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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY BAYLEE SOWTER

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY

KANSAN

NEWS

VISIT KANSAN.COM TO READ MORE OF THIS WEEK’S
NEWS COVERAGE

FEB. 2-5, 2015

KU MEMORIAL UNIONS CONSIDERS
RENOVATIONS FOR KANSAS UNION,
INCLUDING JAYBOWL REMOVAL
CHANDLER BOESE
@Chandler_Boese

For the past two years, the
KU Memorial Unions committee has looked into a
project to redesign aspects
of the Kansas Union to reflect what students want.
Director of Memorial
Unions, David Mucci said
the University is evaluating
which changes reflect students’ desires. Mucci said
the plan was sparked by the
University-wide “Master
Plan” initiated in 2013.
To begin with, the steering committee at the Memorial Unions conducted
more than 50 focus groups
that involved about 86 students and 59 faculty and
staff. The initial idea was to
consider creating a union
in the center of campus,
around Wescoe Hall.
However, the University’s “Master Plan” conflicted with the idea, Mucci
said. Instead, the Memorial Unions staff decided
to work on improving the
Kansas Union.
A steering committee
looked at the data from
the focus groups to assess
necessary changes to the
Union. A majority of participants asked for more
natural light and open
space. The committee also
visited student unions at
other universities, specifically the University of
North Carolina State and
the University of Wiscon-

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY CLARK 1 HUSSEMANN

sin.
From there, the steering
committee created an abstract idea of how the Kansas Union could be reimagined.
“Essentially it was, if
we had our dream project, here’s what the Union
would look like,” Mucci
said. “It really [reflected]
student interest in opening
up the building, bringing
in natural light, [and] expanding space.”
The local architecture
firm
Clark-Huesemann
created a series of plans in
December. Although Muc-

ci said the project is still
very much “in the works,”
the proposed plans show
significant changes to the
Union’s current layout.
For example, the Roasterie on the fourth floor
would expand to the front
of the building, closer to
Jayhawk Boulevard.
“The idea was access
to Jayhawk Boulevard to
make [the shop] more open
and porous — bring people
in, expand our coffee operations,” Mucci said.
More
lounge
space
would be added on the
first through fourth floors,

including a revival of a
restaurant or club on the
first floor. One plan showed
a restaurant as part of the
bookstore on the second
floor.
The other major change,
at least as reflected in the
current plans, would remove Jaybowl, the Union’s
bowling alley. Mucci said
the steering committee was
unsure whether bowling fit
into the new plan, especially if a club were established
on the first floor.
The director of Jaybowl,
Becky Swearingen, was unavailable for comment.

However, much of the
plan is still up in the air.
Some considerations, particularly the financials of
the plan, have not been addressed yet.
“We’re looking towards
fiscal year 2018 for a possible start,” Mucci said.
“There’s really no funding
for this. What we’re really
looking at is a recreation
fee that sunsets in 2017
that might yield some significant dollars, without
requiring additional fees
increases on students.”

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY

KANSAN
FEB. 2-5, 2015

KANSAN EDITORIAL

THE KANSAN’S PUSH TO BECOME
DIGITAL-FIRST, AND WHAT IT MEANS
FOR YOU
KANSAN STAFF
@KansanNews

In a decision made by
The Kansan student management team, its advisers
and The Kansan Board,
the University Daily Kansan will print two days per
week instead of four, beginning in fall 2015.
Currently, The Kansan
prints four days per week:
Monday through Thursday. Once the printing
schedule is modified in the
fall, the print edition will
come out on Mondays and
Thursdays.
After analyzing years of
data and readership statistics — both at the University and on a national level
— it is in the best interest
of our audience to make
this change. We believe
the money used to print
and distribute Tuesday and
Wednesday papers can be
allocated more effectively
in a way that will best benefit our readers. We aren’t
changing the news — just
how you consume it.
While the production of
the printed paper will be
reduced by half, The Kansan will not cover only
half the news. Without
the stress and pressure of
producing content for four
print editions per week,
the Kansan staff will focus
its resources on breaking
news, multimedia and online-exclusive content, as
well as in-depth articles

