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The Cost of Child Care

2013-14

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Contents
Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………..2
What is the cost of child care?.........................................................................6
Is it Affordable?...............................................................................................8
How is the state reducing the burden?...........................................................12
Is there child care available if it’s needed?.....................................................16
Child Care for those with Non-Traditional schedules………………………………18
Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………………….19
Appendix: A

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Introduction: Families and Child Care in
Will, Grundy, Kendall, and Kankakee Counties
Child Care is an integral part of a community’s foundation. Without child care, parents and
guardians may be unable to work or attend school, which can result in serious impacts on
family economics as well as a trickle-down effect on local economies. Issues surrounding child
care, its costs, and affordability can be complex. This report examines the child care climate in
the four counties making up the service delivery area (SDA) for Child Care Resource & Referral
(CCR&R) by presenting the different child care settings, the potential number of children that
could be served, and the costs to families.
CCR&R serves the following Illinois counties: Will, Grundy, Kendall, and Kankakee. The make-up
of these four counties is vastly different and therefore an overall examination would be
ineffectual in providing a useful picture of what child care looks like for each county, or even
the communities within each county.

County

Population
under 12yrs

Total
Population

Will
Grundy
Kendall
Kankakee

128201
9023
24441
18858

680662
50160
116693
113361

**2008-2012 American Community Survey, 5-yr estimates

Land Area
County
in Square
Miles
Will
836.91
Grundy
418.04
Kendall
320.34
Kankakee
676.56

Persons
per
Square
Mile
809.6
119.8
358.2
167.7

***US Census Quick Facts, 2010

Will County is by far the largest of the four counties in population and land area. By examining
the area of land as well as population density it can be seen that Will and Kendall counties
appear to be more urban while Grundy and Kankakee counties appear more rural. While this is
a good picture of a county’s overall environment, each county has pockets of rural and urban
communities presenting their own unique difficulties in maintaining affordable child care
options.

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In order to examine the bigger picture of child care in these counties we must examine what
types of care are available to families, how they locate that care, the cost of care, and the
capacity of that care.

What are the types of care?
There are many child care settings to choose from, and a family considering care for their child
must go through the process of examining each one to find which type of care is right for their
family and their situation. There are many factors that will go into a family’s decision on a
type(s) of child care, including: schedule, location, cost, quality, specific needs and preferences.
Because of all the factors involved in choosing child care, there are also many types of child
care settings; we often refer to these settings as providers.
Parental Care: In this type of care one or both parents care for the children. Often, this
setting is utilized by families where only one parent works, however some families are
able to stagger work and/or school schedules in order to not access outside care
providers.
Family Child Care: Some families who must choose a child care provider outside of
parental care choose for their children to be cared for in a home-like setting. This is
often called Family Child Care or Home-based child care, and it offers the most flexibility
of care as there are many versions of this setting. Family child care can include care in
the child’s home, such as by a nanny or a family, friend, or neighbor, or it can be care
provided in another person’s home.

Licensed Family Child Care providers
o

Licensed Family Child Care Group Home providers
o

These providers are licensed by the Illinois Department of Children & Family
Services (DCFS), and must follow all required guidelines including standards
for health and safety as well as child to staff ratios.

These providers are also licensed by DCFS, however they may care for an
additional number of school aged children depending on their licensed
capacity and number of assistants they have employed.

License-Exempt Family Child Care providers (Family, Friend, Neighbor-FFN)
o

These providers are not licensed by the state, but could include family,
friends, neighbors, or nanny care. These providers may provide care in your
home, or their own home.

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Child Care Center: Some families choose for their children to be cared for in a centerbased environment. Center care can include a variety of options and age groups
including offering full-time and part-time care, before- and after- school programs,
summer programs, private kindergarten and preschool.

Licensed Child Care Centers
o These providers are licensed by the Illinois Department of Child & Family
Services (DCFS), and must follow all required guidelines.

