You are on page 1of 2

Social Context Factor Analysis

January 2015
Data analyzed here were gathered from the fall 2014 administration of the social context survey
to 10 different undergraduate classes at the University of Minnesota (N = 655). The factors that
emerged from this analysis explain 55.4% of total variance and are:
Factor 1, Student-Student Relations (alpha = .839):
13.
20.
23.
27.
30.
36.
38.
39.

I’ve learned something from my classmates.
The students sitting near me rely on each other for help in learning class material.
In general, the people sitting near me in class work well together on class assignments,
questions, etc.
I know something personal about the people sitting near me in class.
I feel comfortable asking for help from my classmates.
I am acquainted with the students sitting near me in class.
During class, I often have a chance to discuss material with some of my classmates.
The students sitting near me respect my opinions.

Factor 2, Student as Instructor (alpha = .855):
15.
I can explain my ideas in specific terms.
17.
The people sitting near me have learned something from me this semester.
18.
I can clearly explain new concepts I’ve learned to others in class.
26.
I can persuade my classmates why my ideas are relevant to the problems we encounter
in this class.
31.
I can use the terminology in this class correctly.
34.
I can explain my thought process from start to finish to others in class.
37.
I can help others in this class learn.
Factor 3, Student-Instructor Relations (alpha = .829):
25.
32.
35.

The instructor is acquainted with me.
I am acquainted with the instructor.
I’ve spoken informally with the instructor before, during, or after class.

Factor 4, Student Self-Efficacy (alpha = .713):
16.
28.
29.
33.

The material covered by the tests and assignments in this class was presented and
discussed in class or online.
I can choose how I learn the material for this course.
In this class, you can learn everything you need to know by listening to/watching the
lectures.
In this class, I control how much I learn.
J.D. Walker jdwalker@umn.edu
Paul Baepler baepl001@umn.edu

Selected  Research  on  Active  Learning  Classrooms  

 

 
Baepler,P.,  Walker,  J.D.  &  Driessen,  M.  (2014).  It’s  not  About  seat  time:  Blending,  Fipping,  and  
Efficiency  in  Active  Learning  Classrooms,  Computers  &  Education  (2014),  doi:  10.1016/  
j.compedu.2014.06.006.  
Baepler,  P.  Brooks,  D.C.,  Walker,  J.D.,    Eds.  (2014).    Active  Learning  Classrooms.    New  Directions  
for  Teaching  and  Learning.    Vol.  137.  
 
Cotner,  S.,  Loper,  J.,  Walker,  J.  D.,  &  Brooks,  D.  C.  “It’s  Not  You,  It’s  the  Room”—Are  the  High-­‐
Tech,  Active  Learning  Classrooms  Worth  It?.  
 
Brooks,  D.  C.  (2012).  Space  and  consequences:  The  impact  of  different  formal  learning  spaces  
on  instructor  and  student  behavior.  Journal  of  Learning  Spaces,  1(2).  
 
Walker,  J.  D.,  Brooks,  D.  C.,  &  Baepler,  P.  (2011).  Pedagogy  and  space:  Empirical  research  on  
new  learning  environments.  EDUCAUSE  Quarterly,  34(4),  n4.  
 
Brooks,  D.  C.  (2011).  Space  matters:  The  impact  of  formal  learning  environments  on  student  
learning.  British  Journal  of  Educational  Technology,  42(5),  719-­‐726.  
 
Whiteside,  A.,  Brooks,  D.  C.,  &  Walker,  J.  D.  (2010).  Making  the  case  for  space:  Three  years  of  
empirical  research  on  learning  environments.  Educause  Quarterly,  33(3),  11.  
 
 
Paul  Baepler    
 
 
 
J.D  Walker  
Center  for  Educational  Innovation    
Center  for  Educational  Innovation    
 
 
Office  of  the  Senior  Vice  President  for  
Office  of  the  Senior  Vice  President  for  
 
Academic  Affairs  and  Provost    
 
Academic  Affairs  and  Provost    
 
234  Morrill  Hall  
 
 
 
234  Morrill  Hall  
 
100  Church  Street  S.E.  
 
 
100  Church  Street  S.E.  
Minneapolis,  MN  55455  
 
 
Minneapolis,  MN  55455  
 
 
baepl001@umn.edu    
 
 
jdwalker@umn.edu