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ANTIGUA STATE COLLEGE

DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER
EDUCATION

UWI
GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN
EDUCATION (DIPED)

PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION
The Diploma in Education (Secondary) is an In - Service
programme for secondary teachers who possess a first degree
but have not been exposed to any professional training in
teaching. The major emphasis in the programme is to help
teachers, through exposure to a range of relevant experiences
and processes, function with a high degree of effectiveness in
the classroom in the context of rapidly changing global,
regional and school environments. At the same time, equal
emphasis will be placed on helping the teacher develop as a
high quality, discerning professional who recognises the
importance of life long learning, self assessment and
continuous professional development. Integration of Theory
and Practice will be emphasized in this programme.

TRAINING PHILOSOPHY
The programme is therefore predicated on the following
principles:
(1)

Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma in Education


(DIPED) programme should be able to clearly
demonstrate sound competence in classroom teaching

(2)

The programme will emphasize a diagnostic and


individualized approach to teacher preparation

(3)

Emphasis will be on the development of a reflective


and problem-solving approach by student teachers

(4)

action-research will comprise an important feature of


the programme

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(5)

Attention will be directed to the social conditions of


schooling and emerging developments, globally and
regionally, which are likely to influence the teacher's
performance in the classroom

(6)

Attention will be paid to the teaching/learning


problems which are evident in the national educational
system.

Graduates Must Clearly Demonstrate Competence in


Classroom Teaching
One of the criticisms which has plagued teacher education in
the Caribbean and indeed internationally, is the fact that
teacher preparation programmes have been far too theoretical.
The argument is often advanced that insufficient emphasis and
time are devoted to opportunities for practising and applying
pedagogical skills. This programme will seek to redress this
problem by employing strategies which involve the
experimentation and testing of a variety of teaching approaches
by student - teachers in the context of embedded practicums
and clinical supervision. Consequently, delivery strategies
such as extensive practice, demonstration, modelling, use of
feedback and follow-up coaching will be utilised.

Diagnostic and Individualized Approach to Teacher


Preparation
Teaching is a highly individualistic activity and the
development of competencies related to the activity varies from
individual to individual. Factors such as past experiences,
individual learning styles and the developmental and cognitive
stages which the teacher is undergoing, all influence the
proficiency and rate at which competencies are mastered. This
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programme will therefore be highly flexible and individualized


in nature and will employ diagnostic and collaborative
approaches aimed at helping each teacher identify his/her own
individual instructional and management problems with a view
to systematically addressing the same.

Emphasis Will Be on the Development of a Reflective and


Problem Solving Approach by the Teacher
Current thinking in the literature and accumulated professional
experience both indicate the importance of reflection and
problem-solving as essential skills which must be developed by
student- teachers if training is to have the desired impact. The
emphasis in this programme will be on reflection as a social
practice. After new information and teaching behaviours have
been presented, teachers will be provided with time to discuss
their applicability and usefulness in the classroom. They will
then be required to try them out, reflect on achievements and
challenges and return to the larger group with information
about the results of their interventions.
Student teachers will also be required to keep journals of their
classroom and school activities. Written responses to these
journals will be provided by supervising tutors. Among other
things, journal entries will focus on such areas as the
observation of the behaviour of individual pupils and the
dynamics of classroom behaviour as well as the organization of
small group and whole class sessions.
The essential concerns which will underline this reflection will
be:
(a)

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What strategies were most meaningful in promoting


learning and cognition?

(b)

What strategies encouraged pupils to reason critically?

(c)

What strategies challenged and excited pupils?

(d)

What strategies helped pupils view themselves as


being capable of achieving?

(e)

What strategies encouraged pupils to view themselves


and others as valued individuals?

(f)

What changes do I need to make to my practice in


order to be more effective?

(g)

What helped me? What did not?

Action Research Will Be an Important Feature of the


Programme
By far too much teaching in schools is conducted in an ad hoc
manner and insufficient or only haphazard attention devoted to
addressing specific instructional and learning problems. A
teacher can only understand the dynamic and multifaceted
nature of teaching and develop a worthwhile professional
approach to instruction if he/she learns to focus on and address
specific classroom related problems.
Each teacher enrolled in the programme therefore, will be
required to conduct an action-research project. The purpose of
the project is to help the teacher develop the ability to
understand classroom events through professional enquiry.
The teacher will be required to consider an array of possible
causes and solutions before taking action. The problem must
be defined, possible solutions considered and an action-plan
developed and implemented. A written analysis of the problem
must then be prepared.

