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INTRODUCTION

Retailing includes all the activities involved in selling goods and services directly to the
consumer for personal or non – personal use. In other words, retailing is the sale of goods and
services to the ultimate consumer for personal, family or household use. Thus, retailing involves
more than selling tangible products. It includes every sale of goods and services to the final
consumers.
At the heart of the Indian growth story is its population, the generators of wealth both as
producers and consumers. With the largest young population in the world, retail formats such as
departmental stores, hypermarkets, supermarkets, specialty stores etc. are flourishing.
As customers taste and preferences are changing the market scenario is also changing from time
to time. It is the changing taste and preferences of the customers which has brought a change in
the market. Income level of the people has changed. Today we can see a new era in retail market
with the opening of many hyper markets, shoppers stop, malls, branded retail outlets and
specialty stores.
This study is based on the survey on customers of a hyper market named BIG BAZAAR. Big
Bazaar came into existence in India since 1994. It is a kind of market where various types of
products are available under one roof. This study is on determining the customers perception
towards the services offered inside the store and the satisfaction level of customers in Big Bazaar
Service is the "sum of acts and elements that allow consumers to receive what they need or
desire from your retail establishment." It is important for a sales associate to greet the customer
and make himself available to help the customer find whatever he needs. When a customer enters
the store, it is important that the sales associate does everything in his power to make the
customer feel welcomed, important, and make sure he leaves the store satisfied. Giving the
customer full, undivided attention and helping him find what he is looking for will contribute to
the customer's satisfaction. For retail store owners, it is extremely important to train yourself and
your staff to provide excellent customer service skills. By providing excellent customer service,
you build a good relationship with the customer and eventually will attract more new customers
and turn them into regular customers. Looking at long term perspectives, excellent customer,
skills give your retail business a good ongoing reputation and competitive advantage.
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Need for the study
At the macro level, India spends nearly 13 percent of its GDP on logistics, as
compared to an average of 10 percent in developing economies. Transportation and
inventory costs constitute over 50 percent of the value added in India. Worldwide, the
logistics costs have decreased from 12.2 percent in 1992 to 11.7 percent as a result of
better supply chain management. This is definitely scope for improvement in India for
reducing costs through a better supply chain design, inventory management operations.
With globalization and shortened product life cycles, the Indian industry is focusing to
reengineer their supply chain and logistics activities to achieve the competitive edge.
Indian companies are increasingly integrating their supply chains and outsourcing their
logistics and supply chain management requirements.
At the micro level, after decades of continuous development ,leading companies across
industries now closely

match one another in most of aspects of production,

manufacturing, sales and marketing. With a lot of work already done in the areas, only a
gigantic innovation can bring about a significant change

Scope of the study
The scope of this research is to identify the Store operations of Future Group BIG
BAZAAR in VISHAKAPATNAM area. This research is based on primary data and
secondary data. Due to time constraint only limited number of persons contacted. This
study only focuses on urban buying behavior of customers because the research
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conducted in VISHAKAPATNAM area. The study does not say anything about rural
buying behavior of customer because rural norms/status/attitude & acceptance of the
rural customers differs with urban customers. The scope of research is limited for
VISHAKAPATNAM area. It provides help to further the research for organized retail
sector in area. It aim to understand VISHAKAPATNAM skill of the company in the area
like technological advancement, competition in management.

Objectives




To know the retail operations that was held in the Big Bazaar, visakhapatnam.
To determine the customer service regarding to the Big Bazaar.
To know the store maintenance.
To know about the availability of the products.
To know which department in the store most used.
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 To know about the promotional activities held in big bazaar.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Technology, customers tastes and preferences play a vital role in today’s generation. Research
Methodology is a set of various methods to be followed to find out various information regarding
market strategies of different products. It is required in every industry for acquiring knowledge
of their products.
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Area of study:
The study is exclusively done in the area of marketing. It is a process requiring care,
sophistication, experience, business judgment, and imagination for which there can be no
mechanical substitutes.
Research Design A research design is purely and simply the frame work or plan for a study that guides in the
collection and analysis of the data. There are two types of research designs, they are
Exploratory research design
Descriptive research design
a. Exploratory Research design:
Exploratory research studies are also termed as formulate research studies. The main purpose of
such studies in that of formulating a problem for more precise investigation or of developing the
working hypothesis forms an operational point of view.
b. Descriptive Research design:
Descriptive research is one that concerned with describing the characteristics of a particular
individual, or of a group. It is concerned with determining frequency with which something
occurs or how two variables vary together. Here the problems are defined and the solutions are
defined and the solutions are provided.
Research Sample

Sampling Plan: Since it is not possible to study whole universe, it becomes necessary to
take sample from the universe to know about its characteristics.

Sampling Units: Customers of Big bazaar.

Sample Technique: Random Sampling.

Research Instrument: Structured Questionnaire.

Contact Method: Personal Interview.
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Sample Size:
A sample was required for the study because the number of customers at the big bazaar
was over 30,000 in the period of project. It is very difficult to consider the whole universe;
therefore, a representative sample size was selected 100 only. Although it looks to be a small
sample, keeping in view the large number of employees, it was to be limited due to time
constraint.
Data Collection
Data is collected from various customers through personal interaction. Specific
questionnaire is prepared for collecting data. Data is collected with mere interaction and formal
discussion with different respondents. Some other relevant information collected through
secondary data .Adequate and relevant data is essential for any meaningful research.

It forms

the basis of the study by supporting the analysis. Data collection is of two types namely:
(1) Primary data
(2) Secondary data.
1) Primary data:
The primary data was obtained by original information gathered for specific purpose & guided
by questionnaire to collect information from customers. The research instruments used for
collecting the primary data is through the questionnaire. The questionnaire was carefully
developed tested and debugged before they were administered on a large scale. The
questionnaire had a mix type of open ended, closed ended and multiple choice questions. These
methods were adopted since the data which is required is highly focused on
customer satisfaction.
2) Secondary data: Secondary sources are the other important sources through which the data
was collected. These are the readily available sources of the data where one had need not put
much effort to collected, because it is already been collected and part in an elderly manner by
some researcher, experts and special. The secondary data are collected through various sources
like

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1. Secondary data are collected through internet related to industry, company &
competitors, etc.
2. Review of articles being published on the topic in various magazines and newspapers.
3. Data are also collected from the company brochures etc.
Data Collection Tool: Data is collected from various customers through personal interaction.
Some other information is collected through secondary data also. Data was collected through a
structured questionnaire, linker technique is used. Linker scale is simply a statement which the
respondent is asked to evaluate according to any kind of subjective or objective criteria,
generally the level of agreement and disagreement is measured .The market survey about the
techniques of marketing and nature of expenditure is carried out by personally interacting with
the potential customers in Big Bazaar.

Limitations:

Time has been a major constraint throughout the study as it has been only for duration of

2 months.
The sample size had to be lesser. The survey is mainly done inside the Big bazaar outlet.

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One problem is that to convince the people for a proper interviewing process in filling up


the questionnaire.
Personal biases might have come while answer the questionnaire.
Due to very large size of the population, only a selected sample of customer could be
contacted.

Industry profile
Retailing, the selling of merchandise and certain services to the consumer. It ordinarily
involves the selling of individual units or small lots to large numbers of customers by a business
set up for that specific purpose. In the broadest sense, retailing can be said to have begun the first
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time one item of value was bartered for another. In the more restricted sense of a specialized,
full-time commercial activity, retailing began several thousand years ago when peddlers first
began hawking their wares and when the first marketplaces were formed. As with most other
business activities, retailing is extremely competitive, and the mortality rate of retail
establishments is relatively high. The basic competition is price competition, but this is
moderated somewhat by such non-price forms of competition as convenience of location,
selection and display of merchandise, attractiveness of the retail establishment itself, and
intangible factors such as reputation in the community. Competition for sales has led to a
blurring of traditional product lines in retailing, and many establishments offer a much wider
variety of merchandise than their basic classification would indicate (e.g., drugstores may carry
food, clothing, office supplies, hardware, etc.).
The diversity of retailing is evident in the many forms this commercial activity now takes,
including vending machines, door-to-door sales, telephone sales, mail-order houses, specialty
stores, department stores, supermarkets, discount houses, and consumer cooperatives. Whatever
form it takes, however, the essence of good retailing remains the same: attractive, appropriate
merchandise offered for sale in an attractive, eye-catching manner at a reasonable price at a
convenient location.

EVOLUTION OF RETAILING INDUSTRY IN WORLDWIDE
The history of retail has included countless ways in which retailers have attempted to get their
products in front of the consumer. But it seems that the businesses that have provided their
customers with the most convenience have generally proven to be the most successful.
For centuries, most retail sales were made by the street vendor or the small family
owned shop, which provided their customers with the convenience of not having to grow their
own food or make their own clothes. By the mid nineteenth century, most of the goods that we
find in today's superstores were supplied by craftsmen or local manufacturers who dealt directly
with their customers. Needed, not to mention that they probably had to travel all over town to get
their shopping done.

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As manufacturing methods improved, and as the road and rail transport network
extended, there developed specialist manufacturers who needed retail stores to sell their goods.
Over time, the small retail store concept grew, and by the mid 1950's small stores blanketed
every high street.
While most people loved the individual attention and great service that the
small store provided, it became more and more difficult for the small store to offer the kind of
prices and selection that the consumer really.
The next big revolution in retailing was the emergence of the retail chains,
and later the superstores. The consumer of the 70's demanded the convenience of having their
favorite stores in one enclosed location where they could easily hop from store to store without
having to concern them about the weather.
This shopping mall concept was quickly embraced by the consumer, but
unfortunately the crowds and traffic of today's mega malls can often turn what should have been
a convenient and comfortable shopping experience into a mission of hand-to-hand combat!
In recent years, the mail order business has experienced some of the most
impressive growth, which would also seem to echo the continuing consumer demand for
convenience. Most retailers are recognizing that they simply have to offer their customers the
ability to order products or services from the comfort of their own home or office in order to
compete in today's retail marketplace.

