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Volume LXXXVIV Issue 3-December 18, 2014

ECO-FRIENDLY
TRANSPORTATION
By Sophia Ketring
Staff Writer
It has been a long time in the
making, but finally the company DecoBike is installing bikes
in different parts of San Diego.
This means that now people
can start utilizing this new,
more eco-friendly form of
public transportation. They no
longer have to use transportation that emits waste into the
atmosphere, like buses. They
can pick the option that does
not harm the environment as
well as helps one’s own health.
The intent of the bikes is to
help those who don’t have the
most ideal options for transportation such as tourists or
people who do not own other forms of transportation,
such as a car. In addition, the
bikes are supposed to promote
a green option for transportation. The bikes are parked
at solar powered stations to
further promote eco-friendly
transportation.
The delay for installing the
bikes is due to disagreements
of where the bikes should be
installed. So far, DecoBike
has installed some of the bike
stations in downtown San Diego. About 50 stations are supposed to go up in downtown
in the years to come. Another
180 stations are supposed to
be set up all throughout San
Diego. The DecoBikes website
provides a map of where bikes
are to be installed in San Diego. It shows that a handful of
stations are to be installed in
the Mission Bay area as well
as near Liberty Station. The
costs for renting a bike are $5
for half an hour and $12 for
two hours. Helmets are not
provided though it is suggested that you bring your own.
One can return a bike that they
have rented to any of the stations that are located throughout the city. The bikes are not
the best alternative for traveling long distances because the
bikes are stationed relatively
close to each other. A map of
the bike stations is suggested
when planning trips.
Overall, the DecoBike stations are perfect for people
who want to get out and experience a glimpse of San Diego
while being active.

“Black Lives Matter”
By Vivi Bonomie
Staff Writer
The night of August 9, 2014
in the city of Ferguson, Missouri 18-year-old Michael Brown
went to a local mart to buy a
pack of cigarillos with a friend.
As he walked down the street,
he was stopped by local police
officer Darren Wilson. Wilson
and Brown got into an altercation, which led to the firing of
12 rounds by Officer Wilson and
the death of Michael Brown.
Speculation and rumor have
built the foundation for the case
of a white police officer that
shot and killed a black teenager. The largest controversy lies
with the fact that the truth will
probably never be known: did
Michael Brown attack Darren
Wilson? Did he steal, not buy,
the pack of cigarettes from the
store he was in? Did he look
suspicious while walking down
the middle of the street? Was
he under the influence of marijuana? Did he try to take Wilson’s gun? There are too many
unanswerable questions in this
case for the public to receive the
truthful answers to all of these
questions because at the end of
the day, it’s the word of a police

officer against the word of a
man who can no longer defend himself.
The nationwide controversy
of this particular case erupted on November 24 when
Officer Darren Wilson was
not indicted in court. This
sparked outrage in many who
believed him guilty of murder
and caused confusion and led

“This image has
started a trend
among protesters
who march with
their hands raised
while chanting,
‘Hands up, don’t
shoot.’”
some to protest.
Missouri law states that a
person can use deadly force
when they have a reasonable belief that deadly force
should be used. In this case,
“reasonable belief ” is defined
as “grounds that could lead a
reasonable person in the same
situation to the same belief.”
After it was proven that
Brown was not as close to

the car as police had originally stated, it became confusing
to the public not only the fact
that the police had made such
a large error, but also the fact
that a trained police officer
found an unarmed man half
a football field’s distance away
threatening enough to kill. The
debate about his hand positioning has lead to a symbolic
statement of its own; Brown’s
autopsy has shown that he was
in fact shot in his arms while
they were raised as well as on
his chest and through his head.
This image has started a trend
among protesters who march
with their hands raised while
chanting, “Hands up, don’t
shoot.”
This spectacle has brought
an onset of protests all over the
world in major cities like New
York, London, Los Angeles,
and even San Diego. People are
outraged at the increasing accounts of police brutality and
the constant lack of response
by the court. These protests
have been sparked by the event
at Ferguson and have been further fueled by the recent death
of 43-year-old Eric Garner.

OPINIONS:

The 60s are Back

FEATURES:

Holiday Traditions from
around the world

SPORTS:

Winter Sports Intro

A&E:

Free the Nipple

s pir it

continued on page 10...