License-Exempt Child Care Centers
o These providers are not licensed by DCFS, although many follow very
similar guidelines. Exempt centers can include the following types of
facilities:

Programs in a public, private or secondary school serving children
3 yrs and older

Programs on federal government property

Programs operated by a church or social service agency where an
individual child is cared for less than 10 hours in a seven day week

Programs that provide temporary care while the parent is on the
premises

Programs that offer short term, special activities and are operated
by civic, charitable or governmental organizations

Some families may also seek to find programs that only specialize in preparing young children
for school entry and therefore have the option of looking into preschool programs. These
programs are often part-day or part-week programs. These programs can be private, often
tuition based, or public as often found in Head Start or ISBE funded Preschool for All programs.
These programs can be found in both center and home-based environments.

How do families locate child care?
Families who choose to pursue child care outside of parental care or care by a family member,
friend, or neighbor may examine various avenues in their search. Families may ask other family
members or friends for referrals to providers they have used, or look into notices and
advertisements posted online, in phonebooks, newspapers, or in other public locations.
Families may even choose to visit child care facilities they see in their communities or along
their commute. Some schools even offer contact information to child care programs offering
before-and after-school care within their district. The State of Illinois also offers a referral
service to families in search of child care administered thru a county’s designated resource and

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referral agency. For the four counties examined in this report, that agency is Child Care
Resource and Referral.
Child Care Resource and Referral (CCRR) maintains a database of licensed and legally licenseexempt child care providers to refer to families seeking child care options. Child care providers
voluntarily agree to be referred to families and provide detailed information on their child care
program at least three times per year.
When a family contacts CCRR in seek of child care referrals a referral specialist performs an
intake with the family to determine what the child care needs and preferences are in an effort
to ensure the family gets a list of providers that most closely meet their needs. Referral
specialists stress that the list is only for referrals and that there are no recommendations made.
Additionally, specialists offer families consumer education information and materials regarding
how to identify quality child care, and can also offer basic information on parenting and child
development, as well as provide assistance in navigating the child care assistance program.

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What is the cost of child care?
Each time a child care provider’s file is updated they are asked to confirm or update their rates
in the CCRR database. Additionally, every two years the state mandates that all resource and
referral agencies participate in a Market Rate Survey (MRS) during which every qualified
provider in an agency’s database is contacted to update their program rates. The cost of care
information in this report is derived from the CCRR database following its participation in the
MRS that ended on December 31, 2013.
The following tables present the average weekly rates for full-time care in a licensed home and
a child care center as broken down by the child’s age and by county location. These tables do
not represent information from part-time programs or public/private preschool programs,
before-and after-school only programs, or summer only programs.

Average Rates for Full-Time Care in a Center

Will County
Grundy
County
Kendall
County
Kankakee
County

2-year-old

3- 4year-old

5-year-old to
kindergarten

Before
& After
School

School
Age
Summer/
Holiday

$246.47

$222.32

$198.26

$195.30

$125.65

$189.99

$181.50

$176.50

$155.00

$149.00

$146.00

$86.00

$143.33

$268.88

$254.81

$232.19

$213.00

$210.00

$134.83

$208.67

$220.11

$209.99

$166.60

$142.82

$123.62

$90.60

$140.62

School
Age
Summer/
Holiday

$149.62
$133.12
$165.05
$119.59

Infant

Toddler

(6weeks to
14 months)

(15 to 23
months)

$261.60

Average Rates for Full-Time Care in a Licensed Home (FCC)

Will County
Grundy County
Kendall County
Kankakee County

Infant

Toddler

(6weeks to
14 months)

(15 to 23
months)

$170.68
$153.12
$187.99
$128.01

$163.43
$146.88
$184.07
$125.71

2-yearold

3- 4year-old

5-year-old to
kindergarten

Before
& After
School

$159.18
$142.78
$180.62
$123.24

$154.95
$137.78
$177.94
$122.74

$151.19
$137.78
$175.56
$120.32

$106.88
$96.67
$125.17
$96.11

As can be recognized in the above tables, rates for care generally decrease as a child ages. This
is generally due to the fact that provider to child ratios, as determined by DCFS, increase as
children get older.

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While the tables above display average rates across entire counties, it does not show the
differences in average rates between rural and urban areas within those counties. For
additional tables depicting average rates in various areas of each county please see appendix A.