RETAILING INDUSTRY IN INDIA
Retail industry is the largest industry in India, with an employment of around 8%
and contributing to over 10% of the country's GDP. Retail industry in India is expected to rise
25% yearly being driven by strong income growth, changing lifestyles, and favorable
demographic patterns.
Is expected that by modern retail industry in India will be worth US$ 275- 350
billion. India retail industry is one of the fastest growing industries with revenue expected in
2007 to amount US$ 320 billion and is increasing at a rate of 5% yearly. A further increase of
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7-8% is expected in the industry of retail in India by growth in consumerism in urban areas,
rising incomes, and a steep rise in rural consumption. Shopping in India has witnessed a
revolution with the change in the consumer buying behaviour and the whole format of
shopping also altering. Industry of retail in India which has become modern can be seen from
the fact that there are multi- stored malls, huge shopping centers, and sprawling complexes
which offer food, shopping, and entertainment all under the same roof.
India retail industry is expanding itself most aggressively; as a result a great
demand for real estate is being created. Indian retailers preferred means of expansion is to
expand to other regions and to increase the number of their outlets in a city. It is expected that
by 2010, India may have 600 new shopping centers.
In the Indian retailing industry, food is the most dominating sector and is growing at
a rate of 9% annually. The branded food industry is trying to enter the India retail industry and
convert Indian consumers to branded food. Since at present 60% of the Indian grocery basket
consists of non-branded items.
India retail industry is progressing well and for this to continue retailers as
well as the Indian government will have to make a combined effort.
Global retail giants are also entering the retail industry in India and this is also one
of the factors in the growth of the organized retail sector in India.

INDIA IS A GROWING MARKET FOR RETAILING INDUSTRY
The scope of the Indian retail market is immense for this sector is poised for the
highest growth in the next 5 years. The India retail industry contributes 10% of the country’s
GDP and its current growth rate is 8.5%. In the Indian retail market the scope for growth can
be seen from the fact that it is expected to rise to US$ 608.9 billion in 2009 from US$ 394
billion in 2005.
The organized retailing sector in India is only 3% and is expected to rise to 2530% by the year 2010. There are under construction at present around 325 departmental
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stores, 300 new malls, and 1500 supermarkets. This proves that there is a tremendous scope
for growth in the Indian retail market.
This led to increase in foreign direct investments Global retail giants are also entering the
retail industry in India and this is also one of the factors in the growth of the organized retail
sector in India. The global retail giants who are entering the organized retail sector in India
are: Wal-Mart, Tosco, Carrefour SA, Metro AG.

Present Indian Scenario:
* Unorganized market: Rs. 583,000 crores
* Organized market: Rs.5, 000 crores
* 5X growth in organized retailing between 2000-2005
* Over 4,000 new modern Outlets in the last 3 years
* Over 5,000,000 sq. ft. of mall space under development
* The top 3 modern retailers control over 750,000 sq. ft. of retail space
* Over 400,000 shoppers walk through their doors every week
* Growth in organized retailing on par with expectations and projections of the last 5 Years: on
course to touch Rs. 35,000 crores (US$ 7 Billion) or more by 2013-14.

RETAIL TRADE FORMATS
The Retail Trade sector comprises establishments engaged in retailing
merchandise, generally without transformation, and rendering services incidental to the sale of
merchandise. The retailing process is the final step in the distribution of merchandise.
Retailers are therefore organized to sell merchandise in small quantities to the general public.
This sector comprises two main types of retailers:

Store retailers
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Non store retailers

STORE RETAILERS:Operate fixed point-of-sale locations, located and designed to attract a high
volume of walk-in customers. In general, retail stores have extensive displays of merchandise
and use mass-media advertising to attract customers. They typically sell merchandise to the
general public for personal or household consumption, but some also serve business and
institutional clients. These include establishments such as office supply stores, computer and
software stores, building materials dealers, plumbing supply stores and electrical supply
stores.
Catalog showrooms, gasoline service stations, automotive dealers and mobile
home dealers are treated as store retailers.
In addition to retailing merchandise, some types of store retailers are also engaged
in the provision of after-sales services, such as repair and installation. For example, new
automobile dealers, electronics and appliance stores, musical instrument and supplies stores
often provide repair services. As a general rule, establishments engaged in retailing
merchandise and providing after-sales services are classified in this sector.

NON STORE RETAILERS:Non-store retailers, like store retailers, are organized to serve the general
public, but their retailing methods differ. The establishments of this sub sector reach
customers and market merchandise with methods, such as the broadcasting of “infomercials,”
the broadcasting and publishing of direct-response advertising, the publishing of paper and
electronic catalogs, door-to-door solicitation, in-home demonstration, selling from portable
stalls (street vendors, except food) and distribution through vending machines. Establishments
engaged in the direct sale (non-store) of products, such as home heating oil dealers and home
delivery newspaper routes are included here.
The buying of goods for resale is a characteristic of retail trade
establishments that particularly distinguishes them from establishments in the agriculture,
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manufacturing and construction industries. For example, farms that sell their products at or
from the point of production are not classified in retail, but rather in agriculture. Similarly,
establishments that both manufacture and sell their products to the general public are not
classified in retail, but rather in manufacturing.

RETAIL FORMATS
CONVENIENCE STORES:
This industry comprises establishments known as convenience stores or
food marts primarily engaged in retailing a limited line of goods that generally includes milk,
bread, soda and snacks in a 2000 to 3000 square foot store with speedy check out. They are
the modern version of the neighbourhood mom-and-pop grocery/general store.

DEPARTMENTAL STORES:
This industry group comprises establishments known as department stores
primarily engaged in retailing a wide range of the following new products with no one
merchandise line predominating: apparel; furniture; appliances and home furnishings; and
selected additional items, such as paint, hardware, toiletries, cosmetics, photographic
equipment, jewellery, toys, and sporting goods. Merchandise lines are normally arranged in
separate departments.

DISCOUNT STORES:
This industry comprises establishments known as department stores that
have central customer checkout areas, generally in the front of the store. Department stores in
this industry offer a wide range of general merchandise (except fresh, perishable foods),
limited service and low prices.

SPECIALITY STORES:

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This industry concentrates on a limited number of complementary merchandise
categories and provides a high level of service in an area typically less than 8000 square feet.
In recent years, a specialty apparel store has been one of the weakest, slowest-growing areas
in retailing.

CATEGORY KILLERS:
This industry is much nearer to discount store that offers a narrow variety but deep
assortment of merchandise. These retailers are basically discount specialty stores. Most
category specialists use a self-service approach, but some specialists in consumer durables
offer assistance to customers.

SUPER CENTERS:
This industry offers a wide variety of food and nonfood merchandise. They are the
fastest growing retail category. Supercenters stock between 100,000 and 150,000 individual
items (SKU’s). The store generally is spread across 150,000 to 220,000 square foot.

HYPER MARKETS:
This industry is large combination food and general merchandise retailers. They
typically stock less than super centers, between 40,000 and 60,000 items ranging from
groceries, hardware, and sports equipment, to furniture and appliances, to computers and
electronics. The store generally is spread across 100,000 to 300,000 square foot.

CHALLENGES FACING THE INDIAN ORGANIZED RETAIL SECTOR :
The challenges facing the Indian organized retail sector are various and these are stopping the
Indian retail industry from reaching its full potential. The behavior pattern of the Indian
consumer has undergone a major change. This has happened for the Indian consumer is
earning more now, western influences, and women working force is increasing, desire for
luxury items and better quality. He now wants to eat, shop, and get entertained under the same
roof. All these have lead the Indian organized retail sector to give more in order to satisfy the
Indian customer. The biggest challenge facing the Indian organized retail sector is the lack of
retail space.
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With real estate prices escalating due to increase in demand from the Indian
organized retail sector, it is posing a challenge to its growth. With Indian retailers having to
shell out more for retail space it is affecting their overall profitability in retail.
Trained manpower shortage is a challenge facing the organized retail sector in
India. The Indian retailers have difficulty in finding trained person and also have to pay
more in order to retain them. This again brings down the Indian retailers profit levels.
The Indian government has allowed 51% foreign direct investment (FDI) in
the India retail sector to one-brand shops only. This has made the entry of global retail giants
to organized retail sector in India difficult. This is a challenge being faced by the Indian
organized retail sector.
But the global retail giants like Tisco, Wal-Mart, and Metro AG are entering
the organized retail sector in India indirectly through franchisee agreement and cash and
carry wholesale trading. Many Indian companies are also entering the Indian organized retail
sector like Reliance Industries Limited, Pantaloons, and Bharti Telecoms. But they are facing
stiff competition from these global retail giants. As a result disco becoming accepted
practices. This too brings down the profit of the Indian retailers.
Some of the reasons for this slow growth are:
1. Retail not being recognized as an industry in India.
2. The high costs of real estate
3. High stamp duty.
4. Lack of adequate infrastructure.
5. Multiple and complex taxation system.

Opportunities in Indian Organized Retail Sector:
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The opportunities in Indian organized retail sector are many for this sector is witnessing a
boom.
The retail industry in India amounted to US$ 200 billion in 2006, and out of this amount the
Indian organized retail sector amounted to US$ 6.4 billion. The opportunities in India
organized retail sector can be judged from the fact that by 2010 it is expected to rise to US$
23 billion.
The various opportunities in the organized retail sector in India are mainly there for
the Indian consumers behaviour pattern has changed. Now the Indian consumer gets more
hefty pay- packages, is younger, a large number of women are working, western influences,
and more disposable income have opened a lot of opportunities in Indian organized retail
sector. The Indian consumer wants to shop, eat and get entertainment in one place and is have
also Given Indian organized retail sector an opportunity to grow The Indian government in
2005 allowed foreign direct investment (FDI) in single brand retail to 51%. This have opened
up a lot of opportunities in India organized retail sector. In fact 325 departmental stores, 300
new malls, and 1500 supermarkets are being built which shows the tremendous opportunities
in

the

organized

retail

sector

in

India.