for the two print editions
per week for news, arts and
features, sports and opinion content.
Keeping up with trends
in journalism, The Kansan
has taken multiple steps to
revamp its online presence.
We have a new website
that allows us to optimize
and organize content in a
way that is the most user
friendly to our readers.
Staying true to our name,
the University Daily Kansan, we will still produce
content on a daily basis.
Our website will continue
to be updated throughout
the day and can be counted
on as a source for the latest
news that affects our campus and beyond.
A top priority at The
Kansan is to tell meaningful stories. By utilizing
online resources, we can
tell better ones. We are able
to include videos, photos,
galleries, tweets and links
in our stories, which will
improve the overall reader experience. In an age
where smart phones and
laptops are always within
arm’s reach, staying up to
date with The Kansan is
easier than ever.
To help you stay connected, we encourage you
to follow The Kansan on
Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. These accounts are
updated frequently with
breaking news, information, photos, videos and
links to our stories. The

JOIN US IN OUR GOAL OF
BEING DIGITAL FIRST
@KANSANNEWS
UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
KANSAN.COM
Kansan is just a click away.
The print edition will be
upgraded as part of this
change. Reporters and editors will be able to take
extra time to write and
develop stories, ultimately
leading to higher quality
content for the print product.
You’re probably wondering if anything is going to
happen to the basketball
posters, puzzles and freefor-alls. They aren’t going
anywhere.
At The Kansan, we take
pride in helping groom the
next generation of journalists and marketers. The
Kansan provides students

with hands-on, real-world
experience you don’t get in
the classroom. In today’s
workplace, applicants are
expected to possess a variety of skills that go beyond
writing stories and creating
print ads. With the change
to a digital-focused media
organization, our student
journalists and marketers
will be better equipped to
land high-profile jobs in
the future.
We know this is a big
change, but it’s a necessary
one. Our staff takes pride
in the national reputation
of The Kansan as a top collegiate newspaper. In 2014,
the Princeton Review

ranked the University Daily Kansan as the 11th best
collegiate newspaper in
the country, and we don’t
plan on stopping there.
The Kansan will continue
to grow and improve, and
this change is a major step
in the right direction.
If you take away just one
thing from this, let it be
this: We still are — and will
continue to be — the student voice of the University of Kansas.
MEMBERS OF THE KANSAN
EDITORIAL BOARD ARE
BRIAN HILLIX, PAIGE LYTLE,
STEPHANIE BICKEL, CECILIA
CHO AND SHARLENE XU

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY

KANSAN

ARTS & FEATURES

VISIT KANSAN.COM TO READ MORE OF THIS
WEEK’S ARTS AND FEATURES CONTENT

FEB. 2-5, 2015

Q&A: “THE HEREDITARY ESTATE” AND
THE DARK SIDE OF FAMILY LIFE
LAUREN METZLER
Lauren Metzler

Daniel Coburn, assistant
professor of photo media
at the University, created
a recently published book
called “The Hereditary Estate,” which provides a look
into the imperfect nature of
families. “The Hereditary Estate” is a collection of images,
some of which represent domestic violence and suicide,
based on events from Coburn’s own family. It consists
of Coburn’s original photography, photos gathered from
yard sales and contributed
essays. Tim Hossler, assistant
professor of design, was the
graphic designer for the project. Coburn comments on his
work and how it has affected
him.
KANSAN: Can you elaborate
on your inspiration for “The
Hereditary Estate”?
COBURN: It was kind of an
inspiration that’s happened
over the course of about five
or six years. Basically, my
work and research revolves
around the family photo
album. [It] is one component of this infrastructure
that supports the American
dream. What got me interested in this (the inspiration) is
my own family. When I was
a … teenager, these truths
about my family history
started to come out — stories from my parents, from
my mother, from my father.
My mother, her sister and my
grandmother were victims of
extreme domestic violence. I
didn’t know this until I was a
teenager. Also, my father had
a brother [who] committed
suicide. There was this kind
of generational, cyclical alcoholism that had happened
through my family history.

