are moved (that is, when you
change the value of a horizontal constraint created between
the endpoints).

When both of its endpoints are moved (that is, when you
Scale, Non-Uniform change the value of a horizontal constraint created between
the endpoints), a spline will scale in the horizontal direction,
but keeps its original dimensions in the vertical direction. The
spline appears to stretch.

This is a constraint on a spline that has been trimmed using
the associative output option from the Edit Curve→Trim Curve
Associative Trim dialog.

The Offset Curve command offsets a chain of curves,
projected curves, or curves/edges in the current assembly,
and constrains the geometry using an Offset constraint.
Offset

This is a constraint on an extracted curve that has been offset
using the legacy Offset Curves option.
Associative Offset
(legacy)

Sketch in Place Overniew
Create a Sketch in Place when you want to associate the sketch feature to a planar object
such as a face or a datum plane. For example, here are sketches in place on the ZX plane
of a Datum CSYS (1) and on a face of the extruded sketch (2).
Sketch in place (1) on a Datum CSYS plane and (2) on a face

Sketch on Path
Create a Sketch on Path when you are building an input profile for features like Variational
Sweep. For example, in the figure below, we have selected a path, located the sketch
plane 15 mm from the start of the curve, and kept the default Normal to Path direction.

Target path (left) and sketch plane on the path (right)
Next, you sketch and fully constrain the feature profile, and use it to create a Variational
Sweep.
Constrained sketch profile (top) and resulting Variational Sweep (bottom)

Sketch on a CSYS plane
Sketch on a planar face Creating a base support Sketch on a path

This tutorial shows you how to:

• Create and extrude a sketch profile.
• Select a sketch plane.
• Rename a sketch.
• Change the input box from coordinate values to
polar coordinate values.
• String lines together.
• Make constraint symbols visible.
• Fully constrain the sketch.

1. Create a new metric part based on the Model template and enter
sk_chamfer as the part name. When you click OK, NX automatically starts the
Modeling application.

2. On the Feature toolbar, click Extrude .
3. In the Extrude dialog box, click Sketch Section .
4. On the Sketcher toolbar, select the sketch name text, type chamfer, and
press Enter.
5. I(n the Create Sketch dialog box, ensure that the sketch type is On Plane.
6. Select the ZC-XC plane of the datum CSYS and click OK.

ZC-XC plane of the datum CSYS (1) and sketch horizontal reference (2)

Note that Sketcher automatically orients your view to the sketch plane and starts
the Profile command.

7. On the Sketch Constraints toolbar, click Show All Constraints and

Create Inferred Constraints .
8. Inn the Profile dialog box, under Input Mode, select Parameter Mode

.
9. Move the cursor near the CSYS origin. When you see the snap to Existing
Point icon, click to define the start of the line.

Icons for Existing Point snap option (3)

10. Move the cursor up vertically.
The dashed line indicates a possible constraint. The vertical arrow indicates a
vertical constraint. Click the middle mouse button to lock the vertical constraint.
Notice that NX ignores horizontal cursor movement. To unlock the vertical
constraint, click the middle mouse button again or blank the angle input box. Click
at an appropriate location to complete the first line.
11. Continue sketching lines to create a shape similar to the figure below. After
you connect the last line, click the middle mouse button to break the string action.

12. Press Esc to dismiss the Profile command.
13. Right–click the bottom line and choose Add Dimensions.

14. IN the Dimensions dialog bar, click Sketch Dimensions Dialog .
15. From the Placement list, choose Auto Placement.

16. Click in the graphics window to place the dimension below the line.
17. Enter 40.0 for the value and 2.0 in the Text Height box and press Enter.
18. Select the left vertical line and place the dimension.
19. Enter 42.0 for the value and press Enter.
20. At the top right corner of the profile, select the angled line near its right end.
21. Select the top horizontal line near its right end.
22. Move the cursor to the right to create an angle dimension and click to place
it.
23. Enter 45.0 for the value and press Enter.
24. Select the upper, horizontal line and place the dimension. Note when you
place the dimension that Sketcher now displays the profile in the fully constrained
color.

25. Enter 25.0 for the value and press Enter.
26. Press Esc twice to close the dialog box and exit the Dimension option.
27. To exit the Sketcher, press Ctrl+Q or click Finish Sketch .
28. NX automatically extrudes the sketch. Click the Start and End input fields in
the graphics window and specify 0 and 40 mm respectively.

4. Start input field (currently inactive)

5. End input field (currently active)

Cone – Drag to resize extrude; double–click to flip
6.
extrude direction.

Click the middle mouse button to complete the extrude. Since you
will use the part in the next tutorial, save your work

Snap Point Tool
The Snap Point Tool lets you designate one or more specific types of point inferencing
methods to use when specifying points and point locations during the creation and editing of
geometric objects. It works in Modeling, Sketcher, Shape Studio and the Dynamic WCS.
The following point methods are supported with the Snap Point tool:

End Point Mid Point Control Point

Intersection Point Arc Center Quadrant Point

Existing Point Point on Curve Point on Surface

Point Constructor

Click the middle mouse button to complete the extrude. Since you will use the part in the
next tutorial, save your work.

1. What are the two possible ways to give constraints in Unigraphics?
2. What dialog lets you create lines, arcs, circles and fillets as well as offer
quick access to trim curve dialog?
3. What option in the sketch dialog re-orients the view to look directly at the
sketch when activated?
4. What type of constraint establishes the size of the sketch object or the
scalar object or the scalar relationship between the two objects?
5. To more the sketch to a different plane which option do you choose?
6. Is it possible to give negative value in dimensioning?
7. What will happen to the constraints if you give the dimension by
positioning dimension?
What is the difference between inferred dimension and inferred dimension settings?

DATUM/POINT

Datum Plane
Lets you create reference planes, either fixed or relative, as construction aids
when existing planes are not available.

Datum Axis
Lets you create a reference axis, either fixed or relative, which can be used to
create datum planes, revolved features, extruded bodies, etc.

Datum CSYS
Lets you create an associative datum coordinate system

Point
Lets you create a point

Point Set
Lets you create a set of points that corresponds to existing geometry. For
example, you can generate points along a curve, face, at the poles of a spline or face

Creating a plane object
Lets you to create an unbounded plane object
Datum Plane-Overview
Use this command to create datum planes. You can use datum planes as aids in
creating other features, such as cylinders, cones, spheres, revolved solid bodies, etc.
Datum planes are also of value in creating features at angles other than normal to the
faces of target solids.
You can create two types of datum planes: relative and fixed.

Relative Datum Planes
A relative datum plane is created in reference to other objects in your model. You can use
curves, faces, edges, points, and other datums as reference objects for datum planes.
There is a wide range of methods you can use to create relative datum planes.
You can create relative datum planes across multiple bodies.

Fixed Datum Planes
Fixed datum planes do not reference and are not constrained by other geometric objects,
except when used in a user defined feature. You can use any of the relative datum plane
methods to create fixed datum planes by deselecting the Associative option in the Datum
Plane dialog. There are also special methods you can use to create fixed datum planes
based on the WCS and Absolute coordinate systems and by using coefficients in an
equation.
Constructing Datum Planes
There are two basic methods you can use to construct datum planes:
Select the edges, planar faces or wireframe geometry needed to specify the datum, and then
choose the Datum Plane option.
Invoke the Datum Plane option and then select the required objects for the datum from the
graphics window. When you have selected enough valid objects to define a datum, a
preview of the datum is displayed in the graphics window. Use the Datum Plane icon
options to help specify objects and constraints
Datum Plane options

Type

Plane types are the construction methods you use to create planes. You can either select a
plane type from the Type option list or click one of the frequently used plane type method
buttons located below the option list. If you use the default Inferred plane type, you can
immediately select objects on which to base the plane.
When you edit a datum plane, you can change its type, defining objects, and associative
status.

Panel of frequently used plane types
Click the following links for details about each plane Type:

• Inferred — Determines the best plane type to use based on objects you select.

• Point and Direction — Creates a plane from a point in a specified direction.

• On Curve — Creates a plane tangent to, normal or binormal to a point on a
curve or edge.

• At Distance — Creates a plane parallel to a planar face or another datum plane
at a distance you specify.

• YC-ZC plane — Creates a fixed datum plane along the XC-YC axis of the Work
Coordinate System (WCS) or Absolute Coordinate System (ABS).

XC-ZC plane — Creates a fixed datum plane along the XC-ZC axis of the WCS
or ABS.

XC-YC plane — Creates a fixed datum plane along the YC-ZC axis of the WCS
or ABS.

• At Angle — Creates a plane using a specified angle.

• Bisector — Creates a plane mid-way between two selected planar faces or
planes using the bisected angle.

• Curves and Points — Creates a plane using a point and a second point, a line,
linear edge, datum axis, or face.

• Two Lines — Creates a plane using two existing lines, or a combination of lines,
linear edges, face axis, or datum axis.

• Tangent to Face at Point, Line or Face — Creates a datum plane tangent to a
non-planar surface, and optionally a second selected object.

• Through Object — Creates a datum plane based on the plane of a selected
object.
• Coefficients — Creates a fixed datum plane by specifying an equation using
coefficients of A, B, C, and D.
• Fixed — Available only when editing a datum plane.
Any datum plane created using the YC-ZC plane, XC-ZC plane, XC-YC plane, or
Coefficients types, or any of the other relative types that were used with the
Associative check box not selected, will all appear as the Fixed type during edit.
During edit, you can change a fixed datum plane to relative by changing the Type,
redefining its parent geometry, and selecting the Associative check box.
You can also do the reverse and change a relative datum plane to fixed, by either
selecting the Fixed type or clearing the Associative check box.

Plane Orientation

Appears when an alternate solution to the previewed plane becomes
available.
Lets you cycle through the possible different solutions for the plane. You
Alternate
can also cycle through alternate solutions using the Page Down and Page
Solution
Up keys. See Alternate Solution for details.

Reverses the direction of the plane normal. You can also:
• Right-click the normal direction conehead and choose Reverse
Direction.

Reverse Plane • Double-click the normal direction conehead.
Normal The plane preview always displays an arrow conehead in its center that
points in the direction of the plane normal.
Common to all Types.

Settings

Associative For datum planes, makes the datum plane associative instead of fixed, so it
is parametrically related to its parent features.
If you clear this check box, the datum plane will be fixed and will not be
associative. If you later edit a non-associative datum plane, regardless of
which type was used to create it, it will appear in the Type list as Fixed.
An associative datum plane displays the name Datum Plane in the Part
Navigator.
A non-associative datum plane displays the name Fixed Datum Plane in
the Part Navigator.
Available to all datum planes of non-fixed Types.

Datum Plane Inferred type options

Type

Determines the best plane type to use based on objects you select.
Depending on the plane type used and the objects you select, additional groups
of options that support it may appear in the dialog box.
When you edit a datum plane created using this method, the type will be the one
that was inferred at the time of creation.
Inferred
You can usually create a datum plane solely by using the Inferred type. See the
other Type options for details on how to use each datum plane type.
See Inferring a datum plane for a simple example.

Objects to Define Plane

Lets you select one or more objects that define the plane. The objects you select
determine the plane type and which additional object types (if any) you can
continue to select.

Select Point Constructor — Displays the Point Constructor dialog box. Click this
Object button if you need to define points.
See the Point Constructor in the Getting Started help for details on point types.

Datum Plane Point and Direction type options

Type

Creates a datum plane from a point in a specified direction.
Point and See Create a datum plane using a point and a direction for a simple example.
Direction

Through Point

Lets you define an origination point for the datum plane using Snap Point
options.
You can drag the point handle to a new point position, as long as it satisfies
the current snap point settings.

Inferred Point — A point type. Click to see the point type list. Select a
point type from the list and then select objects supported by that type.
Specify Point

Point Constructor — Displays the Point Constructor dialog box. Click
this if you need to define points.
See the Point Constructor in the Getting Started help for details on point
types.

Normal Direction

Lets you define the direction of the datum plane.

Inferred Vector — A vector type. Click to see the vector type list.
Select a vector type from the list and then select objects supported by that
type.
Specify
Vector
Vector Constructor — Displays the Vector dialog box.
See the Vector Constructor in the Getting Started help for details on vector
types.

Lets you switch the normal direction vector to the opposite direction. You can
also right-click Reverse Direction on the vector direction conehead, or
Reverse
double-click the conehead.
Direction

Datum Plane On Curve type options

Type

Creates a datum plane tangent to, normal or binormal to a point on a curve or
edge.
On Curve See Create a datum plane on a curve or edge for a simple procedure.

Curve

Lets you select a curve or an edge.
You can optionally select a face, datum plane, datum axis, or a second curve or
Select
edge to make the datum plane perpendicular to it at the point on curve.
Curve

Lets you switch the location of the plane from one end of a curve or edge to the
other end without changing the location value.
Reverse
Use this option if the system-defined location of the plane is not measured from
Direction
the expected end of the curve or edge.

Location on Curve

Lets you precisely place the plane on the curve or edge.
You can specify the plane location on the curve or edge as a function of arc
length or a percentage of arc length.
Location Select one of the following:
• Arc Length
• % Arc Length

The label of this option box changes to match the setting of the Location
option.
Once you have a preview of the datum plane, you can drag its handle along the
curve or edge, or you can enter a value or expression for its location in the
Arc Length / dynamic input box or here in this option box.
%Arc The arc length is a function of the part's unit of measure and the length of the
Length object.
The percent of arc length is measured between 0 and 100 percent.
You can right-click the datum plane handle to switch this parameter back and
forth between Arc Length and %Arc Length.

Orientation on Curve

Lets you specify the direction of the plane on the curve.
Select one of the following options:

Direction • Normal to the curve or edge
Option • Tangent to a non-linear curve or edge
• Bi-Normal to a non-linear curve or edge
• Parallel to Object

Appears when Parallel to Object is the direction option, to let you select an
Select object on which you want to make the datum plane parallel.
Object

Datum Plane At Distance type options

Type

Creates a datum plane parallel to a planar face or another datum plane at a
distance you specify.
At Distance See Create a datum plane parallel and at a distance for a simple procedure.

Planar Reference
Lets you select a planar face or an existing datum plane to use as a reference
Select Planar object for the new datum plane.
Object

Offset

Specifies the value for a distance to offset the datum plane. Type a value in
the Distance box.

Distance You can also:
• Drag the offset handle.
• Type a value in the Distance dynamic input box.

Switches the direction of the offset.
You can also:
• Right-click the offset direction conehead and choose Reverse
Direction.
Reverse
Direction • Double-click the offset direction conehead.
When you reverse the offset direction, the plane moves to the opposite side of
the reference object. The plane normal also reverses in a mirror-like
transformation.

Lets you specify the number of copies of the new plane you want to create.
Number of
Planes The datum plane copies are created successively and spaced evenly from
one another using the same offset value.

Datum Plane YC-ZC, XC-ZC, and XC-YC Plane type options

Type

X=YC-ZC
Plane
Creates a fixed datum plane along the XC-YC, XC-ZC, or YC-ZC axis of the
Work Coordinate System (WCS) or Absolute Coordinate System (ABS).
Y=XC-ZC See Create a datum plane on the absolute or work coordinate system for a
Plane simple procedure.

Z=XC-YC
Plane

Offset and Reference

WCS / Lets you specify the coordinate system on which to create a datum plane.
Absolute
Choose one of the following:
• WCS
• Absolute

Distance Lets you add a distance to offset the new plane from the coordinate system.

Datum Plane YC-ZC, XC-ZC, and XC-YC Plane type options

Type

X=YC-ZC
Plane
Creates a fixed datum plane along the XC-YC, XC-ZC, or YC-ZC axis of the
Work Coordinate System (WCS) or Absolute Coordinate System (ABS).
Y=XC-ZC See Create a datum plane on the absolute or work coordinate system for a
Plane simple procedure.

Z=XC-YC
Plane

Offset and Reference

Lets you specify the coordinate system on which to create a datum plane.

WCS / Choose one of the following:
Absolute • WCS
• Absolute

Distance Lets you add a distance to offset the new plane from the coordinate system.

Datum Plane YC-ZC, XC-ZC, and XC-YC Plane type options

Type

Creates a fixed datum plane along the XC-YC, XC-ZC, or YC-ZC axis of the
Work Coordinate System (WCS) or Absolute Coordinate System (ABS).
X=YC-ZC See Create a datum plane on the absolute or work coordinate system for a
Plane simple procedure.

Y=XC-ZC
Plane
Z=XC-YC
Plane

Offset and Reference

Lets you specify the coordinate system on which to create a datum plane.

WCS / Choose one of the following:
Absolute • WCS
• Absolute

Distance Lets you add a distance to offset the new plane from the coordinate system.

Datum Plane At Angle type options

Type

Creates a datum plane using a specified angle.
Once you select the planar reference and the through axis objects, a preview
datum plane displays, initially set to 90°.
At Angle
See Create a datum plane at an angle for a simple procedure.

Planar Reference

Lets you select a planar face, plane, or datum plane to use as a reference for the
Select angle.
Planar
Object

Through Axis

Lets you select a linear curve, edge, or datum axis to define the angle's axis of
rotation.
Select
You cannot select a linear curve, edge or datum axis that is perpendicular to the
Linear
reference plane
Object

Angle

Angle Lets you select from a list how the angle is defined.
Option
Value
Specifies a value for the angle. Type a value in the Angle box.
You can also:
• Drag the angle handle.
• Type a value in the Angle dynamic input box.
Perpendicular
Specifies that the datum plane is perpendicular to the planar reference object and
passes through the through axis object.
Parallel
Specifies that the datum plane is parallel to the planar reference and passes
through the through axis object.

Angle Appears when the Angle Option is set to Value. Type a degree value.

Datum Plane Bisector type options

Type

Creates a datum mid-way between two selected planar faces or datum
planes using the bisected angle.
Alternate Solution may be available with this method.
Bisector See Create a datum plane midway between planar faces, planes, or datum
planes for a simple procedure.

First Plane

Lets you select the first planar face, datum plane, or plane object needed
Select Planar to define the datum plane.
Object

Second Plane

Lets you select the second planar face, datum plane, or plane object
Select Planar needed to define the datum plane.
Object

Datum Plane Curves and Points type options

Type

Creates a datum plane using a point and a second point, a line, linear edge,
datum axis, or face.
Curves and
See Create a datum plane using curves and points for a simple procedure.
Points

Curves and Points Subtype

Lets you select a subtype method.
All methods involve first specifying a point. Snap Point is available to define the
point.
Curves and Points (Sub-infer)
Creates a datum plane as you specify a point and one or more
reference objects. As you select the additional objects, the software
determines which subtype option to use to create the datum plane.
If you select a line, datum axis, linear curve, or edge for the reference
geometry, the datum plane passes through both objects. Check
Alternate Solution for other possible solutions when the plane is
perpendicular to the second object.
If you select a planar face or datum plane for the reference object, the
datum plane passes through the point, but is parallel to the reference
object.
You can drag a selected point to a new position if it satisfies the Snap
Point settings.
Alternate Solution may be available if it is supported by the subtype.
Subtype
Option One Point
Creates a datum plane that passes through a single point. Depending
on the point, Alternate Solution may be available.
Two Points
Creates a datum plane using two points.
The datum plane passes through the first point and is perpendicular to
the direction defined by both points. Click Alternate Solution to get a
plane that passes through the second point instead of the first.
Three Points
Creates a datum plane that passes through three points.
Point and Curve/Axis
Creates a datum plane using a point and a linear object, such as a line,
datum axis, linear curve, or edge. Alternate Solution is available.
Point and Plane/Face
Creates a datum plane using a point and a planar object, such as a
planar face, datum plane, or plane.

Reference Geometry

Appears when the subtype option is Curves and Points (Sub-Infer).
Lets you select the initial point for the datum plane, followed by any additional
Select reference objects that are required for the inferred type.
Object Also includes the Point Constructor (see Specify Point).

Appears for all subtype options except Curves and Points (Sub-Infer), to let
you specify each point required by the subtype.
Inferred Point — A point type. Click to see the point type list. Select a
point type from the list and then select objects supported by that type.
Specify
Point
Point Constructor — Displays the Point Constructor dialog box. Click
this if you need to define points.
See Point Constructor in the Getting Started help for details on point types.

Appears when the subtype option is Point and Curve/Axis.
Select Lets you select a linear object, such as a line, datum axis, linear curve, or edge
Curve to be used with a point to define the plane.
Object

Appears when the subtype option is Point and Plane/Face.
Select Lets you select a planar object, such as a planar face, datum plane, or plane
Planar object to be used with a point to define the plane.
Object

Datum Plane Two Lines type options

Type

Creates a datum plane using two existing lines, or a combination of lines, linear
edges, face axis, or datum axis. The resulting plane contains the first line and is
parallel to the second.
Two-line datum planes share these traits:
• If the two lines are coplanar, the plane includes both lines.
• If the two lines are not coplanar and not perpendicular, an alternate
Two Lines solution passes through the second line and is parallel to the first.
• If the two lines are not coplanar but are perpendicular, the plane contains
the first line and is perpendicular to the second. There is also an
alternate solution that passes through the second line and is
perpendicular to the first.

First Line

Lets you select the first linear curve, linear edge, or datum axis needed to define
Select the datum plane.
Linear
Object

Second Line

Lets you select the second linear curve, linear edge, or datum axis needed to
define the datum plane.
Select
Linear
Object

Datum Plane Tangent To Face at Point, Line or Face type options

Type

Creates a datum plane tangent to a non-planar surface, and optionally a
second selected object.
Tangent to
Face at Point, See Create a tangent datum plane for a simple procedure.
Line or Face

Tangent to Face Subtype

Subtype Lets you select a subtype method.
Option
All subtypes require a minimum selection of a non-planar face.
Tangent to Face at Point, Line or Face (Sub-infer)
Creates a datum plane as you specify reference objects. The
software determines which of the subtype options listed below to
use based on the objects.
When you select a cylindrical or conical surface, the software
displays a preview of a datum plane that is tangent to it. You can
accept the previewed datum plane, or select a second object that is
tangent to both.
The second object can be any of the following:
• Point
• Linear edge
• Line
• Datum axis
• A second face
• Datum plane
For free-form surfaces and spherical surfaces for the second object,
you can drag a point on surface or snap it to another object based
on the Snap Point settings.
Alternate Solution may be available if it is supported by the
subtype.
One Face
Creates a datum plane tangent to a single cylindrical or conical face.
Through Point
Creates a datum plane tangent to a non-planar face and a point.
Alternate Solution is available.
Through Line
Creates a datum plane tangent to a cylindrical or conical face and a
linear object. Alternate Solution is available.
Two Faces
Creates a datum plane tangent to two non-planar faces (cylindrical,
conical, spherical, and so on). Alternate Solution is available.
Angle to Plane
Creates a datum plane tangent to a cylindrical face and a planar
object or face. You can assign an angle value between the faces, or
set them as Perpendicular or Parallel to one another. Alternate
Solution is available.

Reference Geometry

Appears when the subtype option is Tangent to Face at Point, Line or
Face (Sub-infer).
Lets you select one or more objects that define the plane. Angle options may
also appear depending on the selected objects (see below for angle
Select Object options).
Also includes the Point Constructor (see Specify Point).

Appears for all subtype options except Tangent to Face at Point, Line or
Face (Sub-infer), to let you select a non-planar, cylindrical or conical face to
Select Tangent define the plane.
Face

Appears for all subtype options except Tangent to Face at Point, Line or
Face (Sub-infer), to let you specify each point required by the subtype.

Inferred Point — A point type. Click to see the point type list. Select
a point type from the list and then select objects supported by that type.
Specify Point
Point Constructor — Displays the Point Constructor dialog box.
Click this button if you need to define points.
See Point Constructor in the Getting Started help for details on point types.

Appears only for the Through Line subtype with Select Tangent Face, to
let you create a datum plane that is tangent to a cylindrical or conical face
Select Linear and a linear object.
Object

Appears only for the Angle to Plane subtype with Select Tangent Face and
the Angle option, to let you create a datum plane that is tangent to a
Select Planar cylindrical face and a planar face.
Object

Angle

This option group appears when the subtype option is Angle to Plane or if an angle is inferred
with the Tangent to Face at Point, Line or Face (Sub-infer) subtype.

Angle Option Lets you specify how the angle is defined.
Select one of the following options:
• Value
Specifies a value for the angle. Type a value in the dialog Angle
box. You can also:
o Drag the angle handle.
o Type a value in the Angle dynamic input box.
• Perpendicular
The datum plane is perpendicular to the planar reference object.
• Parallel
The datum plane is parallel to the planar reference.

Angle Appears when the Angle Option is set to Value. Type an angle value.

Datum Plane Through Object type options

Type

Creates a datum plane based on the plane of a selected object.
Through See Create a datum plane on the plane of an object for a simple procedure.
Object

Through Object

Lets you select any of the following types of object:
• Curve
• Edge
• Face
• Datum
• Plane
Select • Axis of a cylindrical, conical, or revolved face
Object
• Datum CSYS
• CSYS
• Spherical surfaces and surfaces of revolution
Curve, edge, or face objects can be planar or non-planar. If you select a conical
or cylindrical face, the datum plane is created on the axis of the face.

Datum Plane Coefficients type options

Type

Creates a fixed datum plane by specifying an equation using
coefficients of A, B, C, and D.
Coefficients For WCS coordinates, the plane is determined by the equation
(aX=bY+cZ=d) A*XC + B*YC + C*ZC = D.
For Absolute coordinates, the plane is determined by the equation
A*X + B*Y + C*Z = D.

Editing datum planes
To edit datum planes, use any of the following methods:
• Right-click Edit Parameters or Edit with Rollback on a datum plane.
• Double-click a datum plane in the graphics window or Part Navigator.
• Choose Edit→Feature→Parameters and select a datum plane from the
dialog list.
All methods open the Datum Plane dialog box.

Editing Relative Datum Planes
For relative (non-fixed) datum planes, you can do the following during edit:
• Change the Type method used to create a datum plane.
• Convert a relative datum plane to fixed by clearing the Associative option,
by selecting the Type method, or by changing the type to one of the fixed methods.

Editing Fixed Datum Planes
For fixed datum planes, you can do the following during edit:
• Change a fixed datum plane to relative by changing the Type, redefining its
parent geometry, and selecting the Associative check box.
• Move a fixed datum plane by changing the Type and then redefining the
datum plane, or by using Edit→ Feature→ Move Feature.
• Flip the direction vector of a fixed datum plane using Reverse Plane
Normal.

Deleting Datum Planes
• Edit→ Feature→ Delete

• Click (Delete) on the Standard toolbar.
• Right-click Delete on the datum plane in the Part Navigator.

Editing Datum Planes from Prior Releases
Relative datum planes created prior to NX use the old style dialogs.

DATUM AXIS - OVERVIEW
This option lets you create a datum axis, which is a reference object you can use to create
other objects, such as datum planes, revolved features, and extruded bodies.
Datum axes can be either relative or fixed.
Relative Datum Axis
A relative datum axis is referenced and defined during creation by one or more other
objects. All relative datum axes are associative. If you make a relative datum axis
non-associative, it becomes fixed.
Fixed Datum Axis
A fixed datum axis is not referenced by other geometric objects, but is fixed in the
position in which it was created. Fixed datum axes are non-associative.
You can create a fixed datum axis using the XC, YC, and ZC axes of the WCS, or
by clearing the Associative option when using one of the relative axis types.
Constructing Datum Axes
There are two basic methods you can use to construct datum axes:
Select the edges, planar faces or wireframe geometry needed to specify the datum, and then
choose the Datum Axis option.
Invoke the Datum Axis option and then select the required objects for the datum from the
graphics window. When you have selected enough valid objects to define a datum, a preview
of the datum is displayed in the graphics window. Use the Datum Axis icon options to help
specify objects and constraints.

Type

Axis types are the construction methods you use to create datum axes. You can select an axis
type from the Type option list or click one of the frequently used axis type method buttons
located below the option list. If you use the default Inferred axis type, you can immediately
select objects on which to base the datum axis.
When you edit a datum axis, you can change its type, defining objects, and associative status.

Panel of frequently used datum axis types
Click the following links for details about each datum axis Type:

• Inferred — Determines the best datum axis type to use based on objects you
select.

• XC-Axis — Creates a fixed datum axis on the XC-axis of the Work Coordinate
System (WCS).

YC-Axis — Creates a fixed datum axis on the YC-axis of the WCS.

ZC-Axis — Creates a fixed datum axis on the ZC-axis of the WCS.

• Point and Direction — Creates a datum axis from a point in a specified
direction.

• Two Points — Creates a datum axis by defining two points through which the
axis passes.

• On Curve Vector — Creates a datum axis tangent, normal, or binormal to a
point on a curve or edge, or perpendicular or parallel to another object.
• Intersection — Creates a datum axis at the intersection of two planar faces, datum
planes, or planes.
• Curve/Face Axis — Creates a datum axis on a linear curve or edge, or the axis of a
cylindrical or conical face or torus.
• Fixed — Available only when editing a datum axis.
Any datum axis created using the YC-Axis, XC-Axis, or ZC-Axis, or any of the other
relative types used with the Associative check box cleared, will all appear as the
Fixed type during edit.
During edit, you can change a fixed datum axis to relative by changing the Type,
redefining its parent geometry, and selecting the Associative check box.
You can also do the reverse and change a relative datum axis to fixed, by either
selecting the Fixed type or clearing the Associative check box.

Axis Direction

Available with most types.
Lets you cycle through the possible directions for the axis normal.
Reverse Direction
Common to all Types.

Settings

Available with non-fixed types.
Makes the new datum axis associative instead of fixed, so it is
parametrically related to its parent features.
If you clear this check box, the datum axis will be fixed and not
associative.
Associative An associative datum axis displays the name Datum Axis in the Part
Navigator.
A non-associative datum axis displays the name Fixed Datum Axis in
the Part Navigator.
When you edit a non-associative datum axis, you can redefine it and
make it associative.

Datum CSYS Overview

Use this command to create an associative datum coordinate system. A Datum CSYS
feature displays in the Part Navigator and in the Edit→ Feature→ Edit Parameters
selection dialog box.

Datum CSYS

Basic Procedure
1. Click the Datum CSYS option to open the CSYS Constructor.
2. You can use any of the CSYS Constructor's options to define the associative
coordinate system, except for the following, which are unavailable: Z Axis, X Point;
CSYS of Object; Point, Perpendicular Curve; Plane and Vector.
3. If you wish to create the Datum CSYS as a component, turn on the Create
Components option.
4. Once you have defined the necessary parameters, click OK or Apply to create the
datum CSYS.

A datum CSYS is composed of separate, selectable components:
• The overall datum CSYS
• Three datum planes
• Three datum axes
• An origin point
You can select the individual datum planes, datum axes, and origin point in a datum CSYS.
You can hide and show a datum CSYS, as well as edit its object display characteristics.
You can move a datum CSYS between layers.

Uses for a Datum CSYS
You can use a datum CSYS to ensure associativity of downstream features that are
updated automatically when the geometries used to define the CSYS are modified.
You can use a datum CSYS to more easily define a feature's coordinate system-related
parameters. For example, the origin for a cylindrical feature is usually coincident with the
intersection between the cylinder's axis and one of the planar faces, and the Z-axis is
coincident with the cylinder's axis. If you use a non-associative coordinate system, you may
later have to manually translate the cylinder whenever you move its defining geometry.
However, if you use an associative datum CSYS, the cylinder updates automatically.
When you position a downstream feature, you can select individual components of a datum
CSYS feature (i.e., datum planes or axes) as positioning references.
You can also select individual components of a datum CSYS, the datum planes and axes,
for mating conditions (see the Assemblies Help for more information).

POINT
You can create associative and non-associative points. When you select the Point option,
Associative and Non-Associative Point icon options display in the graphics window. Choose
the option for the type of point you want to create, and the Snap Point Tool to specify their
locations.
For associative points, point constraints are stored with respect to absolute coordinates.

POINT SET
Creates a set of points that corresponds to existing geometry. Creating a point set allows you
to generate points along a curve, along a face, or at the poles of a spline or face. You may
also recreate the defining poles of a spline.
In some options, you are provided with various methods of spacing the points and defining
where the point set starts and ends. Points may also be located by selecting positions in the
view or by using the Point Constructor.
To create a set of points:
1. Choose one of the options for creating a set of points.
2. Select the reference curve or face.
You can create a point set using the following options:

Point Set Dialog Options
Points on Curve Creates a set of points along an existing curve.

Add Points to Curves Creates random points along one or more curves.

Point at Curve Adds a point along one or more curves at a location equal to a
Percentage percentage value.

Spline Defining Points Lets you select a spline that was created through points and recreate
the construction points.

Spline Knot Points Creates a set of points using the knot points of an existing spline.

Spline Poles Lets you create points at the poles of any spline.

Points on Face Lets you create a set of points on an existing face.

Point at Face Percentage Adds a point on one or more faces at a location equal to U and V
percentage values.

Face (B-Surface) Poles Lets you to create points at the poles of any face.

Group Points Lets you group the points in each point set. Enable this option by
setting it in the ON position. The default is OFF.

PLANE
Lets you create an unbounded plane object using the Plane Constructor. The plane you
create is represented by a 3-4-5 triangle symbol situated with the right angle vertex on the
origin point of the plane. The short leg is oriented along the implied X axis and the long leg
along the implied Y axis. Each of the legs has a gap at the midpoint.

Plane Object Symbol
The plane symbol represents a flat surface extending infinitely through space. You can use
planes to cross-section curves and surfaces, and to define limits of surfaces. The scale of the
plane symbol is fixed. Like any other object, you can delete, blank and unblank a plane
object.

Plane Dialog Options

Lets you specify a plane by defining three points on the plane. Note
Three Points that the third point cannot be on the same line as the first two.

Lets you specify a plane by selecting two existing lines. The
Two Lines specified plane contains the first line and is parallel to the second. If
the two lines are coplanar, then the plane specified will be the plane
containing the two lines.

Lets you specify a plane by selecting a curve and a point on the
Point, Perpendicular plane. The specified plane is perpendicular to the curve at the point
Curve that is the minimum distance point between the curve and the input
point.

Lets you specify a plane containing an existing arc, conic or planar
Plane of Object spline.

Lets you specify a plane by choosing an existing coordinate system.
Plane of CSYS The system creates a plane that is the XY plane of the selected
coordinate system.

Lets you specify a plane by choosing an existing plane.
Existing Plane

Lets you define a plane that is tangent to two solid cylindrical or
Two Tangent Faces spherical faces.

Lets you define a plane through a point and tangent to a solid face
Point, Tangent Face (conical or cylindrical).

Lets you define a plane by specifying coefficients A, B, C and D. For
Coefficients WCS coordinates, the plane is determined by the equation A*XC +
B*YC + C*ZC = D. For absolute coordinates, the plane is determined
by the equation A*X + B*Y + C*Z = D.

Lets you define a plane parallel to a reference plane that contains a
Parallel through specified point.
Point

Lets you define a plane parallel to a reference plane at a specified
Parallel at Distance distance and in a specified direction.

Lets you define a plane that is perpendicular to a reference plane
Perpendicular and that contains a selected line.
through Line

Principal Plane Lets you create planes using the principal axes and planes of the
WCS.

Work / Absolute Lets you specify whether the new plane is created in the work
coordinate system or the absolute coordinate system.

Questions
1. Can you create a datum plane at the defined angle?
2. What is the difference between point and associative point?
3. What is the difference between absolute CS and WCS?
What are different types of creating a datum axis?

CURVE
Modeling Curve Options

Line - Lets you create associative or non-associative curves.
Arc/Circle - Lets you create associative or non-associative arcs and circles.

Lines and Arcs - Lets you quickly create associative or non-associative lines and curves
using pre-defined constraint combinations.

Basic Curves - Lets you create lines, arcs, circles, and fillets, as well as trimming these
curves or editing their parameters.

Chamfer - Lets you create a beveled corner between two coplanar lines or curves.

Rectangle - Lets you create a rectangle.

Polygon - Lets you create different types of polygons.

Ellipse - Lets you create an ellipse.

Parabola - Lets you create a parabola.

Hyperbola - Lets you create a hyperbola.

General Conic - Lets you create conic sections by using either one of the various loft
conic methods or the general conic equation. The resulting conic is either circle, ellipse,
parabola, or hyperbola depending on the mathematical results of the input data.

Helix - Lets you create a helix.

Law Curve - Lets you use the Law Subfunction to create a spline with each of its X, Y,
and Z components defined by a law.

Spline - Lets you create freehand-style curves whose shape is controlled by either
defining data or poles.

Studio Spline - Lets you interactively create an associative or non associative spline
using points or poles.

Text - Lets you generate NX curves from the True Type fonts in your native Windows
font library.

Line Overview
Use Line to create associative curve features. The kind of line you get depends on the types
of constraints you combine; you can create many types of lines by combining different types
of constraints.
You can also create non-associative lines with this option, but they are simple curves and not
features. Individual support planes are used to define the lines. You can let the system infer a
support plane during creation, or you can specify the support plane yourself.
You can use limits to define the length of lines and their extents:
• Specify a distance value
• Stop the line on a constraint location (such as a tangent point)
• Stop the line on a selected object
You can use associative line features to project or intersect reference geometry to the support
plane. Associative curves are best used for a small number of curves that are related to
geometry and each other in a 3D space. If all of your curves are on a 2D plane it may be
easier to use a sketch.
Arc/Circle
Use this option to quickly create associative arcs and circle features. The kind of arc you get
depends on the types of constraints you combine; you can create many types of arcs by
combining different types of constraints.
You can also create non-associative arcs with this option, but they are simple curves and not
features. Individual support planes are used to define the arc. You can let the system infer a
support plane during creation, or you can specify the support plane yourself.
You can use limits to define the start and end point of arcs:
• Specify a distance value
• Stop the arc on a constraint location (such as a tangent point)
• Stop the arc on a selected object
You can use associative arc features to project or intersect reference geometry to the support
plane. Associative arcs are best used for a small number of curves that are related to
geometry and each other in a 3D space. If all of your arcs are on a 2D plane it may be easier
to use a sketch.
Lines and Arcs Overview
Lines and Arcs is a special pull-down menu and toolbar that lets you quickly create
associative or non-associative lines and curves using pre-defined constraint combinations.
You do not have to open a dialog or operate any icon option controls.
• Use MB1 to create a line or arc.
• Use MB2 to cancel out of Lines and Arcs.
• Snap Point rules apply to most of the line and arc creation options.
• Lines and arcs are created automatically when all constraint conditions are satisfied.
• Plane constraints are not used.
• If you use the Associative option:
o All point constraints are stored with respect to absolute coordinates.
o Editing associative lines and arcs created with the Lines and Arcs menu
opens the Associative Line and Associative Arc/Circle dialogs.
Basic Curves
When you choose this option, the Basic Curves dialog is displayed. The icons at the top are
the curve types that you can create, plus two editing methods.

Basic Curves Dialog Icons

Line Brings up the Line mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which gives you options for
creating lines.

Arc Brings up the Arc mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which gives you options for
creating arcs.

Circle Brings up the Circle mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which gives you options
for creating circles.

Fillet Brings up the Fillet mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which gives you options for
creating fillets.

Trim Brings up the Trim mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which gives you options for
trimming basic curves.
Edit Curve Brings up the Edit Curve Parameters mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which
Parameters gives you options for editing parameters of basic curves.

Curve Chamfer
This option creates a beveled corner between two coplanar lines or curves.
To create a curve chamfer:
1. Choose the type of curve chamfer to create, either Simple Chamfers or User Defined
Chamfers.
2. Indicate how you wish to trim the two curves.
3. Enter either an offset and an angle with respect to the first curve or an offset for both
curves.
4. Select the curves that form the corner to be beveled.
5. Indicate the approximate intersection point between the curves.
You may create the following types of chamfers:
Simple Creates a beveled corner between two coplanar lines.
User Creates a beveled corner between two coplanar curves including lines, arcs,
Defined splines, and conics. This option also gives you more control over the trimming
than when creating simple chamfers.

Offset
Offset is the distance between the intersection of the two curves and the beginning of the
chamfer line. For simple chamfers, the offset is the same along both curves.

Angle
A chamfer can also be created using one offset and an angle. The angle is measured from
the second curve.

Rectangle
Lets you create a rectangle by selecting two diagonal corners. When using the cursor to
define the corners, a rubberbanding effect takes place. This allows you to see the rectangle
before it is actually created. Rectangles are created in the XC-YC, YC-ZC, or XC-ZC plane.
The Rectangle option is available from both the Create Curve dialog and the Sketch Tools
dialog.
Procedure
To create a rectangle:
1. Indicate the first corner; use Point Constructor or enter the coordinates.
2. Indicate the second corner; either drag the cursor to the desired location and click the
mouse button or enter the coordinates.
Polygon
Creates a polygon in a plane parallel to the XC-YC plane of the WCS.
To create a polygon:
1. Specify the number of sides.
2. Choose the size method.
3. Enter either a radius and orientation angle or length of side and orientation angle.
4. Specify the origin for the polygon.
There are three methods available for defining the size of a polygon.

Polygon Dialog Options

Inscribed Radius Enter the radius of an inscribed circle.

Side of Polygon Enter a value for the length of one side of the polygon. This length
is applied to all sides.

Circumscribed Radius Enter the radius of an circumscribed circle.

The number of sides specified defines the shape of the polygon. The orientation angle is the
angle the polygon is rotated away from the XC axis in the counterclockwise direction. This
angle indicates where the first corner of the polygon is located. The origin is the point defining
the center point of the polygon and is specified using the Point Constructor.
Inscribed Radius
You can define the size of a polygon by entering the radius of an inscribed circle. An inscribed
radius is also the distance from the origin to the middle of a side of the polygon.

Circumscribed Radius
This option defines the size of a polygon given the radius of a circumscribed circle. A
circumscribed radius is the distance from the origin to a corner of the polygon.
Ellipse
Creating an ellipse is most useful when you want to draw a foreshortened circle, because it
lets you specify the major and minor diameters. Major diameter is usually equal to the true
diameter of the circle. Minor diameter usually represents the amount of foreshortening. The
default ellipse is created in a plane parallel to the work plane, as shown below.

To create an ellipse:
1. Indicate the center point of the ellipse using the Point Constructor.
2. Define the creation parameters of the ellipse.

Semi major and Semi minor
An ellipse has two axes: a major axis and a minor axis (the midpoint of each is at the center
of the ellipse). The longest diameter of the ellipse is the major axis; the shortest diameter the
minor axis. The semi major and semi minor values refer to half the length of these axes.

Start and End Angle
An ellipse is created in the counterclockwise direction about the positive ZC axis. The start
and end angles determine the starting and ending positions of the ellipse and are measured
from the major axis.

Rotation Angle
The rotation angle of an ellipse is the angle at which the major axis is tilted in the
counterclockwise direction from the XC axis. Unless the rotation angle is changed, the major
axis is always parallel with the XC axis.

Parabola
A parabola is a set of points equidistant from a point (the focus) and a line (the directrix), lying
in a plane parallel to the work plane. The default parabola is constructed with its axis of
symmetry parallel to the XC axis.
To create a parabola:
1. Indicate the vertex for the parabola using the Point Constructor.
2. Define the creation parameters of the parabola.

The focal length is the distance from the vertex to the focus. The focal length must be greater
than zero. Width parameters for a parabola are the Minimum DY and Maximum DY. Minimum
DY and Maximum DY limit the sweep of the parabola on either side of the axis of symmetry.
DY values determine the length of the curve by limiting the displayed width of the parabola. If
a Minimum DY value is entered that is algebraically greater than the Maximum DY value, the
lower value is automatically made the minimum and the higher value the maximum.
The rotation angle of a parabola is the angle formed between the axis of symmetry and the
XC axis. It is measured in a counterclockwise direction with a pivot point at the vertex.
Hyperbola
This option allows you to create a hyperbola. By definition, a hyperbola contains two curves -
one on either side of its center. In NX, only one of these curves is constructed. The center lies
at the intersection of the asymptotes and the axis of symmetry passes through this
intersection. The hyperbola is rotated from the positive XC axis about the center and lies in a
plane parallel to the XC-YC plane.

To create a hyperbola:
1. Indicate the center of the hyperbola using Point Constructor.
2. Define the parameters of the hyperbola.
A hyperbola has two axes: a transverse axis and a conjugate axis. The semi-transverse and
semi-conjugate parameters refer to half the length of these axes. The relationship between
these two axes determines the slope of the curve.
Width parameters for a hyperbola are the Minimum DY and Maximum DY. Minimum DY and
Maximum DY limit the sweep of the hyperbola on either side of the axis of symmetry.
DY values determine the length of the curve. If a Minimum DY value is entered that is
algebraically greater than the Maximum DY value, the lower value is automatically made the
minimum and the higher value the maximum.
The angle the semi-transverse axis makes with the XC axis is defined as the rotation angle of
a hyperbola. The pivot point is at the center of the hyperbola and the angle of rotation is
referenced from the positive XC direction. The angle is measured in a counterclockwise
direction.
General Conic
This option creates conic sections by using either one of the various loft conic methods or the
general conic equation. The resulting conic is either a circle, an ellipse, a parabola, or a
hyperbola; depending on the mathematical results of the input data. The General Conic option
is more flexible than the ellipse, parabola, and hyperbola options, since it allows several
different methods for defining the curve.
To create a general conic:
1. Choose a construction method.
2. Indicate the location of the first point of the conic using the Point Constructor or define
the first coefficient.
3. Specify the remaining points of the conic and/or define the slope, anchor, Rho, or
remaining coefficients.
Construction Methods
General Conic Construction Methods
5 Points Creates a conic section defined by five coplanar points.
4 Points, 1 Creates a conic section defined by four coplanar points, with a slope at the
Slope first point.
3 Points, 2 Creates a conic section defined by three points, the slope at the first point,
Slope and the slope at the third point.
3 Points, Creates a conic section defined by three points on the conic and the
Anchor intersection point of the two end tangent vectors.
2 Points, Creates a conic given two points on the conic section, an anchor point to
Anchor, Rho determine the starting and ending slopes, and the projective discriminant,
Rho.
Coefficients Creates a conic using an equation where the controlling conic parameters are
user defined.
2 Points, 2 Creates a conic given two points on the conic section, the starting and ending
Slope, Rho slopes, and the projective discriminant, Rho.
The conic always passes through each point you specify, unless points lie on the two
branches of a hyperbola. With the two methods utilizing slopes, the slope(s) lies at the end(s)
of the conic.
The slope is projected to the plane of the conic. If the slopes are not in the plane generated
by the points defining the conic, the conic is not created and an error message is displayed.
Helix
You can create a helix by defining the number of turns, a pitch, a radius method (law or
constant), turn direction, and the proper orientation. The result is a spline.

Create Helix Dialog Options
Number of Turns Must be greater than zero.
Pitch The distance between successive turns along the helical axis. The Pitch
must be greater than or equal to zero.
Radius Method Lets you specify how the radius is defined. You can either define a radius
by Use Law or Enter Radius.
Radius Enter the value of the radius here if you chose the Enter Radius method.
Turn Direction A Right Hand helix starts at the base point and curls to the right
(counterclockwise). A Left Hand helix starts at the base point and curls to
the left (clockwise).
Define Orientation Lets you use the Z-Axis, X-Point option of the Coordinate System Tool to
define the helix orientation.
Point Constructor Lets you use the Point Constructor to define the base point for the
orientation definition
Number of Turns, Pitch, and Radius Method values are all expressions and can be changed
through Tools-> Expression.
Law Curve
The Law Curve option lets you create a spline using the Law Subfunction. A law spline is
defined by a set of X, Y, and Z components. You must specify a law for each of these three
components.
To create a law curve:
1. Using the Law Subfunction, choose and define a law option for each of the X, Y and Z
components.
2. (Optional) Control the orientation of the spline by either defining an orientation and/or
base point, or specifying a reference coordinate system.
3. Choose OK or Apply to create the curve.
Law Curve uses a combination of X, Y and Z components to define a law spline. You must
select a law type for each component using the Law Subfunction. The available options are:
Constant Lets you define a constant value along the entire law function.
Linear Lets you define a linear rate of change from a start point to an endpoint.
Cubic Lets you define a cubic rate of change from a start point to an endpoint.
Values Along Lets you use two or more points along a spine to define a linear law
Spline - Linear function. After selecting a spine curve, you can indicate multiple points
along it.
Values Along Lets you use two or more points along a spine to define a cubic law
Spline - Cubic function. After selecting a spine curve, you can indicate multiple points
along the spine.
By Equation Lets you define a law using an existing expression and a "parameter
expression variable."
By Law Curve Lets you select a string of smoothly joined curves to define a law function.
Spline
You can create splines using one of several methods. All splines created in NX are Non
Uniform Rational B-splines (NURBS). In this section, the terms "B-spline" and "spline" are
used interchangeably. There are four creation methods for splines:
By Poles Causes the spline to gravitate towards each data point (that is,
pole), but not pass through it, except at the endpoints.
Through Points The spline passes through a set of data points.
Fit A specified tolerance is used in "fitting" the spline to its data points;
the spline does not necessarily pass through the points.
Perpendicular to Planes The spline passes through and is perpendicular to each plane.
The figure below shows three of the spline creation methods.
Text to Geometry Overview
Use Text to generate NX curves from the True Type fonts in your native Windows font library.
Use this function whenever text is required as a design element in your part models. Text lets
you to select any font in your Windows font library, specify character attributes (bold, italic,
type, alphabet), type a text string in the Text dialog field, and immediately convert the string to
a geometry component within your NX part model. Text traces the shape of selected True
Type fonts and uses lines and splines to produce character outlines of a text string, placing
the resulting geometry on a virtual plane.
Questions
1. what is the difference between inscribed and circumscribed radius in a polygon?
2. what is the range of Rho value in general conic options?
3. how many inputs are required to create a parabola and hyperbola?
4. is it possible to give variable radius in Helix?
5. sometimes the curve wont pas through the five points in five points general conic,
why?

CURVE FROM CURVES

B. Curve from Curves Options
Offset - Lets you create curves that are offset from the original curves (lines, arcs,
conics, splines, and edges).
Offset - Lets you create associative curves on one or more faces at a specified
distance from existing curve or edge strings. The resulting curves are created in the
face at a constant distance from the original curve, measured along face sections
normal to the original curve.
Bridge - Lets you blend or bridge two curves at specified points on the curves.

Simplify - Lets you create a string of best fit lines and arcs from a string that has up to
512 curves.
Join - Lets you join together a chain of curves and/or edges into a single spline.

Project - Lets you project curves and points onto faces, planes, and datum planes.

Combined Projection - Lets you combine the projections of two existing curves to
create a new curve. (The two curve projections must intersect.)
Mirror Curve - Lets you copy associative or non-associative curves and edges across
a datum plane or planar surface.
Wrap/Unwrap – Lets you wrap curves from a plane onto a conical or cylindrical face, or
unwrap curves from a face onto a plane.

OFFSET CURVE
Lets you offset strings of lines, arcs, conics, splines, and edges.
Offset curves are constructed through points calculated normal to the selected base
curves. You can choose whether to associate the offset curves to their input data.
Curves can be offset within the plane defined by the selected geometry, or to a parallel
plane using the draft angle and height options, or along a vector you specify when using
the 3D Axial method. Multiple curves can only be offset if they are in a contiguous string
(that is, they must be end to end). The object types of the resulting curves are the same as
their input curves, except for conics and curves created using the Rough Offset option or
the 3D Axial method, which are offset as splines.
Offset Curves Dialog Options

Offset by Distance - Offsets curves in the plane of the input curves.
Draft - Offsets curves in a plane parallel to the plane of the input curves at a
specified distance. A plane symbol marks the plane in which the offset curves
lie.
Law Control - Offsets curves at a distance defined by a law, which you specify
with the Law Subfunction.
3D Axial - Offsets strings of coplanar or non-coplanar (3D) curves. You must
specify a 3D Offset Value and a 3D Axis Vector (see below). ZC is the initial
default vector. The resulting offset curve is always a spline.

Distance The offset distance from the selected curves in the direction indicated by the
conehead vector. Negative distance values offset in the opposite direction.

Draft Height The distance from the plane of the input curves to the plane of the resulting
offset curves.

Draft Angle The angle from the offset vector to a line normal to the reference plane, where
the input curves lie.

3D Offset Value Lets you specify an offset for 3D or non-coplanar curves. Used only with the
3D Axial method.

Axis Vector Lets you specify a vector direction for the axis of an offset. Used only with the
3D Axial method.

Trim Methods for trimming or extending the offset curves to their intersection points.

Extend Factor A multiple of the offset distance. It controls the length of the offset tangent
extension lines. This option is used only for Extended Tangents trim when
Associative Output is toggled OFF.

Group Objects Lets you choose whether to group the offset curves together.

Approx Determines the accuracy of the offset curve if the input curve is a spline or
Tolerance conic.

Number of Lets you construct multiple sets of offset curves.
Copies

Reverse Reverses the positive offset direction of the conehead vector.
Direction

Redisplay Lets you redisplay the direction vector and, if you are using Offset by Draft, the
Reference plane symbol marking the offset plane.
Objects

Associative When this option is selected, the offset curves are associated to the input
Output curves and defining data. When the original curves are modified, the offset
curves also update as necessary. An OFFSET_CURVE feature is created
when this option is enabled.
When this option is not selected, the resulting offset curves are not associated
to the input curves and defining data.

Rough Offset Provides more robust handling of offset curve applications. Use this option to
better deal with self intersecting offset curve situations, when extra curves
may be produced, or when curves may not be trimmed properly. Rough Offset
is only for coplanar curves (2D). The offset curves are splines.

Input Curves Lets you specify the disposition of the original, input curves.
Retain - Keeps the input curves when the offset curves are created.
Blank - Blanks the input curves when the offset curves are created.
Delete - Deletes the input curves when the offset curves are created. This
option is grayed out when Associative Output is selected.
Replace - Acts like a move operation, where the input curve is moved to the
offset curve position. This option is grayed out when Associative Output is
selected.
The curve type may change when you use Replace. For example, when a
conic is input, the offset curve is a spline. Also, the output is always a spline
when Law Control is used.
The disposition instructions that you specify in the Input Curves options only
apply to curves, not edges or sketch curves, which are always kept. You can
use the Blank option with sketch curves when Associative Output is not
selected.

OFFSET IN FACE OVERVIEW
Use this function to create offset curves on one or more faces from connected edges or
curves on the surfaces. The offset curves can be associative or non-associative, and lie at
specified distances from an existing curve or edge section. The curves are created in the
face, and are measured along face sections normal to the original curves.

Curve on Surface (smaller) used to create offset curves (larger)
Different spanning methods let you fill the gaps between the curves.
There are also options to let you trim against the selected face boundaries.
The resulting offset curves are either cubic splines or analytic curves, depending on the
input curves and the faces on which they are offset from.
The offset curves can be created outside their faces if there is enough surface. You can
always, for example, offset outside a planar face.
Offset In Face Options

Selection Steps
Add/Remove Faces
(Optional) You can select which faces on which to create the offset curves.
Even if the software infers the faces for you, you can use this selection step
to change those faces. If the software does not infer the faces automatically,
you must use this option to specify the faces.
Selection Intent is available to specify the faces.

Curves to Offset
Use this option and MB1 to select a curve or edge to offset on the specified
face. Use Shift+MB1 to deselect a curve or edge.
Selection Intent is available.
Once you select a curve the software attempts to infer faces according to
Selection Intent settings, and then updates the current section:offset item in
the dialog listbox with an offset value in the following format:
Parameter Value Expression
Section1:Offset1 1 p3=1
You can change the value of the section's offset by dragging the offset
handle in the graphics window or by entering a value or expression in the
dialog's data field.
You can add additional offset curves to a section by clicking MB3→ Add
Offset to Section on any of the following:
• The section:offset item in the list box.
• The section:offset handle in the graphics window.
• The section handle in the graphics window.
You can give a unique offset value to each curve in the section:offset set (that
is, each Section:Offset item in the dialog list box).
You can also use the following MB3 options on highlighted section:offset
items in the dialog list box and on the offset handles and section anchors in
the graphics window:
• Delete the highlighted or selected section:offset or section
• Reverse Direction of the selected section:offset. When you select an
offset curve or edge with this option, only the offset direction for that
particular offset curve or edge is reversed.
• Reverse All Directions of the section:offsets of a selected section.
When you select this option, all of the offset curves and edges for the
section reverse their directions, putting them on the opposite side of
the section. The offset values do not change when you reverse the
direction.
When you have added all of the offset curves to a section, click the Complete
set and start next set icon (see below).
Following is a typical list of section:offsets:
Parameter Value Expression
Section1:Offset1 1 p3=1
Section1:Offset2 1.2 p3=1.2
Section1:Offset3 -0.5 p3=-0.5
Section2:Offset1 1–0.4 p3=-0.4
To add a new section, select the previously selected curve or edge, or a new
curve or edge.

Complete set and start next set
Use this icon to complete the curves for the current section:offset.
As you select curves and edges and add them to section:offset sets, entries
for each are updated in the list box of the dialog. A dynamic input box for
each offset value displays as you make your selections, along with a leader
line that points to the offset handle (if not disabled by the F3 key).
You can double-click a section:offset set handle to open it for additional
edges and to change its offset value.

Section:Offset Use this field to assign an offset value to the highlighted section:offset entry
in the dialog list box or handle in the graphics window. The label of the field
changes to match the specific section:offset you are changing (for example,
Section1:Offset3).
The field displays the offset value for the selected item in the dialog list box.
You can enter a different value in this field, which updates the offset curve
(both in the list box and in the graphics window).

Use this option to reverse the direction of the offset curve of the selected
section:offset.
Reverse Only the offset direction for that particular offset curve or edge is reversed. To
Direction reverse all offsets for all curves in a section, use MB3→ Reverse All
Directions.

Offset Method Use these methods to define the way the offset distances are measured. The
mode you select applies to all of the strings for the feature.
Chordal
The offset curves are based on the chordal distance, using line segments
between points on the string curve.
Arc Length
The offset curves are created following the arc of the string curve.
Geodesic
The offset curves are created along the minimum distance on the face(s).
Tangential
The offset curves are created at a distance along the tangent to the face
where the curves initially lie, and are projected back onto the face.

Trim and Extend Trim and Extend to Each Other
Offset Curves
Use this option to specify how corners between two curves within the same
section are trimmed.
If you do not select this option, the corner of two curves in a section are not
extended or trimmed.
If you do select this option, the tangents of two curves are extended to form a
corner, and are trimmed.
The setting you select applies to all of the curves and sections for the feature.
Trim to Face Edges
Use this options to specify if the curves are trimmed to the face edges.
Offset curves trimmed to face edges

Offset curves not trimmed to face edges
The setting you select applies to all of the offset curves for the feature.
Extend to Face Edges
Use this option to extend the offset curves to the face boundaries.
Offset curves not extended to face edges

Offset curves extended to face edges
The setting you select applies to all of the strings for the feature.

Enable Preview When you have specified enough parameters to create an initial offset curve
in face, this option generates a preview of it in the graphics window. Use the
preview to determine the correctness of your parameters before completing
the set or creating the feature. This option is selected by default.

Associative Use this option to make the new offset curves in face associative, so they are
parametrically related to their parent features.

Tolerance Let you specify a distance tolerance for the feature, other than the initial value
taken from the Modeling Distance Tolerance.

BRIDGE CURVE OVERVIEW
Use this command to create a bridge curve between user-defined points on two curves.
You can select edges as input curves. You can also constrain the bridge curve to be
coincident with a set of faces, and choose whether or not the bridge curve is associative.

Bridge Curve (1) Between Edges (2) and Coincident With Yellow Faces
After you choose the second input curve, NX creates an initial bridge curve between the
endpoints you selected. You can modify this initial bridge using applicable options on the
Bridge Curve dialog. Clicking OK or Apply creates the bridge curve

Bridge Curve Dialog Options

Selection
Steps First Curve - Lets you specify the first curve to be bridged with the second
curve.

Second Curve - Lets you specify the second curve to be bridged with the
first curve. You can create a Symmetric Constrained Bridge Curve by selecting a
datum or a vector for the second curve.

Reference Shape Curve - Lets you select an existing spline to control the
general shape of an initial Tangent Continuity Method bridging curve. If you
choose OK after selecting the first and second curves, the following message
appears on the Cue line:
Select spline from which to inherit shape
If you choose an applicable spline from the graphics window, the initial bridge
curve assumes the new shape. Clicking OK again creates the bridge curve.
This option is available only with the Tangent Continuity Method, except when
Shape Control is set to Conic.
After you have specified the curves, you can select the First Curve, Second
Curve and Reference Curve steps to make a specific curve the current selection.
This highlights the curve in the graphics window, and lets you modify some of
the options described below.

Constraint Faces lets you select faces when you want to constrain the
bridge curve to a set of faces. Selection Intent rules apply. Use this option when
your design requires a curve that is coincident to a set of faces, or when you are
creating a curve network that defines a tangent edge for blending. When you
specify constraint faces, you cannot use the Curvature Continuity method, or
define a Conic curve.
Note that:
The constraint faces must be capable of being sewed.
G0 continuity must be within the Modeling Distance tolerance.
G1 continuity must be within the Angle tolerance.

Filter Lets you specify the types of curves to allow for selection.
Any allows all curve types to be selected.
Curve allows only non-edge curve objects to be selected.
Edge allows only edge curves to be selected.
Datum lets you select a datum plane for a Symmetric Bridge Curve. This option
is available only during the Second Curve selection step, and only if Continuity
Method is set to Curvature, and Shape Control is set to Peak Point.
Vector lets you select a vector for a Symmetric Bridge Curve. This option is
available only during the Second Curve selection step, and only if Continuity
Method is set to Curvature, and Shape Control is set to Peak Point.

Continuity Lets you specify the continuity method used to construct the bridge curve.
Method
Tangent - Creates a bridging curve that is a cubic, single segment spline, which
is tangent continuous with both curves. The spline created has a degree of 3.
Curvature - Creates a bridging curve tangent and curvature continuous with the
two curves. The spline created has a degree of 5 or 7, depending on the
stiffness.
The figure below compares a tangent bridging curve with a curvature bridging
curve (5 degrees) created for the same set of curves (an arc and a line).

Start/End Lets you change the start or end location of the bridge on the currently selected
Location curve (first curve or second curve). You can move the location point with the
slider, or you can enter a value in the data entry field specifying where on the
curve you want the bridge to start or end. The slider range and acceptable
values in the data entry field are from .00 to 100, which represents the
percentage of the parameter range along the curve. As you change the location,
the bridge curve is updated in the graphics window in real time. If necessary,
click the First Curve or Second Curve steps to select the desired curve.
Moving the slider updates the value in the data entry field. Entering a value in
the data entry field updates the position of the slider.
You can also set the Start/End Location using the Specify Location option, which
calls up the Point Constructor.

Specify Lets you define the Start/End Location using the Point Constructor instead of the
Location slider or data entry field. The point on the curve will be associative with the
bridge curve if the Associative Output option is on.

Reverse Lets you reverse the direction of the tangent vector at the currently selected
Direction curve (first curve or second curve). If necessary, first click the First Curve or
Second Curve steps to select the desired curve. This option is not available for
the Reference Shape Curve selection step or the Conic Shape Control method.

Shape Lets you reshape the bridge curve interactively, getting feedback in real time.
Control
End Points - Lets you change the bridge curve shape by altering its tangency
with the first and second curve end points. Clicking the End Points option
enables the Tangent Magnitude sliders for the first and second curves.
Tangent Magnitude - Lets you adjust the bridge curve by pushing or pulling at
either or both ends of the First Curve and Second Curve using the sliders or by
typing values in the text boxes. The slider ranges represent the percentage of
tangency. Initial values vary between 0.0 and 3.0. If you enter a number larger
than 3.0 in one of the text boxes, the geometry adjusts accordingly, and the
corresponding slider range increases to include the larger number. To get a
reverse tangency bridge curve, click the Reverse Direction button.
Peak Point - Lets you change the bridge curve shape by altering its depth and
skew, as measured from its peak point. Click the Peak Point option to enable the
Bridge Depth and Bridge Skew sliders and data entry fields, and if using the
Curvature Continuity Method, the Stiffness Control. The initial range limits for
both slider bars are between 0.0 and 100.0. Entering numbers in the data entry
fields outside of the slider range updates the bridge curve, but not the sliders.
Moving the slider after entering a number out of the slider range limit reshapes
the bridge curve to within the slider range limit.
Bridge Depth - This slider lets you control how much the curvature of the curves
affects the bridge. After you have selected both curves, you can change the
depth by moving the slider. The value of the slider is the percentage of the
curvature effect. This option is only available when the Continuity Method is
Curvature.
The figure below shows bridges with three different depths on the same two
curves. (All other parameters are identical.)

Bridge Skew - This slider controls the location of the maximum curvature (or
reversal of curvature, if you chose the Reverse Direction option). The value of
the slider is the percentage of the distance along the bridge from Curve 1 to
Curve 2. This option is only available when the Continuity Method is Curvature .
The figure below shows bridges with three different skews on the same two
curves.
Conic - Lets you change the bridge curve shape by altering the fullness of a
conic curve. Clicking Conic enables the Rho Value slider and data entry field.
The Rho Value represents a fraction of the distance from the endpoints to the
apex of the curve. The range for the Rho Value is 0.01 to 0.99. The Conic shape
control is available only with the Tangent Continuity Method.
Rho is the projective discriminant, a scalar value that controls the "fullness" of
each conic section (see the figure below). In the figure below, the distance D1 is
determined from the value entered for rho. A small rho value produces a very flat
conic, while a large rho value (near 1) produces a very pointed conic.

Stiffness Control - Lets you change the freedom of shape of the bridge curve,
but only when using the Curvature Continuity Method. The stiffness of the bridge
curve will control, to some extent, the degree, continuity and complexity of the
curve. Three settings are available: Auto, Low and High.

Setting Effect on Effect on Miscellaneous Effects
Continuity Degree

Auto G3 if possible 5 Attempts to get smoothness in curvature.
and reasonable

Low G2 5 Little constraint on G3 condition, so
allows freedom of shape.

High G3 7 Freedom of shape, but more complex
curve (or section in the v direction for
section features).

G2 The curvature plot is contiguous. For section features, isoclines or
condition reflection lines have no corners where they cross the join between
faces.

G3 The curvature plot is smooth. Splines, section features, isoclines
condition and reflection lines have no abrupt changes in curvature.

The figure below compares bridges created with the three Stiffness Control
options (all other parameters are equal).

Associative Lets you specify whether or not the output bridge curve is associative. A bridge
Output curve that is associative will update automatically when changes are made to its
source objects. The option is on by default.

SIMPLIFY CURVE
Creates a string of best fit lines and arcs from a string of curves (you may select a
maximum of 512 curves).
Prior to simplifying the selected curves, you may specify a status for the original curve(s)
after the conversion. You may choose one of the following options for the original curve(s):
Maintain The original curves are maintained after the lines and arcs are created. The curves
are created over the selected curves.

Delete Removes the selected curves after simplification. Once deleted, you can no longer
recover the selected curves. (If you choose Undo, the original curve is recovered but
is no longer simplified.)

