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Algebra II Unit 1 Plan

Name: Elkin Bustamante_ Date: 09/08/14 to 10/31/14
Transformations of Functions_

Unit: Discrete and Inverse Relationships and

Step 1 – Study the Progression
Standards for Previous
Grade/Course

A.CED.1
A.CED.2
A.CED.3
A.REI.D10
A.REI.B3
RN.A.1
RN.A.2
F-IF.A1
F-IF.B-4
F.IF.B5
F.BF.A1
S-ID.C7

Standards for Current
Grade/Course

Standards for Next
Grade/Course

CHAPTER 1. Arithmetic and
Geometric Sequences and Series.
A-SSE.B4
A-CED.A2
A-REI.D11
F-IF.A3
F-BF.A1a, F-BF.A2
F-LE.A2
CHAPTER 2. Understanding
Inverse Relations.
A-REI.A1
F-IF.B5
F-BF.B4a
F-BF.B4c
F-BF.B4d
G-GPE.A2
CHAPTER 3. Transforming
Functions.
F-BF.A3

Progressions from Previous to Current

Progressions from Current to Next

CHAPTER 1.
Students begin the course by connecting functions to
sequences and exploring the basic characteristics of
arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. They
find general terms and sums, recursively-defined
functions, and they derive summation formulas for
finite arithmetic and geometric series. Finally, they
explore the notions of convergence and divergence as
they develop the formula for the sum of an infinite
geometric series.
In Algebra I, students learned that they can think
of any linear function model y = mx + b as a
transformation of the linear parent function y = x
and any quadratic function model y = ax2 + bx + c
as a transformation of the quadratic parent
function y = x2. The value of m or a controls
vertical stretches, shrinks, and reflections of the
parent graph, and the value of b or c shifts the
graph up or down along the y-axis without
changing its shape.

CHAPTER 2.
This topic deals with inverse relations--relations that
are produced by reversing a dependency relationship
between two quantities. Students first explore the
inverse of a linear function. Through this exploration,
they learn how the domains and ranges of the
function and its inverse are related and that the
graphs are symmetric about the line y = x. They then
investigate the inverses of exponential and quadratic
functions and learn how these give rise to the

 How do you find the missing terms of a geometric sequence?  Recognize that sequences are functions with integer domains.  Can you give examples of a convergent geometric . students will     Understand the graphical.Algebra II Unit 1 Plan logarithmic and square root functions. CHAPTER 3. Use explicit formulas to find the sum of an infinite geometric series. Are there any sequences that are both arithmetic and geometric?  How can we determine the end behavior of a series? Understand the relationship between exponential and logarithmic functions. In Algebra I. Step 2: Use PARCC-like items to “Determine the Criteria” and generate Essential Questions Criteria for Evidence of Student Learning Essential Questions After completing the topic Arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. students explore a third parameter that controls horizontal shifts of graphs by studying scientific data collected in an experiment. and algebraic relationship between a linear function and its inverse. students will be able to  What is true about a function?  Do all functions behave in the same manner?  Recognize arithmetic sequences and identify the common difference. After completing the topic Understanding inverse relations.  How do you find the missing terms of an arithmetic sequence?  Recognize geometric sequences and identify the common ratio. In this topic. tabular. Learn the conditions for convergence of infinite geometric series. why do we need arithmetic sequences?  What strategies do you use to quickly add the numbers from 1 to 100?  How do we find the sums of arithmetic sequences? Does the sum formula for an arithmetic sequence work if there are an odd number of terms? Why or why not?    Determine convergence and divergence of infinite series.   Find explicit terms and sums for arithmetic and geometric sequences. How would you describe the difference between the growth rates of arithmetic and geometric sequences?  If linear functions seem to provide us with similar information. students studied quadratic functions and may have been introduced to exponential functions.

   Is every linear relation a function? Why or why not? Is the inverse of a linear relation always a function? Why or why not? How does the graph of a base 2 logarithmic function compare to the graph of a base 5 logarithmic function? Are there any exponential functions whose inverses are not functions without any limitations on the domain? Why or why not? How does the domain of y  range of y = x2? x compare to the How does the range of y  x compare to the domain of y = x2? What kind of graph would result if you determined the inverse of y = x2 by reflecting its graph across the line y = x? What shapes are formed by the intersection of a plane and a right double cone?  How do you have to slice the cone to form a parabola?  How is the a-value from quadratic functions related to the p-value in the equation of a parabola?  What are the domain and range of the linear parent function y = x?  How does transforming the function rule into the form y = mx + b affect the domain and range?  What describes the transformation each coordinate pair (x.y)?  Consider f(x) = −4(x − 1.  Be able to restrict the domain of a quadratic function in order for its inverse to be a function. Recognize the general form of a quadratic equation and explain how the values of a. the rule that represents the first complete parabolic shape.  Identify one-to-one functions.y) to (−x.885.021)2 + 0. and horizontal shifts.  Describe the transformation from one function to another in terms of vertical shifts. How could you write g(x) as a transformation of f(x)? .    After finishing the topic Transforming functions.  Relate geometric transformations to tables of values for functions.  Connect the geometric definition of a parabola to its algebraic equation.Algebra II Unit 1 Plan  Understand the relationship between quadratic and square root functions. vertical shrinks/stretches. series?    Understand and apply the locus definition of a parabola. h. and k affect the shape of the parabola. students will be able to   Apply transformations to graphs of parent functions. Let g(x) represents the rule that models the second complete parabolic shape (the one that includes 2 seconds).