WASC is on Its Way

By Kieran Bauman
Staff Writer
Unknown to most students,
there is another review on its
way to La Jolla High School.
WASC (the Western Association of Schools and Colleges)
is an organization whose prime
goal is to assess schools. A negative assessment can lead to universities not accepting a high
school’s diplomas as being valid.
This coming spring, the
WASC review team will be visiting LJHS and making trips
to every classroom. They will
be checking for multiple things
that they found lacking in their
last visit to the school. Principal
Dr. Chuck Podhorsky has been
working to make sure the team’s
expectations are fulfilled. “They
will be following up on anything recommended from last
year,” Podhorsky said.
This can be a real danger. Although no school in the SDUSD
has ever lost its accreditation
because of a WASC review,
there have been cases in North-

ern California of schools not
passing.
But Dr. Podhorsky said, “I
am feeling good [about the
assessment]. I went through
academic initiatives with the
chairman, and he was impressed with the work we
were doing here.”
Many of the changes happening to LJHS this past year
have been in preparation for
the upcoming WASC review.
Some of these include the
implementation of Common
Core into the curriculum,
helping English Language
Learning students, helping
out-of-area students, and
re-visiting requirements for
AP and Honors courses.
“For out-of-area students,
we want all students to be
supported. We have had two
parent teacher meetings with
families to try to help this issue.”
This seems to be a growing

theme with WASC: student
equality. Some examples of
this are also seen in the changes towards ESL students.
“There are a percentage of
students here that have English as a second language. We
have implemented two new
courses to improve this,” says
Dr. Podhorsky.
AP and Honors courses have
had their requirements updated as well, in order to make the
courses more accessible to students. “There are three things
that need to be in sync in order for success: the student,
the teacher, and the parent. We
want to know when someone
struggles so that we can help
them.” When asked about what
his thoughts are on the changes he is making in accordance
with WASC, Dr. Podhorsky
replied that he is “doing it not
just for WASC, but because it’s
the right thing to do.”

update
Hey Vikes,
I hope you all had a great
Thanksgiving break. This
month we are doing the holiday food drive so be sure to
bring in cans to your 2nd period class. The winner of the
food drive will get a class pizza party and the 2nd and 3rd
place classes will have a donut
party. Also ASB Commissioner applications are going
to be in January so be sure to
come by the ASB to get more
information if you’re interested! Also thanks to everyone
who signed up for Powder
Puff which will be held January 9th. I hope you all have a
great Winter Break and Happy
Holidays.
Zoe Rashid
ASB President

Hi-Tide

2

The La Jolla High School

Hi- Tide

Editors-in-Chief
Jordan Bowman
Zoe Hildebrand
Isabel Melvin

News Editors
Jeanine Erikat
Nessie Navarro

Opinions Editors
Sara Espinosa
Kaitlin Wheeler

Features Editors
Camille Furby
Lilly Grossman

Student Focus Editor
Lily Kennedy

Sports Editor

Stephanie Buchbinder

A&E Editor

Sarah Rainsdon

Business Manager
Misha Kabbage

Media Editors
Shane Lynch
Ryan Robson

Advisor

Robert J. Boyd

Staff Writers

Andrea Albanez
Creekstar Allan
Kieran Bauman
Viviana Bonomie
Joseph Carroll
Sophia Dorfsman
Lucille Fitzmaurice
Ana Gimber
Sophia Ketring
Jillian Kopp
Ilana Larry
Yenitzia Lopez
Tristan Macelli
Georgie Morris
Lauren Robbins

The Hi-Tide, an open forum, is
the official student newspaper
of La Jolla High School. Unless
otherwise noted, opinions being
voiced in the Hi-Tide belong to
the individual author. The HiTide welcomes letters and opinions from students and staff
members. If you have a letter to
the editor, please drop it off in
Room 514, or give it to any HiTide editor. You may also email
submissions to LJHiTide@yahoo.com. Submissions should
be typed and cannot be anonymous. The Hi-Tide reserves
the right to refuse any material.
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with the Hi-Tide or to purchase
a subscription, please email us
or call (858) 454-3081, extension 4514. Issues are distributed every four weeks. No part of
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without written permission.

OPINIONS

The 60’s Are Back
By Lucy Fitzmaurice
Staff Writer
The age of rebellion and
flower power is back. Young
teens and adults are fighting
for their beliefs and are trying to make a difference in the
world. The 60’s were the days
when pop-culture, individual freedom, music, clothing
and sexuality reigned. In this
era, our thoughts and beliefs
revolve around topics such as
gay rights, world peace, feminism, and the next line up of
Coachella.
The new hippie generation
is now a time of expression
and not caring about what
your parents have to say. The
mentality now is doing what
you want and what is best for
you. We all believe in learning
from our mistakes and experimenting, but unfortunately
we express this in the modern
term of “yolo.” Our free spirits
prance around in saggy jeans,
lulu lemons and LF dresses,
trying to think outside the box
and be creative.

We’re born into a democratic state of mind, proving our
ways to the Grand Old Party. Our ideas come from the
heart and the depths of our
bottomless and adventurous
souls, discovering new things
similar to those who roamed
the 60’s.
Music is reaching new heights
and ways to reach maximum
inspiration and depict real
and powerful emotion. Artists
are creating new methods of
(singing, rap, alternative, pop,
and dubstep). Coachella is the
new Woodstock Festival, with
hippies and free spirits flocking to the desert drenched in
flowers and lace.
Today, our troops are fighting a war in Afghanistan and
Iraq, just as the men in the
60’s fought for their country
in Vietnam. War is inevitable, but people are fighting
for peace more and more religiously. The controversy of
keeping our troops over seas
still remains unsolved. War
today is as it was in the 60’s:
long and tiring.