Blank The selected original curves are removed from the screen, but not deleted, after the
simplified curve is created.

JOIN CURVES
This function joins together a chain of curves and/or edges to create a single B-spline
curve. The result is either a polynomial spline that approximates the original chain, or a
general spline that exactly represents the original chain of curves.
The Join option is a convenient way of creating a spline, rather than building one from
scratch. Once an object is converted to a spline, you have more freedom to edit its shape.
You can control whether the spline is associated with its input curves, and the disposition of
those input curves

Procedure
To join curves and/or edges together:
1. Select the curves you want to join. Use Selection Intent to aid object
selection and to set selection rules.
2. Click OK. The Join Curves dialog appears.
3. Choose a Resulting Curve Type, either General Spline, Polynomial Cubic,
Polynomial Quintic or Advanced Refit.
4. If you want the output spline to be associative with the input curves, select
Associative Output.
5. Choose the Input Curves option that you prefer:
Retain, Blank, Delete, or Replace for nonassociative curves
OR
Retain or Blank for associative curves
6. Click OK.

PROJECT CURVE OVERVIEW
You can project curves, edges, and points onto sheet bodies, faces, planes and datum planes
by using the Project Curve option. You can direct your projection toward, or at an angle to, a
specified vector, a point, or along the face normals. The projected curves are trimmed at
holes or edges of the faces. You can automatically join the output curves after projection. This
reduces a step in your workflow, if you need to manually create another join curve feature
using the former output.
You can associate, copy or move the projected curves, edges, and points onto the original
objects, specified sheet bodies, faces or planes. After you modify the original objects,
specified sheet bodies, faces or planes, the projected objects are updated to reflect these
changes.
When you select the Along Vector, Angle to Vector, and Equal Arc-length as a Direction
Method option, the selected vector remains associative. If the vector direction is changed, the
direction of projection gets updated automatically. s
Project Curve Options

Project Curve Dialog Options

Selection Curves/Points - Lets you select the curves, points or sketches that will be
Steps projected.
Faces/Planes - Lets you select the sheet bodies, faces, planes and datum
planes, onto which the selected curves and points will be projected.

Filter Helps you select the objects that you want by limiting the types of objects that
are selectable. When the Curves/Points selection step is active, the following
Filter options are available: Any (the default), Curve, Point, and Sketch.

Plane Lets you define temporary planes using the Plane Constructor. If the
Constructor Associative copy method is chosen, these temporary planes are ignored.

Direction Specifies how the direction that is used to project the objects onto the sheet
Method bodies, faces and planes is determined. You can choose from the following
direction methods: Along Face Normals, Toward a Point, Toward a Line, Along
Vector, Angle to Vector and Equal Arclength.

Directions Lets you choose whether the projection should be in one or both directions
when the direction method is Along Vector.
Equal Option menu to let you specify how the u and v coordinates will be determined
Arclength if you chose the Equal Arclength direction method.
Angle Lets you specify the angle if you chose the Angle to Vector direction method.
Tolerance During the creation of the associated projection curve feature, the modeling
preferences distance tolerance is used. Available only when you are editing a
projection curve feature.
Curve Fit During edit, you can change the Curve Fit Method that was originally used to
Method create the projected curve, as specified in Modeling Preferences. You can
select Cubic, Quintic or Advanced fitting methods.
Confirm Upon Lets you preview the results and accept, reject, or analyze them. This option is
Apply common to Selection Steps dialogs.

Basic Procedure
To create projection curves, follow these steps:
1. With the Curves/Points selection step active, select the curves and points you wish to
project. Use Selection Intent to aid object selection and to set selection rules.
2. Choose the Faces/Planes selection step, and then select the sheet bodies, faces and
planes on which you wish to project the curves and points. Use Selection Intent to
aid object selection and to set selection rules. You can also specify temporary planes
using the Plane Constructor
3. For the Copy Method, choose either Associate, Copy, or Move (the default is
Associate).
4. Choose the Direction Method, and then specify the point, line, datum axis, vector,
and/or angle if necessary.
5. Choose OK or Apply

Combined Projection
This option combines the projections of two existing curves to create a new curve. The two
curve projections must intersect. You can specify whether the new curve is associated with
the input curves, and what will be done with the input curves.
In most cases this option produces an approximated B-curve. However, an exact curve can
be produced without approximation if the following conditions are satisfied:
• There is only one curve in each of the two original strings, which can be
"matched" together internally by the system with the same number of poles,
degrees and knots.
• The deviation between each correspondent control pole of the two resulting
matched curves is less than the current modeling tolerance along the "non-
projection" direction, which is normal to the two projection vectors.
Basic Combined Curve Projection Procedure
1. To create a new curve by combining two existing curves:
2. Select the first string of curves when the First Curve String icon is active.
3. Choose the Second Curve String icon, and select the second string of
curves.
4. Specify the First Direction Vector, if required. You can use the Projection
Vector Options in the dialog to help you define the vector.
5. Specify the Second Direction Vector, if required. You can use the Projection
Vector Options in the dialog to help you define the vector.
6. If you do not want the combined projection curve to be associative with the
input curves, toggle Associative Output OFF.
7. Specify what you want to happen to the Input Curves.
8. Retain or Blank, when the output curve is associative
9. OR
10. Retain, Blank, Delete, or Replace, when the output curve is non-associative.
11. If you want to preview the results, toggle Confirm Upon Apply ON.
12. Choose OK or Apply.

Combined Projection Dialog Options

Selection Let you select the geometry for the combined curve projection. You can select
Steps curves, edges, faces, sketches, and strings. There are four selection steps
icons:

First Curve String - When active, you can select the first set of curves. You
can use the Filter options to help you select the curves.
Second Curve String - When active, you can select the second set of
curves. You can use the Filter options to help you select the curves. For planar
strings, only the First Curve String and Second Curve String steps are required.
The default projection vectors are normal to the string.

First Projection Vector - Lets you define the projection vector for the First
Curve String, using the projection vector options.

Second Projection Vector - Lets you define the projection vector for the
second set of curves, using the projection vector options.
When either the First or Second Projection Vector selection step is active, the
Projection Vector Options appear in the changeable window located below the
Filter option. These methods let you specify the projection direction for each
curve.

Filter Options that help you select the objects that you want by limiting the types of
objects that are selectable.

changeable Contains the projection vector options when one of the projection vector
window selection steps is active.

Associative If this option is toggled ON, the projected curves are associated with the input
Output curves and defining data.

Input Curves Lets you specify the disposition of the original curves.

Curve Fit During edit, you can change the Curve Fit Method that was originally used to
Method create the combined projection, as specified in Modeling Preferences. You can
select Cubic, Quintic or Advanced fitting methods.
Cubic
Cubic uses degree 3 splines.
Quintic
Quintic uses degree 5 splines.
Advanced
Selecting Advanced displays fields where you can enter your own values for the
maximum number of degrees and the maximum number of segments. The
system will try to rebuild the curves without segments until the number of
degrees specified by the Maximum Degree parameter is reached. If tolerances
cannot be met with the Maximum Degree, segments are added until the number
defined for Maximum Segments is reached. If the maximum degree and
maximum segments combined still does not allow the tolerance to be met, the
curves are created and a message displays that they do not meet the specified
tolerance.
See Curve Fit Method in Modeling Preferences for more information.
These Curve Fit Method options are available on this dialog only when you are
editing a combined curve projection feature.

Mirror Curve Overview
Use this function to copy associative or non-associative curves and edges across a datum
plane or planar surface. You can make the copied curves and edges a MIRROR_CURVE
feature or a collection of non-associative curves and splines. In addition, instead of copying,
you can choose to move non-associative curves across the plane.
Basic procedure
1. Open the Mirror Curve tool.
2. Use the Curves selection step to select the curves and edges you want to mirror.
3. Use the Faces/Datum Planes selection step to select either a datum plane or a planar
surface to use as a mirror plane.
4. Choose a Copy Method, either Associate, Copy or Move.
5. Click OK or Apply to mirror the curves and edges.

Mirror Curve Dialog Options

Selection Curves - Use this option to select the curves, curve features and edges you want to
Steps mirror across a datum plane or planar face. Selection Intent rules are available
during selection.
Faces/Datum Planes - Use this option to select the planar surface or datum plane
across which you want to mirror the selected curves or edges.

Filter Use the filter to differentiate between objects during selection. The filters available
for the selection step are Any, Face, Datum Plane.

Datum Opens the Datum Plane tool, which you can use to create a plane for use in
Plane mirroring the curves or edges.

Copy Associate - Creates a MIRROR_CURVE feature, copied from the selected curves
Method and edges across the datum or planar surface.
Copy - Creates a non-associative copy of the selected curves and edges across the
datum plane or planar surface. Edges are copied as curves or splines.
Move - Moves the selected curves and edges across the datum plane or planar
surface. You cannot move an associative curve feature or feature edge.

Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after choosing Apply, letting you preview the
Upon results as they update the model. You can accept, reject or analyze the results.
Apply

Wrap/Unwrap Curve
This option lets you wrap curves from a plane onto a conical or cylindrical face, or unwrap
curves from a conical or cylindrical face onto a plane. The output curves are B-splines with a
degree of 3, and are associative to their input curves, the defining face, and the defining
plane.
Wrap/Unwrap Basic Procedure:
To Wrap curves from a plane to a face:
1. Select the conical or cylindrical Wrap Face(s).
2. Select the Wrap Plane.
3. Select the Curves you wish to wrap. (If the selected curves do not lie on the wrap
plane, they are first projected onto the wrap plane, normal to the plane, and then
wrapped onto the wrap face).
4. Choose Wrap.
5. Enter a Cut Line Angle.
6. Decide if you want to use the Confirm Upon Apply option.
7. Choose OK or Apply.
To Unwrap curves from a face to a plane:
1. Select the conical or cylindrical Wrap Face.
2. Select the Wrap Plane.
3. Select the Curves you wish to unwrap.
If the selected curves do not lie on the wrap face, they are first projected onto the
wrap face, along face normals, and then unwrapped onto the wrap plane.
You can also select the wrap face. Its unwrapped edges may be useful as a
reference.
4. Choose Unwrap.
5. Enter a Cut Line Angle.
6. Decide if you want to use the Confirm Upon Apply option.
7. Choose OK or Apply.

Wrap/Unwrap Curve Dialog Options

Selection Lets you select the geometry used in this function.
Steps
Wrap Face - when this selection step is active, select the conical or cylindrical
face on which curves will be wrapped, or from which curves will be unwrapped.
Wrap Plane - when this selection step is active, select a datum plane or planar
face that is tangent to the wrap face. You can change the Filter to allow
selection of only datum planes or only faces.
If the conical or cylindrical face you wish to use does not already have an
appropriate tangent plane, you can create one with the following steps. A major
advantage to creating a tangent plane with this method is that the datum plane
updates to remain tangent to the face whenever the model is updated.
Create a datum plane that goes through both the axis of the cone/cylinder and
the tangent line.
Create another datum plane that is tangent to the face and normal to the datum
plane created in the previous step.
Curves - when this selection step is active, select the curves you wish to wrap
or unwrap. You can change the Filter to allow selection of only curves, edges,
or faces.

Filter Options that help you select the objects that you want by limiting the types of
objects that are selectable.

Wrap / Specify whether you want to wrap or unwrap curves.
Unwrap

Cut Line The rotation (between 0 and 360 degrees) of the Tangent Line about the axis of
Angle the cone or cylinder. You can enter either a number or an expression.

Confirm Upon Lets you preview the results and accept, reject, or analyze them. This option is
Apply common to Selection Steps dialogs.

Questions
1. is it possible to offset a curve in two directions simultaneously?
2. can you wrap a curve in a conical surface?
3. what are all the trim options in offset?
4. what are all the methods to project a section on a plane or surface?
5. while simplifying what are the options highlighted for the original curve?
6. is it possible to combine project for the sections in parallel plane?

CURVE FROM BODIES
Modeling Curve from Bodies Options
Intersect - Lets you create intersection curves between two sets of objects. Intersection
curves are associative and will update according to changes in their defining objects.

Section - Lets you create intersection geometry between faces, planes, and/or curves
and specified planes.

Extract - Lets you create geometry (lines, arcs, conics, and splines) using the edges
and faces of one or more existing bodies.

INTERSECTION CURVE
This option allows you to create intersection curves between two sets of objects. Intersection
curves are associative and update according to the changes in their defining objects. You can
select multiple objects in the input sets to perform an intersection operation.
The figure below is an example of intersection curves created where a sheet body intersects
a block that contains a pocket.

1. Open the Intersect Curve dialog. is active.
2. Select the first set of objects to intersect. Use Selection Intent to aid object
selection and to set selection rules. The following Selection Intent options are
available:
3. Any (the default)
4. Faces
5. Datum Planes

6. Click and select the second set of objects to intersect. The same
Selection Intent options are available.
7. Select a method from the available Plane Method list if you have selected a
plane in either input set.
8. Specify the fitting method from the available Curve Fit Method options.
9. (Optional)] Clear the Associative Output check box if you do not want the
intersection curve to be associative. By default, this check box is selected.
10. (Optional) Clear the Enable Preview check box. By default, this check box is
selected.
11. (Optional) Specify the Tolerance value. The existing value in this field is
taken from the default Distance Tolerance Modeling preference.
12. Click Apply to continue creating intersection curves or OK to create the
feature and close the Intersect Curve dialog.
13. The following figure is an example of an intersection curve feature.

Intersection Curve Feature

Face selected as the first set of objects

Face selected as the second set of objects

Resulting intersection curve feature

SECTION CURVE
The Section Curve option creates intersection geometry between specified planes and
bodies, faces, planes and/or curves. The intersection of a plane and curve creates one or
more points. The geometry output can be associative.
Analytic section curves (lines, arcs or conics) are created if the face is planar, analytic, or a
bounded plane. Section curves are trimmed at edges and holes. If no section curves (or
points) can be created for the objects and planes that you specified, an error message is
displayed: No section curves created.
You can create output points instead of curves if you want geometry that can’t be accidentally
selected by other functions that operate on curves.
Section Curve - Basic Procedure
1. Choose the Section Method for specifying the intersecting planes that is
best suited for your section curve operation. You can change the section method at
any point during the selection steps.
2. Use the Objects to Section selection step to select the objects you want to
section. If necessary, use the Filter options to aid in your selection of objects. You
can set the filter option to Any, Body, Face, Curve, Plane or Datum Plane. You can
select additional objects or deselect objects whenever the Objects to Section
selection step is active.
3. Use the Selection Steps to define the sectioning planes. For the Select
Planes and Parallel Planes section methods this involves selecting existing planes
from the graphics window, or specifying a temporary plane using the Plane
Subfunction (if Associative Output is off). For the Radial Planes section method
you must specify a vector and a point to define radial planes. For the Planes
Perpendicular to Curve section method you must specify a curve or edge along
which perpendicular planes are generated, and a spacing method.
4. Set the Associative Output, Group Section Objects, Join, Tolerance and
Confirm Upon Apply fields appropriately for your operation.
5. Click OK or Apply to create the section curves.

Section Curve Dialog

Section Method To create section curves you can use one of the following section methods.
Select Planes - With this method you create section curves by
specifying the individual planes and datum planes to be used to perform the
sectioning. These planes will intersect the bodies, faces, planes and curves
you select for sectioning. You can specify existing planes, or you can define
temporary planes using the Plane Subfunction.

Parallel Planes - This method lets you create section curves by
specifying a base plane, a step value, and the start and end distances for a
set of parallel planes. If the Associative Output toggle is on, you are asked to
select an existing plane or datum plane. If the Associative Output toggle is
off, the Plane Subfunction is available to let you specify the base plane.

Radial Planes - With this method you create section curves by
specifying a vector and a point to define the base plane, a step value, and the
start and end angles for the set of radial planes.

Planes Perpendicular to Curve - This method lets you create section
curves by specifying multiple section planes perpendicular to a curve or
edge. There are several options for controlling the spacing of the section
planes along the curve.

Selection Steps The Selection Steps prompt you to select those objects, planes, vectors,
points or curves that are necessary for the creation of section curves, as
required by the currently specified Section Method.
For the Select Planes section method you must specify one or more objects
to be sectioned and one or more sectioning planesFor the Parallel Planes
section method you must specify one or more objects to be sectioned and a
base plane for the set of parallel planes. For the Radial Planes section
method you must specify one or more objects, a vector and a point
For the Planes Perpendicular to Curve section method you must specify one
or more objects to be sectioned and a curve

Filter The Filter option lets you specify the types of objects to allow for selection.
Options vary depending on the Selection Steps and the Section Method:
With the Objects selection step for all section methods, the filter can be Any,
Body, Faceted Body (Associative Output must not be selected), Face, Curve,
Plane or Datum Plane.
With the Section Plane and Base Plane selection steps that are used
(respectively) with the Select Planes and Parallel Planes section methods,
the filter can be Any Plane, Plane or Datum Plane.
With the Planes Perpendicular to Curve section method the filter can be
Curve or Edge, Curve, or Edge.

First The first changeable window is used when Radial Planes is the section
Changeable method. If the selection step is Radial Axis you will see Vector Method and
Window Vector Constructor options in this window, to help you specify a vector
direction for the radial planes. If the selection step is Point on Reference
Plane you will see Point Method and Point Constructor options, to help you
specify a point for the radial planes.

Second The second changeable window is used with a number of Section Curve
Changeable
Window operations.
For the Section Plane and Base Plane selection steps that are used
(respectively) with the Select Planes and Parallel Planes section methods,
this window displays the Plane Subfunction to help you define planes for the
section curves. With the Base Plane selection step this window also displays
the Step Distance, Start Distance and End Distance data entry fields.
For the Point on Reference Plane selection step used with the Radial Planes
section method the data entry fields Step Angle, Start Angle and End Angle
display in this window.
With the Curve or Edge selection step for the Planes Perpendicular to Curve
section method, a number of Spacing Along Curve options display in this
window.

Associative Turning on the Associative Output toggle causes a SECTION_CURVES
Output feature to be created when you press OK or Apply, associating the section
curves you just created with their defining objects and planes (or set of
planes). Sectioning of planes and datum planes by other planes, which would
create lines of somewhat arbitrary length, is not allowed.
If the Associative Output toggle is off, sectioning using temporary planes
through use of the Plane Subfunction is available. Also, sectioning of planes
and datum planes to create lines is available, and sectioning in context,
assembly parts and faceted bodies is allowed.
This toggle switch is on by default.

Group Section Turning the Group Section Objects toggle on automatically groups the output
Objects section curves and points that are created for each plane. If Associative
Output is on, the Group Section Objects toggle is unavailable.

Join No - Causes section curves created across multiple faces or planes to be
separate curves on each face or plane.
Polynomial - Where possible, the section curves are joined to form
polynomial spline curves, either cubic or quintic, depending on the setting of
the Preferences→ Modeling Preferences→ Curve Fit Method option. If
Associative Output is on, curves are only joined if they correspond to a single
body or face.
General Spline - Where possible, the section curves are joined to form
general spline curves. If Associative Output is on, curves are joined only if
they correspond to a single body or face.
These options are analogous to those for the Join function.

Output Points Select Output Points to define the section without curves. Use this if you want
to avoid accidentally selecting the section geometry when using other
functions that operate on curves.
Note: The points aren't associative. You can only select this option when the
Associative Output option is cleared.

Sample Sample Distance is the distance between output points, and is measured
Distance along the section arc.

Tolerance Lets you specify a tolerance for the section curve operation. The tolerance
value in this field determines how closely the section curves lie to the objects
and planes that define them.
The default is taken from the value set by the Preferences→ Modeling
Preferences→ Distance Tolerance option. Entering a new tolerance value
here overrides the modeling distance tolerance for the section curve
operation. To change the tolerance enter a new value in this field.
For a general description of the use of tolerances during construction see
Tolerance Values.

Curve Fit During edit, you can change the Curve Fit Method that was originally used to
Method create the section curve, as specified in Modeling Preferences. You can
select Cubic, Quintic or Advanced fitting methods.

Cubic

Cubic uses degree 3 splines.

Quintic

Quintic uses degree 5 splines.

Advanced

Selecting Advanced displays fields where you can enter your own values for
the maximum number of degrees and the maximum number of segments.
The system will try to rebuild the curves without segments until the number of
degrees specified by the Maximum Degree parameter is reached. If
tolerances cannot be met with the Maximum Degree, segments are added
until the number defined for Maximum Segments is reached. If the maximum
degree and maximum segments combined still does not allow the tolerance
to be met, the curves are created and a message displays that they do not
meet the specified tolerance.
See Curve Fit Method in Modeling Preferences for more information.
The Curve Fit Method options are available on this dialog only when you are
editing a section curve feature.

EXTRACT CURVE
This option creates geometry (lines, arcs, conics, and splines) using the edges and faces of
one or more existing bodies. The bodies are not changed. Most extracted curves are not
associative, but you can choose to create associative isocline or shadow outline curves.
The following extract options are available:
Extract Curve Dialog Options
Edge Curves Extracts curves from specified edges.
Isoparametric Curves Creates isoparametric curves on a selected face.
Silhouette Curves Creates curves from silhouette edges.
All in Work View Creates curves from all visible edges of bodies in the work view.
Isocline Curves Creates curves where the draft angle on a set of faces is constant.
Shadow Outline Creates curves that show only the outline of the bodies in the work
view.

Questions
1. how to extract a curve on a sphere?
2. what are the different methods of creating a section curve?
3. is it possible to select multiple objects as input in intersection?
4. what are the different methods used in Extract?
5. what are all the work dependent views in Extract?

DESIGN FEATURE
Modeling Design Feature Options
Extrude - Lets you create a body by sweeping selected section curves a linear
distance in a specified direction.
Revolve - Lets you create a feature by revolving selected section curves about a
given axis through a nonzero angle. Part of Swept Features.
Block - Lets you create a block primitive by specifying its orientation, size, and
location.
Cylinder - Lets you create a cylinder primitive by specifying its orientation, size, and
location.
Cone - Lets you create a cone primitive by specifying its orientation, size, and
location.
Sphere - Lets you create a sphere primitive by specifying its orientation, size, and
location.
Hole - Removes material in the shape of several types of standard holes: simple,
counterbored, or countersunk. Holes can be created to a specific depth or completely
through the body.
Boss - Adds material in a cylindrical or conical shape to an existing body.

Pocket - Removes material in a rectangular or cylindrical shape, or you can create a
pocket in a general shape using curves and faces.
Pad - Adds material to a solid body. You can create a rectangular pad, or a pad in a
general shape using curves and faces.
Creates an emboss feature on connected faces. Emboss features are useful for
stiffener and locator objects
Designed specifically for creating stiffening features in “body in white.

Slot - Removes material in the shape of a straight slot with rounded ends or
completely through two faces.
Groove - Removes material in the shape of a groove, as if a tool moved inward (or
outward) on a rotating part. The target body must be cylindrical.
Dart - Lets you add a dart feature along the intersection curve of two sets of faces.

Thread – Lets you create symbolic or detailed threads on features with cylindrical
faces.
User Defined Feature - Lets you add a feature that has been custom designed.

Extrude overview
Use this command to create a body by sweeping a 2D or 3D section of curves, edges,
faces, sketches or curve features a linear distance in a specified direction.
Example construction of two extruded solid bodies

Edges of this planar sheet body are used as profiles for two extruded bodies.

First extruded body is dragged below a section of selected edges.

Apply is used to create the first extruded body.

A second extruded body is created with a 10° draft and a single-sided offset above a
section of a single inner edge.

The result is two extruded bodies.

Boolean options let you unite, subtract or intersect an extrude with other objects.
A single Extrude feature can include multiple sheet and solid bodies.
You can trim an extrude feature using faces, datum planes or solid bodies. You can size an
extrude by dragging distance handles or specifying distance values.
You can create offsets by adding constant values measured from the base section.
You can create drafts by adding degree values.
If you use a face or a sheet body for an extrude section and it is later changed, the extrude
feature updates correctly.
You can use Selection Intent to change the section as you define different ways to create
the extrude.

Extrude options
Section
Lets you specify curves or edges to extrude.
If the section you specify is a single open or closed collection of curves or
edges, the extrude will be a single sheet body or solid body. If you select
multiple open or closed sections, it will be multiple sheet bodies or solid bodies.
In both cases, you get a single extrude feature.

Curve
Lets you select curves, edges, a sketch, or a face for the section to extrude.
Selection Intent is available.

Sketch Section
Select Opens the Sketcher, where you can create a sketch of a section that is internal
Curve to the feature.
On exiting the Sketcher, your sketch is automatically selected as the section to
extrude.
After the feature is created, the sketch remains internal to it and does not appear
in the graphics window or in the Part Navigator. To control the display in the
Part Navigator, right-click the feature and choose:
• Make Sketch External to make the sketch visible and available for
other uses.
• Make Sketch Internal to make the sketch invisible and internal only to
the feature again.

Direction

Lets you specify a direction towards which to extrude the section. The default
direction is the normal of the selected section.
You can specify your own direction using curves, edges, or any of the standard
vector types, including those on the Vector Constructor.
An associativity will exist between the extrude feature and the direction. If you
change the geometry you selected for the direction after creating the extrude
feature, the extrude feature updates accordingly.
Specify
Vector
Inferred Vector — A vector type. Click to see the vector type list. Select
a vector type from the list and then select objects supported by that type.

Vector Constructor — Displays the Vector dialog box.

Switches the direction of the extrude to the opposite side of the section.

Reverse You can also change the direction by right-clicking Reverse Direction on the
Direction direction vector conehead.

Limits

Use the limit options to define the overall construction method and the extents of the extrude
feature.

Represents opposite ends of the extrusion, as measured from the section.
Both the Start and End option lists offer the following options with which you
can control the limits of the extrude.
Value
Lets you specify values for the start or end of the extrusion. Values are
numeric. Values above the section are positive, and those below are
negative.
You can drag the start and end limit handles a linear distance on either
side of the section.
In addition to dragging the handles, you can also type values directly
into the start and end Distance boxes or in the dynamic input boxes.
Symmetric Value
Start / End Converts the Start limit distance to the same value as the End limit.
limit
Until Next
Extends the extrude feature to the next body along the direction path.
Until Selected
Extends the extrude feature to a face, datum plane, or body that you
select.
Until Extended
Trims the extrude feature (if it is a body) to a face you select when the
section extends beyond its edges.
Through All
Extends the extrude feature completely through all selectable bodies
along the path of the specified direction.

Appears for both the Start and End options when either is set to Value or
Symmetric Value.
Distance Sets the start and end limits for the extrude feature to the values you enter in the
boxes.
See the Value option above for additional ways to specify the distance.

Appears for both the Start and End options when either is set to Until Selected
or Until Extended.
Select Lets you select a face, sheet body, solid body, or datum plane to define the
Object bounding start or end extent of the extrude.

Boolean

Boolean Lets you specify how the extrude feature interacts with other bodies it comes in
options contact with on creation.
Displays the Select Body option for all Boolean options except None, to let you
specify the target body. Note that all options except None can leave empty
space where the target body existed.
None
Creates an independent extrude solid body.
When you edit an Extrude feature (and if applicable), you can change
the Boolean option from None to Unite, Subtract, or Intersect, or vice-
versa.

Unite
Combines the extrude volume with two or more bodies into a single
body.

Subtract
Removes the extrude volume from a target body.

Intersect
Creates a body containing the volume shared by the extrude feature
and the existing bodies it intersects.

Appears when the Boolean Option is set to Unite, Subtract, or Intersect.
Select Lets you select a target body.
Body

Draft

Use Draft to add a slope to one or more sides of the extrude feature.
You can apply a draft only to an extrude feature that is based on a planar section.

Draft Lets you specify one of the following draft options.
None
No draft is created.
From Start Limit
Creates a draft where the extrude shape is held stationary at the start
limit, and the draft angle is applied to the side faces from that stationary
shape.
From Section
Creates a draft where the extrude shape is held stationary at the
section, and the draft angle is applied to the side faces from the section.
From Section-Asymmetric Angle
Available only when the extrude extends from both sides of the section.
Creates a draft where the extrude shape is held stationary at the
section, but where the side faces are also split at the section into two
sides. You can separately control the draft angle on each side of the
section.
If you set Angle Option to Single, Front Angle and Back Angle
options appear, to let you assign separate dimensions to the front and
back sides of the asymmetric extrude.
If you set Angle Option to Multiple, an Angle option and a list box
appear, to let you assign separate dimensions to each of the tangent
faces of the front and back sides of the asymmetric extrude.
From Section-Symmetric Angle
Available only when the extrude extends from both sides of the section.
Creates a draft where the extrude shape is held stationary at the
section. Side faces are split at the section and both sides of the section
share the same draft angle.
From Section-Matched Ends
Available only when the extrude extends from both sides of the section.
Creates a draft where the section is held stationary and the side faces of
the extrude feature are split at the section. The shape at the end limit is
matched to that of the start limit, and the draft angle for the end limit
changes to maintain the matched shape.
You can select draft options here in the dialog box or by right-clicking the
extrude preview.

Lets you specify how draft angles are applied.
Single
Lets you specify a single draft angle for all faces of the extrude feature.
Edit the angle by typing a value in the Angle box, or by dragging the
angle handle or typing a value in the dynamic input box.
Angle
Option Multiple
Lets you specify unique draft angles to each tangent chain of faces of
the extrude feature. Edit the dimensions by selecting them from the
dialog list box and typing new values in the Angle box. You can also
drag the angle handles or type values in the dynamic input boxes.
Not available when the Draft option is From Start Limit.

Lets you specify a value for a draft angle. If the draft List box is available, the
value is applied to the selected angle in the list box. Otherwise, the value applies
to all angles in the draft.
A positive angle slopes the sides of the extrude feature inward toward the center
of the selected curves.
Angle
A negative angle slopes the sides of the extrude feature outward away from the
center of the selected curves.
A zero angle value results in no slope.
You can also specify the draft angle by typing a value in the dynamic input box
or by dragging the angle handle.

Front Available only when the Draft option is set to From Section — Asymmetric,
Angle with the Angle Option set to Single.

/ Lets you assign separate angle values to the front and back sides of an
asymmetric extrude feature. You can also type values in the dynamic input
Back Angle boxes or drag the angle handles.

List Appears when the Angle Opton is set to Mulitple, when you can assign
separate draft angles to each tangent chain of faces in the extrude feature.
The list displays the name and value for each draft angle.
You can edit an angle by selecting it in the list box and typing a new value in the
Angle box, by typing a value in its dynamic input box, or by dragging its angle
handle.

Offset

Lets you specify up to two offsets to add to the extrude feature. You can assign
unique values for both offsets.
Type values for the offsets in the Start and End boxes, or in their dynamic input
boxes. You can also drag the offset handles.
Whenever the start and end offsets are of equal value, the offset is symmetric
across the section.
None
No offset is created.
Offset
Single-Sided
Option
Adds a single end offset to the extrude. This kind of offset lets you easily
fill holes and create bosses, simplifying part development.
Two-Sided
Adds an offset with start and end values to the extrude.
Symmetric
Adds an offset with duplicate start and end values, measured from opposite
sides of the section, to the extrude. The value for both start and end is
determined by the last one you specify.

Sets the value for the start of the offset, as measured from the section, to the
Start value you type in the box. You can also enter a value in the dynamic input box
or drag the start handle.

Sets the value for the end of the offset, as measured from the section, to the
End value you type in the box. You can also enter a value in the dynamic input box
or drag the end handle.

Settings

Lets you specify that the extrude feature is one or more sheet bodies or solid
bodies.
To get a solid body, the section must be either a closed profile section or an
open profile section with an offset. If you use an offset, you will not be able to
Body Type
get a sheet body.
This option is available during creation or edit, which means that in some cases,
you can change an extruded sheet body to a solid body, or a solid body back to
a sheet body.

Lets you change the distance tolerance during creation or edit. The default value
is taken from the Modeling Preference Distance Tolerance setting.
Entering a new tolerance value here overrides the modeling distance tolerance
Tolerance for the extrude operation. To change the tolerance, type a new value in this
option box and press the Return or Enter key. The new distance tolerance is
effective for subsequent extrude operations throughout the current session.
For a general description of the use of tolerances during construction,

Preview
Generates a preview when you specify the minimum parameters needed to
Preview create the feature.
This option is selected by default.

Show Show Result computes the feature and displays the result. When you click OK
Result or Apply to create the feature, the software reuses the computation, making the
creation process faster.
Undo Result exits the result display and returns you to the dialog box.
Undo
Result

Revolve
Use this command to create a feature by revolving section curves about a given axis
through a nonzero angle. You can start with a basic cross section and generate round or
partially round features.

Revolving a Section Around an Axis Creates a Solid Body

Revolve options
Section

Lets you specify a section to revolve using one of the following options.
If the section you specify is a single open or closed collection of curves or
Select edges, the revolve is a single sheet body or solid body. If you select multiple
Curve open or closed sections, it will be multiple sheet bodies or solid bodies. In both
cases, you get a single revolve feature.

Curve
Lets you select curves, edges, a sketch, or a face for the section to revolve.
Selection Intent is available.
If you select a planar face when the Selection Intent rule is for something other
than a face, the Sketcher automatically opens to let you sketch new curve
sections on the selected planar face.
To change this behavior, chose File→ Utilities→ Customer Defaults→
Modeling→ General. On the Miscellaneous page, clear the Automatically
Sketch on Planar Faces check box.

Sketch Section
You can optionally open the Sketcher and create a sketch of a section that is
internal to the feature.
On exiting the Sketcher, your sketch is automatically selected as the section to
revolve.
After the feature is created, the sketch remains internal to it and does not appear
in the graphics window or in the Part Navigator. You can control the display in
the Part Navigator by right-clicking the feature and choosing:
• Make Sketch External to make the sketch visible and available for
other uses.
• Make Sketch Internal to make the sketch invisible and internal only to
the feature again.
See Internal and External Sketches for further details.

Axis

Use this option to specify a rotation axis.
You can specify the axis using any of the following:
• Curves
• Edges
The rotation axis you define should not intersect the section curves at a single
point. However, it can be coincident with an edge.
An associativity exists between the revolved body and the rotation axis. If after
creating the revolved body you change the geometry selected for the rotation
Specify axis, the revolved body updates accordingly.
Vector

Inferred Vector — A vector type. Click to see the vector type list. Select
a vector type from the list and then select objects supported by that type.

Vector Constructor — Displays the Vector dialog box.
For more information on vector types, see Vector Constructor in the Common
Tools help.

Changes the direction of the rotation. You can also right-click the direction
Reverse vector conehead and choose Reverse Direction.
Direction

If you use a vector method to specify the rotation axis that requires a separately
selected second point (such as Plane Normal), use one of these options to
define it.
Specify
• Inferred Point — A point type. Click to see the point type list.
Select a point type from the list and then select objects supported by
Point that type.

• Point Constructor
Lets you take advantage of additional point method options.

Angular Limits

The start and end limits represent the opposite ends of the revolve, from 0 to
360 degrees around the rotation axis.
You can best control the revolve limits in the graphics window by dragging the
start and end limit handles on either side of the section. As you drag the
handles, the start and end values change based on their angle from the section.

Start Limit / You can also control the start and end limits by right-clicking their handles or
choosing one of the following settings:
End Limit
Value
Lets you specify a value for the angle of rotation in the Angle box.
Until Selected
Lets you specify a face, solid body, sheet body, or relative datum plane where
you want the revolve to start or end.

Appears for Start Limit or End Limit when either is set to Value.
You can enter an angular value for the start or end of the revolve in degrees, or
Angle you can drag the limit handles.
Values for the start and end are positive or negative depending on the revolution
direction and on which side of the section geometry you drag.

Appears for Start Limit or End Limit when either is set to Until Selected, to let
you specify a limit object.
You can select a face, solid body, sheet body, or relative datum plane for the
Select defining limit.
Object You can bypass this option by selecting a limit handle in the graphics window
and then selecting the desired limiting object.

Boolean

Boolean Displays the Select Body option for all Boolean options except None, to let you
Option specify the target body. Note that all options except None can leave empty
space where the target body existed.
Use the Boolean options to specify how the revolve feature interacts with other
bodies it comes in contact with on creation.
None
Creates an independent revolve solid body.
When you edit a Revolve feature (and if applicable), you can change the
Boolean option from None to Unite, Subtract, or Intersect, or vice-versa.
Unite
Combines the revolve volume with two or more bodies into a single body.
Subtract
Removes the revolve volume from a target body.
Intersect
Creates a body containing the volume shared by the revolve and existing bodies
it intersects.
You can also choose a Boolean option by right-clicking on the preview.
For additional information about Booleans see Boolean Operations.

Appears when Boolean Option is set to Unite, Subtract, or Intersect.
Select Lets you select a target body.
Body

Offset

Use this option to create an offset for the revolve feature. You can specify separate values for
the offsets for either side of the section.

None
No offset is added to the revolve section.
Two Sided
Offset
Option Offsets are added to both sides of the revolve section. Choosing this option
displays the offset Start and End boxes, where you can type the offset values.
You can also enter offset values in the dynamic input boxes or by dragging the
offset handles.

Start The linear dimension start point for the offset.

End The linear dimension end point for the offset.

Settings

Lets you specify if the revolve feature is one or more Sheet bodies or a Solid
body.
To get a solid body, the section must be either a closed profile string or an open
Body Type
profile string with an offset. If you use an offset, you will not be able to get a
sheet body.
You can change the body type during creation, and in some cases during edit.

Lets you change the distance tolerance during creation or edit. The default value
is taken from the Modeling preference Distance Tolerance setting.
Entering a new tolerance value here overrides the Modeling distance tolerance
Tolerance for the revolve operation. The new distance tolerance is effective for subsequent
revolve operations throughout the current session.
For a general description of the use of tolerances during construction, see
Tolerance Values.

Preview
Generates a preview when you specify the minimum parameters needed to
Preview create the feature.
This option is selected by default.

Show Show Result computes the feature and displays the result. When you click OK
Result or Apply to create the feature, the software reuses the computation, making the
creation process faster.
Undo Result exits the result display and returns you to the dialog box.
Undo
Result

Block
The insert→ Design feature pull- down list includes the primitive features like the block and
cylinder. It also includes other commonly used features (holes, bosses, etc.)
As a best practice, you should limit the number of primitive features to one per part:
however, in this course you will be creating multiple solids so that you can learn how to use
the Unite, Subtract, and Intersect functions.
Choose the Block icon or choose Insert→Design Feature→Block
The Block dialog displays. Blocks can be created by three different methods: however, the
origin, Edge Lengths method is used most frequently.
The Snap Point toolbar displays, if it does not, you can choose MB3→Snap Point in the
main many bar to display the toolbar.

The Snap Point toolbar is used to assist you in your selections.
The Snap Point toolbar is used to assist you in your selections.
Origin, Edge Lengths - Lets you create a block by defining the length of each edge
and a corner point.

Two Points, Height - Lets you create a block by defining the height and two diagonal
points for the base.

Two Diagonal Points - Lets you create a block by defining two 3D diagonal points
representing opposite corners.
Cylinder

You can create a cylinder by specifying the orientation, size and location. To do this, you
can select from either of the following options:
• Specify the direction vector, and the diameter and height values.
• Select an arc and enter a height value.
Choose the Block icon or choose Insert→Design Feature→Cylinder

Cylinder options

Type

Axis, Diameter Lets you create a solid body cylinder by specifying the direction vector, and
and Height defining the diameter and height values.

Height and
Lets you create a cylinder by selecting an arc and entering a height value.
Arc

Axis

Appears only when the Axis, Diameter and Height type is selected.

Lets you specify the axis for creating the cylinder.

Specify Vector • Vector Constructor
Opens the Vector dialog box.
• Inferred Vector

This is the default vector type. Click to see the vector type list.
Select the required vector type, then select objects supported by that
vector. You can change the vector anytime and select new objects.

Reverses the displayed cylinder direction so that the imprint points toward
Reverse the selected cylinder.
Direction

Lets you specify the point for creating the cylinder.

• Point Constructor
Opens the Point dialog box.

Specify Point • Inferred Point

This is the default point type. Click to see the point type list. Select
the required point type, then select objects supported by that point.
You can change the point anytime and select new objects.

Arc Selection

Appears only when Arc and Height type is selected.


Arc or Circle
Select Arc Lets you select an arc.
The software derives the orientation of the cylinder from the selected arc.
The axis of the cylinder is normal to the plane of the arc and passes through
the arc center. A vector indicates this orientation.

Properties

Diameter Specifies the diameter of the cylinder.

Height Specifies the height of the cylinder.

Boolean

Boolean Specifies the Boolean operation.
Option
None
Creates an independent cylinder solid body.
When you edit a Cylinder feature (and if applicable), you can change
the Boolean option from None to Unite, Subtract, or Intersect, or
vice-versa.
Unite
Combines the cylinder volume with two or more bodies into a single
body.
Subtract
Removes the cylinder volume from a target body.
Intersect
Creates a body containing the volume shared by the cylinder feature
and the existing bodies it intersects.

Lets you select a body for the Boolean operation.

Select Body

Cone

You can create cone primitives by specifying an orientation, size and location, using the
following options:

Diameters, Height Define the base diameter, top diameter, and height
values.

Diameters, Half Angle Define the base diameter, top diameter, and half angle
values.

Base Diameter, Height, Half Define the base diameter, height, and half vertex angle
Angle values.

Top Diameter, Height, Half Define the top diameter, height, and half vertex angle
Angle values.

Two Coaxial Arcs Select two arcs, which do not need to be parallel.

Diameters, Height
This option creates a solid body cone by defining the base diameter, top diameter, and
height values.

Procedure
To create a cone using this method:
1. Define the cone direction.
2. Enter the base and top diameters and the cone height.
3. Define the origin.
Diameters, Half Angle
This option creates a cone by defining the base diameter, top diameter and half angle
values.

Procedure
To create a cone using this method you must:
1. Define the cone direction.
2. Enter the base and top diameters and the cone half angle.
3. Enter the base origin.

Base Diameter, Height, Half Angle
This option creates a cone by defining the base diameter, height and half vertex angle
values.

Procedure
To create a cone using this method you must:
1. Define the cone direction.
2. Enter the base diameter, height, and the half vertex angle.
3. Enter the base origin.

Top Diameter, Height, Half Angle
This option creates a cone by defining the top diameter, height and half vertex angle
values.

Procedure
To create a cone using this method you must:
1. Define the cone direction.
2. Enter the top diameter, height, and the half vertex angle.
3. Enter the base origin.

Two Coaxial Arcs
This option creates a cone feature by selecting two arcs. The arcs do not have to be
parallel.
Sphere
You can create sphere primitives by specifying an orientation, size and location, using the
following options:

Diameter, Center Define a diameter value and a center.
Select Arc Select an arc to create the sphere.

Diameter, Center
This option creates a sphere by defining a diameter value and a center.
To create a sphere using this method you must:
1. Enter the diameter value.
2. Define the sphere center.
The center of the sphere is defined using the Point Constructor.

Select Arc
This option creates a sphere by selecting an arc.

The arc you select does not have to be a complete circle. The system creates a complete
sphere based on any arc objects. The selected arc defines the sphere's center and
diameter.

Hole Insert→Design Feature→Hole
The Hole option lets you create a simple hole, a counterbore hole or a countersunk hole in
a solid body. For all hole creation
options, the depth values must be
positive

Simple Hole
This option lets you create a simple Hole, with a specified Diameter, Depth and Tip Angle
for a pointed tip.

Basic Procedure for Simple Hole
To create a hole using the Simple method, follow these steps:
1. Use the Placement Face selection step to select the planar placement face
or datum plane on which to locate the hole. The system displays a preview in the
graphics window of the hole and its dimensions using the current parameters. If
you selected a datum plane, you can use the Reverse Side button to switch the
direction of the vector.
You can enter values for the parameters discussed in the following steps before
you select the planar placement face.
When you change a value in one of the parameter fields discussed below,
pressing the Return or Enter key updates the graphics window preview of the
hole with the new value.

3. (Optional) Use the Thru Face selection step to select a face through which
the hole is to extend and pass through. If you specify a Thru Face, the Depth and
Tip Angle options become unavailable.
4. Enter a value for the Depth, or accept the default.
5. Enter a value for the Tip Angle, or accept the default. You can press the
Return or Enter key to update the graphics window preview of the hole with the
new value.
6. Click OK or Apply to create the hole.
7. Use the Positioning dialog to precisely locate the hole

Positioning Options

Horizontal
Creates a positioning dimension between two points aligned with the
horizontal reference.

Vertical
Creates a positioning dimension between two points aligned with the
vertical reference.

Parallel
Creates a positioning dimension that constrains the distance between
two points, measured parallel to the work plane.

Perpendicular
Creates a positioning dimension that constrains the perpendicular
distance between an edge of the target solid and a point on the feature or
sketch.

Parallel at a
Distance Creates a positioning dimension that constrains a linear edge of the
feature or sketch and a linear edge of the target solid (or any existing curve,
on or off the target solid) to be parallel and at a fixed distance apart.

Angular
Creates a positioning constraint dimension between a linear edge of the
feature and a linear reference edge/curve at a given angle.

Point onto Point
Creates a positioning dimension the same as the Parallel option, but
with the fixed distance between the two points set to zero.

Point onto Line
Creates a positioning constraint dimension the same as the
Perpendicular option, but with the distance between the edge or curve and
point set to zero.

Line onto Line
Creates a positioning constraint dimension the same as the Parallel at a
Distance option, but with the distance between the linear edge of the feature/
sketch and the linear edge/curve on the target solid set to zero.

Reverse Normal When positioning a user defined feature, this option lets you flip it 180
degrees about its placement tool face.
Counterbore - Lets you create a counterbore hole, with a specified Hole Diameter, Hole
Depth, Tip Angle, C-Bore Diameter and C-Bore Depth.

Basic Procedure for Counterbore Hole
To create a hole using the Counterbore method, follow these steps:
1. Use the Placement Face selection step to select the planar placement face
or datum plane on which to locate the hole. The system displays a preview in the
graphics window of the hole and its dimensions using the current parameters. If
you selected a datum plane, you can use the Reverse Side button to switch the
direction of the vector.
You can enter values for the parameters discussed in the following steps before
you select the planar placement face

When you change a value in one of the parameter fields discussed below,
pressing the Return or Enter key updates the graphics window preview of the
hole with the new value.

3. (Optional) Use the Thru Face selection step to select a face through which
the hole is to extend and pass through. If you specify a Thru Face, the Hole Depth
and Tip Angle options become unavailable.
4. Enter a value for the C-Bore Diameter, or accept the default. This value
should be greater than the value for the Hole Diameter.
5. Enter a value for the C-Bore Depth, or accept the default.
6. Enter a value for the Hole Diameter, or accept the default.
7. Enter a value for the Hole Depth, or accept the default. This field is not
available if you specified a Thru Face.
8. Enter a value for the Tip Angle, or accept the default. This field is not
available if you specified a Thru Face.
9. Click OK or Apply to create the hole.

Countersink - Lets you create a countersink hole, with a specified Hole Diameter, Hole
Depth, Tip Angle, C-Sink Diameter and C-Sink Angle
.

Basic Procedure for Countersink Hole
To create a hole using the Countersink method, follow these steps:
• Use the Placement Face selection step to select the planar placement face
or datum plane on which to locate the hole. The system displays a preview in the
graphics window of the hole and its dimensions using the current parameters. If
you selected a datum plane, you can use the Reverse Side button to switch the
direction of the vector.
You can enter values for the parameters discussed in the following steps before
you select the planar placement face.

When you change a value in one of the parameter fields discussed below,
pressing the Return or Enter key updates the graphics window preview of the
hole with the new value.

• (Optional) Use the Thru Face selection step to select a face through which
the hole is to extend and pass through. If you specify a Thru Face, the Hole Depth
and Tip Angle options become unavailable.
• Enter a value for the C-Sink Diameter, or accept the default. This value
should be greater than the value for the Hole Diameter.
• Enter a value for the C-Sink Angle, or accept the default.
• Enter a value for the Hole Diameter, or accept the default.
• Enter a value for the Hole Depth, or accept the default. This field is not
available if you specified a Thru Face.
• Enter a value for the Tip Angle, or accept the default. This field is not
available if you specified a Thru Face.
• Click OK or Apply to create the hole.

Boss Insert→Design Feature→Boss
Use this option to create a boss on a planar surface or datum plane. For a simple
procedure to use this option.

Basic Parameters of a Boss

Boss Dialog Options
Selection
Steps Placement Face - Lets you specify a planar face or datum plane on which to
locate the boss.

Target Solid - If you select an absolute datum plane for the placement face
and more than one solid is present in the part, a Target Solid selection step
becomes available, which you must use to select a target solid for the boss.

Filter Helps you to select desired objects by limiting the available types of objects.
Options are Any, Face and Datum Plane.

Diameter Lets you enter a value for the diameter of the boss.

Height Lets you enter a value for the height of the boss.

Taper Lets you enter an angle from which the cylinder wall of the boss inclines inward.
Angle This value can be negative or positive. A zero value results in a vertical cylinder
wall with no taper.

Reverse This button becomes available if you select a datum plane for the planar
Side placement face. Clicking the button both reverses the temporary direction vector
and the recreates the preview of the boss.

Basic Boss Procedure
To create a boss, follow these steps:
1. From the Boss dialog select a planar placement face or datum plane on which to
locate the boss. The system displays a preview in the graphics window of the boss
and its dimensions using the current parameters. If you selected a datum plane, you
can use the Reverse Side button to switch the direction of the vector.
2. Enter a value for the Diameter.
3. Enter a value for the Height.
4. Enter a value for the Taper Angle.
5. When you are ready to create the boss, click OK or Apply.
Use the Positioning dialog to precisely locate the boss.

Pocket Insert→Design Feature→Pocket

You can use the Pocket option to create a cavity in an existing body, using one of the
following methods:

Cylindrical Lets you define a circular pocket, to a specific depth, with or without a blended
floor, having straight or tapered sides.

Rectangular Lets you define a rectangular pocket, to a specific length, width, and depth, with
specific radii in the corners and on the floor, having straight or tapered sides.

General Lets you define a pocket with much greater flexibility than the cylindrical and
rectangular pocket options.

Cylindrical
This option lets you define a circular pocket, to a specific depth, with or without a blended
floor, having straight or tapered sides.
To create a cylindrical pocket, select a planar surface or datum plane and specify the
parameters shown below.
Use the Positioning dialog to precisely locate the cylindrical pocket.
Diameter The diameter of the pocket.

Depth The depth of the pocket, measured from the origin point along the specified
direction vector.

Floor The rounded radius for the bottom edges of the pocket. This value must be equal
Radius to or greater than zero.

Taper The draft angle applied to the pocket walls. This value must be equal to or
Angle greater than zero. (A value of zero results in straight walls.)

Rectangular
This option lets you define a rectangular pocket, to a specific length, width, and depth, with
specific radii in the corners and on the floor, having straight or tapered sides.
X Length The length of the pocket.

Y Length The width of the pocket.

Z Length The depth of the pocket.

Corner The rounded radius (zero or greater) for the vertical edges of the pocket.
Radius

Floor The rounded radius (zero or greater) for the bottom edges of the pocket.
Radius

Taper The angle at which the four walls of the pocket incline inward. This value cannot
Angle be negative. A value of zero results in vertical walls.

General Pocket
This option lets you define a pocket with much greater flexibility than with the Cylindrical
and Rectangular pocket options
Pad Insert→Design Feature→Pad
Use the Pad option to create a pad on an existing solid body, using either of the
following methods:

Rectangular Lets you define a pad to a specific length, width, and depth, with specific radii in
the corners, having straight or tapered sides.

General Lets you define a pad with greater flexibility than the rectangular pad option.

Rectangular Pad

For a rectangular pad, you must specify the following parameters:
Length The length of the pad.
Width The width of the pad.

Height The height of the pad.

Corner The rounded radius for the vertical edges of the pad. The radius specified must
Radius be a positive or zero. (A zero radius results in a sharp edged pad.)

Taper The angle at which the four walls of the pad incline inward. This value cannot be
Angle negative. (A zero value results in vertical walls.)

To create a rectangular pad:
1. Select a planar placement face.
2. Select a horizontal reference.
3. Enter values for the feature parameters.
4. Position the pad.
5. Use the Positioning dialog to precisely locate the pad.
General Pad

This option lets you define a pad with
greater flexibility than with the Rectangular Pad option.
The basic steps to create a General Pad are:
1. Specify the Placement Face (or faces).
2. Specify the Placement Outline.
3. Specify the Placement Outline Projection Vector.
4. Specify the Top Face (or faces).
5. Specify the Top Outline.
6. Specify the Top Outline Projection Vector.
7. Specify the Outline Alignment Method.
8. Specify a radius at the placement, top, and/or corners of the pad.
9. Specify an optional Target Body.
10. Choose Apply to create the pad.
Use the Positioning dialog to precisely locate the pad.
Emboss
Use this option to create an emboss feature. Emboss features are useful for stiffener and
locator objects.
This option provides a wide range of ways to control and manage the shape and orientation
of the emboss, its endcaps and sidewalls.

Emboss (in Yellow) Created on a Target Surface Using a Rectangular Section
To create an emboss you must:
• Specify a closed section.
• Specify a vector.
• Specify an input target.
You can define the endcap (the floor or ceiling of the emboss) and the sidewalls by
choosing from a number of procedural methods. You could, for example, define the endcap
as the offset of selected faces on the target, and the sidewalls as a draft from the endcap
(see figure above).
You can also create joggles. A joggle is an emboss feature whose edges are trimmed by
adjacent faces or by a user-selected vector (if the emboss falls on a free-edge boundary).
Offset Emboss
Designed specifically for creating stiffening features in “body in white,” Offset Emboss
produces relatively simple linear embosses on sheet surfaces. You can create these
emboss features rapidly and predictably, but you don't have as many options as with the
regular Emboss command
Slot
This option lets you create a passage through or into a solid body in the shape of a straight
slot. An automatic subtract is performed on the current target solid. The depth value for all slot
types is measured normal to the planar placement face.

Slot Option
Thru Slot Lets you create a slot that goes completely through two selected faces.
Types of Slots
Rectangular Lets you create a slot with sharp edges along the bottom.
Ball-End Lets you create a slot with a full radius bottom and corners.
U-Slot Lets you create a slot with a "U" shape (rounded corners and floor radii).
T-Slot Lets you create a slot whose cross section is an inverted T.
Dove-Tail Lets you create a slot with a "dove-tail" shape (sharp corners and angled walls).

Rectangular
This option lets you create a slot with sharp edges along the bottom.
You must specify the following parameters:
Width The width of the tool which forms the slot.
Depth The depth of the slot, which is measured in the opposite direction of the slot axis and
is the distance from the origin point to the bottom of the slot. This value must be
positive.
Length The length of the slot, measured in a direction parallel to the horizontal reference.
This value must be positive.
To create a slot:
1. Choose the type of slot you want.
2. Select a planar placement face.
3. Select a horizontal reference.
4. Enter values for the feature parameters.
5. Use the Positioning dialog to precisely locate the slot
Ball-End
A ball slot leaves a full radius bottom and corner. The Depth value must be greater than the
ball radius (half the Ball Diameter value).
You must specify the following parameters:
Ball The width of the slot (i.e., the diameter of the tool).
Diameter
Depth The depth of the slot, which is measured in the opposite direction of the slot axis
and is the distance from the origin point to the bottom of the slot. This value must
be positive
Length The length of the slot, measured in a direction parallel to the horizontal
reference. This value must be positive.

U-Slot
You can use this option to create a slot with a "U" shape. This type of slot leaves rounded
corner and floor radii. The Depth value must be greater than the Corner Radius value.
You must specify the following parameters:
Width The width of the slot (i.e., the cutting tool diameter).
Depth The depth of the slot, which is measured in the opposite direction of the slot
axis and is the distance from the origin point to the bottom of the slot. This
value must be positive.
Corner Radius The floor radius of the slot (i.e., the cutting tool edge radius).
Length The length of the slot, measured in a direction parallel to the horizontal
reference. This value must be positive.

T-Slot
This option lets you create a slot whose cross section is an inverted T. You must specify the
following parameters:
Top Width The width of the narrower, upper portion of the slot.
Bottom Width The width of the wider, lower part of the slot.
Top Depth The depth of the top part of the slot, which is measured in the opposite
direction of the slot axis and is the distance from the slot origin to the top of
the bottom depth value.
Bottom Depth The depth of the bottom part of the slot, which is measured in the opposite
direction of the tool axis and is the distance from the bottom of the top
depth value to the bottom of the slot.

Dove-Tail
You can use this option to create a slot with a "dove-tail" shape. This type of slot leaves sharp
corners and angled walls. You must specify the following parameters:
Width The width of the slot opening on the face of the solid body, measured perpendicular to
the slot path direction and centered on the slot origin.
Depth The depth of the slot, which is measured in the opposite direction of the tool axis and
is the distance from the origin point to the bottom of the slot.
Angle The angle between the slot floor and the side wall.

Groove
This option lets you create a groove in a solid body, as if a form tool moved inward (from an
external placement face) or outward (from an internal placement face) on a rotating part, as
with a turning operation. Available groove types are:
Rectangular Lets you create a groove, whichleaves sharp corners all around.
Ball-End Lets you create a groove, which leaves a full radius at the bottom.
U-Groove Lets you create a groove, which leaves radii in the corners.
Procedure
The basic procedure to create a groove is:
1. Choose the type of groove you wish to create (Rectangular, Ball-End, or U-Groove).
2. Select the cylindrical or conical placement face.
3. Enter the parameter values in the dialog and choose OK. A groove "tool" is
temporarily displayed as a disc. This shape will be subtracted from the target solid.
4. Select the target edge (on the target solid).
5. Select the tool edge or centerline (on the groove tool).
6. Enter the desired horizontal distance between the selected edges and choose OK.
7. Use the Positioning dialog to precisely locate the groove.

Dart Feature - Overview
This function lets you add a dart feature along the intersection curve of two sets of faces.

Dart Feature Example

First Face Set
Intersection Curve
Second Face Set
Dart Feature
To create a dart feature you must specify:
• Two sets of faces that intersect. A face set can be a single face or several faces.
• A base location point for the dart, either
o a point along the intersection curve, or
o a point at the intersection of the intersection curve and a plane.
• A depth.
• An angle.
• A radius.
By default the orientation of the dart is on a plane that is perpendicular to the intersection
curve of the two sets of faces, but you can define the orientation yourself.
First Set
Lets you select the faces for the first set. You can select one or more faces for the face set.
Second Set
Lets you select the faces for the second set. You can select one or more faces for the face
set.
Location Curve
Lets you select a location curve when there is more than one possible curve that you could
select. Specifically, this would be with disconnected intersection curves between two face
sets. All candidate location curves are highlighted. When you select a candidate location
curve, a preview of the Dart feature displays and you are immediately advanced to the next
selection step.
Location Plane
Lets you optionally specify the position of the dart feature relative to a plane or datum plane.
Orientation Plane
Lets you optionally select a plane for the orientation of the dart feature.

Dart Feature - Procedure
1. Use the First Set selection step to select the first group of faces on which the dart is
to be located.
2. Use the Second Set selection step to select the second group of faces on which the
dart is to be located.
3. Use the Method selection step to specify how to locate the dart, either Along Edge or
Position.
4. Specify the Dimensions of the required dart, the angle, depth and radius.
5. Click OK or Apply to create the Dart feature

Thread
This option lets you create symbolic or detailed threads on features with cylindrical faces.
These features include holes, cylinders, bosses, and subtractive or additive sweeps of circular
curves. You can create both symbolic and detailed threads.
Symbolic - Symbolic threads are displayed as a dashed circle on the face or faces that will
be threaded. Symbolic threads use external thread table files, which you can customize for
your specific thread requirements, to determine default parameters. Symbolic threads cannot
be copied or instanced once created, but you can create multiple and instanced copies at
creation time. See the figure below for examples of symbolic threads.

Symbolic Threads - External on the Left, Internal on the Right
Detailed - Detailed threads look more realistic, but take considerably longer to create and
update because of their complex geometry and display. Detailed threads use embedded
tables for the default parameters, and can be copied or instanced after creation. Detailed
threads are fully associative; if the feature is modified, its thread updates accordingly. You
can choose to make a symbolic thread partly associative, or specify a fixed length. Partly
associative means that if the thread is modified, the feature will update (but not vice versa).

Detailed Thread

Thread Dialog Options
Thread Symbolic - Symbolic threads are displayed as a dashed circle on the face or
Type faces that will be threaded. Symbolic threads use external thread table files,
which you can customize for your specific thread requirements, to determine
default parameters. Symbolic threads cannot be copied or instanced once
created, but you can create multiple and instanced copies at creation time.
Detailed - Detailed threads look more realistic, but take considerably longer to
create and update because of their complex geometry and display. Detailed
threads use embedded tables for the default parameters, and can be copied or
instanced after creation.
Major The largest diameter of the thread.
Diameter
Minor The smallest diameter of the thread.
Diameter
Pitch The distance from a point on a thread to a corresponding point on the next
thread, measured parallel to the axis.
Angle The angle included between the sides of the thread measured in a plane through
the axis of the threads.
Callout References the thread table entry that provides default values for symbolic
threads.
Shaft Size / Shaft Size appears for external symbolic threads. Tapped Drill Size appears for
Tapped internal symbolic threads. This option does not appear when the Thread Type is
Drill Size Detailed.
Method Defines the thread manufacturing method, such as Rolled, Cut, Ground and
Milled. This option only appears for the symbolic Thread Type.
Form Determines which lookup table is used to obtain the parameter defaults.
Examples of Form options are unified, metric, trapezoidal, acme and buttress.
This option only appears for the symbolic Thread Type.
Number of Lets you specify whether a single thread or multiple threads should be created.
Starts This option does not appear when the Thread Type is Detailed.
Tapered If this option is toggled ON, the symbolic thread will be tapered. This option does
not appear when the Thread Type is Detailed.
Full Thread If this option is toggled ON, the symbolic thread will update when the cylinder's
length changes. This option does not appear when the Thread Type is Detailed.
Length The distance from the selected starting face to the end of the thread, measured
parallel to the axis. For symbolic threads, defaults are supplied by lookup tables.
Manual Turning this option on during creation of a symbolic thread lets you enter values
Input for options that would otherwise be supplied from the lookup table. The Manual
Input option does not appear when the Thread Type is Detailed.
Choose For symbolic threads, this option lets you choose a standard thread table entry
from Table from the lookup table.
Include If a selected face belongs to an instance array, this option lets you apply the
Instances thread to the other instances. This option does not appear when the Thread Type
is Detailed.
Rotation Lets you specify whether the thread should be Right Hand or Left Hand.
Select Start Lets you specify a new starting location for a symbolic or detailed thread by
selecting a planar face on a solid body, or a datum plane.

Terminology

Thread Creation Parameters
Major Diameter is the largest diameter of the thread. For internal threads, the diameter must
be larger than the cylindrical face diameter.
Minor Diameter is the smallest diameter of the thread. For external threads, the diameter
must be smaller than the cylindrical face diameter.
Pitch is the distance from a point on a thread to a corresponding point on the next thread,
measured parallel to the axis.
Angle is the angle included between the sides of the thread measured in a plane through the
axis of the threads. The default is 60 degrees.
Length is the distance from the selected starting face to the end of the thread, measured
parallel to the axis.
Creating a Symbolic Thread
To create symbolic threads:
1. Choose Symbolic for the Thread Type.
2. Choose the thread manufacturing Method.
3. Choose the Form for the thread.
4. Select one or more cylindrical placement faces.
5. Modify the parameters as desired.
6. Callout references the thread table entry that provides the default values.
7. Choose Tapered if you want the thread to be tapered.
8. If you want the thread to update when the cylinder changes, choose Full Thread.
9. If a selected face belongs to an instance array, you can apply the thread to the other
instances by choosing Include Instances.
10. Decide the rotation of the thread to be, either a Right Hand or a Left Hand thread.
11. Choose Select start if you want to specify a new starting location for the thread.
12. Choose OK or Apply.
Questions
1. As a best practice how many primitives can be used?
2. is it possible to give negative taper in Boss?
3. For creating a Pad or Pocket on a non-planar face what method would you
choose?
4. What are the different types of taper in Extrude?
5. What is the difference between Until selected and Until Extended in Extrude?
6. What are the Boolean Operations?
7. what is the range of half angle in Cone?
8. is it possible to produce a Dove Tail slot for certain length?
9. What is the default angle in Thread?
10. What are the different types of Slot?

Associative Copy

1. Extract
2. Composite Curve
3. Instance Feature
4. Mirror Feature
5. Mirror Body
6. Instance Geometry
7. Promote

Extract

Use this command to create a body by extracting an object from another body. You
can extract a face, a region of faces or an entire body.
Extract options

Type

Specifies the type of extract feature to create. Select from the following
options
• Face — Creates a sheet body of the selected faces to extract.
Type
• Region of Faces — Creates a sheet body which is a collection of
faces that are related to the seed face and limited by boundary faces.
• Body — Creates an extracted associative copy of an entire body.

Faces to Extract

Appears only when Type is set to Face.

Face Option Lets you specify the type of faces you want to extract. Select from the
following options:
• Single Face — Extracts the selected face.
• Adjacent Faces — Extracts the faces immediately adjacent to the
selected face (the selected face is not included).
• Body Faces — Extracts all the faces in the same body as the
selected face.

Lets you select the faces to create the extract face feature.
Select Face

Seed Face

Appears only when Type is set to Region of Faces.

Lets you select the seed face. All other faces in the feature are related to the
seed face.
Select Face

Boundary Faces

Appears only when Type is set to Region of Faces.

Lets you select the boundaries for the Region of Faces type extract feature.
Select Face

Body to Extract

Appears only when Type is set to Body.

Lets you select the body to create the extract body feature.
Select Body

Region Options

Appears only when Type is set to Region of Faces.

Lets you specify if you want to collect those boundary faces whose edges
Traverse form a part of the interior loops, for each face encountered within the
Interior boundaries.
Edges

Use Tangent Lets you use the tangent edge angle for manufacturing applications. See the
Edge Angle Manufacturing Help for more information.

Angle Available only when the Use Tangent Edge Angle check box is selected.
Tolerance Sets the angle tolerance to the value you specify.

Settings

Fix at Current Lets you fix the timestamp at which the feature is placed.
Timestamp

Lets you hide the original geometry when the extracted feature is created, if
Hide Original
the original geometry is a single face sheet body.
Lets you create an extracted face without any holes that are present in the
Delete Holes original face.

Available only for Face type extract feature.
Lets you convert one or more faces from any type of body into sheet bodies.
You can select the underlying surface type from the following types:
• Same as Original — converts the selected faces into sheets,
maintaining the original underlying surface type.
• Polynomial Cubic — converts the selected faces to polynomial cubic
B-surface type sheets. Note that this option almost always
approximates the original faces, so they may not be replicated
exactly. However, a polynomial cubic B-surface type sheet is actually
just an array of parametric cubic (PC) patches which can be exported
Surface Type to almost all other CAD, CAM, and CAE applications
• General B-surface — converts the selected faces to more general B-
surface types. The resulting sheets may be rational (rather than
polynomial), and their degrees may not be cubic (a degree of three).
This option is more likely to exactly replicate your original faces, but
these resulting B-surface type sheets are more difficult to transfer to
other systems.
Sometimes the system replicates the original surfaces exactly, but other times
may have to approximate them, depending on the type of output you chose
and the type of original surfaces you selected.