Now sketch what −f(x − 2) + 3 would look like. . a term they may have seen previously in their Geometry course. Transformations (of functions) Vertical Shift Horizontal Shift Vertical Stretch Vertical Shrink Vertical Compression Quadratic Function Parent Function.  How are horizontal transformations for the parent quadratic function and the parent absolute value function similar? Step 3: Vocabulary Mathematical Vocabulary Needed to Answer Essential Questions (Focus on New Vocabulary) Arithmetic Sequence Common Difference Geometric Sequence Common Ratio Recursive Definition Arithmetic Series geometric Series Indices Sigma Finite Series Infinite Series partial Sums Convergent Divergent Relation Inverse Function Quadratic Function Parabola One-to-one Function Exponential Function logarithmic function Discriminant Focus Directrix. Students will also encounter the term Fractal.Algebra II Unit 1 Plan  Do you think that a piecewise function can be transformed like a quadratic function?  Make a parent function f(x) of your own.

vertical stretches and shrinks. students should:  Understand the definition of a function  Be able to determine rate of change from a table. or algebraic rule  Be able to identify domain and range from the graph of a function  Be able to apply the distance formula to find the distance between two points in the Cartesian plane It may be necessary to provide a more in-depth review of the definitions of functions and relations than this topic provides. graph. To be successful with the material in this topic. students should already understand the following concepts:  Linear and exponential functions. To be successful with the material in this topic. and tabular representations of a function and its inverse. graphical. To be successful with the material in this topic. and vertical shifts of quadratic functions Step 5: Plan the Components: Core Curricular Resource and Additional Instructional Resources Monday Objective: Tuesday Objective: Wednesday Objective: Thursday Objective: Friday Objective: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday .Algebra II Unit 1 Plan Step 4: Check-in on Analysis of Student Work from Previous Units Previously Taught Standards to be Revisited in the Upcoming Unit CHAPTER 1. domain. and range  Symbolic manipulation skills  Subscript notation CHAPTER 2. The use of multiple representations is essential in this topic. students should understand:  The general shape of the graph of a quadratic function  Reflections. Students need to see the connections among the algebraic. Functions. can provide this review. CHAPTER 3. The Agile Mind Algebra I topic.

Algebra II Unit 1 Plan Objective: Objective: Objective: Objective: Objective: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Monday Objective: Tuesday Objective: Wednesday Objective: Thursday Objective: Friday Objective: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Monday Objective: Tuesday Objective: Wednesday Objective: Thursday Objective: Friday Objective: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Core Curricular Resource: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Additional Resources: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Topic/Strategy to Revisit: Step 6: Instructional Strategies and Possible Mathematical Misconceptions .

 Address the inverse of a linear function using the Exploring "The inverse of a linear function. Strategies to Address Misconceptions  It is important for students to be able to sketch a parent function and the resulting graph after any transformations have been applied.     Introduce a review of the parent functions students were exposed to in Algebra I and introduce the concept of  graphically transforming a function." Use Students Activities provided by Agile Mind. the time spent connecting numerical and graphical representations to the symbolic representation is important.  Take a closer look at horizontal shifts. Explore “The exponential function and its inverse” and use Student Activity Sheet 3. students should have computer access for the activities.  Uses the Guided assessment to formatively check for student understanding of concepts addressed.  Use data collected from a motion detector of a bouncing ball.  Use the Guided assessment to formatively check for student understanding of concepts in this topic."  Explore the inverse of a quadratic function. . Students apply transformations to fit a model to the ball-bounce data. This is a good time to emphasize to students the difference between an inverse variation (which is a special kind of functional relationship described symbolically as xy=k. To take full advantage of the interactive materials and to develop a clear understanding of transformations. Because the symbolic representation of a horizontal shift can appear to be counter-intuitive. where k is a nonzero constant) and an inverse function (which refers to the function that results when reversing the dependency relationship between two variables in a one-to-one function).Algebra II Unit 1 Plan Possible Mathematical Misconceptions Instructional Strategies  Introduce the concept of the inverse of a function using the Overview from Agile Mind. Students should develop understanding of the reasoning behind the rule. Students have a hard time choosing the correct sign for the value of h.       Allow time for numerical exploration of at least three inverse variations before I move students to the representations of the process of finding inverse functions. Listen for students who try to use the terms as synonyms. Explore "The inverse of a linear function. The activities in this block are supported by the materials in the Exploring "Making the algebra-geometry connection" and Student Activity Sheet 4. Student Activity Sheet 1 supports the review. The Exploring "Transformations to fit data" and Student Activity Sheet 2 support the learning process.