Gay rights, feminism, weed,
and GMOs in our foods are all
new things people are standing
up for. Gay marriage has now
taken over as the new movement. People are putting their
time and hearts into fighting
for what they believe is right,
such as promoting the legalization and destigmatization of
marijuana use one election and
state at a time. Men and women
are taking a stand on what they
believe by pouring their hearts
and souls into their actions.
Lastly, individuality is blossoming. The journey of personal freedom, purifying one’s
soul, and finding inner happiness is a goal for many. Spirituality has grown as well. The
definition is changing and
evolving everyday. Freedom of
speech and press are also more
stressed in these days. Individuality is also represented by being selfish in the way of finding
oneself. Listening to the inner
voice while on the path of righteousness is key now, just as it
was a few decades back.

Escape the Drama
It Is Not Worth Your Time

By Andrea Albanez
Staff Writer
It happens to everyone when
they enter high school. It is
impossible to miss, once you
become a freshman, and it is
hard to forget once you graduate. This, ladies and gentlemen,
is social drama. It is the one
thing in high school that takes
over our lives that isn’t worth
our time.
Being a junior,
I can think of the
many stories, conflicts, problems, and
issues that many
people create from
other people’s opinions. This is a result
of having nothing
better to do.
We make social
drama and use it
to fuel our sense of
confidence and make us feel
better about ourselves. The
amount of social drama that
is built up over the course of a
high school year is insane and
only serves as a way to feel that
our life is better then someone
else’s life.
Many people that are consumed by social drama don’t
realize how much it can affect
someone. One word, remark,
or rumor about someone can
completely change the way

they think about others, their
life, and themselves.
The amount of time spent
looking up someone’s Instagram or Facebook to find a
flaw about their life is time
wasted. One single remark or
rumor could change someone’s mood in less than a minute.
Even after students graduate,
high school drama can have

An example of this can be
seen in the movie The Breakfast
Club. It is based around five
students who are in detention
on a Saturday because of their
bad actions.
The five of them, all with
completely different characteristics and personalities, but all
the same on the inside, battle
with social issues and problems
they face at home and school.
None of them could
escape the issues they
were dealing with but
were relieved to discover that they were
sharing the same
hardships with their
fellow students. This
movie gives a clear
example of how much
negativity can arise
through social drama
and self-image.
It is fair to say now
that we all know that
starting rumors or bringing
up hurtful and bad comments
about someone is not okay. It is
up to us to avoid saying damaging remarks to others and
stop spreading drama that isn’t
needed.
For the people who like to
start rumors or bring up social
drama, know that anything you
say, do, or bring up, can affect
people around you permanently, even if it is meant to be funny.

“One simple remark
or rumor could
change someone’s
mood in less than a
minute.”
a long lasting effect on others. In some cases, students
graduate early to escape the
immature high school drama
they are going through. Others won’t even return to their
high school reunion because
of the sad and painful times
they faced. While some people may think what they said
about another person won’t
matter later on, when it could
actually drastically change
how someone views life.

December 18, 2014

IN NEED
OF SPIRIT
By Ana Gimber
Staff Writer

La Jolla High School has
some school spirit, but it could
use more. The lack of participation is showcased in spirit
weeks and events. The problem is that many students go
to school events, games, and
wear red and black just for extra credit or to get out of class.
Not many students go to
sports’ games and cheer on
the teams. Sophomore Preston
Weber responded to the lack of
spirit in our school by saying,
“Not a lot of students come to
the tennis games, sadly. This
year I’m sure we would love
the support.” The sad truth is
that most of the time the visitor school has more spectators
than we do.
There is also a small turn out
at after school events and some
major sports games because of
the cost. Big events like Blast
Off and Homecoming are only
$7, but people still find a way
to spend that money on a few
bags of chips instead.
The main times we display
school spirit is at Blast Off,
Homecoming Game, pep rallies, and football games against
our rivals like Bishops and Cathedral. Even these events still
don’t have full attendance rates
and could use a lot more fans.
Vikings need to keep the
spirit up. When talking to
ASB President and senior Zoe
Rashid about Spirit Week, she
said, “It’s easy to blow it off because it’s optional.” She also
added, “They have to want to
get involved.”
Many students say they want
pep rallies and find them to be
quite enjoyable, but most of
the time it’s just because they
want to get out of class. Also,
a flaw in the pep rallies is that
the winter and spring athletes
are never recognized like the
fall athletes.
“It would be nicer if we
would be able to have a pep
rally in spring and winter so
we could recognize all the
teams,” Webber noted. One alternative would be to have pep
rallies but not recognize the
sports teams because we don’t
have pep rallies for winter and
spring. Some other schools
have night rallies to boost
school spirit, with multiple
games played by the students.
This way no one would miss
class, it would be free, and no
sports team would feel excluded. Another idea to increase
participation in Spirit Week is
to have competitions for most
spirit between grades. Our
school spirit may be low, there
is no reason we can’t change
that.