Preview

Appears only when Type is set to Region of Faces.

Preview
Preview Region shows a preview of the resulting extracted region feature
Region
once you have selected the faces.
Finished
Finished Preview closes the preview of the extracted region of faces.
Preview

Composite Curve

Use the Composite Curve command to extract curves and edges from the work part.
To extract from other parts in the same assembly, use the Composite Linked Curve
command.

Composite Curve options

Curve

Selects the curves or edges to be extracted as composite curves. Use the
Selection Intent options on the Selection Bar to aid selection of multiple
Select Curve curves.

Reverses the inferred direction of all curve loops.
Reverse
Direction

Available only if you select a loop of curves to create the composite curve
feature.
Specify Origin
Lets you specify the origin curve from the loop of curves.
Curve

Settings

Creates an associative composite curve feature. This option is not
Associative
available while editing a composite curve feature.

Hides the original curve when the composite feature is created.
Hide Original

Allow Self-
Allows selection of self-intersecting curves as input curves.
intersection

Instance Feature

Creates an instance feature array from existing features. You can define a
rectangular or circular array, mirror a body about a datum plane and mirror a feature
through a datum plane or planar face.
An instance is a shape-linked feature, similar to a copy. You can create instances of both
features and feature sets. Since all instances of a feature are associated, you can edit the
parameters of the feature and those changes are reflected in every instance of the feature.
Using instance arrays allows you to:
• Quickly create patterns of features such as bolt hole circles.
• Create a number of similar features and add them to the model in one step.
• Edit all instanced features in one step.
As the instances are created, the Boolean operation is defined by that of each of the
features that was selected for instancing. For example, if you select a boss and a hole, the
instance of the boss is added and the instance of the hole subtracted, from the solid body
to which they are attached.
The following instance array options are available:
Rectangular Lets you create a linear array of instances from one or more selected features.
Array

Circular Array Lets you create a circular array of instances from one or more selected
features.

Pattern Face Opens the Pattern Face dialog under Direct Modeling, to let you make copies
of a face set. Pattern Face is similar to the Instance function, but is easier to
use, and you do not have to have a feature-based model to use it.

You cannot instance the following objects:
• Shells
• Chamfers
• Blends
• Offset sheets
• Datum
• Trimmed sheet bodies
• Instance sets
• Draft features
• Free form features
• Trimmed features

Instance Array Types
You can create three types of rectangular and circular instance arrays:
General Creates an instance array from existing features and validates all geometry. An
instance of a General array is allowed to cross an edge of the face. Also, instances
in a General array can cross over from one face to another.

Simple Similar to a General instance array, but it speeds up the instance array creation by
eliminating excessive data validation and optimizing operations.

Identical The fastest way to create an instance array; it does the least amount of validation,
then copies and translates all the faces and edges of the master feature. Each
instance is an exact copy of the original. You can use this method when you have a
great many instances, and you are sure they are all exactly the same.

Rectangular Array

This option lets you create a linear array of instances from one or more selected features.
Rectangular instance arrays can be either two-dimensional in XC and YC (several rows of
features) or one-dimensional in XC or YC (one row of features). These instance arrays are
generated parallel to the XC and/or YC axes based on the number and offset distance you
enter.
Enter Parameters Dialog Options
General The type of instance array you wish to create.
Simple
Identical
Number Defines the total number of instances to be generated parallel to the XC axis of
Along XC the WCS. This number includes the existing feature you are instancing.
XC Offset Defines the spacing for the instances along the XC axis. This spacing is
measured from a point on one instance to the same point on the next instance
along XC axis.
Number Defines the number of instances to be generated parallel to the YC axis of the
Along YC WCS. This number includes the existing feature you are instancing.
YC Offset Defines the spacing for the instances along the YC axis. This spacing is
measured from one instance to the next along the YC axis.
Rectangular Array Procedure
Here is the basic procedure for creating a rectangular instance array:
1. From the Instance dialog, click Rectangular Array.
2. Select the features you want to instance.
3. In the Enter Parameters dialog, specify the array method (General, Simple, or
Identical), the Number Along XC, the XC Offset, the Number Along YC and the YC
Offset.
4. Choose OK. The system displays a preview in the graphics window of how the array
will be distributed.
5. Choose Yes to create the instance array, or No to return to the Enter Parameters
dialog.
Circular Array
This option lets you create a circular array of instances from one or more selected features.
You specify:
• The array method
• The rotation axis about which the instances are generated
• The total number of instances in the array (including the original feature)
• The angle between the instances
After you specify the rotation axis, the following options appear:
Enter Parameters Dialog Options
General, Simple, Identical The type of instance array.
Number The total number of instances created in the circular
array, including the existing feature you are instancing.
Angle The angle between the instances.
Circular Array Procedure
Here is the basic procedure for creating a circular instance array:
1. From the Instance dialog, click Circular Array.
2. Select the features you want to instance.
3. In the Enter Parameters dialog, specify the array method (General, Simple, or
Identical), the total Number of instances and the Angle between instances. Then,
choose OK.
4. Choose Point & Direction or Datum Axis to establish the rotation axis.
5. Choose Yes to create the instance array, or No to return to the Enter Parameters
dialog.
Pattern Face Overview
Pattern Face lets you make copies of a face set. It is similar to the Instance
function, but is easier to use, and you do not have to have a feature-based
model to use it. It is also faster and more straightforward. Use this function
when you have a set of faces and you want to make a rectangular or circular
pattern of them.
Mirror Body
The Instance Mirror Body option lets you mirror an entire body about a datum plane. You can
use this, for example, to form the other hand of a lefthand or right hand part. When you use
this option, the system creates a feature whose name is Mirror. This feature is time stamped
and listed in the when you use Information-> Feature, just like other features. When you
mirror a body, the Mirror feature is associative to the original body - it has no editable
parameters of its own.
Mirror Body Procedure
To create a mirrored body, follow these steps:
1. From the Instance dialog, click Mirror Body.
2. Select one or more bodies to mirror.
3. Select a datum plane. On selecting the datum plane, the body is then mirrored.
Mirror Feature
The Instance Mirror Feature option lets you create symmetrical models by mirroring selected
features through a datum plane or planar face. Mirror Feature, however, lets you mirror
features within a body.
Mirror Feature Procedure
1. From the Instance dialog, click Mirror Feature.
2. From the Mirror Feature dialog, click the Feature to Mirror selection step option.
3. If necessary, use the Filter field to limit the features shown in the Features in Part
listing.
4. Highlight the features in the Features in Part listing that you wish to mirror, and use
the Add button to add them to the Features in Mirror listing.
5. If desired, turn on the Add Dependencies option, to include feature dependencies of
the selected features that are to be mirrored.
6. If desired, turn on the All in Body option, to mirror all features present in the body.
7. Click the Mirror Plane selection step option. Move the cursor to the graphics window
and select the datum plane or planar face to be used to reflect the feature during the
mirror operation.
8. Click OK or Apply. The features in the Features in Mirror listing are mirrored across
the mirror plane.

Instance Geometry
Use Instance Geometry to create copies of objects. You can copy bodies, faces,
edges, curves, points, datum planes, and datum axes. You can create the copies in mirror,
linear, circular, and irregular patterns, as well as along a tangent continuous section.
Instance Geometry options
Type

Specifies the method you use to create instance geometry. Each type lets you create an
instance of geometry using a method that is best suited to the geometry and your design
intent. When you edit an instance geometry feature, you can change its type, defining objects,
and associative status.
Select a type by either clicking the buttons or by selecting an option from the Type list.

Instance Geometry types
Click the following links for details about each instance geometry Type:

From/To — Creates instance geometry by copying objects from one point or CSYS
location to another point or CSYS location.

Mirror — Creates instance geometry by copying objects across a mirror plane.

Translate — Creates instance geometry by copying objects in a specified direction.

Along Path — Creates instance geometry by copying objects along the path of a curve
or edge. You can add an offset rotation angle to each instance.

Rotate — Creates instance geometry by rotating copies of objects around a specified
point. You can add an offset distance between the rotated copies.

Geometry to Instance (available with all types)

Lets you select objects to copy as instances of geometry.
You can select solid bodies, sheet bodies, faces, edges, curves, points,
Select Object
datum planes, and datum axes.

Settings (available with all types)

Creates a fully associative instance geometry feature.
If you clear this check box, you get separate unparameterized copies
Associative instead of an instance geometry feature.
An instance geometry feature displays the name Instance Geometry in the
Part Navigator.

Preview (available with all types)

Generates a preview when you specify the minimum parameters needed to
Preview create the feature.
This option is selected by default.

Computes the operation and displays the result. When you click OK or
Apply, the software reuses the computation, making the creation process
Show Result faster.

Appears when Show Result is active.
Exits the result display and returns you to the dialog box.
Undo Result

Questions
1. By using Extract can you extract an entire body?
2. Can you instance free form features?
3. What are the three types of instance arrays?
4. What is the difference between Mirror Body and Mirror Feature?
5. In which type of array edge crossover is possible?

Combine Bodies

1. Unite
2. Subtract
3. Intersect
4. Emboss Sheet
5. Sew
6. Patch
7. Quilt
8. Unsew

Unite
The Unite boolean function let you combine the volume of two or more bodies into a single
body. You have the option to save and retain unmodified copies of the target and tool bodies.
This option creates a UNITE feature.
You can unite solids with solids. You cannot unite a solid body and a sheet body, or a sheet
body and a sheet body. The table below contains an overview of which Unite Boolean
operations are allowed.
Target Tool Allowed?
Solid body Solid body Yes
Solid body Sheet body No
Sheet body Solid body No
Sheet body Sheet body No

Dialog Options
Unite Dialog Options
Selection Target Body - Use this step to select a target solid body that you want to modify
Steps with one or more tool solid bodies. The target body is united with the tool bodies.
Tool Body - Lets you select one or more tool solid bodies to use to modify the
selected target body. The tool bodies are untied with the target body.
Retain Saves the specified tool bodies for the unite operation. Use this option if you want
Tool to save a copy of the tool bodies in an unmodified state.
Retain Saves the target body for the unite operation. Use this option if you want to save a
Target copy of the target body in an unmodified state.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you preview
Upon the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common to Selection
Apply Steps dialogs.
Unite Basic Procedure
To use Unite, perform these steps:
1. Select the target body.
2. Select one or more tool bodies.
3. If you wish to save an unmodified copy of the original target body, turn on Retain
Target.
4. If you wish to save an unmodified copy of the original tool bodies, turn on Retain Tool.
5. Choose OK. The target body is modified by the creation of four UNITE features, and
a new solid body is created that contains the combined volumes of all the selected
bodies.

C. Subtract
The Subtract option creates SUBTRACT features that let you use tool bodies to remove
volume from a target body. This operation can leave empty space where the subtracted target
body existed. You have the option to save and retain unmodified copies of the target and tool
bodies.
Dialog Options
Subtract Dialog Options
Selection Target Body - Use this step to select a target sheet or solid body from which you
Steps want to subtract one or more tool bodies.
Tool Body - Lets you select one or more tool sheet or solid bodies to subtract
from the selected target body.
Filter Use the Filter to restrict selectable objects. Options are All, Sheet and Solid Body.
Retain Saves the specified tool bodies for the subtract operation. Use this option if you
Tool want to save a copy of the selected tool bodies, which will remain unmodified.
The Retain Tool option is not available when editing a SUBTRACT feature.
Retain Saves the target body for the subtract operation. Use this option if you want to
Target save a copy of the target body, which remains unmodified.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you preview
Upon the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common to Selection
Apply Steps dialogs.
Basic Subtract Procedure
To use Subtract, perform these steps:
1. Select the target body.
2. Select one or more tool bodies. In the following example figure, four cylinders are
selected for the tool bodies.
3. If you wish to save an unmodified copy of the original target body, turn on Retain
Target.
4. If you wish to save an unmodified copy of the original tool bodies, turn on Retain Tool.
5. Choose OK. The target body is modified, and volume is removed by the creation of
four SUBTRACT features.

Intersect
This option lets you create a body containing the volume shared by two different bodies. You
can intersect solids with solids, sheets with sheets, and a sheet with a solid, but not a solid
with a sheet. An INTERSECT feature is created by this option. Intersect can leave empty
space where the intersected target and tool bodies existed. You have the option to save and
retain unmodified copies of the target and tool bodies.
To intersect a sheet body with a solid body, select the sheet as the target and the solid as the
tool.
The table below contains an overview of the Intersect Boolean operations allowed.
Target Tool Allowed?
Solid body Solid body Yes
Solid body Sheet body No
Sheet body Solid body Yes
Sheet body Sheet body Yes

Dialog Options
Intersect Dialog Options
Selection Target Body - Use this step to select a target sheet or solid body that you want to
Steps intersect with one or more tool bodies.
Tool Body - Lets you select one or more tool sheet or solid bodies to intersect
with the selected target body.
Filter Use the Filter to restrict selectable objects. Options are All, Sheet and Solid Body.
Retain Saves the specified tool bodies for the intersect operation. Use this option if you
Tool want to save a copy of the selected tool bodies, which remain unmodified.
Retain Saves the target body for the intersect operation. Use this option if you want to
Target save a copy of the target body, which remain unmodified.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you preview
Upon the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common to Selection
Apply Steps dialogs.
Intersect Basic Procedure
To use Intersect, follow these steps:
1. Select the target body.
2. Select the tool body.
3. If you wish to save an unmodified copy of the original target body, turn on Retain
Target.
4. If you wish to save an unmodified copy of the original tool bodies, turn on Retain Tool.
Choose OK. The target body is modified, and volume is changed by creation of an
INTERSECT feature.

Emboss Sheet - Overview
The Emboss Sheet function allows you to incorporate part of the shape associated with one
or more solid bodies into a sheet. All that is needed is a target sheet and one or more tool
bodies, positioned so that they intersect the sheet in the areas where the shapes of the
bodies are to be transferred onto the sheet. The Keep Tool Shapes on: option indicates on
which "side" of the sheet that the solid body shapes are to be added.
Emboss Sheet - Dialog Fields
Emboss Sheet Options
Selection Use these selection steps to specify the target sheet and tool bodies:
Steps Target Sheet - Lets you select the sheet whose shape is to be changed. After
the sheet is selected, a vector is drawn showing the "positive" side of the sheet.
Tool Solids Lets you select one or more bodies that intersect the target sheet.
Keep Tool Specifies which part of the tool bodies are added to the sheet.
Shapes on: Same Side as Sheet Normal - The portions of the tool bodies that lie on the
same side of the sheet as the displayed sheet normal vector are added to the
sheet’s shape. The portions of the tool bodies on the other side of the sheet
are discarded.
Opposite Side as Sheet Normal - The portions of the tool bodies that lie on
the opposite side of the sheet as the displayed sheet normal vector are added
to the sheet’s shape. The portions of the tool bodies on the same side of the
sheet as the normal are discarded.
Confirm Lets you preview the results and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is
Upon Apply common to Selection Steps dialogs.

Emboss Sheet - Procedure
1. Use the Target Sheet option to select a sheet to be modified.
2. Use the Tool Solid(s) option to select one or more bodies to be used to modify the
sheet.
3. Change the Keep Tool Shapes On: option, if desired.
4. Click OK or Apply to emboss the sheet.

Sew
The Sew option lets you join together two or more sheet bodies, thus creating a single sheet.
If the collection of sheets to be sewn encloses a volume, a solid body is created. The selected
sheets must not have any gaps larger than the specified tolerance. Otherwise, the resultant
body will be a sheet, not a solid.
Dialog Options
Sew Dialog Options
Selection The Selection Steps icons let you specify the target and tools for the Sew
Steps operation. There are four Selection Steps icons available. When the Sew Input
Type is set to Sheet, only the first two Sheet icons are available. When the
Sew Input Type is set to Solid, only the last two Solid icons are available.
Target Sheet - when this selection step is active, you can choose the target
sheet. Only available when the Sew Input Type is set to Sheet.
Tool Sheets - when this selection step is active, you can choose one or more
tool sheets. Only available when the Sew Input Type is set to Sheet.
Target Faces - when this selection step is active, you can choose one or more
target faces from the first solid. The faces must be coincident with one or more
tool faces. Only available when the Sew Input Type is set to Solid.
Tool Faces - when this selection step is active, you can choose one or more
tool faces from the second solid. Only available when the Input Type is set to
Solid.
Sew Input Defines whether you are sewing together sheets or solid bodies. Choose Sheet
Type or Solid accordingly.
Output Lets you create more than one sewn sheet. This option is only available when
Multiple the Sew Input Type is set to Sheet.
Sheets
Sew All If a selected body is part of an instance array and you have turned this option
Instances ON, the entire instance array is sewn. Otherwise, only the selected instance is
sewn.
Sew The maximum distance that edges to be sewn together can be separated for
Tolerance the sew operation to succeed. Edges to be sewn together will sew if the
distance between them is less than the specified tolerance. If the distance
between them is greater than this tolerance, they will not sew together.
Search Lets you find the common faces between two solid bodies. The edges of the
common common faces will be highlighted.
faces
Target Area Displays the total area of the selected target faces and the tool faces.
Tool Area
Confirm Upon Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common
to Selection Steps dialogs.

Basic Sew Procedures
To sew sheets together:
1. Choose Sheet. The Target sheet icon is selected.
2. Select the target sheet.
3. Choose the Tool sheets icon, and select the tool sheet(s) to be sewn to the target.
4. If you want to create more than one sewn sheet, choose Output Multiple Sheets.
5. Define the Sew Tolerance.
6. Choose Apply or OK.
To sew solids together:
1. Choose Solid. The Target faces icon is selected.
2. Select the target face(s).
3. Choose the Tool faces icon, and select the face(s) on the tool solid that are
coincident with the target solid's selected face(s).
4. If a selected body is part of an instance array, and you want all the instances to be
sewn, choose Sew All Instances.
5. Define the Sew Tolerance.
6. Choose Search common faces if you want to see where the sewing will occur.
7. Choose Apply or OK.
Unsew overview

Use the Unsew command to separate an existing sheet body or solid body into
multiple bodies. The selected faces are unsewn along the edges of the selected face,
resulting in multiple bodies.
Unsew is useful in a workflow where you want to perform additional modeling tasks on a
specific region of an existing model. You can now unsew a model without referencing its
history.
The following graphic shows an unsewn face of a sheet body.
Choose Insert→Combine Bodies→Unsew.

Patch
This option lets you use a sheet body to replace some of the faces of a solid body. You can
also patch a sheet to another sheet.
Patch is useful when:
• Small gaps or small mismatches in surface normals between tool and target bodies
might cause other operations, such as Trim Body or Split Body, to fail.

• You want to apply a handshaped blend.
• You want to create a hole patch that has a more complex shape than those provided
by the Hole options.

Dialog Options
Patch Dialog Options
Selection Lets you select the geometry needed for the Patch feature.
Steps Target Body - Lets you select a body to be the target for the patch feature.
Tool Sheet - Lets you select a sheet to act as the tool for the patch feature.
Tool Face - If you want to use a single face of a tool sheet that has multiple
faces, click the Tool Face icon and choose the face that you want.
Create Hole Lets you patch a closed sheet to the target body to create a hole.
Patch
Reverse A conehead vector displays the default direction in which the target body
Removal faces will be removed. To reverse the direction, click the Reverse Removal
Direction Direction button.
Confirm Upon Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them.
Basic Patch Procedure
1. Select the target body, which can be a sheet or a solid.
2. Select the tool sheet to patch.
3. Define the side of the sheet from which the target body faces are removed.
4. If you wish, you can select one of the tool sheet's faces.
5. If a closed sheet is to be patched to the target body turn on the Create Hole Patch
option.
6. Choose OK or Apply.

Quilt
This option lets you combine several surfaces into one surface. The system creates a
single B-surface that approximates a four-sided region lying on several existing faces.
The system projects points from a driver surface along a vector or along the driver surface
normal vectors onto the target surfaces (the ones being approximated). These projected
points are then used to construct the approximating B-surface. You can think of the
projection as a process of emitting a ray from each original point to the target surfaces.

Dialog Options
Quilt Surface Dialog Options

Driver Type Lets you specify the type of driver surface.

Projection Lets you indicate whether you want the direction of the projection of the driver
Type surface onto the target surfaces to be a single vector, or vectors which are
normal to the driver surface.

Projection Used to limit the distance that points are projected onto the target surface
Limit when the projection vector may pass through the target surface more than
once. This option is active only when the Along Driver Normals projection type
is used.

Tolerances Lets you define inside and edge distance and angle tolerances for the Quilt
feature.

Show Check When this option is toggled ON, the points that are calculated during the
Points approximation of the quilted surface are displayed.

Check for When this option is ON, the system checks for and tries to handle overlapping
Overlaps surfaces.
Questions
1. What is meant by retain tool in Boolean operation?
2. How to unite two solid bodies which is not in touch?
3. What is the default tolerance value in sew?
4.What does assembly cut mean?

Trim
Divide Face
Join Face
Trim Body
Split Body
Trimmed Sheet
Trim and Extend
Untrim
Divide Face overview

Use this command to divide one or more faces of an existing body (or bodies) in a
single operation using multiple dividing objects like curves, edges, faces, datum planes,
and/or solid bodies. The faces to be divided and the dividing objects are associative, that
is, if either input object is changed, the results update to reflect the changes.
Divide Face is commonly used to create parting edges on models of parts, patterns,
molds, or dies.

Divide face feature example

Face selected for the divide face operation

Curve selected as the dividing object

Faces resulting from the divide face operation

You can add a single Divide Face feature to multiple bodies.

• Choose Insert→Trim→Divide Face.

• On the Feature Operation toolbar, click Divide Face.
Join Faces
You can choose from the following two methods to join faces on a solid body:

On Same Surface Lets you remove redundant faces, edges, and vertices from selected
sheet and solid bodies.
Convert to B- Lets you join multiple faces into a single B-surface type face.
Surface

On Same Surface
This option lets you remove redundant faces, edges, and vertices from selected sheet and
solid bodies. You may need to use this option after a Subdivide Face operation.
For example, if you subdivide a face and subsequently discover that you no longer need or
want that subdivision, you can perform a Join Face on the body to remove the now
unwanted edges and/or faces.

Convert to B-Surface
You can use this option to join multiple faces into a single B-surface type face. The
selected faces must be adjacent to each other, belong to the same solid body, have
matching u-v box ranges, and the edges at which they join must be isoparametric.
When you select more than two faces for the join operation, the system attempts to match
the faces in pairs. You must select the faces in order so that the matching pairs share
edges (see the figure below).

General Tips and Techniques
Immediately after a Join Face operation, you can use Undo to reverse the effect of the
operation and restore the body to its previous state.
You can change the tolerance values used to join faces of a body by editing the distance
tolerance and the angle tolerance
Trim Body

This option lets you trim one or more target bodies using a face or datum plane. You
can select a portion of the body that you want to retain, and the trimmed bodies take the
shape of the trimming geometry.

Trim Body and Vector Direction
The direction of the normal vector determines which portion of the target body is kept. The
vector points away from the portion of the body that is kept. The following figures show how
the direction of the vector affects which portion of the body is kept.
Trimming body

Cylinder axis

Vector direction pointing towards the axis of the cylinder

Target body

Resulting trim body feature
Trimming body

Cylinder axis

Vector direction pointing away from the axis of the cylinder

Target body

Resulting trim body feature
In the following figure, the displayed direction is accepted. Notice that the resulting body is
the portion of the target body that the vector pointed away from.
Selected datum plane

Accepted direction

Where do I find it?
Modeling → Insert → Trim → Trim Body

Feature Operation toolbar → (Trim Body).

Trimmed Sheet
This option lets you create an associative trimmed sheet.
Trimmed Sheet Dialog Options
Selection Steps Target Sheet Body - Lets you select the target surface body. The cursor
position that you use to select the target sheet body also specifies a region
point, which is used with the Region selection step.
Projection Vector - Lets you select a datum axis when your Projection
Along method is Datum Axis.
Trim Boundary - Lets you choose the trimming objects, which can be
faces, edges, curves and datum planes.
Region - Lets you choose regions that will be retained or discarded when
the surface is trimmed.
Filter Helps you select the objects that you want by limiting the types of objects
that are selectable.
Retain Trim Maintains the selection of the trimming boundary, so that you can use it
Boundary again with different target sheet bodies.
Allow Target Helps you to filter out the edges of the target sheet body as trimming
Edge Selection objects. This option is available when the Projection Along option is set to
Face Normals.
Projection Along Lets you define the projection direction for the curves/edges to be imprinted.
You can choose between Face Normals, Datum Axis, ZC-Axis, YC-Axis,
XC-Axis, and Vector Constructor.
Regions will be Lets you define whether regions you select will be kept or discarded when
the surface is trimmed.
Tolerance Used when the trimming edges are imprinted on the target body.
Output Exact This option produces intersection edges as imprinted edges, except when
Geometry the projection is along face normals and edges or curves are used for the
trimming object.
Show Helps you to see and deselect unimprinted trimming objects.
Unimprinted Show Unimprinted Objects - When chosen, highlights in the graphics
Objects / Show window all trimming objects that are not imprinted. The label of the option
All Trimming changes to Show All Trimming Objects.
Objects Show All Trimming Objects - When chosen, highlights in the graphics
window all selected trimming objects. The label of the option changes to
Show Unimprinted Objects.
Confirm Upon Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is
common to Selection Steps dialogs.
Basic Procedure
To create a trimmed sheet:
1. First define a tolerance using the Tolerance option
2. Turn on Output Exact Geometry.
3. Use the Target Sheet Body selection step to select a target body to be trimmed.
4. Use the Projection Along option menu to specify a projection direction.
5. Use the Trim Boundary selection step to select the trimming objects that define the
boundaries.
6. Use the Region selection step to select the regions you want kept or discarded.
Click OK or Apply.

Trim and Extend - Overview
This option lets you extend and trim one or more surfaces using a set of tool objects, such as
curves, datum planes, or surface sets.
Trimming a Sheet
In this we trim a sheet with another sheet:
1. Set the Limit to Until Selected.
2. Select the target faces you want to trim.
3. Set the Extend Method to C2 Linear.
4. Select the Enable Preview option.
5. Click the Tool Selection button.
6. Select the tool edges of the sheet to trim against the target.
7. Look at the preview and determine if the trim operation is how you want it.
8. Set the Region option to Remove. The area on the target sheet on the same side as
the vector will be discarded in the trim and the opposite side will be retained.
9. Click the Okay button. The target sheet is trimmed against the tool sheet.
Trimming a Solid Body
In this we trim a solid body with a sheet body:
1. Set the Limit to Until Selected.
2. Select a face on the target solid body you want to trim.
3. Set the Extend Method to C2 Linear.
4. Select the Enable Preview option.
5. Click the Tool Selection button.
6. Select the tool edges of the sheet body to trim against the target body.
7. Look at the preview and determine if the trim operation is how you want it.
8. Set the Region option to Keep. The area on the target body on the same side as the
vector will be retained in the trim and the opposite side will be discarded.
9. Click the Okay button. The target body is trimmed against the tool body.
1.

Selected target edges with preview

Extending a Sheet Body
In this we extend the edges of an extracted face.
1. Set the Limit to Distance.
2. Enter a value in the data entry field.
3. Set the Extend Method to C2 Linear.
4. Select the Enable Preview option.
5. Select the target edges you want to extend.
6. Look at the preview and determine if the extend operation is how you want it.
7. Click the Okay button. The target edges are extended in a new TRIM_AND_EXTEND
feature.
Creating a Corner
In this we use Trim and Extend to create a corner:
1. Set the Limit to Until Selected.
2. Select a face on the target body on which to trim and create a corner.
3. Set the Extend Method to C2 Linear.
4. Select the Enable Preview option.
5. Select the Make Corner option.
6. Click the Tool Selection button.
7. Set Region to Remove and Selection Intent to Single.
8. Select the tool edge on the sheet body to use to create a corner on the target body.
9. Look at the preview and determine if the corner is how you want it. The direction of
the vector on the target, which shows the area, will be removed, as set by the Region
option.
Click the Okay button. The target body is trimmed and formed into a corner.
Untrim overview

The Untrim command enables you to remove imposed boundaries and extends
planar, cylindrical, and conical faces in the linear direction of the selected face.
Instead of extracting multiple faces and then extending them, use the Untrim command to
perform additional modeling tasks on a specific region of an existing model.
You can use faces of a solid body, or a sheet body as input. The selected faces are copied
and extended along their axis to create an associative untrim feature.
An untrimmed face is inherently unsewn.
For more information about the Unsew feature, see Unsew overview.
The following graphic shows an untrim feature.

Choose Insert→Tim→Untrim.

OFFSET/SCALE
D. Modeling Offset/Scale Options
Offset - Lets you create an offset sheet body from an existing face at a specified
distance (constant or variable) and direction.
Rough Offset - Lets you create an offset sheet body without self-intersections, sharp
edges or corners from a set of faces or sheet bodies using a large offset distance.
Offset Face - Lets you offset one or more faces of a body along the face normals.

Scale - Lets you scale solid and sheet bodies about the Work Coordinate System
(WCS). You can use uniform scaling, or you can scale independently in the XC, YC,
and ZC directions.
Thicken Sheet - Lets you offset or thicken a sheet body to create a solid body. The
offset is applied normal to the faces of the sheet body.
Hollow - Lets you hollow out or create a shell around a single solid body based on a
user specified thickness value.
Sheets to Solid Assistant - Produces solids from sets of unsewn sheet bodies, by
automating the process of sewing a set of sheets (Sew) and then thickening the result
(Thicken Sheet).
Wrap Geometry - Lets you simplify a detailed model by computing a solid envelope
that surrounds it, effectively "shrink wrapping" the model with a convex polyhedron of
planar faces.

Offset Surface
This option lets you create offset surfaces from one or more existing faces.
The system creates a true offset surface by offsetting points along normals of the selected
face. The specified distance is called the offset distance and the existing face is called the
base face. You may select any type of face as the base face. If you select multiple faces to
offset, multiple offset bodies are produced.

Constant Offset
The system automatically creates a constant offset surface at the Distance you entered.
If you delete a base surface, the system deletes the offset surface. If you transform the base
surface, the offset surface updates to a new position to maintain associativity.
Variable Offset
If you choose a single face to offset and then specify Variable, the Cue line asks that you
indicate four points on the base surface using the Point Constructor. For each point you
define you must also enter a Distance. Unless changed by you, the system retains the offset
distance value of the previous point. When you select and define the fourth point and
distance, the system creates the variable offset surface.
If you delete the base surface, the system deletes the variable offset surface as well. If you
transform the base surface, the variable offset surface updates to the corresponding new
position.
Procedure to Offset a Single Face
To create an offset surface, you must:
1. Select the face you wish to offset. A normal direction vector is displayed.
2. For a Constant Offset, enter a Distance and Edge Tolerance. For a variable offset
select Variable.
A positive distance value offsets the base face in the direction of the vector. A
negative value offsets the base face in the opposite direction. The offset distance
must be nonzero.

Rough Offset Overview
Rough Offset lets you create an offset sheet body without self-intersections, sharp edges or
corners from a set of faces or sheet bodies using a large offset distance. This option lets you
generate a large rough offset from a set of faces or sheet bodies when the Offset Face and
Offset Surface functions cannot.
Rough Offset Dialog Options
Rough Offset Dialog Options
Selection Offset Face/Sheet - Lets you select faces or sheet bodies that you wish to
Steps offset.
Offset CSYS - Lets you select or construct a coordinate system (CSYS) for the
offset, in which the Z direction indicates the offset direction, the X direction the
stepping or sectioning direction, and the Y direction the stepover direction. The
default CSYS is the current working CSYS.
Filter Lets you restrict, or "filter," objects during object selection. Can be set to Any,
Face or Sheet Body.
CSYS Lets you select or construct a CSYS for the offset using the standard CSYS
Constructor Constructor. Available when the Offset CSYS selection step is active.
Offset Lets you specify the distance for the offset.
Distance
Offset Lets you specify the deviation for the offset. The value you enter indicates the
Deviation allowable offset distance range.
Stepover Lets you specify the stepover distance.
Distance
Surface Lets you specify the method by which the system builds the rough offset
Generation surface.
Method Cloud Points - The system uses the same method to build the surface as that
of the From Point Cloud option. Selecting this method enables the Surface
Control options, which lets you specify the number of patches for the surface.
Through Curves - The system uses the same method to build the surface as
that of the Through Curves option. Note that if this option is specified, the
Boundary Trimming options are unavailable.
Rough Fit - The system uses a method to create the surface that is less
accurate than the other methods, but which can produce a surface when the
others fail to do so.
Show Use the preview option with the Through Curves and Rough Fit methods to see
Section the section curves that will be used to create the rough offset surface. The
Preview preview is available only for the Through Curves and Rough Fit surface
generation methods.
Surface Lets you determine how many patches are used to build the sheet. This option
Control is available only with the Cloud Points Surface Generation Method.
System Defined - The system automatically adds a calculated number of U
direction patches to give optimum results in building the new sheet.
User Defined - Enables the U Patches field, to let you specify how many U
direction patches you want to allow in building the sheet. The value must be at
least one.
Boundary Lets you specify the trim status of the new sheet.
Trimming No Trim - The sheet is created in a rough rectangular pattern, and is not
trimmed.
Trim - The sheet is trimmed against the edges of the surface used in the offset.
Boundary Curve - The sheet is untrimmed, but a curve is created on the sheet
corresponding to the boundary where the trim would have occurred if the Trim
option had been used.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Upon Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common
to Selection Steps dialogs.

Creating a Rough Offset
1. Use the Offset Face/Sheet selection step to select faces or sheet bodies to offset.
2. Use the Offset CSYS selection step and the CSYS Constructor to specify a CSYS. If
you skip this selection step the default current working CSYS is used, and the Z
direction will be the offset direction.
3. Specify an Offset Distance, an Offset Deviation and a Stepover Distance.
4. Specify the Surface Generation Method, either Cloud Points, Through Curves, or
Rough Fit.
5. Click OK or Apply.
Offset Face
You can use Offset Face to offset one or more faces or features of a body, or an entire body,
along the face normals.
The offset distance can be positive or negative, providing the topology of the body does not
change. A positive offset distance is measured along a vector normal to the face pointing
away from the solid.
After you select the desired faces or body and choose OK, the faces are moved and the body
is updated.

Basic Offset Face Procedure
To offset one or more faces, you must:
1. Enter an Offset Value.
2. Choose the Selection Intent rule that best lets you specify the faces you want to
offset.
3. Select the faces and choose OK or Apply.

Scale
This option lets you scale solid and sheet bodies. You can use uniform, axisymmetric or
general scaling methods. The operation is fully associative.
The scale is applied to the geometry of the body rather than to the independent features that
comprise the body. You can edit the Scale Type, Scale Factor, Reference Point, Reference
Axis and Reference CSYS using Edit -> Feature -> Parameters.
Scale Dialog Options
Type Lets you choose the type or method of scaling:
Uniform - scale uniformly in all directions.
Axisymmetric - scale with a specified scale factor (or multiplier), symmetrically
about a specified axis. This involves assigning one scaling factor along an axis
you specify, and another, single scaling factor to be applied to the other two axis
directions.
General - scale with different factors in all three X, Y, Z directions.
Selection There are four basic selection steps, although not all are available with every
Steps scaling Type method.
Body - Lets you select one or more solid or sheet bodies for the scale
operation. This step is required for all three Type methods.
Reference Point - Lets you specify a reference point from which the scale
operation is centered. The default reference point is the origin of the current
WCS, though you can specify another using the Snap Point tools. This step is
available only with the Uniform and Axisymmetric Types.
Reference Axis - Lets you specify a reference axis for the scale operation.
Available only with the Axisymmetric Type method. The default is the WCS Z
axis. You can change this using the Vector Method subfunction.
Reference CSYS - Lets you specify a reference coordinate system when using
the General Scale method. Selecting the Reference CSYS selection step
enables the CSYS Method button.
Scale Lets you specify the scaling factors (multipliers) by which the current size is to
Factors change. One, two or three scale factors are required, depending on the scale
Type.
For the Uniform type there is a single Scale Factor parameter to enter. For the
Axisymmetric type there are two scale factor parameters: Along Axis and Other
Directions. For the General type, there are three scale factors: X Direction, Y
Direction and Z Direction.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Upon Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common
to Selection Steps dialogs.

Scale Basic Procedure
To scale a body, follow these steps:
1. Select a solid or sheet body to scale.
2. Choose Uniform, Axisymmetric or General scaling type.
3. For Uniform and Axisymmetric, specify a Reference Point.
4. For Axisymmetric specify a Reference Axis (or accept the default Z axis).
5. For General specify a Reference CSYS (or accept the default ).
6. Enter the appropriate Scale Factors.
7. Choose OK or Apply.

Thicken Sheet
This option lets you offset or thicken a sheet body to create a solid body. The offset is applied
normal to the faces of the sheet body. In the following figure, compare the upper and lower
views of a sheet body that has been thickened. You can use Edit-> Feature-> Parameters or
Tools-> Expression to edit or change the offset parameters for a Thicken Sheet body. You
can use Information --> Feature to list the expression names and offset values for Thicken
Sheet body.

Sheet Body Before (Upper) and After (Lower) Thicken Sheet
Thicken Sheet Dialog Options
Selection Steps
Input Sheet Body Lets you select a sheet body to thicken.
Target Solid Body Lets you select a target solid for a Boolean operation with the new
feature. This icon will not be active if the Action you select is Create.
Other Options
First Offset / Let you specify one or two offsets for the Thicken Sheet feature. Positive
Second First Offset and Second Offset values are applied in the normal direction
Offset indicated by the displayed vector. Negative values are applied in the
opposite direction. The combination of the two offsets must generate a
nonzero thickness.
Tolerance Lets you change the Distance Tolerance for the thicken sheet operation.
Action Lets you create a new solid feature, or perform other Boolean operations
with a target solid body.
Show Failure If a thicken sheet error occurs, this button is enabled. Clicking the button
Data identifies the possible faces that may have caused the thicken sheet
operation to fail.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Upon Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is
common to Selection Steps dialogs.
Hollow
This option lets you hollow out a solid body, or create a shell around it, using specified
thickness values. You can assign individual thicknesses for faces, and select regions of faces
for piercing during hollowing.

Hollow Dialog Options
Type There are three types of Hollow operation.
Face - Lets you create a hollow by collecting pierced and offset faces.
Region - Lets you create a hollow based on a collection of faces that are
related to a "seed face," and which are limited by boundary faces.
Body - Lets you create a shell around a single solid body based on a
specified thickness value.
Selection Steps The Selection Steps change depending upon which Hollow Type is currently
active.
Pierced Face - Lets you select the faces to be pierced during the Hollow
operation. Used with the Face Type.
Offset Face - Lets you select which faces are to be offset from their original
positions during the hollow operation.
Solid body - Lets you select a solid body for a Hollow operation. Used only
with the Body Type.
Seed Faces - Lets you select one or more seed faces. Used only with the
Region Type.
Boundary Faces - Lets you select one or more boundary faces.
Filter Aids in selecting faces. Used with all Hollow Types.
Preview Region Highlights the region you have defined, to let you see if it is the way you
want it. Enabled after you have selected the seed and boundary faces. Used
only with the Region Type.
Default The default value for the thickness of all face offsets used by Hollow.
Thickness
Alternate Lets you specify a unique thickness value for offset faces. Available only
Thickness when the Offset Face selection step is active.
Offset Face Lists the offset faces you have selected for the hollow operation, and their
changeable thickness values. You can select entries in this list and assign them unique
window thickness values. Selecting an offset face entry highlights it in the graphics
window in cyan, verifying that it is the desired face. You can then enter a
unique offset value for the entry in the Alternate Thickness field.
Hollow Under some circumstances Hollow may need to replace exact geometry with
Tolerance tolerant geometry. In all situations where approximation is required, the new
geometry will have a tolerance less than or equal to the tolerance specified
in this field.
Show Failure Whenever a hollow error occurs, this button is enabled. Clicking the button
Data identifies the possible faces that may have caused the hollow operation to
fail.
Confirm Upon Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is
common to Selection Steps dialogs.

Hollow Basic Procedure
1. Choose the Type of hollow feature you wish to create, either Face, Region or Body.
2. Depending on the Type, choose the proper selection steps.
3. If desired, modify the Default Thickness and Alternate Thickness (optional).
4. Modify the Hollow Tolerance if desired (optional).
5. Choose OK or Apply.

Sheet to Solid Assistant
Sheet to Solid Assistant produces solids from sets of unsewn sheet bodies, by automating the
process of sewing a set of sheets (Sew) and then thickening the result (Thicken Sheet). If the
given sheets should cause this process to fail, an analysis is automatically done on them to
try to find the source of the problem. Sometimes this can result in a simple deduced remedy,
and sometimes the surfaces must be rebuilt.
Sheet to Solid Assistant can detect and correct many geometric conditions that would result in
thickening failures, and can be a useful tool when attempting to use data from external
CAD/CAM systems.
The option works by first performing a check of the input data to ensure it is valid. If the input
data appears valid, the system attempts to first sew it, then thickens the result, and finally
checks the validity of the result.
If for some reason the input data turns out to be invalid, then the problem geometry is
highlighted so you can edit or replace it.
Sheet to Solid Assistant Dialog Options
Selection Steps Target Sheet - Let you select the target sheet from which a solid will be
created. When you select a target sheet, an arrow displays on it that
indicates the direction of the First Offset.
Tool Sheets - Lets you select one or more tool sheets that you want to sew
to the target.
First Offset / Lets you specify one or two offsets for the thicken portion of the operation.
Second Offset These data entry fields work the same as with the Thicken Sheet option.
Sew Tolerance The maximum distance that edges to be sewn together can be separated
for the sew operation to succeed. This option works the same as that used
in the Sew function

Basic Sheet to Solid Assistant Procedure
1. Use the Target Sheet selection step to select a sheet on which you want to generate
a solid with thickness. An arrow displays on the sheet to indicate the direction of the
first offset.
2. [optional] Use the Tool Sheets selection step to select sheets you wish to sew to the
target. If you skip this step, there will be no sew operation, and only the thicken
operation will be attempted.
3. Enter First and Second Offset data to add thickness to the solid.
4. If you selected one or more tool sheets, enter a desired Sew Tolerance.
5. Click Apply. The system then performs a validity check of the input surfaces.
6. If the input sheets pass the first validity check, the system attempts to create the solid
body. If this succeeds, the solid body is created and is itself checked for validity. If the
new solid body passes the last validity check, creation of the solid becomes final.
7. Once you have made all adjustments click Apply. If all is well at this point, the solid is
created.

Wrap Geometry
Wrap Geometry lets you simplify a detailed model by computing a solid envelope to surround
it, effectively "shrink wrapping" it with a convex polyhedron of planar faces. The original model
can consist of any number of solids, sheets, curves and points.
Wrap Geometry works by converting the input geometry to points, which are then wrapped in
a single solid body composed of planar faces. The faces are offset slightly outward to ensure
that the wrapping envelope encompasses all of the selected geometry. The underlying
geometry is unaltered. If you wish, you can specify an additional offset by entering a value in
the Additional Offset field.
Since the result of the wrapping operation is a solid body, the input you specify must not be
coplanar.
The following figure shows how a solid body appears before and after it is wrapped.

Wrap Geometry can be useful if you are:
• Performing packaging studies (for example, to simplify a complex model)
• Performing space capturing studies (for example, to get an approximation of space
required for multiple disjointed objects)
• Converting wireframe data (for example, as a starting point for converting it to a solid
body)
• Hiding proprietary data (for example, to get a reasonable representation without
details)

Wrap Geometry Dialog Options
Selection Geometry to Wrap - Lets you select any number of solids, sheets, curves or
Steps points in the current work part that are to be wrapped.
Splitting Planes - Lets you use planes to split the input geometry. Separate
envelopes are calculated for each side of the plane, and the results are united
into a single body.
Filter The Filter options let you specify the types of geometry to include in the wrap.
Options are:
Any - Any objects in the selection mask are included in the wrap.
Body - Only solid bodies in the selection mask are included in the wrap.
Curve - Only curves in the selection mask are included in the wrap.
Point – Only points in the selection mask are included in the wrap.
Close Gaps Lets you specify the method to use to close gaps that may exist between offset
faces. Options include:
Sharp - Each planar face is extended until it meets adjacent faces.
Beveled - Planar faces are added in gaps to create a beveled effect. The
bevels do not get narrower than the value specified in the Distance
Tolerance data entry field, thus avoiding the creation of tiny faces in the
wrapping polyhedron. Gaps smaller than the Distance Tolerance value are
closed using sharp edges.
No Offset - Faces are not offset. This results in faster wrap times, but the
result usually does not enclose the original data.
Distance Determines the level of detailing of the wrapping polyhedron. The value you
Tolerance specify is used to generate the wrap points on the input data. The points are
then used to calculate the envelope. For curves, this value represents the
maximum chordal deviation. For bodies, this value represents the maximum
facet to surface deviation. The value defaults to one hundred times the part's
distance tolerance.
Additional Lets you set an additional offset beyond that generated by the system for the
Offset faces of the resulting body.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Upon Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them.
OK or Apply Clicking OK or Apply creates a WRAP_GEOMETRY feature consisting of a
single solid body making up the enclosing envelope.

Basic Wrap Geometry Procedure
To perform a wrap geometry operation:
1. Use the Geometry to Wrap selection step to select one or more bodies, curves or
points to be wrapped.
2. Choose a Close Gaps option to specify the method to use to close gaps that may
exist between offset faces.
3. Set the Distance Tolerance if necessary.
4. Set any Additional Offset that the wrapping operation may require.
5. Optionally use the Splitting Planes selection step if you wish to retain some of the
detail of the original geometry in the wrapping envelope.
6. Click OK or Apply to create the Wrap Geometry feature.
Questions
1. What is the difference between offset and rough offset?
2. What is the difference between scale and offset face?
3. In which scale sub option, scaling is possible in three directions individually?
4. What is the difference between thicken sheet and sheet to solid assistant?
5. Is it possible to give variable thickness is shell?
What is the function of wrap geometry?

DETAIL FEATURE
Modeling Detail Feature Options
Edge Blend - Lets you modify a solid body by rounding selected edges.
Face Blend - Lets you create a blend tangent to specified sets of faces.

Soft Blend - Lets you create blends that are more "aesthetic" and less "mechanical"
than standard NX blends.
Use this command to blend surfaces and apply tangent and curvature constraints to
the tangent curves of the blend.
Fillet – Lets you create fillet sheets of constant or variable radius between two faces
(from solid and/or sheet bodies).
Use this command to blend surfaces and apply tangent and curvature constraints to
the tangent curves of the blend.
Bridge - Lets you create a sheet body, either tangent or curvature continuous, that
joins two faces.
Spherical Corner - Lets you create a spherical face at a corner where three walls meet.

Chamfer - Lets you bevel edges of a solid body by defining the desired chamfer
dimensions.
Taper - Lets you apply a taper to faces or edges, relative to a specified vector.

Body Taper - Lets you create tapers designed for the casting process: tapers on both
sides of a parting surface, matching of tapers on both sides of a parting surface, and
automatically adding material to undercut regions.

Edge Blend Overview
Use Edge Blend to round selected edges that are shared by at least two faces. Blending
works as if it is rolling a ball along the edge being blended (the blend radius), keeping the ball
in contact with the faces that meet at the edge.
The blending ball rolls on the inside or outside of the faces, depending on whether you are
creating a rounded edge blend (removing material) or a fillet edge blend (adding material).
Procedure for Creating an Edge Blend
In this basic example, you create a constant radius edge blend feature using two sets of
edges.
1. Open the Edge Blend tool.
2. Select one or more edges for your first edge set.
3. Specify a radius for the edge set that will be applied to all of its edges using one of
the following methods:
• drag the radius drag handles, or
• enter a value for the radius in the dynamic input box. You can also specify a
radius in the dialog changeable window
4. Continue selecting edges for the first edge set.
5. After you have selected all of the edges for the first edge set, finalize it by doing one
of the following:
• click the Complete Set And Start Next Set Button, or
• click MB2.
6. Repeat the previous steps for each additional edge set you want to add to the blend
feature.
7. Click MB2 to complete the second edge set.
8. You can optionally do the following:
• Use the Stop Short selection step to insert points that halt the blend before its
normal end point.
• Change the Distance Tolerance.
• Specify Overflow options to handle those cases where the blend passes over
sharp edges, notches, or cavities.
• Select the Special Blend At Convex/Concave Y option to get an alternative
shape at Y-intersections.
9. If you want to change the radii of any of the blend's edges from constant to variable,
do either of the following:
• Use the Variable Radius selection step to vary the radius of the blend along
selected edges.
• Use the Setback selection step to change the shape and radius of corners in
the blend.
10. Click OK or Apply to create the blend feature.

E. Blend With a Constant Radius
Selection Steps
Use the selection steps to define edge sets for constant radius blends. Once you have
defined an edge set you can optionally add variable radii, setbacks, and stop short points to
them.
Constant Radius - Use this step to create one or more edge sets for the blend feature. This
is the first thing you do in creating an edge blend.
Variable Radius - You can vary the radius of a blend along its length by specifying points on
its edges and entering different values for radii at each point. You must already have
specified at least one constant radius edge before you can use this option to add variable
radius points to it.
Setback - You can add setback points to a blend corner, and by adjusting the distance of
each setback from the vertex, apply additional shaping to the corner. You can use setbacks
to create, for example, what is loosely known as a "ball nose blend."
Stop Short - You can stop a blend short of its edge end points by adding stop short points.
Complete Set and Start Next Set - Use this button with the Constant Radius selection step
to add edges sets to the blend. As you select curves and edges and add them to edge sets,
entries for each are added to or updated in the changeable window.

Editing Edge Blends
Use one of the following methods to edit an edge blend in normal mode:
• Use MB3-> Edit Parameters over a selected or highlighted edge blend in the graphics
window or the part navigator.
• Double-click an edge blend in the graphics window or part navigator.
• Use Edit-> Feature-> Parameters, and select the edge blend.
Edge Blend Handle Availability
Edge Blend Handle Availability
Handle Availability
Edge Set Handles Always displayed and available.
Variable Radius Variable radius handles are displayed when the Constant Radius and
Handles Variable Radius selection steps are active.
Setback Handles Available only when the Setback selection step is active.
Stop Short Handles Available only when the Stop Short selection step is active.

Face Blend Overview
Use this command to create complex blend faces tangent to two sets of input faces, with
options to trim and attach the blended faces. Face Blend lets you control the orientation of
the cross-sections using one of two types:
• Rolling Ball creates a face blend as if it were subtended by a ball rolling in
constant contact with two sets of input faces. The plane of the blend cross section
is defined by the two contact points and the center of the ball.
• Swept Section sweeps a cross section along a spine curve. The plane of
the blend cross section is always normal to the spine curve.
Creating a Rolling Ball Face Blend

Input Sheet Bodies and Rolling Ball Blend with Constant Radius

1. Click (Face Blend) on the Feature Operations toolbar.

2. Click (Rolling Ball) and keep the default Circular Cross Section
type.
3. Choose Enable Preview to see a preview before applying the blend to your
model. Note that NX creates a preview only after you specify sufficient parameters.

4. Click (First Face Chain) and select the first set of faces or bodies.
Selection Intent rules apply during object selection. If you need to reverse the set's

normal, double-click the normal arrow in the graphics window or click (Flip
Direction) on the dialog.

5. Choose Second Face Chain and select the second set of faces or
bodies. Selection Intent rules apply during object selection. If you need to reverse
the set's normal, double-click the normal arrow in the graphics window.
6. Specify appropriate Radius, Trim and Sew, and other options for your
blend. Our example uses a radius of 0.75 and the default Trim and Sew Options.
7. Click OK or Apply to create the blend. If the blend fails, an error message
will identify the cause, and in some cases, a large asterisk may show the location
of the error.
Note that NX:
• Trimmed the input faces to the blend
• Trimmed the blend to the input faces
• Sewed the two faces and blend together

8. Next, suppose we decided to switch our blend radius from constant to Law
Controlled. To modify an existing blend, click MB3 on the blend and choose Edit
with Rollback.
9. On the Face Blend dialog, change Radius to Law Controlled and choose
Define Law.

10. Click (Linear), select a spine curve, and click OK.

11. Specify Start and End Values (we used 0.5 and 1.25) and click OK to
create the blend with the new radius.

Face Blend with Law Controlled Radius

Creating A Swept Section Face Blend
Input Solid and Swept Section Blend with Law Controlled Radius

1. Click (Face Blend) on the Feature Operations toolbar.

2. Click (Swept Section) and keep the default Circular Cross Section
type.
3. Choose Enable Preview to see a preview before applying the blend to your
model. Note that NX creates a preview only after you specify sufficient parameters.

4. Click to expand the dialog and turn off the Terminate at Internal/First
Sharp Edges(s) option. This will allow the blend to cross the crease in the first
face chain.

5. Click (First Face Chain) and select the first set of faces or bodies.
Selection Intent rules apply during object selection. If you need to reverse the set's

normal, double-click the normal arrow in the graphics window or click (Flip
Direction) on the dialog.

1. Double-click the normal arrow
to reverse its direction away from
the face.

6. Click (Second Face Chain) and select the second set of faces or
bodies. Selection Intent rules apply during object selection.If you need to reverse
the set's normal, double-click the normal arrow in the graphics window or click

(Flip Direction) on the dialog.
7. For Swept Section blends, you must select a spine curve using the Spine

step. Click (Spine) and select the spine curve:
8. On the Radius drop-down menu, choose Law Controlled and click Define

Law. In the Law Function dialog, click Linear and click OK. Specify Start
and End values for the Law Control. For this example, we used 3.25 and 5.00, and
kept the default Trim and Sew Options. NX previews the swept blend.

9. Click OK or Apply to create the blend. If the blend fails, an error message
will identify the cause, and in some cases, a large asterisk may show the location
of the error.

Final Swept blend

Soft Blend
Soft blends let you create blends whose cross sectional shape is not circular, which can
help you avoid the hard "mechanical" appearance sometimes associated with circular
blends. This function gives you more control over the cross sectional shape, and allows
you to create designs that are more aesthetically pleasing than other types of blends.
Adjusting the shapes of blends may let you produce designs with lower weights, or better
stress resistance properties.
The figure below shows the geometry that is defined to create a soft blend, and the
resulting soft blend feature.
To create a soft blend, follow these steps:
1. Choose First Set and select the first set of faces to be blended. Use the
Reverse Normal option if necessary. Choose OK when correctly defined - the next
icon will become active.
2. Choose Second Set and select the second set of faces. Again, use the
Reverse Normal option if necessary. Choose OK when correctly defined.
3. Choose First Tangency Curve and select the tangency curves on the first
wall, then choose OK.
4. Choose Second Tangency Curve and select the tangency curve on the
second wall.
5. Choose Define Spine String and select a spine string.
6. If you are using the Match Curvature Smoothness method, specify the
shape of the blend by entering values for the Rho and Skew parameters; r you can
choose Law Controlled and select law curves instead.
7. Choose Apply to create the blend. If the blend fails, an error message will
display a reason, and in some cases a large asterisk may show the location of the
error.

Styled Blend
Styled Blend Between Two Surfaces
Styled Blend gives you three ways to create a curved blend between two surface walls:
This Lets you create a styled blend using
Method

Law Tangent holding lines generated by intersection with the wall and a tube, where a
law-controlled tangency determines the radius of the tube.

Curve Explicitly selected tangent holding lines.

Profile Tangent curves defined by intersection with the wall and a tube with a defined
profile.

Studio Surface toolbar→ Blend group→ (Styled Blend)
Insert→ Detail Feature→ Styled Blend

Fillet
This option lets you create fillet sheets of constant or variable radius between two faces. You
can create a fillet between the faces of a solid and/or sheet bodies. A fillet is created tangent
to two faces. However, for the fillet to be created, the faces must intersect or be close enough
so that the fillet touches both faces at all points of tangency.

Fillet Type
You are given these options for the fillet:
Constant Creates a fillet with a fixed radius.
Linear Creates a linear fillet of variable radius. The change in radius of curvature is
linear from the start to the end of the fillet.
S-shaped Creates a variable radius fillet of an S-shaped curvature.
General Creates a variable radius fillet by specifying multiple points on the spine curve
and functional values at each point. This option only appears if you selected a
spine curve.
The figure below shows examples of each fillet type.

Bridge
Bridge lets you create a sheet body that joins two faces. You can specify either tangent or
curvature continuity between the bridge and defining faces. Optional side faces or strings (up
to two, in any combination), or the drag option, can be used to control the shape of the bridge
sheet body. To edit a Bridge free form feature, use Edit-> Feature-> Parameters.
Primary Faces - Lets you select the two primary faces that will be joined by the bridge
feature. This is a required step.

Side Faces - Lets you select one or two side faces (optional).

First Side String & Second Side String - Both the First and Second Side String selection
steps are optional, and let you select one or two strings (curves or edges) to guide the shape
of the bridge
Basic Bridge Procedure
The general procedure to create a bridge free form feature is:
1. Choose the Continuity Type (tangent or curvature).
2. Select the Primary Faces (see Selecting Faces).
3. (Optional): Select one or two Side Faces and/or Side Strings to control the sides of
the bridge surface.
4. Once you have specified the primary faces, any desired side strings or faces, and the
continuity type, choose Apply to create the bridge sheet body.
If you are not satisfied with the sheet body, there are two things you can do:
o Perform an Undo and repeat the creation process, or
o If you have not specified side faces or strings, use the Drag option to alter the
shape of the bridge surface.
5. When the sheet body is completed and is correct, choose Cancel to exit from the
dialog, or choose OK to create another bridge sheet body.

Spherical Corner Overview
You can create a spherical corner from three walls of one or more faces each. The spherical
corner consists of a single face.

Spherical Corner
To create a spherical corner you only need to select faces for three walls that form a corner
and specify a radius. The walls do not actually have to come in contact with one another. The
system previews the spherical corner for you, at which time you can experiment by reversing
the wall directions, changing the radius, and specifying new wall faces.
Spherical Corner Dialog
Spherical Corner Dialog Options
Selection Wall 1 Faces, Wall 2 Faces, Wall 3 Faces
Steps Select three sets of wall faces using these three selection steps. You can select
any valid collection of faces for each wall that are at least continuous. You can
select continuous faces that are not in the same body. You can select all three
walls from faces contained within the same solid or sheet.
Radius Enter a value for the radius of the sphere that is to define the spherical corner.
Reverse When you select one or more faces for a wall selection step a vector displays its
Face Normal face normal direction. This is the side of the face on which the spherical corner
will be created. If you want the spherical corner on the other side of the wall use
this option to reverse the direction, putting the spherical corner on the other
side.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Upon Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them.

Creating a Spherical Corner basic procedure
1. Enter a value for the radius of the sphere that defines the spherical corner in the
Radius field and press the Enter/Return key.
2. Use the Wall 1 Faces selection step to select the first set of faces.
3. Use the Wall 2 Faces selection step to select the second set of faces.
4. Use the Wall 3 Faces selection step to select the third set of faces.
5. Click Apply to create the spherical corner, or OK to create it and exit the dialog

CHAMFER OVERVIEW
Use this option to create simple beveled edges on a solid body

You can create chamfers through one of three methods: Symmetric Offsets, Asymmetric
Offsets, and Offset and Angle.
Option Name Description

Use Symmetric Offsets to create a simple chamfer whose offset from the
selected edge is the same along both faces. You specify a single positive
Symmetric value for both offsets.
Offsets

Use Asymmetric Offsets to create a simple chamfer with two values for the
offsets from the selected edge. You specify two positive values, one for each
Asymmetric offset.
Offsets

Use Offset and Angle to create a simple chamfer whose offsets are
determined by an offset and an angle. You specify one positive value for the
Offset and offset and an angle.
Angle

Use this option to exchange the offsets or the offset and angle from one side
of the edge string to the other. The chamfer is reversed, but its length remains
Reverse unchanged. Not available with Symmetric Offsets.
Offsets

Offset Method Select a method to use in determining how the offset is used to create the
chamfer.
Offset Edges Along Faces
Use this method to produce chamfers for simple shapes. With this method, the
offset values are measured along the faces from the edge being chamfered.
This defines the start and end values of the new face(s).
Offset Faces and Trim
Use this method to produce chamfers for more complex shapes that may not
work with the Offset Edges Along Faces method. The offset is not measured
from the edge; instead, it is the distance that the model's faces are offset.
Normals between the original faces and the intersections of the (theoretical)
offset faces define the start and end values of the new chamfer face(s). The
offset surfaces are extended, if necessary, and used to trim the original
surfaces that make up the defining edge. The chamfer surface is the surface
that spans these two new edges.
The method options are not available with chamfers created with Offset and
Angle.
Chamfer All If the feature you are chamfering is a member of an instance set, you can use
Instances this option to add the chamfer to all instances in the instance set. Generally,
you should always add a chamfer to the master feature of an instance set, and
not one of the instanced features. This way, if the array parameters are later
changed, the chamfer will always remain visible in the instance set.

Draft Overview
Draft is an operator that changes faces to have an angle relative to a specified draw
direction. The Draft operator is generally used to apply a slope to vertical faces on a pattern,
a part, a mold, or a die, so that when the part is pulled from the mold or die, the faces move
away from each other rather than sliding along each other.
You need to specify at least the following inputs for the draft operation:
• Draw direction
• Stationary objects
• Faces to draft
• Draft angle

Option
Option Name Description
Icon

Opens the Draft dialog. Click Apply to create the draft feature and
Draft keep the Draft dialog open for further drafting operations, or click OK
to create the draft feature and close the Draft dialog.
Draft From
Use this type if the draft operation requires that a planar cross
Stationary
section through the part be maintained throughout the face rotation.
Plane

Use this type if the draft operation requires that an edge of the face
Draft From
selected to be drafted be maintained throughout the face rotation.
Stationary
This is the only draft type that can have varying draft angles within a
Edges
face.

Draft Tangent Use this type if the draft operation requires that the faces to be
to Faces drafted remain tangent to adjacent faces after the draft operation.

Draft To Use this type if the draft operation requires that a planar cross
Parting section through the part be maintained throughout the face rotation,
Edges and that a ledge be created as necessary at parting edges.

Inferred Lets you select from all the NX vector creation options. For general
Vector information about vector options, see Vector Construction Options.

Stationary Lets you select a planar face, a datum plane, or a plane normal to
Plane the draw direction by selecting a point that it passes through.

Lets you select faces to draft. Use Selection Intent to speed object
Faces to Draft selection and to capture intent for application during updates after
editing.

Stationary Lets you select edges that are to remain unchanged (stationary)
Edges throughout the draft operation.

Lets you select points on stationary edges within a tangent face
Variable
group, to specify varying draft angles. You can enter different angles
Angle Point
for each of the reference points you specify.

Tangent Lets you select faces to draft and the faces that the drafted faces are
Faces to Draft to remain tangent to after the draft operation.

Parting
Lets you select parting edges.
Edges

Reverse
Lets you reverse the displayed direction vector.
Direction

This is the default draft method for all draft features. Draft surfaces
Isocline created with Isocline must generally satisfy whatever condition is
specified by the value of the draft angle.

Draft features created with the True Draft method use a different
geometry definition for draft surfaces than those created using the
True Draft Isocline method, and are in some cases more accurate. In addition,
drafts created with this method are not rigidly required to meet the
conditions specified by the draft angle.

Draft all Lets you choose whether to draft only a selected instance of a
instances pattern, or all instances in the array.
Body Taper - Overview
Use the Body Taper function to build tapers that support molding and casting parts. The
function lets you create tapers on both sides of a parting surface, match tapers on both sides
of a parting surface, and automatically add material to undercut regions.
Body Taper - Dialog Options
Body Taper Dialog Options
Method You can create body tapers by specifying either edges or faces; both can
achieve the same results. You may want to use one method over the other
depending on the body and the intended result.
Edge - Use this method to create tapers by specifying a pair of reference
edge loops, one on each side of the parting sheet.
Face - Use this method to create tapers by specifying faces.
Selection Steps Parting - Use this step to select a parting sheet or a datum plane. The
parting sheet can be planar or non-planar.
Draw Direction - Use this step to specify the direction in which the taper
should be drawn.
Selection Steps for the Edge Method
The following options are used only with the Edge method.
Loop Above Parting - Use this step to specify a set of reference edges
forming a loop above the parting sheet
Loop Below Parting - Use this step to specify a set of reference edges
forming a loop below the parting sheet
Unmatched Edges - Use this step to specify the set of reference edges you
selected with Loop Above Parting and Loop Below Parting whose tapers you
do not want matched to each other. This step is optional.
Movable Edges - Use this step to specify which edges are allowed to move
during the taper operation.
Selection Steps for the Face Method
The following options are used only with the Face method.
Faces to be Tapered - Use this step to select the faces that you want taper.
Unmatched Faces - Use this step to specify the faces you selected with the
Faces to be Tapered step that you do not want matched against neighboring
faces.
Movable Faces - Use this step to specify which faces are allowed to move
during the taper operation. The intersection edges between movable faces
and tapered faces are used as movable edges.
Changeable Presents Vector Methods and the Vector Constructor for use with the Draw
Window Direction selection step.
Draw Angle Use this option to specify the angle of the taper that you want to draw. The
default value is 2 degrees.
Isocline / True Lets you switch between the Isocline and True Draft taper creation modes.
Draft Isocline - This is the default mode for the creation of all tapers. Taper
surfaces created in Isocline mode generally must satisfy whatever condition
is specified by the value of the Draw Angle.
True Draft - Tapers created in the True Draft mode are in some cases more
accurate. Tapers created in this mode are not required to meet the conditions
specified by the Draw Angle. You can sometimes create a taper using True
Draft mode that you could not create using the Isocline mode.
Match Taper Use this option to add material, if necessary, to opposing tapers at the
parting sheet, to ensure that they meet evenly. Matching is disabled if you
select the Highest Reference Point option.
Highest Use this option to specify that the highest reference point for each face is
Reference used for the taper. When the parting surface (or plane) intersects the faces to
Point be tapered, double-sided face tapers are created on both sides of the
surface. When this option is selected, the Match Taper option is disabled.
Confirm Upon Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply. This lets you
Apply preview the results and accept, reject or analyze them as the update occurs.

Body Taper - Creating a Double-Sided Taper
To create a simple double-sided taper, follow these steps:
1. Choose a method, either Edge or Face. For the example, we used Face.
2. Use the Parting selection step to select a sheet or datum plane across which to
create the double-sided taper. In the example, we selected a planar sheet body for
the parting.

Selected Parting Sheet (red)
3. Use the Draw Direction selection step to specify the direction in which the taper is to
be drawn. In the example, we accepted the default direction, which is the positive Z
axis.