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Is it affordable?
Knowing what a provider charges for child care is not the only factor in deciding if care is
affordable for a family. To get a better picture of what is affordable to a family one must also
examine income.
According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, the affordability benchmark for
childcare expenses is 10% of a family’s income i. As can be seen in the tables below, the cost of
care for children can over reach the 10% threshold especially if enrolled in a center, and also
dependent on the child’s age. (Dollar amounts are extended to display the yearly expenses in relation to gross
yearly income). ii iii

Will County
10% of Median
Family Income

$8,461.30

Infant in a
FCC

3-4- year
old in a
FCC

Infant in a
Center

3-4-year old
in a center

Median
Rent

$8,875.36 $8,057.40 $13,603.20 $10,309.52 $11,892.00

Median Rent

3-4-year old in a center

Infant in a Center

3-4- year old in a FCC

Infant in a FCC

10% of Median Family Income

$11,892.00
$10,309.52
$13,603.20
$8,057.40
$8,875.36
$8,461.30

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Grundy County

10% of Median
Family Income

Infant in
a FCC

3-4- year
old in a
FCC

Infant in a
Center

$7,281.50

$7,962.24

$7,164.56

$9,438.00

3-4-year
old in a
center

Median
Rent

$7,748.00 $10,644.00

Median Rent

3-4-year old in a center

Infant in a Center

3-4- year old in a FCC

Infant in a FCC

10% of Median Family Income
$10,644.00
$7,748.00
$9,438.00
$7,164.56
$7,962.24
$7,281.50

Kendall County

10% of Median
Family Income
$9,121.00

Infant in
a FCC

3-4- year
old in a
FCC

3-4-year
old in a
center

Infant in a
Center

Median
Rent

$9,775.48 $9,252.88 $13,981.76 $11,076.00

$13,632.00

Median Rent

3-4-year old in a center

Infant in a Center

3-4- year old in a FCC

Infant in a FCC

10% of Median Family Income
$13,632.00
$11,076.00
$13,981.76
$9,252.88
$9,775.48
$9,121.00

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Kankakee County

10% of Median
Family Income
$5,976.00

3-4- year
old in a
FCC

Infant in a
Center

3-4-year
old in a
center

Median
Rent

$6,661.20 $6,382.48

$11,445.72

$7,426.64

$9,252.00

Infant in
a FCC

Median Rent

3-4-year old in a center

Infant in a Center

3-4- year old in a FCC

Infant in a FCC

10% of Median Family Income

$9,252.00
$7,426.64
$11,445.72
$6,382.48
$6,661.20
$5,976.00

Those figures only represent the costs associated with having one child in care; families with
two or more children face an even greater burden in being able to afford the cost of child care.
Often times these costs can be comparable to the costs of higher education as the current
average costs of tuition and fees at Illinois public universities is $13,382.iv According to a
national comparison, Illinois is ranked #7 for the least affordable child care for an infant in a
center, and #10 for least affordable child care for a 4-year-old in a center. v
It is important to note that the median income is a measurement of gross income, and does not
account for the reduction of income by taxes, or benefits such as health insurance. When a
family is considering where to send their children for care their preferences for quality,
location, or type may be squashed when confronted by the aspect of affordability in relation to
cost. The table below depicts the percentage of a family’s median income eaten up by child
care expenses.

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Percentage of Median Income
Infant in a FCC
16
10.5 9.5

Will

12

3-4- year old in a FCC
11 10 13 11

Grundy

Infant in a Center
11 10

15

Kendall

3-4-year old in a center
19
12

11 11

Kankakee

12

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How is the state reducing the burden?
In the State of Illinois there is a program most commonly referred to as the Child Care
Assistance Program (CCAP). This program is funded at both the state and federal level, and is
provided thru the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS). In Illinois this program is
administered by the local resource and referral agencies as part of a contract with IDHS. This
program “provides low-income, working families with access to quality, affordable child care
that allows them to continue working and contributes to the healthy, emotional and social
development of the child. Families are required to cost-share on a sliding scale based on family
size, income, and number of children in care.” vi
Who is eligible for this assistance? According to the state’s website: vii
In addition to helping low-income, working families, the Child Care Assistance Program also serves:
• Families who are receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and participating in education