It was interesting to me because that never appeared
in my own family photo album. What I saw in my own
family photo album was a
series of happy moments. So
I guess you’d say that a lot of
my work is about creating
a supplement to the family
photo album that tells a more
complete story about the
sometimes-troubling nature
of family.
KANSAN: Because you never
experienced these issues until
you were a teenager, how has
this book affected you?

COBURN: Making these
photographs has become
very cathartic. It’s been very
therapeutic. All of the photographs that I made for the
book are staged recreations
of memories and fantasies
that I had on my journey to
adulthood. Some of them are
memories that my parents
may have had that they’ve
relayed to me, some of them
are my own childhood memories. So I’m restaging these
events, and I’m having to
do that in concert with my
parents and my immediate
family. I’m working with
them very closely in this act
of theater, this moment that
we’re recreating. During that
process, discussions happen,
conversation happens, we
talk about things that we’ve
maybe never talked about before. In that sense, it’s been a
very positive thing. It is about
my family, but I hope that
it’s accessible. I want it to be
accessible to most people. In
an ideal world, I would think
of these as somehow referencing this kind of universal
experience, something that
everyone can identify with.
KANSAN: Can you describe
the catharsis that you’ve ex-

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

perienced?
COBURN: It’s really more
about communication, and
I think that there was a lack
of communication. I think
through the act of just being
honest with each other about
the things that have happened in their past, and how
that has affected us, [is helpful]. I think that there is this
passing of values from generation to generation. If we can
confront those things and
stop them, then that’s a good
thing; that’s a positive thing.
KANSAN: Did you have a
specific process to create your
photographs?
COBURN: Yeah, they’re all
different. I think my work has
become more and more abstract over time. I originally
started by making very direct
portraits of my parents and
my brother and his children,
but I’ve allowed myself to
take some liberties with some
abstraction. For instance, I’ll
photograph a landscape that,
for me, represents a certain
psychological state. Or I’ll
maybe photograph someone
else that’s in my life, maybe

a significant other, and that
person becomes a metaphor
for maybe my grandparent
or something like that. I’m
interested in making photographs that can become icons
or symbols of the human existence.
KANSAN: One of the photos was of a blurred woman,
leaning back in a rocking
chair. Can you tell me about
that photo?
COBURN: Sure, that’s my
mom. The blurring that happens in that image, and in
other images where I make a
double exposure, I want the
work to be about my family,
but I also want it to be about
the medium of photography.
I really think it’s important
for photographers to engage
with the history of the medium. For me, that work is
also about spirituality. There’s
this history of photography
and spirituality. For instance,
late-19th-century photographers were actually con men
[who] would convince people
that they could actually take
pictures of ghosts or their deceased relatives. So that blurring that happens, I think,

references that history of
spiritualism in photography.

KANSAN: Has your experience from this book had any
affect on how you teach your
students?

COBURN: I think it’s important that no matter what type
of creative you are — whether you’re a writer or artist
or photographer — that it’s
important to see the value
in documenting the things
that are close to you, because
those are the things that you
know intimately and you
understand very intimately.
Sometimes, I think it’s easy
to discount personal issues as
not being important. But in
actuality, I think [discounting personal issues] is very
important, and sometimes
it’s almost disingenuous to
remove yourself from your
immediate environment and
not show the world what’s
important to you, personally. I encourage my students
to remain true to themselves
and to have some sort of integrity in what they choose
to photograph and choose to
make.