Many Indian companies seeing the various opportunities in organized retail sector in India
have entered it. Pantaloons have decided to increase its retail space to 30 million square feet
with an investment of US$ 1 billion. Reliance Industries Limited is targeting for annual sales
of US$ 25 billion by 2011. It is planning to invest US$ 6 billion in order to open 1,500
supermarkets and 1000 hypermarkets. Bharti Telecoms is planning a joint venture with Telco a
global

retail

giant

worth

£

750

million.

The opportunities in the organized retail sector in India have also increased with the desire of
many global retail giants to set up shop here.
The global retail giants who are entering the Indian organized retail sector are:

Tesco

Wal- Mart

Metro AG
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Carrefour SA

The opportunities in Indian organized retail sector are varied and it must be fully exploited by
the Indian ret
Rank

Retailer

Home Country

Sales

in

Millions
1
2
3
4

Wal-Mart
Stores, Inc.
Carrefour
Group
The

Home

Depot, Inc.
The
Kroger
Co.

USA

$202,011

France

$62,216

USA

$53,553

USA

$50,098

5

Royal Ahold

Netherlands

$48,239

6

Metro AG

Germany

$43,816

USA

$39,176

USA

$37,931

USA

$37,328

USA

$36,151

7
8
9
10

Target
Corporation
Albertson's,
Inc.
Sears,
Roebuck &Co.
Kmart
Corporation

TOP 10 RETAILERS IN THE WORLD
RETAIL PLAYERS PROFILE IN INDIA

SPENCER’S RETAIL

SUBHIKSHA

PIRAMYD RETAIL

SHOPPERS STOP

FUTURE GROUP
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US$

RELIANCE RETAIL

TRENT

Major players
Spencer’s:
Founded

: 2001

Headquarters

: Kolkata

Parent

: RPG based

Leader ship

: Sanjiv Goenka Vice Chairman; J.H.Mehata President.

Various formats

: Spencer’s fresh, Spencer’s daily, Spencer’s super,
Spencer’s hyper stores, Spencer’s express.

Future plans

: Enter into consumer durables segment, open 15 new stores 10 cities

SUBHIKSHA:Type

: discount department store

Founded

: 1997

Headquarters

: Chennai

Leadership

: R.Subramanian, managing director

Number of locations : 450 stores across 5 states
Various formats

: fruits & Vegetables, pharmaceutical, FMCG and Telecom

Future plans

: Subhiksha to touch a 1000 store chain with a pan-India presence
By 2007

SHOPPES STOP:
Type

: Retail conglomerate

Founded

: 1991

Parent

: K Raheja group
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Leadership

: B.S.Nagesh customer care associate & managing director
Govind customer care &chief executive officer.

Number of locations: 10 cities with 20 outlets
Various formats

: Modern retail stores

Future plans

: Extend the No .of its departmental stores from 20 to 48 in
About 3 years

FUTURE GROUP:
Founded

: 1987

Head quarters

: Calcutta

Parent

: Future retail

Leadership

: Kishore biyani, CEO and MD; Rajan malhotra, Head
,Big Bazaar; Damodar mall, president and CEO
Food Bazaar

Number of locations

: 31 cities

Future plans

: Biyani has to open 75 stores

LIFESTYLE:
Type

: Private Company

Founded

: 1999

Head quarters

: Bangalore, Karnataka

Parent

: Landmark group
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Leadership

: Micky Jagtiani, Chairman; Renuka Jagtiani-vice chairperson,
Vipin sethi-CEO

Number of locations

: 1350 stores across middle East and Africa and India

MAX:
Founded

: 2004

Head quarters

: UAE

Parent

: Landmark group

Leadership

: Micky Jagtiani, Chairman; Renuka Jagtiani-vice chairperson,
Vipin sethi-CEO

Number of locations : 15 countries across 250 stores

COMPANY PROFILE
Future Group is India’s largest retailer and one of the leading business houses with a strong
presence in retail. Its founder and Group CEO is Mr. Kishore Biyani. Kishore Biyani founded
Pantaloons in 1997, followed by a number of popular retail formats including Big Bazaar,
Central, Food Bazaar, Brand Factory and Home Town, that now cater to almost the entire
consumption basket of a wide cross-section of Indian consumers.

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Future Group is a leading business houses with multiple businesses spanning across the
consumption space. While retail forms the core business activity of Future Group, group
subsidiaries are present in consumer finance, capital, insurance, leisure and entertainment, brand
development, retail real estate development, retail media and logistics.
A staunch believer in the group’s corporate credo, ‘Rewrite Rules, Retain Values,’ Kishore
Biyani considers Indianness as the core value driving the group. He recently authored a book, ‘It
Happened In India’ that captures his entrepreneurial journey and the growth of modern retailing
in India.
Futures Group is a trusted international development firm known for our evidence-based,
integrated approach to improving the health and well-being of people worldwide. Led by its
flagship enterprise, Pantaloon Retail, the group operates over 16 million square feet of retail
space in 73 cities and towns and 65 rural locations across India. Headquartered in Mumbai
(Bombay), Pantaloon Retail employs around 30,000 people and is listed on the Indian stock
exchanges.
Future Group India was established in 1994 with a vision to provide diverse services in Indian
and Global markets. The business areas of Future Group cover BPO (Business Process
Outsourcing), New Media, Security Management, and Construction. Through their strategic
investment and services, the future of Future Group shows a rising star in the business sky of
India.

VISION AND MISSION
Vision
Future Group shall deliver Everything, Everywhere, Every time for Every Indian Consumer in
the most profitable manner.

Mission
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We share the vision and belief that our customers and stakeholders shall be served
only by creating and executing future scenarios in the consumption space leading to

economic development.
We will be the trendsetters in evolving delivery formats, creating retail reality,
making consumption affordable for all customer segments – for classes and for



masses.
We shall infuse Indian brands with confidence and renewed ambition.
We shall be efficient, cost- conscious and committed to quality in whatever we do.
We shall ensure that our positive attitude, sincerity, humility and united determination
shall be the driving force to make us successful.

FUTURE GROUPCULTURE, VALUES AND BELIEFS
Future Group Work Culture
We abide by a rich culture where we believe that Outstanding Performances are a result of
enablement, empowerment and Development of our people. “People First” is our credo and
everybody in the Future Family values and nurtures relationships.

Future Group Values







Leadership: to be a leader, both in thought and business.
Respect & Humility: to respect every individual and be humble in our conduct.
Introspection: leading to purposeful thinking.
Openness: to be open and receptive to new ideas, knowledge and information.
Valuing and Nurturing Relationships: to build long term relationships.
Simplicity & Positivity: Simplicity and positivity in our thought, business and action.
Adaptability: to be flexible and adaptable, to meet challenges.
Flow: to respect and understand the universal laws of nature.

Future Group Retailing Principles

To define the core customer and merchandise for the store, its price points, its
assortments and presentation of sales for that target group
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To have consistency of quality in every merchandise of the store i.e., same taste and price

points to every merchandise
To always have a unique and exclusive merchandise to differentiate itself from the


Competition
To give value for money to the customer
To upgrade technology, by way of bar coding, computerization, recoding systems and to



monitor inventories, analyze the customer data base for effective marketing
To be a low cost operator in terms of cost
To build up successful partnerships with vendors
To build up stores through carefully thought out strategies and execution

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Mr. Kishore Biyani, Managing Director

Kishore Biyani is the Managing Director of Pantaloon Retail (India) Limited and the Group
Chief Executive Officer of Future Group.

Mr. GopikishanBiyani, Wholetime Director

GopikishanBiyani, is a commerce graduate and has more than twenty years of experience in the
textile business.

Mr. Rakesh Biyani, Wholetime Director

Rakesh Biyani, is a commerce graduate and has been actively involved in category management;
retail stores operations, IT and exports. He has been instrumental in the implementation of the
various new retail formats.

Mr. Ved Prakash Arya, Director

Ved Prakash Arya, is an engineer by training and is a graduate of the Indian Institute of
Management, Ahmedabad. Prior to joining Pantaloon Retail, he was the CEO of Globus.
Mr. ShaileshHaribhakti, Independent Director
Shri ShaileshHaribhakti, is a Chartered Accountant, Cost Accountant, and a Certified Internal
Auditor. He is the Deputy Managing Partner of Haribhakti& Co., Chartered Accountants and past
24

president of Indian merchant Chambers. He is on the Board of several Public Limited
Companies, including Indian Petrochemicals Corporation Ltd., Ambuja Cement Eastern Ltd. etc.
He is on the Board of Company since June 1, 1999.

Mr. S Doreswamy, Independent Director

S. Doreswamy, is a former Chairman and Managing Director of Central Bank of India and serves
on the board of DSP Merrill Lynch Trustee Co and Ceat Limited among others.

Dr. D O Koshy, Independent Director

D. O. Koshy, holds a doctorate from IIT, Delhi and is the Director of National Institute of Design
(NID), Ahmedabad. He has over 24 years of rich experience in the textiles and garment industry
and was instrumental in the setting up of NIFT centers in Delhi, Chennai and Bangalore. He is a
renowned consultant specializing in international marketing and apparel retail management.

Ms. AnjuPoddar, Independent Director

AnjuPoddar, holds a Bachelor of Engineering from University of Oklahoma and is a Director,
NIFT, Hyderabad chapter. She also serves on the board of Maharishi Commerce Ltd and Samay
Books Ltd, among others.