& training in accordance with their responsibility and service plans (RSP);
• Teen parents seeking a high school degree or its equivalent; and/or
• Families not receiving TANF, who are pursuing additional education to improve their job opportunities

How does it work? Families apply for the assistance and must provide documentation of their
employment and/or education status. The resource and referral agencies determine eligibility
based on income and status, and then follow state mandated policies approving cases on what
a family qualifies for in terms of full-time or part-time care, how many days per month the state
will pay for care, at what rate the provider of choice will be paid, and how much the family’s copay for care will be.
The following income guidelines and co-pay rates became effective January 1, 2014 viii:
Family
Size

Min.
Income

Max.
Income

Min.
Co-Pay

Max.
Co-Pay

2

$0.00

$2,392.00

$2.00

$224.00

3

$0.00

$3,011.00

$2.00

$283.00

4

$0.00

$3,631.00

$2.00

$341.00

5

$0.00

$4,251.00

$2.00

$400.00

6

$0.00

$4,871.00

$2.00

$458.00

7

$0.00

$5,490.00

$2.00

$517.00

8

$0.00

$6,110.00

$2.00

$575.00

9

$0.00

$6,730.00

$2.00

$634.00

10

$0.00

$7,350.00

$2.00

$692.00

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Current income guidelines require a family to be at 185% or less of the Federal Poverty Level
(FPL) for their family size. The current maximum co-payment rates for any given family size vary
from 9.36% to 9.42% of a family’s gross monthly income. Whether or not this program makes
child care affordable is subjective to a family’s situation. To better explain, we can examine the
following charts that show what percentage of income a family will need to cover child care
expenses with and without the Child Care Assistance Program.

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Will
Grundy
Kendall
Kankakee

Will
Grundy
Kendall
Kankakee

Family Size of 2: 1 parent working full-time at minimum wage ($8.25) {$17,160.00 per year gross}
Infant in Care
2 year-old in care
4 year-old in care
CTR
FCC
CCAP
CTR
FCC
CCAP
CTR
FCC
79%
52%
5%
Will
67%
48%
5%
Will
60%
47%
55%
46%
5%
Grundy
47%
43%
5%
Grundy
45%
42%
81%
57%
5%
Kendall
70%
55%
5%
Kendall
65%
54%
67%
39%
5%
Kankakee
50%
37%
5%
Kankakee
43%
37%
Co-pay: $77
Family Size of 2: 1 parent working full-time at $13.80/hr-$28,704/year---maximum amount to still qualify for CCAP
Infant in Care
2 year-old in care
4 year-old in care
CTR
FCC
CCAP
CTR
FCC
CCAP
CTR
FCC
47%
31%
9%
Will
40%
29%
9%
Will
36%
28%
33%
28%
9%
Grundy
28%
26%
9%
Grundy
27%
25%
49%
34%
9%
Kendall
42%
33%
9%
Kendall
39%
32%
40%
23%
9%
Kankakee
30%
22%
9%
Kankakee
26%
22%

CCAP
5%
5%
5%
5%

CCAP
9%
9%
9%
9%

Co-pay: $224
Family size of 4: 2 parents working full-time ($10.47 & $10.48 per hour)--$43,572 per year, maximum to still qualify for CCAP
Infant in Care
2 year-old in care
4 year-old in care
CTR
FCC
CCAP
CTR
FCC
CCAP
CTR
FCC
Will
31%
20%
9%
Will
27%
19%
9%
Will
24%
18%
Grundy
22%
18%
9%
Grundy
18%
17%
9%
Grundy
18%
16%
Kendall
32%
22%
9%
Kendall
28%
22%
9%
Kendall
25%
21%
Kankakee
26%
15%
9%
Kankakee
20%
15%
9%
Kankakee
17%
15%

Co-pay: $341

CCAP
9%
9%
9%
9%

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Those charts demonstrate how expensive child care can be for a family’s budget, and they represent
only having one child in care. A family that qualifies for CCAP will not see a significant increase in their
monthly family co-pay whether they have one child in care or three children in care, but a family who
does not qualify for assistance will see their expenses jump significantly. The bottom two charts on
the previous page illustrate the percentages to be paid at the very top of where a family in that size
and income bracket can still qualify for assistance. Should a parent in those scenarios take a wage
increase, even so small as to make $500 more per year, it would end up costing their family thousands
of dollars each year. The charts also illustrate, however, how much of an impact the Child Care
Assistance Program can make for a family’s financial survival.