OPINION

FFA OF THE WEEK: GOING TO GO GET YOUR GIRL BECAUSE I HEARD
SHE LIKES MARTINI NIGHT

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY

KANSAN
FEB. 2-5, 2015

#LIKEAGIRL SUPER BOWL COMMERCIAL
SENDS POSITIVE MESSAGE FOR WOMEN
KANIKA KSHIRSAGAR
@sneakykaniky

S

UPER Bowl Sunday is treated
like a religious holiday. The
living room is a church, the
chips and beer are our versions of
bread and wine. Friends and family
gather around to enjoy a classic
game of football. But whether or
not your favorite team made it to
the championship, the commercials
are a must-watch. The commercials
during the Super Bowl are classic,
and sometimes they are the most
talked about during parts of the
evening.
Every year, companies dish out
millions to have just a few seconds
of viewers’ attention. The reported rate for running a 30-second
ad during the Super Bowl is $3.8
million, according to sbnation.com.
With that amount of money, an ad
needs to be creative — and this year,
a common theme was emotional
appeal.
Many of the commercials tugged
at our heartstrings, getting us out of
our game mode and in touch with
our softer side. Dove and Toyota
made sure viewers thought about
their own father while they watched
the sincere bond between child and
dad unfold. While there was an emphasis on appreciation for our dads
this year, I was satisfied to see there
were also commercials directed to
the female audience. The NFL has
faced scrutiny when it comes to
women-related issues, as seen with
domestic abuse cases. So, I think it
was especially appropriate for ads
like No More domestic violence and
#LikeAGirl to run.
In Always’ #LikeAGirl commercial, adolescent boys and girls were
asked to act out how a girl would
run or fight — what followed were
actions associated with overly-dramatic and uncoordinated body
language. When prepubescent girls
were asked the same questions, their
depictions of the actions represented
girls as strong, fierce and capable.
The dissimilarity between the two

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/LIKE A GIRL

age groups revealed the decline of
self-esteem and confidence many
females experience as they get
older and become more influenced
by negative societal stereotypes of
women.
Out of 1,800 Americans, 76
percent of girls ages 16 to 24 said
they no longer saw the phrase “like
a girl” as an insult after watching the
video. Two out of three men who
saw it said they would stop or think
twice before using the phrase “like
a girl” in a negative way, according
to a study by Research Now from
December.
I’d like to applaud Always for

their #LikeAGirl commercial. They
couldn’t have picked a better time
to point out to sexist jerks that
women should be equal to men. The
commercial shows that women are
not born into the world thinking
they are weaker than their male
counterparts, but being constantly
told that idea can affect women as
they hit puberty. The Super Bowl is
a male-dominated event, so it was
refreshing to see an advertisement
focus on women’s issues. Not only
does it get women thinking about
how they view themselves, but it
effectively reaches the attention of
male viewers as well.

It’s important to take away from
this commercial that negative ideas
of women will only continue if we
decide to create a barrier. Men get
blamed a lot for issues related to
women’s equality, but if we allow
it to continue and do nothing, we
aren’t helping the problem either.
Sometimes going along with the status quo is just as bad as deliberately
doing or promoting the wrong idea.
KANIKA KSHIRSAGAR IS A JUNIOR
FROM OVERLAND PARK STUDYING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING.

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY

KANSAN

SPORTS

VISIT KANSAN.COM TO READ MORE OF THIS
WEEK’S SPORTS CONTENT

FEB. 2-5, 2015

SUPER BOWL XLIX DISPLAYED
EVERYTHING TO LOVE, AND HATE,
ABOUT NFL
EVAN RIGGS
@EvanRiggs15

A

S the red, white and blue
confetti settled on the University of Phoenix Stadium
field after Sunday’s Super Bowl, it
signaled the final glimpse of the
tumultuous NFL season which had
preceded it. But speckled throughout the Glendale, Ariz. arena, some
of the 70,000 spectators remained
quiet and patiently waited.
They wanted more. They wanted
one more game-winning drive from
quarterback Tom Brady. One more
implausible catch from Seahawks
receiver Jermaine Kearse. One more
Cinderella story, just as prominent
as that of Patriots rookie cornerback
Malcolm Butler, who clinched the
victory with an interception in the
waning seconds. Some would even

settle for one more fight as the final
seconds on the season ticked down.
In many ways, the game itself
represented what was a turbulent
season for the league. The NFL was
put into the limelight for its mishandling of player’s off-field conduct
this year, especially in domestic
violence cases. League commissioner Roger Goodell made a concerted
effort to increase player safety with
new policies, which ultimately failed
in multiple instances in 2014.
The Super Bowl placed the
immaculate receptions, the big hits
and the scandals on center stage,
which enthralled fans, but it also
displayed the side of the sport which
we despise.
In the two weeks leading up to the
Super Bowl, the NFL again made
national headlines for the Patriots’
mishandling of game balls, in what
is now being called “Deflategate.”