Ms. Bala Deshpande, Independent Director

Bala Deshpande, is Independent Director, Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd. and also serves on the
boards of Deccan Aviation, Nagarjuna Construction, Welspun India and Indus League Clothing
Ltd, among others.

Mr. Anil Harish, Independent Director

Anil Harish, is the partner of DM Harish & Co. Associates & Solicitors and an LLM from
University of Miami. He also serves on the board of Mahindra Gesco, Unitech, IndusInd Bank
and Hinduja TMT, among others.

ACHIEVEMENT AND AWARDS
1987
25

Company incorporated as Manz Wear Private Limited. Launch of Pantaloons trouser, India’s first
formal trouser brand.
1991
Launch of BARE, the Indian jeans brand.
1992
Initial public offer (IPO) was made in the month of May.
1994
The Pantaloon Shoppe – exclusive menswear store in franchisee format launched across the
nation. The company starts the distribution of branded garments through multi-brand retail
outlets across the nation.
1995
John Miller – Formal shirt brand launched.
1997
Pantaloons – India’s family store launched in Kolkata.
2001
Big Bazaar, ‘Is se sastaauracchakahinahin’ - India’s first hypermarket chain launched.
2002
Food Bazaar, the supermarket chain is launched.
2004
Central – ‘Shop, Eat, Celebrate In The Heart Of Our City’ - India’s first seamless mall is
launched in Bangalore.
2005

26

Fashion Station - the popular fashion chain is launched aLL – ‘a little larger’ - exclusive stores
for plus-size individuals is launched
2006
Future Capital Holdings, the company’s financial arm launches real estate funds Kshitij and
Horizon and private equity fund Indivision. Plans forays into insurance and consumer credit.
Multiple retail formats including Collection i, Furniture Bazaar, Shoe Factory, EZone, Depot
and futurebazaar.com are launched across the nation.
Group enters into joint venture agreements with ETAM Group and Generali
FG has won Various Awards from:





CNBC Awaaz Consumer Awards 2009
Images Fashion Forum 2009
Coca-Cola Golden Spoon Awards 2009
Indian Retail Forum Awards 2008
The INDIASTAR Award 2008
Retail Asia Pacific 500 Top Awards 2008.
Coca-Cola Golden Spoon Awards 2008.

The following are the Group Companies:LIFESTYLE

PANTALOONS, CENTRAL MALLS

Value Segment

Big Bazaar

Super Market Chain

Food Bazaar

Sports Wear Retailer

Planet Sports

Electronics Retailer

E-Zone

Home

Improvement

Chain

Home Town

Rural Retail Chain

Aadhaar
27

Sports Bar and Bowling Company, F123, Bombay Blues,
Leisure

and Spaghetti Kitchen, Noodle Bar, The Spoon, Copper

Entertainment

Chimney,
Gelato
Future Generali, Future Brands, Future Logistics, Future

Other Group Companies

Media, Future Capital Holdings

CONCEPTS OF THE STORE
Food Needs

Food Bazaar, KB Fairprice, etc

Clothing Needs

BB, Central, Pantaloon, ALL, etc

Shelter Needs

Home

town,

Home

Bazaar,

eZone,

Furniture

Bazaar, etc

Security needs

Future

Generali

Future

Group

is
that

the

insurance

offers

arm

security

to

of

the

individual

needs.

Technology needs

Future Knowledge Services Limited (FKSL)
Future

Training needs

Human

Development

Development(FHDL)
28

Logistics needs

Future Logistic Solution Limited (FLSL)

and

CATEGORIES AND SUB-DEPARTMENTS
CATEGORIES
Apparels

SUB-DEPARTMENT
Men’s
Ladies
Kids
Home

GM Home

Fashion

Plastics
Utensils
Crockery
Stationary
Luggage
Footwear

GM Fashion

Toys and Sports

Electronics

All types of Electronics

Furniture

All types of Furniture
Fit and Healthy

Food

Beauty
Live Kitchen
F and V
Food

The

Non Food

Store

Staples

has

been divided into various concepts to lend Shopping convenience to the Customers. The
following are the concepts present in Big Bazaar:
1. Fashion at Big Bazaar

29

2. Food Bazaar
3. Home Bazaar
4. Furniture Bazaar
5. Electronics Bazaar
6. Chowpatty
7. Navaras
8. F123
9. Star and Sitara.
STORE SUPPORT FUNCTIONS
1. Marketing

Marketing is the process of planning and
executing the conception, pricing, promotion
and distribution of ideas, goods and services
to satisfy customers. It is the techniques used
to attract and persuade consumers.

2. Experience Design

Experience

Design

is

everything

the

Customer sees, both outside & inside a store
that creates a Positive Image of a Business.

30

3. Maintenance and Facilities

The 3 functions of this department are:1. House Keeping – General Cleanliness and
Hygiene

of

the

Store

2. Security Services – Complete Store
security

and

Movement

tracking

3. Maintenance – Safety and ensuring
consistent Power supply for the Store

4. Commercial

Commercial function in a Store operation
refers to the Cashiering. The sub-function of
cashiering includes - the Cashiering process,
Cash Till Management & Cash Trouble
-Shooting.

31

5. People Office

Human Capital is considered to be the most
valuable asset in any organization. People
need to be nurtured, developed, motivated
and rewarded so as to ensure business
growth.

PO

department

ensures

the

acquisition and development of the right
kind of people.

Strategy:
3-C Theory
According to Kishore Biyani’s s 3-C theory, Change and Confidence among the entire population
is leading to rise in Consumption, through better employment and income which in turn is
creating value to the agricultural products across the country. Big Bazaar has divided India into
three segments:
• India one: Consuming class which includes upper middle and lower middle class (14% of
India's population).
• India two: Serving class which includes people like drivers, household helps, office
peons, liftmen, washermen, etc. (55% of India's population) and
• India three: Struggling class (remaining 31% of India's population).
While Big Bazaar is targeted at the population across India one and India two segments, Aadhaar
Wholesale is aimed at reaching the population in India three segment. With this, Future Group
emerged as a retail destination for consumers across all classes in the Indian society.

32

Corporate social responsibilities:
At Future Group, corporate social responsibility, inclusive growth and sustainability are at the
core of our strategy and business practices. This reflects in our commitment to the community,
environment and to every stakeholder in building a stronger foundation for our long-term,
sustainable growth.

We believe modern organized retail has the power to strengthen the economy, create grass root
employment and contribute significantly to social inclusion. As India’s premier retail player and
one of India’s leading home-grown business houses, Future Group is present across the
consumption value chain. Through millions of customers and thousands of suppliers, we are
conscious of the economic, social and environmental impact of our activities.
We believe the challenges of inequity in our robust and growing domestic economy need to be
tackled through sustainable development. Consequently, our principles are focussed on two main
areas: integrating sustainable development into business activities and promoting sustained
economic development for the country.
Future Group targets long-term sustainability in its business through three aspects.

Inclusive Growth

Community-driven development

Environmental Responsibilities

INCLUSIVE GROWTH:
Future Group’s vision of inclusive growth for a harmonious society, points to a future in
which the entire population can enjoy a better quality of life. We aim to serve as a catalyst
that stimulates the use of inclusiveness as a powerful development tool. Future Group
aims to create and sustain an environment conducive to the domestic growth of India by
partnering with various stakeholders and playing a proactive role in India’s development
process.

33

Future Group believes in broad-based growth, the fruits of which are not concentrated in
the hands of few but shared by the community as a whole. This is the way towards
achieving the dual goal of profitable and socially responsible growth. Our initiatives in
inclusive

development

include

livelihood

issues, diversity management,

skill

development and protecting the environment, to name a few.
Modern Indian retail can help improve incomes and provide opportunities for growth to
individuals with lower education levels or from the unorganized sector. With fair wages
and benefits,

opportunities for further development and growth and a better working

environment, modern retail offers much more than most alternatives available to such
individuals.
Future Group focuses on three key enablers for inclusive growth: employability,
innovation and entrepreneurship. While employability helps create a qualified and
skilledworkforce, innovation and entrepreneurship help drive growth and generate
employment.

Encouraging Environmental Stewardship:

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing the world today. Future Group

strives to reduce environmental impact and optimize energy consumption in its stores and
strengthen green considerations in logistics operations. Our endaevour is to promote eco-friendly
products and raise awareness on environmental issues both internally and externally.