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Is there child care available if it’s needed?
Besides cost, one of the other biggest issues for families in need of child care is availability. Families
often have preferences for location, hours, and quality of care that may, or may not, be available to
them regardless of cost. The charts below illustrate the types and availability of childcare across
multiple areas ix:
Will
Area
Joliet-Metro
Bolingbrook-Romeoville
All Others

Centers
59
12
48

Licensed
Homes
156
135
84

Before-and-After
School Programs
29
8
19

Licensed
Homes
3
11

Before-and-After
School Programs
2
3

Licensed
Homes
34
9
32

Before-and-After
School Programs
6
6
6

Licensed
Homes
33
29
14

Before-and-After
School Programs
3
2
1

Grundy
Area
Morris
All Others

Centers
2
6
Kendall

Area
Oswego-Aurora
Yorkville
All Others

Centers
8
4
4
Kankakee

Area
City of Kankakee
Bradley-Bourbonnais
All Others

Centers
9
6
3

It would seem that if a family is living in a fairly urban area there is a good chance that they will be
able to find the type of provider they prefer, however families living in the more rural areas of a
county seem to have far fewer choices for formalized care. Assuming that a family has access to the
type of provider that they prefer, there is also often a struggle within communities to have enough
slots available to serve all the children that need care. Often times this can result in long waiting lists,
and families having to utilize non-traditional care or types of care that they may be unhappy with.

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Capacity of Child Care Centers by County and Age Group x

Will
Grundy
Kendall
Kankakee

6wks14mos
809
41
235
124

15-23mos
1016
54
223
129

24-35mos
1424
75
310
195

3-4yrs
2360
103
580
309

5yrsKindergarten
1899
89
340
266

Total
7508
362
1688
1023

Capacity of Licensed Family Child Care (home) Providers across all ages (1wk-12yrs) xi
Will
Grundy
Kendall
Kankakee

3495
137
705
665

Population Age 5 years and under by County, 2011 estimates xii
number of children 5
years and under
Will

57,883

Grundy

4,282

Kendall

11,786

Kankakee

9,149

As can be seen from the figures above, it is clear that there are not enough slots available in
formalized care settings to accommodate the number of children that could need that type of care.
Additionally, formal care arrangements are typically only available from 6am to 6pm, with few
exceptions. A lack of time availability also makes securing child care difficult.

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Child Care for Those with Non-Traditional Schedules
Frequently, families who cannot locate the type of care they would prefer, and those whom work
non-traditional schedules often utilize Family, Friend, and Neighbor (FFN) providers. There is currently
no way to know how many FFN providers are being used to help families go to school and work,
however we do have the information on the number of FFN providers who were paid by the state
through the Child Care Assistance Program:

Will
Grundy
Kendall
Kankakee

Number of FFN
providers xiii paid thru
CCAP
967
28
60
322

Because traditional hours of care for formalized arrangements are typically between 6am and 6pm,
there are thousands of families who cannot entertain those programs as an option for their child or
children. There are some Family Child Care providers who do offer evening or night hours until 12am,
however there are still plenty of families who need care between 12am and 7am, or on the weekends,
who do not have any licensed options available.
Across the four counties served by Child Care Resource and Referral, there are only 80 providers who
accept children on Saturdays (only 1 center and 1 summer camp), and 40 providers who accept
children on Sundays (no centers, 1 summer camp) xiv. There are 168 providers (6 are centers) that offer
care until midnight, but none that offer care for the full time of an overnight shift of 11pm to 7am. xv
Because there are limited providers to choose from for non-traditional schedules many families
choose FFN providers who offer the flexibility, and often times the lower cost, that allows them to
continue working to provide for their family.
Family, Friend, and Neighbor providers also offer families the option of being able to have a child
cared for in their own home rather than having to go to a different location. For many parents with
young children this can be ideal so as not to disrupt a child’s routine or environment. For parents of
school-age children that can lessen the burden of trying to find a formal provider that is also within
their child’s school district for purposes of school transportation.