Though investigation is ongoing,
Patriots coach Bill Belichick and
Tom Brady became the men tabbed
as responsible for the under-inflated
balls.
On Sunday, Belichick held up
his fourth Lombardi trophy, tying
Chuck Noll for most by a NFL head
coach. Brady scooped up a handful
of Super Bowl records — most
completions, touchdowns and his
third Most Valuable Player award
— while also leading his team back
from a 10-point deficit on two exhilarating touchdown drives in the
fourth-quarter.
Deflategate forgotten.
In the first half, Seahawks defensive end Cliff Avril was sent off
the field and was diagnosed with
a concussion; he didn’t return.
Good progress for the NFL on head
injuries on the national stage, right?
Wrong.

In the fourth quarter, Patriots
wide receiver Julian Edelman took
a shot from Kam Chancellor after
a 21-yard catch on 3rd-and-14. It
was a crucial catch, but the millions
of viewers saw it: Edelman was
concussed, or at least appeared to
be. He kept playing. Only a few
plays later, he came down with what
would soon be the game-winning
touchdown as he finished with 109
yards, and a pair of glassy eyes.
Player safety forgotten.
Despite all of it, the Super Bowl
featuring Katy Perry became the
most-watched television program of
all-time, according to NBC.
Good or bad, people are watching
football, regardless of any disdain
viewers might have with the league
— on-or-off the gridiron. That’s
how the NFL rolls, and we can’t get
enough of it.

SPORTS CALENDAR
SOFTBALL
LIU Brooklyn
Feb. 6, 2015
8 a.m.
Boca Raton, Fla.

TRACK AND FIELD
Husker Invitational
Feb. 7, 2015
All day
Lincoln, Neb.

MEN’S BASKETBALL
Oklahoma State
Feb. 7, 2015
1 p.m.
Stillwater, Okla.

WOMEN’S TENNIS
UNLV
Feb. 6, 2015
10 a.m.
Las Vegas, Nev.

WOMEN’S SWIMMING AND DIVING
Iowa State
Feb. 7, 2015
10 a.m. Lawrence

SOFTBALL
Florida Atlantic
Feb. 7, 2015
5 p.m.
Boca Raton, Fla.

SOFTBALL
Georgia Tech
Feb. 6, 2015
10:15 a.m.
Boca Raton, Fla.
WOMEN’S SWIMMING AND DIVING
Iowa State
Feb. 6, 2015
6 p.m.
Lawrence

WOMEN’S TENNIS
Pacific
Feb. 7, 2015
Las Vegas, Nev.
SOFTBALL
Arkansas
Feb. 7, 2015
12:30 p.m.
Boca Raton Fla.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
Oklahoma State
Feb. 7, 2015
7 p.m.
Lawrence