OPINIONS

December 18, 2014

HOW TO BE
A TEACHER

By Saba Faridi
Contributor
It is not very difficult to be
a good teacher. There are just
a few easy steps to make your
students love you!
First off, it is important to
have a certain attitude towards
your students. Always be serious in a way that makes the
students scared to come talk to
you. Stay mad for unimportant reasons and never be sympathetic towards the students.
Also, make sure you bring all
personal problems into the
classroom, and take your emotions out on the kids.
Make sure you do various
things like yelling, talking
very fast (or very slow), and
making fun of the students.
In addition, keep a good eye
on everyone and accuse them
of various things they may or
may not have done. If you ever

have trouble expressing the way
you feel, just use cuss words,
they usually get the job done.
Now we get to the class policies. Never accept late work under any circumstance and make
sure there are very strict consequences for things like being
tardy or missing a day.
It is important to give lots
of homework without caring
about the fact that the students
also have 5 other classes to worry about. In addition, don’t worry about actually teaching the
subject, they can always learn
it themselves. Basically, you
should be satisfied with the fact
that colleges and other teachers
judge the student on the grades
and not the teacher.
The next step involves the assessments. When giving tests,
make sure the material on it has
nothing to do with the material
the kids learned. The tests need
to be long and filled with free re-

sponse questions, with a very
limited amount of time. Also,
it is important to give the
students pop quizzes (right
before the semester ends) on
things you know they are not
familiar with, just to add a
little spice to the class. Now
moving on to the midterm
and finals.
Not only must you give a
test with a lot of questions,
but make sure to include details from things they learned
very early on in the year.
These test most importantly
need to be a very big portion
of their grades. Because all
that matters is that you judge
them based on the tests they
take.
The most vital and last step
for being a good teacher is to
tell the students how much
you hate your job and the fact
that you are not getting paid
enough for this.

RACISM HERE, THERE,
EVERYWHERE?
By Sara Espinosa
Opinions Editor
Late November saw the release of the teaser trailer of
the seventh episode of the Star
Wars franchise; and with it, a
new racial controversy. In the
trailer, the Black British actor
John Boyega is seen on-screen
with a Stormtrooper outfit. In
the Star Wars series, however,
Stormtroopers are supposed
to be clones of an ultimate creator of debated race.
This scene caused upheaval
in social media. Racial comments against Boyega from
Star Wars fans invaded the internet simply because he was a
black man filmed with a uniform. Although it is not even
clear why Boyega is wearing
a Stormtrooper outfit, a race
based argument has already
been raised. This is just an example of how people quickly
jump to conclusions based on
race.
Racial issues have always
dominated our country. One
would think that after all those
years of fighting and protesting, civil rights could finally be
practiced without a negative
outcome. But obviously this is
still not the case.
The Ferguson riots in Ferguson, Missouri, are a perfect example of what happens when
differences are not solved.

Whether it was an injustice or
not, why is it that we use violence to manage problems regarding race?
Another example are the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles,
California, in 1992. Rodney
King, an African American civilian, was beaten to a pulp by
four police officers, the majority
of them being white, after a car
pursuit.
The police officers, as well as
Darren Wilson from Ferguson,
were acquitted by the court. It
seems to me that race is not always the reason of social unrest,
but an excuse, and that the media seems to specialize in featuring cases involving people of
different races to incite a sense
of racism within the population.
The St. Louis Rams infuriated the St. Louis Police Officers
Association when four football players before a game performed the “hands up, don’t
shoot” gesture of solidarity regarding the Ferguson Riots.
The Association immediately demanded an apology. Why
should these men be disciplined
from executing their freedom of
speech right? It is not a matter
of race; it is a matter of justice
and fairness.
Even more recently, Daniel
Pantaleo, a white police officer
in New York, was not convicted
after the death by a chokehold
of Eric Garner, an unarmed

African American man. The
media is already linking this
episode with Ferguson, Missouri.
Did racism influence Michael Brown to be shot? Did
it influence Pantaleo to keep
Garner in an illegal chokehold? Only they know the
answer. What I do know,
however, is that decisions influenced on race need to stop.
It is not worth to cause upheaval over a person’s skin
color. After all, we are all human beings living in the same
world. Isn’t it time to stop the
bickering? Disregarding race,
a murder is a murder. Bill de
Blasio, the current New York
Mayor said, “This is a fundamental issue for every American who cares about justice.”
If we want to start functioning as a cohesive country,
racism cannot exist between
people. Men and women,
boys and girls, all deserve
rights to live a safe and happy
life. But with conflicts, such
as the Ferguson incident, they
are preventing and or prohibiting people access to this
kind of desirable life.
The only way to prevent
these terrible incidences from
happening is to stop the racism and leave people with
peace. Race has been the
cause of many conflicts, it’s
time to end this battle.