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Conclusion
Child care is a complex industry. Families need child care to work, employers need employees, child
care providers need children to care for, and local economies need the revenues from all parties.
When families struggle to find and afford child care it can have a direct impact on their employers and
local economies. While factors of location, availability, and cost are impactful on a family and
community, there are other factors that may come into play when addressing the child care industry.
In the last several years there has been a push to increase the quality of the care being offered in
communities, however funding for programs has also been routinely cut from state and federal
budgets. Including the factors that determine quality, and what quality may cost to a provider, and
subsequently a family, leads the question of cost for care in an entirely different direction.
On the surface of the issue communities can work to ensure that families have access to formal care,
that Family, Friend and Neighbor providers are supported and recognized, and encouraging families
who qualify for the Child Care Assistance Program to utilize it in an effort to better support their own
financial stability, which in turn better supports local economies through increased spending and tax
revenues. It is also important to remember that each family looking for care has specific child care
needs and preferences; no one family will ever be looking for the exact same thing, so supporting
various types of providers is not an option, but rather a necessity.

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i

U.S. Government Printing Office. (2013, May 20). Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Program; Proposed rules.
Federal Register 78(97). Retrieved January 29, 2014, from http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-20/html/201311673.htm
ii
Median Family Income is from the 2012 American Community Survey 3 year estimates.
iii
Median Monthly Rent is from the 2010-2012 American Community Survey 3 year estimates.
iv
Average tuition and fees for the 2013-14 academic year as reported by www.collegeillinois.com
v
Parents and the High Cost of Child Care, Child Care Aware of America, 2013 report, retrieved January 2014 at
http://usa.childcareaware.org/sites/default/files/Cost%20of%20Care%202013%20110613.pdf
vi
Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) website, Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP). Accessed on January 31,
2014, at http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=29720
vii
Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) website, Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP). Accessed on January 31,
2014, at http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=30355
viii
Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) website, Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP), Parent Co-payment
Information. Accessed on January 30, 2014 at http://www.dhs.state.il.us/onenetlibrary/12/documents/Forms/IL4443455b.pdf
ix
Information accessed from the NACCRRAware database, as managed by CCR&R and INCCRRA. Accessed on 5/1/2014.
x
Information accessed from the NACCRRAware database, as managed by CCR&R and INCCRRA. Accessed on 5/1/2014.
xi
Information accessed from the NACCRRAware database, as managed by CCR&R and INCCRRA. Accessed on 5/1/2014.
xii
Illinois Early Childhood Asset Map (IECAM) website, tabular search for population by county. Accessed on 5/1/2014 at
http://iecam.illinois.edu.
xiii
Illinois Early Childhood Asset Map (IECAM) website, tabular search for CCAP Centers and Homes receiving payment, by
county. Accessed on 4/1/2014 at http://iecam.illinois.edu.
xiv
Information accessed from the NACCRRAware database, as managed by CCR&R and INCCRRA. Accessed on 5/1/2014.
xv
Information accessed from the NACCRRAware database, as managed by CCR&R and INCCRRA. Accessed on 5/1/2014.

Appendix A
Will County
Joliet Metro-FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group

Total

Min $

Max $

Avg $

6 Weeks to 14 Months

97

120.00 255.00 166.86

15 to 23 Months

100

119.00 225.00 159.32

24 to 35 Months

100

110.00 225.00 157.02

3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only

99
98
58

110.00 225.00 152.75
90.00 225.00 147.70
50.00 175.00 103.75

Summer/Vacation/Holiday

93

95.00

225.00 148.19

**Joliet Metro includes: Joliet, Crest Hill, Lockport, Plainfield, Shorewood, New Lenox, and Rockdale.

Bolingbrook/Romeoville-FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only

Total Min $ Max $ Avg $
100 125.00 250.00 170.45
101 120.00 225.00 163.16
102 100.00 225.00 157.59
103 75.00 200.00 153.52
102 75.00 200.00 150.21
69
50.00 197.00 106.95