Draw Direction Vector
4. Use the Faces to be Tapered selection step to specify the faces you want to taper. In
the example, we selected the face of the cylinder.
Selected Face to Taper (red)
5. If necessary, you can use any of the following optional selection steps to help define
the taper:
For the Face method
• Unmatched Faces
• Movable Faces
For the Edge method
• Loop Above Parting or Loop Below Parting
• Unmatched Edges
• Movable Edges
6. Specify a Draw Angle. For the example we entered 15 degrees.
7. Specify whether the taper is to be Isocline or True Draft. For the example, we used
Isocline.
8. If necessary, you can use one of the following options:
• Match Taper
• Highest Reference Point
9. Click Apply to create the taper.

Double-Sided Taper
Questions
1. How many variable radiuses are possible in edge blend?
2. What is meant by cliff edge?
3. What is the other name for body taper?
4. What is mean by isocline taper?
5. What is mean by true draft?
6. What is the difference between face blend and soft blend?
7. Is it possible to give blend value in soft blend?
In which option isocline and true draft is possible?

SURFACE

Modeling Surface Options
Extension - Lets you create extension sheets (tangential, normal to surface, angled,
circular, or law controlled) from an existing base sheet.
Sheet from Curves - Lets you create bodies through selected curves.

Bounded Plane - Lets you generate a planar sheet by utilizing strings of end-to-end
curves for the sheet boundaries.
Transition - Lets you create a feature at the intersection of three or more sectional
shapes.
Through Points - Lets you define a rectangular array of points through which the body
will pass.
From Poles - Lets you specify points as poles (vertices) of a control net which defines
the shape of the body.
The Rapid Surfacing command reverse engineers a facet body quickly, where speed
is more important than surface quality
From Point Cloud - Lets you create a sheet body that approximates a large "cloud" of
data points, typically produced by scanning or digitizing.
Ribbon Builder - Lets you build a sheet body between the input profile and a offset
profile.
Midsurface - allows you to create a midsurface feature that resides in a single target
solid.

Extension
This option lets you create tangential, normal to surface, angled or circular controlled
extension sheets from an existing base sheet.
In certain cases when the underlying surface of the base face is a B-surface, the extension
body is represented exactly by a B-surface. But often, the extension body is still an
approximation, even if the base face is a B-surface. For example, angled and normal to
surface extensions are always approximations.
To create extension bodies, choose from one of the following options:
Tangential Lets you create bodies that are tangent to a face, edge, or corner.
Normal to Lets you create an extension normal to a face along an existing curve lying
Surface on the face.
Angled Lets you create an extension body at a specified angle to an existing face
along a curve lying on the face.
Circular Lets you create a circular extension from the edge of a smooth surface. The
extension follows the radius of curvature along the selected edge.
Each extension creation option shares a few basic steps:
1. You first select an existing face as the base face. This is the face that the extension
body "extends."
2. You also select an existing object such as a base curve, an edge, or in the case of a
corner extension, a corner. This specifies the intersection of the base sheet face with
the extension body. When selecting an edge or corner, you must specify a point on
the surface near the desired object. This point is used to determine which edge or
corner is to be extended.
3. Various direction vectors also are displayed to help you in determining such things as
the direction the system creates the body, or the angle you wish to specify for the
body.

Sheets From Curves
This option lets you create bodies through selected curves.

Local Settings
When you choose Sheets From Curves, the following options appear:
Cycle By Processes all selectable curves one layer at a time. To speed up the processing,
Layer you may wish to turn this option ON. This causes the system to create bodies by
processing all selectable curves one layer at a time. All the curves defining a
body must be on a single layer.
Warnings Causes the system to stop processing and to display warning messages after
generating bodies, if there are any warnings. You are warned about nonclosed
planar loops of curves, and non planar boundaries. If you select OFF, you are
not warned, and processing does not stop.
Basic Procedure
To convert curves to sheets, you must:
1. Set the Cycle By Layer toggle switch as desired.
2. Set the Warnings toggle switch as desired.
3. Choose OK.
4. Choose the curves you wish to sheet using the Class Selection Tool.
5. Choose OK.

Bounded Plane
This option lets you generate a planar sheet by utilizing strings of end-to-end curves for the
sheet boundaries. The strings selected must be coplanar and form a closed shape, and you
must be able to chain them.
To create a bounded plane you must establish the boundary, and if necessary, define any
internal boundaries (holes).
A bounding string can consist of single or multiple objects. Each object can be either a curve,
solid edge or a solid face.

To specify the planar boundary, select a closed string of end-to-end curves and/or solid
edges. Objects in each section string can be selected in an arbitrary order - the system sorts
the selected objects.
The bounded plane can be created with or without holes. A hole in a bounded plane is
defined as an internal boundary where the sheet is not created. After the outer boundary is
selected, you can define holes by continuing the selection of objects and selecting complete
internal boundaries (holes) one at a time. The system calculates where the boundaries start
and end.

Transition Feature - Overview
The Transition function lets you create a feature at the intersection of two or more sectional
shapes.
You can impose either a tangent or curvature condition on the sections. You can have a
different number of elements for the sections. If you do not use a surface to impose match
conditions on a section, a tangent condition is imposed that is normal to the plane of the input
section.
The Transition feature is parametric and associative to any geometry used in its creation.

Three Sections (Numbered) Form a Transition Feature
Transition Feature - Procedure
1. Select the section elements for the first section. To aid selection, set the filter to
curve, edge or sketch.
2. Set the continuity to no constraint (G0), tangent (G1) or curvature (G2). Choose OK.
The section is added to the list in the sections window.
3. Use the Reverse Direction button if necessary to reverse the section direction.
4. Repeat this sequence for each section you wish to add to define the Transition
feature.

Two Sections Defined - Mapped Solution Displayed
As you add sections, the system automatically displays a solution for the point
mapping between each of them and displays a wireframe preview in the graphics
window.
Three Sections Defined - Mapped Solution Displayed
5. Once you have added all of the sections you can:
• Use the Coupling Points option to dynamically edit, insert and delete any of the
bridge curve coupling points.
• Use the Bridge Curves option to dynamically edit the shape of the bridge
curves.
• Use the Surface Preview option to see the Transition feature before you create
it.
6. Choose the Create Surface option to create a Transition feature. If this option is not
selected, only bridge curves are created.
7. Click OK or Apply to create the feature or the bridge curves.

Final Transition Feature

Transition Feature - Dialog
Transition Dialog Options
Selection Lets you select the elements for each section. The section elements can
consist of splines, lines, arcs, conics, surface edges, sketches, etc.
Filter Lets you specify the types of objects to allow for selection.
For section selection: Any, Curves, Edges and Sketch.
For surface selection: Any and Face.
Sections Shows the sections that you have specified, their continuity, and their flow
Window direction.
More/Less Expands or contracts the dialog to reveal or hide additional options.
Options
Continuity Lets you assign the type of mating condition of the sections, either tangent
(G1) or curvature (G2 ). A surface must be selected to use G2 curvature.
Reverse Lets you reverse the section direction so that bridge curves can be
Direction remapped.
Coupling Points Displays the coupling points in the Coupling Points window of the section
Window selected in the Sections window.
On selecting a section, select the Show All Points On Section option to
display all of that section's points. You can then select one of the section's
points.
Edit Coupling Point: This option becomes active if it is possible to move the
selected coupling point to another section.
Insert Coupling Point
This option lets you add new coupling points and bridge curves to a section.
Delete Coupling Point
This option lets you delete a coupling point from a section and its associated
bridge curve. When you delete a coupling point it is removed from the
coupling points list, and its related bridging curve is also removed.
Bridge Curves This option lets you edit the shape of the bridge curves.
Bridge Curves
On selecting a section that has the bridge curves you want to edit, the Bridge
Curves list updates the list in this field. The list includes all of the individual
curves and Bridge groups you can edit.
Shape Control
You can edit bridge curves using either of these methods:
• End Point
• Peak Point
Surface Lets you see a shaded preview of the surface.
Preview
Create Surface When this option is active a TRANSITION feature surface is created.
Otherwise, only bridge curves are created.

Through Points and From Poles
The Through Points and From Poles free form features options use the same interactive
creation techniques, so they are described together in this section.
Through Points - Lets you define a rectangular array of points through which the body will
pass. The body interpolates each specified point. Using this option, you have very good
control over the body in the sense that it always passes through the points that you specify.
From Poles - Lets you specify points as poles (vertices) of a control net which defines the
shape of the sheet. Using poles gives you much better control of the overall shape and
character of the body. Using this option also gives you a much better chance of avoiding
unwanted undulations (reversals of curvature) in the sheet.
The options on the Through Points and From Poles dialogs are the same.
Through Points and From Poles Dialog Options
Patch Type Lets you create a body containing a single patch or multiple patches.
Closed Lets you select a method for closing a multiple patch sheet body.
Along
Row Lets you specify the row degree (1 to 24) for a multiple patch. For a single patch,
Degree the system determines the row degree from the row with the highest number of
points.
Column Lets you specify the column degree for a multiple patch. For a single patch, the
Degree system sets this to one less than the number of specified rows.
Points From Lets you define the points by choosing a file that contains them.
File

Through Points & From Poles Procedure
To create a body using Through Points or From Poles, you must:
1. Choose a Patch Type.
2. For multiple patch, choose a Closed Along method for closing the sheet body.
3. For multiple patch, enter the degrees for rows and columns. You do not have to
specify degrees for single patch.
4. Specify rows of points or poles to be used to create the body, using either the Point
Specification Method dialog or by using specifying a file containing the point
definitions.

From Point Cloud
From Point Cloud lets you create a sheet body that approximates a large "cloud" of data
points, typically produced by scanning or digitizing. While there are some restrictions, this
function lets you create a body from a large number of points with a minimum amount of
interaction.
The resulting sheet body is much "smoother" than one created from the same points using
the Through Points method, but is not as close to the original points.

From Point Cloud Feature Dialog Options
Select Points Lets you select points when this icon is active.
Points From Lets you define the points by choosing a file that contains them.
File
U Degree Let you control the degree of the sheet body in both U and V directions. The
V Degree default degree of 3 can be changed to any value from 1 to 24. (The default of
3 is recommended.)
#U Patches Let you specify the number of patches in each direction. The combination of
#V Patches degree and patches in each direction controls the distance error between the
input points and the generated sheet body.
Coordinate Consists of a vector approximately normal to the sheet body (corresponding to
System the Z axis of the coordinate system), and two vectors that indicate the U and V
directions of the sheet body (corresponding to the X and Y axes of the
coordinate system).
Boundary Lets you define the boundary of the sheet body that you are creating. See
Boundary for details.
Reset Lets you create another sheet body without leaving the dialog.
Confirm Upon Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common
to Selection Steps dialogs.
Basic From Point Cloud Procedure
Following is the general procedure to create a From Point Cloud body. Also, see the
abbreviated "quick" method procedure.
1. Select the points, or specify a file that defines the points.
2. Specify the U and V degree of the surface.
3. Specify the number of patches in the U and V directions.
4. Specify the local U-V coordinate system.
5. Specify the boundary around the desired points.
6. Choose OK or Apply to create the sheet body.

Rapid Surfacing overview

The Rapid Surfacing command reverse engineers a facet body quickly, where speed is
more important than surface quality. You specify the desired degrees and segments, and
create a curve network on the facet body. NX uses this curve network to generate a G1
continuous surface model of the facet body. This example shows a curve network projected
to the facet body, and the resulting surface.

Projected curve network and resulting rapid surface

Where do I find it?
Choose Insert→Surface→Rapid Surfacing.

Ribbon Builder - Overview
This function lets you build a sheet body between the input profile and a offset profile. The
offset profile is developed by offsetting the original profile the given distance in the viewing
direction. You can also angle the sheet body in the viewing direction by specifying an angle
other than 0.0. The offset profile will be smoothed so that its minimum radius in the viewing
direction will be approximately equal to that specified.
You can use Ribbon Builder to create a sheet such that at any point along the original curve,
the sheet lies in the direction formed by crossing the tangent of the curve and the vector input
to the function (or at a specified angle to that direction).
Ribbon Builder - Dialog Fields
Ribbon Builder Dialog Options
Selection Profile to Offset - Lets you select a profile that defines the shape of the
Steps ribbon sheet you wish to create.
Offset View - Lets you select an object that defines the direction in which to
view the offset. You can use the Vector Method option menu, or select a
datum axis.
Filter The filter aids in object selection. The following filter masks may be specified:
Profile to Offset: Any, Curve, Edge, Face, Sketch, String
Offset View: Datum Axis, Vector.
Changeable Displays the Vector Method option menu for use with the Offset View
Window selection step, when selecting the direction in which to view the offset.
Offset Lets you specify the distance for the offset. You can enter a negative value for
Distance an offset distance, if the offset is expected to be opposed to the offset
direction.
Angle Lets you specify the angle for the offset.
Minimum Lets you specify minimum radius.
Radius The Ribbon Builder works by building a sheet that is the original selected
curve (profile) and an offset of that curve. If the specified offset distance is
greater than a local radius of the selected curve (offset would be degenerate),
the offset curve is smoothed out in this area. Generally, the larger the
minimum radius number, the smoother the offset curve.
Switch Offset Switches the direction of the offset specified in the Offset View selection step.
Side
Confirm Upon Lets you preview the results and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is
Apply common to Selection Steps dialogs.

Ribbon Builder - Procedure
1. Use the Profile to Offset selection step to select curve/edge(s) representing the shape
of the ribbon sheet you wish to create.
2. Use the Offset View selection step to specify a vector defining a normal to the view in
which the profile will be offset.
3. Supply the Offset Distance for the profile.
4. Supply the Angle you wish the ribbon sheet to be rotated in the normal direction.
5. Supply the Minimum Radius you wish the offset profile to have.
6. Click OK or Apply to create the RIBBON_SHEET feature.

Midsurface Feature
The Midsurface feature option is available from the Structures application. Structures' model
idealization function refers to the use of a simplified model whose behavior can be utilized to
model the behavior of a more complicated system. This is performed using the Midsurface
creation feature.
The model idealization process allows you to create a midsurface feature that resides in a
single target solid. There can only be one midsurface feature in a target solid. You can edit a
Midsurface feature from Modeling, but you must be in Structures to create one.

Questions
1. Is it possible to create a surface in an open profile using bounded plane?
2. Is it possible to create a surface in an open profile using sheet from curve?
3. What is the difference between bounded plane and sheet from curve?
4. Whether transition is possible for closed profile?
5. what is the difference between bounded through points and through poles?

MESH SURFACE
Modeling Mesh Surface Options
Ruled - Lets you create a ruled body (sheet or solid) through two curve outlines. (This
option is a special case of the Thru Curves option.)
Through Curves - Lets you create a body through a collection of curve outlines in one
direction.
Through Curve Mesh - Lets you create a body from a collection of existing curve
outlines running in two different directions.
Section - Lets you create bodies through sections which you define using conic
construction techniques.
N-Sided Surface - Lets you build a surface with an unrestricted number of curves or
edges that form a simple, closed loop, with assigned continuity to outside faces.

Ruled
This option is a special case of the Thru Curves option. The Ruled option creates a ruled
body (sheet or solid) through two curve outlines. The curve outlines are referred to as section
strings. A section string can consist of a single or multiple objects. Each object can be either a
curve, solid edge, or a solid face. You can also select a point or a endpoint of a curve as the
first of the two section strings.

After you have selected the section strings, the Ruled Feature dialog appears.
Ruled Feature Dialog Options
Alignment Lets you choose a method for controlling the alignment of the
isoparametric curves.
Tolerance Lets you specify a distance tolerance. The default is the distance
tolerance modeling preference.
Temporary Grid Display Lets you specify the parameters of the temporary grid display.
Ruled Procedure
To create a ruled body:
1. Select the Section Strings. Use Selection Intent to aid object selection and to set
selection rules.
2. Choose the Alignment method.
3. Enter a distance Tolerance.
4. Enter the Temporary Grid Display u and v count values.
5. Click OK to create the rule surface..
Alignment Method
The Alignment option menu lets you choose a method for controlling the alignment of the
isoparametric curves:
Parameter Spaces the points through which the isoparametric curves will pass at equal
parameter intervals along the defining curves.
Arclength Spaces the points through which the isoparametric curves will pass at equal
arclength intervals along the defining curves.
By Points Aligns points between section strings, which have different shapes.
Distance Spaces the points along each curve at equal distances in a specified direction.
Angles Spaces the points along each curve at equal angles around a specified axis line.
Spine Curve Places the points at the intersections of the selected curves and planes
perpendicular to the input curve.

Through Curves
This option lets you create a body through a collection of curve outlines in one direction. The
curve outlines are referred to as section strings. The section strings you select define the
rows of the body. A section string can consist of a single object or multiple objects. Each
object can be either a curve, solid edge, or a solid face.

After you have selected the section strings, the Through Curves Feature dialog is displayed.
Through Curves Feature Dialog Options
Patch Type Lets you create a body containing a single patch or multiple patches.
Alignment Lets you control the alignment between selected section strings.
Closed in V When this option is ON, the sheet is closed along columns (that is, the V
direction).
V Degree Lets you enter the v degree for a multiple patch.
Tolerance The maximum distance between the input geometry and the resulting sheet. The
default is the Distance Tolerance modeling preference.
Constraints Lets you constrain the body so that it is tangent to or curvature continuous with
one or more selected faces at the first or last section strings. Options are No
Constraint for no constraints, Tangency and Curvature.
First Section String - Constrain the body so that it is tangent to (Tangency), or
curvature continuous with (Curvature) one or more selected faces or sheet body
at the first section string.
Last Section String - Constrain the body so that it is tangent to (Tangency), or
curvature continuous with (Curvature) one or more selected faces or sheet body
at the last section string.
Direction - Lets you specify the tangent direction for the constraint boundaries.
Options are Not Specified for no direction specified, Isoparametric and Normal.
Simple Builds the simplest surface possible, sometimes referred to as "Light Math." A
simple surface with constraints avoids the insertion of extra math components
when possible, thus reducing abrupt changes of curvature. A simple surface also
minimizes the number of patches.
Basic Through Curves Procedure
To create a Through Curves body:
1. Select the desired Section Strings through which the body will pass.
2. Choose a Patch Type for the body, either single or multiple.
3. Choose an Alignment method.
4. For multiple patch, specify whether the body will be closed in the V direction.
5. For multiple patch, enter a degree for the V Degree.
6. Enter a distance tolerance.
7. Specify any desired tangency or curvature constraints on the first and/or last primary
string.
8. For a simple surface turn on the Simple toggle.
9. Choose OK.
10. Click OK a final time, if necessary, to create the body.

Through Curve Mesh
This option lets you create a body from a collection of existing curve outlines (known as
strings) running in two different directions.
The curve mesh body created is a polynomial bicubic. This means that its degree is cubic (a
degree of 3) in both the U and V directions.
Through Curve Mesh Feature Dialog Options
Emphasis Lets you determine which set of control strings has the most effect over the
shape of the curve mesh body, or specify that both sets have equal effect.
Intersection Checks the mesh of strings for intersection with one another. If the strings do
Tolerance not intersect, the minimum distance between them must be smaller than the
specified intersection tolerance.
Constraints
First Primary Lets you constrain the body so that it is tangent to, or curvature continuous with
String one or more selected faces or sheet body at the first primary string.
Last Primary Lets you constrain the body so that it is tangent to or curvature continuous with
String one or more selected faces or sheet body at the last primary string.
First Cross Lets you constrain the body so that it is tangent to or curvature continuous with
String one or more selected faces or sheet body at the first cross string.
Last Cross Lets you constrain the body so that it is tangent to or curvature continuous with
String one or more selected faces or sheet body at the last cross string.
Construction Options
Normal Builds a curve mesh surface using the standard procedures. Will create a body
or surface with a greater number of patches when compared with the other
options.
Use Spline Lets you create a body using the points and tangent values at the points for the
Points input curves. For this option, the selected curves must be single B-curves with
the same number of defining points.
Simple Builds the simplest curve mesh surface possible. A simple surface with
constraints avoids the insertion of extra math components when possible, thus
reducing abrupt changes of curvature. A simple surface also minimizes the
number of patches and the boundary noise in a surface.
Basic Through Curve Mesh Procedure
1. Select the primary strings and the cross strings.
2. Set the Emphasis option.
3. Set the Intersection Tolerance.
4. Specify the constraints. for the primary and cross strings.
5. Set the Construction Options. If you specify the Simple option you will have to either
specify primary and cross curve templates, or allow the system to select them.
6. You can optionally select Rebuild options for both the primary and cross strings.
7. Choose OK to construct the through curve mesh.

Section
You can use the Section option to construct bodies through sections that you define using
conic construction techniques.
You can think of a section free form feature as an infinite family of section curves lying in
prescribed planes, starting and ending on, and passing through, certain selected control
curves. Additionally, the system obtains conic end slopes directly from the control curves, and
uses a continuous 2D conic shape parameter to vary the fullness of the sections along the
body.
To comply with industry standards, and to make data transfer easy, the Section options
produce a body with B-surfaces as output.
Section Body Dialog Options
ends-apex- The feature starts on the first curve selected, passes through an interior curve
shoulder known as the shoulder curve, and ends on the third curve. The slope at each
end is defined by a selected apex curve.
ends-slopes- The feature starts on the first curve selected, passes through the shoulder
shoulder curve, and ends on the third curve. Slopes are defined at the start and end by
two independent slope control curves.
fillet- The feature starts on the first curve selected, is tangent to the first body
shoulder selected, ends on the second curve, is tangent to the second body, and passes
through the shoulder curve.
three-points- Lets you create a section free form feature by selecting a starting edge curve,
arc an interior curve, an end edge curve, and a spine curve.
ends-apex- The feature starts on the first curve selected and ends on the second curve.
rho The slope at each end is defined by a selected apex curve. The fullness of each
conic section is controlled by the corresponding rho value.
ends-slopes- The feature starts on the first edge curve selected and ends on the second
rho edge curve. Slope is defined at the start and end by two independent slope
control curves. The fullness of each conic section is controlled by the
corresponding rho value.
fillet-rho The feature forms a smooth blend between two curves which lie respectively on
two bodies. The fullness of each conic section is controlled by the
corresponding rho value.
two-points- The feature has circular sections of a specified radius. The body is created in a
radius counterclockwise direction from the first selected curve to the second selected
curve, with respect to the spine direction.
ends-apex- The feature has conic sections that start on the first curve selected and end on
hilite the second curve and are tangent to a specified line. The slope at each end is
defined by a selected apex curve.
ends-slopes- The feature has conic sections that start on the first edge curve selected and
hilite end on the second edge curve and are tangent to a specified line. Slope is
defined at the start and end by two independent slope control curves.
fillet-hilite The feature has conic sections that form a smooth blend between two curves
which lie respectively on two bodies, and are tangent to a specified line.
ends-slope- The feature starts on the first edge curve selected and ends on the second
arc edge curve. Slope is determined at the start by a selected control curve.
four-points- The feature starts on the first curve selected, passes through two interior
slope curves, and ends on the fourth curve. You also select a slope control curve
which defines the starting slope.
ends-slopes- The feature is an S-shaped body with sections that form a smooth cubic blend
cubic between two selected edge curves. Slope is defined at the start and end by two
independent slope control curves.
fillet-bridge The feature has sections that form a bridge between two curves that lie on two
sets of faces.
point-radius- Lets you create a body with circular sections by defining the starting point on a
angle-arc selected edge, a tangent face, the body's curvature radius, and the angle that
the body spans.
Five-points Lets you create a section free form feature using five existing curves as control
curves. The body starts on the first curve selected, passes through three
selected interior control curves, and ends on the fifth curve selected.
linear- Lets you create a linear section surface that is tangent to a face.
tangent
Circular- Lets you create a circular section surface that is tangent to a face.
tangent
Circle Lets you create full circular section surfaces.

N-Sided Surface - Overview
This option lets you build a surface with an unrestricted number of curves or edges that form
a simple, closed loop, and assign continuity to outside faces. You can remove holes in
surfaces that are not four-sided. Shape control options are available to refine sharpness at
center point, while maintaining continuity constraints. This option creates an
NSIDED_SURFACE feature.
Example Creation Sequence of an N-Sided Surface
The first upper left figure in the example shown above shows a solid with a six-sided void in
its center. In the upper right figure the void has been filled with a shaped n-sided surface. The
lower middle figure shows further shaping done to the n-sided surface.
N-Sided Surface - Dialog Fields
N-Sided Surface Dialog Options
Type Trimmed Single Sheet - Lets you create a single surface covering the entire
region within a closed loop of selected surfaces.
Multiple Triangular Patches - Lets you create a surface of individual,
triangular patches, each consisting of the triangular region between each side
and a common center point.
Selection Boundary Curves - Lets you select a closed loop of curves or edges to serve
Steps as a boundary for construction of the N-Sided Surface. The closed loop
represents the profile of the boundary for the new surface, and can consist of
any number of curves or edges.
Boundary Faces - Lets you select faces for tangency and curvature
constraints. The Shape Control dialog then displays to let you move and tilt
the center point, and change its continuity and flow direction.
UV Orientation - Spine - (Optional) Lets you select a spine curve to define
the V orientation of the new surface. Available only with the Trimmed Single
Sheet type, and only when the Spine toggle under UV Orientation is turned
on.
UV Orientation - Vector - (Optional) Lets you use Vector Methods to define
the V orientation of the new surface. The UV orientation of the new n-sided
surface follows the given vector direction. Available only with the Trimmed
Single Sheet type, and only when the Vector toggle UV Orientation is turned
on.
UV Orientation - Area - (Optional) Lets you use two diagonal points to define
a rectangular UV orientation for the new surface on the WCS plane.
Filter Helps you to select desired objects by limiting the available types. The filter
can be set to Any, Curve, Edge, Sketch or String.
UV Orientation (Optional) The UV Orientation options let you specify the direction the new
surface is to follow as it is built. If you do not use one of these options to
specify UV orientation, the system generates the surface automatically. These
options are available only with the Trimmed Single Sheet Type.
Spine - Enables the UV Orientation - Spine selection step.
Vector - Enables the UV Orientation - Vector selection step.
Area - Enables the UV Orientation - Area selection step.
Trim to Lets you specify that the new surface is either trimmed or untrimmed to the
Boundary boundary curves or edges. Available only with the Trimmed Single Sheet
type.
Merge Faces If this option is on, the system treats tangent-continuous portions of the loop
if Possible as single curves, and builds one face for each tangent-continuous section. If
this option is off, the system builds one face for each curve or edge in the
loop. Available only with the Multiple Triangular Patches type.

N-Sided Surface - Procedures
For Trimmed Single Sheet:
1. Select Trimmed Single Sheet Type.
2. Use the Boundary Curves selection step to select a profile forming a closed loop. The
profile can consist of edges or curves.
3. (Optional) Use the Boundary Faces selection step to select faces to represent a
constraining boundary.
4. (Optional) Use the UV Orientation toggle switches and the matching selection step,
UV Orientation - Spine, or UV Orientation - Vector, to specify a spine or vector to
define U/V orientation for the surface.
5. (Optional) Turn on the Trim to Boundary option if you want the surface trimmed to
the boundary curves or edges.
6. Click Apply.
7. If you used the Boundary Faces selection step to specify faces on which to base
tangency, clicking Apply immediately creates the trimmed surface. If you did not use
the Boundary Faces selection step, clicking Apply opens the Shape Control dialog to
let you adjust the center flatness. Use the Center Flat slider to adjust flatness, and
click Apply to create the surface.
For Multiple Triangular Patches:
1. Use the Boundary Curves selection step to select a profile forming a closed loop. The
profile can consist of edges or curves. Use the Filter option if necessary to aid object
selection.
2. (Optional) Use the Boundary Faces selection step to select faces to represent a
constraining boundary.
3. (Optional) Turn on the Merge Faces if Possible option if you want the system to treat
tangent-continuous portions of the loop as single curves, and build one face for each
tangent-continuous section.
4. Click Apply for the system to create a temporary surface and to open the Shape
Control dialog.
5. From the Shape Control dialog you can make dynamic changes to the surface. You
can change the Match Continuity. You can change the position of the center point
and tilt its plane using the Center Control X, Y, Z sliders. You can change the flatness
of the surface around the center point using the Center Flat slider. You can also
specify the flow direction using the Flow Direction on Outside Walls options.
6. Once the temporary surface is adjusted the way you want, click the OK or Apply
button to permanently create the n-sided surface.
Questions
1. How many guide curves can be given in through curve?
2. What is the difference between ruled and through curve?
3. What are the sub options in N-sided surface?
4. What is the difference between swept and through curve mesh?
5. Is it possible to create a solid body using through curve mesh?

SWEEP
F. Modeling Sweep Options
Swept - Lets you create a body defined by moving a curve outline in a prescribed
manner along a path in space.
Sweep along Guide - Lets you create a single body by extruding an open or closed
boundary sketch, curve, edge or face along a guide formed by one or a series of
curves, edges, or faces. Part of Swept Features.
Tube - Lets you create a single solid body by sweeping a user-specified circular cross
section, consisting of user-defined outer and inner diameters ,along one or more curve
objects. Part of Swept Features.
Variational sweep – Lets you create a solid or sheet body feature that sweeps a
master cross section variably along a path.

Swept
You can use this option to construct swept bodies.
A swept body is a shape swept out by a curve outline moving in a prescribed manner along a
path in space. The moving curve outline is referred to as the section string. The path is
referred to as the guide string, because it guides the motion.

Section Strings
As mentioned above, the moving curve outline is referred to as the section string. A section
string can consist of single or multiple objects. Each object can be either a curve, solid edge,
or a solid face. Section strings do not have to be smooth, and the number of objects within
each section string can differ. You can input any number of section strings from one up to the
maximum number of 150.
Guide String Options
The guide string controls the orientation and scaling of the swept body in the sweeping
direction. A guide string can consist of single or multiple segments. Each segment can be
either a curve, solid edge or a solid face. All of the objects in each guide string must be
smooth and contiguous. You must supply either one, two or three guide strings.

Sweep Along Guide
This option allows you to create a single body by extruding an open or closed boundary
sketch, curve, edge or face along a guide (a path) formed by one or a series of curves, edges
or faces.

When using the Curve string selection method, you can create a solid or a sheet body by
sweeping a section string along a curve or a string of curves (a guide string). This functionality
may seem similar to the free form swept feature. However, in the Sweep Along Guide feature,
you are allowed to select only one section string and only one guide string with or without
smooth guide objects.
The Body Type modeling preference determines whether a solid or a sheet body is created. If
it is set to Sheet Body, the system generates a single sheet body consisting of multiple faces,
and the ends of the Sweep Along Guide feature are not capped. You can edit any creation
parameters of a swept feature using Edit->Feature->Parameters.
Procedure
After choosing this method you must:
1. Select a section string.
2. Select a guide string.
3. Enter offset values.
4. If necessary, choose a Boolean operation.
String Selection Methods
You can select a string using any of the following methods:
Solid Face Lets you select solid faces without having to first extract the curves.
Solid Edge Lets you select edges from solid faces without having to first extract the curves.
Curve Lets you select a nonsketch curve, or individual sketch curves, to be used for a
swept feature operation.
Chain Lets you select a chain of sketch or nonsketch curves to ensures proper object
Curves selection and order.
Sheet Body Lets you create a single body by sweeping one or more sheet bodies.

Tube
This option creates a single solid body by sweeping a user-specified circular cross section
along one or more curve objects. The circular cross section consists of user-defined outer and
inner diameter values. You can use this option to create wire bundles, harnesses, tubing,
cabling, or piping applications.
The terms "Tube" and "cable" are used interchangeably. For example, the name that appears
when you move the cursor over the icon is Tube, but the feature it creates is called CABLE in
the Feature Selection dialog (for example, Edit-> Feature-> Parameters).

Tube Dialog Options
Outer Lets you enter a value for the outer diameter of the tube. This value cannot be
Diameter zero.
Inner Lets you enter a value for the inner diameter of the tube. This value maybe be
Diameter zero.
Output Type Lets you create either a Multiple Segment or a Single Segment tube.
A Multiple Segment tube has a series of lateral faces, either cylindrical or
toroidal, along the guide string.
A Single Segment tube has only one or two lateral faces, which are B-surfaces.
(The tube has one lateral face if the inner diameter is zero.)

Variational Sweep
Use this command to create a solid or sheet body feature that sweeps a master cross
section variably along a path. You can create multiple bodies in one feature from a single
master cross section.
The master cross section is a sketch you create with the Sketch on Path option in the
Sketcher. The path you select for the sketch defines the origin of the sketch on path. You
can add optional rails to serve as guides for the master cross section as it sweeps along
the path using the SketcherIntersect command. Guide rails can be curves or edges

Variational Sweep Using 6 Guide Rails

= Master cross cection (orange)

= 6 Optional guide rails (dark blue)
= 6 Intersection Points where the master cross section intersects guide rails (created
with the Sketcher Intersect command)

= Sweep extends past the guide rails

Option
Description
Name

Lets you specify a master Section from a sketch created with the Sketch on Path
option.
Selection Intent is available when you construct the section.
Select You can select only curves or edges from the sketch on path (you cannot select
Section curves or edges from a “sketch in place”). They do not have to be connected, but
they must be a part of the same sketch on path.

Opens the Sketcher for you to create an internal sketch. The Sketcher opens with
the Sketch on Path type already specified, and you are prompted to specify the
sketch plane for the path. Selection Intent is available.

Sketch On exiting the Sketcher, your sketch is automatically selected as the sketch on
Section path to use for the sweep. However, you have the option of deselecting any of the
curves to form the desired section.

Minimizes the number of faces, where possible, by merging faces along the path
direction. If off, the feature has multiple faces, each corresponding to a segment
of the base curve.

Merge
Faces if
Possible

Merge Faces On for a Single Variational Sweep (top), and Off (bottom)

Lets you specify the variational sweep is a Solid body or a Sheet body when the
Body Type section is closed. The default is taken from the Body Type setting in Modeling
Preferences.

Questions Pg.No.169
1. How many guide curves can be given in swept?
2. What is the difference between swept and seep along guide?
3. What is the difference between single and multi segment tube?
4. What is the constraint required to give guide curve in swept?
FLANGE SURFACE
Modeling Flange Surface Options

Law Extension - This option lets you create a law controlled extension for an existing
base sheet, based on laws for length and angle. You can create flanges or extensions
where a particular direction is important or referencing of the existing face is
necessary.

Law Extension
This option lets you create a law-controlled extension for an existing base sheet, dynamically
or based on laws for distance and angle. You can create flanges or extensions when a
particular direction is important or when referencing of the existing face is necessary (for
example, in die design or mold design, draft direction plays an important role in creating
parting surfaces). This option creates a feature named LAW_EXTENSION.
Law Extension Basic Procedure
You can create a law-controlled extension surface by first selecting a base curve or edge from
which the extension is to be created. Then choose one of the two methods for defining the
direction reference, by either creating a temporary vector or by selecting one or more faces. If
you select a face or collection of faces to specify the direction reference, the base curve
should lie on the faces. Next, you can optionally choose a spine curve.
There are two methods for specifying the laws for creating an extension surface: Dynamic
and General.
Basic Procedure to Create a Dynamic Law Extension
To create a dynamic law extension, follow these steps:
1. Open the Law Extension function (Insert-> Free Form Feature-> Law Extension).
2. Select a curve or edge for the Base Curve String from which the extension is to be
created. Use Selection Intent to aid object selection and to set selection rules.
3. Choose the Reference Method option and the appropriate selection step to define a
reference direction.
o If you set the reference method to Faces, use the Base Face selection step
to select one or more faces.
o If you set the reference method to Vector, use the Vector selection step to
create a temporary vector.

Start Handle-Set (1), Reference Direction Coneheads (2), End Handle-Set (3)

4. (Optional) Use the Spine Curve selection step to select a spine curve string for
alternate orientations for the law-controlled extension.
5. (Optional) If you want to preview the law-controlled extension, turn on the Show
Preview option.
6. (Optional) Click on the base curve to add additional base points on the curve near the
picked locations. A new handle-set is displayed at the selected point location.
Selecting any existing base point handles and then clicking on a point on the base
curve will move the selected point to the new location.
The cursor changes to the Point Indicator cursor when placed on the base curve string

A new handle-set is displayed at the new base point
7. (Optional) MB3 click on an angle or distance handle to present options to change the
transition type. Transition types vary depending on which handle-sets you have
selected.
8. Rotate the handles to specify the angle or drag the length handle to specify the length
for the point. Alternatively you can select the handle and type into the screen input
field to specify a numeric value. Clicking the MB2 will apply your changes and exit
from the input field.
9. If you want to create the law-controlled extension on both sides of the base curve
string, turn on the Extend on Both Sides option.
10. If you do not want the law-controlled extension faces merged as a single sheet body,
turn off the Merge Faces if Possible option.
11. Click Ok or Apply to create the law-controlled extension.
Basic Procedure to Create a General Law Extension
To create a simple law extension, follow these steps:
1. Follow steps 1-4 above.
2. Choose the desired Distance, and enter the appropriate values.
3. Choose the desired Angle, and enter the appropriate values.
4. If you want to create the law-controlled extension on both sides of the base curve
string, turn on the Extend on Both Sides option.
5. If you do not want the law-controlled extension faces merged as a single sheet body,
turn off the Merge Faces if Possible option.
6. Click Apply to create the law-controlled extension.

Law Extension Dialog Options
Law Extension Dialog Options
Reference The Law Extension surface requires a reference direction, which you specify
Method using one of two methods: Faces or Vector.
Faces - Specifies to use one or more faces to form a reference coordinate
system for the extension surface.
Vector - Specifies that a single coordinate system is calculated and used at
every point along the base curve string to define the extension surface.
Selection Base Curve String - Lets you select a base curve or edge string that the
Steps system will use to define the surface profile at its base edge.
Reference Face - Lets you select one or more faces to define the reference
direction to use in constructing the extension surface.
Reference Vector - Lets you specify a vector using the standard vector
methods or vector constructor, to define the reference direction to use in
constructing the extension surface.
Spine String - (Optional) Specifying an optional spine string changes the
way in which the system determines the orientation of the local CSYS, such
that the plane that is perpendicular to the spine string determines the plane in
which the angle is measured.
Define Law - Lets you define laws by creating handle systems at key points
and specifying law values for the distance and angle.
Law There are two methods for specifying the laws for creating an extension
Specification surface: Dynamic and General.
Method Dynamic - Lets you dynamically specify angles/lengths at key locations by
dragging handles.
General - Enables the Distance and Angle selection steps. These steps open
the Law Subfunction menus, where additional methods are available to
specify the distance.
Distance Lets you specify a law method to use for the length of the extension, and the
appropriate values to use with that method. Distance methods include
Constant, Linear, Cubic, By Equation, and By Law Curve.
Angle Lets you specify a law method to use for the angle of the extension, and the
appropriate values to use with that method. Angle methods include Constant,
Linear, Cubic, By Equation, and By Law Curve.
Extend on Both Turning this option on causes the law extension to be created on both sides
Sides of the base curve string, using the same distance and angle parameters on
both sides. This option effectively mirrors the law extension sheet across the
base curve string.
Merge Faces if When enabled, creates the law extension feature as a single sheet body. If
Possible off, the law extension feature is a single sheet body with multiple faces, each
corresponding to a segment of the base curve. This option is on by default.
Distance Lets you change the distance tolerance when editing a law extension feature.
Tolerance The default value is taken from the modeling preferences Distance
Tolerance. Available only in the Edit mode.
Angle Lets you change the angle tolerance when editing a law extension feature.
Tolerance Available only in the Edit mode.
Show Preview Provides a preview of the law extension surface that will be created. This
preview includes all of the visual characteristics of the original part.

DIRECT MODELING
Modeling Direct Modeling Options
Constrain Face - Lets you impose 3D constraints on face collections of geometric
models. You can then move the faces to meet the constraints, while retaining the
original topology, if possible.
Resize Face - Lets you change the diameter of cylindrical or spherical faces, as well
as the half-angle of conic faces, with adjacent blends recreated.
Offset Region - Lets you offset a set of faces or a whole body in a single step.
Adjacent blends can be optionally recreated. Faces are specified either as target
faces or by region extraction methods
Replace Face - Lets you replace a set of faces with another face, with the ability to
regenerate adjacent blends. You can use this option when you want to change the
geometry of a face, such as to make it simpler, or to replace it with a complex surface.
Local Scale - Unlike the Scale option, which lets you scale solid and sheet bodies,
Local Scale lets you scale faces within a local face set.
Move Region - Provides simple methods to let you locally move the faces on a body.
It can be useful if you want to adjust a prototype model, and is fast and easy to use.
Pattern Face - Lets you make copies of a face set. It is similar to the Instance
function, but is easier to use and you do not have to have a feature-based model to
use it.
Reblend Face - Lets you edit blend faces, regardless of their feature history. The
function works with translated files and unparameterized solids, and you can use it to
create a parametric feature while maintaining tangency properties.
Simplify - Lets you remove connected sets of faces from a solid body.

Constrain Face
Constrain Face allows you to impose 3D constraints on face collections of geometric models.
You can then move the faces to meet the constraints, while retaining the original topology, if
possible. This option lets you edit a model with or without feature history (such as one created
by a translator).
To use Constrain Face, you must identify the faces you need to move in order to change the
solid model as you intend, and then specify a dimension or geometric constraint for them. You
can use this option when you want to define and change dimensions, add geometric
constraints to a model, edit faces, or relocate features. A CONSTRAIN_FACE feature is
created.
Constrain Face uses the same seed and boundary techniques as that of Extract Region
under the Extract Geometry option. However, with Constrain Face you can select more than
one seed face, and selection of boundaries is optional. If you select no boundary faces, what
you effectively have is multiple single selection. The faces you select must form a connected
region, and the types of faces that are available for selection depend on the chosen constraint
type. A boundary face can be of any type. A seed face cannot be a boundary member, and
vice versa.

Constrain Face Dialog Options
Constraint You can select one constraint type per operation (a feature can maintain only
Type a single constraint).
Distance - Constrains the distance between a face and a reference object.
This constraint type requires the following:
• a target face
• a reference object (typically any directed object, such as a
plane, cylinder, datum plane, datum axis, edge, line or even in some
cases a vector)
• a distance
Angle - Constrains the angle between a target face and a reference object.
This constraint type requires the following:
• a planar or cylindrical target face
• a reference object
• a point
• an angle
Align - Constrains a face so that it is coincident to a reference object. This
constraint type requires the following:
• a planar or cylindrical target face
• a reference object
Parallel - Constrains a face by moving it so that it is parallel to a reference
object, and passes through an associative point. This constraint type requires
the following:
• a planar or cylindrical target face
• a reference object
• a point the target face will pass through
Perpendicular - Constrains a face by moving it so that it is perpendicular to a
reference object, and passes through an associative point. This constraint
type requires the following:
• a planar or cylindrical target face
• a reference object
• a point the target face will pass through
Tangent - Constrains a face by making a planar or conic face tangent to
another. This constraint type requires the following:
• a planar or cylindrical target face
• a reference object
• a point the target face will pass through
Selection Availability of the selection steps depends on which constraint type is active.
Steps Selection steps may be optional depending on the constraint type, as well as
on the design intent.
Seed - Lets you identify one or more seed faces.
Boundary - Lets you select a set of faces to serve as the boundary of a
selected region. Optional.
Non-Blend - If you specified a boundary using the Boundary selection step,
the Non-Blend selection step identifies any smoothly adjacent faces for you by
highlighting them
Target Face - Lets you specify a face that is to be constrained. The Target
Face is used to determine which face to measure 'from' when relating to the
Constraint Reference. A Target Face is only specified when there is more
than one face to be moved. The Target Face must be planar or cylindrical.
Constraint Reference - Lets you specify a fixed object to serve as a
constraint reference. Planar or cylindrical faces, datum planes, planes, edges,
curves and lines are allowed.
Assistant Point - Lets you specify a reference point that the Target Face is to
pass through.
changeable Presents vector methods used with the Constraint Reference selection step to
window define a constraint reference.
Distance Required for the Distance Constraint Type. You can enter a positive value for
distance here or an equivalent expression. Negative distances are allowed.
Angle Required for the Angle Constraint Type. Negative values are ignored.
Reset Lets you discard all selections and begin a new selection sequence.
Preview Move Lets you highlight the region to be extracted before committing to the
Region movement.
Confirm Upon Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is
common to Selection Steps dialogs.

Constrain Face Example Procedure
When using the Constrain Face option, remember that it uses the same seed and boundary
technique as that of Extract Region under the Extract Geometry option. It may be useful to
view the Extract Region figure, which illustrates the principle of how geometry located
between the seed and boundary faces is affected.
1. Choose a Constraint Type. In the example we are going to use for this basic exercise
we have chosen the Distance constraint type.
2. Choose the Seed selection step and then select one or more seed faces. In the
example figure shown below we have selected a blend face highlighted in red, which
rests on top of the tapered boss.

3. Choose the Boundary selection step and select one or more boundary faces. This
step may be optional depending on the constraint type, the selected seed faces and
on your intent. In the example figure, we have selected for the boundary the planar
face highlighted in red on which the boss rests.

4. Choose the optional Non-Blend selection step to view any system-recognized blends.
If any smoothly adjacent faces are highlighted, they will be treated as blends and
recomputed as such. If you do not intend these faces to be blends, deselect them
here.
5. Choose the Target Face selection step to select a face to be constrained. In the
example figure we have selected the planar, circular face highlighted in red that is
centered on top of the boss.
6. Choose the Constraint Reference selection step to select a reference object on which
to infer a vector. In the example figure we have selected an edge highlighted in red.

7. If you are using the Distance or Angle constraint types, enter a value in the respective
Distance or Angle data entry fields. You can enter numeric values or expressions,
which must be positive. In the example we entered a numeric value of 2.25.
8. Click Apply. The specified constraints are put into effect, and any faces subject to
change are moved. In our example figure, the boss height is increased from its former
height of 1.25 to 2.25.
Resize Face - Overview
This option lets you change the diameter of cylindrical or spherical faces, as well as the half-
angle of conic faces, with adjacent blends recreated. Resize Face provides a fast and
straightforward way to modify a model, regardless of feature history.
You will find a number of uses for Resize Face, such as when you need to change a hole
diameter, adjust the taper angle of a bolt or change the size of a boss. You may also find it
useful when doing mold/casting design.
You can use this option to:
• Change a set of cylindrical faces to have the same diameters.
• Change a set of spherical faces to have the same diameters.
• Change a set of conic faces to have the same semi angles.
• Recreate connected blends with any of the parameter changes.
The two figures show highlighted cylindrical faces that are resized to a common value.
Resize Face, Before and After
Basic Procedure for Resize Face
To resize a face, follow these steps:
1. Use the Target Face selection step to select the face of a cylinder, sphere or conic.
On selecting the face, if it is a cylinder or sphere its diameter value displays in the
Diameter field, or if it is a conic its half-angle value displays in the Half Angle field.
2. Begin selecting additional faces.
(Optional) Use the Face Type option to limit the type of faces that you can
select.
(Optional) Use the Size Range option to limit the selection of faces to a
percentage of the value shown in the Diameter or Half Angle fields.
3. Use the Non-Blend selection step to display and, if desired, deselect any highlighted
smooth edges that you do not want the system to preserve as blends.
4. When face selection is complete, enter a new value for the diameter in the Diameter
field. Click OK or Apply.
Resize Face - Dialog Fields
Resize Face Dialog Options
Selection Target Face - Lets you select cylindrical, spherical or conical faces that are to
Steps be resized. On selecting the first face, its value for diameter or half angle
appears below in the Diameter or Half Angle fields.
Non-Blend - Clicking this selection step highlights any faces that are smoothly
adjacent to the target faces, and which the system recognizes and intends to
treat as blends.
Face Type This option acts as a filter and helps you to select the desired faces by
restricting the types you can select. Options are Any, Cylindrical, Conic and
Spherical.
Size Range This option lets you select only the faces that match a specific percentage
range of sizes as measured against the value displayed in the Diameter or Half
Angle fields.
Diameter Lets you specify the new value for the diameter of all selected cylinders or
spheres.
Half Angle Lets you specify the new value for the angle of all selected conics.
Confirm Upon Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common
to Selection Steps dialogs.
Offset Region
This option lets you offset a set of faces or a whole body in a single step. Adjacent blends can
be optionally recreated. Faces are specified either as target faces or by region extraction
methods using the same seed and boundary techniques as that of Extract Region under the
Extract Geometry option. Offset Region is a fast and straightforward way to modify a model
regardless of feature history. Another benefit is the regeneration of blends.
Possible uses for this option include mold and casting design, such as with the casting of
unparameterized parts using faces. This option creates a feature named OFFSET_REGION.
Following is an example of the use of Offset Region. In the following figure, two faces have
been selected as targets for an offset (highlighted in red).

Selected Surfaces Before Offset
In the next figure shown below is the result of the offset. No topology was changed during the
offset.
After Offset

Basic Procedure to use Offset Region
To offset or extract a region using this option, follow these steps:
1. Use the Seed selection step to select one or more faces to offset. If you wish to
extract a region, select only one face to act as the seed face.
2. (Optional) Use the Boundary selection step to specify the bounds of an extracted
region. If you selected more than one face in the Seed selection step, and then select
a boundary, only the first specified seed face will be offset. The rest will be
disregarded by the system.
3. (Optional) Use the Non-Blend selection step to display and deselect any smooth
edges that you do not want the system to regenerate as blends.
4. Enter a value for the Offset.
5. (Optional) Use the Preview Offset Region button to review what you have selected
and what is going to be moved during the operation.
6. Click OK or Apply.

Replace Face
Replace Face lets you replace a set of faces with another face, with the ability to regenerate
adjacent blends. You can use this option when you want to change the geometry of a face,
such as to make it simpler, or to replace it with a complex surface. You can use Replace Face
even on nonparameterized models. This option creates a feature named REPLACE_FACE.
You can select the face from any existing solid or sheet body.
Below is an example of a Replace Face operation.
Replace Face Operation - Both Solids are Still Separate
In the top portion of the figure there are two solids. The lower solid has a highlighted face that
is the Target Tace. The top solid's opposite, nonplanar face is the Tool Face. The bottom
portion of the figure shows the result of the Replace Face operation. Note that both solids are
still separate.
Replace Face Dialog Options
Selection Target Face - Lets you select one or more faces to be replaced. Any face type is
Steps allowed to be selected.
Non-Blend - Clicking this selection step highlights any faces that are smoothly
adjacent to the target faces, and which the system recognizes and intends to
treat as blends.
Tool Face - Lets you select a face to serve as the site for the replacement face
for the selected target faces. Only one face can be selected. On selecting the tool
face, a vector displays to show its direction. In some situations where multiple
solutions to a replace face operation exist, you can toggle between them using
the Reverse Direction toggle button.
Reverse Lets you toggle between possible solutions for a Tool Face selection, when that
Direction situation exists. Clicking this option reverses the vector direction of the selected
Tool Face.
Simplify This option toggle lets you simplify the geometry representation of a surface.
Surface
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Upon Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common
to Selection Steps dialogs.
Basic Procedure for Replace Face
To replace a set of faces using this option, follow these steps:
1. Use the Target Face selection step to select one or more faces to replace.
2. (Optional) Use the Non-Blend selection step to display and deselect any smooth
edges that you do not want the system to regenerate as blends.
3. Use the Tool Face selection step to select a replacement face for the selected target
faces. If necessary, use the Reverse Direction option to change the direction of the
vector.
4. Click OK or Apply.

Local Scale
Unlike the Scale option, which lets you scale solid and sheet bodies, Local Scale lets you
scale a local face set of a solid body. You can use Local Scale even on nonparameterized
models.
Possible uses for this option include mold and casting design, such as with the casting of
unparameterized parts using faces. This option creates a feature named LOCAL_SCALE.
You can select faces from any existing solid or sheet body.
Below is an example of a Local Scale operation performed on an unparameterized solid. In
the top portion of the figure a single face has been selected for the seed (highlighted in red).
The Local Scale Type has been set to Axisymmetric, and no boundary face has been
specified. The result is shown in the lower portion of the figure.

Local Scale on an Unparameterized Body
Local Scale - Dialog Options
Local Scale Dialog Options
Type Lets you choose the type or method of scaling:
Uniform - Lets you scale uniformly in all directions.
Axisymmetric - Lets you scale with a specified scale factor (or multiplier),
symmetrically about a specified axis. This involves assigning one scaling
factor along an axis you specify, and another, single scaling factor to be
applied to the other two axis directions.
General - Lets you scale with different factors in all three X, Y, Z directions.
Selection There are six basic selection steps, although not all are available with every
Steps scaling Type method.
Seed Face - Lets you specify one or more faces, as seed or target faces.
Boundary Face - Lets you select a set of faces to serve as a region
boundary.
Non Blend Face - Clicking this selection step highlights any faces that are
smoothly adjacent to the seed or target faces, and which the system
recognizes and intends to treat as blends.
Reference Point - Lets you specify a reference point from which the scale
operation is centered.
Reference Axis - Lets you specify a reference axis for the scale operation.
Available only with the Axisymmetric Type method.
Reference CSYS - Lets you specify a reference coordinate system when
using the General Scale method.
Changeable This area displays the Vector Method option menu for use with the Reference
Window Axis selection steps.
CSYS Method This option becomes available when the Reference CSYS selection step is
active.
Scale Factors Lets you specify the scaling factors by which the current size is to change.
One, two or three scale factors are required, depending on the scale Type.
Preview Scale Lets you view the region to be moved by highlighting it before committing to
Region the movement.
Reset Cancels all face selections and restores the dialog settings to their initial
state.
Confirm Upon Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is
common to Selection Steps dialogs.
Basic Procedure to use Local Scale
To scale one or more faces in a local face set, follow these steps:
1. Choose the Uniform, Axisymmetric or General scaling type.
2. Use the Seed selection step to select one or more faces to scale. If you wish to
extract a region to scale, select only one face for the seed.
3. (Optional) Use the Boundary selection step to specify the bounds of a local scale
region. If you selected more than one face in the Seed selection step, and then select a
boundary, only the first specified seed face will be scaled. The rest will be disregarded by the
system.
4. (Optional) Use the Non Blend Face selection step to display and deselect any smooth
edges that you do not want the system to regenerate as blends.
5. Specify a reference:
o For Uniform and Axisymmetric, specify a Reference Point.
o For Axisymmetric specify a Reference Axis (or accept the default Z axis).
o For General specify a Reference CSYS (or accept the default ).
6. Enter the appropriate Scale Factors.
7. (Optional) Use the Preview Scale Region option button to review what you have
selected and what is going to be moved during the operation.
8. Choose OK or Apply.

Move Region
This option provides simple methods to let you locally move the faces on a body. It can be
useful if you want to adjust a prototype model, and is fast and easy to use. The tool provides
blend recognition and recreation, and is independent of modeling history. You can even use it
to move all of the faces on a body.
This option creates a feature named MOVE_REGION. You can select faces from any existing
solid or sheet body.
Below is an example of a Move Region Operation. The top figure shows a series of faces
selected as seeds on a solid body (highlighted in red). No boundary is specified, and the Non-
Blend option was applied to the two edge blends. The Translate Point to Point option was
used to move the region to an edge control point on the left. The results are shown in the
lower figure.
Selected Faces (Highlighted in Red) Before the Move Region

Same View, Showing How the Faces have Moved to the Left
Move Region Dialog Options
Move Region Dialog Options
Selection Steps Seed - Lets you specify one or more seed faces to move.
Boundary - Lets you select a set of faces to serve as a region boundary.
Non-Blend - Clicking this selection step highlights any faces that the
system recognizes and intends to treat as blends.
Move Method Once you have specified the seed and boundary objects, you can choose a
method to use for the movement.
Translate Point to Point - Lets you move the selected region of faces
from one point to another point.
Translate Direction & Distance - Lets you move the selected region of
faces using a direction vector and a displacement distance.
Rotate About an Axis - Lets you move the selected region of faces using
a direction vector and a displacement distance.
Rotate Between Two Axes - Lets you move the selected region of faces
by rotating them between two axes.
Define Clicking this option button takes you directly to the sub-dialog for the
Transformation currently specified Move Method. Clicking a Move Method toggle button
does the same thing.
Preview Move Lets you view the region to be moved by highlighting it before committing
Region to the movement.
Reset Cancels all face selections and restores the dialog settings to their initial
state.
Confirm Upon Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is
common to Selection Steps dialogs.
Basic Procedure to use Move Region
To move a region using this option, follow these steps:
1. Use the Seed selection step to select one or more faces to move.
2. (Optional) Use the Boundary selection step to select faces that define a boundary for
the region to be moved.
3. (Optional) Use the Non-Blend selection step to display and deselect any smooth
edges that you do not want the system to regenerate as blends.
4. Choose a Move Method. Depending on the Move Method you chose, the appropriate
Translate or Rotate sub-dialog displays to let you define the translation or rotation
parameters.
5. Use the Translate or Rotate sub-dialog to specify how you want the selected seed
faces to be moved. This involves defining points, vectors or both, depending on the
method. The Move Region dialog then redisplays.
6. Click OK or Apply.

Pattern Face Overview
Pattern Face lets you make copies of a face set. It is similar to the Instance function, but is
easier to use, and you do not have to have a feature-based model to use it. It is also faster
and more straightforward. Use this function when you have a set of faces and you want to
make a rectangular or circular pattern of them. The figures below show two sample patterns,
each based on a single seed face (highlighted).

Rectangular Pattern Face
Partial Circular Pattern Face
You can select a set of faces to serve as a template for rectangular and circular patterns. You
can also create a mirror pattern given a mirror face or datum plane.
Pattern Face uses the same seed and boundary techniques as Extract Region under the
Extract Geometry option. However, with Pattern Face you can select more than one seed
face, and selection of boundaries is optional. If you select no boundary faces, what you
effectively have is multiple single selection. The faces you select must form a connected
region. A boundary face can be of any type. A seed face cannot be a boundary member, and
vice versa. This option creates a feature named PATTERN_FACE.

Pattern Face - Dialog Options
Pattern Face Dialog Options
Type Rectangular - Lets you copy a face or set of faces to create a linear pattern of
those faces.
Circular - Lets you copy a face or face set to create a circular pattern of those
faces.
Reflection - Lets you copy a face or face set to create a mirrored pattern of
those faces.
Selection Seed - Lets you specify one or more faces, as seed or target faces.
Steps Boundary - Lets you select a set of faces to serve as a region boundary. If you
wish to copy an extracted region, you would use this selection step. (Optional.)
X-Axis - Lets you define the X-Axis for the Rectangular and Circular Types.
You can use the Vector Method option menu to define the X-Axis, or select a
reference for it from the graphics window.
Y-Axis - Lets you define the Y-Axis for the Rectangular Type. You can use the
Vector Method option menu to define the Y-Axis, or select a reference for it
from the graphics window.
Planar Reference - Lets you define a plane through which to mirror a pattern
of faces. You can select a datum plane or planar face.
Number Defines the total number of instances of the face set to be generated parallel to
Along XC the X-Axis. This number includes the existing face set that you are copying.
Used only with the Rectangular Type.
Number Defines the total number of instances of the face set to be generated parallel to
Along YC the Y-Axis. This number includes the existing face set that you are copying.
Used only with the Rectangular Type.
XC Offset Defines the spacing for the copies along the XC axis. This spacing is
measured from a point on one copy to the same point on the next copy along
the XC axis. Negative values position the copies in a negative direction along
the axis. Used only with the Rectangular Type.
YC Offset Defines the spacing for the copies along the YC axis. This spacing is
measured from a point on one copy to the same point on the next copy along
the YC axis. Negative values position the copies in a negative direction along
the axis. Used only with the Rectangular Type.
Number The total number of copies created in the circular pattern, including the existing
face or face set that you are copying. Used only with the Circular Type.
Angle The angle between the copies in a circular pattern. Used only with the Circular
Type.
Preview Lets you view the region to be copied by highlighting it before committing to the
Pattern operation. For an extracted region this would show what is to be extracted,
Region from the seed to the boundary. For target faces, this would show the faces to
be copied.
Reset Cancels all face selections and restores the dialog settings to their initial state.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Upon Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common
to Selection Steps dialogs.
Basic Procedure to use Pattern Face
To copy a set of faces in a pattern onto a face using this option, follow these steps:
1. Choose the Type of Pattern Face you wish to create, Rectangular, Circular or
Reflection.
2. Use the Seed selection step to select one or more connected faces to copy to the
pattern.
3. (Optional) Use the Boundary selection to select faces that define a boundary for the
region of faces to be copied to the pattern.
4. For the Rectangular type:
o Use the X-Axis selection step to specify a direction for the x-axis. Select an
object from the graphics window or, if necessary, use the Vector Method option menu to
define the direction.
o Use the Y-Axis selection step to specify the y-axis. Select an object from the
graphics window or, if necessary, use the Vector Method option menu to define the direction.
o Enter a value for Number Along XC. The face set you are copying should be
part of the total value.
o Enter a value for Number Along YC. The face set you are copying should be
part of the total value.
o Enter a value for XC Offset.
o Enter a value for YC Offset.
For the Circular type:
o Use the X-Axis selection step to specify the central axis of the circular
pattern. If necessary, use the Vector Method option menu to define the axis.
o Enter a value for Number. The face set you are copying should be part of the
total value.
o Enter a value for Angle.
For the Reflection type:
o Use the Planar Reference selection step to specify a planar object or a datum
plane to act as the plane through which the face set is copied.
5. Click OK or Apply. The selected face set is copied to a pattern on the face.

Reblend Face - Overview
This function lets you edit the radii of blend faces, regardless of their feature history. It works
with translated files and unparameterized solids. You can use it to create a parametric feature
while maintaining tangency properties. It provides a straightforward and effective way to apply
parametric design.
Face Blends Before Reblend Face

Chain Selection of Face Blends

Face Blends With New Radius After Reblend Face

Reblend Face - Dialog Options
Reblend Face Options
Size Range Lets you perform mass selection of face blends based on the size of their blend
radii.
Reblend Lets you specify a new blend radius for all of the selected faces.
Radius
Chain Faces Automatically selects all blend faces with the same radius as the single face
you selected, and which connect together with that face in a continuous chain.
If this option is not enabled, you can select only one blend face at a time.
More / Less Expands and contracts the Reblend Face dialog to make available the Blend
Options Radius listing window.
Blend Radius This option window shows a listing of all selected faces, each with its blend
radius and an ascending face or chain number. You cannot change the blend
radii shown in this listing.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you
Upon Apply preview the results, and accept, reject or analyze them.

Reblend Face - Basic Procedure
1. Open the Reblend Face dialog.
2. Select the faces you wish to reblend.
3. To verify the selections, optionally use the Blend Radius list window to examine the
selected faces and their radii.
4. Type a value in the Reblend Radius box for the new radius of all selected faces.
5. Click OK or Apply to reblend all of the selected faces with the parameter in the
Reblend Radius box.

Simplify Body
This option lets you remove connected sets of faces from a solid body. Simplify Body is useful
when you want to alter a complex model to emphasize key features, but retain the ability to
recover the details. Also, simplifying components reduces the amount of data required when
those components are loaded into an assembly.

Basic Simplify Body Procedure
To simplify a solid body:
1. Select at least one face for Retained Faces.
2. Select one or more Boundary Faces.
3. Use Boundary Edges to add or remove edges from the current set.
4. (Optional) Turn the Verify Removed Faces option ON, then select one or more faces
that you expect to be removed in the simplification.
5. (Optional) Turn the Automatic Hole Removal option, and define Hole Dia Less Than.
6. You can use the Imprint Faces option to create new edges, if necessary, by using
existing datum planes.
7. (Optional) Choose Preview if you want to see the effects of applying Simplify Body
before the original body is modified.
8. Choose a creation confirmation option.
9. Choose OK or Apply to create the simplification. A message appears that tells you
how many faces were removed by the simplification operation, and how many faces
remain. Review Failing Wounds becomes active, if applicable.
Questions
1. What let you offset a whole body in a single step?
2. What let you to remove connected sets of faces from a solid body?
3. Can you change the scale of a body individually in all directions?
4. Can you use Resize Face for planar faces, Why?

SHEET METAL FEATURES
Sheet Metal features supply sheet metal specific detail to your model. These features are
parametrically defined just as normal modeling features, however, sheet metal features are
capable of exhibiting bending and distorting due to sheet metal forming.
The following sheet metal features represent various types of flanges:
• Flange
• Inset Flange
• Profile Flange
• Multibend Bracket
• General Flange
• Bridge
You can apply these sheet metal features to other features:
• Bead
• Punch
• Hole
• Slot
• Cutout
• Corner
• Relief
• Solid Punch
• Edge Rip
The following features support bending and forming operations:
• Bend
• Unbend
• Rebend
• Metaform
The following utilities perform specific Sheet Metal functions, but are not features themselves:
• Bracket
Sheet metal features are associative - if you change the geometry used to create a sheet
metal feature that feature updates.

Sheet Metal Feature Toolbar
You can access all Sheet Metal features, utilities, and operations within the Modeling
application via Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature or from the Sheet Metal Feature
Toolbar. Note that the Sheet Metal Feature Toolbar may be hidden when you enter Modeling
the first time. Use View->Toolbars->Customize to enable the toolbar and to enable or disable
specific functions within the toolbar.

Sheet Metal functions below with icons:

Flange Inset Flange Profile Flange

Multibend Bracket General Flange Bridge

Bead Punch Hole

Slot Cutout Corner
Relief Solid Punch Edge Rip

Bend Unbend/Rebend Metaform

Form/Unform Bracket

Flange
This feature lets you create a Sheet Metal Flange on a planar face. The Flange can then be
shown in the fully formed (as designed) state, in a fully unformed (flat) state, or in an
intermediate state.
You can access the Flange dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Flange or
from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Flange, use Modeling->Edit->Feature or the
Edit Feature toolbar.
Procedure
The steps for creating a Sheet Metal Flange are:
• Select a straight edge.
• Edit the desired parameter values.
• Choose a method for positioning the Flange.
• Choose OK or Apply to create the Flange.
The following parameters can be used to customize your Flange. These parameters are
initially set to default values.
• Specify the Flange parameters (optional).
• Specify Left Side Taper/Miter/Butt parameters and Right Side Taper/Miter/Butt
parameters using Options (optional).
• Re-specify the direction of the Flange using Flip Bend Direction (optional).
• Re-specify the options for the thickness and/or left/right tapers/miters/butt using
Options (optional).

Inset Flange
This option lets you create an inset flange on a planar face.
You can access the Inset Flange dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Inset
Flange or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit an Inset Flange, use Modeling->Edit-
>Feature or the Edit Feature toolbar.