SPORTS

FOLLOW @KANSANSPORTS FOR ON-THE-FLY TWEETS OF THIS
WEEKEND’S HAPPENINGS IN SPORTS

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY

KANSAN
FEB. 2-5, 2015

SIGNING DAY: IN A PINCH, BEATY
FINDS SPEED AND LENGTH IN TEXAS
DAN HARMSEN
@udk_dan

Any team that fires its
head coach in late September of the previous season
and ultimately finishes
3-9, and 1-8 in its conference, has holes to fill.
It’s just that Kansas’ holes
might be even bigger than
most, given the recent happenings within the program.
With the graduation of
21 seniors off last year’s
roster, running back Brandon Bourbon transferring
to nearby Washburn and
wide receiver Nigel King
throwing his name into
the 2015 NFL Draft, new
head coach David Beaty —
hired Dec. 5 — had a day
shy of two months to get
cracking.
“You’re drinking from a
firehose for a while there,”
Beaty said of the chaotic
61-day stretch in which he
accepted the coaching position, hired his entire staff
and scrambled to solidify
24 letters of intent from often mercurial 18 to 20 year
olds. “You’re managing a
lot of things.”
So in a bit of pinch at a
Kansas football program
that doesn’t exactly recruit
itself in a coaching limbo,
Beaty and his burgeoning
staff did what they did
best: recruit the homeland.
“I think probably the
biggest thing for us was
familiarity of players,”
Beaty said. “Most of these
(coaches) have a background in the state of Texas.”
The funny thing, though,
was as desperate as Beaty
and staff may have seemed
in the moment, thanks to

BEN BRODSKY/KANSAN
Coach David Beaty explains the talent KU football signed for this upcoming season.

his deep-rooted Texas ties,
the phone worked both
ways.
“The relationships in the
state (helped),” Beaty said.
“Guys just picking up and
calling.”
On one end of the phone
a high-school coach connected to Beaty — or one
of his staff members —
and would call with the
name of an overlooked recruit. Beaty would answer
with two conditions.
“We said we needed to
improve our profile from
a length perspective as
well as speed perspective,”
Beaty said Wednesday as
he announced his 2015 recruiting class. “It’s a long,
fast league now.”
“We can’t make them taller,” he continued, “but we

can make them bigger.”
One of those late-stage
additions that was both
long and fast and Texan, a
Jan. 31 commitment, came
kudos to assistant coach
Klint Kubiak.
“I got to take my hat off
to coach Klint Kubiak,”
Beaty said of the Denzel
Feaster signing. “He found
a guy that had been playing quarterback his entire
career, except for his last
five games.”
Quite possibly, Feaster
may have never played a
down of Division 1 football
as quarterback. Because of
that, he slipped through
the recruiting cracks.
But at a school like Kansas, a swift position change
can maximize untapped
abilities in a player like

Feaster. It worked for Kerry Meier, Brandon McAnderson and Toben Opurum, just to name a few.
“This guy has instincts,”
Beaty said of Feaster. “He
will come downhill and he
will knock the fire out of
you. He puts his head on
the ball. He doesn’t even
know what he’s doing there
yet.”
Feaster will most likely play somewhere in the
secondary. There, he will
be joined by six other 2015
defensive backs, one from
Georgia, one from Michigan, the rest from Texas —
just one of them, Marnez
Ogletree, measuring in
at sub-six-foot (5 feet 10
inches).
“All of these corners that
are coming in here, they

have arms that are extremely long,” Beaty said as
he splayed his arms wide
of his body toward opposite ends of the Anderson
Family Football Complex.
“We want them to be able
to touch the walls as they
stand in this room.”
The theme of length recurred on the offensive
side of the ball, highlighted by 6-foot-4 wide receiver Chase Harrell from
Huffman, Texas.
“I’ve known him since
he was a pup,” Beaty said
of Harrell. “Had a guy at
Texas A&M that Chase reminds me, reminds me of
Mike Evans. He has a lot
of similar qualities in the
way he’s built, the way he
moves at a young age.”
Although Kansas didn’t
sign a player ranked higher
than three stars according
to any recruiting database
— not that that matters —
the Jayhawks stuck with
what was right for the program and didn’t deviate
from the long-term plan.
“The thing I am most
proud of is that our coaches did not let athletic ability get in the way of just
taking a guy because he’s
that good,” Beaty said. “He
had to be good and he had
to be a Kansas guy.”
Even if he’s from Texas
like Feaster is.
“When we offered him
the scholarship, he shed a
tear,” Beaty said of Feaster
— Kansas his lone Power 5
offer.
“He wants to be here.”
And by all accounts on
Wednesday, so does David
Beaty.

AN ONLINE EXCLUSIVE OF

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