3

Hi-Tide

Fraternities Become
By Vivi Bonomie
Staff Writer

Co-Ed

Rape occurring on college
campuses has finally received
the attention it deserves. More
universities have found themselves in situations where
sexual violation has reached
alarmingly high levels. It is no
secret that fraternities have
developed a reputation for the
sexual harassment of females
at their infamously wild parties.
While many different options
are being considered in order
to prevent these awful situations on campuses all over the
country, Wesleyan University
in Connecticut has come up
with a very unique solution to
prevent rape in these male-oriented houses: co-ed fraternities.
The university was forced
to look at their options after
several cases of sexual harassment on campus. One fraternity, Beta Theta Pi, was given
the shocking nickname of the
“rape factory”, while Psi Upsilon is embroiled in a sexual
assault lawsuit. The university’s administration shocked
many students when President Michael Roth made the
announcement that in the
next three years all fraternities
would have to become co-ed.
My initial response to this
so-called solution was to think
how contradicting it is to try

and prevent women from getting raped by placing them
under the same roof as those
who have been notoriously accused of rape for generations.
However, while this solution
does in fact seem ridiculous,
the university’s argument is
the idea that mixing males and
females will create an environment that is gender-equal.
The expectation is that when
the young men of these fraternities are forced to live with
young women, they will begin
to see them as equals instead
of sexual accolades. By living
in the same house, they will
begin to realize that women
are not much different from
them, a goal that has so far,
been apparently difficult to
reach. While rape cases have
been treated in many different
ways and with many different
“solutions,” it seems to me that
this idea of co-ed fraternities
could actually work.
Even though I believe that
teaching men not to rape is a
more long-lasting and obvious solution, forcing them to
realize that women are in the
same position as them, might
finally make them understand
that rape is a bad thing. It is
hard to tell what the outcome
of this experiment will be, but
we can only hope that it will be
successful and help influence
other universities while protecting more females from entitled frat boys along the way.

Hats On,Hats Off
By Yenitzia Lopez
Staff Writer
At La Jolla High School,
there are several rules involving the dress code that many
students either don’t seem to
comprehend or simply do not
like. One of those many rules
includes the use of hats, hoods,
or headgear in classrooms
and/or around campus, with
the exception of hallways. “No
hats, hoods, or headgear inside any building,” is stated in
the 2014-2015 La Jolla High
School Student Handbook.
Why is it that teachers feel
the need to make students
take off hats while engaging
in classroom activities? Some
teachers may claim that wearing a hat inside of the classroom is “disrespectful” or even
“distracting.”
I believe that this rule is both
unfair and unreasonable. What
is so “distracting” about a hat
that I am only allowed to wear
one in the hallways (passing

period) or in the quad?
For some women, the use of
wearing either a hat or beanie
inside the classroom might be
used as a fashion statement, to
hide a terrible haircut, or simply a dreadful hair day.
For men, the use of a hat
could be taken as showing off
favorite sports teams or just
the fact that a person is really
into collecting hats.
How is it that a beanie is said
to be “distracting” someone,
but the flower-crown on the
head of the girl sitting next to
me isn’t considered distracting?
Saying that the hat I am wearing is distracting, is similar to
saying that the rings on my
fingers are distracting. Being
distracted in a class environment is inevitable. If I want to
wear a beanie to keep my head
warm, especially now in the
winter time, I should be able to
do that without a teacher telling me to take it off because it
is “distracting.”

Hi-Tide

4

By Andrea Albanez
Staff Writer

FEATURES

December 18, 2014

LJHS Students’ Holiday Tradtions from
Around the World

As the countdown to December began, we were already in
the prime of the holiday season. American holiday traditions usually involve hanging
up festive lights, decorating a
Douglas Fir Christmas tree,
singing traditional Christmas
carols, and waiting for Santa
to come down the chimney.
While many people throughout the month of December
celebrate this holiday, others
celebrate other holidays based
off of their religious practices
and culture.
A prominent religious and

social holiday that many people celebrate is Christmas.
While most view Christmas
as the day of opening presents,
being with family, and watching Christmas movies, the
Christian denominations view
Christmas as the day when Jesus was born. All Christian denominations, including Christians, Catholics, Protestants,
Lutherans, Mormons, and so
on, celebrate Christmas in this
way, in addition to the American spin on their holiday.
Junior Gavin Heap, a Mormon, says that “lots of people
don’t know this, but Mormons
are Christian, so we do the
standard Christmas tree, pres-