As part of our sustainable-development initiatives, we have made a commitment to care
for the environment. Through our commitment, we look to make a significant positive impact on
the ecology and surroundings in which we operate.
Through investment and innovation we are leading the way in providing a greener way to do
business.
We fulfil our responsibility for delivering high quality services in a sustainable and
environmentally responsible manner by:

Reducing the environmental impact of store construction and operations

Improving energy efficiency for important environmental benefits and reducing operating
costs

34

Strengthening environmental considerations in the design of green products and packaging;
developing green product lines that respect environmental concerns

Reinforcing environmental considerations in logistics

Improving social mobility:
Through community-driven development, we aim to foster a symbiotic relationship with Indian
entrepreneurs across communities to create increased self-employment opportunities.
The grassroots nature of community-driven development promotes people participation in
development decisions that are usually decided in a top-down manner.
Economically disadvantaged women and ethnic minorities are among those who stand to gain
the most through our community-driven development initiatives. Our approach is to help and
collaborate with different communities in the rural pockets of our country to achieve harmonious
growth.
Recognizing the potential to address economic inequality/disparity and accomplish other
objectives contributing to inclusive growth, Future Group has spread its reach deep into rural
India. Our people engage to undertake community mobilization and capacity building, and help
develop measures to reach isolated, ethnically diverse, or remote communities.
Our engagements provide us with practical knowledge about designing and building upon
community-driven operations and provide them with an enabling and inclusive framework.
CSR activities:
As a part of Future Group, Big Bazaar is involved in various social activities that include green
initiatives for the community, blood donation camps, Diwali celebrations with orphanages, visits
to orphanages and other NGOs helping underprivileged children. These activities usually involve
all members of the management as well as staff of Big Bazaar.
• In September 2011, Future Group signed a strategic partnership with the Himachal Pradesh
Government to directly source, market and promote the state’s products and services through its
Big Bazaar stores under the brand ‘Himachal’. The aim of this partnership is to aid the
35

development of various ‘source-to-market’ initiatives to enhance livelihoods for more than
25,000 families in the state.
• Big Bazaar created a platform called Yatra to provide women of self-help groups across various
towns and regions of Maharashtra and Gujarat the opportunity to market their wide assortment of
indigenous food and non-food products. As part of the programme, women from over 30 regional
self-help groups were invited, encouraged and helped to set up stalls to exhibit their products at
Big Bazaar stores.
• Big Bazaar Mysore started offering a free wholesome meal to all its customers, who in return
contribute ‘Shraddha Anussar’ for a community cause. In other words, the customers donate any
amount for the meal which would be used for a local, regional or topical cause.
BIGBAZAAR ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE:

SUB DIVISIONS OF FUTURE VALUE RETAIL LTD.

36

SUB DIVISION OF HOME SOLUTION RETAIL INDIA LTD.

SWOTANALYSIS OF BIG BAZAAR:
Strengths:

37

High brand equity enjoyed by Big Bazaar

State of the art infrastructure

A vast variety of stuff available under one roof

Everyday low prices, which attract customers

Maximum percent of footfalls converted in sales

Huge investment capacity

Biggest value retail chain in India

It offers a family shopping experience, where entire family can visit together.

Available facilities such as online booking and delivery of goods Weakness:

Falling revenue per sqft

General perception: ‘Low price = Low quality’

Overcrowded during offers

Long lines at billing counters which are time consuming

Opportunity:

A lot of scope in Indian organized retail as it stands at approximately 4%.

Increasing mall culture in India.

More people these days prefer to visit big stores where they can find large variety under
one roof

Threats:

Competition from other value retail chains such as Shoprite, Reliance (Fresh and trends),
Hyper city and D mart.
38

Unorganized retail also appears to be a threat to Big Bazaar’s business. A large population
still prefers to visit local convenient stores for daily purchases

Changing Government policies

International players looking to foray India

The variety of product range in Big Bazaar:

This is an area where Big Bazaar stands as a leader in front of all retail stores in India. Its main
target customers are from middle or low income groups with focus on both genders i.e male or
female of the society and also on all age groups i.e from a kid to an old generation .They diverse
in their product mix to an enormous strength starting from food segment to furniture, home
fashion, electronic section, to home decors and toys too. Big Bazaar has something for everyone
who drops in at the store. So, is variety of products at Big Bazaar Vijayawada.

Major competitors
Its major competitors considering the nearby location of the store are, Chermas (Family shopping
mall) and nearby shopping malls such as, lifestyle, shopper’s stop, reliance digital etc.,

39

Marketing mix:
Marketing mix is a major concept in modern marketing and includes every thing that a marketer
uses to create a blend that would favorably influence the demand for it products or services.
Marketing mix is a set of controllable, tacticle marketing tools that the form uses to achive its
objectives in the target market. Popularly the 4ps are used to represent the elements of marketing
mix. Each ‘P’ stands for






Product
Place
Promotion
Price
Process
People
Physical evidence

Product is anything that can be offered to a market for attention, acquisition, use, or
consumption that might satisfy a want or need.
Place refers to marketing activities undertaken to make the product or service available to
consumer at convenient locations where they are normally expected to shop for such things.
Promotion is the communication arm of marketing and includes marketing activities used to
inform, persuades, and remind the target about an organization, its product, services, and other
activities to build a favorable image.
Price is the sum that the consumers pay in exchange for product, or not to get services.
A Physical evidence is the first distinction of a product. A product could be easily recognized by
its appearance.
The Process of the product is essential in marketing. This determines the capability of the
product to supply the demand of the consumers.
The People are the target consumers of the company.
Life Cycle of Big Bazaar:

40

The following graph shows the retail life cycle and we can say that Big Bazaar is currently at the
Life cycle of Big Bazaar:

Customer Segmentation:

Big Bazaar targets higher and upper middle class customers.

The large and growing young working population is a preferred customer segment.

Big Bazaar specifically targets working women and home makers who are the primary
decision makers.

Positioning of big bazaar:

41

42

Marketing
DEFINATION:
Marketing is an organizational function and a set of processes for creating, communicating and
delivering value to customer and for managing customer relationships in way that benefits the
organization and its stakeholders.

Importance of Marketing:
Marketing is a very important aspect in business since it contributes greatly to the success of the
organization. Production and distribution depend largely on marketing. Many people think that
sales and marketing are basically the same. These two concepts are different in many aspects.
Marketing covers advertising, promotions, public relations, and sales. It is the process of
introducing and promoting the product or service into the market and encourages sales from the
buying public. Sales refer to the act of buying or the actual transaction of customers purchasing
the product or service.

Marketing Promotes Product Awareness to the Public
Strategically, the business must be centered on the customers more than the products. Although
good and quality products are also essential, the buying public still has their personal
preferences. If you target more of their needs, they will come back again and again and even
bring along recruits. If you push more on the product and disregard their wants and the benefits
they can get, you will lose your customers in no time. The sad thing is that getting them back is
the hardest part.
A company must invest in marketing so as not to miss the opportunity of being discovered. If
expense is to be considered, there are cost-effective marketing techniques a company can embark
on such as pay-per-click ads and blogging.

Marketing Builds Company Reputation

43

In order to conquer the general market, marketers aim to create a brand name recognition or
product recall. This is a technique for the consumers to easily associate the brand name with the
images, logo, or caption that they hear and see in the advertisements.
For example, McDonalds is known for its arch design which attracts people and identifies the
image as McDonalds. For some companies, building a reputation to the public may take time but
there are those who easily attract the people. With an established name in the industry, a business
continues to grow and expand because more and more customers will purchase the products or
take advantage of the services from a reputable company
Ads
Marketing plays a very essential role in the success of a company. It educates people on the latest
market trends, helps boost a company’s sales and profit, and develops company reputation. But
marketers must be creative and wise enough to promote their products with the proper marketing
tactics. Although marketing is important, if it is not conducted and researched well, the company
might just be wasting on expenses and time on a failed marketing approach.

Four P’s of Marketing
Product - A product is seen as an item that satisfies what a consumer needs or wants. It is a
tangible good or an intangible service. Intangible products are service based like the tourism
industry, the hotel industry and the financial industry. Tangible products are those that have an
independent physical existence. Typical examples of mass-produced, tangible objects are the
motor car and the disposable razor. A less obvious but ubiquitous mass produced service is a
computer operating system.
Every product is subject to a life-cycle including a growth phase followed by a maturity phase
and finally an eventual period of decline as sales falls. Marketers must do careful research on
how long the life cycle of the product they are marketing is likely to be and focus their attention
on different challenges that arise as the product moves through each stage.
The marketer must also consider the product mix. Marketers can expand the current product mix
by increasing a certain product line's depth or by increasing the number of product lines.
Marketers should consider how to position the product, how to exploit the brand, how to exploit
44

the company's resources and how to configure the product mix so that each product complements
the other. The marketer must also consider product development strategies.
Price – The price is the amount a customer pays for the product. The price is very important as it
determines the company's profit and hence, survival. Adjusting the price has a profound impact
on the marketing strategy, and depending on the price elasticity of the product, often it will affect
the demand and sales as well. The marketer should set a price that complements the other
elements of the marketing mix.
When setting a price, the marketer must be aware of the customer perceived value for the
product. Three basic pricing strategies are: market skimming pricing, market penetration pricing
and neutral pricing. The 'reference value' (where the consumer refers to the prices of competing
products) and the 'differential value' (the consumer's view of this product's attributes versus the
attributes of other products) must be taken into account.
Promotion - represents all of the methods of communication that a marketer may use to provide
information to different parties about the product. Promotion comprises elements such as:
advertising, public relations, personal selling and sales promotion.
Advertising covers any communication that is paid for, from cinema commercials, radio and
Internet advertisements through print media and billboards. Public relations is where the
communication is not directly paid for and includes press releases, sponsorship deals,
exhibitions, conferences, seminars or trade fairs and events. Word-of-mouth is any apparently
informal communication about the product by ordinary individuals, satisfied customers or people
specifically engaged to create word of mouth momentum. Sales staff often plays an important
role in word of mouth and public relations (see 'product' above).

Place - refers to providing the product at a place which is convenient for consumers to
access. Place is synonymous with distribution. Various strategies such as intensive distribution,
selective distribution, exclusive distribution and franchising can be used by the marketer to
complement the other aspects of the marketing mix

45

Inter-store Stock Transfers
Inter Store Stock Transfer refers to transferring of goods from one store to another within the
limits. The reasons for inter stock transfer could be:

Fluctuating customer demand
Category initiated – for newly open stores.

The steps involved in Inter Store Stock Transfer are as follow:

Having identified the no of merchandise required for particular category, it is the duty Of

DM to send the requisition of required merchandise to zonal front end category.

Front End Category then checks the status of all the stores within the octroi limits and
raises the Stock Transfer Order (STO) against sent requisition.
Stock Transfer Order:
It is a document which is raised by the zonal front end category for transferring of goods from
one place to another. STO is raised and sent to the store which will transfer goods to receiving
store by the front end category .This document gives information about all merchandise
which needs to be transferred to receiving store. For example: article number, quantity,
store name (where goods need to be transferred) etc.
46

Front

End Category then sends the 10 digit STO number by mail to the sending

store.

