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ENGL 2112, Sec.

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Fort Valley State University
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of English and Foreign Languages
Spring 2015
(3 credit hrs.)
I. GENERAL INFORMATION

Course: ENGL 2112-1 (Miller, Rm. 205)

Title:

World Literature II

Instructor:
Office:
Phone:
E-Mail:
FAX:
Office Hrs.:

Dr. Jorgette Mauzerall


Miller, Rm. 231
478-825-6684 or 6393
mauzeraj@fvsu.edu
478-825-6110
M/W 11:30 12:30

M/T/W/Th 3:30 5:30 & by appointment

II. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students engage the study of world literature from the early modern
period to the present day. Students make a comparative study of representative works from literary and
cultural traditions from around the world.
III. PREREQUISITES: Completion of ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 with a grade of C or above.
IV.

REQUIRED TEXTS: Paul Davis et al. The Bedford Anthology of World Literature:
The Modern World, 1650 The Present, CONCISE EDITION, VOL. 2.
New York: Bedford/St. Martins, 2003.
Vol. 2 ISBN# 13:978-0-312-44154-8

Supplemental Texts: The Blair Handbook or other basic writing handbook; a standard college desk
dictionary; handouts;
material on reserve in the library.
Library material online at http//fortvalley.docutek.com
Password: mauzerallj
Suggested Bibliography: See ends of introductions to authors in Bedford Anthology for Further
Readings.
Library Assignments: library and web searches for research paper.
V. GENERAL EDUCATION OUTCOME: Students will be assessed for the following outcome:
Students will demonstrate in writing an understanding of the concepts and values of a culture as
revealed in a work of art or literature.
VI. COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES: Assessment will be done for Area C
Students will demonstrate in writing an understanding of the concepts and values of a culture as revealed in a
work of art or literature.

Course Learning Outcomes: As a result of successfully completing the course, a student should be able
to do the following:
1.
Read critically;
2.
Experience and appreciate other cultures and human perspectives via reading selections and
other class assignments;
3.
Demonstrate writing and analytical skills by writing essays and other assignments;
4.
Understand basic principles for making literary judgments.
Course Objectives and How They Will Be Achieved:
FVSU 1a

Students should be able to write clearly and effectively.


Students will write logically constructed critical essays in clear language,
demonstrating their ability to comprehend use of literary techniques.

FVSU 1d

Students should be able to comprehend written texts critically.


In critical writings, students will present evidence and will form conclusions based on their analytical
reading of course selections.

FVSU 4a
FVSU 4b

Students should be able to understand and critically examine their own culture
and the culture of others.
Students will demonstrate some understanding of literary and cultural themes by
identifying them in selected literary works. Students multicultural awareness will be
reflected in their critical writing, their class discussion, and short essay quizzes or objective
quiz responses.

FVSU 5a
FVSU 5b

Students should be able to demonstrate their global awareness and their understanding
of ethical issues and forces shaping and altering social institutions.
In quizzes, tests, papers and other assignments that tie in with assigned readings,
students will demonstrate some awareness of philosophies and significant social forces
in traditional cultures.

FVSU 5b

Students should be able to demonstrate basic knowledge of literary achievements


and the history of philosophy of the literary periods and movements covered in the
course.
Students will demonstrate through short essay answers, quizzes, tests, class discussion,
and critical writing assignments, a basic knowledge of literary achievements made
during the literary periods and movements covered in the course. They will also demonstrate
limited knowledge of the history and philosophy of these literary periods and movements.

VII. SCHEDULE OF ASSIGNMENTS: (See syllabus below)


VIII. GRADING STANDARDS AND CRITERIA
A grade of "D" or better is required to pass the course, unless a grade of C is required for a particular major.
Semester average will be computed as follows:
Brief, low stakes analytical/ response essays
Research paper
Reading quizzes/participation

10%
20%
20%

3
Major tests
Final Exam (comprehensive)

30%
20%

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NUMERICAL GRADES ARE CALCULATED BASED ON THE FOLLOWING:


A+ = 97-100
A = 94 - 96

B+ = 87-89
B = 84-86

C+ = 77-79
C = 74-76

D+ = 67-69
D = 64-66

F = below 60

MIDTERM GRADE will be based on average of first major test, short essay response, participation.
Essay evaluation is based on the following criteria:
1. Each essay must contain either a clearly implied or explicitly stated central idea.
2. Each essay must be unified and coherent: the paragraphs must stand in clear relation to the thesis and
to each other.
3. Each essay must be fully developed (not necessarily with 5 paragraphs); each paragraph should
contain a leading idea and specific details or examples (including quotations) that clarify, support, and
explain the leading idea.
4. Sentences must be clear and in general conformity with standard English; they should not contain
errors in grammar and mechanics so numerous or severe as to distract from meaning.
5. Preferably, the essay will also end with a paragraph, or at least a sentence, which conveys a sense of
completion.
[Note: an essay fulfilling the above criteria represents acceptable college work, a respectable level of
accomplishment. On the other hand, to go beyond that level--that is, to be evaluated as superior--an essay must
show superiority in content and development, organization, sentence style, and vocabulary.]

IX. INSTITUTIONAL AND COURSE POLICIES

ATTENDANCE POLICY:

Attendance is recorded daily, beginning on the first full class day.


The official institutional policy on absences states that students may be absent from a class a number of
times equivalent to the credit hour value of the class. In this three credit class that meets twice a week,
then, two (2) absences are allowed. Also note that three lates add up to an absence. The student may
expect to lose one and one-half (1.5) percentage points for each absence in excess of the above scale.
(Points will be deducted from the final course grade.) Exceptions to this policy in regard to point
reduction may be approved by the instructor in cases involving death in the family, or military duty. It is
the students responsibility to provide legitimate written excuses and documentation to instructors of
classes involved. Other reasons not covered here must be cleared with the Vice President of Student
Affairs or the appropriate school dean.
Roll Call: Attendance is normally taken at the beginning of the class period. When students arrive late,
it is their responsibility to ask--after class is dismissed--to be recorded as present; otherwise, the record
shows an unexcused absence for that day.
Missed Assignments: Graded assignments missed due to excused absence or tardiness may be made up
within one week of the student's return to class; it is the student's responsibility to initiate such

arrangements and to persist in efforts to complete the work within the deadline. Pop quizzes and excused
ungraded assignments cannot normally be made up (but check with the instructor in each case); however,
the excuse will at least prevent the deduction of points for the missing work.
Late Papers: Papers turned in late, without a legitimate, documented excuse, will lose (3) points for
each day late. After one week, a paper will not be accepted unless the student has discussed this with the
instructor and made special arrangements to turn in the assignment at a later date. This usually involves
doing additional work. THE INSTRUCTOR CANNOT TAKE RESPONSIBILITY

FOR ASSESSING ANY WORK SUBMITTED AFTER THE LAST CLASS


MEETING.
Incompletes:Agradeofincompleteispossibleonlywhenastudenthascompletedthemajorityof
assignedwork(asdeterminedbytheinstructor),hasbeenperformingatasatisfactory(Caverage)level,
andhasalegitimate,documentedexcuseformissedwork.
Required Materials:
A notebook for note taking in class, with pocket in which handouts can be saved.
Blue or black medium point pens.
8 " x 11" typing paper.
A floppy disk or flash drive
Assignment Format: All out-of-class papers should be typed on 8 " x 1" typing paper, with pages
numbered. All in-class, written assignments are to be done on 8 " x 11" paper (no torn, rough-edged
notebook paper), on one side only, blue or black ink. Papers are folded long-ways with the student's
name, course number and section, the date, and the title of the assignment on the outside top.
** IMPORTANT: All work should be saved on disk.
____________________________________________________________________________________________

TOACHIEVE MAXIMUM SUCCESS DURING THE SEMESTER, you will need to


do the following:
1. GET YOUR TEXTBOOKS IMMEDIATELY. If you are having trouble obtaining the text, go
online to see if the assignment or some of it is available. Check the syllabus and your notebook well
ahead of time for each day's assignments. Be prepared for announced or unannounced quizzes on reading
assignments.
2. Come to class on time for first roll call each day, bringing pens, paper, your notebook, syllabus, and
the appropriate volume of The Bedford Anthology, as indicated on the syllabus. Take notes on class
instruction and record assignments announced in class or changes to the syllabus.
3. REMEMBER THAT THIS IS A CONTENT CLASS and YOU ARE DEVELOPING YOUR
CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS. You need to keep up with reading, underline/take notes on
important ideas in textbook. Analyze what you read about history, world cultures, influential authors.
Ask questions. Make comparisons. Evaluate the ideas of assigned authors. Relate them to major themes
stressed in the course: religion, views of the natural world, government/power

structures, imperialism, economic theory and practice, gender issues, theories of


the mind and how it works, multiculturalism, the individual vs. society.
4. Participate actively and enthusiastically in class discussion, respecting the views of others and
questioning your own assumptions.
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5. HELP CREATE AN EFFECTIVE,
(See Classroom Code of Conduct.):

