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1.

Listen to “Indiana” by The Original Dixieland Jazz Band (Disc 1, Track 1 on
Jazz: The Definitive Performances). Review the discussion about this track in
your textbook (2008 edition: page 77, 2001 edition: page 104). While listening
to this recording, do the parts sound improvised to you? Why or why not? I
have to agree with Shipton, the parts do not sound improvised to me. The
movement of the music is very predictable and it is hard to hear any sort of
significant variations. There is little ornamentation or alterations between
sections, and the delivery of the melody between instruments is straightforward.
The music comes off as rehearsed and structured.
2. Listen to “Dippermouth Blues” by King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band (Disc 1,
Track 3 on Jazz: The Definitive Performances). Review the discussion about
this track in your textbook (2008 edition: page 88, 2001 edition: page 120).
Comment on the use of individual solos as compared with the ODJB
recording above. In “Dippermouth Blues” the solos are more clear and distinct.
The featured solo instrument is prominent and well-defined. In Indiana, it is hard
to tell which instrument is being featured and the solos seem to blend in with the
rest of the band and stick to a firm form with no room for freedom and
improvisation.
3. Listen to “Wild Cat Blues” by the Clarence Williams Blue Five (Disc 1, Track
5 on Jazz: The Definitive Performances). Review the discussion about this
track in your textbook (2008 edition: page 97, 2001 edition: page 133). In the
online lecture, I tried to differentiate between New Orleans and Chicago
styles. How would you classify this recording and why? Compare this
recording with the ODJB recording in number 1. This would classify as New
Orleans Jazz because it features a clarinet and not a saxophone which is common
in Chicago style jazz. Compared to the ODJB this piece has more spirit and
energy. The recording is also much more clear and has balance to it. It has more
swing to it and is slightly slower. The ODJB featured a percussive component to it
also and this piece does not have that.
4. Listen to the “West End Blues” by the Hot Five (Disc 1, Track 7 on Jazz: The
Definitive Performances). Review the discussion about this track in your
textbook (2008 edition: page 105, 2001 edition: page 143). Do you hear some
aspects of ragtime in Earl Hines playing? – A little bit, but it seems to be a
combination of several styles. The left hand is very march like and there is a
moment where I hear ragtime, but also lots of colorful, rich, warm chords that
remind me of the romantic era.
5. Listen to “Singin' the Blues” by Frankie Trumbauer & His Orchestra (Disc
1, Track 6 on Jazz: The Definitive Performances). Review the discussion
about this track in your textbook (2008 edition: page 112, 2001 edition: page
153). Is this a blues? Explain. No. It does not follow a twelve bar blues form or

blues chord progression. Clarinet Marmalade.New Orleans jazz because it consists of trumpet. clarinet.New Orleans jazz because it consists of trumpet. “Tiger Rag” by The Original Dixieland Jazz Band. and trombone. Is it the arrangement of the music or the orchestration? Or the spoken dialogue? Not sure… . there is no call and response pattern. clarinet. clarinet.New Orleans jazz because it consists of trumpet. 7. Listen to “Dead Man's Blues” by Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers. b. What musical aspects am I speaking of? I really had trouble with this question. 6. Tiger Rag. Muskrat Ramble. a. and no shuffle or walking bass line or blues notes. There are aspects of this music which do not fit well in a classic jazz unit. and trombone. c. Listen to “Muskrat Ramble” by Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five. and “Clarinet Marmalade” by The Original Classify each of these recordings with regard to New Orleans and Chicago styles with a brief explanation as to why. and trombone.

Listen to “Dead Man's Blues” by Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers. well in a classic jazz unit. 7. There are aspects of this music. Classify each of these recordings with regard to New Orleans and Chicago styles with a brief explanation as to why.Dixieland Jazz Band. What musical aspects am I speaking of? . which do not fit.