Having received the STO number from Front End Category, particular category’s
DM accesses the STO on SAP for full details.
On the basis of STO raised by Front End Category, DM sends the required number of
merchandise to the store warehouse. Store warehouse makes the physical count of the goods and
scans the each merchandise in the system. Packing of goods is done and STN (Stock Transfer
Note) is generated by the store warehouse.
Stock Transfer Note:
It is a document which is raised by the sending store to receiving store. This document gives
information about all merchandise which is getting transferred to receiving store.
For example: article number, quantity, store name (where goods need tobetransferred)etc.
 The 3 copies of STN are issued:
One copy stays with the sending store
One copy for receiving store
One copy is an acknowledgement for the sending store
 Against the STN, a Gate Pass must be issued by the sending store.
 Store copy of STN and gate pass must be signed by the transporter for the number of
merchandise he will be delivering to the other store.
 Records for the gate pass must be maintained by the store security personnel.
 An entry must be made in the Outward Register, which is maintained at the Security.
Registers maintained at stock receiving points.
1. Security in warding and out warding register.
2. In warding registers.
3. Out warding register.
4. SIS registers.
5. Stock handover register.
6. Vendor returns register.
7. Non sellable inward register.
8. Non sellable outward register.
9. Outward gate pass.

47

The research agenda on retail store execution straddles three existing areas of
literature: 1) empirical studies of retail store execution, 2) literature on the relationship between
customer satisfaction and financial performance in the retail industry and 3) empirical studies of
execution in other industries such as retail operation and adherence of various policies in the
retail operations.
Retail store execution strategies have attracted the attention of researchers in
operations management only recently, but this stream of work is most closely related to our
paper. Perhaps the first reference on retail store execution is Salmon (1989) who argued that
execution in retailing has become more important than other aspects of retail business (e.g.,
merchandising).
DeHoratius and Raman (2006) analyze the relationship between incentives provided
to store managers and monthly sales and shrinkage across a chain of stores. They control for
store fixed effects, inventory, and advertising expenditures and, as in our work, find a positive
and significant relationship between inventory and sales at the store level.
The literature on missing inventory and inventory record inaccuracy in retailing (see
Raman et al. 2001a, 2001b) found empirically that, because of execution failures, customers
often do not find the product they seek, even if these products are within the store. Raman et al.
(2001a, 2001b) report that over 65% of the inventory records at retailer Gamma were inaccurate
at the store-SKU level, and that over 16% of the inventory at retailer Beta was missing from the
shelf.
Their studies report that such issues arise mainly due to store and distribution center
replenishment processes, merchandising, inventory management and employee turnover.
DeHoratius and Raman (2003) outline three approaches to the inaccurate inventory problem:
prevention and elimination of root causes (using methods similar to the Ishikawa process of JIT
principles), correction and identification of errors through inspection policies, and lastly software
solutions that integrate the source of errors into the inventory management system.
In a follow-up study, Ton and Raman (2004) find that higher product variety and
inventories lead to a higher incidence of phantom stock outs (such that inventory is in the back
room but does not reach the shelf) and lost sales. Ton and Huckman (2005) study the impact of
employee turnover on process conformance within retail stores and find that the negative effect

48

of turnover is most pronounced in stores with low process conformance (lesser discipline in
process execution and adherence to quality standards).
Corsten and Gruen (2003) study the root causes of retail inventory stock outs and point
to mechanisms that address the issue of stock outs and improve sales. Van Donselaar et al. (2006)
find that store managers systematically made corrections on automated order advices either by
shifting orders from peak days to non-peak days or by changing the order size. Fundamentally,
this stream of literature has viewed retail operation from the factory lens while omitting the
service delivery and customer-employee interaction aspects of retailing.
For example, Fisher (2004) argues that both the auto plant and a retail store face a
similar execution challenge of making sure what is needed arrives at the right time. Literature on
customer satisfaction is voluminous and spans several areas such as marketing, management and
accounting. For example, numerous papers use the ACSI (American Customer Satisfaction
Index) to study customer satisfaction at the company, industry and macroeconomic levels.
For the purposes of our paper, we focus only on customer satisfaction studies that are
immediately related to our work in retailing and do not survey the literature that studies the
design of satisfaction survey instruments, because in this work we had no control over survey
design. The basic tenet of this research stream is that higher service quality improves customer
satisfaction, resulting in better financial performance, although the mechanisms by which this
improvement happens vary. Iacobucci et al. (1994, 1995) provide precise definitions of service
quality versus customer satisfaction.
They contend that service quality should not be confused with customer satisfaction,
but that satisfaction is a positive outcome of providing good service. Titter and Larker (1998)
provide empirical evidence at the customer, business-unit and firm- level that various measures
of financial performance (including revenue, revenue change, margins, return on sales, market
value of equity and current earnings) are positively associated with customer satisfaction.
However, in the retail industry they find a negative relationship between satisfaction and
profitability which may be because benefits from increased satisfaction can be exceeded by the
incremental cost in retail. Sulek et al. (1995) find that customer satisfaction positively affects
sales per labor hour at a chain of 46 retail stores.
Anderson et al. (2004) find a positive association between customer satisfaction at the
company level and Tobin’s q (a long-run measure of financial performance) for department
49

stores and supermarkets. Babakus et al. (2004) link customer satisfaction to product and service
quality within retail stores and find that product quality has a significant impact on store-level
profits.
To summarize, research on customer satisfaction views employees as facilitators of
the sales process who are critical to improving the conversion ratio, by providing information to
the customers on prices, brands, and product features and by helping customers to navigate store
aisles, finding the product and even cross-selling other products.
The unique feature of the retail store execution problem is that it combines the factory
and the sales components, but this stream of literature focuses only on the latter. Empirical
studies of execution span other industries as well. For example, retail banking is dominated by
the sales function; Frei and Hawker (1999) quantify the inefficiencies in process execution due to
process design using Data Envelopment Analysis. Frei et al. (1999) study the impact of the
aggregate process performance and process variation on the financial outcome using a sample of
135 bank branches. They report that process variation negatively affects financial performance.
Another prominent focus on execution which takes the factory viewpoint is found in
the automotive industry. In this context the role of process design and conformance has long
been debated, and the virtues of the Toyota Production System are well documented. Womack et
al. (1991) show that Toyota’s competitive advantage arises from a combination of employee
motivation, training, process designs and JIT techniques.
Fisher and Titter (1999) study the impact of product variety on automotive assembly
plant operations and find that increased option content variability in car assembly has an adverse
effect on plants’ operational performance, which is manifested in higher total labor hours,
overhead hours, downtime hours, rework and inventory levels. McDuffieet al. (1996) find that
parts complexity persistently impairs productivity.
Perhaps the closest to retailing are the streams of literatures studying customer
satisfaction, operational failures and performance in the airline and healthcare industry, because
these industries too combine factory and sales components of execution. Studies of execution in
the healthcare industry focused on operational failures in the execution process (Tucker 2004) as
well as on learning through these failures (Tucker and Edmondson 2003). Ren and Wang (2006a)
empirically link process consistency and service quality while Ren and Wang (2006b) further
show how service quality affects volume at US hospitals.
50

Using data on customer complaints caused by operational failures in the airline
industry, Lapre and Tsikriktsis (2006) find that customer dissatisfaction follows a U-shaped
function of operating experience: first dissatisfaction decreases with experience because airlines
learn but then dissatisfaction increases because customers increase their expectations of service.
Tsikriktsis (2006) shows that the relationship between operational performance and
profitability depends upon a company’s operating model; “focused” airlines show a link between
late arrivals and profitability, whereas full service airlines do not. Moreover, capacity utilization
is a stronger driver of profitability for full-service airlines than for focused airlines. Anderson et
al. (2006) find that drivers of customer satisfaction are affected by customer attributions of blame
for service failures: namely, customer-employee interactions are less important when the
customer attributes blame to the service provider.
It is sometimes said that success is the result of a good plan well executed. For a retailer,
plans are mostly formulated at corporate headquarter and executed in their stores. Corporate
planning functions include choosing the assortment of products to carry in each store at each
point in time, setting store inventory levels and product prices, setting staffing levels,
determining how many stores to have and where they are located and creating the physical
design of stores and planograms that specify the location of all products within each store.
A retail store is an interesting amalgam of a factory and a sales office and store
employees are
responsible for a wide range of execution tasks that collectively determine the success of
corporate plans.Factory related store execution tasks include receiving product, moving product
from the back room to shelves as needed, putting items moved by a customer back to where they
belong on the shelf and checking customers out. Fisher (2004) notes similarities between the
execution tasks of a retail store and an automobile assembly plant, and suggests drawing on the
Toyota Production System as a source of ideas for improving retail store execution. Sales office
store execution tasks include all interactions with customers, such as greeting them, asking if
they need help, and when requested, providing advice to enable them make a purchase decision
and to find the products they have decided to buy. Academic research to date has focused almost
exclusively on planning functions.
For example, the operations management literature includes numerous papers
on inventory optimization that are applicable to setting planned inventory levels in a retail store.
51