FOCUSED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

o TURN CELL PHONES OFF AND PUT THEM AWAY DURING CLASS. NO ELECTRONIC
EQUIPMENT, SUCH AS CELLPHONES OR LAPTOPS, SHOULD BE IN USE OR VISIBLE DURING
CLASS PERIOD, UNLESS SPECIFICALLY PERMITTED OR REQUIRED BY THE INSTRUCTOR.
FOR STUDENTS WHO REPEATEDLY VIOLATE THIS RULE, THE INSTRUCTOR RESERVES THE
RIGHT TO TAKE POSSESSION OF CELL PHONES AND RETURN THEM TO STUDENTS AT THE
END OF CLASS.
o LEAVE FOOD OR DRINK OUTSIDE.
o DO NOT WEAR HATS, SUNGLASSES, REVEALING CLOTHING OR OTHER ATTIRE THAT IS
DISTRACTING AND INAPPROPRIATE FOR AN ACADEMIC SETTING. (This includes clothing with

offensive or disrespectful images or words.)


o AFTER CLASS HAS BEGUN, AVOID LEAVING UNLESS ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY.
o OBSERVE THE CLASSROOM CODE OF CONDUCT AT ALL TIMES.
o BE CONSIDERATE AND RESPECTFUL OF OTHERS, ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY ARE
SPEAKING. Remember, we are practicing communication skills, which include listening. Racist or
sexist language is unacceptable.
Note: the instructor reserves the right to deduct points from the students participation grade for repeated
violation of classroom rules.
___________________________________________________________________________________
Plagiarism: is not tolerated. All work should be yours. Practice is the only way to improve your writing.
Failure of the course or further disciplinary action--including a fine, probation, or expulsion--may result for
plagiarism and other academic dishonesty. Do not seek assistance from anyone other than WIN lab tutors or
your instructor. If you have questions about plagiarism, ask your instructor.
In this course, do not use any outside sources, unless specifically assigned to do so.
A Statement on Equal Opportunity: In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you
have a disability that affects your progress as a student in this class, please meet with me so we may
discuss how to create an environment in which you can best learn. Your notification will be kept
confidential.
Unless otherwise notified in writing, you, the student, are granting me, the instructor, the right to reproduce your
homework assignments in limited Fair Use settings for purposes of professional and/or pedagogical analysis.

THE ABOVE SCHEDULE AND PROCEDURES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE IN THE EVENT OF
EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES.

Consider this syllabus a contract between the student and the instructor.
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SYLLABUS
(Subject to revision)
* Unless otherwise noted, all reading is in the appropriate volume of The Bedford Anthology of World
Literature. Following the first class, all assignments should be completed prior to class on the date
indicated. You should read all introductions to each assigned writer, whose nationality is given in bold.
1-13

Introduction to course. Review aspects of literary analysis. Begin discussion of historical


background of 17th and 18th centuries in Europe and America.

1-15

Get text and required materials.


18th-Century
(The Enlightenment/Age of Reason/Neoclassicism)

Look up classicism on Internet or in encyclopedia; come with notes, ready to discuss.


Alexander Pope (British) Read intro. (278-84); An Essay on Man - Epistle 1, first 16
lines, secs. 1, 2 & 3, 9 & 10 (284-91). If you do not have your book, Google Alexander
Pope and Essay on Man. Click on Pope Essay on Man Complete text. Print out from
internet these sections and bring to class.
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1-20
Read Intro. to text (4-15). Get started on next assignment (Swift).
1-22
Jonathan Swift (Irish) - Intro. (227-31); Gullivers Travels Ch. 3 (232-43).
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1-27
Gullivers Travels Chs. 4, 5, 6, 7 (243-258). Be prepared for quiz.
1-29

Gullivers Travels Chs. 8, 9 (258-65).


BOOK CHECK Lose 3 pts. on participation grade if you do not have your text.

(TO BE CONTINUED)