ents, Christmas carols, and
family time together.”
Another big holiday during
December is Hanukkah, a holiday celebrated by people who
are Jewish.
Kelila Krantz, a senior, explained how her family practices the holiday. “We celebrate
it for eight days. We light the
Menorah, eat latkes, which are
potato pancakes, play a game
called Dreidel, and spend time
with family.”
Others may also wonder
about the Muslim religion and
what they celebrate. Salma
Hassane, a senior, explained
how the lunar calendar affects
the religious holidays they cel-

ebrate. “Muslim holidays go
by the lunar calendar, so our
holidays change every year.
They move up eleven days, so
sometimes they are during the
winter and sometimes they are
during the summer. So this
year, we don’t have any holidays in December.”
A holiday that is usually
brushed from the spotlight but
still important in this season is
Chinese New Year. A later holiday during the winter season,
also because Chinese months
follow the lunar calendar, the
festivities usually start on January 31st and go on for fifteen
days.
Junior Michelle Lee says that

when her family celebrates the
holiday, “We have a big family
dinner and adults give kids red
envelopes” for good luck in the
New Year. Inside of these red
envelopes is “usually a decent
amount of money. It depends
on who gives it to you. Grandparents give a lot.” It is a festive
holiday like our New Year’s to
celebrate the coming of a new
year.
This demonstrates the variety
of holidays that are celebrated
throughout the month of December. People’s religions and
their cultural traditions affect
the various holidays they celebrate during the winter holiday season.

New Surf Company Created by LJHS Alum Welcoming New Staff
By Joseph Carroll
Staff Writer
Recently, a former student
from La Jolla High School
created a new surf brand and
company called MAKO.
Casey Richmond, who graduated several years ago, is one
of four partners of the company, along with three other
friends from Brigham Young
University.
Richmond and the other partners of the company
grew up surfing, where they
also had the chance to work at
surf shops and learn about the
many different surf industries.
The company was created earlier in November, and just released their first line of clothing several weeks ago.
MAKO currently sells
T-shirts, crew neck sweat-

shirts, hats, and long sleeve
henley thermal shirts, all of
which are perfect for gifts and
presents during the holidays
and any occasion.
MAKO items are being sold
at Mitch’s Surf Shop in La Jolla
and their website, www.ma-

Photo Courtesy of Joseph Carroll

komfg.com. Within just two
days of releasing their first
line of clothing, the complete

inventory of sweatshirts was
sold out.
As the company continues
to grow, they plan to come
out with a lot more items and
products. MAKO also is going
to sponsor surfers and photographers in the near future.
Richmond states,
“No matter how big we
get we want to feature
up and coming surfers and photographers.”
One of the students involved with MAKO is La
Jolla High student Kyle
Jetter. MAKO has featured
his photos on their blog, as
well as their Instagram.
Jetter remarks, “I’m super stoked to be helping
out MAKO and to be taking pictures for them because
it’s a sick brand and was made
from someone from La Jolla.”

Vegan Vendetta
Owners begin forcing vegan diets on their own animals
By Vivi Bonomie
Staff Writer
While veganism and vegetarianism have become rapidly
growing trends among those
seeking a healthier lifestyle,
one would think that this diet
would not apply to one’s pets
at home.
In July of 2013, a small orange kitten named Roger was
brought in to Lort Smith Animal Hospital in Melbourne,
Australia, after being forced
by its owners to adopt a vegan
diet.
As printed in the Herald Sun,
Dr. Leanne Pinfold, the cat’s
veterinarian stated, “It was
extremely weak and collapsed
when it came in. It was almost
non-responsive.” She said that

the cat’s diet of potatoes, rice
milk, and pasta had made him
critically ill. Roger spent three
days in the hospital where he
was injected with IV fluids,
placed on a heating pad, and
fed immense amounts of meat.
Thankfully, he was able to recover fully and was immediately put up for adoption.
This incident has forced
veterinarians to warn people against “forcing ideologies” upon their unsuspecting
pets. As they are carnivorous
animals, cats require a meatbased diet in order to maintain their health, and while the
values and decisions that come
along with being vegan may
be important to an individual
person, it is cruel to force these
beliefs onto their pets.

This case was recently
brought back to light as apparently more people have decided that being vegan cannot
remain an individual journey,
but that their cats must be
dragged along with them.
If vegancats.com has any
say in the matter, the risk of
a dead cat is better than the
risk that comes with a cat that
eats meat like it’s supposed to
do. We live in a time where
people are respected for their
decisions to eliminate animal
byproducts from their diet.
What some people fail to realize, however, is that this decision is not one they should
make for their pets who are
obviously unable to object
and, therefore, suffer from the
lack of meat in their diet.