Recently, however, a few pioneering papers (Raman et al. 2001a, 2001b, DeHoratius and Raman
2003, Ton and Raman 2004, Corsten and Gruen 2003, Ton and Huckman 2005, Van Donselaar et
al. 2006) have provided evidence of deficiencies in retail store execution, suggesting that
optimized plans might be severely blunted by less than perfect execution.
Although these papers have focused mostly on missing inventory, inventory
record inaccuracy and inventory replenishment, it is reasonable to suspect that, given the high
level of problems with inventories, other aspects of retail execution are imperfect also.
Interestingly, for many years, retailers have been administering surveys to their customers to
measure both their overall level of satisfaction and their opinion of various details of their store
experience.
Many of the detailed questions relate to store execution. For example, ‘Did you
find what you were looking for?’ is a commonly asked question directly related to the missing
inventory issue noted above. It is thus natural to consider using this data to better understand
issues related to store execution, including what factors influence the quality of execution and
what is the impact of execution on output variables of interest to the retailer, such as sales and
overall customer satisfaction.
This paper reports a effort to do this using proprietary data
obtained from a large retail chain with over 500 stores. The data is tracked monthly at the store
level for a 17 month period and is comprised of 1) financial store performance data, including
sales, number of transactions and number of units sold, 2) operational data, such as payroll,
employee turnover, and in-stock levels, and 3) the results of ongoing customer satisfaction
surveys that use a variety of questions to measure for a particular store visit a customer’s overall
satisfaction as well as their perception of various aspects of their experience that may have
influenced their overall satisfaction.
I analyzed this data to discern correlates of 1) sales, 2) overall customer
satisfaction and 3) the percentage of customers who answered ‘yes’ to the question ‘Did you find
everything you were looking for?’, a metric we call customer perceived in-stock. Because we
were interested in assessing the impact of the detailed variables on sales, satisfaction and
customer perceived in-stock, we first transformed the data to attempt to remove spurious sources
of correlation. For example, most variables were impacted by time, via trend and seasonality, and

52

hence might be correlated with each other because of this common correlation with time, but this
type of correlation was not of interest to us.
Retail involves the sale of goods from a single point (malls, markets, department stores etc)
directly to the consumer in small quantities for his end use. In a layman’s language, retailing is
nothing but transaction of goods between the seller and the end user as a single unit (piece) or in
small quantities to satisfy the needs of the individual and for his direct consumption.
Let us understand the concept with the help of an example.
Tim wanted to purchase a mobile handset. He went to the nearby store and purchased one for
himself.
In the above case, Tim is the buyer who went to a fixed location (in this case the nearby store).
He purchased a mobile handset (Quantity - One) to be used by him. An example of retail.
The store from where Tim purchased the handset must have shown him several options for him
to select one according to his budget and need.
From where do you think the store owner (also called the retailer) purchased all the handsets?
Here the manufacturers and the wholesalers come into the picture.
The retailers purchase goods in bulk quantities (huge numbers) to be sold to the end-users either
directly from the manufacturers or through a wholesaler.
STORE OPERATIONS
Store operations is exactly what it is operating and overseeing all the functions of the store from
setting of shop, deciding what type of store you want, what products you want to sell deciding on
what type of customers you are trying to attract in your store, then ordering products, hiring
personnel, pricing the products, deciding on a location, taking an inventory, advertising the
products etc., and it would be categorized as business.
The study of retail store operations consists of different aspects these different aspects may
53

performed by the staff daily in store
STORE ATMOSPHERE
The store must offer a positive ambience to the customers for them to enjoy their shopping and
leave with a smile.

The store should not give a cluttered look.

The products should be properly arranged on the shelves according to their sizes and
patterns. Make sure products do not fall off the shelves.

There should be no foul smell in the store as it irritates the customers.

The floor, ceiling, carpet, walls and even the mannequins should not have unwanted
spots.

Never dump unnecessary packing boxes, hangers or clothes in the dressing room. Keep it
clean.

Make sure the customers are well attended.

Don’t allow customers to carry eatables inside the store.
Cash Handling

One of the most important aspects of retailing is cash handling.

It is essential for the retailer to track the daily cash flow to calculate the profit and loss of
the store.

Cash Registers, electronic cash management system or an elaborate computerized point of
sale (POS) system help the retailer to manage the daily sales and the revenue generated.

Prevent Shoplifting/Safety and Security

The merchandise should not be displayed at the entry or exit of the store.

Do not allow customers to carry more than three dresses at one time to the trial room.

Install CCTVs and cameras to keep a close watch on the customers.

54

Each and every merchandise should have a security tag.

Ask the individuals to submit carry bags at the security.

Make sure the sales representative handle the products carefully.

Clothes should not have unwanted stains or dust marks as they lose appeal and fail to
impress the customers.

Install a generator for power backup and to avoid unnecessary black outs.

Keep expensive products in closed cabinets.

Instruct the children not to touch fragile products.

The customers should feel safe inside the store.

Refunds and Returns

Formulate a concrete refund policy for your store.

The store should have fixed timings for exchange of merchandise.

Never exchange products in lieu of cash.

Never be rude to the customer, instead help him to find something els

Training Program

The store manager must conduct frequent training programs for the sales representatives,
cashier and other team members to motivate them from time to time.

It is the store manager’s responsibility to update his subordinates with the latest softwares
in retail or any other developments in the industry.

It is the store manager’s responsibility to collate necessary reports (sales as well as
inventory) and send to the head office on a daily basis.

Inventory and Stock Management

The retailer must ensure to manage inventory to avoid being “out of stock”.
55

Every retail chain should have its own warehouse to stock the merchandise.

Take adequate steps to prevent loss of inventory and stock.
In big bazaar there are so many activities were there those are as follows

1. Gender
Responses

No of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Male

80

80

Female

20

20

Total

100

100
Table No 5.1

Chart 5.1

Interpretation:
From the above table, it is observed that 80% of respondents are male members and 20% of
respondents are female members
56

2. Salary per month
S .NO
1
2
3
4

Responses
below-20000
20000-30000
30000-40000
>50000
Total
Table no 5.2

No of respondents
45
25
18
12
100

Percentage
45%
25%
18%
12%
100%

Chart no : 5.2

Interpretation:
From the above table it is observed that 45% of respondents are with the salary range of
below20000 in big bazaar and

25% of respondents are with the salary range of 20000-30000
57

and 18% of respondents are with a salary range of 30000-40000 remaining 12% respondents
are above 50000 salary range in big bazaar

3. Purchasing goods from big bazaar in a month
S.No

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

more than 5 times

10

10%

2

3 – 5 times

48

48%

3

1-2 times

24

24%

4

less than a month

18

18%

Total

100

100%

Table no 5.3

Chart no 5.3
Interpretation:
From the above table it is observed that 48% of respondents are purchasing in big bazaar for
3-5 times in a month and 24% of respondents are purchasing 1-2 times in a month and 18% of
58

respondents are less than a month and10% of respondents are visit big bazaar are more than 5
times in a month

4 .In customer perspective best part of big bazaar
S.NO

Responses

No.of respondents

Percentage

1

PUC (plastic, crockery ,utensils)

20

20%

2

FBB(fashion at big bazaar)

49

49%

3

Electronics

11

11%

4

Food bazaar

20

20%

Total

100

100%

Table no 5.4

Chart no 5.4
Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 20% of respondents are preferrering Big Bazaar mainly
for purchasing PUC (plastic ,crockery, utensils)and 49% of respondents preferring mainly FBB

59

(fashion at big bazaar) and 11% of respondents preferred mainly electronics and remaining 20%
of respondents preferring mainly food bazaar in the big bazaar
5. Main reason to visit big bazaar
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

Quality

21

21%

2

Offers

47

47%

3

Price

23

23%

4

near to home

11

11%

Total

100

100%

Table no 5.5

Chart no 5.5
Interpretation:
from the above table it is observed that, 21% of respondents come to Big Bazaar for quality and
47% of people come for offers and 23% of respondents come for price and remaining 1% of
respondents come mainly it near to home to big bazaar.

60

6. Compared to other outlets, pricing of products in big bazaar are
S.No

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

Very low

12

12%

2

Low

56

56%

3

Almost same

26

26%

4

High

6

6%

Total

100

100

Table no 5.6

Chart no 5.6
Interpretation;
From the above table it is observed that 12% of respondents said pricing is very low when
compared to other stores and 56%0f respondents said pricing is low and 26% of respondents
said pricing is almost same and 6% of respondents said pricing is high in big bazaar
7 . Customer service

61

S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

12

12%

2

Satisfied

24

24%

3

slightly satisfied

44

44%

4

Dissatisfied

14

14%

5

highly dissatisfied

6

6%

Total

100

100%

Table no 5.7

Chart no 5.7
Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 12% of respondents are highly satisfied with the
customer service in big bazaar and 24% of people are satisfied and 44% of people are slightly
satisfied about customer service and last some respondents are fell dissatisfied about customer
service
8. Pricing of big bazaar
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents
62

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

24

24%

2

Satisfied

32

32%

3

slightly satisfied

34

34%

4

Dissatisfied

9

9%

5

highly dissatisfied

1

1%

Total

100

100%

Table no 5.8

Chart no 5.8
Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 24% of respondents are highly satisfied about the pricing
of big bazaar and 32% of respondents are satisfied and 34% of respondents are slightly satisfied
and last some respondents are fell dissatisfied about the pricing in big bazaar
9. Time taken for billing at the counter
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

63

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

10

10%

2

Satisfied

20

20%

3

slightly satisfied

30

30%

4

Dissatisfied

28

28%

5

highly dissatisfied

12

12%

Total

100

100%

Table no 5.9

Chart no 5.9
Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 10% of people are highly satisfied about time taken for
billing at the counter and 20% of people are satisfied and 30% of people are slightly satisfied
and last some respondents are fell dissatisfied about billing at the counter in big bazaar

10. Arrangement of products
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

12

12%

2

Satisfied

70

70%

64

3

slightly satisfied

9

9%

4

Dissatisfied

7

7%

5

highly dissatisfied

2

2%

Total

100

100%

Table no 5.10

Chart no 5.10
Interpretation :
From the above table and chart we observe that 12% of respondents are highly satisfied about
arrangement of products and 70% of respondents are satisfied and 9% of respondents are
slightly satisfied and last some respondents are fell dissatisfied about arrangement of products in
big bazaar