Summer/Vacation/Holiday

92

75.00

200.00 146.29

Will-All Others--FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
47
47
47
47
47
31

Min $
120.00
107.00
100.00
100.00
88.00
50.00

Max $
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
225.00

Avg $
177.77
173.32
168.51
163.98
161.38
112.52

45

76.00

250.00 160.36

Appendix A
Joliet Metro-Centers
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only

Total
30
36
42
42
42
21

Summer/Vacation/Holiday

20

Min $
205.00
175.00
150.00
140.00
140.00
70.00

Max $
318.00
300.00
280.00
260.00
260.00
169.00

Avg $
261.12
244.38
217.15
192.54
189.01
127.05

115.00 260.00 185.75

Bolingbrook/Romeoville-Centers
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only

Total
9
9
10
11
11
9

Summer/Vacation/Holiday

9

Min $
195.00
195.00
170.00
155.00
95.00
95.00

Max $
357.00
315.00
283.00
264.00
264.00
195.00

Avg $
277.89
267.67
236.30
213.45
207.36
143.11

155.00 278.00 216.67

Will-All Others--Centers
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
28
31
32
33
30
23
27

Min $
155.00
155.00
155.00
120.00
120.00
60.00

Max $
364.00
342.00
314.00
296.00
296.00
165.00

Avg $
257.68
243.97
225.66
203.70
203.23
114.52

115.00 262.00 184.52

Appendix A
Kendall County
Oswego/Aurora-FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group

Total

Min $

Max $

Avg $

6 Weeks to 14 Months

20

150.00

255.00

194.10

15 to 23 Months

20

150.00

225.00

189.10

24 to 35 Months

20

150.00

225.00

183.90

3 to 4 Years

20

150.00

225.00

181.10

5 Years to K

20

130.00

225.00

177.95

B/A Only

11

75.00

150.00

116.82

Summer/Vacation/Holiday

16

130.00

200.00

167.31

Yorkville-FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
6
6
6
6
6
1

Min $
145.00
145.00
145.00
145.00
145.00
131.00

Max $
219.68
210.69
201.87
200.00
200.00
130.55

Avg $
186.61
185.12
183.64
182.09
181.66
130.55

5

145.00

200.00

179.94

Kendall-Other-FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
13
14
14
14
13
9

Min $
135.00
135.00
135.00
135.00
125.00
100.00

Max $
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
200.00

Avg $
179.23
176.43
174.64
171.64
169.08
134.78

12

125.00

200.00

155.83

Appendix A
Oswego/Aurora-CENTERS
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates
Age Group

Total

Min $

Max $

Avg $

6 Weeks to 14 Months

8

253.00

316.00

285.75

15 to 23 Months

8

239.00

288.00

268.62

24 to 35 Months

8

220.00

276.00

250.38

3 to 4 Years

8

198.00

250.00

228.00

5 Years to K

8

165.00

250.00

223.88

B/A Only

7

112.00

160.00

138.86

Summer/Vacation/Holiday

7

165.00

285.00

225.14

Yorkville-CENTERS
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
4
4
4
4
4
3

Min $
230.00
205.00
197.00
192.00
185.00
120.00

Max $
252.00
252.00
216.00
201.00
201.00
155.00

Avg $
244.75
228.50
208.50
197.25
193.50
133.33

2

185.00

195.00

190.00

Kendall-Other-CENTERS
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
4
4
4
4
4
2

Min $
180.00
180.00
170.00
165.00
165.00
115.00

Max $
293.00
284.00
252.00
226.00
226.00
131.00

Avg $
259.25
253.50
219.50
198.75
198.75
123.00

3

115.00

220.00

182.67

Appendix A
Kankakee County
KANKAKEE-CITY-FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group

Total

Min $

Max $

Avg $

6 Weeks to 14 Months

6

95.00

135.00

112.12

15 to 23 Months

6

95.00

127.70

110.45

24 to 35 Months

7

65.00

125.00

103.19

3 to 4 Years

7

65.00

125.00

102.41

5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

7
6
7

65.00
50.00
65.00

125.00
110.00
125.00

102.41
87.50
102.36

BRADLEY/BBN-FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
15
15
16
16
16
9