Procedure
To create an inset flange, you must:
• Select a straight edge
• Edit the desired parameter values.
• Choose a method for positioning the inset flange
• Choose OK or Apply and the inset flange is created.
The following parameters can be used to customize your inset flange. These parameters are
initially set to default values.
• Specify the inset flange profile dimensions (optional).
• Specify a bend allowance formula.
• Specify an inset distance (optional).
• Specify a left and/or right bend relief using options (optional).
• Re-specify the direction of the flange using Flip Bend Direction (optional).
Profile Flange
Profile Flange allows you to create a set of bends that attach to existing geometry and wrap
around existing geometry. You will need to define a section profile (side view) using the
sketcher. Once the section Profile is defined, you can also redefine/edit the default Web
Profile (Top/Flat Pattern View). Width can be defined using a combination of Width, Start
Offset and End Offset values. You have an option to add/edit/delete bends to the flange that
are not in the plane of the Section Profile. Accomplish this by using the Multibend Bracket
dialog that is accessible from the Profile Flange dialog.
This feature is controlled by two sketches, i.e., one section view sketch and the other a web
view or the Top/Flat Pattern view sketch. The Section Profile can be used to define the
number of bends and the location of each and the Web Profile can be used to define the final
shape (outline) of the solid.
The Section Profile can have sharp corners. In such cases, automatic bends will be added at
these corners. This automatic bend radius can be defined through the options dialog.
You can access the Profile Flange dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature-
>Profile Flange or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Profile Flange, use
Modeling->Edit->Feature or the Edit Feature toolbar or select the feature in the graphics
window and do a right mouse button click on it. This should bring up a pop-up dialog with Edit
Parameters option on it

Multibend Bracket
Use the Multibend Bracket to create a fully associative sheet metal feature defined from user
selected reference geometry. Select 3D reference geometry to define a set of planes. Using
bend parameters that you define, the Multibend Bracket unfolds this reference geometry onto
a base plane. Use the Sketcher to develop a sketch of the unformed bracket outline based on
this unfolded reference geometry. The system extrudes the sketch into a solid and applies the
appropriate bends.
You can access the Multibend Bracket dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature-
>Multibend Bracket or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Multibend Bracket, use
Modeling->Edit->Feature or the Edit Feature toolbar.

General Flange
Use the General Flange to create a sheet body or solid body flange along any curved bend
edge and planar or non-planar face. There are several methods with which you can build a
General Flange.
• Parameters method: You can define multiple consecutive bend/web areas for a single
flange.
• Build to Sections method: You can build a General Flange from a set of curves that
define the cross sections of the flange.
• Build to Faces method allows you to define a General Flange that matches an input
set of faces.
• Punch Vector method is similar to Parameters method, however, the first bend angle
is defined such that the cross-section curves are parallel to a given vector regardless
of the construction method, all General Flanges are tangent to the tangent faces
along the bend edges.
You can access the General Flange dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature-
>General Flange or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a General Flange, use
Modeling->Edit->Feature or the Edit Feature toolbar.
Procedure
All General Flanges follow the same basic procedure:
• Select a bend edge (or continuous edges)
• Verify the target attachment faces and the tangent faces
• Select a spine string (optional)
• Enter construction data (parameters, section curves, shaping faces, punch vector,
etc.)
• Enter options such as Bend Allowance Formula, r-Value, and Distortion method

Bridge
This feature lets you create a bridge between a base and target. The Bridge feature is
different from the General Flange. You can create a bridge as a transition between two bodies
as opposed to only an extension from a single body.
You can access the Bridge dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Bridge or
from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Bridge, use Modeling->Edit->Feature or the
Edit Feature toolbar.
You can use the Bridge feature to create single and double bend surfaces between a base
and a target. During creation, the Bridge is constrained at the base and target profiles. The
Bridge behaves like the General Flange unforming as an extension from the base profile. You
can use the Bridge in conjunction with the General Flange to design addenda and binders.
The Bridge supports the following construction types:
• Tangent at Target - You can use this construction type to create the Bridge when
base faces/edges have been selected along with either target faces or target
faces/edges.
• Intersect Angle at Target - You can use this construction type to create the Bridge
when base faces/edges have been selected along with either target edges/curves or
target faces/edges.
• Z-Bend - You can use this construction type to create the Bridge when base
faces/edges have been selected along with any combination of target faces/edges.
Procedure
The steps for creating the Bridge are:
• Specify base faces
• Specify the base profile
• Specify the target faces
• Specify the target profile
• Specify the construction type if applicable.
• Specify the construction parameter values where applicable.
• Specify the distortion method parameters to be used for subsequent
forming/unforming processes.
• Specify a unite option and choose Apply to create the Bridge feature.

Bead
Beads are similar to the general pad and general pocket features, in that they form
protrusions or depressions in a variety of shapes. But unlike pads and pockets (which are
created by defining their outline shapes), beads are created by following a prescribed
centerline path. The Bead dialog is a Selection Steps dialog. You can access the Bead dialog
from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Bead or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar.
Beads are useful in the design of sheet metal products to add strength to the product or to
control the formability of the material during metal stamping operations (e.g., lock beads can
stop a sheet metal blank from sliding into the die cavity).
Beads can be created as a part of the body they are on, or as a separate feature. Because
beads are fully associative to the sheet or solid bodies on which they lie, they update
accordingly when the bodies update.
The cross section of a bead falls into one of three general categories: U-shaped, V-shaped, or
circular. This cross section can also vary between the three shapes as you move along the
centerline.
Punch
The Punch is used to model emboss, coin and lance operations across multiple, adjacent
placement faces. Open and closed profiles intersecting the periphery of the part are also
supported. Several additional capabilities are available, including:
• An option to automatically create the Tool Center Point (centroid).
• Automatic projection of the Tool Center Point down to the Placement Face.
• An option to define the Placement Outline as the inside or outside perimeter of the
punch.
• Automatic identification of Placement Faces given a user-supplied seed face
• An option to create a flanged cutout (a.k.a. drawn cutout).
• An option of creating Lance type punches in which one or more sides of the Punch
are Pierced. This capability is commonly used to create louvers.
You can access the Punch dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Punch or
from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Punch, use Modeling->Edit->Feature or the
Edit Feature toolbar.
Procedure
The steps for creating a Punch are:
• Specify Punch Type (emboss, coin or lance).
• Specify the Placement Face (seed face).
• Specify the Placement Outline.
• Select a Tool Center Point, or specify automatic centroid creation in Options.
• Select the Lancing Curves from the selected Placement Outline curves if punch type
is Lance.
• Flip the punch side vector, if needed.
• Select a Top Type (offset, flat, round, cone).
• Enter a punch depth.
• Enter die radius, taper angle, and punch radius (for emboss operations only).
• Enter cone depth (for emboss and cone top only).
• Specify a Punch Direction (tool axis).
• Choose OK or Apply to create the Punch

Hole
This feature allows you to create a Hole on any type of face. The Hole feature is unique from
the Modeling Hole feature in that it can be placed on any type of face, and it will form and
unform itself to the underlying surface.
You can access the Hole dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Hole or from
the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Hole, use Modeling->Edit->Feature or the Edit
Feature toolbar.
Procedure
The steps for creating a Hole are:
• Specify Punch, Through, or Depth type.
• Specify the placement face.
• Specify the through face (for a Through Hole).
• Specify the diameter (all), depth and tip angle (for Depth Holes only).
• Specify the direction vector for the Hole.
• If you do not need to use RPO, set the Positioning Method to edge offsets.
• Specify the Offset Edges.
• Specify the offset distances from the Offset Edges.
• Choose OK or Apply to create the feature.
• If you want to create RPO dimensions, set the Positioning Method to RPO. Do not
select any Offset Edges.
• Choose OK or Apply to create the feature's tool body.
• If the Placement Face is non-planar, you must select a planar face (or datum plane)
for RPO positioning. Specify RPO Dimensions just as you would for other modeling
features.
• Choose OK or Apply to create the Hole.

Slot
This feature lets you create a Slot on any type of face. The Slot feature is unique from the
Modeling Slot feature in that it can be placed on any type of face, and it will form and unform
itself to the underlying surface.
You can access the Slot dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Slot or from the
Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Slot, use Modeling->Edit->Feature or the Edit Feature
toolbar.
Procedure
The steps for creating a sheet metal slot are:
• Specify Punch, Through, or Depth type.
• Specify the placement face.
• Specify the through face (for a Through Slot).
• Specify the length, width, and depth (for Depth Slots only).
• Specify the direction vector for the Slot.
• If you do not need to use RPO, set the Positioning Method to edge offsets.
• Specify the Offset Edges.
• Choose OK or Apply to create the feature.
• If you want to create RPO dimensions, set the Positioning Method to RPO. Do not
select any Offset Edges.
• Press OK or Apply to create the feature's tool body.
• If the Placement Face is non-planar you must select a face (or datum plane) for RPO
positioning. Specify RPO Dimensions just as you would for other modeling features.
• Choose OK or Apply to create the Slot

Cutout
This feature allows you to create a Cutout on any type of face. The Cutout feature is unique
from the General Pocket in that it forms and unforms itself with its underlying placement
face(s).
Here are some of the unique characteristics of the Cutout feature:
• Cutouts can distort with underlying Sheet Metal Features, such as the Flange, Inset
Flange, General Flange, Bridge, and Bend.
• The outline of the Cutout can be open as long as the ends of the outline intersect with
the periphery of the target body.
You can access the Cutout dialog from Modeling->Sheet Metal Feature->Cutout or from the
Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Cutout, use Modeling->Edit->Feature or the Edit
Feature toolbar
Procedure
The steps for creating a Sheet Metal Cutout are:
• Specify the placement face.
• Specify a through face (Through type Cutouts only).
• Specify the placement outline.
• Specify a projection vector.
• Flip the conehead pointing to the region to discard, if needed.
• Choose OK or Apply to create the Cutout
Corner
Use the Corner feature to create corners between two flanges. The Butt Joint corner will
automate and enhance the creation of flange butt joints. You can control the Overlap and Gap
for the butt joints. You can create Butt Joint corners for a wide range of different flange
parameters and states.
You can access the Corner dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Corner or
from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Corner, use Modeling->Edit->Feature or the
Edit Feature toolbar.
Procedure
To create a Corner feature perform the following steps:
• Select the type of corner you want to create.
• Select an edge or face of a bend or web side face closest to the common edge where
you want to create a corner feature.
• Enter the Overlap and Gap values for Butt corner or the Gap or Relief Radius for
Simple Miter corner.
• Turn the Multiple Steps toggle ON if you want to create a Miter Corner on multiple
side faces at the same time.
You can create Butt Joint/Machinery/Simple Miter/Full Miter corners between any two side
faces having different parameters and states in the following conditions.
• Bend angles cannot be less than or equal to 0.5 and more than or equal to 180
degrees.
• The side faces cannot intersect each other.
• The side faces on which you want to create a corner cannot have any features (such
as holes) attached to them.
• If any side face on which you want to create a corner is a flange side face then it
cannot have any flange butt joints or miters. Bend tapers are not allowed for
Machinery Corners.
• The sides on which you want to create a corner should have a common edge
between their bend side faces. It is not required to have common edge while editing
the corner.
• Corner cannot be created if any parent self-forming feature is in an intermediate
state.

Relief
Use the Relief to create a fully associative Circular, U, V, or Routed Relief feature between
bend areas. This feature is designed to work with Flanges, Bends, Profile Flanges, General
Flanges, Corners, and it can also be applied to any planar geometry.
Internally, the Relief feature is composed of several hidden Cutout features.
You can access the Relief dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Sheet Metal
Relief or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Relief, use Modeling->Edit->Feature-
>Parameters, or the Edit Feature Parameters toolbar, or Part Navigator->Edit Parameters. To
Edit with Rollback a Sheet Metal Relief, use Part Navigator->Edit with Rollback.

Solid Punch
Use the Solid Punch feature when you want to create a sheet metal feature that inherits the
shape from the punch type tool body.
You can access the Solid Punch dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Solid
Punch or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Sheet Metal Solid Punch, use
Modeling->Edit->Feature or the Edit Feature toolbar.
Edge Rip
The Edge Rip feature lets you create an opening (or gap) in a hollowed solid along an edge.
Subsequent operations like Bend and Unbend/Rebend can then be performed on the ripped
solid.
You can access the Edge Rip dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Edge Rip
or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Sheet Metal Edge Rip, use Modeling->Edit-
>Feature or the Edit Feature toolbar.

Bend
Use Bend to create a bend area in a solid body of uniform thickness along any straight
application curve. This bend area can then be formed and unformed using the Form/Unform
button.
It is also possible to convert a cylindrical face of a solid body into a Bend. This bend area can
also be formed and unformed. You can convert an edge between two planar faces into a
Bend that can be formed and unformed.
You can access the Bend dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Bend or from
the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a General Flange, use Modeling->Edit->Feature or
the Edit Feature toolbar.
Procedure
Application Curve Bends follow the same basic procedure:
• Select a placement face.
• Select an application curve.
• Specify Bend vector and Stationary Side vector.
• Enter parameters (angle, radius, etc.).
• Enter options such a Bend Allowance Formula, Angle type, Radius type, and
Application Curve type.
Cylindrical Face Bends follow a similar procedure:
• Select a cylindrical placement face.
• Specify the Stationary Side vector.
• Enter options such as Bend Allowance Formula.
To create a Bend from an existing edge:
• Select an existing edge.
• Specify the Stationary Side vector.
• Enter radius parameter.
• Enter options such as Bend Allowance Formula and Radius type.

Unbend/Rebend
Use the Unbend/Rebend feature to unform, unform to an angle, or reform cylindrical bend
regions. The bend regions can be constructed from straight brake Sheet Metal features such
as Flanges and Bends as well as non-Sheet Metal features such as Sketches and Extrusions.
Parent self-forming features will convert into non-self-forming features when the
Unbend/Rebend operators are used.
You can access the Unbend/Rebend dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature-
>Unbend/Rebend or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a Unbend/Rebend
operator, use Modeling->Edit->Feature or the Edit Feature toolbar.
Procedure
To create an Unbend/Rebend operation, perform the following steps:
• Select the bend operation: The bend operation can be set to Unbend (to unform a
region), Rebend (to reform a region to its original shape), or Unbend-to-Angle (to
unform a region to a new angle).
• Specify a new bend angle (for Unbend-to-Angle operation).
• Select the bend region to operate on. This can be done by selecting a bend edge
adjacent to a cylindrical face or by selecting an existing Unbend/Rebend operation in
the model.

MetaForm
MetaForm is an associative feature that allows you to unform complex geometry (not
restricted to Sheet Metal features) to an alternate shape, while accounting for material
characteristics. You could unform a finished part surface to a die face surface. Also, you could
unform a complex surface to a planar face in order to generate a flat pattern.
You can access the MetaForm dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature-
>MetaForm or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar. To edit a MetaForm feature, use
Modeling->Edit->Feature or the Edit Feature toolbar.
Procedure
To create a MetaForm feature, perform the following steps:
• Select faces that define a region boundary.
• Select faces that define a target boundary.
• Define boundary conditions that control how the region faces will be formed to the
target faces.
• Select the geometry that will be mapped.
• Specify any material properties or analysis options that are to be associated with the
feature.
• Select Apply or OK to build the MetaForm feature.

Form/Unform
Use the Form/Unform dialog to form or unform self-forming features without the need to
switch to the Sheet Metal Forming/Flattening application. You can use this operation when
you want to quickly form or unform sheet metal features, but you don't need to create the
intermediate states or sequences.
You can access this operation from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Form/Unform or
from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar.
Procedure
The steps for forming or unforming a Sheet Metal feature are:
• Select a self-forming feature either in the graphics window or from the list window in
the Form/Unform dialog.
• Choose the operation you would like to perform such as Form Selected Features or
Unform Selected Features.
• Alternatively, you can choose Form All or Unform All to perform an operation on all
self-forming features in the part.

Bracket
This option is a utility that creates a bracket from reference geometry. It is not a feature but a
collection of features. Each bracket consists of a Base Pad, created by an Extrude feature. A
Flange or General Flange feature is built off the Base Pad. One or more Cutout features then
trim the flange to size. The Cutout is built to match input reference points. The resulting
bracket will align with the reference geometry. It is possible to build subsequent flanges off of
existing bracket geometry. The flanges on a bracket can be formed and unformed as any
other flange feature.
To edit a bracket, you must edit the individual features that make up the bracket. A bracket is
not associative to its reference geometry. If you need to create a fully associative straight-
brake bracket, we recommend using the Multibend Bracket feature.
You can access the Bracket dialog from Modeling->Insert->Sheet Metal Feature->Sheet
Metal Bracket or from the Sheet Metal Feature toolbar.
Procedure
The steps for creating a Bracket are:
• Select a planar Base Face.
• Optionally select Clearance Points on the Base Face.
• Select a Reference Face that intersects the plane of the Base Face.
• Optionally, select Clearance Points on the Reference Face.
• Reverse the Material Direction if necessary.
• Specify bracket parameters.
• Press OK or Apply when you are ready to create the Base Pad and Flange.
• Choose to create a new body or unite the bracket Base Pad to some existing
geometry.
• The system builds the Base Pad and Flange. It then unforms the Flange.
• Optionally edit the unformed outline of the bracket. When complete, the system
applies a Sheet Metal Cutout feature to the Base Pad and Flange.

EDIT CURVE

Modeling Edit Curve Options
All - Lets you modify non-associative curves.

Parameters - Lets you edit the parameters (that is, the defining data) of most types of
curves.
Trim - Adjusts the endpoints of curves (lines, arcs, conics, or splines) based on the
bounding entities selected (curves, edges, planes, faces, points, or cursor locations)
and the segment(s) of curve selected for trimming.
Trim Corner - Trims two curves to their intersection point, thereby forming a corner.

Divide - Divides a curve into a series of like segments.

Edit - Lets you edit existing fillets.

Stretch - Lets you move geometric objects, while simultaneously stretching or
shrinking selected lines.
Arc Length - Trims a curve by a given arc length increment, or to a total arc length.

Smooth Spline - to automatically remove imperfections in the curvature properties of a
B-spline.

Edit Curve All
The options under Edit-> Curve-> let you modify existing non-associative curves.
You can edit a number of curve types using a Selection Steps dialog similar to the one that
was used to create them. The creation and editing of these types of curves is covered in the
same section of the documentation (for example, see Offset Curve and Wrap/Unwrap Curve).
The Edit-> Curve-> All option opens a dialog with all non-associative edit curve functions.
Edit Curve Parameters
This option lets you edit most types of curves. When this icon is active and you select a
curve, you are automatically put into edit mode for that type of curve.
Editing a Line
You can edit a line by changing its endpoints or its parameters (length and angle).
To change a line's endpoint:
1. Select the line end to be modified. The line can now be rubberbanded from the fixed
end.
2. Specify a new position using any of the Point Method options on the dialog.
To change a line's parameters:
1. Select the line, avoiding its control points.
2. Key in new values for the length and/or angle in the dialog bar, then press <Enter>.

Editing an Arc or Circle
You can change an arc or circle's parameters by entering new values in the dialog bar, or you
can change it by dragging. You can also change an arc to its complement.
You can move an arc or circle to a new location, regardless of the editing mode that is active,
as follows:
1. Select the center of the arc or circle (release MB1).
2. Move the cursor to a new location and press MB1, or enter a new XC, YC, ZC
location in the dialog bar.
You can use this method to move an arc or circle to another control point, such as the end of
a line, or the center of another circle.
To create the complement of an arc, you must be in Parameters mode. Simply select one or
more arcs and choose Complement Arc from the Edit Curve Parameters dialog.
Editing an Ellipse
Use the Edit Curve Parameters option to edit one or more existing ellipses. This option
behaves much the same as that for creating an ellipse. You are allowed to select a maximum
of 128 ellipses.
When you select multiple ellipses, the values of the last selected ellipse become the default
values. This allows editing by inheritance:
1. Select ellipse(s) to edit.
2. Select the ellipse with the desired values.
3. Choose Apply.
All selected ellipses become identical.
The absolute value is used for the semimajor and semiminor values. For example, if you enter
a negative five for the semimajor axis, this is interpreted as positive five.
Any start angle, end angle, or rotation angle value is accepted. A new rotation angle is
applied to the original position of the ellipse. The new angle is not added to the current
rotation angle value.
Editing a Spline
This option provides several methods that let you modify a spline. In general, to edit a spline,
you must:
1. Select a spline to edit.
2. Select the edit method you wish to use.
3. Define the parameters to use in editing the selected spline.
The following options are available for modifying a spline:
Edit Spline Menu Dialog
Edit Point Lets you move, add, or remove the defining points of a spline.
Edit Pole Provides options for editing the poles of a spline.
Change Slope Lets you change the slope at the spline's defining points.
Change Lets you change the curvature at the spline's defining points.
Curvature
Change Lets you change the degree of the spline.
Degree
Move Multiple Lets you move a segment of a curve without affecting the rest of the curve.
Points
Change Lets you modify the shape of a curve by changing its degree while preserving
Stiffness the number of control poles.
Fit Reduces the data required to define a spline by "fitting" it to existing points
that define the spline.
Smooth Lets you reduce variations in the curvature distribution of an open spline.
Restore When edits to the spline have caused it to be out of synchronization with its
Defining Data defining data, this option resets the spline to its defining data. This option is
only effective for Edit Pole operations.
Undo Restores the spline to its state prior to the last modification. If more than one
modification is made, you may choose Undo as many times as needed.
You can display the original spline during editing by turning the Display Original Spline option
ON.
When you edit a spline that was created through defining points, using the Change Degree or
Change Stiffness options, the following warning message is displayed. Defining Data and its
Associated Dimensions Will Be Deleted. If you continue with the edit, the defining points are
removed.

Trim Curve
Trim Curve adjusts the endpoints of curves based on bounding entities and segment(s) of
curves selected for trimming. You can trim or extend lines, arcs, conics or splines. You can
trim to (or extend to) curves, edges, planes, faces, points, or cursor locations. You can specify
that the trimmed curve is associated with its input parameters.
You can use bodies, faces, points, curves, edges, datum planes and datum axes as bounding
objects when trimming a curve. You cannot trim bodies, sheet bodies or solid bodies.
Basic Trim Curve Procedure
The basic procedure to trim (or extend) a curve is shown in the following steps.
1. Use the First Bounding Object selection step to specify the first bounding object. If
you want to trim or extend the bounding object, turn on Trim Bounding Objects and
set the Trim/Extend option to either Start or End.
2. Select the second bounding object (optional). If you have already turned on Trim
Bounding Objects for the first bounding object, the second bounding object is also
going to be trimmed. You can independently set the Trim/Extend option for the
second bounding object to Start or End.
3. Set the desired Method to Find Intersections option.
4. Use the String to Trim selection step to specify one or more curves you wish to trim or
extend. The ends of the curves you select indicate the ends that will be trimmed.
5. Set the Extend and Trim options for the selected curve.
6. If you chose Along a Vector for the Method to Find Intersections option, use the
Vector Direction selection step to specify the desired direction of the trim.
7. Turn on the Associative Output option if you want the output trimmed curve to be
associative with its input parameters.
8. Use the Input Curves pull-down menu to specify the disposition of the curves to be
trimmed.
9. Click OK or Apply.
Trim Corner
This option trims two curves to their intersection point, thereby forming a corner. The corner
that is created depends on the objects selected. As with all Edit options, the portion of the
curves selected, with respect to their intersection point, is trimmed (see the figure below).
When you select curves for a corner trim, position the selection ball so that it includes both
curves.

Divide Curve
This option divides a curve into a series of like segments (i.e., line-to-line; arc-to-arc). Each
segment created is a separate entity and is assigned the same font as the original curve. The
new objects are placed on the same layer as the original curve.
There are five different methods for segmenting a curve:
Equal Segments Uses the length of a curve or a specific curve parameter to divide a curve
into equal segments. The curve parameter depends on the type of curve
being segmented (e.g. line, arc, and spline).
Segments by Divides a curve into segments using bounding objects, which may be
Bounding Entities points, curves, planes, and/or faces.
Input Arc Length Divides a curve based on the arc length defined for each segment.
Segments
At Knotpoint Uses selected knotpoints to segment a curve.
At Corners Divides a spline at the corners

Edit Fillet
Edit Fillet lets you edit existing fillets. This option behaves similar to the two-object fillet
creation technique.
To edit an existing fillet:
1. Select the trim method you wish to use.
2. Select the objects to edit.
3. Define the parameters to use for creating the modified fillet.
There are three possible trim methods when you are editing a fillet: automatic trim, manual
trim, and no trim. These methods are the same as those used when creating fillets.
You must select the objects to be edited in a counterclockwise direction. This ensures that the
new fillet is drawn in the proper direction.

Stretch Curve
Use this option to move geometric objects, while simultaneously stretching or shrinking
selected lines. You can move most object types, but you can only stretch and shrink lines.
Stretch Dialog Options
Delta XC, Delta YC, To use the Delta method, enter delta XC, YC and ZC values. The
Delta ZC geometry is moved or stretched by these delta values.
Reset Values Resets the three delta buffers to zero.
Point to Point Displays the Point Constructor dialog to let you define the reference and
destination points.
Undo Lets you change the geometry back to a previous state.
Basic Stretch Curve Procedure
To perform a stretch:
1. Choose Stretch from the Edit Curve dialog. The Stretch dialog is displayed.
2. Select the geometry you wish to stretch, either individually or using a rectangle.
3. Specify the method, Delta or Point to Point, you wish to use to stretch the selected
objects
Choosing Apply or OK extends or moves the selected geometry from the reference point to
the destination point. Geometry that is moved is translated by the delta values, and zero
length lines are deleted.

Edit Arc Length
You can use the Edit Arc Length option to trim a curve by a given arc length increment, or to
a total arc length.
Arc Length is not applicable for Sketcher curves. The option is available when a sketch is
active so that you can still edit non-sketch curves without having to disable the active sketch.
You can enter either a positive or negative value for the arc length. A positive value
generates an extension of the curve. A negative value truncates the curve.
Procedure
To trim a curve using arc length increments:
1. Select the curve to be trimmed.
2. Set the Trim/Extend option to Start, End or Both.
3. Choose the Incremental option.
4. Enter the value for the the Arc Length increment you wish to use in the Length field.
5. Set the Associative Output and Input Curves options.
6. Click OK or Apply.

Smooth Spline - Overview
Use this option to automatically remove imperfections in the curvature properties of a B-
spline. This feature is useful with manually created splines, which often have minor
imperfections depending on the number and location of picked points.
You can smooth B-spline curves to remove minor imperfections by minimizing curvature
magnitude or curvature variation within the curve.
You can also smooth a B-spline in a specified region or across the entire spline. Knots are
inserted at the boundary of the region and within the region until there are enough free control
points to reduce the variation to the desired levels. Repeated use of this option on a spline will
make it increasingly linear.
Smooth Spline - Basic Procedure
To smooth a B-spline, follow these steps:
1. Select a B-spline to smooth. If the B-spline is associative, a warning message
displays that feature parameters will be removed.
2. Choose the Smoothing Type, Curvature or Curvature Variation.

3. Choose the level of constraint you want for the start and end of the B-spline, G0, G1,
G2, or G3.
4. Use the Smoothing Factor slider to specify how many times you want the smoothing
operation performed each time you click Apply.
5. Use the Modification Percentage slider to specify the level of overall smoothing you
want for the B-spline.
6. Click Apply to smooth the B-spline. You may want to click Apply a number of times
until you get the desired shape, or you may want to change the boundary constraints.
7. When the shape is as desired, click OK. The B-spline is smoothed accordingly.

EDIT FEATURE
Modeling Edit Feature Options
Parameters - Lets you edit a feature by changing its creation parameters.

Positioning - Lets you change the location of a feature by specifying new values for
the positioning dimensions. You can also add or delete positioning dimensions.
Move – Lets you move features that are not constrained by positioning dimensions.

Reorder - Lets you change the order in which a feature is applied to a body. You can
reorder a feature before or after a selected reference feature.
Replace – Lets you change all references of an object to another object.

Suppress - Lets you remove features from the display.

Unsuppress - Lets you retrieve previously suppressed features.

Suppress by Expression - Lets you suppress a feature using the expression editor,
which provides a list of "suppress" expressions to edit.
Remove Parameters – Lets you remove all parameters from one or more bodies.

Solid Density - Lets you change the density value and/or density units of a solid body.

Playback - Lets you rebuild the model, starting with the first feature. Options let you
move to any feature in the model, analyze and edit features in the partially-rebuilt
model, or trigger an update that finishes rebuilding the model (unless an update
failure occurs).

Edit Feature Parameters
This option lets you edit a feature based on the method and parameter values used when it
was created. The user interaction depends on the type of feature you select. The parameters
of most features can be edited with the Edit Parameters options.
You can edit the expressions and references of more than one feature at a time by using
multiple-selection in the Edit Parameters list box followed by OK, or by using the Part
Navigator-> MB3-> Edit Parameters option on multiply-selected features. An
expression/reference dialog displays to let you change the values of feature expressions and
resolve feature references. This dialog is similar to the create and edit dialogs used in User
Defined Feature.
To edit parameters for single features, follow these steps:
• Select the feature to be edited, either from the graphics area or from the Feature
Selection dialog. The values of the feature's parameters are displayed in the graphics
area. A dialog with the appropriate Edit Parameters options also appears.
• Select a dimension in the graphics area, then enter a new value in the Enter New
Expression dialog. Or Choose an option from the dialog with the Edit Parameters
options, enter new values, and choose OK.
When you choose Edit Parameters and select a feature to be edited, the options on the dialog
that appears may vary, depending on which feature you select:
Feature Dialog Lists the names and values of the parameters of the selected feature, and
lets you enter new values. This option appears for all features.
Reattach Lets you change the location or orientation of a feature by redefining its
feature references. This option appears only for features that can be
reattached.
Change Type Lets you change holes or slots to other types of holes or slots, respectively.
Swept Features Lets you edit a swept feature (Extrude, Revolve, or Sweep Along a Guide)
Datum Planes and Lets you edit both datum planes and datum axes.
Datum Axes
Booleans Lets you select a new target body and/or a new tool body when editing a
boolean feature
Patch Bodies Edits that you can make to a Patch Body feature include changing the
target or tool bodies, reversing the direction of the patch, or change the
setting of the Create Hole Patch toggle.
Blends Lets you edit pre-V15.0 blend feature.
Instances Lets you edit instances.

Edit Positioning
This option lets you move a feature by editing its positioning dimensions. You can edit a
dimension value, add a dimension, or delete a dimension.
Procedure
To edit a feature's positioning dimensions:
1. Choose the Edit Positioning icon.
2. Select the feature to be edited.
3. Choose the type of dimension edit (add, edit, or delete).
4. Select the dimension.
5. Complete the edit, then choose OK.
Dimension Editing Options
Add Dimension Lets you add a positioning dimension to a feature.
Edit Dimension Value Lets you move a feature by changing the values of the feature's
selected positioning dimension.
Delete Dimension Lets you delete a selected positioning dimension from a feature.

Move Feature
This option lets you move a nonassociative feature to a desired location. You may not use
this option to move features whose location has been constrained using positioning
dimensions. If you wish to move such a feature, use the Edit Positioning Dimension option.
Move Feature Dialog Options
Delta DXC, DYC, Lets you move a feature by specifying a distance and direction using
DZC coordinates. The feature is moved relative to the work coordinate system.
To a Point Lets you move a feature from a reference point to a destination point.
Rotate Between Lets you move a feature by rotating the feature between a reference axis
Two Axes and a destination axis.
CSYS to CSYS Lets you reposition a feature from its position in a reference coordinate
system, to a destination coordinate system.

Reorder Feature
This option lets you change the order in which a feature is applied to a body. The desired
feature can be reordered before or after a selected reference feature.
As you create features, the system assigns a time stamp to each one. When you modify a
body, the update is controlled by the ordering of the time stamps.
Following is an illustration example of how to use the reorder option:
1. Create a block.
2. Create a hollow feature on the block.
3. Create a boss on the block.
In this example, the boss does not contain the hollow. If you wish to hollow the block and the
boss, you can simply reorder the boss before the hollow.
When reordering features that have associated features, the associated features are also
reordered.
Reorder Feature Dialog Options
Reference Lists the features present in the part. You can select a feature from this listing to
Feature list be the Reference feature on which to base the reorder of items you select from
box the Reposition Features list box. You can also select a Reference feature directly
from the graphics window. All features appear in the list box with their time
stamps in parenthesis.
Filter Lets you control the types of features displayed in the Reference Feature list box.
Choose Lets you choose where to place the Reposition feature in relation to the
Method Reference feature.
Before - The selected Reposition Features will be moved before the Reference
feature.
After - The selected Reposition Features will be moved after the Reference
Feature.
Reposition Lets you select the Reposition features you wish to move in relation to the
Features Reference feature. The features that appear in the Reposition Features list box
list box all have time stamps that follow that of the Reference feature. The features you
select for repositioning will be moved before or after the Reference feature,
depending on the setting of the Choose Method option. You can also select
Reposition features directly from the graphics window. Features selected for
repositioning appear highlighted in the graphics window.
Procedure
To reorder one or more features from the Reorder Features dialog, follow these steps:
1. Select a feature from the Reference Feature list box or the graphics window that you
wish to make the Reference feature. The Reference feature is the pivot feature about
which the reposition features are placed. If a Reference feature is selected and you
wish to change it to another, you can deselect it by clicking on it in the graphics
window with <Shift><MB1>. Then you can select the desired reference feature. You
can do this even after Reposition features have been selected.
2. Use the Choose Method option to specify how to reorder the Reposition features,
either Before the Reference feature or After. Once the Reference feature and the
method have been specified, the features that can be reordered display in the
Reposition Features list box.
3. Choose the desired Reposition features from the Reposition Features list box or the
graphics window. Selected Reposition features are highlighted in the graphics
window. Depending on what you select for repositioning, other features may also be
selected for reorder by implication.
4. Choose Apply and the system performs the reorder on the selected feature only
within the list box, letting you perform multiple reorders. Choose OK to finalize the
reorder operation. Choosing Cancel terminates the reorder operation without making
any changes.

Replace Features
This option allows you to make changes to the basic geometry of a design without having to
remodel all of the dependent features from scratch. It lets you replace bodies and datums,
and lets you reapply dependent features from the first bodies onto the second. The original
features on the first bodies and datums are thus replaced by new features, while maintaining
associativity with downstream features.
This is a very powerful and flexible tool that you can use in many ways. For example, you can
use it to:
• Replace older versions of bodies imported from external systems to updated versions
of the same bodies, without having to redo later modeling.
• Replace one freeform surface with another modeled in a different way.
• Remodel a set of features in a body in a different way.
Replace Features is not meant as a replacement for the Copy Feature, Paste Feature or any
of the other Edit Feature options. It is intended as a way to make edits to a body based on its
parent geometry. As such, it maintains associativity between features and bodies.
Replace Features Basic Examples
The following basic procedures represent just some of the ways you can use the Replace
Features functionality.
To replace one version of a body imported from an external system to an updated version of
the same body:
1. Import the new version of the body into your part, and reorder it to the start of the
part.
2. Open the Replace Feature option and use the Body/Datum selection step to select
the body to be replaced.
3. Use the Original Features selection step to select just the base unparameterized
feature.
4. Use the Replacement Features selection step to select the new unparameterized
feature.
5. You will then be prompted to indicate on the new body the faces or edges that have
been used for later feature operations.
6. At this point an update occurs. You will possibly be asked for additional selections for
edges/faces that were created during later modeling, which the system could not
infer. In this case, the Edit During Update (EDU) dialog will display. You can make
additional changes and selections by using the EDU to edit features.
To replace a free form surface with an enlarged copy of the same surface:
1. Use the Copy Feature and Paste Feature options to make a copy of the surface you
want to enlarge
2. Use the Enlarge option to enlarge the surface.
3. Use the Reorder option to reorder the new features, including the new enlarge
feature, to just after the timestamp of the original surface.
4. Use the Original Features selection step to select the original surface feature.
5. Use the Replacement Features selection step to select the new surface features and
the enlarge feature.
6. You will then be prompted to indicate on the new body the faces or edges from the
old body that have been used for later feature operations.
7. At this point an update occurs. You will possibly be asked for additional selections for
edges/faces that were created during later modeling, which the system could not
infer. In this case, the Edit During Update (EDU) dialog will display. You can make
additional changes and selections by using the EDU to edit features.
To remodel a set of features in a body in a different way to correct geometry:
1. Use the Suppress option to suppress the features that are later than the ones to be
remodeled.
2. Use the Copy Feature option to make a copy of the features that are earlier than
those to be remodeled.
3. Working on the new body, build the corrected geometry.
4. Use the Body/Datum selection step to select the old body.
5. Use the Original Feature selection step to select the features that you have
remodeled.
6. Use the Replacement Features selection step to select the newly created features
with the correct geometry.
7. You will then be prompted to indicate on the new body the faces or edges from the
old body that have been used for later feature operations.
8. Unsuppress the features you suppressed earlier. At this point an update occurs. You
will possibly be asked for additional selections for edges/faces that were created
during later modeling, which the system could not infer. In this case, the Edit During
Update (EDU) dialog will display. You can make additional changes and selections by
using the EDU to edit features.

Suppress Feature
This option lets you temporarily remove one or more features from the target body and the
display. Not available if Delayed Update on Edit is active.
A suppressed feature still actually exists within the data base but it is removed from the
model. Since the features still exist, they can be retrieved using Unsuppress Feature.
Suppressing features lets you:
• Reduce the size of your model, especially if it is rather large, making it easier to work
with. This speeds up the creation, object selection, edit, and display time.
• Remove noncritical features, such as small holes and blends, from your model for
analysis work. Suppressed features are not meshed in GFEM Plus.
• Create features in locations where there is conflicting geometry. For example: If you
need to position a feature using an edge that has already been blended, you do not
need to delete the blend. You can suppress the blend, create and position the new
feature, and then unsuppress the blend.
Base Procedure
To suppress features:
1. Choose the Suppress Feature icon.
2. Select the features to be suppressed, either from the list in the Feature Selection
dialog or by selecting them in the graphics window.
3. If you do not want the Feature Selection dialog to include any dependents in the
Selected Feature(s) list, turn List Dependents off.
4. Choose OK.

Unsuppress Feature
This option lets you retrieve previously suppressed features. Not available if Delayed Update
on Edit is active. After you choose the Unsuppress Feature icon, a list of all suppressed
features is displayed in the Feature Selection dialog, and you are prompted to select the
feature(s) you want to unsuppress.

Suppress by Expression
Using this option, you can use an expression to suppress a feature using the expression
editor, which provides a list of suppress expressions to edit. Not available if Delayed After Edit
is active.
If a child feature has its own suppress expression, its suppression status will be controlled by
that instead of by its parent's suppress status (i.e., the child is not automatically suppressed
when its parent becomes suppressed). Child features that do not have their own suppress
expressions are automatically suppressed when their parents suppress

Remove Parameters
This option lets you remove all parameters from one or more solid and sheet bodies. You can
also remove parameters from curves and points that are associated with features, making
them non-associative.
Disassociating bodies and curve and point features can help shorten the time for an update,
and can be useful if you are redesigning your part.
Procedure
1. Select the objects whose parameters you wish to remove. Use the Filter mask, if
necessary, to restrict what is selectable. If you know the name of an object whose
parameters you wish to remove you can select it by entering its name in the Name
field and pressing the <Return> key. Otherwise, use the mouse and cursor to make
your selections from the graphics window.
2. Once you have specified all objects whose parameters you wish to remove, click the
OK button.
3. A warning dialog displays stating that parameters are about to be removed. Click the
OK button to complete the operation and remove the parameters. Clicking the Cancel
button dismisses the warning dialog and retains the parameters for the selected
objects.

Solid Density
This option lets you change the density and/or the density units for one or more existing solid
bodies.
To change the density or density units of solid bodies:
1. Enter the desired solid density value.
2. If you wish to change the units, choose Change Units, then select the desired units
from the menu and choose OK.
3. Select the solid body or bodies you wish to change.
You can change the default solid density used when solid bodies are created with the
Preferences-> Modeling-> Density option. When you choose the Change Units option, you
are given the following density units to choose from: Lbs-Inches, Lbs-Feet, Grams-Cm, and
Kg-Meters.
Changing the density units causes the system to recalculate the current density value based
on the new units; you can change the density value, if desired.

Playback
This option lets you review how the model is created, feature by feature. You can also edit the
model as it updates. You can move forward or backward to any feature, then edit it. Then you
can move to a different feature. Or, at any time, you can trigger an updating of the model that
starts at the current feature and continues until the model is complete, or until a feature fails
to update. Playback gives you more control over the update process than the other update
methods.
Edit During Update Dialog
The Edit During Update (EDU) facility appears if a failure or a warning occurs during an
Update of your model. Your model can be updated during a number of operations, including
feature update, suppression and deletion. If a problem occurs during the update, the EDU
displays. Playback also starts the EDU, beginning an update with the first feature.
Edit During Update Dialog Options
message Shows any applicable error or warning messages, as well as whether the
window current feature updated successfully or failed.
Show Failure Temporarily displays failed geometry. This option is available only if an object
Area involved in the failure, such as a tool body, is available for display.
Show Current Displays the part of the model that has been successfully rebuilt. Some
Model features, such as instances in an array, may not appear in the current model
until the last related feature is rebuilt.
Post Recovery Let you specify what should happen when the icon options you choose is
Update Status completed.
Continue restarts the automatic update process from where it left off.
Pause lets you choose other Edit during Update options, rather than
automatically resuming update.
Icon Options The review and edit options that are available for your model.
Icon Options
The possible options are:
Undo – Undoes the last modification you made to the model before updating began.
Go Back To - Lets you move backward through the model to a selected feature that you
choose from the Update Selection dialog.
Step Back - Lets you move backward through the model one feature at a time.
Step - Advances one feature at a time through the model.
Go To - Lets you move forward through the model to a selected feature. In this case, the
Update Selection dialog lists the features that have not yet been rebuilt.
Continue - Triggers the update process, which continues until the model is completely
rebuilt or until a feature fails. If you choose Continue when a failure occurs, that feature is
skipped.
Accept – Marks the current feature that failed and halted the update process as "out of
date," letting you ignore the problem and allowing the system to continue with and complete
the update process.
Accept Remaining - Marks all features that fail to update and their dependents as "out of
date," letting you ignore the problem and allowing the system to continue with and complete
the update process.
Delete - Lets you delete the feature that failed to update
Delete Dependents - Lets you delete the dependents of a feature that failed to update.
Suppress - Suppresses the feature currently being updated.
Suppress Remaining - Suppresses the feature currently being updated and all subsequent
features.
Review the Model - Lets you analyze, but not edit, the rebuilt model with options from the
menu bar or the MB3 popup menu. Review the Model cannot be used to review features that
failed during update or that have not yet been rebuilt.
Edit Parameters - Lets you change the parameters of the feature currently being updated.
Delayed Delete - A special feature known as "Delayed Delete" can let you edit child features
whose parents have been deleted.
Edit Positioning Dimension - Lets you reposition the selected or failed feature.

EDIT SURFACE

Modeling Edit Surface Options
Enlarge - lets you change the size of an untrimmed sheet or face, by creating a new
ENLARGE feature that is associative with the original, overlayed untrimmed face.
Global Shaping - Lets you deform a surface in a predictable fashion, with full
associativity of the result.
IsoparametricTrim/Divide - Lets you trim a body in either the U or V isoparametric
direction at a specified parameter.
Boundary - Lets you modify or replace an existing boundary of a sheet body.

Degree - Lets you change the degree of a body.

Stiffness - Lets you modify the shape of the body by changing its degree.

Change Edge - Lets you perform edge matching on a B-Surface by modifying an edge
to coincide with a curve, or an edge of another body, or to lie in a plane.
Reverse Normal - Lets you add Reverse Normal Features to one or more sheet
bodies.
Move Defining Point - Lets you move points lying on the body.

Move Pole - Lets you move a pole of the body.

Enlarge
The Enlarge option lets you change the size of an untrimmed sheet or face, by creating a new
ENLARGE feature that is associative with the original, overlayed untrimmed face. You can
change each of the untrimmed edges of the ENLARGE feature by a given percentage.
When creating models using sheets it is good practice to overbuild them, to eliminate
downstream solid modeling issues. If you have not overbuilt these primary sheets far enough
you may be unable to increase their size without resorting to using the Isoparametric Trim
function. Isoparametric Trim, however, is not associative, and when used breaks the
parameterization of the sheet. The Enlarge option lets you create a new sheet that is both
associative with the original untrimmed face and lets you change the dimensions of each of
the untrimmed edges.
Enlarge Dialog Options
Type There are two methods by which you can extend the edges of the ENLARGE
feature.
Linear - Extends the edges of the enlarge sheet linearly, in a single direction.
Using the Linear Type lets you increase an enlarged feature's size, but you
cannot decrease it.
Natural - Extends the edges of the enlarge sheet by following the natural curve of
the edges. If you use the Natural Type to size an enlarged feature, you can both
increase its size and decrease it. Natural is the default for the Type option.
All Lets you control all of the U/V-Min/Max sliders as a single group. When this switch
is on and you move any of the individual sliders, all of the sliders move
simultaneously, retaining their existing percentage ratios between each other.
OFF - Turning off the All switch provides individual control of the sliders and each
of the untrimmed edges.
ON - If each of the U/V-Min/Max sliders is at a different position, and you turn on
the All switch, any subsequent change to an individual slider is proportionately
made to the other 3 as well.
U-Min, Use the U-Min, U-Max, V-Min and V-Max sliders or their respective data entry
U-Max, fields to change the size of the untrimmed edges of the enlarge sheet. Values you
V-Min, enter in the data entry fields or drag with the sliders are percentages of the
V-Max original size. You may enter values or expressions in the data entry fields.
Reset Resets all of the sliders back to their original position. In creation mode, this
means setting all of the sliders back to their default position (0,0,0,0).
Reselect Lets you select another face. Clicking this option deselects the currently selected
Face face and sets all slider and field values back to zero.
Edit a Lets you create a copy of the sheet body, rather than editing the one selected.
Copy

Enlarge Basic Procedure
1. Select an exiting face that you wish to enlarge. The face can be either trimmed or
untrimmed. Either way, the resulting enlarged sheet is an associative copy of the
original untrimmed face that has extended boundaries
2. Once you select the sheet to enlarge, it is highlighted with a U/V grid in the graphics
window, with the U and V directions indicated. The initial enlarged sheet is identical to
the untrimmed selected face.
3. Choose either Natural or Linear for the type of extensions to use for the enlarged
sheet.
4. You are now ready to resize the enlarge feature. Use the U-Min, U-Max, V-Min and
V-Max sliders to drag and resize the percentage values. As you drag the sliders the
enlarge feature dynamically resizes in the graphics window.
5. If you wish to start over, use the optional Reset button to set all of the sliders back to
their original position. This will negate any values you may have already specified.
6. Use the Reselect Face button if you wish to enlarge a different face.
7. Click OK or Apply to create the enlarge feature.

Global Shaping
Global Shaping lets you deform a surface in a predictable fashion, with full associativity of the
result. You can use this function when styling to alter an existing surface while preserving its
aesthetic properties. When performing manufacturing operations you can use Global Shaping
to modify a surface to account for the effects of springback during metal forming.
Global Shaping Dialog Options
Type Overcrown - Creates a new sheet by "overcrowning" a selected sheet, based on
deformation using a function or based on a reference surface.
Stretch - Shapes a new sheet against base and/or control sheets by stretching it
in a specified Stretch Direction.
Control By Both of the following methods produce features that are fully associative to the
provided input data
Function - Lets you deform a sheet body within a specified region. With this
method the amount of offset at any point within the region is specified by a given
transition function or by a transition function that you define.
Surface - Lets you introduce deformations into a sheet body through
manipulation of a reference surface. You select a Base surface and optionally a
Control surface. The deviation between the base surface and the control surface
determines the amount of normal offset that is applied to the new sheet body at
any given point.
Confirm Opens the Confirm Upon Apply dialog after you choose Apply, letting you preview
Upon the results, and accept, reject or analyze them. This option is common to
Apply Selection Steps dialogs.
Overcrowning using Control By Function
1. On the Global Shaping dialog, select one or more faces to overcrown.
2. Set the Type to Overcrown and the Control By option to Function. Click OK or Apply.
The Overcrown by Function dialog then displays.
3. On the Overcrown by Function dialog use the Region Bounds selection step to select
a closed curve or string for the region boundary.
4. You are now ready to deform the new sheet body. Optionally modify the defaulted
Point in Region using the Snap Point tools.
5. Optionally modify the defaulted Direction for the deformation using the Vector Method
option menu. Updating the direction from the default immediately updates the
projected representation of the new sheet body.
6. Optionally modify the height of the new sheet body at the Point in Region by entering
a new value in the Height data entry field, or by dragging the Height slider.
7. Optionally change the desired Transition function from the Function 1 default. You
can choose one of the two provided transition functions, Function 1 or Function 2, or
you can define your own transition function using the Law Subfunction.
8. Optionally drag the Shape Control slider to dynamically change the slope of the new
sheet body.
9. Choose OK or Apply to create the newly associated sheet body.
Overcrowning using Control By Surface
1. On the Global Shaping dialog, select one or more faces to overcrown.
2. Set the Type to Overcrown and the Control By option to Surface. Click OK or Apply.
The Overcrown by Surface dialog then displays.
3. On the Overcrown by Surface dialog use the Base selection step to select a sheet
body for the base surface.
4. Advance to the Control selection step. The Move Pole option becomes available to let
you create deviations on the base or optional control surface.
5. Choose OK or Apply to complete the creation of the control surface deformations and
newly associated sheet body.
Using Stretch and Control By Function
1. On the Global Shaping dialog, select one or more faces to overcrown and stretch.
2. Set the Type to Stretch and the Control By option to Function. Click OK or Apply. The
Stretch by Function dialog then displays.
3. On the Stretch by Function dialog use the Region Bounds selection step to select a
closed curve or string for the region boundary.
4. You are now ready to deform the new sheet body. Optionally modify the defaulted
Point in Region using the Snap Point tools.
5. Optionally modify the defaulted Direction for the deformation using the Vector Method
option menu. Updating the direction from the default immediately updates the
projected representation of the new sheet body.
6. Optionally modify the height of the new sheet body at the Point in Region by entering
a new value in the Height data entry field, or by dragging the Height slider. When
using either the data entry field or by dragging the slider, the height of the new sheet
body is dynamically updated.
7. Optionally change the desired Transition function from the Function 1 default. You
can choose one of the two provided transition functions, Function 1 or Function 2, or
you can define your own transition function using the Law Subfunction.
8. Optionally drag the Shape Control slider to dynamically change the slope of the new
sheet body.
9. Choose OK or Apply to create the newly associated sheet body.
Using Stretch and Control By Surface
1. On the Global Shaping dialog, select one or more faces to stretch.
2. Set the Type to Stretch and the Control By option to Surface. Click OK or Apply. The
Stretch by Surface dialog then displays.
3. On the Stretch by Surface dialog use the Base selection step to select a sheet body
for the base surface.
4. Advance to the Control selection step. The Move Pole option becomes available to let
you create deviations on the base or optional control surface.
5. Choose OK or Apply to complete the creation of the control surface deformations and
newly associated sheet body.

Isoparametric Trim/Divide
This option lets you trim or divide a B-surface by a percentage parameter in either the U or V
isoparametric direction. You can trim or divide a sheet body (when the parameter you specify
is between 0.0% and 100.0%) or extend it (when the parameter you specify is less than 0.0%
or greater than 100.0%).
Choosing Isoparametric Trim/Divide opens a dialog with the following options:
Isoparametric Trim Lets you trim a sheet body.
Isoparametric Divide Lets you divide a sheet body.

Sheet Boundary
This option lets you modify or replace an existing boundary of a sheet. You can remove trim
or individual holes from a sheet body, or you can extend the boundaries if the sheet is a
single face sheet body.
First select the sheet you want to modify. This sheet is called the base sheet.You have the
choice of editing the original sheet body or a copy of the original sheet body.
You must next choose one of the following options:
Remove Lets you remove a hole from a sheet body.
Hole
Remove Lets you remove trims performed on a sheet body (i.e. boundary trim and holes)
Trim and restore the body to a parametrically rectangular form.
Replace Lets you replace single or connected edges of a sheet body with new edges that
Edge lie inside or outside the current ones

Change Degree
This option lets you change the degrees of a body. Bodies with underlying multiple patch
surfaces can only have their degree increased. Also, bodies which were created "closed" can
only have their degree increased.
A warning message is displayed indicating that this operation will remove the parameters
from the sheet body. You are asked to OK or Cancel the operation.
You have the choice of editing the original sheet body or a copy of the original sheet body.

Change Stiffness
This option lets you modify the shape of a body by changing its degree.
A warning message is displayed indicating that this operation will remove the parameters
from the sheet body. You are asked to OK or Cancel the operation.
You have the choice of editing the original sheet body or a copy of the original sheet body.
Decreasing degree reduces the "stiffness" of the body and allows it to mimic the undulations
(reversal of curvatures) of its control polygon more closely. Increasing degree makes the body
"stiffer" and less sensitive to undulations in its control polygon.
If you increase the degree using this function, the new body will have the same poles as the
original, but a different (stiffer) shape and fewer patches. This contrasts with the Change
Degree option which produces a new body with the same shape, different poles and the same
number of patches as the original underlying surface.

Change Edge
This option lets you modify an edge of a B-Surface using various methods. You can modify an
edge of a B-Surface to make it match a curve or an edge of another body, or to lie in a plane.
You can also deform the edge so that all the cross tangents along that edge pass through the
same point, align to a specified vector, match the cross tangents of a selected edge on a
second body, or lie in a specified plane.
You have the choice of editing the original sheet body or a copy of the original sheet body.
After you have selected the body and edge to modify, the following options are available:
Edge Only Lets you modify the selected edge.
Edge & Lets you match the selected edge and/or the normals to various objects.
Normals
Edge & Cross Lets you match a selected edge and/or its cross tangents to various objects.
Tangents
Edge Provides a higher degree of match between two surfaces than the Edge &
Curvature Cross Tangents option. If continuation of curvature is required from surface to
surface then you should use this option instead. The procedures are identical
with that of Edge & Cross Tangents.
Check Lets you toggle the Information window ON or OFF, which provides feedback
Deviation on how much a surface deformed when matching two free form bodies for
position and tangency.

Reverse Normal
Lets you add Reverse Normal features to one or more sheet bodies. Reverse Normal features
are useful in preventing update problems due to trimming operations using sheets. They can
also be handy in controlling shading displays, especially if you are using third party shading
tools.
When you first choose the Reverse Normal option a sheet selection dialog displays prompting
you to select the sheet bodies you wish to reverse. You can select one or more sheet bodies.
After selecting at least one sheet body, the OK, Apply and Display Normal buttons are
enabled, and a conehead displays indicating the current normal direction of the first face in
every selected sheet body. Use the Display Normal button to redisplay the sheet body
normals, in case they become erased or are corrupted on the graphics screen by other
operations.
Choosing OK or Apply creates a Reverse Normal feature for every selected sheet body.

Move Defining Point
You can use Move Defining Point to move the points lying on a sheet body (defining points).
When you use this option, a warning message is displayed indicating that the operation will
remove the parameters from the sheet body. You are asked to OK or Cancel the operation.
You have the choice of editing the original sheet body or a copy of the original sheet body.
Edit A Copy lets you keep a copy of the sheet body. Copies of the original sheet body are not
associated with the original.
Once you have chosen an option and selected a face to edit, the Move Point dialog appears.
Move Point Dialog Options
Points to Move Lets you choose the point(s) to move.
Redisplay Surface Points Lets you redisplay the points that are eligible for selection.
Points From File Lets you read in points from a file to replace the original points.
Selecting Points
The system prompts you to select the face and the type of points you want to move. Using the
Move Point dialog, you can move a single point, an entire row, an entire column, or a
rectangular array using the following options:
Single Point Lets you specify a single point to move. This is the default option.
Entire Row Lets you move all points in the same row (constant V). To move the row,
select a point in the row you want to move.
Entire Column Lets you move all points in the same column (constant U). To move the
column, select a point in the column you want to move.
Rectangular Lets you move the points contained in a rectangular area. To move the area,
Array select two opposite corner points of the rectangle you want to move

Move Pole
Move Pole lets you move the poles of a sheet body. This can be useful in the interactive
design of free-form aesthetic shapes, such as those found in consumer products and
automobile bodies. You may wish to move poles when you want to modify the shape of a
surface to improve its appearance, or to make it comply with some criteria like minimum
distance or deviation to other geometrical elements.
You can drag poles along the normal vector to the surface or on the plane tangent to it. You
can drag rows or columns, while preserving the curvature or tangency at the edges. You can
use the Deviation Check and Section Analysis options to provide visual feedback of the
surface edit with respect to other reference geometry.
Single Pole - Lets you specify a single pole to move.
Entire Row (constant v) - Lets you move all poles in the same row (constant V). To move
the row, select a pole in the row you want to move.
Entire Column (constant u) - Lets you move all poles in the same column (constant U). To
move the column, select a pole in the column you want to move.
Rectangular Array - Lets you move the poles contained in a rectangular area. Rectangular
Array supports only the Along Defined Vector and Along Normal drag options.
EDIT FACE
Modeling Edit Face Options
Move Face
Lets you move faces of a feature by linear translation or by rotation about
an axis. This option converts the selected feature into an unparameterized
feature.
Replace
Face Lets you exchange a single face of a feature with new sheet geometry.
This option converts the selected feature into an unparameterized feature.
Subdivide
Face Lets you use existing curves to create new edges and faces on existing
bodies.
Delete Face
Lets you delete one or more faces of a body.
Resize Face
Lets you change the radial parameters of a single face of an analytic solid
body (cone, sphere, cylinder, and torus).
Join Faces
Lets you join multiple faces on a body, removing all unnecessary edges
and vertices.

Move Face
This option lets you move one or more faces of a solid body by linear translation or by
rotation about an axis. This option can only operate on unparameterized bodies. If you select
a face from a parameterized body for this operation, a message is displayed, warning you
that the parameters will be removed from the body if you continue. If you choose to continue,
all parametric data (feature and sketch information) is deleted from the selected body.
To use this option, follow these steps:
1. Select the face(s) you wish to move.
2. Choose the method of face movement.
3. Select the projection faces and or planes using the Class Selection Tool.
Replace Face
This option lets you replace the geometry of a single solid face with new sheet geometry. The
selected face must be bounded by other faces.
You can replace the selected face with one of the following sheet types:
Planar Lets you replace the selected face with a planar-shaped sheet.
Cylindrical Lets you replace the selected face with a cylindrical-shaped sheet.
Spherical Lets you replace the selected face with a spherical-shaped sheet.
Conical Lets you replace the selected face with a conical-shaped sheet.
Toroidal Lets you replace the selected face with a toroidal-shaped sheet.
Select Lets you replace the sheet of a selected face with an existing sheet or the sheet
Face of a selected solid face.
This operation does not allow the topology of the solid body to change. The system replaces
the geometry of the selected face with the user-specified geometry.
This option can only operate on unparameterized bodies. If you select a face from a
parameterized body for this operation, a message is displayed, warning you that the
parameters will be removed from the body if you continue. If you choose to continue, all
parametric data (feature and sketch information) is deleted from the selected body.
The original edges of the selected face are deleted and new edges are recalculated by
intersecting the new sheet (of the selected face) with the sheets of all the adjacent faces. If
these intersections would fail (e.g., attempting to replace the planar sheet of one of the faces
on a one inch cube with a spherical face with a quarter inch radius), the system does not
replace the face. Also note that nonanalytic sheets, such as B-surface type sheets, cannot be
extended beyond the geometry that defines their bounds.
To use this option, follow these steps:
1. Select a feature.
2. Select the face to be replaced.
3. Define the replacing sheet.
After a Replace operation, you can restore the solid body to its previous state with Undo.
Choosing Undo causes the system to immediately reverse the last Replace operation only.

Subdivide Face
This option lets you use existing curves to create new edges and new faces on a single face
of an existing body while maintaining associativity.
To use this option, follow these steps:
1. Select the face to be subdivided.
2. Determine the curve status (maintain or blank originals)
3. Select the curves to subdivide the face.
you can edit these edges/faces using Edit->Feature->Parameters. Curves which are
associated with the subdivided face feature cannot be deleted. If you transform the curves
associated with a subdivided face, the face itself is also updated. If you transform the solid
body on which any subdivided faces reside, their associated curves do not move. However,
the subdivided faces are updated accordingly.

Delete Face
This option lets you remove one or more faces of an existing body. If multiple faces are
selected, they must all belong to the same solid body.
This option can only operate on unparameterized bodies. If you select a face from a
parameterized body for this operation, a message is displayed, warning you that the
parameters will be removed from the body if you continue. If you choose to continue, all
parametric data (feature and sketch information) is deleted from the selected body.
To use this option, follow these steps:
1. Select the face to be deleted using the Class Selection Tool.
2. Determine the method to repair the opening.
Immediately after a Delete operation, you can reverse the effect of that operation, and restore
the body to its previous state, with Undo.
Deleting a face from a solid body leaves an opening which must be closed. You can specify
that the system either Create New Faces or Trim Existing Faces to close the opening.
Create New Faces causes a new face to be generated from the edges of the opening. The
system creates a new face by finding a surface which best fits all the edges of the opening.
The edges are not modified in any way.

Trim Existing Faces causes the surrounding faces to extend until they intersect, to cover the
opening left by the deletion. The system deletes the edges surrounding the opening and
recalculates any required new edges.
Trim Existing Faces has the following restrictions:
• The faces that will be trimmed as a result of deleting a face cannot be parallel to each
other. (They would never intersect.)
• Nonanalytic surfaces, such as B-surfaces, cannot be extended beyond the geometry
that defines their bounds.
Choose Undo to reverse the previous Delete operation and restore the solid body to its
previous state.
Resize Face
This option lets you change the radial parameters of analytic faces only. Analytic faces
include conical, cylindrical, spherical, and toroidal.
This option can only operate on unparameterized bodies. If you select a face from a
parameterized body for this operation, a message is displayed, warning you that the
parameters will be removed from the body if you continue. If you choose to continue, all
parametric data (feature and sketch information) is deleted from the selected body.
The Resize Face option requires that you select a single face to be modified. Nonanalytic
faces are not selectable. If you select a nonanalytic face, the following error message is
displayed:
Invalid Face Type For This Operation
When you select single face bodies, such as spheres, the system immediately proceeds to
the new size prompt. The prompt for the new size parameter depends on the face you have
selected. When you select a sphere or cylinder, you can change the diameter value. When
you choose a cone, you can change its half angle, and when you choose a torus you can
change its major and minor radii.
Immediately after changing an analytic solid body, you can reverse the effect of that operation
and restore the face to its previous state with Undo.

Join Faces
You can choose from the following two methods to join faces on a solid body:
On Same Surface Lets you remove redundant faces, edges, and vertices from selected
sheet and solid bodies.
Convert to B-Surface Lets you join multiple faces into a single B-surface type face.

On Same Surface
This option lets you remove redundant faces, edges, and vertices from selected sheet and
solid bodies. You may need to use this option after a Subdivide Face operation.
For example, if you subdivide a face and subsequently discover that you no longer need or
want that subdivision, you can perform a Join Face on the body to remove the now unwanted
edges and/or faces.
Convert to B-Surface
You can use this option to join multiple faces into a single B-surface type face. The selected
faces must be adjacent to each other, belong to the same solid body, have matching u-v box
ranges, and the edges at which they join must be isoparametric.
When you select more than two faces for the join operation, the system attempts to match the
faces in pairs. You must select the faces in order so that the matching pairs share edges (see
the figure below).
TOOLS
Modeling Tools Options
Expression Lets you define and edit arithmetic or conditional formulas for the feature
parameters in your part.
Visual Editor Provides a static graphical representation of a model with its corresponding
dimensions and expressions, and simplifies the editing of object parameters.
Update Lets you specify when your model updates during the current session.
Part Navigator - Provides a visual representation of your part. Use it to organize,
select and control the visibility of your data as well as simply browse to
understand it.
Customize Customize the main menu bar and the toolbars to make the interface easier for
you to use.
User Defined Feature – Lets you create your own features to automate
commonly used design elements.
Part Families Lets you create a family of parts by designing a template part, and then using
the NX spreadsheet to describe the various part family members.

Expressions Editor Overview
Expressions are arithmetic or conditional formulas that define the characteristics of features.
You can use the Expressions Editor to define the formula strings for the expressions in your
part. By editing the formulas, you can edit your model parameters. You do not have to type
complex text strings to define the formulas.
You can use expressions to parametrically control the relationships between the features of a
part, or between parts in an assembly. You can use expressions to define and control many
dimensions of a model, such as the dimensions of a feature or a sketch.
You can easily create many types of intelligent expressions based on measurements and
interpart references. All expressions have a single, unique name and a string or formula that
can contain a combination of variables, functions, numbers, operators, and symbols.
Expression names are variables that you can insert in the formula strings of other
expressions.
You can find the Expressions Editor in the following places:
• Tools-> Expressions
• Part Navigator-> Details Panel-> MB3-> Edit in Expression Editor on a selected
expression
• Part Navigator-> Main Panel-> User Expressions-> MB3-> Edit in Expression Editor
on a selected expression
Creating an Expression
To create an expression:
1. Open the Expressions Editor.
2. Enter a name for the expression in the Name field.
3. You can optionally:
• Choose a Dimensionality for the expression.
• Choose a Unit type for the expression.
4. Enter a value and/or formula string in the Formula field.
5. To create the expression, press the Enter key or click the Accept Edit button. The
expression is added to the Expressions List window.
Editing an Expression
To edit an expression:
1. Open the Expressions Editor.
2. Click MB1 on the expression you want to edit in the Expression window. It's
information fills the Name, Function, Dimensionality, etc. fields.
If you know the name of the expression you want to edit, you can enter it in the Name
field and tab to the Formula field. The expression's current value automatically displays
in the field, ready for you to edit.
3. Make your edit changes.
• Enter a new name in the Name field.
• Enter a new value and/or formula string in the Formula field.
You can optionally select an expression from the Expressions List window and:
ο Click MB3-> Insert Formula to insert that expression's
formula at the cursor position of the Formula field.
ο Click MB3-> Insert Name to insert that expression's name at
the cursor position of the Formula field.
 You can optionally change the dimensionality and units of user-defined
expressions.
 As you begin editing, the highlighting of the expression in the list window
changes to light blue, indicating you have entered edit mode.
 If you wish to cancel your edit of the expression, use the Reject Edit button.
4. To finalize the edit, click the Accept Edit button. The expression is updated in the
Expressions List window.

Visual Editor
The Visual Editor provides a static graphical representation of a model with its corresponding
dimensions and expressions, to simplify the editing of object parameters. You can edit
expressions from the Visual Editor and update your model to reflect the changes.
The Visual Editor Dialog
The Tools-> Visual Editor dialog consists of the following components:
• A graphical cartoon which represents a view of the current model, along with its
associated dimensions. The cartoon is a static graphical image which is used for
reference while editing.
• A list of expressions associated with the model and an area for editing the
expressions. When you select a dimension on the cartoon, the associated expression
is highlighted in the list and you can edit it immediately. The model is updated when
you choose Update.

Update Options
Delayed After Lets you specify when to update the display with your edits.
Edit When this option is turned ON, you can perform as many edit operations as you
wish, but not update your model until you choose the Update option.
When turned OFF, you can only perform one edit operation at a time before the
system updates the display.
Update Lets you update the display with your previously made edits. When you choose
Model this option, the display is updated to show the effects of the edits made while
Delayed After Edit is ON. This option is only available when the Delayed After
Edit option is toggled ON.
Edit During Lets you review how the model is created, feature by feature. You can also edit
Update the model as it updates. You can move forward or backward to any feature,
(EDU) then edit it.