11. Quality of products
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

14

14%

2

Satisfied

46

46%

3

slightly satisfied

30

30%

65

4

Dissatisfied

8

8%

5

highly dissatisfied

2

2%

Total

100

100%

Table no 5.11

Chart no 5.11
Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 14% of respondents are highly satisfied about quality
of products and 46% of respondents are
satisfied

satisfied and 30% of respondents are

slightly

and last some respondents are dissatisfied about quality of products in big bazaar

12. Announcement of offers
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

54

54

2

Satisfied

26

26

3

slightly satisfied

12

12

4

Dissatisfied

7

7

66

5

highly dissatisfied

1

1

Total

100

100

Table no5.12

Chart no 5.12
Interpretation:
From the above table

it is observe that 54% of respondents are highly satisfied about

announcement of offers and26% of respondents are

satisfied and12% of respondents are

slightly satisfied and last some respondents are fell dissatisfied about announcement of offers in
big bazaar
13. Store location
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

64

64%

2

Satisfied

17

17%
67

3

slightly satisfied

14

14%

4

Dissatisfied

4

4%

5

highly dissatisfied

1

1%

Total

100

100%

Table no 5.13

Chart no 5.13

Interpretation:
from the above table it is observe that 64% of people are highly satisfied about store location
and17% of people are satisfied and14% of people are slightly satisfied and last some respondents
are fell dissatisfied about store location of big bazaar

14. Attraction of promotions
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

18

18%

2

Satisfied

54

54%

68

3

slightly satisfied

24

24%

4

Dissatisfied

3

3%

5

Highly dissatisfied

1

1%

Total
Table no 5.14

CHART NO 5.14
Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 18% of people are highly satisfied about attraction of
promotion and54% of people are

satisfied about and24% of people are slightly satisfied and

last some respondents are fell dissatisfied about attraction of promotions in big bazaar
1 5 . Availability of different product in big bazaar.
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

14

14

2

Satisfied

38

38

3

slightly satisfied

24

24

4

Dissatisfied

20

20

69

5

highly dissatisfied

4

4

Total

100

100

Table no 5.15

Chart no 5.15
Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 14% of respondents are highly satisfied about availability
of products and 38% of respondents are satisfied and24% of respondents are slightly satisfied
and last some respondents are dissatisfied about availability of products in big bazaar

16. Freshness of the products
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

16

16

2

Satisfied

44

44

3

slightly satisfied

30

30

4

Dissatisfied

8

8

5

highly dissatisfied

2

2

70

Total

100
Table no 5.16

100
.

Chart no 5.16
Interpretation:
From the above table and it is observe that 16% of respondents are highly satisfied about
freshness of the products and44% of respondents are satisfied and 30% of respondents are
slightly satisfied and last some respondents are dissatisfied about freshness of the products in big
bazaar

17. Aroma in the store
S.NO

Responses

No. of respondents

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

24

24

2

Satisfied

38

38

3

slightly satisfied

22

22

4

Dissatisfied

11

11

71

5

highly dissatisfied

5

5

Total

100

100

Table no 5. 17
.

Chart no 5. 17

Interpretation:
From the above table and chart it is observe that 24% of respondents are highly satisfied about
aroma in the store and38% of respondents are satisfied and22% of respondents are slightly
satisfied and last some respondents are fell dissatisfied about aroma in the store in big bazaar

18.Range of products
S.NO

Responses

No of respondents
72

Percentage

1
2
3

highly satisfied
Satisfied
slightly satisfied

18
44
24

18
44
24

4
5

Dissatisfied
highly dissatisfied
Total
Table no 5. 18

10
4
100

10
4
100

Chart no 5.18

Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 18% of respondents are highly satisfied about range of
the productsand44% of respondents are satisfied and24% of respondents are slightly satisfied
and last some respondents are fell dissatisfied about range of the products in big bazaar

19. Cleaning of the store
S.NO

Responses

No.of respondents

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

16

16

73

2

Satisfied

28

28

3

slightly satisfied

26

26

4

Dissatisfied

22

22

5

highly dissatisfied

8

8

Total

100

100

Table no 5.19

chart no 5. 19
Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 16% of respondents are highly satisfied about cleaning of
the store and 28% of respondents are satisfied and26% of respondents are slightly satisfied and
last some respondents are fell dissatisfied about cleaning of the store

20. Security system at big bazaar
S.No

Responses

No .of respondents

74

Percentage

1

highly satisfied

38

38

2

Satisfied

44

44

3

slightly satisfied

14

14

4

Dissatisfied

3

3

5

highly dissatisfied

1

1

Total

100

100

Table no : 5.20

Chart no 5. 20

Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 38% of respondents are highly satisfied about security
system and44% of respondents are satisfied and14% of respondents are slightly satisfied and last
some respondents are dissatisfied about security system in big bazaar

21.parking place of the big bazaar

75

S.No

Response

No.of respondents

Percentage

1

Highly satisfied

4

4

2

Satisfied

14

14

3

Slightly satisfied

24

24

4

Dissatisfied

26

26

5

Highly dissatisfied

32

32

TOTAL

100

100

Table no 5.21

Chart no 5. 21

Interpretation:
From the above table it is observe that 4% of respondents are highly satisfied about parking
place and 14% of respondents are satisfied and24% of respondents are slightly satisfied and26%
of respondents are dissatisfied about security systemand32% of respondents are highly
dissatisfied about security system in big bazaar

FINDINGS

76

 From the research conducted it is evident that customers are mainly visit big bazaar for
offers
 customer service at big bazaar were overall satisfied. But some areas it need to improve
 Most of the people who visited Big Bazaar are nearly 3-5 times in a month
 Effective visual merchandising is essential to attract shoppers enticing them to make a





purchase.
54% of customers are highly satisfied by announcement of offers with in 100 samples
Store location was highly satisfied by the customers.
Most of customers are satisfied with the aroma of the store.
Majority of the respondents said that security system of the store is satisfied.
Effective attraction of promotions should also be supported by good sales staff to close

deals with shoppers.
 most of the customers are highly dissatisfied about parking place

SUGGESTIONS
 Give information through SMS , Mail , or Social media … when the new arrivals /offers
available in BIG BAZAAR

77

 Fashion assistance will need proper training for giving better assistance to the customer,
some of the fashion assistance will have to assign some target for monthly and provide
some incentives for that…
 Parking place should be improved and arrange a security guard for giving directions for
car parking entrance and exit also.
 Give ads frequently and give more information in ads about BIG BAZAAR they need
local publicity also…
 BIG BAZAAR should put hoardings at near colleges and give special offers to student's
to attract as most of the customers are students in BIG BAZAAR.
 BIG BAZAAR should put brand logos at the entrance door and also provide information
on offers, at which floor it is available

SUMMARY

The project work report titled “RETAIL STORE OPERATIONS with reference to BIG
BAZAAR, VISHAKAPATANAM” divided into 6 Chapters.
78

First chapter deals with the introduction to the project report need for the
study, objectives of the study, Methodology and limitations. In the introduction of the study a
brief discussion is made on retail store operations . Later the need for the study has been
described. After that the objectives of the study has been constituted and to realize the
objectives what methodology was followed been described in step by step manner. Finally, the
limitation of the study is also discussed.
Second chapter deals with the industry profile. In this chapter total overview
of retail set industry been discussed. The trends and history of the industry has also been
discussed with a chronological order. Later the industry prospectus is also mentioned.
Third chapter the overview of the company has been discussed. All
functional activities like production and operations, Human resource management, financial
management and marketing operations of the BIG BAZAAR is clearly mentioned. Various
organ grams of different departments in the company also depicted.

Fourth chapter of this project report thesis deals with the theoretical
back ground of the topic retail store operations. Its characteristics, operations, difficulties and
various strategies applicable to the retail store operations were clearly discussed.
Fifth Chapter deals with the analysis and interpretation part. The data was
analyzed with 21diagrams and equal number of tables. The analyzed data was also interpreted
with possible information available at the time of filling up the questionnaire and interviews .
At last the sixth chapter deals with the summary, findings and
suggestions. As the last part of the thesis the bibliography and annexure also attached.
QUESTIONNARE

NAME:

AGE:
79

GENDER:
1.Salary per month
A) Below 20000

B)20000-30000

C) 30000-40000

D)Above 50000

2 .How often will you purchase from big bazaar?
A) More than 5 times a month

B) 3-5 times in a month

C) 1-2 times in a month

D) less than one time in a month

3. In your perspective Which was the best part of big bazaar ?
A) PUC(plastic,crockery,utensils)

B)FBB(fashion at big bazaar)

C) Electronic goods

D) Food bazaar

4. What was the main reason behind you to visit big bazaar for purchasing?
A) Quality

B) Price

C) Offers

D) Near to home

5. Whether compare to other stores price of products in big bazaar was……………..
A) Very low

B) Low

C) Almost same

D) High

STATEMENT

6.

Highly
satisfied

Satisfied

Customer service

80

Slightly
Satisfied

Dis-

Highlydis-

satisfied

satisfied

7.

Pricing of the big bazaar

8.

Time taken for billing at the
counter

9.

Arrangement

of

the

products
10.

Quality of products

11.

Announcement of offers

12.

Quality of products

13.

Attraction of promotions

14.

Availability of the products

15.

Freshness of the products

16.

Aroma in the store

17.

Range of products

18.

Cleaning of the store

19.

Security system at the time
of checkout

20.

Parking place

21.Any
suggestions…………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………

81

BIBILOGRAPHY

BOOKS REFERRED:
Marketing management
Marketing research

PhilipKotler
A. parasuraman

WEB SITES:

82

WWW.Google .com
WWW .Big bazaar.com
Management study guide
E books .com
WWW.wikipedia.com
WWW.store operations.com

83