Min $
65.00
65.00
65.00
65.00
65.00
50.00

Max $
200.00
200.00
200.00
200.00
150.00
150.00

Avg $
136.50
134.17
133.28
132.97
128.59
98.33

14

65.00

150.00

128.39

K3-OTHER-FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
4
4
4
4
4
2

Min $
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
115.00

Max $
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
125.00

Avg $
122.50
122.50
122.50
122.50
122.50
120.00

4

100.00

150.00

122.50

Appendix A
KANKAKEE-CITY-CENTERS
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group

Total

Min $

Max $

Avg $

6 Weeks to 14 Months

4

175.00

255.65

224.58

15 to 23 Months

4

150.00

255.65

213.08

24 to 35 Months

5

130.00

183.65

159.46

3 to 4 Years

5

130.00

143.00

136.70

5 Years to K
B/A Only

5
2

60.00
60.00

143.00
88.00

122.70
74.00

Summer/Vacation/Holiday

2

130.00

133.00

131.50

BRADLEY/BBN-CENTERS
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
4
4
4
4
4
2

Min $
175.00
150.00
130.00
130.00
90.00
90.00

Max $
255.65
255.65
220.00
197.00
137.75
125.00

Avg $
225.66
216.91
179.66
151.19
120.69
107.50

4

125.00

188.00

145.19

Max $
180.00
170.00
150.00
140.00
140.00
90.00

Avg $
180.00
170.00
150.00
140.00
140.00
90.00

K3-OTHER-CENTERS
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
1
1
1
1
1
1
0

Min $
180.00
170.00
150.00
140.00
140.00
90.00

Appendix A
Grundy County
MORRIS-FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group

Total

Min $

Max $

Avg $

6 Weeks to 14 Months

4

$110.00 $150.00 $130.00

15 to 23 Months

4

$110.00 $125.00 $120.00

24 to 35 Months

4

$110.00 $125.00 $117.50

3 to 4 Years

4

$110.00 $125.00 $117.50

5 Years to K
B/A Only

4
1

$110.00 $125.00 $117.50
$50.00 $50.00 $50.00

Summer/Vacation/Holiday

4

$110.00 $125.00 $117.50

Grundy-All Other Areas--FCC
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
4
4
5
5
5
2
4

Min $
$155.00
$145.00
$140.00
$125.00
$125.00
$70.00

Max $
$205.00
$205.00
$185.00
$170.00
$170.00
$170.00

Avg $
$176.25
$173.75
$163.00
$154.00
$154.00
$120.00

$115.00 $170.00 $148.75

Appendix A
MORRIS-CENTERS
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group

Total

Min $

Max $

Avg $

6 Weeks to 14 Months

1

$183.00 $183.00 $183.00

15 to 23 Months

1

$178.00 $178.00 $178.00

24 to 35 Months

1

$155.00 $155.00 $155.00

3 to 4 Years

1

$150.00 $150.00 $150.00

5 Years to K
B/A Only

1
2

$150.00 $150.00 $150.00
$85.00 $90.00 $87.50

Summer/Vacation/Holiday

2

$125.00 $135.00 $130.00

Grundy-All Other Areas--CENTERS
Day Shift
Weekly, FT Rates

Age Group
6 Weeks to 14 Months
15 to 23 Months
24 to 35 Months
3 to 4 Years
5 Years to K
B/A Only
Summer/Vacation/Holiday

Total
3
3
4
4
4
4
2

Min $
$165.00
$165.00
$140.00
$140.00
$135.00
$70.00

Max $
$195.00
$185.00
$175.00
$155.00
$155.00
$110.00

Avg $
$181.00
$176.00
$155.00
$148.75
$145.00
$85.00

$140.00 $155.00 $147.50

2013-14
Cost of Care Report

A Child Care Resource & Referral report funded
in part by the Illinois Department of Human Services
Written and Prepared by Karen Flores,
Data and Community Collaboration Coordinator
©2014 Child Care Resource &Referral

801 N Larkin Ave., Suite 202
Joliet, IL 60435
www.childcarehelp.com