Part Navigator Overview
The Part Navigator provides a visual representation of your part. Use it to organize, select
and control the visibility of your data as well as simply browse to understand it. In addition,
Drafting as well as Modeling data is included in the Part Navigator.
The Part Navigator is divided into a stack of panels: the Main Panel, the Dependencies Panel,
the Details Panel, and the Preview Panel. As you construct your model or drawing, data is
populated into these panel windows. Use the panels to navigate through the part and perform
various operations on it.
Main Panel
The Main Panel provides the most overall view of your part. You can double-click items for
edit, select them for use in functions, and select and clear their check boxes to control their
visibility or suppression status. You can also use filters to customize what appears in the Main
Panel and show only the information you want to see.
Dependencies Panel
Use the Dependencies Panel to view the parent-child relationships of the feature geometry
selected in the Main Panel.
Details Panel
Use the Details Panel to view, and in some cases edit, the parameters belonging to the
feature selected in the Main Panel.
Preview Panel
The Preview Panel displays preview images of selected items in the Main Panel that have
preview objects.
Opening the Part Navigator
To open the Part Navigator:
1. Click the Part Navigator tab on the Resource Bar.
2. Pin the Part Navigator open, by clicking the pin icon in the upper left corner. This will
prevent it from sliding closed when you move the cursor off the Part Navigator tab.
- Navigator Unpinned
- Navigator Pinned Open
You can open or redisplay the Part Navigator from any NX application. You can also
open the Part Navigator using Tools-> Part Navigator.
Customizing the Resource Bar
To change how the Part Navigator works with the Resource Bar:
1. Click Preferences-> User Interface. The User Interface Preferences dialog displays.
2. Click the Resource Bar tab.
 Choose the Left or Right option to specify the side of the NX window on
which you want the Resource Bar to appear.
 Choose the Pages Automatically Fly Out option to have the Part Navigator
open and close automatically when you move the cursor over and off its
selected tab on the Resource Bar.

User Defined Feature Overview
User defined features (UDFs) let you extend the range and power of NX built-in features. You
can create your own features that automate commonly used design elements. You can add
the user defined features you create to target model . You can define the shape and function
of features, and create hierarchical libraries of features that are tailored to your needs.
When you insert a UDF into a part, it is treated as a single feature. If you attempt to suppress
or delete a UDF component, the entire UDF is suppressed or deleted. Components on a UDF
must be controlled by a suppress expression in order to be individually suppressed and
unsuppressed.
You can explode a UDF and break out its individual component features, so they display
separately in the Part Navigator. When you do this the component features are also
automatically included in a new feature set of the UDF.

Part Families
The Part Families option lets you create a family of parts. You begin by creating a template
part, and then use the NX spreadsheet to create a table describing the various part family
members.
Part Families Dialog Options
Available Lets you choose the type of available columns that can be selected for the
Columns Part Families spreadsheet.
Available Lists the columns that are available for adding to the spreadsheet.
Columns list box
Add Column Lets you add a column to the Chosen Columns list by selecting its name in
the Available Columns list, then choosing this option.
Chosen Columns Shows the items that have been selected for the part family; each item
list box represents one column in the spreadsheet. When you select an item in the
Chosen Columns list, any associated geometry is highlighted in the
graphics area.
Remove Column Lets you remove a column from the Chosen Columns list by selecting its
name in that list, then choosing this option.
Family Save Lets you specify the default directory for the creation of family member part
Directory files.
Part Family Options for the spreadsheet.
Spreadsheet
General Procedure
1. Create a template part.
2. In the template part, define the attributes that will be used in the family.
3. Create and save a family table, defining the various configurations of the family
members:
a. Open the spreadsheet from the Part Families dialog by clicking Part Family
Spreadsheet-> Create.
b. From the spreadsheet use Part Family-> Create Parts on the family table to
create a NX part file.

Customizing Dialog Overview
Customize the main menu bar and the toolbars to make the interface easier for you to use.
Showing and hiding items is as easy as dragging and dropping.
• Drag and drop a menu item to a toolbar
• Drag and drop a toolbar item to a menu bar
• Show and hide toolbar and menu bar items
• Show and hide entire toolbars
• Create cascade menus on the menu bar or toolbar
• Remove menu items
• Create your own custom buttons.
FORMAT
Modeling Format Options
Layer Setting To work with layers of selectable, visible, invisible, and work layers.
Visible in view The Visible Layers in View allows you to view all views in the current layout.
Layer Category To create, edit and delete layer categories.
Move/Copy to These functions enable you to transfer objects or their copies among the
Layer layers in a part file.
WCS To work with Work Coordinate System. To originate, Rotate, Dynamically
Rotate, Orient, Save, the WCS.
Group Features Lets you group features into a special collection called a Feature Set.
Members of a Feature Set can be controlled together during suppress, delete
and move feature operations.
Reference Sets Reference sets let you control the amount of data that is loaded from each
component and viewed in the context of an assembly.
Group Identify individual objects as a group, and handle them as a single unit.
Objects can be removed from a group and restored to their individual status.
Pattern Use this option to duplicate standard parts, to add standard information (such
as borders, lines, text and title blocks) to your file, and to reduce the size of
your current part file.

Layer Settings Dialog
Option Description
Work Shows the current work layer.
Range or Category Select layers or categories. Select by entering a layer range or category
name.
Category Filter Controls which items appear in the Category list box. You can enter a
string.
Category List Box Contains all of the categories that match the contents or wildcards of
the Category Filter field, in alphabetical order, along with their
descriptions.
Edit Category Takes you directly to the Layer Category dialog. This option allows you
to modify the description, contents or name of an existing category,
create a new category, or delete an existing category.
Information Produces a listing of the pending layer status in the Information
window. The result is the same as that of the Information->Other->
Layer option.
Layer/Status List Contains the list of layers that you can select to change status.
Box
Selectable Make layers selectable.
Make Work Make a layer the work layer.
Invisible Turn layers invisible.
Visible Only This option becomes available after you select at least one layer or
category from the appropriate list box.
Layers Option Menu Controls the display of the Layers list box on the Layer Settings dialog.
Selections: All Layers, Layers with Objects, All Selectable Layers
Show Object Count Displays the number of objects in each layer.
Show Category Displays the category names.
Names
Fit All Before Controls whether or not the system should recalculate new view scales
Displaying before updating the display.

Visible in View
The Visible Layers in View dialog allows you to view all views in the current layout.
To... Do This...
Display a list of all views in the current Select Visible in View from the Format pull-down
layout menu
Choose a view Select a view from the list or
select a view in the graphics display area
Replace the individual layer settings of Select a view from the list and select 'Reset to
the selected view with the global layer Global'. 'Reset to Global' takes effect immediately.
settings If you are finished with the Format->Visible in View
option, to exit the function, click Cancel immediately
after 'Reset to Global'. To edit the Visible in View
settings again, click OK.
Add to the list of visible layers Select Visible
Remove from the list of visible layers Select Invisible
Store the selected layers as visible in Click Apply or OK
the view and update the graphics
display area

Layer Category Procedures
Creating New Categories - Create new categories by entering a name in the Category text
field and selecting Create/Edit.
Editing Existing Categories - Selecting an existing category from the list, the system places its
name in the Category text field, and its description in the Description text field.
Deleting Categories To remove a category, select it from the Layer Category list and select
the Delete button. Layer & Status Shows all layers contained in the category being edited
marked with the status Included.

Creating a New Layer Category
To create a new layer category:
1. Select Format->Layer Category. This displays the Layer Category dialog.
2. Enter a name in the Category text field.
3. Select Create/Edit. This opens the second Layer Category dialog.
4. Select the layer to which you want to assign the category.
5. To assign a layer to the category, click Add. To unassign a layer from the category,
click Remove.
6. Click OK. This re-displays the Layer Category dialog and makes the assignment
effective.
To add a description to the new category:
1. Enter text in the Description field.
2. Click Apply Description.

Layer Category Dialog
Option Description
Filter Controls which items appear in the Category list box.
Category list box Lists available categories.
Category field Displays the selected category.
Create/Edit Creates new and edits existing categories.
Delete Deletes a category.
Rename Renames categories.
Description field Displays the selected category's category description.
Apply Description Applies the description in the Description field to the selected category.

Move/Copy to Layer
These functions enable you to transfer objects or their copies among the layers in a part file.
• Select Move to Layer or Copy to Layer.
• Select the objects intended for the transformation.
• Select or enter the number of the destination layer. You can select a destination layer
from the layer list box, the graphics window or you can enter a layer number in the
data entry field.
• Select OK to perform the transformation.
Move to Layer Remove objects from one layer and place them on another layer.
Copy to Layer Keep objects on their original layer, and place copies on another layer.
Reference Sets
Reference sets let you control the amount of data that is loaded from each component and
viewed in the context of an assembly. A well-managed reference set strategy can lead to:
• Faster load times
• Reduced memory usage
• Less cluttered graphics displays
A reference set is a named collection of objects that you can reference from an another part.
You can use reference sets to, for example, reference geometry representing different stages
of manufacture. Using reference sets can drastically reduce, or even totally eliminate, the
graphical representation of portions of the assembly without modifying the actual assembly
structure or underlying geometric models.

Objects in a Reference Set
Objects that can be members of a reference set include:
• geometry
• coordinate systems
• planes
• pattern objects
• immediate components of the part
Creating a Reference Set
1. Choose Format-> Reference Sets to bring up the Reference Sets dialog.
2. Click the Create icon to bring up the Create Reference Set dialog.
3. Provide a name for the reference set in the Name field.
4. Decide whether you want to create a reference set CSYS (coordinate system) by
toggling the Create Reference Set CSYS on or off.
5. Choose OK in the Create Reference Set dialog.
6. The CSYS Constructor dialog appears if you had toggled on the Create Reference
Set CSYS option. Use this dialog to define your coordinate system.
7. Select the objects that you want to place into your reference set.
8. When you have finished selecting objects, choose OK or MB2.
Modifying a Reference Set
To modify an existing reference set:
1. Make sure that the work part contains the reference set that you want to modify.
2. Open the Reference Sets dialog if it is not already open (Format-> Reference Sets).
3. Select the reference set that you want to modify in the Work Part list.
4. Choose the operation that you want to perform from the active icons on the dialog.

Group
Identify individual objects as a group, and handle them as a single unit. Objects can be
removed from a group and restored to their individual status.
A complex part can be managed with ease if the objects are rationally grouped. The
selection process can be greatly enhanced if a part consists of grouped objects.
Term Definitions
Member Object belonging to a group.
Group Collection of its members. You can handle a group as an object separate from its
members.
Name Assigned to a group at the time of its creation.
Option Description
Create Group Creates an unnamed group.
Create Named Group Creates a group and give it a name.
Add to Group Adds objects to a group.
Remove From Group Removes members from groups without ungrouping any groups.
Ungroup Top Ungroup a top-group without ungrouping any of its sub-groups.
Ungroup Full Ungroup a top-level group and all of its subgroups.

Group Features
This option lets you group features into a special collection called a Feature Set. Members of
a feature set can be controlled together during suppress, delete and move feature operations.
Basic Procedure
1. Click on Format-> Group Features. The Sets of Features dialog opens.
2. Enter a name for the feature set in the Feature Set Name field.
3. If necessary, use the Filter field to limit the number of features shown in the Features
in Part listing.
4. If desired, turn on the Add Dependencies option, to include feature dependencies of
the selected features that are to be added to the feature set.
5. If desired, turn on the All in Body option, to include all features in the body in the
feature set.
6. Highlight the features in the Features in Part listing that you wish to add to the feature
set, and click the Add button. You can make multiple selections by highlighting
multiple items in the Features in Part listing and clicking the Add button once. You
can remove features in the Features in Set listing by highlighting them and clicking
the Remove button.
7. Turn on Hide Feature Set Members if you do not want the feature set members to
display in other feature dialogs.
8. Click OK or Apply. The features in the Features in Set listing are grouped together
under the feature name you specified in the Feature Set Name field.
Editing a Feature Set
To edit a feature set do one of the following:
• Select Edit->Feature->Parameters and select the feature set.
• Select the feature set in the Part Navigator and use MB3-> Edit Parameters.
A dialog opens to let you edit the expressions and references of the features in the feature
set. If you select multiple feature sets, all expressions and references of all the features in the
sets are available to edit.
Add/Remove Members
To change the members in a feature set, go to the Part Navigator and use MB3->
Add/Remove Members. The Sets of Features dialog displays, where you can add and remove
features in the set.
• You can add feature sets to other feature sets.
• You can add features to more than one feature set.
• You cannot add features that were created after the feature set.
• If you delete a feature set, all of its member features are also deleted. To delete a
feature set without deleting its members, first remove its members.
• You can create empty feature sets that contain no members.
• If you suppress a feature set, all of its members are suppressed. If you unsuppress a
feature set, all of its members are unsuppressed, except those members that were
already suppressed before they were added to the feature set.
Patterns
Use this option to duplicate standard parts, to add standard information (such as borders,
lines, text and title blocks) to your file, and to reduce the size of your current part file.

What is a Pattern?
A Pattern Is one object representing individual objects saved in another file called the
Object pattern master part file. You create a pattern by retrieving the pattern data from
the pattern master part file. Pattern data for a particular part must exist before that
part can be retrieved as a pattern.
Pattern Is saved in the pattern master part file. Only points, lines, arcs, conics, splines, b-
Data curves, dimensions, drafting objects, surfaces, and solids can be filed as pattern
data. All other objects, including nested patterns, are ignored during pattern data
filing.
Pattern Are the control points for pattern objects.
Points

Retrieved from Pattern Master Part File and Used in Six Places

Creating a Pattern
To save pattern data, first set the Save Pattern Data option under File->Options->Save
Options to save patterns in the way you want. If it is set to 'No', no pattern data will be saved.
1. Save a part that contains the objects that you want to use as a pattern. This creates a
'Pattern Master Part File'.
2. Open the part file into which you want to retrieve a pattern.
3. Retrieve the 'Pattern Master Part File' saved in Step 1.
The following operations apply to pattern objects.
• File->Import->Part
• Edit->Delete, Blank, Layer, Transform, Object Display (Color)
• Format->Group, Attribute
• the Dimensioning operations in the Drafting application
• the Assemblies operations
Option Description
Retrieve Pattern Retrieves the pattern data representing the points, lines, arcs, conics,
splines, b-curves, dimensions, drafting objects, sheets, and solids in a
pattern master part file, and displays them as a single pattern object in
your current part file.
Expand Pattern Imports the individual objects, which make up the pattern object
directly into your current part file, and deletes the pattern object.
Update Pattern Re-retrieves pattern data to reflect any changes that may have been
incorporated in the pattern master part file while your current part is
open.
Replace Pattern Replaces the current pattern master part file with another while
maintaining the same scale, origin, and orientation.
Edit Display Changes the display status of the origin marker, the max/min box, and
Parameters the control points of the pattern objects.
List Associated Parts Displays the Information window with all pattern master part files
referenced by pattern objects for the current part file. Pattern master
part files referenced within other loaded parts in the session are also
shown.
List Pattern Errors Displays the Information window with all errors that occurred during
the last pattern operation.
Create Pattern Point Creates pattern points anywhere in the pattern master part file.

ASSEMBLIES

Assembly Introduction
Assemblies is an integrated Unigraphics NX application that facilitates the construction of
assemblies of parts, the modeling of individual parts within the context of the assembly, and
the production of parts lists for assembly drawings.
You can create links from the assembly to its components to simplify the incorporation of
changes across the various levels of product definition. One advantage to using assemblies is
that a design change to one part file can be reflected in all assemblies that use the part.
When initially creating an assembly, you do not need to create or alter any geometry. The
system creates a link from the assembly to the component, which allows the system to keep
track of your assembly structure. You can create an assembly by several different techniques
that combine parts and/or subassemblies together. You can also generate a parts list of the
contents of an assembly based on previously assigned attributes.
Assemblies appears on the Applications pulldown as an application that can be toggled ON or
OFF. Toggling the Assemblies application ON causes an assemblies license to be taken, the
Assemblies toolbar to appear, and the functions available from the Assemblies pulldown
menu to expand. Some assemblies functions, such as designing in context or access to the
Assembly Navigator, are also available without an assemblies license or when the
Assemblies application is toggled OFF.

Assemblies Concepts
Components
Assembly part files point to geometry and features in the subordinate parts rather than
creating duplicate copies of those objects at each level in the assembly. This technique not
only minimizes the size of assembly parts files, but also provides high levels of associativity.
For example, modifying the geometry of one component causes all assemblies that use that
component in the session to automatically reflect that change. Within an assembly, a
particular part may be used in many places. Each usage is referred to as a component and
the file containing the actual geometry for the component is called the component part
Top-down or Bottom-up Modeling
You are not limited to any one particular approach to building the assembly. You can create
individual models in isolation, then later add them to assemblies (bottom-up), or you can
create them directly at the assembly level (top-down). For example, you can initially work in a
top-down fashion, then switch back and forth between bottom-up and top-down modeling.
Design in Context
When the displayed part is an assembly, it is possible to change the work part to any of the
components within that assembly (except for unloaded parts and parts of different units).
Geometry, features, and components can then be added to or edited within the work part.
Geometry outside of the work part can be referenced in many modeling operations. For
example, control points on geometry outside of the work part can be used to position a
feature within the work part.
Associativity Maintained
Geometric changes made at any level within an assembly result in the update of associated
data at all other levels of affected assemblies. An edit to an individual piece part causes all
assembly drawings that use that part to be updated appropriately. Conversely, an edit made
to a component in the context of an assembly results in the update of drawings and other
associated objects (such as tool paths) within the component part.
Mating Conditions
Mating conditions let you position components in an assembly. This mating is accomplished
by specifying constraint relationships between two components in the assembly. For example,
you can specify that a cylindrical face on one component is to be coaxial with a conical face
on another component.

The relationship between the two components is associative. If you move the fixed
component's location, the component that is mated to it also moves when you update. For
example, if you mate a bolt to a hole, if the hole is moved, the bolt moves with it.
Using Reference Sets to Reduce the Graphic Display
Large, complex assemblies can be simplified graphically by filtering the amount of data that is
used to represent a given component or subassembly by using reference sets. Reference
sets can be used to drastically reduce (or even totally eliminate) the graphical representation
of portions of the assembly without modifying the actual assembly structure or underlying
geometric models. Each component can use a different reference set, thus allowing different
representations of the same part within a single assembly. The figure below shows an
example of a bushing component used twice in an assembly, each displayed with a different
reference set.
When you open an assembly, it is automatically updated to reflect the latest versions of all
components it uses. Load Options lets you control the extent to which changes made by other
users affect your assemblies.
Machining of Assemblies
Assembly parts may be machined using the Manufacturing applications. An assembly can be
created containing all of the setup, such as fixtures, necessary to machine a particular part.
This approach has several advantages over traditional methods:
• It avoids having to merge the fixture geometry into the part to be machined.
• It lets the NC programmer generate fully associative tool paths for models for which
the programmer may not have write access privilege.
• It enables multiple NC programmers to develop NC data in separate files
simultaneously.
Assemblies Functionality
Some of the major features of Assemblies include:
• Component geometry is pointed to from the assembly, rather than duplicated
throughout the assembly.
• You can create assemblies using either a top-down or bottom-up approach.
• Multiple parts can be opened and edited simultaneously.
• Component geometry can be created and edited in the context of the assembly.
• Associativity is maintained throughout the assembly regardless of how and where the
edits are made.
• The graphical representation of an assembly can be simplified without editing the
underlying geometry.
• Assemblies are automatically updated to reflect the latest version of referenced parts.
• Mating conditions let you position components in the assembly by specifying
constraint relationships between them.
• The Assembly Navigator provides a graphical display of the assembly structure and
lets you select and manipulate components for use in other functions.
• You can use assemblies in other applications, particularly Drafting and
Manufacturing.

Definition of Terms
Assemblies introduces several new terms, a few of which are defined below. It is
recommended that you become familiar with these terms before you attempt to use the
interactive procedures described in this help documentation. For further definitions, refer to
the Glossary.
Assembly A collection of piece parts and subassemblies representing a product. In
Unigraphics NX, an assembly is a part file which contains components.
Component A usage of a part within an assembly, at a particular location and orientation.
A component may be a subassembly consisting of other, lower level
components. Each component in an assembly contains only a pointer to its
master geometry. When you modify the geometry of one component, all other
components in the session using the same master automatically update to
reflect the change.
Component The part file or master pointed to by a component within an assembly. The
Part actual geometry is stored in the component part and referenced, not copied,
by the assembly.
Component The geometric objects from the component part, displayed within the
Members assembly. The component members may be a subset of all the geometry in
the component part if a reference set is used. Also referred to as component
geometry.
Design in The ability to directly edit component geometry as it is displayed in the
Context assembly. Geometry from other components can be selected to aid in the
modeling. Also referred to as edit in place.
Top-down Modeling technique where component parts can be created and edited while
Modeling working at the assembly level. Geometric changes made at the assembly
level are automatically reflected in the individual component part immediately.
Bottom-up Modeling technique where component parts are designed and edited in
Modeling isolation of their usage within some higher level assembly. All assemblies
using the component are automatically updated when opened to reflect the
geometric edits made at the piece part level.
Displayed Part The part currently displayed in the graphics window.
Work Part The part in which you create and edit geometry. The work part can be your
displayed part or any component part which is contained in your displayed
assembly part. When displaying a piece part, the work part is always the
same as the displayed part.
Loaded Part Any part currently opened and in memory. Parts are loaded explicitly using
the File-> Open option and implicitly when they are used in an assembly
being opened.
Reference Set A named collection of geometry from a part that may be used to simplify the
graphic display of the component part in higher level assemblies.
Mating The set of constraints that exists for a single component. Each component in
Condition an assembly can have only one mating condition, although that mating
condition may consist of relationships to several other components.

Assembly Navigator
The Assembly Navigator gives you a graphical display of the assembly structure of the
displayed part in a separate window, and provides a quick and easy method of manipulating
components in an assembly. For example, you can use the Assembly Navigator to select
components for various operations, as well as to perform assembly management functions
such as changing the work part, changing the displayed part, blanking and unblanking
components, and more.
ADVANCED ASSEMBLY
Advanced Pulldown Menu
The options on the Advanced pulldown menu are:
Advanced Pulldown Menu Options
Wrapped Simplifies a complex assembly by computing a solid envelope that encloses
Assembly the assembly. This effectively "shrink wraps" the assembly with a convex
polyhedron of planar faces.
Linked Exterior Extracts the exterior faces of an assembly into a LINKED_EXTERIOR
feature. You can extract all of the faces, or a selection of them. You can edit
your selection of faces before extracting them.
Simplify You can create a single, airtight solid from an assembly that preserves the
Assembly exterior details while removing proprietary interior details.
Zones Zones can be thought of as a way of partitioning an assembly model into
meaningful regions. Zones can either be boxes or planes.
Representations Creates a faceted body which is associated with the solid body or face from
which it was derived. Faceted bodies are often used as a lightweight
alternative to heavy solid bodies.
Scripts Scripts, which map one or more filters to actions, can be used to build up a
simple program to manipulate the assembly.

Wrap Assembly
The Wrap Assembly function (also known as assembly envelope) simplifies a complex
assembly by computing a solid envelope that encloses the assembly. This effectively "shrink
wraps" the assembly with a convex polyhedron of planar faces.
This feature is similar to the Wrap Geometry feature that is described in the Modeling Help,
except that the WRAP_ASSEMBLY feature allows interpart links in the input geometry. It is
created in the context of the displayed part, but resides in the work part. Input data can reside
anywhere in the current assembly, because interpart links relate the data to the
WRAP_ASSEMBLY feature.
Linked Exterior
Extracts the exterior faces of an assembly into a LINKED_EXTERIOR feature. You can
extract all of the faces, or a selection of them. You can edit your selection of faces before
extracting them.

Simplify Assembly Overview
You can create a single, airtight solid from an assembly by using the Simplify Assembly
wizard. A simplified assembly lets you:
• Preserve complex exterior details while removing interior details (if, for example, you
need to send a subassembly that can be used for measurements in a larger
assembly, but preserve your subassembly's proprietary interior details)
• Reduce the data required when an externally-accurate representation of your
assembly is adequate, rather than needing to fully load the assembly.

Zones
Zones can be thought of as a way of partitioning an assembly model into meaningful regions.
Zones can either be boxes or planes. Zone filters work from the bounding box of a part, which
is computed from the solid geometry in the part. Wireframe geometry is not included in the
calculation, and therefore not in a zone filter.
Zones are:
• Defined and stored at the assembly level.
• Named uniquely within their own name space.
• Available for comparison against the volume of the components being loaded, the
comparison functions being provided by the filter language.
• Located in the absolute coordinate system of the assembly they are defined in.

Representations
You can use the options on this dialog to create a faceted body which is associated with the
solid body or face from which it was derived. Faceted bodies are often used as a lightweight
alternative to heavy solid bodies. Using faceted bodies instead of solid bodies can
significantly improve performance, especially in large assemblies.

COMPONENTS MENU
The Components cascade menu provides options for creating and editing assembly
components.

Components Menu Options

Add Existing Lets you add an existing component to your assembly.

Create New Lets you create a new component to add to your assembly.
Create New Lets you create a new parent for your current displayed part.
Parent

Create Array Lets you create a component array.

Substitute Lets you substitute a component in your assembly.
Component

Reposition Lets you reposition a component in your assembly.
Component

Mate Lets you mate a component in your assembly.
Component

Replace Replaces reference sets for one or more components. From the displayed
Reference Set assembly part, select the component for which you want to replace the
reference set, then specify the new reference set name. You can also specify
that the reference set is either Empty or comprised of the Entire Part.

Suppress Lets you suppress a component. Other options for suppressing components
Component appear on the Parameters page of the Component Properties dialog.

Unsuppress Lets you select one or more suppressed components to unsuppress. You
Component can also select suppressed components from the Assembly Navigator and
then choosing this option.

Define Mating Lets you examine the mating conditions for a selected component, and
Alternates ensure the correct faces have been named. You can name the faces of the
original component.

Verify Mating Applies names to faces of alternate parts, and lets you load the substituted
Alternates alternate part and verify the substitution works correctly.

Part Family Updates part family members and provides a Family Report.
Update

Check Checks the selected components against each other and other visible
Clearances components for possible interferences. If no components are selected, you
will be prompted to select one. Unloaded parts are ignored.

ADD EXISTING
The Assemblies-> Components->Add Existing option lets you create an assembly using a
bottom-up design method, by adding a part to the work part as a component. This part can be
an existing part, or you can create a part family member on the fly.
Selecting the Part to be added
When you choose Assemblies-> Components-> Add Existing or the Add Existing Component
icon on the Assemblies toolbar, the Select Part dialog appears. This dialog gives you options
for selecting the part to be added, or you can select the part directly from the graphics
window:
The Add Existing Part Dialog
After you have selected the part to be added, the Add Existing Part dialog appears, which
gives you options for modifying how the component is added. If you have chosen to preview
the component, it appears in a Staging View when the Add Existing Part dialog appears:

Add Existing Part Dialog Options

Multiple Add Lets you add more than one instance of the component you selected.
After you have added each instance, the Point Constructor remains active
to let you add another instance if you wish. When you are finished,
choose Back or Cancel.

Component Name The name of the currently selected component.
Reference Set
Lets you specify a reference set for the component you are adding.
Positioning
Specifies how you will position the component when it is added.
Layer Options
Specifies the layer on which the component will be placed.

Layer Lets you enter the layer that you want to use if you chose As Specified for
Layer Options.
When a component is added, the absolute position of the component is placed at the
specified destination position/orientation in the new parent part. When a component is added
with a reference set, the coordinate system associated with the reference set is always added
to any existing transformation before the component is added to the new assembly. There is
no effect on the component if the reference set was created without a coordinate system.
Degrees of Freedom
To position a component, you can use a combination of constraint types. When you begin to
mate the component, there are six ways in which it can move (i.e., six degrees of freedom):
three for rotation, and three for translation. Each constraint that you specify removes some of
these degrees of freedom. In the example below, the mating component has been partially
constrained, so that it now has only three degrees of freedom left.

Positioning Added Components
You can use three different options to initially position the component in the assembly:

Absolute Places the component using the Point Constructor.

Mate Specifies mating conditions to fix the component's location. You establish a
constraint relationship between the component you are adding and a fixed
component.

Reposition Move components after they have been added to the part. The component
highlights at its initially specified origin.

Mating Types
The mating constraint types are:

Mate Positions two objects of the same type so that they are coincident. For planar
objects, their normals will point in opposite directions.

Align For planar objects, it positions the two objects so that they are coplanar and
adjacent. For axisymmetric objects, it aligns the axes.

Angle Defines an angle dimension between two objects.

Parallel Defines the direction vectors of two objects as parallel to each other.

Perpendicular Defines the direction vectors of two objects as perpendicular to each other.

Center Lets you center one object everywhere along the center of the other, or center
one or two objects between a pair of objects.

Distance Specifies the minimum 3D distance between two objects. You can control
which side of the surface the solution should be by using positive or negative
values.

Tangent Defines a physical contact between two objects.

Selection Steps (Mating Conditions)
The selection steps help you select the geometry for a mating constraint. Two of them,
Second From and Second To, are active only when certain other options are chosen in the
Mating Conditions dialog.
When From is active, select the geometry for the mating constraint from the component
being mated. When To is active, select the geometry for the mating constraint from the
assembly or the To component.
When Second From is active, select the geometry for the mating constraint from the mated
components. This step is grayed out unless you have chosen the Center mating type, plus 2
to 1 or 2 to 2 from the Center Objects option menu.
When Second To is active, select additional geometry for the mating constraint from the
assembly or from the To component. This step is grayed out unless you have made either of
the following choices:
The Center mating type, plus the 1 to 2 or 2 to 2 Center Objects option.
The Angle mating type, plus Planar from the Angle Objects option menu.
Once you have selected geometry for a selection step, the next selection step becomes
active. You can also activate a selection step directly by pressing its icon.
You can select:
• lines (including straight edges)
• planar surfaces (including datum planes)
• cylindrical surfaces
• spherical surfaces
• conic surfaces
• toroidal surfaces
• points
• circles
• datum axes
• the CSYS
• components
The Filter options are available to help you select the geometry.
Preview (Mating Conditions)
Lets you see what the solution of your currently defined mating constraints will look like,
before the components are moved. This option can save time since, if the current solution is
not what you want, it should take less time to cancel the preview (which only affects the
display) than to undo the solution and move the components back to their original positions.
After you have finished reviewing the solution, choose Unpreview to refresh the graphics
display.
Vary Constraints
Lets you modify mating constraints' offset and angle expressions, or reposition selected
components as allowed by the current mating constraints.

Vary Constraints Dialog Options

Select Components Lets you select one or more components. The other options are
grayed out while you are selecting them.

Finished Selection Choose this when you have finished selecting components to make
the other options active.

Mating Constraints list Lists all the mating constraints of the selected components that have
an offset or angle expression.

Offset Expression or Shows the current name and value of the offset or angle expression
Angle Expression belonging to the selected constraint. You can change the expression
value.

Offset or Angle Shows the current value of the expression.

Slider Lets you change the offset (or angle) by moving the slider. You can
see the effects in the graphics window and in the Offset (or Angle)
value.

Icons

Translate Lets you move the selected components either to a selected point, or
to a position that you define by specifying the distance that the
components should travel in the XC, YC, and ZC directions.

Rotate About a Point Lets you rotate the selected components about a point that you
specify.

Rotate About a Line Lets you rotate the selected components about a line that you define.

Reposition Brings up the CSYS Constructor to let you define how the selected
components should be repositioned.

Rotate Between Axes Lets you rotate the selected components between specified axes.

CREATE NEW
You can create a new component part file and a reference to that component in the assembly
work part. When you create a new component, feature parameters are maintained.
The Assemblies-> Components-> Create New option lets you create an assembly using a
top-down design method. Using this method, you can design a component part within the
context of the assembly, or use a black box representation, where you design a general
outline of the component part, thereby establishing the assembly-component relationship.
Common Procedures
To create a new component:
• Select the geometry to be included in the new component part. Or, you can select
one or more components from the work part to create a new subassembly.
• Specify a filename for the new part.
• Enter a name for the part.
• Enter a name for the reference set.
• Designate on which layer of the work part the component geometry will be placed. To
designate the work layer, choose the Work option; to designate the original layer,
choose the Original option. To designate another layer, choose the As Specified
option and enter the desired layer number in the text entry field.
• Indicate whether you want the component origin aligned with the parent assembly's
WCS or Absolute coordinate system.
• Indicate whether you want the defining objects (if any) of the selected geometry to be
copied into the new component part.
• Indicate whether you wish to delete the original geometry from the assembly since it
is now referenced from the component part. Deleting the original geometry is similar
to a move operation, while retaining the original geometry is like a copy operation.
Component Origin specifies where the absolute coordinate system lies within the component.
WCS sets the absolute coordinate system to be the same location and orientation as the
WCS of the displayed part. Absolute sets the absolute coordinate system to be the same
location and orientation as the absolute CSYS of the work part (i.e., the objects retain their
absolute position). The Absolute option enables any geometry that is far removed from the
absolute origin in the parent assembly to be close to the origin in the component part.
If Copy Defining Objects is toggled OFF, selected geometry that depends on defining objects
that were not selected will be left out of the new component. If this option is toggled ON, all
selected geometry and defining objects are copied to the new component.
If you toggle Delete Originals ON, the originals of any objects which were copied into the
component are deleted. The originals of any dependent objects which were copied are also
deleted. If there are any objects which depend on some object which is going to be deleted,
those dependent objects are deleted as well (even though they have not necessarily been
copied).
You may find it useful to turn Retain Annotations ON (under Preferences-> Drafting) when
using Delete Originals, so that any annotations which reference the deleted objects can be
reattached by hand to the occurrences of those deleted objects. The system creates a new
component part file containing the selected geometry and also creates a component in the
assembly work part.

CREATE NEW PARENT
You can create a new parent for your current displayed part. During the operation, an
empty assembly is created, and the current displayed part is added to it as a child. When
the operation is complete, the new parent assembly becomes the displayed and work part.
You cannot create a new parent if your current displayed part is a non-master part. Also,
new parents are always master parts. (The version of the New Part File dialog that
appears for this operation does not have the Non-Master Part option.)
If your current work part is not the displayed part, you will receive a message that the
parent will be created for the current displayed part.
The new parent inherits the last active arrangement of the part from which it was created.
Exploded views, however, are not inherited.

CREATE ARRAY
You can use the Create Array options to create and edit an associative array of components
in an assembly. You can create array components according to feature instance sets (feature
isets), or by creating a linear or circular array. Component arrays can also be created with the
Create Component Array option on the Assemblies toolbar.
Using component arrays lets you:
• Quickly create patterns of components and component mating conditions.
• Add similar components in one step.
• Create a number of similar components whose mating conditions are the same.
Feature ISET Arrays
You may create component arrays, called Feature ISET Arrays, based on feature instance
sets. There is one component for each feature in the instance set, and the components
automatically mate to the appropriate faces.
When creating a feature ISET array you must first position a component via mating
conditions, so that the component is mated to one of the features in the instance set. By
default, the first mated component is the template component. Any new components you add
share the template's attributes. (You may specify a new template at any time.)
Whenever you add a new component to the array, the component is positioned via mating
conditions. The system copies the mating conditions from the template, and applies them to
the appropriate feature. In the figure below, if Bolt (1) were the template, Bolt (2) would be
added so that the same faces on the bolt were mated, but to different faces in the component.
If you change the template's mating conditions so that new components cannot be mated
correctly, the system positions these components absolutely.
When geometry is duplicated for each feature in an instance set, each component mates
independently. When there is no duplicate, each component mates to the same geometry.
Linear
Lets you create orthogonal or non-orthogonal master component arrays. Using this option,
you can define a 1- or 2-dimensional master component array.
To create a linear master component array, you must:
• Choose a direction definition.
• Select a X direction reference.
• Select a Y direction reference (for a 2-dimensional array).
• Enter appropriate total number and offset values.
A linear component array is created by using a mating condition that translates the
components along an defined axis. You can define X and Y directions using the following
Direction definitions:

Face Normals Defines X and Y direction references with faces that are normal to the desired
placement plane.

Datum Plane Defines X and Y direction references with datum planes that are normal to the
Normals desired placement plane.

Edge Defines X and Y direction references with edges which are coplanar to the
desired placement face.

Datum Axis Defines X and Y direction references with datum axes which are coplanar to
the desired placement face.
A linear component array is defined by the following parameter values:

Total Defines the total number of instances to be generated parallel to the X direction
Number - you select. This number includes the existing feature you are instancing.
XC

Offset - XC Defines the spacing for the instances along the X direction you select. This
spacing is measured from a point on one instance to the same point on the next
instance along the X direction you select.

Total Defines the number of instances to be generated parallel to the Y direction you
Number - select. This number includes the existing feature you are instancing.
YC

Offset - YC Defines the spacing for the instances along the Y direction you select. This
spacing is measured from one instance to the next along the Y direction you
select.

Circular
Lets you create a circular array of master components from a selected template component.
You specify a rotation axis about which the components are generated. You also specify the
number of components to create in the array, and the angle at which each component is
created about the rotation axis.
To create a circular master component array you must first select the features to instance.
Then you must:
• Choose an axis definition.
• Select an axis of rotation.
• Enter appropriate total number and angle values.
A circular component array is created by using a mating condition that translates the
components about an axis. You can define an axis of rotation using the following Axis
definitions:

Cylindrical Face Defines an axis of rotation which coincides with the axis of a selected
cylindrical face.

Edge Defines an edge as the axis of rotation.

Datum Axis Defines an existing datum axis as the axis of rotation.

After specifying the rotation axis, you can specify the following options:

Total Defines the number of components to be created in the circular array, including
Number the existing feature you are instancing.

Angle Defines the angle at which each component is created about the reference
point.

Editing a Component Array
Assemblies-> Edit Component Arrays lets you change a component array in the work part.
To edit the parameters of an array, you must:
• Choose an array from the list.
• Edit the parameters you want to change.

SUBSTITUTE COMPONENT
You can remove an existing component and add another component in the exact orientation
and position as the original. You can also rename the new component if desired.
To substitute a component, select the one you wish to replace and choose Substitute
Component from the Assemblies toolbar or Assemblies-> Components-> Substitute
Component. A message named Substitute Component appears, which gives you the
following options:

Substitute Component Options

Remove and Not an associative operation. Any parents at any level that refer to the
Add substituted component will lose their associative links.

Maintain Maintains mating conditions over the substitution if you have used the
Mating alternates option to define mating condition mappings.

Cancel Cancels the substitution operation.

Common Procedures
To substitute a component:
• Select the component to be substituted.
• Select the part you wish to substitute as the new component.
• If you wish to rename the component, enter a new component name.
• Set the Ref. Set Used option to either Maintain Ref. Set or Entire Part. If you choose
Maintain Ref. Set, the system keeps the reference set the same, if the part being
substituted in has the current reference set defined. Otherwise, it brings in the entire
part.
• Designate on which layer of the work part the substitute component geometry will be
placed. To designate the work layer, choose the Work option; to designate the
original layer, choose the Original option. To designate another layer, choose the As
Specified option and enter the desired layer number in the text entry field.

REPOSITION COMPONENT
When you select one or more components and choose Assemblies-> Components->
Reposition Component, Edit-> Reposition from the Assembly Navigator popup menu, or
Reposition from the graphics window popup menu, the Reposition Component dialog and
drag handles appear. You can reposition the components either with the options on the
Reposition Component dialog, or by using the drag handles.
If you selected a single component that has at least two parental levels (i.e., the component is
part of a subassembly that is itself part of a larger assembly), the Reposition Component
dialog has two pages: Transform and Variable Positioning. The single component can be a
subassembly, as long as you do not select any of its children.
Transform Page
These options may also appear on other dialogs that use motion.

Transform Page Options

Transform Icons

Point to Point Lets you move the selected components by specifying two points.

Translate Lets you define the amount of distance that the selected components
should be moved.

Rotate About a Point Lets you rotate the components about a selected point.

Rotate About a Line Lets you rotate the components about a line by moving the drag
handle to the point that you define and aligning the drag handle to the
axis that you define.

Reposition Lets you define how the selected components should be repositioned
by moving the CSYS.

Rotate Between Axes Lets you rotate the selected components between selected axes.

Rotate Between Lets you rotate the selected components between selected points.
Points

Mating Conditions Dialog
You can create a normal mating condition in two ways:
• When adding an existing part as a component to your assembly (choose Assemblies-
> Components-> Add Existing, then choose Mate from the Positioning menu on the
Add Existing Part dialog). The part being added becomes the mated component.
• By choosing Mating Conditions (found under Assemblies-> Components-> Mate
Component), and choosing an existing component from the assembly.

SUPPRESS COMPONENT
Suppressing a component removes it and its children from the display. Suppressed
components are not deleted; they still exist in the database, but are ignored for many
assembly functions in which blanked or unloaded components would participate. Suppressed
components (and their children, which become suppressed when their parents are
suppressed) are effectively removed from the current assembly structure, with the following
results:
• Suppressed components are not shown in any view (including exploded views) or
drawing.
• You can specify whether suppressed components should be shown in the
Assemblies Navigator with the Include Suppressed Components option (available on
the Assembly Navigator toolbar or Tools-> Assembly Navigator-> Include Suppressed
Components).
• Suppressed components are not shown in dialogs (except for Suppress, Unsuppress,
and Suppress by Expression), parts lists, and reports.
• Suppressed components do not participate in weight management calculations,
clearance analyses, or clone operations.
• Suppressed components will not be loaded with their parent assemblies, but
suppressing a loaded component does not unload it.
• Mating conditions and linked geometry that depend on a suppressed component will
not be updated until the component is unsuppressed.
Suppress by Expression
To suppress a component by expression, select the component and open the Component
Properties dialog. On the Parameters page, choose the Controlled by Expression option.
UNSUPPRESS COMPONENT
Suppressing a component removes it and its children from the display.
Suppressed components are not deleted; they still exist in the database, but are
ignored for many assembly functions in which blanked or unloaded components
would participate. We can again get back these things for the suppressed
components from unsuppress component option.

DEFORM PART
You can define a part as capable of assuming more than one shape when it is added to an
assembly. This is especially useful for parts such as springs or hoses, which are often given
different positions in the same assembly.
In order to use deformable (flexible) components, two phases must be completed for each
part:
• Define Deformable Part: defines the shapes into which the component can be
deformed. You must have write access to the part file.
• Deform Part: selects one of those shapes for a particular use. You must have write
access to the assembly where the deformation occurs, but you do not need write
permission to the part itself.
Deform Part Procedures
In order to use flexible components, you must complete two phases for each part:
• Define Deformable Part: defines the shapes into which the component can be
deformed.
• Deform Part: selects one of those shapes for a particular use.
Define Deformable Part
1. Decide which components will need more than one shape.
2. If you do not own the part, decide how to save it. You must save the feature that this
operation creates with the part, or the part will not be deformable.
3. Open the Modeling application, and choose Tools-> Define Deformable Part.
4. Use the Define Deformable Part dialog to designate the components that you want to
be deformable, and to define the shapes the components can assume.
5. After you have selected the definition, features, expressions, and references that you
want to use in the deformable part, choose Finish to create the deformable feature.
6. Save the part.
Deform Part
1. Create your assembly. When you want to add a deformation, choose Assemblies->
Components-> Add Existing, and select a component that can be deformed. The
input parameter dialog for the deformable component appears after the positioning
dialog. Go to step 3.
2. You can also add a deformation to a deformable component that is already in your
assembly by selecting it and choosing the Deform Part option, which is available at:
• Assemblies-> Components-> Deform Part
• The selected component's popup menu in the graphics window
• The Edit-> Deform option on the component's popup menu in the Assembly
Navigator
In the Deform Component dialog, select the assembly level in which you want to
place the deformation. If the shape that you want to use is not defined for that level,
choose New. When you are finished, choose OK in the Deform Component dialog to
create the deformation.
3. If the deformation does not need any outside references, you can position and mate it
in the assembly as you would any other component.
4. You can also edit components after adding them to the assembly, including making
them deformable and deforming their shape.
You can use the Assembly Navigator's Shape column to check a component's
deformation status: whether it is currently deformed, whether it is capable of
deformation but has kept its default shape, or whether it is not currently deformable.
Display Mating Conditions
There are several ways to display the current mating conditions:
• Choose Assemblies-> Components-> Mate Component
The root node, mating conditions, and mating constraints appear in the tree at the top
of the Mating Conditions dialog. You may have to expand some of the nodes to see all
the mating conditions and constraints.
• Choose Information-> Assemblies-> Mating Conditions
An abbreviated version of the Mating Conditions dialog, which includes the mating
conditions tree that appears on the full Mating Conditions dialog appears.
• The Reposition Component dialog includes a list of the mating constraints for the
selected components.

REFERENCE SETS
Reference sets let you control the amount of data that is loaded from each component and
viewed in the context of an assembly. A well-managed reference set strategy can lead to:
• Faster load times
• Reduced memory usage
• Less cluttered graphics displays
A reference set is a named collection of objects that you can reference from an another part.
Using reference sets can drastically reduce, or even totally eliminate, the graphical
representation of portions of the assembly without modifying the actual assembly structure or
underlying geometric models. Any part can have many reference sets.

REPLACE REFERENCE SET
Replaces the display of a component in the graphics screen with one of its reference sets.
When you choose this option, all existing reference sets for the selected node are listed.
When you choose Replace Reference Set. Choosing a reference set replaces the
component's display with that reference set.
You can replace a reference set by choosing one of the following:
• Replace Reference Set option menu or icon from the Assemblies toolbar
• Assemblies-> Components-> Replace Reference Set
• Replace Reference Set from the graphics window popup menu
• Replace Reference Set from the Assembly Navigator popup menu
• Set as Current on the Reference Sets dialog

MATING ALTERNATES
You can substitute an old component for a new component, and the mating conditions of the
old component can be transferred to the new component. This is made possible by a form of
associative substitution called mating alternates, which maintains the component mating
conditions.
The following options are covered in this section:
Define Examines the mating conditions for a selected component, and ensure the correct
faces have been named.
Verify Loads a substituted alternate part and verify the substitution works correctly.
Associative substitution uses names to identify the parts used in the mating conditions. Each
mated face in the old component and the corresponding face in the new component must
have a name. The face names of the old component are matched to the face names of the
new alternate component. Alternates are only valid at one level of an assembly. When you
exchange one alternate component for another, you are only able to maintain the mating
conditions in the assembly face where the exchange is performed.

Define Alternates
The Assemblies-> Components-> Define Mating Alternates option lets you examine the
mating conditions for a selected component, and ensure the correct faces have been named.
You can name the faces of the original component. If you have not selected a component
when you choose this option, the Class Selection dialog appears.
When you select a component and choose Assemblies-> Components-> Define Mating
Alternates, the Define Names dialog appears. The Define Names dialog lets you attach
names to the faces of the original component. It lists the mating conditions, and prompts you
to enter the part names:

Verify Alternates
The Assemblies-> Components-> Verify Mating Alternates option applies names to faces of
alternate parts, and lets you load the substituted alternate part and verify the substitution
works correctly.
To verify a component:
1. Select the component you want to substitute.
2. Choose a new part file.
3. Select the part you are adding to the assembly. The new component is a temporary
addition that allows the component to be displayed.
4. Use the Add Component option to add the part to the assembly. The mating
conditions of the old component are analyzed and applied to the new component. A
dialog displays the status of each mating condition.
5. When the old component is highlighted, select the equivalent face on the part you are
substituting.
6. Choose OK.
When you substitute an old component for a new component, the Verify option displays the
mating condition status for the component. The mating conditions are displayed in the Match
Objects dialog, which has two list boxes. The mating conditions for the new component are
displayed in the upper list box. If the selected face does not match the old component, the
mating constraints are listed in the lower box, and you are prompted to select and rename the
appropriate face on the new component.
If the selected face does match the old component, the system will analyze the mating
conditions and display the result of attempting to solve the constraints. If the mating condition
could not be solved, you can choose Show Mating Error for a description of the mating failure.
If the mating condition fails to solve correctly, you can still perform the substitution. The
mating condition is attached to the new component, but the component is not successfully
updated with the existing constraints.

CHECK CLEARANCES
Provides a simple way to check the clearances for all selected components, if you do not wish
to run a full Clearance Analysis.
To perform a Check Clearances analysis, select the components whose clearances you want
to check, and then choose Assemblies-> Check Clearances or press the Check Clearances
icon on the Assemblies toolbar. If you choose Check Clearances when you do not have any
components selected, you will be prompted to select a component.
When the operation is complete (or interrupted), an Interference Check report appears if there
was any interference, as shown in the example below. This report lists all the hard, soft, and
touching interferences between the selected components and the rest of the assembly. Note
that each type of interference (hard, soft, and touching) is marked with an icon.
Example of a Check Clearances Report

CONTEXT CONTROL MENU
Context Control Menu Options
Find Component Lets you search for a component.
Open Components Lets you open selected components within the currently displayed
assembly, which are currently not loaded or not visible.
Isolate Components Lets you show just the selected components. All other components
are blanked.
Open by Proximity Provides options for loading components in a small region of a larger
assembly for uses such as clearance analysis.
Show Product Outline Shows or hides an outline of the overall assembly.
Save Context Saves the context of the current assembly.
Restore Context Restores the original context.
Define Product Outline Lets you define which objects should appear in a product outline.
Set Work Part Lets you define the selected component as the work part, or you can
choose this option and then select the part.
Set Displayed Part Lets you define the selected component as the displayed part, or you
can choose this option and then select the part.

Find Component
The Find Component dialog provides a central point for locating components by any global
property. Each page of the dialog, which can be reached by selecting the tabs, represents a
search method:
• By Name
• By State
• By Attribute
• From List
• By Size, based on the component's bounding box
To open the Find Component dialog, choose Assemblies-> Context Control-> Find
Component or press the Find Component button on the Assemblies toolbar.
Each time you choose Apply in the Find Component dialog, the components that match the
search criteria are added to the list that will be selected when you choose OK.

Open by Proximity
The Open by Proximity dialog simplifies the process of loading a set of components that are
located in a small region of a larger assembly. Uses for the Open by Proximity functions
include:
• When you wish to do a "lightweight" load of nearby components to understand your
design context
• When you wish to do a "solid" load of nearby components for precise solid-based
clearance analysis or to enable the creation of mating conditions or WAVE interpart
links
• When you wish to load large components in the vicinity of the work part for overview
purposes

Product Outline
Lets you define a set of geometry that gives a hint of the overall size and shape of an
assembly without having to load components. When you are working on components that
form a part of a much larger assembly, such as an engine block or aircraft, defining an outline
gives you a rapid feel for the location of objects with minimal effort. This can be particularly
useful when there is a problem with a component that is not familiar to you. You can set
several display properties for the product outline's geometry, such as color, line font, and
translucency. This helps you distinguish the outline from the real geometry.

Define Product Outline
When you choose the Define Product Outline option, the Product Outlines dialog appears,
with the options that are described in the table below:

Show Product Outline
Shows the currently defined product outline. If you choose the Show Product Outline option
when there are no existing product outlines, you will receive a message that gives you the
option of opening this dialog.
The Show Product Outline option exists in two forms: as a menu option (Assemblies->
Context Control-> Show Product Outline) and as an Assemblies toolbar icon, as shown
below.

Set Work Part
Set Work Part lets you select the part in which to create geometry. This option is helpful when
you want to design in context.
You can specify a new work part in any of the following ways:
• Choose Assemblies-> Context Control-> Set Work Part to make the currently
displayed part the work part.
• Select the component and choose Make Work Part from the graphics window popup
menu or the Assemblies toolbar.
• Use the Make Work Part option on the popup menu in the Assembly Navigator.
• Double click on the component in the Assembly Navigator.
Make Work Part
Selects the part in which to create geometry, giving you the ability to design in context. If the
assembly contains multiple occurrences of a component, you can use this option to select
which specific occurrence of the component to make the work part. The Assembly Navigator
grays out non-work components.

Cloning of Assemblies
Cloning provides a flexible, top-down interface for modifying the components referenced in an
assembly. The cloning options are:
Create Clone Assembly Creates a new cloned assembly from an existing assembly.
Edit Existing Assembly Modifies an existing cloned assembly.
Cloning is useful when you want to create, in a single operation, a new assembly or set of
related assemblies (such as WAVE control and product assemblies) that shares similar
assembly structure and associativities with an existing assembly or set of assemblies, but that
has some different component references. You could, for example, create several versions of
an assembly with a core set of common components, but with other components modified or
replaced.

EXPLODED VIEWS
In an exploded view, specified parts or subassemblies have been displaced from their real
(model) positions, as shown in the figure below.
Exploded assembly
Create Explosion Procedure
To create a new explosion:
1. Choose the Create Explosion option from the Exploded Views cascade menu or
toolbar.
2. Enter a new explosion name or accept the default name. Duplicate names not
allowed.
3. Choose the Edit Explosion option to bring up the Edit Explosion dialog.
4. Make sure that the Selection radio button is active, and select the components that
you want to explode.
5. (Optional) If you want to move the drag handles into a different position before
moving the components, either:
 Choose the Snap Handles to WCS option, or
 Activate the Move Handles Only radio button and drag the handles into
position. You can also use the Edit Explosion options to move handles.
6. Activate the Move Objects radio button.
7. There are three methods for moving the components into their exploded positions:
 Immediately drag the selected components by holding down MB1
while moving the cursor. You do not need to change any of the options on the
Edit Explosion dialog.
 Use the options on the Edit Explosion dialog to define the exploded
positions of the selected components (without dragging). You may need to
choose OK or Apply to move the components into position.
 If you select a translation or rotation drag handle, you can further limit
how the selected components should be dragged by using the options on the
Edit Explosion dialog, and then drag the components into their exploded
positions.
8. When you are finished exploding the selected components, you can press MB2 to
switch back to the Selection mode. You can now add or remove components from the
group, and explode the new selection.
9. (Optional) You can select one or more exploded components and choose the
Unexplode option to move them back to their unexploded positions.
Explosion Menu Options
The Assemblies-> Exploded Views cascade menu gives you options for creating and editing
exploded views. These options are also available on the Exploded Views toolbar.

Exploded Views Cascade Menu Options

Create Explosion Lets you name and create a new exploded view that has no parameters.
You can then edit this new view until its appearance and parameters are
what you want.

Edit Explosion Lets you explode selected components in a newly-created view, or edit an
existing explosion.

Auto-explode Automatically explodes selected components based on their mating
Components conditions.

Unexplode Unexplodes an exploded component.
Component

Delete Explosion Deletes an existing exploded view.

Hide Explosion Removes an exploded work or selected view, and grays any dimensions
which are attached to the wrong assembly representation.

Show Explosion Shows an exploded view of the selected work view or, if more than one
exploded view exists, you are prompted to specify a work view.

Hide Component Hides a component in any view, exploded or not.

Show Component Shows a hidden component. If there are no hidden components, you will
receive a message.
Create Tracelines Launches the tracelines tool, which lets you create tracelines in an
exploded view, which defines the paths that components follow when they
are exploded in that view

Show Toolbar Controls the visibility of the Exploded Views toolbar.

Create Explosion
Creates a new exploded view, whose parameters you can then edit to produce the explosion
that you want. If the view already has an exploded view, you can create a new explosion
using the existing explosion as a starting place. This is useful for defining a series of exploded
views showing a different component being moved.

Edit Explosion
Lets you move selected components into the positions that you want them to have in a new or
existing exploded view. The Edit Explosion option brings up the Edit Explosion dialog. After
selecting components, you can either drag them or use the options on the Edit Explosion
dialog to define their positions in the exploded view.
Edit Explosion Procedure
To edit an existing explosion:
1. Choose the explosion that you want to edit from the Work View Explosion option on
the Exploded Views toolbar.
2. Choose the Edit Explosion option to bring up the Edit Explosion dialog.
3. Make sure that the Selection radio button is active, and select the components that
you want to explode.
4. (Optional) If you want to move the drag handles into a different position before
moving the components, either:
• Choose the Snap Handles to WCS option, or
• Activate the Move Handles Only radio button and drag the handles into
position. You can also use the Edit Explosion options to move the handles.
5. Activate the Move Objects radio button.
6. There are three methods for moving the components into their exploded positions:
7. When you are finished exploding the selected components, you can press MB2 to
switch back to the Selection mode. You can now add or remove components from the
group, and explode the new selection.
8. (Optional) You can select one or more exploded components and choose the
Unexplode option to move them back to their unexploded positions.

Auto-explode Components
Creates an exploded view automatically by allowing you to specify an explosion offset.
Each selected component is exploded along a normal vector based on the components
mating conditions and a magnitude taken from a chosen combination of a user expression
and a clearance value derived from the bounding box of the component in the view. Using
Add Clearance, you can control whether or not a clearance offset is automatically generated

This option may not produce a perfect exploded view the first time; it is intended to give you a
good start towards a perfect explosion. After using Auto-Explode Components, you can follow
up and refine your explosion by choosing Edit Explosion and editing the parameters with the
Explode Component dialog.

Unexplode Component
Unexplodes one or more selected components (i.e., moves them back to their original places
in the assembly).
Procedure
To unexplode a component of an existing exploded view:
• Select components to unexplode.
• Choose Unexplode Component.
Delete Explosion
Deletes an existing exploded view. If more than one explosion exists, the Exploded Views
dialog, which contains a list of all exploded views, appears. If one or more selected
explosions are associated with any other view, a warning is displayed, listing these explosions
and indicating that the associated view must be deleted first.

Procedure
To delete an explosion:
• Choose Delete Explosion.
• If the Exploded Views dialog appears, select the name of the exploded view and
choose OK.

Hide Explosion
Removes an exploded work or selected view, and grays any dimensions which are attached
to the wrong assembly representation. If you do not have Use Work View selected, you are
prompted to choose which view you want to hide.
Procedure
To hide an exploded work or selected view:
• Choose Hide Explosion.
• If a drawing is displayed, you are prompted to select a drawing view.
• If you are using a modeling layout and you have Use Work View unselected, select a
view containing an explosion.

Show Explosion
Shows an exploded view of the selected work view or, if more than one exploded view exists,
you are prompted to specify a work view. This option does not appear on the Exploded Views
toolbar. Show Explosion regenerates all instances of the selected view in the current layout or
drawing. An exploded view must already exist.
Procedure
To show a hidden exploded view, choose Show Explosion and select the appropriate
exploded view.

Hide Component
Hides a component in any view, exploded or not. Hide Component is like moving the
component to a special layer and making that layer invisible in the view.
Procedure
To hide a component in a particular view:
• Select components to hide.
• Choose the Hide Component option from the Exploded Views cascade menu or
toolbar.

Show Component
Shows selected hidden components. If there are no hidden components, a message appears.
Procedure
To show a hidden component:
• Select a hidden component in the Assembly Navigator.
• Choose the Show Component option from the Exploded Views cascade menu or
toolbar.
If you choose Show Component before you select a hidden component, a list with hidden
components appears. Select a component from this list.

Create Tracelines
The Create Tracelines dialog appears when you click the Create Tracelines icon on
the Exploded Views toolbar or choose Assemblies→ Components→ Exploded Views→
Create Tracelines.
Create Tracelines Dialog Options

Selection Steps

Start Point When this selection step is active, select geometry in the component where you
want the traceline to start.
End Point
When the End Point selection step is active, select geometry in the component
where you want the traceline to end.
If it is difficult to select the ending geometry, you can instead set this selection
Component
step to Component and then select the component where the traceline should
end.

Tracelines Procedure
To create a traceline:
1. Open or create an exploded view.

2. Choose (Create Tracelines) to open the Create Tracelines dialog.

3. Select the Start Point ( ) of the traceline.

4. Select the End Point ( ) of the traceline.
If the geometry of the end component is not suitable for defining a point, you can
select the component itself. Set this selection step to Component and select the
component where the traceline should end. This option determines the position of
the end point by using the unexploded positions of the components.

5. Choose Alternate Solution to cycle through possibilities for the
traceline. You can also select any of the segment drag handles (the small green
arrows in the traceline segments) and drag them until the traceline is the shape
that you want.
6. (Optional) If you do not like any of the alternate solutions, you can select
and drag segments of the traceline until the traceline is the shape that you want.
7. You could also change the shape of the traceline by selecting the vector at
either end of the traceline and clicking MB3 to see options for editing that vector.
8. Choose OK or Apply to create the vector.

Show Toolbar
Controls the visibility of the exploded views toolbar.

ASSEMBLY SEQUENCING
The Assembly Sequencing functions let you control the order in which an assembly is
assembled and disassembled. You can model and play back sequence information.

Sequences Cascade Options
Operations Cascade Options
Create Sequence Creates a new assembly sequence
Sequence Lets you view or edit properties of sequences. This option brings up the
Properties Sequence Properties dialog.
Add Assemble Step Creates an assemble step in the active sequence for the selected
component.
Add Disassemble Creates a disassemble step for the selected component.
Step
Step Properties Lets you view or edit properties of the steps within sequences. This
option brings up the Step Properties dialog.
Make Current Step The sequence of the selected step becomes the active sequence.
Delete Deletes the selected item. This option does not place it on the clipboard.
Navigator Cascade Options
Find in Lets you find a specified component in the Sequence Navigator.
Sequence
Show All When this toggle is ON, the Sequence Navigator shows all sequences. When
Sequences the toggle is OFF, only the active sequence appears in the Sequence
Navigator.
Playback Cascade Options
Rewind to First Goes immediately to the first step in the sequence.
Step Reverse Moves back one step.
Reverse Play Runs through the active sequence in reverse order.
Play Runs through the active sequence in the forward direction.
Step Forward Plays the next forward step.
Forward to Last Goes immediately to the last step in the sequence.
Stop Stops the playback.

Create Assembly Sequence Procedure
To create an assembly sequence:
1. Make sure that Sequencing is ON. You can toggle it ON (or OFF) with Assemblies->
Sequences-> Sequencing, or with the Assembly Sequences icon on Assemblies
toolbar.
2. Make sure that the Sequence Navigator is ON.
3. Choose Create Sequence from the Assembly Sequencing toolbar, the Assemblies->
Sequences menu, or from the Sequences node popup menu in the Sequence
Navigator.
4. Move any components that you will not use in this sequence from the unprocessed
folder to the Ignored folder with the Ignore popup option or by dragging them.
5. Move any components that will be assembled before this sequence to the Pre
assembled folder by dragging them or by using the Preassemble popup option.
6. Each sequence step can consist of a single component, a subgroup, or a camera
step.
7. Assemble the remaining components or subgroups that you want to assemble into
step nodes by using the popup menu options, the toolbar commands, the cascade
menu options, or by dragging.
8. If you want to disassemble any of the components at any point in the sequence,
select the component and choose Add Disassemble Step from the toolbar.
If you want to disassemble a subgroup, select it and choose Disassemble as Group
from the toolbar or the cascade menu.
1. Select the components or subgroups in the graphics window if they are not in one of
the Sequence Navigator folders.
2. You can add information such as Description, Time, or Cost to a step node with the
Step Properties dialog.
3. Modify the sequence as you wish by choosing commands from the toolbar or the
Sequence Navigator popup menus, or by dragging the steps.
4. You can modify the columns in the Sequence Navigator.
5. If you want to create another sequence, choose Create Sequence again. You can
make all existing sequences appear in Sequence Navigator by choosing Show All
Sequences.

Playback Assembly Sequence Procedure
You can check the validity of the sequence by playing it back (using the options on the
Assembly Sequencing toolbar or the Assemblies-> Sequences-> Playback cascade menu):
• Choose Rewind to First if you want to play the sequence from the first step, or choose
Forward to Last if you want to play the assembly sequence backwards from its last
step.
• If you want a continuous playback, set Playback Speed, and then Choose Play,
Choose Stop to stop the continuous playback at any point while it is running.
• If you want to manually step through the sequence, choose Step Forward or Step
Reverse to move through the sequence one step at a time.
During playback, components are added or removed from the sequencing view in the
graphics window. Also, the Sequence Navigator marks the current and completed steps with
icons.

Assembly Sequencing Notes
Sequences only create references to existing components in an assembly. You cannot create
new components or add components from outside the assembly with the sequencing
functions. Changes that you make to the assembly, however, are reflected in the sequence,
including:
• When a component is added to an assembly, it appears in the sequence in the
Unprocessed folder.
• When the component used for a sequence step is removed from the assembly, the
corresponding step is deleted from the sequence.
• An associative substitution does not cause any change in a sequence. However, a
non-associative substitution causes the sequence step to be deleted. In this case, the
component is added to the Unprocessed folder.
You can use component attributes to provide a default time and cost for a selected
component. To create time and cost with attributes:
1. Select the component.
2. Open the Component Properties dialog.
3. Choose the Attributes tab.
4. For a default time, enter SEQUENCE_DEFAULT_TIME in the Title field, and enter
the value for the default time in the Value field.
5. For a default cost, enter SEQUENCE_DEFAULT_COST in the Title field, and enter
the value for the default cost in the Value field.
6. Choose OK in the Component Properties dialog.
Questions Pg.No.259
1. What are the types of assemblies?
2. Is it possible to edit a part in assembly mode?
3. What is the different positioning used in bottom up assembly?
4. Is it possible to reposition a component if it is fully constrained?
5. What is the difference between center and align?
6. What is the function of product outline?
7. How many degrees of freedom exist?
8. As a best practice in how many mating conditions all the degrees of freedom is
constrained?
9. How many layers are there in UG?
10. Is it possible to array a part that is fully constrained?
11. What is the function of Wave Geometry Linker?
12. How to check the interference in the assembly?
13. What are the different types of Explosion?
14. Before deleting the Explosion what you have to do?
15. What are Trace lines?
16. Is it possible to hide a single component in Exploded View?
17. Why we are going for Sequencing?
18. What is the difference between assembly and assembly together in Sequencing?
19. What is Replace Reference Set?
How to verify the mating conditions in the assembly navigator?

DRAFTING

Introduction to Drafting
The Drafting application is designed to allow you to create and maintain a variety of drawings
made from models generated from within the Modeling application. Drawings created in the
Drafting application are fully associative to the model. Any changes made to the model are
automatically reflected in the drawing. This associativity allows you to make as many model
changes as you wish. Besides the powerful associativity functionality, Drafting contains many
other useful features including the following:
• An intuitive, easy to use, graphical user interface. This allows you to create drawings
quickly and easily.
• A drawing board paradigm in which you work "on a drawing." This approach is similar
to the way a drafter would work on a drawing board. This method greatly increases
productivity.
• Support of new assembly architecture and concurrent engineering. This allows the
drafter to make drawings at the same time as the designer works on the model.
• The capability to create fully associative cross-sectional views with automatic hidden
line rendering and crosshatching.
• Automatic orthographic view alignment. This allows you to quickly place views on a
drawing, without having to consider their alignment.
• Automatic hidden line rendering of drawing views.
• The ability to edit most drafting objects (e.g., dimensions, symbols, etc.) from the
graphics window. This allows you to create drafting objects and make changes to
them immediately.
• On-screen feedback during the drafting process to reduce rework and editing.
• User controls for drawing updates, which enhance user productivity.
Drawing Navigator Overview
The Drawing Navigator provides a visual display of a part's drawing sheets, member views,
section lines, and tables in a hierarchical tree structure. You can manipulate drawings, views
on drawings, and open dialogs for changing drawings with MB3 options (see the options link
above).
Double-click a sheet to open a drawing.
Double-click a view to start the View Style dialog for editing.
You can select and drag a view from one sheet to another.