By Misha Kabbage
Business Manager

everyone to stop by and get to
know her.
La Jolla High has never had
As the seasons are changing, anything more than counseling
so is our staff here at La Jolla available to students who also
High School. La Jolla High has needed psychological attengenerally had the same staff tion, so this year we are proud
and faculty for quite a while to welcome Dr. Joan Rich, our
now. Within the past year, that very own school psychologist
has been changing.
and therapist.
At one point during the last
Dr. Rich has been a developtwo years, we had almost no mental school psychologist for
counselors. Now, we have four forty years, and spent the last
wonderful counselors at our year traveling in Europe with
service at any time. This year, her husband. She loves workLa Jolla High welcomed Ms. ing with kids and enjoys the
Karoczkai, also known as Ms. short amount of time she has
K, who is currently our newest spent with La Jolla High students so far.
counselor.
She explains
Ms. K has
that things are
been coundifferent here
seling
for
than her priabout
six
or experiencyears, engages. “Here, I
ing with kids
am folded into
across
all
the counseling
primary and
family, wheresecondary
as previously I
school levels.
worked much
She worked
more with speat
Clairecial education,
mont High
Photo Courtesy of Misha Kabbage
and not so
School for
much with stuthe majority
of her career, but revealed that dents in general education.
“I am more available to the
La Jolla High has been her favorite work environment thus general education students
which has been very interestfar.
Ms. K says that what she re- ing.” If you’re ever in need of
ally enoys about La Jolla High someone to simply talk to, ex“is that there are so many clubs press any issues or struggles to,
and there is such a strong net- contact Dr. Rich in the counwork of people involved in ex- seling office.
Dr. Rich and Ms. Karoczkai
tracurriculars. I am really impressed by the variety of talents have already enriched our
and hobbies students have, and counseling department imI love the team of people I work mensely, so if you haven’t met
either of them yet, stop by the
with.”
Ms. K is an application reader office and say hello.
Every student is encouraged
for UCSD, which enables her
to give seniors lots of insight to approaching and seeking
and help on what they should help from those in the counbe including in their applica- seling office, whether it be
tions. She loves connecting for academic related topics or
with students and encourages therapeutic services.

FEATURES

December 18, 2014

5

Hi-Tide

Is a Gap Year an Option for You?

By Sophia Dorfsman
Staff Writer

Some people see taking a gap
year as never being an option,
while others dream of it. A gap
year can be filled with studying
abroad, interning, working, or
just figuring life out.
Lexe McCally, a senior planning on taking a gap year,
makes a good point that “society is so conditioned to have
such a structure.” We are all
pushed into this system where
we are expected to go to high
school, college, and then grad
school, consecutively.
Not that that system is wrong
for everyone, but by no means
is it necessarily right for everyone. There are numerous other
options and alternative routes
that are great options.
“Taking a gap year has been
a thought that has been lingering in my mind for a while. I
decided when the work load
and the pressure was getting to

be too extensive and I thought
it would be good to learn some
things outside of the classroom
for a bit… because there are
things that you can’t learn from
a book. I finalized my decision
at the beginning of this school
year,” says McCally.
Interested in agriculture, the
environment, and design, but
not exactly sure what she wants
to pursue, McCally has her heart
set on working with WWOOF
(World Wide Opportunities on
Organic Farms), for the year
following her graduation.
This organization offers a
chance for citizens around the
world to go live with a host who
owns an organic farm, where
you can help out on the farm
as well. When one becomes a
member, you pay a fee that is at
most $72, which allows access
to a database of many farms in
the country that they have chosen to farm in. Arrangements,
like how long one will stay with
a host and farm with them, are

planned directly with the
hosts.
The time period a volunteer works on a farm can
range from three days to six
months. In most of the countries, you must be eighteen

Photo Courtesy of Sophia Dorsman

years or older to participate,
and there is no age limit, as
long as that individual is able
to work. There are some exceptions, however, if you are
under eighteen, but the host
is responsible for anything
that happens to you and most

hosts do not want that responsibility.
While many would question
if a new adult could handle
themselves in a foreign country, McCally knows what she
is doing and is mature enough
to go on her own. Her parents
and friends are very supportive of what she has chosen to
do, as long as she has a plan,
which is to start off in New
Zealand and work her way to
Australia, India, and then Europe, farming in each country
she visits. This will be her first
time out of the United States.
What comes with getting out
of the country is immersing
herself in new and different
culture, “I chose WWOOF because I think it’s a great way to
fully experience another country because you are meeting
the locals, putting your hands
in the dirt there, and seeing
different ways of life. Whereas, when most people travel,
they buy a key chain with their

name on it from, say, Paris,
and are just seeing the very
surface of what goes on in the
country.”
McCally plans on going to a
state school when she touches down in the United States
again because it is affordable.
This means she will apply for
college next fall. After talking
to the college admission officers of the schools she was
interested in, McCally realized
that they prefer that students
apply the year before they attend college, because “an acceptance is only valid for so
long,” McCally says.
There are other options, and
Lexe is a perfect example of
one of those. If you are set on
going straight to college, one
you’ve adored for a long time
now, by all means, follow your
heart. But if you aren’t quite
sure what you want to do the
rest of your life, experience the
world a little bit to figure it all
out.