Drawing Options
Drawing MB3 Options
Grid Toggles the grid on or off.
Monochrome Toggles monochrome on or off.
Update Updates all views on all drawing sheets.
Insert Sheet Starts the New Drawing Sheet dialog.
Collapse Collapses the nodes tree.
Expand Expands the nodes tree.
Filter Provides the following options for filtering a nodes display:
• Remove Item
• Remove All But Item

Sheet Options
Sheet MB3 Options
Open Displays and activates an existing drawing sheet so that the sheet can
accept the placement of new views and annotations
Update Updates only out-of-date views.
View Dependent Starts the View Dependent Edit dialog.
Edit
Creates a base view.
Add Base View

Creates a drawing view. This view type contains no modeling geometry.
Add drawing view

Adds views from other parts or components.
Add view from
part
Edit Sheet Starts the Edit Drawing Sheet dialog.
Copy Lets you copy a sheet.
Paste Lets you paste a sheet.
Delete Removes a drawing sheet.
Rename Lets you change the drawing sheet name.
Properties Starts the Drawing Properties dialog.

View Options
View MB3 Options
Style Starts the View Style dialog.
Add Projected View Lets you create a projected view.
Add Detail View Lets you create a detail view.
Add Section View Lets you create a section view.
Add Half Section View Lets you create a half section view.
Add Revolved Section Lets you create a revolved section view.
View
Update Updates a view.
View Dependent Edit Starts the View Dependent Edit dialog.
Cut Stores a view in a buffer so you can paste it onto a drawing sheet.
Copy Lets you copy a view.
Paste Lets you paste a view.
Delete Removes a view.
Rename Lets you rename a view.
Expand Member View Toggles between expanded view and regular view.
Properties Starts the Properties dialog.

Section Line Options
Section Line MB3 Options
Style Starts the Section Line Style dialog.
Edit Starts the section line on-screen options.
Blank/Unblank Blanks or unblanks the section line.
Navigate to Section View Finds and zooms in on the section view.
Properties Starts the properties dialog.

Parts List Options
Parts List MB3 Options
Edit Levels Lets you select or deselect a component's solids, curves, or views to add
or remove from the parts list using toggle options.
Style Starts the Annotation Style dialog and provides the following property
pages:
• Parts List
• Sections
Export Exports a table to an external file or browser.
Update Parts List Forces the parts list to update.
Autoballoon Automatically creates ID symbol callouts for views associated to parts list.
Blank/Unblank Blanks or unblanks the parts list.
Cut Removes the parts list and adds it to the clipboard
Delete Removes the parts list.
Paste Pastes data from the clipboard.
Rename Modifies the parts list name.

Parts List Section Options
Parts List Section MB3 Options
Origin Lets you establish an associative relationship between views, geometry, tables
and other annotations to define the location of an annotation on the drawing.
Edit Levels Lets you select or deselect a component's solids, curves, or views to add or
remove from the parts list using toggle options.
Style Starts the Annotation Style dialog and provides the following property pages:
• Parts List
• Sections
Cell Style Starts the Annotation Style dialog and provides the following property pages:
• Lettering
• Cells
• Fit Methods
Sort Lets you sort a table by column value.
Export Exports a table to an external file or browser.

Update Forces the parts list to update.
Parts List
Autoballoon Automatically creates ID symbol callouts for view(s) associated to a parts list.
Blank Blanks the parts list.
Cut Removes the section and places it on the clipboard
Copy Places table section on the clipboard
Paste Pastes table section data from the clipboard
Delete Removes the parts list.
Edit Display Lets you edit the display properties of a parts list with the Edit Object Display
dialog. See Gateway Help for a description of this dialog.
Properties Lets you set attributes for the parts list with the properties dialog.

Drafting Environment Overview
The Drafting environment is an NX application that provides easy to use user interface
elements that allow you to produce industry standard engineering drawings directly from 3-D
Modeling or Assembly parts. You can also produce drawings from 2-D parts. The
drawings are associative to the model. Therefore, the drawing reflects changes in the model
as the design stages progress -- allowing you to keep drawings up-to-date with the assembly
model or individual modeling piece parts. The Drafting environment includes but is not limited
to the following:
• MB3 options for many drafting functions let you access options that are specific to a
particular drafting object (for example, dimension options). MB3 options also let you
edit a drafting object's parameters with MB3-> Style or Edit-> Style.
• You can easily drag and place annotations, edit annotation values, and delete
drafting objects.
• Helper lines (dotted lines) visually assist you in aligning annotations and drawing
views.
• You can select member views directly on a drawing and move and align a view.
• Drafting options are accessible from Edit and Insert Menus, toolbars, and Resource
tabs.
• You can drag and drop template files from Resource bar options to automatically
create parts lists, tabular notes, and drawings.
• The Drawing node, included in the Part Navigator, provides quick access to drawings
in the current part.
Drafting User Interface Elements
Option Bars Option bars display on the graphics window after you make a selection
from a Drafting toolbar or menu. These on-screen options allow you to
maintain focus on the graphics window and execute common
operations. For example, during dimension creation you can change
nominal precision, tolerance type, tolerance precision, and tolerance
values by interaction with options on the Dimension bar.
Dynamic Input Boxes Dynamic input boxes are text entry areas that let you specify values for
a parameter.
Snap Point Toolbar Lets you specify point methods to use when creating or editing drafting
objects.
Drafting Toggles Lets you show or hide NX toolbars.
Toolbar
Drawing Layout Provides options for drawings and views.
Toolbar
Drafting Annotation Provides annotation options.
Toolbar
Dimension Toolbar Provides dimension options.
Annotation This toolbar assists you with the creation and placement of leaders and
Placement Toolbar an object's origin.
Drafting Preferences Provides preferences for drafting.
Drafting Tables Provides options for tabular notes and parts lists tables.
Drafting Toggles Let's you choose which toolbars to display.
Drafting Edit Toolbar Provides options for editing drafting objects.

DIMENSION
Dimension Toolbar Overview

Dimension Toolbar
The Dimension Toolbar provides options for creating dimension types. The toolbar can be
customized so options for all dimensions are available as icons. However, you can also
customize the toolbar, as shown above, with pull-down menus for drafting dimension types
and Chain/Baseline dimension types which significantly reduces the size of the toolbar.

Dimension Types Overview
The dimension types, available on the Dimension Toolbar or from the Insert->Dimension pull-
down menu, allow you to create or edit various dimension types as well as set local
preferences. To create a particular dimension type, choose the appropriate option button.
Each option is discussed below in the Dimension Types table.
Dimension Types
Inferred
Lets you create dimensions using the systems capability to intelligently
infer a dimension type based on the object(s) you select and the cursor
location.
Horizontal
Creates a horizontal dimension between two selected points.
Vertical
Creates a vertical dimension between two selected points.
Parallel
Creates parallel dimensions between two selected points.
Perpendicular
Creates a perpendicular dimension between a line or centerline, and a
defined point.
Angular
Creates an angular dimension, which defines in degrees the angle
between two non-parallel lines.
Cylindrical
Creates a cylindrical dimension, which is the linear distance between two
objects or point positions.
Hole
Lets you create diameter dimension of any circular feature with a single
leader.
Diameter
Dimensions the diameter of a circle or arc.
Chamfer
Creates a chamfer dimension.
Radius
Creates a radius dimension that uses a short arrow from the dimension
value to the arc.
Radius to
Center Creates a radius dimension that draws an extension line from the center
of the arc.
Folded Radius
Creates a radius dimension for an extremely large radius arc-one whose
center lies off the drawing area.
Thickness
Creates a thickness dimension which measures the distance between
two arcs or two splines.
Arc Length
Creates an arc length dimension, which measures the distance around
the perimeter of an arc.
Ordinate
Dimension Contains options that allow you to create ordinate dimensions.
Horizontal
Chain Lets you create a set of horizontal dimensions where each dimension
shares its end point with an adjacent dimension.
Vertical Chain
Lets you create a set of vertical dimensions where each dimension
shares its end point with an adjacent dimension.
Horizontal
Baseline Lets you create a set of horizontal dimensions where each dimension
shares a common baseline.
Vertical
Baseline Lets you create a set of vertical dimensions where each dimension
chares a common baseline.

Horizontal
This option allows you to create a horizontal dimension between two selected points. You
use the Point Position options (e.g., control point, intersection point, arc center, etc.) to help
select the points you want to dimension to. If a single object such as a line is dimensioned, it
must be selected at opposite ends.
To create a Horizontal dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Horizontal icon from the Dimension toolbar or
choose Insert-> Dimension-> Horizontal.
2. Select a horizontal edge.
3. Drag dimension to desired location.
4. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Vertical
This option allows you to create a vertical dimension between two selected points. You use
the Point Position options (e.g., control point, intersection point, arc center, etc.) to help
select the points you want to dimension to (e.g. control point, intersection point, arc center,
etc.). If a single object such as a line is dimensioned, it must be selected at opposite ends.
To create a Vertical dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Vertical dimension icon from the Dimension
toolbar or choose Insert-> Dimension-> Vertical.
2. Select the first arc center point.
3. Select the second arc center point.
4. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
5. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Parallel
This option allows you to create parallel dimensions between two selected points. You use
the Point Position options (e.g., control point, intersection point, arc center, etc.) to help
select the points you want to dimension to.
To create a Parallel dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Parallel icon from the Dimension toolbar or
choose Insert-> Dimension-> Parallel.
2. Select the first tangent point. You can set the Snap Point toolbar to tangent point only
for easier selection.
3. Select the second tangent point.
4. While in rubber band mode, click MB3->Appended Text-> Below. Results: a dynamic
input box displays.
5. Enter 2PLS, then press the ENTER key.
6. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
7. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Perpendicular
This option allows you to create a perpendicular dimension between a base line and a
defined point. The base line can be an existing line, linear centerline, symmetrical line, or
cylindrical centerline. The dimension is created perpendicular to the selected line. The
following figure shows a perpendicular dimension measured between the angled edge at the
back right of the part and the intersection point defined by the witness lines.
To create a Perpendicular dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Perpendicular icon from the Dimension toolbar
or choose Insert-> Dimension-> Perpendicular.
2. Select a line.
3. Select a point.
4. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
5. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Angular
This option allows you to create an angular dimension, which defines in degrees the angle
between two non-parallel lines (a base line and a second line). Both major and minor angular
dimensions can be created.
Creating an Angular Dimension
With no objects selected, choose the Angular icon from the Dimension toolbar or choose
Insert-> Dimension-> Angular.
1. Choose the Line option.
2. Select the first line or edge.
3. Select the second line or edge.
4. If desired click the Alternate Angle option.
5. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
6. Click MB1 to place the dimension.
Cylindrical
This option allows you to create a cylindrical dimension, which is the linear distance between
two objects or point positions. It enables you to dimension the profile view of a cylinder. A
diameter symbol is automatically appended to the dimension. The position of the diameter
symbol relative to the dimension text and the symbol used to represent the diameter are
controlled through Preferences-> Annotation-> Radial.
To create a cylindrical dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Cylindrical icon from the Dimension toolbar or
choose Insert-> Dimension-> Cylindrical.
2. Select a cylindrical face (you may have to zoom in to select the face).
3. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
4. Click MB1 to place the dimension

Hole
This option allows you to dimension with a single leader the diameter of any circular feature.
When the dimension is created a diameter symbol is included in the dimension text. The
diameter symbol can be changed to another symbol using Preferences->Annotation->Radial.
To create a Hole dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Hole icon from the Dimension toolbar or choose
Insert-> Dimension-> Hole.
2. Select the hole.
3. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
4. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Diameter
This option allows you to dimension the diameter of a circle or arc. The created dimension
has two arrows that point to the opposite sides of the circle or arc. Depending on the current
placement setting in the dimensions dialog, arrows are placed either on the inside or the
outside of the circle or arc.
To create a Diameter dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Diameter icon from the Dimension toolbar or
choose Insert-> Dimension-> Diameter.
2. Select the diameter.
3. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
4. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Chamfer
The chamfer dimension type displays the chamfer dimension size. This option only supports
45 degree angle chamfers.
To create a Chamfer dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Chamfer icon from the Dimension toolbar or
choose Insert-> Dimension-> Chamfer.
2. Select the chamfer edge to dimension with MB1.
3. Drag the chamfer dimension to the desired location.
4. (Optional) If desired, click MB3 to edit the dimension before placing it.
5. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Radius
This option allows you to create a radius dimension that uses a short arrow from the
dimension value to the arc. A radius symbol is automatically appended to the dimension text.
The symbol used and its placement with respect to the dimension is controlled in
Preferences-> Annotation-> Radial.
To create a Radius dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Radius dimension icon from the Dimension
toolbar or choose Insert-> Dimension-> Radius.
2. Select an arc.
3. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
4. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Radius to Center
This option allows you to create a radius dimension that draws an extension line from the
center of the arc. A radius symbol is automatically appended to the dimension text. The
symbol used and its placement with respect to the dimension is controlled in Preferences-
>Annotation->Radial.
To create a Radius to Center dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Radius to Center dimension icon from the
Dimension toolbar or choose Insert-> Dimension-> Radius to Center.
2. Select an arc.
3. Drag dimension to desired location.
4. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Folded Radius
This option allows you to create a radius dimension for an extremely large radius arc-one
whose center lies off the drawing area. It is assumed that the center of this radius lies off the
drawing (thus requiring a foreshortened or folded radius display).
To create a Folded Radius dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Folded Radius icon from the Dimension toolbar
or choose Insert-> Dimension-> Folded Radius.
2. Select the radius.
3. Select the target center radius point.
4. Select the desired location of the folded radius.
5. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
6. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Thickness
You can create a thickness dimension between two curves (including splines). The
thickness dimension measures the distance between a point on the first curve and the
intersection point on the second curve in the normal direction from the point specified on
the first curve.
1. With no objects selected, click thickness on the dimension toolbar or choose
Insert→ dimension→ thickness.
2. Select the first curve.
3. Select the second curve.
4. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
5. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Arc Length
This option allows you to create an arc length dimension which measures the distance
around the perimeter
To create an Arc Length dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Arc Length icon from the Dimension toolbar or
choose Insert-> Dimension-> Arc Length.
2. Select the arc to dimension.
3. To set precision, tolerances, or appended text, click MB3 while rubber banding and
select the appropriate option. See the Options hyperlink at the top of the page.
4. Drag the dimension to the desired location.
5. Click MB1 to place the dimension.

Ordinate Dimensions
Ordinate Dimensions are dimensions that describe horizontal and vertical distances from a
single base position or datum origin. This type of dimensioning is an alternate method used in
place of conventional dimensioning.
The format for ordinate dimensions differs from that of conventional dimensions. Conventional
dimensions show horizontal or vertical separation between two objects and consist of a
dimension placed between two arrows pointing to the dimensioned objects. Ordinate
dimensions, however, consist of dimension text and a single extension line.

Creating an Ordinate Dimension
To create a datum origin using No Origin Text:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Ordinate Dimension icon from the Dimension
toolbar or choose Insert-> Ordinate Dimension.
2. Specify an ordinate set name in the Ordinate Set Name field.
3. Choose Select No Origin Text for the origin display method.
4. Indicate a datum origin location. Use the Point position options.
5. Choose OK.
6. Select both vertical and horizontal margins.
7. Choose the Horizontal and Vertical icon for the dimension type.
8. Choose the Arc Center option.
9. Select all arcs to dimension. Results: as you select arcs, the dimensions display.
10. Cancel the Ordinate Dimensions dialog.

Horizontal Chain
This option lets you create multiple horizontal dimensions that are placed end to end.
Dimensions are successively continued from the extension line of the previous dimension
and form a set of chained dimensions. Use the Remove Last option to remove the last
dimension added if necessary.
To create a Horizontal Chain dimension:
1. With no objects selected, choose the Horizontal Chain icon from the Dimension
toolbar or choose Insert-> Dimension-> Horizontal Chain.
2. Enter a value in the Offset text box if you desire a vertical offset for each succeeding
dimension.
3. Select the first end point.
4. Select succeeding end points until all end points are selected.
5. Drag the chain dimensions to the desired location.
6. Click MB1 to place the horizontal chain dimension.

Vertical Chain
This option lets you create multiple vertical dimensions that are placed end to end.
Dimensions are successively continued from the extension line of the previous dimension
and form a set of chained dimensions. Use the Remove Last option to remove the last
dimension added if necessary.
To create a vertical chain dimension:
1. From the Drafting Application, choose the Vertical Chain icon or choose Insert-
>Dimension->Vertical Chain.
2. Enter a value in the Offset text box if you desire a horizontal offset for each
succeeding dimension.
3. Select the first end point.
4. Select succeeding end points until all end points are selected.
5. Drag the chain dimensions to the desired location of placement.
6. Click MB1 to place the vertical chain dimension.

Horizontal Baseline
This option lets you create a series of associative horizontal dimensions measured from a
common baseline. Each successive dimension is vertically offset to prevent overlaying the
previous dimension. The first object selected defines the common baseline. Use the Remove
Last option to remove the last dimension added if necessary.
To create a horizontal baseline dimension:
1. From the Drafting Application, choose the Horizontal Baseline icon or choose Insert-
>Dimension->Horizontal Baseline.
2. Enter a value in the Offset text box if you desire a vertical offset different from the
default value.
3. Select the first end point. The first object you select is the common baseline.
4. Select succeeding end points until all end points are selected.
5. Toggle the Reverse Offset button if necessary.
6. Drag the baseline dimensions to the desired location of placement.
7. Click MB1 to place the horizontal baseline dimension.

Vertical Baseline
This option lets you create a series of associative vertical dimensions measured from a
common baseline. Each successive dimension is horizontally offset to prevent overlaying the
previous dimension. The first object selected sets the common baseline. Use the Remove
Last option to remove the last dimension added if necessary.
To create a vertical baseline dimension:
1. From the Drafting Application, choose the Vertical Baseline icon or choose Insert-
>Dimension->Vertical Baseline.
2. Enter a value in the Offset text box if you desire an offset different from the default.
3. Select the first end point. The object you select sets the common baseline.
4. Select succeeding end points until all end points are selected.
5. Drag the baseline dimension to the desired location of placement.
6. Click MB1 to place the baseline dimension.

ANNOTATION
Annotation Toolbar Overview

Annotation Toolbar
The Annotation Toolbar provides options that let you add/edit symbols, text, crosshatching,
and automatically inherit feature and sketch dimensions, and gdt display instances onto your
drawings. There are also options for adding raster images and customer defined symbols.

Drafting Annotation Toolbar Options
Annotation Toolbar Options
Opens the GDT Parameters dialog to let you automatically inherit
GDT geometric display instances onto a drawing.
Parameters
Opens the Feature Parameters dialog to let you automatically inherit
Feature hole and thread parameters or sketch dimensions onto a drawing.
Parameters
Opens the Annotation Editor onscreen options and mini-text editor to let
Annotation you create and edit notes and labels.
Editor
Opens the Tabular Label dialog to let you create tabular labels.
Tabular Label
Opens the Annotation Editor dialog with the GD&T symbols tab open to
GDT Symbol let you create (with or without label) and edit GD&T symbols.
Opens the Utility Symbols dialog to let you create and edit utility
Utlility Symbol symbols.
Opens the ID Symbols dialog to let you create and edit ID symbols.
ID Symbol
Opens the Symbol Library dialog to let you create or edit a symbol
Custom instance from the symbol library.
Symbol
Opens the User Defined Symbols dialog to let you place symbols on
User-Defined your drawing.
Symbol
Opens the Open Image file selection dialog box to let you select a JPG
Image or PNG raster image to place on your drawing.
Opens the Weld Symbol dialog to let you create and edit weld symbols
Weld Symbol on your drawing.
Opens the Crosshatching dialog to let you specify a crosshatch or area
Crosshatching fill within a user-defined boundary.

GDT Parameters Overview
GDT Parameters allows you to automatically inherit geometric tolerance display instances
into drawing member views. Geometric tolerancing features cannot be inherited onto a
Broken view. Choose Insert-> GDT Parameters or choose the GDT Parameters icon from the
Annotation toolbar to choose this option.
Inheriting GDT Parameters
To inherit GDT Parameters onto a Drawing view, use either one of the following methods:
Select individual tolerance feature instances
1. Choose Insert-> GDT Parameters or choose the GDT Parameters icon from the
Annotation toolbar. A GDT Parameters dialog displays, allowing you to choose the
tolerance feature(s) to inherit.
2. Choose the desired tolerance feature(s) to inherit.
3. Choose the Select Member View option and select the member view(s) you wish the
tolerance feature(s) to be inherited to. Views can be selected from the view list, or
from the graphics screen. If you make a mistake selecting views, you can choose the
Reset button and start again.
4. Choose Apply.
Select All Tolerance Features
1. Choose Insert->GDT Parameters or choose the GDT Parameters icon from the
Annotation toolbar.
2. Choose the Inherit All in Orientation option.
3. The Inherit All Model Tolerance dialog displays. Select view(s). Select the member
view(s) to inherit tolerance feature(s). You can select views from the view list box or
from the graphics screen. If you make a mistake selecting views, you can choose the
Reset button and start again.
4. Choose Apply.

Feature Parameters Overview
Feature Parameters lets you automatically inherit hole and thread parameters, in the form of
callouts, onto a drawing. You can also inherit sketch dimensions from the same Feature
Parameters dialog. You can customize the annotation template that specifies the format for
callouts and dimensions
To create a feature dimension.
1. From Drafting, choose Insert->Feature Parameters or choose the Feature
Parameters icon from the Drafting Annotation toolbar.
2. Click the plus sign to expand the features tree. If necessary, you can fully load
assembly component parts with the MB3 Open Fully pop-up option.
3. Choose a standard (ANSI, ISO-DIN, or JIS) for callouts from the Template options.
4. Select the Feature(s) you wish to annotate from the Feature Parameters Tree list.
Note that features you select from the tree list highlight in the Graphics window.
5. Click MB2 to toggle to the view list box. Choose a view to annotate, then click the
Apply button.
6. The selected features are automatically annotated. The annotations are in drag mode
and can be relocated if desired. Click MB2 if you wish to toggle back to the Feature
Parameter Tree List.

Annotation Overview
The Annotation bar and dynamic mini text box provide the most commonly used options for
creating annotation. These tools take up a minimum of graphic window space.
Annotation Icon Options
The Annotation icons provide options for creating notes, labels, and symbols. An option also
provides access to the full Annotation dialog. The Annotation icon options reside in the upper
left or upper right corner of the graphics window opposite the side where the resource bar
appears.

Annotation Icon Options
Dynamic Mini Text Box
The dynamic mini text box lets you enter text and symbols for your notes and labels. You can
resize the text box by dragging its corners or sides. Horizontal and vertical scrollbars appear
automatically when required.

Mini Text Box
While rubber banding annotation the following MB3 options are available and provide the
same options as the on-screen Annotation icons:
• Annotation Editor
• Annotation Style
• Add Drafting Symbol
• Add GDT Symbol
• Add Datum Symbol

Annotation Icon Options
The mini text box displays along with the following on-screen Annotation icon options:
Annotation Icon Options
Opens the Annotation Editor dialog and hides the mini-text box. Text in the mini
Annotati text box transfers to the Annotation Editor's text entry area. This dialog only
on Editor has a Close button. When you click Close, the mini-text box re-displays with
any modified text from the Annotation Editor.
Opens the Annotation Style dialog to allow you to set lettering preferences for
Annota the current note or label. The options on this dialog are the same as
tion Style Preferences-> Annotation-> Lettering but they do not set global preferences.
Lets you insert a drafting symbol into a note or label. You can insert any of the
Drafti following symbols:
ng Symbols

Fractions and two line text is available from the full Annotation Editor.
Lets you insert a GD&T symbol into a note or label. The recommended usage
GD&T for this option is to embed a single GD&T symbol. You can insert any of the
Symbols following symbols:

Use the Annotation Editor to create a full GD&T callout.
Let's you insert a datum callout into a note or label. You can insert any of the
Datu following datum callouts:
m Callouts
ANSI Y14.5M-1982 symbols

ISO and ASME symbols

Annotation Placement Toolbar Overview

The Annotation Placement toolbar only displays for dimensions, notes, labels, and ID symbol
origin placement. Only those options that apply to a particular object are available.
This toolbar provides:
• Leader options
• Help lines for associating a leader to a drafting object
• Access to alignment positioning options, the Create Leader dialog, and the Origin tool
dialog
To create a note
1. Click the Annotation Editor icon on the Drafting Annotation toolbar or choose Insert->
Annotation.
2. Enter text in the mini-text box and/or symbols from the Annotation bar. If desired, you
can choose the full Annotation Editor dialog for entering text and symbols.
3. Drag the cursor to the desired location.
4. Click MB1.
To create a label
1. Click the Annotation Editor icon on the Drafting Annotation toolbar or choose Insert->
Annotation.
2. Enter text in the mini-text box and/or symbols from the Annotation bar. If desired, you
can choose the full Annotation Editor dialog for entering text and symbols.
3. Press, drag, and release MB1 on geometry to draw a leader.
4. Click MB1 at the desired location.
Annotation Editor
When you choose Insert->Annotation Editor an Annotation Editor dialog displays allowing you
to create and edit notes and labels. The notes and labels you create can include symbols
represented by control character sequences as well as references to expressions, part
attributes and object attributes. In addition to being able to access the Annotation Editor
directly, you can also access it from several other dialogs for the purpose of creating and
editing appended text. These dialogs include the Dimensions, Ordinate Dimension Sets,
Ordinate Dimensions, and Tolerance Editor dialogs.

Tabular Label Overview
Tabular labels provide a means to automatically create table style labels for one or more
objects at once using an XML tabular label template. For example, you can use this feature to
place tabular labels on shipbuilding objects such as piping runs, flow details, flanges, etc.
The system queries the selected object's NX attributes and uses the names and associated
values as the content of the tabular label. You can choose from one or more formats where
each format contains a set of attribute name-value pairs.

GD&T Symbols Pane

The GD&T Pane allows you to enter the control characters for GD&T symbols into the edit
window. There is also a button to check the syntax of GD&T symbols.
On the left side of the GD&T pane is a column of four buttons. These buttons enter the control
characters for the following GD&T symbols: Begin Single Frame, Begin Composite Frame,
Vertical Frame Separator, and Begin Next Frame. To the right of these buttons are the
buttons for the various tolerance characteristics, material conditions, and other GD&T
symbols.
The default GD&T Frame Height Factor for new parts is controlled by the Frame Size setting
on the Customer Defaults dialog at Drafting-> Annotation-> Geometric Tolerance Symbols.
For existing parts it is read from the part file. The default tolerance standard is controlled by
the Tolerancing Standard setting on the Customer Defaults dialog at Drafting-> Annotation
Editor-> Geometric Tolerance Symbols.
To create a GD&T symbol you can first click either the Begin Single Frame or Begin
Composite Frame button. This inserts the control characters into the edit window to indicate
the start and end of a symbol. This also adds the starting and ending vertical separators for
the symbol and places the cursor between them, so symbol creation can continue without
having to move the cursor. Clicking a characteristic symbol button inserts the symbol followed
by a vertical separator. Clicking the Begin Next Frame button inserts a vertical separator
followed by the control characters for a GD&T new-line. When creating two or more single
feature control frames, you need to insert a vertical separator each time you choose Begin
Next Frame.

Utility Symbols Overview
This option allows you to create various utility symbols such as centerlines, offset center
points, target points, and intersection symbols. When you choose Insert-> Utility Symbol, the
Utility Symbols dialog displays. This dialog allows you to control the display of each symbol.
Utility Symbol Options
Symbol Types Creates any of the available utility symbols such as bolt circles, centerlines,
target and center points, etc.
Point Position Determines the placement of a utility symbol based on the available point
Options positions.
Symbol Controls the display of a utility symbol by changing it's parameters. Symbol
Parameters parameter diagrams vary depending on the choice of utility symbol you
choose to create.
Multiple Is available for Linear and Cylindrical Centerlines (face point option).
Centerlines
Action Buttons Inherits drafting preferences from an existing drafting object, reset drafting
preferences to customer default settings, or apply edits or creation of utility
symbols.

Basic Procedure for Creating Utility Symbols
The following is a general procedure for creating Utility Symbols. Details are discussed at
length on the pages that follow.
To create a utility symbol:
1. Select the type of utility symbol you want to create.
2. Set the parameters that control the display and placement of the utility symbol.
3. Select the object(s) from which the utility symbol is to be created
Symbol Types

The following Utility Symbol types are available:
Linear You can create linear centerlines through points or arcs. A linear centerline that
Centerline passes through a single point or arc is called a simple centerline.
Full Bolt You can create full bolt circles through points or arcs. The radius of the full bolt
Circle circle is always equal to the distance from the center of the bolt circle to the first
point selected.
Partial Bolt This option allows you to create partial bolt circles through points or arcs. The
Circle radius of the partial bolt circle is always equal to the distance from the center of
the bolt circle to the first point selected.
Offset This option allows you to create an offset center point for an arc. The offset
Center Point center point is used to indicate the center of an arc at any location rather than
the arc's true center. This becomes especially useful when dimensioning very
large arcs whose true centers lie outside the bounds of the drawing sheet.
Cylindrical This option allows you to create cylindrical centerlines, which conform with ANSI
Centerline Y14.2 standards. Cylindrical centerlines are associative to the two points used
to define them. The Point Position options are used to define the desired points
Block Block Centerline option lets you create or edit an associative Block Centerline.
Centerline You can use this option, When a centerline is required for a body rather than a
face, To create centerlines for block components used in molds or casts, For
block components with angled holes.
Partial This option allows you to create partial circular centerlines through points or
Circular arcs. The radius of the partial circular centerline is always equal to the distance
Centerline from the center of the circular centerline to the first point selected.
Full Circular This option allows you to create full circular centerlines through points or arcs.
Centerline The radius of the full circular centerline is always equal to the distance from the
center of the circular centerline to the first point selected.
Symmetrical This option allows you to create a symmetrical centerline on your drawing to
Centerline indicate where there is symmetry in the geometry. This saves you from having
to draw the other half of the symmetrical geometry.
Target Point This option allows you to create an ANSI standard target point symbol. If you
locate the symbol on an existing object, the system places the symbol center on
the object nearest to the position you select
Intersection This option allows you to create an apparent intersection symbol, which is
represented by the witness lines on a corner
Automatic This option automatically creates centerlines in any existing view(s) where the
Centerline hole or pin axis is perpendicular or parallel to the plane of the drawing view.

ID Symbols

The Insert-> ID Symbol option allows you to create and edit ID symbols on your drawing. ID
symbols can be created as stand-alone symbols, or they can be created with leaders. The ID
symbols dialog allows you to specify the symbol type, text, size, and placement.
ID Symbols Options Functions
ID Symbol Types Creates various types of ID symbols.
Symbol Text Adds text to an ID symbol.
Symbol Size Allows you to change the size of a symbol.
Leader Types Specifies the type of leader to use when creating a symbol with a
leader.
Leader From Options Controls the leader placement for a symbol.
Specify Leader Creates an ID symbol with one or more leaders.
Create ID Symbol Places an ID symbol on the drawing at an indicated position using
the Origin Tool dialog.
Remove last leader Removes the last leader point while you are in the process of
point defining the leader. You do this by simply clicking Remove Last
Leader Point.
Action Buttons Inherits the symbol size of an existing symbol, reset preferences to
customer default settings, or apply edits to an existing symbol.

ID Symbol Types

ID Symbol Types

The ID Symbol dialog contains a variety of ID Symbol Types for you to use. Each symbol type
creates a different type of ID Symbol. The following figure shows examples of ID Symbols you
can create.

ID Symbols

Custom Symbol Overview
Insert-> Symbol-> Custom Symbol lets you create or edit an instance of a symbol from the
Symbol Library. The libraries are either provided by the system or created by a designated
Symbol Librarian using File-> Utilities-> Create Custom Symbol. When you choose Insert->
Symbol-> Custom Symbol, the Symbol Library dialog displays with two list boxes. The upper
box, the Library List box, contains the names of all the libraries. The lower box, the Symbol
List box, is initially blank. When you choose a library from the Library List box, the lower list
box updates and displays the icons for all the symbols in the chosen Library as shown below.
Symbol Library Options
Library List Box Lets you choose a library.
Symbol List Box Displays all of the available symbols from a library as image icons after you
choose a library. When you choose a symbol, the Symbol Instance dialog
displays for that symbol.
Symbol Instance The Symbol Instance dialog displays after you choose a symbol from the
Symbol List box. This dialog lets you create or edit an instance of a symbol.
Action Buttons Cancel - lets you cancel the dialog. All other action buttons are unavailable.

User-Defined Symbols
The User-Defined Symbol option allows you to place symbols on your drawing which are
either provided by us or previously created by you using File-> Utilities-> Edit Symbol Font
File. The user-defined symbols you place on your drawing can either be stand alone symbols,
or they can be added to existing drafting objects.
Procedure
To place a user-defined symbol perform the following steps:
1. Choose Insert->User-Defined Symbol.
2. Select the directory in which the symbol resides (either current Part, the Current
Directory, or Utility Directory).
3. Select the desired symbol from the displayed list of symbol files contained in the
directory you selected.
4. Indicate the desired placement mode for the symbol.
To edit a user-defined symbol perform the following steps:
1. Choose Insert->User-Defined Symbol.
2. Select the symbol.
3. Change the symbol parameters in the dialog (e.g. length, height, scale, aspect ratio).
4. Choose Apply.
5. Choose Flip Horizontal or Flip Vertical to change the symbol orientation.
User Defined Symbols Options
Use Symbols In: Retrieves user-defined symbols from the current part or a specific
directory
SBF List Box Lists the currently available SBFs in either the current directory or
the utility directory.
Symbols List Box Lists the currently available symbols.
Define Symbol Size By: Defines your desired symbol size using either the Length and
Height and/or the Scale and Aspect Ratio option(s).
Symbol Orientation Aligns or orient standalone symbols placed on the drawing.
Add To Drafting Object Adds a symbol to a drafting object.
Standalone Symbol Indicates a position for the symbol anywhere on the drawing.
Flip Horizontal Instructs the system to horizontally flip a standalone symbol by
inverting its connection points.
Flip Vertical Instructs the system to vertically flip a standalone symbol by
mirroring it about an imaginary line between the Anchor Point and
the Orientation Point.
Action Buttons Inherits preferences from an existing symbol, reset symbol
preferences to the default length and height, or apply edits to an
existing standalone or user-defined symbol.
Image Overview
You can place a raster image (either .jpg or .png) onto a drawing sheet while in the Drafting
application. Saving the part stores the image in the part file.
Procedure for Placing an Image
To place a raster image (jpg or png) on a Drawing Sheet:
1. Choose Application-> Drafting.
2. Choose Insert-> Sheet and open a drawing sheet.
3. Choose Insert-> Image or click the image icon on the Annotation toolbar.
4. From the Open Image dialog, select the image to place and click OK. Alternately, on
Windows operating systems, you can drag an image file from the Explorer or from the
desktop and drop it on a drawing sheet
To rotate an image:
1. If you have not just placed the image, edit the image by double-clicking it.
2. Select the rotation handle (if the rotation handle is very close to one of the size
handles, you can use the confirmation dialog to select the rotation handle).
3. Press MB1 and drag the rotation handle clockwise or counterclockwise.
To scale an image:
1. If the scale handles are not displayed, double-click the image to enter edit mode.
2. If you want to scale the image disproportionately, turn off Lock Aspect.
3. Drag one of the scale handles to size the image. Or, enter a value in either the Width
box or the Height box. Press ENTER or TAB.
To flip an image:
1. If you do not see image handles or axes, double-click the image.
2. Double-click an axis.

Weld Symbol
The Weld Symbol option allows you to create various Weld symbols in both Metric and
English parts and drawings. Weld symbols are associative and relocate when the model
changes or are flagged as Out-of-Date the same as a regular annotation label. The symbols
can be edited for their properties such as text size, font, arrow dimensions etc.
Basic Procedure for Weld Symbol Creation
1. If required, define the customer default for the desired standard.
2. Fill out the Weld Symbol dialog with the desired options.
3. Note that the Center Symbol option is available when we choose the Spot weld
symbol. If you toggle this option on, the system disregards the dotted reference line.
4. Choose Create Weld Symbol. The Create Leader dialog displays.
5. Indicate the leader end point with the cursor. At this point, you can indicate additional
intermediate points, place the symbol, or cancel.
6. Choose OK to place the symbol. The Origin Tool dialog displays.
Crosshatching

The Crosshatching option allows you to create patterns within a user-defined boundary.
Crosshatching is done by hatching or by filling a specified area with a pattern. A crosshatched
object includes the hatch or area fill pattern and the defining boundary entities.
Crosshatching Options
Pattern Type Specifies either crosshatch or area fill.
New Boundary Defines holes or islands that you do not wish to crosshatch.
Chain Selects a sequence of connected curves.
Chain to End Allows the system to chain select the curves until no more joined curves
are found.
Remove Last Deselects any number of previously selected curves by choosing the
Remove Last button. This option deselects one curve at a time back to
the beginning of the current boundary (hole or island).
Reset Deselects all selected curves in the current boundary (hole or island) at
once. Pressing the Reset button again deselects all curves in the previous
boundary (hole or island).
Apply Creates a new crosshatch using the selected boundaries.

Procedure
To create a Crosshatch:
• Check Preferences->Annotation->Fill/Hatch to be sure that the crosshatch pattern
you wish to create is the one selected.
• Choose Insert->Crosshatching.
• Choose either Crosshatch or Area Fill.
• Define the boundary by selecting geometric objects.
• Click Apply to create the crosshatch.

EDITING
Drafting Edit Toolbar Overview
The Drafting Edit Toolbar provides options for editing drafting objects in object-action or
action-object mode. In object-action mode, you can select the object on the graphics window,
then select the appropriate icon from the toolbar. In action-object mode you can select an icon
on the toolbar, then select the appropriate object.

Drafting Edit Toolbar

Drafting Edit Toolbar Options
Create/Edit Options
Choose this option and the edit wrench cursor displays. You can
Edit annotation then select an object and an appropriate action occurs.
Select an object first, then click this option and an appropriate
response occurs.
Reassociates (reattaches) an annotation object to the same
Edit associativity types of objects (text, geometry, centerlines, etc.) that were
available during the leader types creation.
Choose the Style option and the Class Selection dialog starts to
Edit Style let you select an object. Appropriate actions for the object occur.
Starts the Suppress Drafting Object dialog to let you control the
Suppress Drafting display of some drafting objects.
Object
Starts the dynamic icon text options.
Edit Text
Starts the Origin Tool dialog to let you establish an associative
Edit Origin relationship between views, geometry, and other annotations and
also to define the location of an annotation on the drawing.
Starts the Leader dialog to let you add, remove, or edit leaders.
Edit Leader
Starts the Ordinate Dimension dialog for editing.
Edit Ordinate
Starts the Crosshatch Boundary dialog to let you replace, add, or
Edit Crosshatch remove a boundary.
Boundary
Starts the Edit Parts List Levels icon options.
Parts List Levels
Starts the Edit Drawing Sheet dialog to let you select a sheet for
Edit Sheet editing.
Starts the Section Line dialog to let you modify a section line.
Edit Section Line
Starts the Section Components in View dialog to let you edit
Section Components assembly components of a Section View to be either sectioned
in View or non-sectioned.
Starts the View Dependent Edit dialog to let you edit the display
View Dependent Edit of objects in a selected member view

Style Overview
Style dialogs let you edit preference options for current or existing drafting objects. To set
global preferences for new drafting objects, use options on the Preferences pull-down menu.
There are two Style dialogs:
• Annotation Style - provides options for notes, labels, dimensions, symbols, tabular
notes, and parts list.
• View Style - provides options for member views.

Suppress Drafting Object Overview
Edit->Suppress Drafting Object allows you to control the display of one or more of the
following drafting objects: dimensions, drafting aids, Geometric Tolerancing, and tabulated
notes. The value of an expression that you assign controls the visibility of each drafting
object. If the control expression has the value zero, the drafting object becomes invisible. If
the control expression has a nonzero value, the drafting object displays.
You can control the display of multiple objects by assigning them the same control
expression. Or, you can assign one control expression per object.

Origin

Edit-> Origin lets you establish an associative relationship between views, geometry, and
other annotations to define the location of an annotation on the drawing. The associative
annotations relocate themselves to the proper location when the model or related annotations
update. The default alignment type (Drag, Relative toView, etc.) and default parameter
settings in the Alignment Specific Options area of the dialog depends on the current
alignment setting in Preferences->Origin. The Origin Tool dialog becomes active whenever
you choose an option that places or modifies annotations on a drawing.
Basic Procedure for Relative to View Alignment
1. Choose Edit->Origin.
2. Select a standalone drafting object.
3. Select the Relative to View alignment option.
4. Select a view from the View List box or from the Graphics Screen.
5. Choose Apply.
6. Drag the object to the desired location.
7. Click Mouse Button 1 (MB1).
8. Click Cancel to dismiss the dialog.

Origin Tool Alignment Options
Drag Lets you rubberband annotations or dimensions into place.
Relative to View Lets you associate standalone drafting objects (notes, symbols, etc.) to a
drafting view (this option excludes modeling views).
Horizontal Text Lets you horizontally align the text of an annotation with the text of
Alignment another annotation in the part.
Vertical Text Lets you vertically align the text of an annotation with the text of another
Alignment annotation in the part.
Align with Arrows Lets you align dimensions with their dimensions lines.
Point Constructor Lets you to use any of the point construction options to locate the origin of
an annotation.
Offset Character Lets you locate annotations and dimensions using scale factors that are
relative to the character size of the annotation/dimension.

Leader

Edit->Leader allows you to add, remove, or edit leaders on existing drafting objects such as
notes, labels, ID symbols, and GD&T symbols.
Edit Leader Options
Add Adds a leader to an existing drafting object.
Remove Removes a leader (or leaders) from an existing drafting object.
Edit Edits the side of a label that a leader is drawn from (leader side).
New Leader When the Add option is set in the Edit Leaders dialog, the New Leader button
becomes available. This button allows you to quickly add additional leaders to
the selected drafting object.
Leader Side Controls the side of a label that a leader is drawn from. The two available
options are From Left and From Right.
Text Specifies how the text in a label displays.
Alignment

Ordinate Dimension
Edit-->Ordinate Dimension allows you to modify some aspects of ordinate dimensions and
dimension sets that cannot be edited using the dialogs available under the Insert pull-down.
Edit Ordinate Dimension Options
Edit Dogleg Edits doglegs.
Edit Margin Edits an ordinate dimension margin.
Merge Ordinate Sets Merges one or more ordinate sets into a selected "base"
set.
Move Dimensions to Another Set Moves a dimension from one set to another.
Crosshatch Boundary

Edit->Crosshatch Boundary allows you to replace, add, or remove crosshatch boundaries.
This option may also be used to re-associate retained crosshatching.
Crosshatch Boundary Options
Replace Replaces any boundary of an existing crosshatch with a new boundary
Add Adds boundaries to an existing crosshatch.
Remove Removes any number of existing boundaries from a crosshatch.
Chain Easily and quickly select a sequence of curves, which are joined end-to-end.
Chain to End Causes the system to chain until no more joined curves are found.
Remove Last Deselects any number of previously selected curves in the current boundary
definition, or previously selected boundaries by choosing the Remove Last
button. This option deselects one curve or boundary at a time.
Reset Deselects all selected curves, boundaries, and the crosshatch at once.
Update Updates the selected crosshatch with the previously performed edits. It then
Crosshatch allows you to continue editing the same crosshatch, if desired.

Edit Sheet
Allow you to modify the currently active drawing sheet by changing any of its drawing sheet
parameters including Name, Size, Scale, and Unit of Measure.

Section Line Overview
Edit-> View-> Section Line allows you to edit an existing section line. You can use this option
to add, delete, or move segments of a section line. You can also use it to redefine an existing
hinge line, or to move the rotation point of a revolved section view.
Edit Section Line Options
Select Section View Selects a section view in preparation for editing a section line.
View Selection List Located directly below the Select Section View option, the View
Selection List lets you select a section view from the current drawing.
Add Segment Adds a new cut segment to a section line.
Delete Segment Deletes a segment from a section line.
Move Segment Moves individual segments of a section line.
Move Rotation Point Edits the rotation point for a revolved section view.
Redefine Hinge Line Edits a section view's hinge line.
Redefine Cut Vector Edits the cut vector from the section cut view of a pictorial member
view. This option is only available when you edit a pictorial section line
Redefine Arrow Edits the arrow vector from the section cut view of a pictorial member
Vector view. This option is only available when you edit a pictorial section line
Cut Angle Edits the cut angle of an unfolded section line when using either the
Add Segment or Move Segment options.
Point Construction Defines point locations by choosing from a variety of methods.
Options
Vector Construction Defines vectors by choosing from a variety of methods.
Options
Reverse Vector Reverses the section line arrow direction when you are using the
Redefine Hinge Line option.
Associative Hinge Select Associative Hinge Line to make the hinge line associative to
Line geometry. When the geometry for the hinge line changes the section
view orients itself to the hinge line angle.
Reset Undoes your section line edits and allows you to start over.

Section Components in View
Edit-> View-> Section Components in View allows you to edit assembly components of a
Section View to be either sectioned or non-sectioned. For multiple occurrences of a
component in a section view, you can specify individual occurrences to have either sectioned
or non-sectioned properties. This option allows you to:
• Control the sectioning of individual components within different views in the drawing.
• Edit the sectioning properties (sectioned or non-sectioned) of an occurrence of a
component in Section View and takes precedence over the component's user-defined
part attribute.
Section Views in Assembly Drawings
When creating an assembly drawing, it may sometimes be necessary to show certain
components uncut (non-sectioned) in section views that appear on the drawing. Standard part
components such as nuts, bolts, pins, etc. are commonly shown on a drawing in this manner.
To accomplish this task, you can use the user-defined attributes functionality. By setting the
user-defined part attribute called section-component to the proper setting, you can add
components to an assembly that appear non-sectioned in section views on the drawing. You
can also specify sectioning properties for individual occurrences of a component in a view
with the Edit-> View-> Section Components in View option.

View Dependent Edit Overview
Edit->View-> View Dependent Edit allows you to edit the display of objects in a selected
member view without affecting the display of those objects in other views. In addition, you can
also use View Dependent Edit to edit objects (such as curves) that exist directly on the
drawing sheet. The View Dependent Edit functionality allows you to erase or edit entire
objects or selected portions of objects.
View Dependent Edit Options
View Selection You can select a view name from the list or select a view from the Graphics
List window.
Erase Objects Erases entire geometric objects (such as curves, edges, splines, etc.) from
a selected member view or drawing
Edit Entire Edits the color, font, and width of entire objects (such as curves, edges,
Objects splines, etc.) in a selected view or drawing.
Edit Object Edits the color, font and width of object segments in a selected view or
Segments drawing.
Edit Section View You use this option on Section Views where the Erase All but Selected
Background option was used from the Section Line Creation dialog. Edit Section View
Background lets you keep or remove section view background curves for
previously erased faces and bodies.
Delete Selected Deletes erasures that you may have previously applied to objects using the
Erasures Erase Objects option.
Delete Selected Deletes selected view dependent edits made to objects on drawings or in
Edits drawing member views.
Delete All Edits Deletes all previously made view dependent edits on drawings or in
drawing member views.
Model To View Converts certain objects, which exist in the model (model dependent), to
objects, which exist in a single member view (view dependent).
View To Model Converts certain objects, which exist in a single member view (view
dependent objects), to model objects.
Line Color Changes the color of a selected object.
Line Font Changes the line font (dashed, solid, etc.) of a selected object.
Line Width Edits the line width (normal, thick, and thin) of geometric objects.

DRAWING LAYOUT
Drawing Layout Toolbar Overview

Drawing Layout Toolbar
The Drawing Layout toolbar provides options for drawing sheets and views. Drawing sheet
options let you create, open, and delete drawing sheets. Drawing view options let you add
orthographic, pictorial, broken, and break-out section views. Options are also provided for
updating, aligning, and moving/copying views, defining a view's boundaries, and toggling
between the drawing view and modeling view.
Drawing Layout Toolbar Options
Drawing Layout Options
Creates a new drawing sheet using the New Drawing Sheet
Insert Sheet dialog.
Opens a drawing sheet using the Open Drawing Sheet
Open Sheet dialog.
Deletes a drawing sheet using the Delete Drawing Sheet
Delete Sheet dialog.
Starts the dynamic icon options to let you create a base
Add Base View view.
Starts the Select Parts dialog to let you select a part from
Add View from Part which to add a view.
Starts the dynamic icon options to let you create a
Add Projected View projected/auxiliary view.
Starts the dynamic icon options to let you create a detail
Add Detail View view.
Starts the dynamic icon options to let you create a
Add Section View simple/stepped section view.
Starts the dynamic icon options to let you create a half
Add Half Section View section view.
Starts the dynamic icon options to let you create a revolved
Add Revolved Section View section view.
Lets you populate your drawing with views using the Other
Add Other Section Views Section Views dialog.
Lets you manually update selected drawing views using the
Update Views Update Views dialog.
Starts the Break-Out Section dialog to let you create, edit,
Break-Out Section or delete a break-out section view.
Starts the Broken View dialog to let you create, modify, and
Broken View update broken views.
Starts the Move/Copy View dialog to let you move or copy
Move/Copy View existing views on the drawing.
Starts the Align View dialog to let you align views on a
Align View drawing.
Starts the Define View Boundary dialog to let you specify
View Boundary the view boundary type for specific member views on a
drawing.
Lets you toggle between the modeling display and the
Display Drawing drawing display.

Insert Sheet Overview
Insert-> Sheet starts the Insert Sheet dialog which allows you to create a new drawing sheet
by defining a drawing name, and specifying drawing parameters such as Size, Scale, Unit of
Measure, and Projection Angle. After all drawing parameters have been set, choosing Apply
replaces the current display with a display of the new drawing.
Options
Filter Locates a drawing or a series of drawings in a part file.
Drawing Name Specifies the name of a new drawing.
Selection Field This field is where you enter the drawing sheet name. Names may contain
up to 30 characters. Spaces in the name are not allowed. All names are
converted to upper case. The default drawing sheet name is SH1.
Drawing Size May choose a drawing size.
Drawing Scale Establishes the default scale for all view types added to the drawing.
Unit of Measure Specifies either inch or SI units.
Projection Angle Specifies either 3rd angle or 1st angle projection.

Open Sheet
Format-> Open Sheet allows you to open an existing drawing by choosing from a list of
previously created drawings. You can either select a drawing name from the list, or type a
name in the selection field (see the following figure). If you enter the drawing name
incorrectly, an error message appears.
You can use the Open Drawing Dialog's Filter option to rapidly locate a drawing or a series of
drawings in a part file. Enter a portion of a drawing name followed by an asterisk (*), and
choose the OK button. The system then performs a search, and displays the desired drawing
name(s) in the listing window. You can then highlight the drawing name and copy it to the
selection box.
Delete Sheet
Edit-> Delete Sheet allows you to delete an existing drawing. If no drawings currently exist,
this option is unavailable.
You can either select a drawing name from the list or type in a name. The current drawing is
not displayed in the Delete Drawing dialog and therefore cannot be deleted. You can use the
Delete Drawing Sheet dialog's Filter option to rapidly locate a drawing or a series of drawings
in a part file. Enter a portion of a drawing name followed by an asterisk (*), and choose the
OK button. The system then performs a search, and displays the desired drawing or drawings
in the listing window. The drawing name can be highlighted, placed into the selection box, and
deleted by choosing Apply or OK.

Base View Overview
You can create one or more base views on a drawing. A base view is a modeling view that
you import on to a drawing. The base view can be a standalone view or a parent view for
other drawing types such as a section view. Once you place a base view, the system
automatically puts you in projected view mode.
Use any of the following methods to create a Base View:
• Choose Insert-> View-> Base View when a drawing sheet is displayed.
• From the Drawing Layout toolbar, choose Add Base View to Drawing.
• Choose MB3-> Add Base View when a drawing sheet is selected.
• Choose MB3-> Add Base View in the drawing navigator when a drawing is selected.

Base View from Part Overview
You can include views from other parts or components. The file you select must be an NX
part file and cannot be the current part file (the file containing the drawing sheet on which the
view of the part is to be placed). You cannot select a part file that references the current part
file in any way.
Use any one of the following methods:
• Choose Insert-> View-> Base View from Part when a drawing sheet is displayed.
• Choose Base View from Part icon from the Drawing Layout toolbar when a drawing
sheet is displayed.
• Select a drawing sheet and choose MB3-> Base View from Part.
• Select a drawing sheet node from the drawing navigator and choose MB3-> Base
View from Part

Projected View Overview
You can create a projected view from any parent view. The system intelligently infers
projected orthographic and auxiliary views as you move the cursor in a circular motion around
the parent view's center. The system also snaps the view into view corridors. A dashed helper
line displays to assist you in keeping the view in a corridor until you place it. The system
automatically infers:
• A hinge line to use as a reference to rotate the view into orthographic space.
• A vector direction that is perpendicular to the hinge line. The view is seen against the
vector arrow.
You can manually define the hinge line and also reverse the vector direction before you place
the view.
Orthographic Views
The inferred orthographic view option allows you to create orthographic projections from
existing views. To place an orthographic view onto the drawing, you indicate a position in the
desired orthographic quadrant determined by the parent view. The orthographic view
automatically aligns with the parent view, and has the same view scale as the parent view
Auxiliary Views
The Auxiliary View option allows you to project a view from an existing view perpendicular to
a defined hinge line. The hinge line you define is associated to the auxiliary view. Any
changes in the location, orientation, or angle of the hinge line are reflected in the view.
Choose any of the following methods:
• Create a base view and the system automatically steps you into projected view mode.
• Insert->View pull-down when a drawing sheet is displayed and one or more views
exists on the displayed sheet.
• Choose the Projected View icon on the Drawing Layout toolbar when a drawing sheet
is displayed and one or more views exists on the displayed sheet.
• Choose MB3-> Projected View after you select a member view.
• Choose MB3->Projected View on a selected member view in the drawing navigator.

Shaded view overview

You can display drawing member views in shaded mode in addition to the existing wireframe
mode. Shaded view display is not supported for revolved and unfolded section views.
Shaded views support all functionality in existing wireframe views such as display and
control of visible lines, hidden lines, silhouettes and so on.
Shaded views allow people unfamiliar with drawing conventions to interpret the drawing
more easily.

1. Right-click a view's border and choose Style→Shading→Render
Style→Fully Shaded.
2. Click OK.
Fully Shaded Section View

Plotting Shaded Views While plotting shaded views, non-rectangular detail views may
overlap with the adjacent views because the view border is
treated as rectangular for view clipping during plotting. A
workaround is to reposition the views to remove the overlap
before plotting.

Edit shaded views You can edit individual member views to change the shaded
rendering style (Wireframe, Partially Shaded, or Fully
Shaded) with the View Style dialog box. The software
immediately changes the view display.

Annotations on shaded views Drafting annotations always display in front of the shaded
geometry of member views. You can attach annotations to all
edges and curves displayed in a shaded view. However, it is
not possible to create text islands where the annotation has a
background that obscures the view.

Templates and shaded views Drawing and sheet templates support member views for all
rendering styles. If you drop a template with a particular view
rendering style onto a model, the software creates a drawing
with a view rendered in the template's rendering style.

Shaded View Display Shaded views do not support “Face Analysis” and “Studio”
rendering styles.
By default, all shaded settings available in the Modeling
application are inherited by shaded geometry in member
views with “Shaded” and “Partially Shaded” rendering styles.
A shaded imported view looks the same as the corresponding
modeling view if it has the same rendering style. Any changes
to these shaded settings in Modeling are reflected on the
display of existing and subsequently created shaded member
views.

UV Grid on Shaded Views UV grid curves are displayed on top of any shaded geometry
in viewswhen both the UV Grid check box is selected in View
Style→General and UV grid data is selected using
Edit→Object Display→Wireframe Display.

View dependent control for You can set Translucency and Partial Shading on objects in
Translucency and Partial Shading a member view in the View Dependent Edit dialog box. See
Related Topics at the top of this page. These attributes affect
the display only in the member view in which you apply them
and take precedence over corresponding settings applied to
the same objects in the Edit Object Display dialog box.
These settings have no effect on shaded object display in
Modeling.
Please note the following:
• You can control a shaded object’s translucency
setting in the Edit Object Display dialog box.
However, this setting influences the translucency
appearance of the object in all member views
where it appears. If you apply translucency
amount with the View Dependent Edit dialog
box for an object in a view, it overrides the
amount applied using the Edit Object Display
dialog box in that particular view.
• A Translucency option is available in
Preferences→Drafting→View→Visual. When
turned on, all shaded objects in every member
view of the drawing are drawn with the
translucency setting specified using the View
Dependent Edit dialog box or the Edit Object
Display dialog box. When turned off, all shaded
objects in every member view of the drawing
appear opaque, regardless of their individual
translucency settings.

Shaded view background The background of shaded views is transparent to allow you
to place shaded views on top of other shaded views and non-
shaded views.

Inherited Rendering Style A derived view inherits the Rendering Style setting from its
base view at the time of creation regardless of the Rendering
Style setting in the View Preferences dialog box. However,
after you create a derived view, you can change its
Rendering Style setting.

Shaded views in Monochrome Faces in shaded views are displayed in color in monochrome
Mode mode.

PMI display Drafting member views honor the Display PMI through
Shaded Model setting that is available in the Modeling
application under Preferences→PMI. This setting is stored
with the part. If the check box is selected for a part, all
member views of the part on a drawing display PMI through
any shaded geometry.

Where do I find it?
• Choose Preferences→View→View Preferences→Shading→Rendering
Style.
• In the View Style dialog box, choose Shading→Rendering Style.
• Right-click a drawing view and choose Style→Shading→Rendering Style.

Detail View Overview
You can create detail views with either a circular or rectangular boundary. A detail view is a
view, which contains an enlarged portion of an already existing drawing view. The enlarged
detail view shows detail, which is not apparent in the view from which the detail was made.
Circular Detail View
You can choose any of the following
methods to create a Detail View:
• Choose Insert-> View-> Detail View
when a drawing sheet is displayed.
• From the Drawing Layout toolbar,
choose Add Detail View to Drawing.
• Choose MB3-> Add Detail View
when a drawing sheet is selected.
• Choose MB3-> Add Detail View in the drawing navigator when a drawing is selected.
Procedure for Creating Detail Views
To create a view with a circular view boundary:
1. From Drafting, Choose Insert-> View-> Detail View.
2. Select the on-screen Circular Boundary icon option if it is OFF.
3. Select a point for the detail center in the parent view. Use the Snap Point options to
help select the desired point.
4. Indicate a second point to define the detail radius. This point can be a screen
position.
5. Drag the cursor to the desired location.
6. Click MB1 to place the view.
To create a view with a rectangular view boundary:
1. From Drafting, Choose Insert-> View-> Detail View.
2. Select the on-screen Rectangular Boundary icon option if it is OFF.
3. Select a point for the detail rectangular corner in the parent view. Use the Snap Point
options to help select the desired point.
4. Indicate a second point for the opposite rectangular corner in the parent view. This
point can be a screen position.
5. Drag the cursor to the desired location.
6. Click MB1 to place the view.

Section View Overview
Section View functionality lets you create a:
• Simple Section View - A view that allows you to see the inside of a part. It is created
by dividing the part with a single cutting plane.

A Simple Section View
• Stepped Section View - Lets you create a section which contains linear steps. You
can make these steps by indicating multiple cuts, bends, and arrow segments. All
bend and arrow segments are created perpendicular to cut segments.
Use any of the following methods:
• Choose MB3-> Add Section View on a selected parent view.
• Choose MB3-> Add Section View on a parent view in the Drawing Navigator.
• Choose the Add Section View to Drawing icon on the Drawing Layout Toolbar.
• Choose Insert-> View -> Section View.
Procedure to Create a Simple Section View
To create a simple section view:
1. From Drafting, Choose Insert-> View-> Section View.
2. Click MB1 on the base view you wish to section.
3. Turn snap point methods on or off to assist you in picking a point on the view
geometry.
4. Move the dynamic section line to the desired cut position point.
5. Click MB1 to place the section line.
6. Move the cursor outside the view to the desired view corridor.
7. Click MB1 to place the section view.
Creating Stepped Section Views
Creating a stepped section view is similar to creating a simple section view. The difference is
that you define additional points for the section line to bend or cut through by choosing MB3->
Add Segment.
To create a stepped section view:
1. From Drafting, Choose Insert-> View-> Section View.
2. Click MB1 on the base view you wish to section.
3. Turn snap point methods on or off to assist you in picking a point on the view
geometry.
4. Move the dynamic section line to the desired cut position point.
5. Click MB1 to place the section line.
6. Click MB3-> Add Segment.
7. Select the next point and click MB1.
8. Continue to add bends and cuts using MB3-> Add Segment as desired.
9. Move the cursor to the desired location.
10. Click MB1 to place the view.

Stepped Section Cut

Half Section View Overview
You can create a view with half of the part sectioned and the other half un-sectioned. Half
sections are similar to simple and stepped sections in that the cut segment is parallel to the
defined hinge line. Note that the section line for a half section contains only one arrow, one
bend, and one cut segment. The following figure illustrates the various segments of the
section line, as well as the system-generated half section view.
1.Arrow segment 2. Cut segment 3. Bend segment 4. System generated half section view
Use any of the following methods:
• Choose MB3-> Add Section View on a selected parent view.
• Choose MB3-> Add Section View on a parent view in the Drawing Navigator.
• Choose the Add Section View to Drawing icon on the Drawing Layout Toolbar.
• Choose Insert-> View -> Section View.
Procedure for Creating Half Section Views
To create a half section view:
1. Choose Insert-> Half Section View.
2. Select a parent view to section.
3. Select a snap point location (arc center) to place the section line.
4. Select a second point to place the bend.
5Drag the cursor to the desired location and click MB1 to place the view.

Revolved Section View Overview
You can create section views which are revolved about an axis. The following figure shows a
revolved section view with its associated parent view and section line. A revolved section view
can contain a single revolved cut plane, or it can contain steps to form multiple cut planes. In
either case, all cut planes are revolved into a common plane.

Use any of the following methods:
• Choose MB3-> Add Revolved Section View on a selected parent view.
• Choose MB3-> Add Revolved Section View on a parent view in the Drawing
Navigator.
• Choose the Add Revolved Section View to Drawing icon on the Drawing Layout
Toolbar.
• Choose Insert-> View -> Section View.
Procedure for Creating a Revolved Section View
To create a revolved section view:
1. Choose Insert-> View-> Revolved Section View.
2. Select a parent view to section.
3. Select a rotation point to place the section line.
4. Select a point for the first segment.
5. Select a second segment point.
6. While inside the view, click MB3-> Add Segment.
7. Select a segment leg.
8. Select a point to define the new segment.
9. Drag the view to the desired location and click MB1 to place the view.

Unfolded Section Cut Overview
You can create unfolded section views that has a corresponding section line that contains
multiple cut segments without any bend segments. The segments are unfolded in a plane
parallel to the hinge line. The following figure shows an example of an unfolded section view
with its associated parent view and section line.

An Unfolded Section View with an Associated Section Line
Procedure for creating an Unfolded Section View
To create an unfolded section cut using the Point to Point option:
1. Choose Insert-> View-> Other Section Views.
2. Choose the Unfolded Section Cut option.
3. Select a parent view. The parent view is where the system creates the section line.
When you select the parent view, its view bounds highlight.
4. Define a section view hinge line using the Vector Construction option. A vector arrow
displays showing the direction of the hinge line and the direction that the section line
arrows point. If the section line arrow is pointing in the opposite direction, you can
change its direction by choosing the Reverse Vector button.
5. Choose the Point to Point option.
6. Select the first rotation point. The cursor rubber bands as you move the cursor.
7. Select the remaining rotation points.
8. In our example, we select the end edge so that the section line cuts through the
model.
9. Choose OK.
10. Drag the view to the desired location on the drawing. During the drag the view's
boundaries are visible. Note that you can only move the view along its orthographic
corridor.
11. Indicate a view location. The section view is aligned with the feature that received the
first rotation point. If you need to make any modifications to the section line, use Edit-
> Section Line.

Folded Section Cut Overview
Folded Section Cut lets you create a view with multiple segment cuts with no bends. The
folded view is in orthographic alignment with the parent view. The view shows a line where
the segments join each other.

Parent View (Top) and Folded Section Cut (Bottom)
Procedure for Creating a Folded Section Cut
To create a folded section cut:
1. Choose Insert-> View-> Other Section Views -> Folded Section Cut.
2. Select a view.
3. From the Vector Constructor options, choose the XC Axis to define a hinge line.
4. (Optional) Choose Reverse Vector.
5. Choose Apply to accept the hinge line.
6. From the Point Selection pull-down menu on the Section Line Creation dialog, choose
Arc center.
7. Select the three arc centers as shown below.
8. Choose OK.

Simple/Stepped Section Cut from Pictorial View
This option lets you create either a simple or stepped section cut from a pictorial parent
member view. The section line displays as a pictorial section line.
When you select this option, the system displays five creation step icons.
The system determines whether the section cut is simple or stepped by the number of cut
segments. If the number of cut segments is more than one the section cut is determined to be
stepped. The steps involved for creating a simple or stepped section cut from a pictorial view
are as follows:
1. Choose the Simple/Stepped Section Cut from Pictorial View option from the Add View
dialog.
2. Select a parent view.
3. Define the arrow direction.
4. Define a cut direction.
5. Define cut positions(s).
6. Indicate the location of the section cut view on the drawing.

Tips and Techniques for Sectioning Pictorial Views
• The Use Parent Orientation option on the Add View dialog is available only for simple
section cuts from pictorial views and half section cut from pictorial views. It has no
effect on stepped section cuts.
• The cut direction vector and arrow direction vector must be perpendicular to each
other.

Half Section Cut from Pictorial View
This option lets you create a half section cut from a pictorial parent member view. The section
line displays as a pictorial half section line (see the following figure).
The creation procedure is similar to the simple section cut from pictorial view and is outlined
below.
1. Choose the Half Section Cut from Pictorial View option from the Add View dialog.
2. Select a parent view.
3. Define the arrow direction.
4. Define a cut direction.
5. Define cut positions(s).
Indicate the location of the section cut view on the drawing.

Update Views Overview
Edit-> View-> Update Views allows you to manually update selected drawing views to reflect
changes that have occurred to the model since the last time the views were updated. Items
that may be updated include hidden lines, silhouettes, view bounds, section views, and
section view details. If the currently displayed drawing or any of its views are not up to date,
an "OUT-OF-DATE" message appears next to the drawing name in the lower left corner of
the drawing display. This message may also appear when the drawing contains any invalid
section lines.

Break-Out Section Overview
Break-Out sections allow you to see the inside of a part by removing a region of the part. The
region is defined by a closed loop of break-out curves. You can apply break-out sections to
both orthographic and pictorial views.
• Only the planar cut faces of a break-out section are crosshatched.
• Splines created by the fit method are not selectable for break-out section boundary
regions (splines created by Through Points or By Poles are selectable).
• Curves used to define the base point cannot be used as boundary curves.
To find the Break-Out Section option
• Choose Insert-> View-> Break-Out Section.
• Choose Insert-> View-> Break-Out Section View when a drawing sheet is displayed.
• From the Drawing Layout toolbar, choose Break-Out Section.
• Choose MB3-> Break-Out Section in the drawing navigator when a view is selected.
Pictorial Break-Out Section View

Break-Out Creation Steps
The Break-Out Section dialog contains creation step icons that guide you through the
interactive steps required to create a break-out section. As you complete each step, the
creation step icon for the next interactive step automatically highlights. Only the icon for the
current step highlights, all other icons appear grayed out. If you make a mistake during the
break-out creation process, you can go back to a previous step by clicking on the appropriate
icon. For example, when you create a break-out section view there are five creation step
icons available:
• Select View
• Indicate Base Point
• Indicate Extrusion Vector
• Select Curves
• Modify Boundary Points
Procedure for creating Break-Out Section View
The steps required to create a break-out section are as follows:
1. Select a view.
2. Exit the member view.
3. Choose Insert-> View-> Break-Out Section.
4. Select the view where you have added break-out curves.
5. Select a base point.
6. Indicate the extrusion vector.
7. Select curves.
8. Modify boundary points.
9. Click the Apply button on the Break-Out Section dialog.
Editing a Break-Out Section
The five steps available when editing a break-out section are:
1. Select Break-out Section
2. Indicate Base Point
3. Indicate Extrusion Vector
4. Select Curves
5. Modify Boundary Points
Broken View Overview
The Broken View option allows you to create, modify, and update compressed views with
multiple boundaries which are known as broken views. Options on the Broken View dialog are
unavailable until you select a view. You can select a view from the graphics screen. Once you
select a view, the view displays in expanded view mode.

Basic Procedure for Creating a Simple Broken View
1. Choose Drawing-> Broken View.
2. Choose a view from the View Select Box or from the Graphics Screen. Observe that
the view expands. Options on the Broken View dialog become available.
3. Choose Simple Break from the Curve Type option menu.
4. Choose Inferred Point from the Point Construction option menu.
5. Select the boundary start point with the cursor.

6. Select the line end point with the cursor. This defines the Simple Break curve.

7. Continue defining the primary region until you have a closed region as shown in the
following figure.

8. Choose Apply. If you are not attached to geometry you must define an anchor point.
9. Choose the desired curve from the Curve Type option menu.
10. Define a break region as shown in the following figure.
11. Choose Apply.
12. Choose Display Drawing or Cancel.

Move/Copy Overview
The Move/Copy View dialog allows you to move or copy existing views on the drawing. Views
can be moved or copied To a Point, Horizontally, Vertically, Perpendicular to a Line, or To
Another Drawing.
Choose Edit-> View-> Move/Copy.
Choose the Move/Copy icon from the Drawing Layout toolbar.
To move views with Cut/Paste:
1. Select the view to move.
2. Choose MB3->Cut.
3. Select a sheet.
4. Choose MB3->Paste.
To copy views with Copy/Paste:
1. Select the view to copy.
2. Choose MB3->Copy.
3. Select a sheet.
4. Choose MB3->Paste.
Move/Copy View Options
Move/Copy View Options
View Selection List Selects one or more views to be moved or copied.
To a Point Moves or copies views to a new point location on the drawing.
Horizontally Moves or copies views in a horizontal direction.
Vertically Moves or copies views in a horizontal direction.
Perpendicular to a Moves or copies views perpendicular to a defined hinge line.
Line
To Another Drawing Move or copies views to another drawing.
Copy Views Copies existing views and moves them to a new location on the
drawing.
View Name Enters a name for a view that is to be copied onto the drawing. The view
name must be entered into the field prior to placing it on the drawing.
Distance Controls the distance that a view is moved/copied relative to the
originally selected view.
Vector Construction Defines vectors by choosing from a variety of methods. Depending on
Options which option you choose, the system interprets the selected object(s)
accordingly.
Deselect Views Deselects views. This is useful if you make a mistake selecting views.

Align View Overview
You can align existing drawing views on a drawing. Views can be aligned using the alignment
methods: Overlay, Horizontally, Vertically, Perpendicular to a line, and Infer. Several
alignment options are available to help you define the point location on the view(s) where the
alignment takes place.
To align views using the Align View dialog:
1. Choose Edit-> View-> Align View or choose the Align View icon from the Drawing
Layout toolbar.
2. Choose an alignment option.
3. Select a statonary view or point inside a view.
4. Select view(s) to align.
5. Select one of the five alignment methods.
Align View Options
View Selection List Selects the views you want to align. Both active and reference view can
be selected. In addition to selecting views from the list, views can also be
selected directly from the graphics screen.
Overlay Align views both horizontally and vertically so that they may be
superimposed one upon the other.
Horizontally Horizontally aligns selected views with each other.
Vertically Vertically aligns selected views with each other.
Perpendicular to a Aligns a selected view perpendicular to a specified reference line.
Line
Infer Aligns views based on the matrix orientation of a selected stationary
view.
Alignment Options Controls the way in which views are aligned.
Snap Point Options Defines point locations by choosing from a variety of methods.
Depending on which option you choose, the system interprets the
selected object(s) accordingly.
Vector Defines vectors by choosing from a variety of methods. Depending on
Construction which option you choose, the system interprets the selected object(s)
Options accordingly.
Deselect Views Is useful if you make a view selection error when aligning views. You can
use the Deselect button to clear the selection and start again.

View Boundary Types
The View Boundary option menu allows you to choose from several different boundary types.
To make this menu available for use, you must first select a view. The following paragraphs
briefly describe each option. Procedures for using each method are described in the pages
that follow.
Break Line/Detail - allows you to use user-defined curves to define a Break Line or a Detail
View Boundary. The defined curves must reside in a drawing member view.
Manual Rectangle - Allows you define a view boundary using a manually created rectangle.
This method is commonly used to hide unwanted geometry in a particular view.
Automatic Rectangle - Allows you to define a view boundary which automatically resizes (if
required) after model updates. This option is used when you want to show all of the geometry
in a particular view. It is also used when you want to have a section line of a section view
determine the view boundary.
Bound By Objects - Allows you to define a view boundary, which automatically resizes to
include selected solid edge(s) and points on the model geometry. This option is commonly
used for rectangular detail views whose size or shape might need to change because of
model changes.

TABLES
Drafting Tables Toolbar Overview
The Drafting Tables toolbar provides you with options for creating parts list, tabular notes,
import options, export options, and creating automatic callouts.

Drafting Tables Toolbar

Tables Toolbar Options
The Tables toolbar provides options for both Tabular Notes and Parts Lists. Options that do
not apply to a particular element are unavailable.

Tables Toolbar Options
Lets you insert a generic empty tabular note that contains 5
Tabular Note rows and 5 columns. You locate the note at the cursor location.
This option is available only in the Drafting application.
Inserts a generic parts list that contains 3 columns. This option
Parts List is available in the Gateway and Drafting applications.
Opens the Parts List Levels options.
Edit Table
Lets you edit a table's cell using the Annotation Editor.
Edit Text
A pull-down menu provides the following options:
Insert Options • Insert Row Above
• Insert Row Below
• Insert Header Row
• Insert Column to Left
• Insert Column to Right
Resizes a selected column's width or a selected row's height.
Resize
A pull-down menu provides the following options:
Select Options • Select Cells
• Select Rows
• Select Columns
• Select Section/Table
A pull-down menu provides the following options:
Import Options • Import Attributes - Starts the Import Attributes dialog.
• Import Expressions - Starts the Import Expressions.
• Import Spreadsheet - Starts the Import Spreadsheet.
Merges selected cells. Unmerge Cells restores the selected
Merge/Unmerge Cells cells to the original state that existed before the merge.
Changes the cell text to bold.
Bold
Changes the cell text to italic.
Italic
Lets you sort selected rows by column value.
Sort
Changes the lock state of a row.
Lock/Unlock Rows
Attaches or detaches rows to/from parent rows or the entire
Attach/Detach Rows table.
Restores the contents of the cells to their automatic values as
Restore Automatic Text defined by the default text box in the columns tab of the
Annotation Style dialog for the column.
Opens the browser and goes to the URL defined in the cell.
Goto Cell URL
Forces the parts list to update.
Update Parts List
Let's you automatically create balloon callouts for parts lists
Autoballoon and tabular notes.
Starts the Exports Parts List dialog. Lets you export the parts
Export list to an external file or browser.
Saves a customized parts list template file and updates the
Save As Template tables palette on the Resource bar.

Tabular Note Overview
The Tabular Note options allow you to create and edit tables of information on drawings.
Tabular notes are often used to define the dimensional values of similar parts within a family
of parts. You also use them for hole charts and material lists. You can use the Import option
to import expressions, attributes, and spreadsheet data.
Tabular notes can reference expressions, part attributes, and object attributes. Elements of
tabular notes, which reference expressions or attributes, remain associative and update as
these values change in the part.
When you choose the Tabular Note option the system creates a default 5 row by 5 column
tabular note that you can drag to the desired location on the graphics window and place by
clicking MB1. You can change the defaults on the Customer Defaults dialog-> Drafting->
Annotation -> Sections with Number of Rows and Number of Columns.
To create a tabular note, use any of the following methods:
• From Drafting, choose Insert-> Tabular Note.
• From Drafting, choose the Tabular Note icon from the Tables toolbar.
• From the Tables palette of the Resource bar, drag and drop a template onto the
graphics window.
To create a tabular note:
1. Choose Insert-> Tabular Note.
2. Drag the table to the desired location.
3. Click MB1 to place the tabular note.
Table Options
Tables Options
Edit Lets you edit a table's cell using a dynamic input box.
Edit Text Lets you edit a table's cell using the Annotation Editor.
Insert This pull-down menu provides the following options:
• Rows
o Insert Row Above - Inserts one or more rows above the
selected row.
o Insert Row Below - Inserts one or more rows below the
selected row.
o Insert Header Row - Inserts a header row.
• Columns
o Insert Column to the Left - Inserts one or more columns to
the left of the selected columns
o Insert Column to the Right - Inserts one or more columns to
the right of the selected columns.
Resize Lets you resize a table by dragging a horizontal or vertical table grid line.
Select This pull-down menu provides the following options for selection:
• Cells
• Rows
• Columns
• Section/Table
Import This pull-down menu provides the following options:
• Import Attributes - Starts the Import Attributes dialog.
• Import Expressions - Starts the Import Expressions dialog.
• Import Spreadsheet - Starts the Import Spreadsheet dialog.
Merge Cells Merges adjacent cells.
Unmerge Cells Unmerges merged cells.
Sort Sorts a table by column values.
Lock/Unlock Applies only to Parts Lists. Turns on or off the lock state of the selected
Rows rows. Rows that are locked have a symbol displayed to the left of the row.
Attach/Detach Applies only to Parts Lists. Attaches or detaches rows to/from parent rows
Rows or the entire table.
Automatic Text Applies only to Parts Lists. Restores the default text of the respective
columns to each of the selected cells. This operation first erases the
contents of the cells.
Goto Cell URL Launches the default Internet browser and loads the URL as specified in
the cell styles for the cell. This item is only available if a URL was specified
for the cell.
Update Parts List Manually updates the parts list. Parts lists can also be updated from the
drawing navigator.
Autoballoon Let's you automatically create balloon callouts for parts lists and tabular
notes.
Export Starts the Exports Parts List dialog. Lets you export the parts list to an
external file or browser.
Save As Let's you save a customized parts list template file in the tables palette.
Template You can drag and drop the template onto a drawing.

To merge cells:
1. Select the cells to merge.
2. With the cursor over one of the selected cells, choose MB3-> Merge.
To unmerge cells:
1. Select a cell that was previously merged.
2. With the cursor over the selected cell, choose MB3-> Unmerge.
To insert a blank row:
1. Select a row. You can also select more than one row.
2. Click MB3-> Insert-> Rows Below. You can also select Above.
To Insert a blank column:
1. Select a column. You can also select more than one column.
2. Click MB3-> Insert-> Columns To the Left. You can also select Columns To the Right.
To import attributes into a table:
1. Choose Insert-> Tabular Note or choose the Insert Tabular Note icon from the
Drafting Tables toolbar.
2. Select a cell.
3. With the cursor over the selected cell, choose MB3-> Import-> Attributes. Result: the
Import Attributes dialog opens.
4. From the Named Object list box, select a target object from which to import attributes.
5. From the Attributes list box, select one or more attributes or choose the Select All
option to import all the objects listed.
6. Choose OK or Apply.
To import expressions into a table:
1. Choose Insert-> Tabular Note or choose the Insert Tabular Note icon from the
Drafting Tables toolbar. You can also drag and drop a table template from the Table
palette on the Resource bar.
2. Select a cell.
3. With the cursor over the selected cell, choose MB3-> Import-> Expressions. Result:
the Import Expressions dialog opens.
4. From the Part File list box, select a part from which to import expressions.
5. From the Choose Expressions list box, select one or more expressions or choose the
Select All option to import all the expressions listed.
6. Choose OK or Apply.
To sort a table:
1. Select the table.
2. With the cursor over the table, choose MB3-> Sort.
3. On the Sort dialog, select the column names on which to sort.
4. To change the precedence of the sort, select a column name and click the up or
down arrow to move the item higher or lower in precedence.
5. If desired, click the Ascending/Descending option on a selected item to reverse order
the sort.
6. Click the OK or Apply option.
To create a Tabular Note template:
1. Choose Insert-> Tabular Note and place the tabular note.
2. Customize the parts list using MB3 options on table elements as desired.
3. Select the tabular note and choose MB3-> Save As Template.

Parts List Overview
Parts lists provide an easy way for you to create a bill of materials for your assembly. There
are a large variety of options that allow easy customization. You can create one or more parts
lists at any time during the creation of your assembly. The parts list can be made to
automatically update as your assembly grows or update on demand. Individual piece
numbers can either be locked or renumbered as needed. Automatic callouts can also be
generated and updated as the parts list updates.
You can define columns in parts lists so that the values of attributes display in the cells for the
row representing a component occurrence. Key fields help to determine when component
occurrences are considered as the same items, giving the capability to count items that are
alike.
If a parts list format was defined in a version of NX prior to NX2, this earlier format is used to
create the parts list with the Insert-> Parts List option. Otherwise, a generic parts list is
created with three columns: a callout column, a general column referencing the member
name, and a quantity column.
To create a parts list:
1. Choose Insert-> Parts List.
2. Drag the table to the desired location.
3. Click MB1 to place the parts list.
Editing Parts List Levels
To edit a parts list level assembly with subassemblies:
1. Select the parts list.
2. With the cursor over the table, choose MB3-> Edit Levels.
3. Turn on the Leaves Only option.
4. Choose OK. Result: subassemblies are removed from the parts list.
To create autoballoon callouts (method 1):
1. Create a parts list.
2. Choose Tools-> Table-> Autoballoon.
3. Select the parts list.
4. Choose MB3 Autoballoon.
5. Select the drawing view from the graphics screen or from the Parts List Autoballoon
dialog.
6. Click OK or Apply on the Parts List Autoballoon dialog.
7. If desired, arrange callouts by dragging.
To create autoballoon callouts (method 2):
1. Create a parts list.
2. Choose Tools-> Table-> Autoballoon.
3. Select a drawing view.
4. Choose MB3-> Autoballoon.
5. Select a parts list from the graphics window or from the Drawing Navigator
6. If desired, arrange callouts by dragging.

To Attach a row:
1. Select a target row in a Parts List.
2. With the cursor over the selected row, choose MB3-> Attach/Detach Rows. Result:
the row moves according to the restrictions stated in the overview.

To Detach a row:
1. Select an attached row in a Parts List.
2. With the cursor over the selected row, choose MB3-> Attach/Detach Rows..
To create a parts list template:
1. Choose Insert-> Parts List and place the parts list.
2. Customize the parts list using MB3 options on table elements as desired.
3. Select the parts list and choose MB3-> Save As Template.
To export a table:
1. Select the table.
2. With the cursor over the table, choose MB3-> Export. Result: the Export Table dialog
opens.
3. Choose an Output Location option (Information Window, File, or Browser). For this
example, choose File.
4. Enter a name in the File Name text box.
5. Choose Browse. Result: The Output Table file box opens.
6. Choose a location and OK the Output Table dialog.
7. Choose a Format option (Spaces, Commas, or Tabs Between Columns).
8. Choose OK or Apply.
To Lock a row:
1. Select a row.
2. With the cursor over a row, choose MB3-> Lock/Unlock. Result: a small lock symbol
displays.
To Unlock a row.
1. Select a locked row.
2. With the cursor over the row, choose MB3-> Lock/Unock. Result: the lock symbol
goes away.
To go to a URL Address:
1. Select a cell.
2. Choose MB3-> Go To Cell URL.
To edit cell text using the Annotation Editor:
1. Select the cell to edit.
2. With the cursor over the cell, choose MB3-> Edit Text.
3. Use Annotation Editor options to enter and format the cell text.
4. OK the Annotation Editor dialog.
To merge cells:
1. Select the cells to merge.
2. With the cursor over one of the selected cells, choose MB3-> Merge.
To unmerge cells:
1. Select a cell that was previously merged.
2. With the cursor over the selected cell, choose MB3-> Unmerge.

1. How to bring the user defined view in the drafting?
2. Is it possible to change the drafting sheet parameters after placing the view?
3. What is the difference between Folded and Unfolded section view?
4. What is the difference between section and half section view?
5. Is it possible to give auto dimension in drafting?
6. What is the difference between full bolt circle and full circular centerline?
7. What is the purpose of symmetrical centerline?
8. How to insert GDT symbols in drawing?
9. How will you edit the size of the character, line type in drafting?
10. Is it possible to bring multiple part lists?
11. What is the difference between broken view and breakout section?
12. Is it possible to sketch a drawing in drafting?
13. How to insert balloon?
14. What is the function of GDT parameters?
Is it possible to show a half or a part of a view?

MANUFACTURING
Introduction to Manufacturing
The Manufacturing module allows you to interactively program and postprocess milling,
drilling, turning, and wire edm tool paths. Customizable configuration files define the available
machining processors, tool libraries, postprocessors, and other high level parameters which
can be targeted to specific market segments such as Mold and Die and Machinery.
Templates allow you to customize the user interface and specify machining Setups which can
include machine tools, cutting tools, machining methods, shared geometry, and sequences of
operations.
The Operation Navigator allows you to view and manage relationships between operations,
geometry, machining methods, and tools. It allows groups of parameters to be shared among
many operations, eliminating the repetitious, tedious task of respecifying parameters for each
operation, and provides separate views to manage these relationships.
Because of the highly customizable nature of the Manufacturing module, the available options
and general appearance of dialog boxes on your system may differ from those described in
this document. The organization and contents of this documentation is based on the Mach Kit
(default set of configuration files, templates, and libraries) delivered with each release by NX.

Upon entering the Manufacturing module for the first time with a part, you are required to
choose an Application Package (configuration.dat file) and a Machining Discipline. This
determines the Machining Applications (templates) available in the Create Operation dialog
box. The chosen Machining Discipline may be changed at any time in the Create Operation
dialog box by choosing another Type option.

Terminology
An understanding of the following terms is essential to effective usage of the Manufacturing
application.
Assemblies
Assembly parts can be machined using NX Manufacturing applications. You can select
geometry in an assembly part file or any component part file to use in an operation. If the
selected geometry is located in the component part file, the CAM operation will contain an
occurrence of the selected geometry. All selected geometry is associative.
CAM objects (Operations, Tools) can only be retrievable in the assembly part file. You can
retrieve libraries of tools or from a component library part file. Part merge can be used to
retrieve CAM objects from the component part into the assembly part.
An assembly can be created containing components, such as clamps and fixtures. This
approach:
• Avoids having to merge clamp, fixture, etc. geometry into the part to be machined.
• Allows you to generate fully associative tool paths for models that you may not have
write access privilege.
• Enables multiple NC programmers to develop NC data in separate files
simultaneously.
The Manufacturing application retains the information used in generating a tool path. This
capability is termed associativity.
Operation Navigator
The Operation Navigation Tool is a graphic user interface that enables you to manage
operations and operation parameters for the current Part. The Operation Navigator enables
you to specify groups of parameters that are shared among operations. The Operation
Navigator uses a tree structure to illustrate the relationships between groups and operations.
Parameters may be passed down or inherited from group to group and from group to
operation based on the positional relationships in the Operation Navigator. Except for a few
cases, you can determine whether or not to apply inheritance.
Operation
An Operation contains all information used to generate a single tool path. For each operation
that you generate and accept, the system saves the information used to generate the tool
path in the current part. This information includes the tool path name, geometric data (e.g.,
permanent boundaries, surfaces, points, etc.), permanent tools, the postprocessor command
set, display data, and the coordinate system of definition.
You can use this information either when editing an operation or as the default when defining
a new operation. For example, you can retrieve an operation, change only one desired
parameter, and regenerate the tool path without having to respecify the geometry, tools, or
any other data.
Associativity
Furthermore, if the geometry or tool has been edited since the operation was originally
generated, regenerating it in this manner automatically uses the new information. For
example, when you edit a curve that is part of a boundary, a regeneration process modifies
the boundary to include the changes that were made. You can then update any operation
using this boundary without having to reselect the geometry.
In the case of CAM operations, it is unreasonable to automatically update the tool path every
time the geometry is altered, since some operations can take many minutes to complete.
Therefore, it is up to you to update the tool paths when necessary.
The Point and/or Plane subfunctions are used to specify Avoidance Geometry and Engage
and Retract data in all operations. In addition they are used as alternative methods of
specifying Points and Surfaces in Point-to-Point.
For operation types, which require boundaries, geometry edits cause the recalculation of this
boundary data, as needed.
Curve edit options, such as Transformations, Curve Trim, Modify Line Endpoint and Edit
Spline, cause the boundary data to be updated. However, no new members are inserted, and
no members are removed.
Filleting options, such as Simple Fillet, Two Curve Fillet, and Three Curve Fillet, cause the
new fillet to be inserted in a boundary if the following conditions are met:
1. The two filleted entities must be consecutive members of the boundary or first and
last members of a closed boundary. In the case of a Three Curve Fillet, this
requirement must be satisfied after the second curve has been deleted.
2. The filleted entities must both be trimmed automatically by the system.
MCS
The Machine Coordinate System (MCS) is the coordinate system for the output of tool paths
and GOTOs in the CLSF. This allows you to move the Work Coordinate System (WCS)
independently.

Setup
In NX the NC machining environment is referred to as the setup. The first time you open a
part in the Manufacturing application you select the setup from the Machining Environment
dialog and then select initialize. With the setup you can input and save the full machining
environment; this includes the tool paths and their parameters.
The tool paths and their parameters are saved inside what is called an operation. Each
operation contains its own tool path and parameters. NX allows you to separate the
operations into sections called groups. These groups become parents when operations are
placed underneath them in the Operation Navigator. Therefore, the documentation often
refers to them as parent groups, when talking about an issue that relates to the group both
before and after it contains operations. The relation between the operations and these parent
groups is displayed through the different views of the Operation Navigator.
The Operation Navigator contains four views: Geometry View, Tool View, Method View, and
Program Order View. Each operation has four parent groups: geometry, tools, methods, and
the program order. As you would assume, to view the geometry parent groups look in the
Geometry View. To view the tool parent groups, look in the Tool View.
Benefits of Using the Setup
• The setup helps you to organize and logically group all the information related to the
NC machining. This includes the operations, parameters for tooling, geometry, cutting
methods, and programs.
• The setup shares information within and among the views. You can make a change in
one view and see how the change is reflected in the other views.
• The setup allows you to focus on the specific information you choose so that you are
viewing only the information you need to see. This allows you to quickly and easily
access the information you need to organize a job.
• NX provides several pre-defined setup templates to initialize the CAM session.
• The setup promotes standardization as it can be saved as a template to be reused.
• The Operation Navigator presents information clearly and graphically, so that other
users can easily see how the Manufacturing setup is organized.

Environment
When planning the machining of a part there are many decisions to be made. NX helps you
organize, store, and use the information related to the planning of a part. This information
defines the machining environment. The following four bullets describe the four main aspects
of the planning process. They may be addressed in various orders.
• Decide what steps you are going to use to create the part you desire. For example,
consider the various geometry to be machined so that you can decide what operation
types are required, such as roughing, semi-finishing, and finishing. We call these
considerations the method. When you answer these questions about stock,
tolerances, and feed rates, you are defining the Method.
• Choose which machine you want perform the machining of this part. Also, select the
tools and tool assemblies for each cut. The machine uses the assemblies to hold the
tool to the machine. Choosing all of these tooling aspects is called defining the
tooling.
• Decide the orientation of the part relative to the machine. Consider the following: what
side to machine, where the part is placed on the machine, which operations are
needed for what features, and how to clamp it down. Decide on the finished part, the
initial part geometry, clearance planes, clamps and fixtures. This is called the
geometry aspect, since the answers to these questions define the geometry.
• The NC program holds the ordered list of cuts for machining the part. This information
is sent to the machine tool.

Operations
The main unit of NX CAM is the setup. The setup consists of all the operations and the
environment in which the operations were created. An operation contains a uniquely
generated tool path and the information within the tool path: geometry, tool, and machining
parameters. An operation is different from an NC program in that one operation generates
one tool path and the NC program may generate numerous tool paths. You post process the
NC program to create the actual commands that are sent to the CNC controller.

Four Parents of an Operation
Each operation has four parents. The operations inherit information from each parent and the
system uses it to calculate the tool path. The four types of parent groups are given below:
• The geometry for the specific operation.
• The tooling to be used.
• The machining parameters for the operation.
• The program that contains the operation.
These are the four parents that supply information to an operation. For each new operation
you need to select these four parent groups. The previous selections remain modal as you
create operations so you only need to select what changes. Below is a short description of
each of these four Parents.
The geometry for the specific operation
For each operation you must choose the orientation and the geometry. The orientation is
defined by a coordinate system and the geometry is defined in various ways, depending on
what type of operation you are creating.
The coordinate system, fixture offset, clearance plane and tool axis can all be stored in an
orientation group.
The geometry to be machined in each operation needs to be defined either in the geometry
parent or within each individual operation. It is usually more convenient to define the
geometry in a geometry parent group. If the geometry is specified here it can be used by all
the subsequent operations of the parent. For example, if you are going to repeat similar
operations on two cavities, you can put the cavity geometry in two groups, and then create or
copy the same operations under each group. This saves you from duplicating your efforts.
The geometry also defines the part material, which is used to calculate machining data.
The tooling to be used
Each operation needs a tool to cut the tool path. Tools can be retrieved from a library with
hundreds of standard tools, or created as needed. Tools are placed in holders, carriers, and
turrets, on a machine tool. Tools have a tool material that is used to calculate machining data.
The machining parameters for the operation
Each operation contains numerous parameters. The most specific parameters such as
engage, retract, and stepover, are stored in the operation. Some parameters are shared by
many operations and are stored in the Method parent group. These shared parameters can
include the stock, tolerance, feedrates, and display colors. The method also defines the cut
method used to calculate machining data.
The Program that contains the operation
You create programs to help you organize your operations and the order in which the system
runs them. If you need two programs (or tape files) for this job, you create a program group
for each one, such as tape_1 and tape_2. When you create an operation, you select whether
it machines in the program tape_1 or tape_2. Before you postprocess, you can reorder the
operations in each program, or move them from one program to the other.
Setup Views
As described in the previous sections, the setup can be seen from four different views in the
Operation Navigator: Program Order, Method, Geometry, and Tool. Most NC programmers
tend to think of machining data in some combination of these views (possibly at different
times). When you switch from one view to another, for example, from the Program Order View
to the Tool View, you are viewing the same set of operations grouped together based on
different information.
In each view, columns can be displayed in the Operation Navigator to show the three other
parent groups of each operation.
Having different views not only allows you to view and plan all the operations while you are
creating the NC Program, but after the operations are created, you can go back and edit them
in any of the views. These two steps, planning and editing, are described below for each of
the views. Note that for the Program Order View, the explanation is combined.
Program Order View
The Program Order View contains all the operations in the machining order. This view helps
you to group all of the operations in the setup in chronological order as you create them. In
this view, it is easy to drag and drop if you need to change the order of the operations. When
using the Program Order View you can make your changes, check your sequence of
operations, and output to the postprocessor without changing views. The Program Order View
allows you to work as you always have in the past in NX.
Geometry View
The Geometry View groups all the operations in the part according to the geometry groups.
For example, all the operations in the MILL_GEOM group are grouped together and all the
operations for the MILL_AREA group are grouped together and so on. Because of this
organization, when editing you can easily locate the geometric information you need and edit
it as you desire.

All changes made to the Feature transfer to each of the Operations below it.
Geometry groups are used to share geometry and orientation entities among operations. The
contents of the groups are inherited by the groups and operations below them in the
Navigator tree.
Tool View
The Tool View contains the entire list of tools that have been pulled from the tool library or
created in the part to be used in the part. The tools display in the Tool View whether they are
actually used in the NC program or not. If a tool is used the operation in which it is used is
listed below the tool. If the tool is not used there is not an operation below the tool.
Method View
The Method View helps you to group all the operations in the setup based on their machining
method. For example, Mill, Drill, Lathe, roughing, semi-finishing, finishing. When you are
editing, you are able to quickly see the methods that are used in each operation. This allows
you to find and edit the method information.
In the Method View a list of operations is organized underneath a Method name.
These are all the operations for which this Method is used.

The Four Views
The Operation Navigator is continually displayed in one of four different views: the Machining
Method view, Program Order view, Machine Tool view, or Geometry view. Each view
organizes the same set of operations according to the theme of the view. In addition, each
view shows the relationship between the operations and the organizational groups that are
particular to that view.
You can easily switch from one view of the Operation Navigator to another by choosing one of
the icons in the main menu bar. The Operation Navigator icon is a toggle that displays and
hides the Operation Navigator.

Program Shows which Program group each operation belongs to and the order in which
Order View operations will be executed on the machine tool. This order is used for output
to the postprocessor or CLSF. In this view, the order of the operations is
relevant and important. Therefore, sorting of columns is disabled.
Machine Allows you to organize the operations under common machining applications
Method which share the same parameter values (rough, finish, semi finish)
View
Geometry Shows the machining geometry and MCS each operation will use. In this view,
View the order of the operations within any geometry group is relevant and
important. Therefore, sorting of columns is disabled.
Machine Organizes operations by cutting tools. It can also organize cutting tools by
Tool View turrets on a lathe or by tool type on a mill.

Operation Navigator
The Operation Navigator is a graphical user interface (GUI) that enables you to manage
operations and operation parameters for the current part. Operation Navigator enables you to
specify groups of parameters that are shared among operations.
The Operation Navigator uses a tree structure to illustrate the relationships between groups
and operations. Parameters may be passed down or inherited from group to group and from
group to operation based on the positional relationships in the Operation Navigator. Except
for a few cases, you can determine whether or not to apply inheritance.
The Operation Navigator is found in the Resource bar to the right of the screen in the
Manufacturing Application. The Resource bar contains five tab options.
Click on the Operation Navigator tab to bring up the Operation Navigator.
Double click the tab and the Operation Navigator breaks away from the Resource bar. The
Operation Navigator is now ready to be docked wherever you drag and drop it. When you
want the Operation Navigator to rejoin the Resource bar, close the Operation Navigator
window and the Operation Navigator automatically rejoins the Resource bar.
When the Operation Navigator is in the Resource bar a pushpin icon is found in the top left
hand corner. Click on the pushpin to post the Operation Navigator. Now you can move your
cursor outside the navigator window and the navigator window remains open.

Status Icons in Columns
The Operation Navigator displays icons along with or instead of text in some of the columns.
The Name column uses icons as well as text to communicate the name and status of the
operation. The columns for Toolchange, Path and In Process Workpiece support icons
instead of text. This allows you to make these columns much smaller and therefore display
more columns in the Operation Navigator. If you use your mouse to hover over an icon, the
system displays a tool tip which gives you a textual description of what the icon means. In the
case of the Toolchange column this description includes the name of the upcoming tool. To
get an idea of how this will be displayed please see the following image.

Name
In the Name column operations and programs in the Operation Navigator are preceded by
one of three status symbols: Complete, Regenerate, or Repost as illustrated below.
Icon Meaning of Description
Icon
Complete Indicates the tool path has been generated and output
(postprocessed or CLS). The path has not changed since then.
Regenerate Indicates the tool path for the operation has never been generated, or
the generated tool path is out of date.
Repost Indicates the tool path has never been output, or the tool path has
changed since it was last output and the last output is out of date.

Common Operation Options
This section discusses options that are common to many Operation Types.

Avoidance Specifies, activates (or cancels) geometry used for non-cutting moves
Geometry
Corner and Feed Prevents the cutter from gouging as it cuts concave or convex corners
Rate Control
Customize Dialog Specifies the parameters (text fields, buttons, and option menus) that
appear in high level operation parameter dialog boxes
Display Options Determines how the tool and tool path are displayed on the screen
Engage And Establishes the direction and distance the tool moves into or out of cutting
Retract movements within the tool path.
Feed Rates Specifies feedrate values for different types of tool movements
Machine Control Redefine the cutting tool, control whether circular or B-Spline (NURBS)
tool motions are allowed in the tool path, enter post processor commands
in the tool path, determine spindle axis (for lathe operations), provide
cutter compensation information in the tool path
Postprocessor Provides special instructions to the machine tool within the tool path
Commands
Visualize Graphically simulates and verifies the material removal process of a tool
path
Tool Path Generate and review the tool path
All other This button gives you quick access to all customizable items available to
Parameters this dialog, that are not currently customized into the main dialog.
NX Library Allows you to access tools, machines and feeds and speeds data from a
database.

FACE MILLING
Face Milling Overview
Face Milling is best at cutting planar faces on solid bodies such as pads on a casting. By
picking the faces, the system automatically knows not to gouge the rest of the part.
There are three templates provided for creating face milling operations. Create Operation -->
Mill_Planar --> and then selecting one of the following:
• Face Milling Area - Face Milling Area has part geometry, cut area, wall geometry,
check geometry, and automatic wall selection.
• Face Milling - Face Milling has part geometry, faces (blank boundaries), check
boundaries, and check geometry.
• Face Milling Manual - Face Milling Manual contains all the geometry types, and the
cut pattern is set to mixed.

Specify Face Geometry
• With Face Milling, you can specify the face geometry simply by selecting the faces to
be machined.
• You also can define face geometry by selecting existing curves and edges or by
specifying a sequence of points in much the same way as in Planar Milling.
• You can easily create boundaries from a face and its chamfers using an option called
Ignore Chamfers.
• Face Milling automatically combines regions that are within close proximity and need
to be cut to the same height.
• Additionally, with Face Milling you can program the cutting and traversing of voids.

Specify the amount of material to be removed
With Face Milling, you can specify the amount of material to be removed and the surrounding
part and check geometry to avoid gouging. The selected faces define the floors to be faced
off. By selecting the solid body as part geometry, the system can avoid gouging the part.
The thickness of the material to be removed is measured upward from the level of a face
boundary plane and along the tool axis. All boundaries of the Face Geometry can be defined
at different levels. The tool axis is automatically defined as the normal of the first selected
face boundary plane. Since Face Milling removes material in planar levels with respect to the
tool axis, the normal of a face boundary plane must be parallel with the tool axis. If it is not,
the face will be ignored during tool path generation.
Although Planar Mill can be used to perform Face Milling, the Face Milling Module greatly
simplifies the process. In Planar Mill, you can create the boundary geometry by picking the
desired face, lifting the boundary to the desired height, and selecting the floor at the plane of
the planar face. Several operations may be needed when planar faces to be machined are at
different levels.
A Face Milling operation is created from a template, and requires geometry, a tool, and
parameters to generate a tool path. The face geometry is required as an input for tool path
generation. For each selected face, the processor traces the geometry, identifies regions to
be machined, and cuts these regions without gouging the part.
The Face Milling dialog box enables you to specify whether you wish to define Part, Face, or
Check geometry. It contains many parameters common to Planar Milling. Each is described in
the following sections.

Benefits of Using Face Milling
Face Milling provides the following benefits:
• Interaction is very simple, because you just select all the faces to be machined and
specify the amount of stock to be removed from the top of each face.
• When regions are close together and are the same height, they can be machined
together, saving time because you eliminate some of the engage and retract moves.
Combining regions also yields the most efficient tool path because the cutter is not
traveling as far in between cutting regions.
• Face Milling provides a quick and easy means of describing the stock that needs to
be removed from the tops of selected faces. The stock is modeled from the face up
instead of in a top-down fashion.
• Face Milling allows you to easily machine planar faces on a solid, such as the
standing pads commonly found on castings.
• The solid on which the faces reside is recognized as part geometry when the regions
are created. If the solid body is selected as part, you can use gouge checking to
avoid gouges to the part.
• Different cut patterns can be used for each face to be machined, including a manual
cut pattern, in which you use a Teach Mode to drive the cutter.
• The cutter will run off of standing pads, completely clearing the part before lifting.
• When cutting across voids, you can have the cutter maintain the cut, without any lifts.

Class Selection for Faces in Face Milling
Sometimes it is more efficient to select multiple faces than to select faces individually. In a
Face Milling operation, you can use Class Selection to select multiple faces based on criteria
you supply such as object name, layer, and color.
• In a Face milling operation or MILL_BND geometry group dialog, select the Face
Geometry icon.
• In the Face Geometry dialog, set the Filter Type to Face Boundary.
• The Append Face dialog is activated.
• The Class Selection button will be made available for selecting faces.
Cut Method
Cut Methods determine the tool path pattern used to machine cut regions:
• Zig-Zag, Zig, and Zig With Contour all produce variations of parallel linear cutting
passes.
• Follow Periphery produces a sequence of concentric cutting passes that can progress
inward or outward.
• Profile produces a single cutting pass that follows the part portion of the cut region
contour. Unlike the other cut types, Profile is not designed to remove a volume of
material, but rather to follow the part portion of the periphery of the region only. If a
cut region consists entirely of blank geometry, a profile cut method will not produce
any cutting motions in that region.
• Mixed allows you to select different cut methods at each region, one of which is
Manual Cut.
Stepover
Stepover allows you to specify the distance between cut passes. You can specify the
distance directly by entering a constant value or percentage of the tool diameter, or indirectly
by entering a scallop height and allowing the system to calculate the distance between cut
passes.
You can also define variable stepovers by specifying an allowable range for the system to use
in determining the stepover size, or by specifying stepover sizes and corresponding numbers
of passes. Stepover provides the following options.

Specify Blank Overhang
The Blank Overhang determines the maximum amount the tool will be allowed to extend
beyond the face. You enter the Blank Overhang as a percentage of the tool diameter.
Setting the Blank Overhang so that it is smaller than the tool diameter (less than 100.0) will
yield cut regions which machine less air and take less time to cut.
utting Across Voids
Across Voids is a cut parameter specific to Face milling. For the system to recognize a void,
it must be a fully-enclosed pocket or hole. When cutting across voids, you have three
options:
• Follow will attempt to go around the void at the cut level:
• Cut will continue cutting along the same direction at the cut feed rate, in effect
ignoring the void.
• Traverse will continue along the same direction, but change from Cut feed rate to
Traverse feed rate while the tool is completely in air, if the distance across the void
exceeds the traverse distance. The traverse feed rate is only activated when the tool
is completely off the workpiece and not while it is still touching it.
Final Floor Stock
Final Floor Stock is a cut parameter specific to Face Milling and Planar Milling. In Face
Milling, Final Floor Stock defines the thickness of material to be left uncut above the face
geometry. The total thickness of material to be removed is the distance between the Blank
Distance and Final Floor Stock.
Cut Depth
In Face Milling, the cut levels are calculated for each selected face as follows:
• Cut levels = (blank_distance – floor_stock) / depth_per_cut.
• Blank distance and floor stock are measured from the face plane and along the tool
axis normal to the face plane.
Blank Distance = distance between the plane of a face and the blank distance.
Floor Stock = distance between the plane of a face and the floor stock.
Blank Distance
Blank Distance defines the total thickness of material to be removed, measured above the
plane of the selected face geometry and along the tool axis. This option is used in
combination with Final Floor Stock to determine the actual thickness of material to be
removed. This is used in combination with Depth of Cut to determine how many cut depths
will be generated at each face.
Blank Stock
Blank Stock is the distance the tool is positioned from the defined blank. Note that in Face
Milling, if you select faces, these are actually blank boundaries. Therefore, the system offsets
the distance around the selected faces. If you select cut area, the system offsets the distance
around the cut area. This enlarges the cut areas to account for extra material around the
sides of the faces you are machining.
Mixed Cut
Mixed Cut in Face Milling provides you with various cutting methods to machine each defined
region of your part. Depending on the geometry of the region you are machining, you may
decide to cut using Manual Cut Pattern, one of the Automatic Cut Patterns, or Omit (if you do
not want to cut the region). Because you have these options with Mixed Cut, you can
determine with each cut region whether it would be best to use a predetermined automatic cut
pattern, whether you should create your own cut pattern using Manual Cut, or whether no
cutting is needed for that region (Omit). Use Mixed Cut Patterns when you need different cut
patterns on each face of the part, or when you want to use Manual Cut pattern.
Benefits of Using Mixed Cut Patterns
Mixed Cut Patterns provide the following benefits:
• You have unlimited cut pattern choices to ensure the most efficient machining for
various regions of the part. If you decide that the predetermined automatic cut
patterns are not efficient, you can choose to use Manual Cut Pattern and create your
own or select Omit for no cutting.
• With every cut region, you can choose a new cut method, helping you to match the
best cut pattern to the geometry for that particular defined region of the part.
• You can do a gouge check with every motion you define by turning the toggle on or
off, allowing you to check for accuracy and avoid costly material damage.

PLANER MILLING
Planar Milling Overview
Planar Milling operations create tool paths that remove volumes of material in planar layers.
This type of operation is most commonly used to rough out material in preparation for a
finishing operation.
Cavity Milling and Planar Milling are similar in that they both remove material in cut levels that
are perpendicular to the Tool Axis. However, the two operation types differ in the method
used to define the material.
• Planar Milling uses boundaries to define the Part material.
• Cavity Milling uses boundaries, faces, curves, and bodies to define the Part material.
Planar Milling is intended to cut parts with vertical walls, and planar islands and floors normal
to the tool axis. Cavity Milling is intended for parts with tapered walls and contoured floors as
illustrated below.
Planar and Cavity Mill Parts
The Cut Volume is the material to be removed. You can specify the material to be removed as
the Blank material (stock piece, forging, casting, etc.), minus the Part material as illustrated
below. You can define the Blank and Part geometry with boundaries in Planar Milling, or by
selecting faces, curves, or bodies in Cavity Milling.

Part and Blank Geometry
In Planar Milling, boundaries are used to define the Part, Blank, Check, and Trim geometry.
The boundaries are swept along the tool axis to the Floor Plane to define the Part and Blank
volumes.

Blank and Part Boundaries

In the above figure, a Blank boundary defines the Blank volume and multiple Part boundaries
define the Part volume. The cut volume (material to be removed) is defined by the Blank
volume minus the Part volume.
It is not always necessary to specify a Blank boundary. A Part boundary may serve as a
peripheral loop (main containment boundary) by enclosing the other Part boundaries as
illustrated below.
Part Boundaries

In the above figure, a Part boundary serves as a main containment boundary, essentially
defining the Blank volume. Multiple Part boundaries within the main containment boundary
define the Part volume. The cut volume (material to be removed) is defined by the difference
between the Blank volume and the Part Volume.
Boundaries can be defined by selecting curves or edges, permanent boundaries, or faces. To
correctly identify the Part and Blank volumes, boundaries should be placed at the top of the
material.
Although a Blank boundary may be specified as Tanto, the tool does not actually cut tangent
to a Blank boundary. If it did, the tool would cut through empty space for the first pass and no
material would be removed until the first stepover. Instead, the first cutting pass is offset into
the Blank material the distance of one stepover as illustrated below.

Tanto on a Blank Boundary
The above figure illustrates the first Tanto pass of a Follow Periphery cut pattern on a Blank
boundary.

Boundary Geometry
In Planar Milling, the following boundary creation options are available to define and modify
cut regions. Refer to Temporary Boundaries in the Boundaries section of this document for
details on how to create boundaries. Also, refer to the Introductions of Planar and Cavity
Milling for a discussion of how these options work together to define the cut regions.
Boundaries also may be used by Cavity Milling operations. Boundary Geometry options may
need to be customized into the operation parameters dialog box.

Part
Part allows you to specify geometry that will represent the finished Part.
Part Boundaries

Blank
Blank allows you to specify geometry that will represent the raw material you wish to cut
away. A Blank boundary does not represent the final part and can be cut through or engaged
into directly.

Cut Depths Defined at Floor and Island Tops

Check
Check enables you to define geometry you do not wish to violate such as clamps that hold
the part. The areas where the Check Geometry overlaps the volume of material to be
removed will not be cut You may specify a Check Stock value (Cutting—>Check Stock)
which defines the distance the tool will be positioned from the Check Geometry. A Tanto tool
position is applied to Check Boundaries.

Check Boundary
When the tool encounters Check Geometry, it will either cut around the Check geometry or it
will retract depending on the status of Follow Check in the Cut Parameters dialog box.
Trim
Trim allows you to specify boundaries that will further constrain the cut regions at each cut
level. You may define the area of the cut region to exclude from the operation by specifying
the Side Trimmed as Inside or Outside for Closed boundaries, or Left or Right for Open
boundaries.

Side Trimmed Outside
You may specify a Trim Stock value (Cutting—>Trim Stock) as illustrated below to define
the distance the tool will be positioned from the Trim Geometry.

Trim Boundary
An On tool position is always applied to Trim Boundaries. You do not have the option of
specifying a Tanto condition.

Floor
Floor defines the lowest (last) cut level. All cut levels are generated parallel to the Floor
plane. Only one Floor can be defined per operation. Redefining the Floor automatically
replaces the existing Floor.
The following figure illustrates an example of how the Floor correctly defines the lowest cut
level when a Blank boundary is used.

Floor Defining Lowest Level of Blank Geometry
The following figure illustrates an example of how the Floor correctly defines the lowest cut
level when only Part boundaries are used.

Floor Defining Lowest Level of Part Geometry
The cutter must be able to reach the Floor without gouging the part. If the Floor defines a cut
level that is inaccessible as illustrated below, an error message is displayed.

Inaccessible Floor Plane
If you do not specify a Floor, the system uses the X-Y plane of the Machine Coordinate
System.

Machinable Regions
Machinable Regions are the areas at each cut level where the tool can cut without gouging
the part. The tool will only be positioned into those areas where it can remove material and
not gouge the part. When a cut level has islands or walls that are close enough together to
prevent the tool to cut through without gouging, the area is divided into separate regions. The
following figure shows how an area is broken up in to multiple cut regions because the tool is
too large to fit in some areas without gouging.

Machinable Regions
The system creates machinable regions by tracing around the Part and Blank geometry.
These traces are made at each cut level to create one or more machinable regions per level.
Each region consists of an enclosed peripheral shape and may contain islands inside. Islands
that are outside the enclosed peripheral shape will not be part of the machinable region and
will form separate Open Regions.
If Blank geometry is defined, the processor will cut only the regions which lie within the blank
and ignore any cavity regions which lie outside the blank as illustrated below.

Only Regions Within the Blank are Cut
A Closed region is created when the tracings create a closed peripheral shape around
material to be removed. Islands may exist within the peripheral shape. The following are
different types of Closed regions.
A Facing region is a type of Closed region where Blank geometry creates the periphery of
the bounded area and and no Part geometry falls within that bounded area. The tool will
remove all Blank material from that level.

Facing Region
A Core region is a type of Closed region where the Blank geometry creates the periphery of
the bounded area and Part geometry falls within that bounded area. The tool will remove the
Blank material from around the Part geometry.
Core Region
A Cavity region is a type of Closed region where the Part geometry creates a peripheral
boundary. This type of region may contain islands. The tool will remove the material from
within the cavity to the Part geometry.

Cavity Region
An Open Sided region is a type of Closed region where the Part Geometry and the Blank
Geometry form a peripheral loop containing segments that are defined by both the Part and
Blank. The segments defined by Part geometry cannot be violated. The segments defined by
Blank geometry form the open side of the cut region and allow the tool to pass through as
illustrated below.

Open Sided Region
An Open region is created when the tracings do not create a closed peripheral shape around
material to be removed. This can occur when the Part geometry consists of islands only with
with no Blank geometry enclosing them, or when the Part geometry does not form an
enclosed area (as with an open Part boundary) as illustrated below.
Open regions can only use Profile or Standard cut types. Attempting to use any other cut type
will cause the system to display an error message and will fail to generate a tool path.
Open Regions
Do not confuse a Core Region (which is a type of Closed Region) with an Open Region
containing islands. Notice in the following illustration that the Core Region is defined by both
Part geometry and Blank geometry. The Open Region, however, is defined only by the Part
geometry which forms an island. No Blank geometry is defined in the Open region.

Core Region vs. Open Region
Also, do not confuse an Open Sided Region (which is a type of Closed Region) with an
Open

Open Sided Region vs. Open Region
In each of the above two examples, the Open Region is a shape or collection of shapes that
do not represent a continuous area.
During tool path generation for a Planar Milling operation when the tool axis is normal to the
Part Surface, the tool axis is defined relative to the normal of the Floor and the Machine
Coordinate System (MCS) as follows:
• If the Z-axis of the MCS is perpendicular to the normal of the floor, then the tool axis
is the normal of the floor.
• If the Z-axis of the MCS is not perpendicular to the normal of the floor, the tool axis is
the normal of the floor that is most nearly aligned with the Z-axis of the MCS.
When there is more than one area at a cut level to be machined, you have two methods of
ordering how these areas will be cut as they are propagated to successive cut levels.
• Remove all of the machinable regions at one cut level before moving to the next cut
level (cut by level first).
• Remove each cut region to its lowest cut level before moving to the next cut
If an undefined region includes all island shapes, these shapes will always be cut by level first
regardless of user-defined cut order.

Custom Boundary Data
With Custom Boundary Data, you can set the stock, offset, cut feed rate, tool position,
machine control events (post commands, tolerance, and blank distance associated with the
selected boundary or the individual boundary member.
Benefits of Custom Boundary Data
• You have control with Custom Boundary Data because you decide where in the part
you specify the custom boundary data. For example, if you are concerned about
machining certain complex areas of a part, you can specify a larger stock value for
just this particular area.
• You have more flexibility with the machining of your part because you can make
adjustments wherever needed. This results in a high-quality finished part.
Using Custom Boundary Data
Define Boundary Parameters
Define the following values associated with the selected boundary:
• Stock
• Offset
• Cut Feed Rate
• Tool Position
• Machine Control Events (Post Commands)
• Tolerance
• Blank Distance
You can apply these settings to the entire boundary or each individual boundary member.
You also can edit these settings for the entire boundary or individual members.
You can define stock, cut feed rate, and tolerance at the following levels:
• Operation Level (i.e., within the main dialog box).
• Boundary Level (i.e., when selecting a Permanent boundary or a Face or when
editing boundaries of an operation).
• Boundary Member Level (i.e., when selecting Temporary boundary members or
editing members of a boundary).
You can define tool position and machine control events (post commands) at the following
levels:
• Boundary Member Level (i.e., when selecting boundary members or editing members
of a boundary).
You can define offset values at the following levels:
• Geometry Group Level (Operations inherit data at the Geometry Group Level.).
If custom parameters are defined at the boundary member level then they take precedence
over any parameters defined at any other level. Likewise, custom parameters defined at the
boundary level take precedence over the parameters at the operation level. During tool path
generation, the total distance measured from the tool to the boundary is the sum of the stock
and the offset values.
Stock
With Stock you can specify a distance from the tool to the boundary. Generally, the system
ignores stock values when the tool position is On. This is not true, however, when you define
custom stock values for the individual members of a boundary.
For the Tanto member, the offset value is equal to the combined stock value of the member
and the tool radius. For the On member, the offset value is equal to the custom stock value of
the member as illustrated below:

Tool Offset when Custom Stock is Applied
Since the tool position and stock values may vary between the tool path segments that
correspond to two joining boundary segments, the system may need to resolve how the tool
path will be generated at the intersection. These conditions may override the Corner Control
settings you may have specified for Convex corners.
Offset
Offset is similar to the Stock. With Offset you can specify a distance measured from the tool
to the boundary in the Geometry Group Level.
Cut Feed Rate
Choose Cut Feed Rate and enter the cut feed rate for that boundary in the text field. Specify
English or Metric units as indicated below.
English Units Metric Units
None None
IPM (inches per minute) MMPM (millimeters per minute)
IPR (inches per revolution) MMPR (millimeters per revolution)
If you add an arc in the corner of a tool path, the feed rate along that arc will be whatever the
feed rate was along the previous boundary member.

Feed Rate Around an Inserted Arc

Tool Position
Tool Position determines how the tool will position when it approaches the boundary member.
This option allows you to specify the tool position as Tanto or On for each individually
selected boundary member.
Machine Control Events
Use Machine Control Events (post commands) to give special instructions to the machine tool
within the tool path. You can specify the machine control events either at the start or end of a
tool path, or at both the start and end of the tool path.
Tolerances
Tolerances enable you to specify the Intol and Outtol values for the tool along the boundary.
Intol
Intol is the maximum allowable violation of the inside (left) of a boundary.
Outtol
Outtol is the maximum allowable violation of the outside (right) of a boundary. The advantage
of assigning two separate values is that you can specify unequal bands.

Intol/Outtol (unequal bands)
Blank Distance
Choose Blank Distance and enter a value to be applied as the blank offset distance from the
selected boundary.
Face Selection
The Face Selection options enable you to specify which type of interior edges to use in
creating boundaries. These options (Ignore Holes, Ignore Islands, Ignore Chamfers, Convex
Edges, Concave Edges) are available only when creating boundaries from selected faces.
Ignore Holes
Ignore Holes causes the system to ignore the holes in the face that you select to define your
boundaries. If this option is toggled Off, the system creates boundaries on the selected face
around each hole.

Ignore Holes On/Off

Ignore Islands
Ignore Islands causes the system to ignore the islands in the face that you select to define
your boundaries. If this option is toggled Off, the system creates boundaries on the selected
face around each island.
Ignore Islands On/Off
Ignoring holes and islands reduces processing time, especially when you are using complex
solid models. Many solids contain holes that are of no consequence in developing a tool path.
By allowing the processor to ignore those holes you gain processing speed. You can similarly
exclude islands in roughing operations if the depth of cut permits (i.e., the tool path is not so
deep so as to enter the island area).
Ignore Chamfers
Ignore Chamfers enables you to specify whether or not adjacent chamfers, fillets, and rounds
will be recognized when creating boundaries from selected faces. When Ignore Chamfers is
toggled OFF, boundaries are created on the edges of the selected faces. When toggled ON,
boundaries are created to include chamfers, fillets, and rounds adjacent to selected faces as
illustrated below.

Remove Last
Remove Last becomes available once you define a boundary. Selecting this option removes
the previously defined boundary.
Create Next Boundary
Create Next Boundary becomes available when you are defining a boundary by Curve/Edges
method. Selecting this option completes the creation of the current boundary based on the
selected curves/edges and allows you to immediately start creating the next boundary.
Convex Edges
Use Convex Edges to control the tool position for boundary members that occur along convex
edges of the selected face. This option may be set to one of the following:
• On allows you to specify an On tool position for all boundary members created along
convex edges. On is the default setting.
• Tanto allows you to specify a Tangent tool position for all boundary members created
along convex edges.

Convex and Concave Edges
Concave Edges
Concave Edges allows you to control the tool position for boundary members that occur along
concave edges of the selected face (see the above figure). This option may be set to one of
the following:
• Tanto allows you to specify a tangent tool position for all boundary members created
along concave edges. Tanto is the default setting.
• On allows you to specify an on tool position for all boundary members created along
concave edges.

Options While Generating the Tool Path
After you have started generating the tool path, the following options are available while the
tool path is generating.
Display Cut Regions
When it is toggled NO, Display Cut Regions will display the outline of the cut regions at each
cut level before the tool path is displayed. It will start displaying on the next cut level after it is
toggled ON.
Display Uncut Regions
When it is toggled on, Display Uncut Regions will display the outline of the uncut regions at
each cut level before the display of the tool path. This options is only available in Planar
Milling. It will start displaying on the next cut level after it is toggled on. If Display Cut
Regions is toggled on, the cut regions and uncut regions will be displayed and the same
time.

Pause After Display
When Pause After Display is toggled ON, the system will pause after the tool path has been
displayed at each cut level before proceeding to the next. If the cut regions are being
displayed, the system will pause after the cut region has been displayed before displaying the
Tool Path. This will allow you to set or adjust the other options at each cut level. To proceed
with the tool path generation, hit OK.
When this option is toggled OFF, the Tool Path will be generated to completion without
pausing. This will make the options unavailable.
Refresh Before Display
When it is toggled ON, Refresh Before Display will refresh the graphical display after the
Tool Path has been display at each cut level.
Uncut Regions
Uncut Regions will allow you to use the following options while the Tool Path is in being
generating:
Overlap Distance
Overlap Distance allows you enter a value for an offset to be applied to both open and
closed boundaries.
Display
Display will display the uncut regions for the current cut levels. This option creates temporary
display entities for visual reference only.
Output
Output will create boundaries for the uncut regions from the current cut level.

Machine
Machine displays the Machine Control dialog box, which allows you to specify the tool axis,
determine whether or not arc outputs are used in the tool path, enter postprocessor
commands, determine the spindle axis, and add cutter compensation.
Machine Control options also can be defined at the boundary level, at the boundary member
level, and the group level, using Custom Boundary Data.

Avoidance
Avoidance allows you to specify, activate, cancel and manipulate points, lines or symbols.
These points, lines or symbols help you define tool clearance motion before and after an
operation. This option also enables you to save the avoidance control parameters you have
defined, which can then be retrieved for future operations.
Common Avoidance Sub-Options
After you choose one of the Avoidance Geometry options, the system prompts you to choose
one of the following Avoidance sub-options:
Specify allows you to choose a method of defining the point. The Avoidance Geometry
symbol appears on the display screen at the specified location and remains displayed until
the screen is refreshed. After you use Specify, the system shows the status as ACTIVE.
Omit allows you to disable tool motion to and from the Avoidance Geometry until you enable
it again using the Reinstate option. The system shows the status as INACTIVE. If you choose
Omit before you specify an Avoidance Geometry option, the system displays an error
message.
Reinstate allows you to reactivate an omitted Avoidance Geometry option. After you use
Specify, the system shows the status as ACTIVE. If you choose Reinstate before you specify
an Avoidance Geometry option, the system displays an error message.
Verify allows you to verify the work coordinate location of an ACTIVE or INACTIVE
Avoidance Geometry option. You cannot change the location of an option using Verify.
Redisplay Point allows you to redisplay the specified Avoidance Geometry option. The
Avoidance Geometry symbol appears on the display screen at the specified location and
remains displayed until the screen is refreshed.
Tool Axis allows you to specify a vector to set the Tool Axis at the Avoidance option location.
See the discussion of the Vector Constructor in the Gateway manual.
Avoidance Options
The following are the available Avoidance options:
FROM Point defines the initial cutter location at the start of a new segment of cutter path. It
does not cause tool movement and it outputs a FROM command as the first entry in the tool
path. Therefore, any other post commands will follow the FROM command.
Start Point is a tool positioning location in the cutter path start up sequence that can be used
to avoid geometry or fixture components. The Start Point will not output if defined below the
Floor Plane.
Return Point is a tool positioning location used to control the position of the cutter as it
moves away from the part at the end of a cutting sequence.
GOHOME Point is the final tool position. The FROM Point is often used as this position.
GOHOME Point outputs a GOHOME command as the final entry in the tool path. The
postprocessor will always interpret the GOHOME command as a Rapid move. When you
select this option you have two additional options:
Clearance Plane defines a safe clearance distance for tool motion before and after an
operation and during any programmed obstacle avoidance moves between points.
Lower Limit Plane defines the lower limit of tool motion. When the Lower Limit Plane is to be
violated, you have several "Actions" available; a warning can be issued to the tool path and
the CLSF, the system can adjust the points upward, or omit them altogether. The action
depends on the submodule.
Redisplay Avoidance Geometry is the method used to redisplay the points and plane
symbols in the Floor plane, if they are active. This option also displays the current Reference
Coordinate System (RCS).

Corner
Corner provides options to help prevent gouging as the cutter moves around pocket corners.
For concave corners, it is possible for the cutter to make a smooth transition between interior
part walls by automatically generating corner geometry (fillets) that are slightly larger than the
cutter radius. For convex corners, the tool can transition part walls by extending the adjacent
segments or by rolling around the corner.

Cut Depths
Cut Depths allows you to determine the cut levels of a multi-depth operation. Cut Depths
may be defined by island tops, the floor plane, and by keying in values. The Cut Depths
parameters only apply if the tool axis is normal to the floor, or the part boundary is parallel to
the floor. If the tool axis is not normal to the floor, or the part boundary is not parallel to the
floor, then the tool path will be generated on the floor only (as if the Type had been set to
Floor Only). Cut Depths displays a dialog box containing the following options:

Type Specifies the method used to define the cut depths
Maximum Defines the largest allowable cut depth for each cut level occurring after the
Initial level and before the Final level
Minimum Defines the smallest allowable cut depth for each cut level occurring after the
Initial level and before the Final level
Initial Defines the cut depth for the first cut level of a multi-level Planar Milling
operation
Final Defines the cut depth for the last cut level of a multi-level Planar Milling
operation
Increment Adds a side stock value to each succeeding cut level in a multi-level roughing
Side Stock tool path
Top Off Generates a separate path on the top of each island that the processor could
Islands not initially clean with one of the cut levels
Type
Type allows you to specify the method used to define the cut depths. The method you select
determines which numeric values may be input in the above dialog box. A cut level is always
generated at the floor regardless of which method you select.

The option you select here is displayed in the Planar Milling dialog box under Cut Depths for
easy visual reference. Each of the above Type options are described on the following pages.
User Defined
User Defined allows you to specify cut depths exclusively by entering numeric values. This
option activates the Maximum, Minimum, Initial, Final, and Increment Side Stock fields.

User Defined
Floor Only
Floor Only generates a single cut level at the Floor plane as illustrated below.
Floor Only
Floor & Island Tops
Floor & Island Tops generates a single cut level at the Floor Plane followed by a cleanup
path at the top of each island. Cleanup paths are restricted to the top face of each island and
do not cut outside the island boundaries. Notice in the following figure how the tool paths do
not superimpose on top of one another in the top view.

Floor & Island Tops
It is important when using this option to understand what NX regards as an island. In the
above figure, for example, cleanup paths are created in what appear to be pockets.
Levels At Island Tops
Levels At Island Tops generates a planar cut level at the top of each island followed by a
single cut level at the Floor Plane. Unlike cleanup paths which do not cut outside the island
boundaries, cut levels generate tool paths that completely remove all blank material within
each planar level. Notice in the following figure how the tool paths superimpose on top of one
another in the top view. This option activates the Initial, Final, and Increment Side Stock
fields.
Levels At Island Tops
It is important when using this option to understand what NX regards as an island. In the
above figure, for example, cut levels are created in what appear to be pockets.
Fixed Depth
Fixed Depth generates multiple cut levels at a constant depth. Maximum is used to specify
the cut depth. You can also specify an Increment Side Stock value. Top Off Islands may be
used to define additional cleanup paths for island tops that do not coincide with the cut levels.

Fixed Depth

Maximum and Minimum
Maximum defines the largest allowable cut depth for each cut level occurring after the Initial
level and before the Final level. Minimum defines the smallest allowable cut depth for each
cut level occurring after the Initial level and before the Final level. These two options work
together to define an allowable range in which cut depths can be defined. The system creates
equal depths as close to the specified Maximum depth as possible. Island tops falling within
this range will define cut levels. Island tops not falling within this range will not define cut
levels, but may be machined with a cleanup path using the Top Off Islands option.

Maximum and Minimum
G.Control Points
The Control Geometry options enable you to specify Control Points that determine where the
tool engages and the floor plane position that defines the lowest cut level. Points and Floor
are each described below.
Points enables you to specify Pre-Drill Engage Points which allow the tool to descend along
the tool axis into a vacancy where it can then begin a pocketing cut, or specify Cut Region
Start Points which determine the proximity of engages and stepovers. Both methods allow
you to specify depth values that determine which cut levels utilize these points. Points
displays a dialog box containing the options described below.

Pre-Drill Engage Specifies engage locations within previously drilled holes or other
Points vacancies in the Blank material
Cut Region Start Defines the tool engage position and the stepover direction by
Points specifying Custom or Default Start Points

Pre-Drill Engage Points (Pocketing only)
Pre-Drill Engage Points enables you to specify engage locations within previously drilled
holes or other vacancies in the Blank material. The defined point projects along the tool axis
to the Clearance Plane where it positions the tool. The tool then descends along the tool axis
into the vacancy where it then moves directly to the processor determined start point for each
cut level. Pre-Drill Engage Points are not applied to Profile and Standard Drive Cut Types.

Pre-Drill Engage Point
In the above figure, the tool descends into the pre-drilled hole to cut level 1 and then moves to
the processor determined start point for that level where it then begins a Follow Periphery
pattern with an Outward direction. The tool then retracts, traverses to the pre-drilled hole,
descends to cut level 2, and moves to the processor determined start point for that level and
so on.
If you specify multiple Pre-Drill Engage Points, the point closest to the processor determined
start point for that region is used. The tool uses the Pre-Drill Engage Points only when
descending to cut levels within the specified Depth. Once the cut levels exceed the specified
depth, the processor disregards the Pre-Drill Engage Points and uses the processor
determined start point. Pre-Drill Engage Points are active only when the Engage Method is
set to Automatic.
To specify Pre-Drill Engage Points, select Points in the Planar or Cavity Mill dialog box and
Edit in the Pre-Drill Engage Points section of the Control Geometry dialog box. You may then
specify the depth of the hole and specify the points.
Active
Active indicates that the tool will use the specified control points to engage the material.
Display
Display allows you to highlight all of the control points along with their associated point
numbers as temporary screen displays for visual reference.
Edit
Edit allows you to specify and delete Pre-Drill Engage Points. Edit does not enable you to
move points or change attributes of existing points. You must Remove existing points and
Append new ones. Edit displays the Pre-Drill Engage Points dialog box containing the
following options.
Append allows you to initially specify points as well as add points later.