San Diego Bay’s Parade of Lights
By Camille Furby
Features Editor

The Frap House
By Jillian Kopp
Staff Writer
A new frappuccino house,
The Frap House, opened on
7846 Herschel Avenue this
past month. With sixteen different flavors, including dessert fraps, coffee fraps, tea
fraps, and fruit fraps, one is
sure to find a frappuccino to
their liking.
The small store also serves
beverages such as Izze Sparkling Juice, Fiji Natural Water,
Zico Pure Coconut Water, Naked Juice, Pellegrino Sparkling
Water, espresso, hot chocolate,
and tea.
There is a display of basic
treats, but they are limited because they want to stay true
to the idea of a frappuccino
house, and not a bakery.
The Frap House, the first of
its kind, opened on November
2, 2014. To pick the flavors to
serve, one of the managers,
Laura Goldstein, and her part-

ner pick flavors that they decide
taste good, put them all on the
shelves, and then reorder the
most popular flavors.
Their most popular flavors
are the Frosted Latte, which
patrons say tastes like coffee,
the Cookies and Cream, and
the Vanilla Chai. Their flavors
include Chocolate Decadence,
Red Velvet, White Chocolate
Symphony, Cookies and Cream.
When interviewed, Goldstein
noted that it is fun to work
there, because they have music
playing at all times. The employees are teenagers and young
adults. They are currently opening position for the upcoming
break, and for the spring, when
things start to get busy.
Their goal in creating the house
was to make a hang out spot for
teenagers. They encourage high
school students to come and enjoy a $4.99 frappuccino while
hanging out with friends. The
Starbucks just down the road
has yet to comment.

Every year, the boating community of
San Diego holds an event known as the
Parade of Lights. Held on two consecutive
Sundays in December, almost 80,000 spectators come to the San Diego Bay to watch
eighty boats fully decorated for the holiday
season.
The parade begins at Shelter Island, then
travels to the Embarcadero, Seaport Village,
and eventually ends at the Ferry Landing in
Coronado. This year, the theme is Children
Stories, and begins at 5:30pm at Shelter Island and ends around 8:00pm when the
boats make their final stop in Coronado.

Photos Courtesy by Shane Lynch

December Recipe of the Month

By Sophia Dorfsman and
Lauren Robbins
Staff Writers
Here are some recipes to help
you celebrate the upcoming
holidays!
Sweet Curry Brown Sugar
Popcorn
Ingredients:
-2 to 3 tablespoons coconut
oil
-1/2 cup popping corn
-2 tablespoons unsalted butter
-2 tablespoons brown sugar
-1 heaping teaspoon curry
powder
-pinch of cayenne
-salt
Directions:
1. Put the oil in a large, deep
pan with a lid. Turn the heat
up to medium, add 2 kernels
of corn, and cover.
2. When the kernels pop, remove the lid and pour in the
remaining popcorn kernels.

Cover and shake the pot, holding the lid on.
3. Cook over medium heat,
shaking the pot occasionally,
until the popping sound stops
after about 5 minutes.
4. Meanwhile, melt the butter
and stir the brown sugar into
it (this helps the brown sugar stick to the popcorn). Pour
the popcorn into a large bowl,
drizzle on the melted butter
and sprinkle in the curry powder, cayenne, and a good shake
of salt.
(Courtesy of Love and Lemons)
Peppermint Bark
Ingredients:
-2 (12 ounce) packages milk
chocolate chips
-2 (12 ounce) packages white
chocolate chips
-2 teaspoons peppermint extract
-8 peppermint candy canes,
crushed, divided

Directions:
1. Line a 12x18 inch jelly roll
pan with aluminum foil.
2. Melt the milk chocolate in
a microwave-safe glass or ceramic bowl in 30-second intervals, stirring after each melting, for 1 to 5 minutes. Don’t
overheat or the chocolate will
scorch. Stir in the peppermint
extract. Spread the chocolate
evenly in the prepared pan;
chill until set, about 30 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, melt the white
chocolate in a microwave-safe
glass or ceramic bowl in
30-second intervals, stirring
after each melting, for 1 to 5
minutes. Stir in 1/4 cup of the
crushed candy canes. Spread
the white chocolate mixture
evenly over the milk chocolate. Sprinkle the remaining
candy cane pieces evenly over
the white chocolate layer. Chill
until set, about 1 hour. Break
into small pieces to serve.
(Courtesy of allrecipes.com)