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Attention Must be Directed to the Social Conditions of


Schooling Which Influence the Teacher's Classroom
Functioning
Many inexperienced teachers and far too frequently, many
experienced teachers, view teaching and learning from a purely
microscopic perspective. There is generally the tendency to be
concerned only with events and situations in one's own
classroom rather than view the school as a social system
comprising a number of interacting parts. As a result, much of
a beginning teacher's efforts can be misdirected and
insufficiently informed. An integral aspect of this training
programme therefore will be the requirement for teachers to
direct their attention to the social conditions of schooling which
impinge upon the teacher's work in the classroom. For
example, areas such as teacher- pupil relationships, school
climate, and expectations of teachers and students will be
addressed.
PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES
This programme is designed to help teachers
develop and demonstrate in the classroom and in the
school, an understanding of critical
philosophical,
sociological and psychological factors which affect the
learning and development of children and adolescents;

examine the ways in which the educative environment


contributes to growth and development of children;

analyse the values and implications associated with


current educational practices and, on the basis of this
analysis, develop a philosophical platform for action in
the classroom, school and educational system;

improve their understanding of Caribbean educational


systems and their organisation, as well as their implications
for teacher functioning at the secondary level;

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develop the basic skills necessary for reading and


interpreting research data and for conducting action
research;

appropriately diagnose the instructional needs of


individuals within a class setting and design instructional
programmes relevant to these needs;

use a variety of learner-centred instructional approaches


which promote conceptual understanding, as well as
critical thinking and social skills on the part of students, in
an holistic manner;

explore, in collaborative contexts, a range of approaches


which can be used in order to integrate new technologies
across the curriculum at the secondary level;

develop the basic skills necessary for


conducting
formative and summative assessments in classroom
settings and employ appropriate feedback strategies to
assist learners in addressing challenges encountered;

improve
develop
skills;

develop a critical and inquiring attitude to teaching and to


their own learning, as evidenced by a predisposition to
constructive self analysis and openness to feedback from
peers and supervisors.

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their understanding of self and others and


high quality communication and interpersonal

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Applicants must have a university degree or its equivalent in
the specialisation which they teach with a G.P.A of at least 2.0.
This specialisation must be clearly identifiable (based on
official transcript details) and would be evidenced by proof of
successful completion of at least eight courses, (equivalent of
24 credits) in the specialisation. The candidate must teach in
the specialisation for the full duration of the programme.
Applicants for admission who are not graduates of the
University of the West Indies must, at the time of their
application, arrange for the submission of official transcripts of
their university record to the Campus Registrar.
Each application must be accompanied by the required
application fee which is non refundable.
The originals and one copy of each of the following documents
must be submitted with this application (not required for UWI
graduates):
o
o
o
o

Birth Certificate;
Academic Certificates/Transcripts
Professional Certificates/Diplomas
Marriage Certificate/Deed Poll, if present name is different
from that on documents.

Applicants with qualifications in a language other than English


should submit a certified English translation of these
qualifications.
STATUS OF THE STUDENTS AT THE COLLEGE
a. All students shall meet the UWI criteria for admission and
registration to the Graduate Diploma in Education for
Secondary Teachers, including: Faculty and subject
requirements, requirements, pre-requisites, course
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loading, sequencing, rate of progress as required by the


Faculty of Humanities and Education and UWI
Examinations Regulations.
b. Once registered and in good standing in accordance with
the UWI programme regulations, the registered status of
these persons shall be maintained.
c. Students shall be registered at the Antigua State College,
pay its prescribed fees and be subject to its rules,
regulations and procedures for leave of absence and
discipline.
d. Student academic records shall be maintained by both the
Antigua State College and the UWI in their respective
standard formats. It is the responsibility of the UWI to
make its records of these students available to the students
or other authorized persons in accordance with normal
UWI policy and practice

CREDITS
Credits will be awarded on the basis of 5 credits per course.
Methods course:
5 credits
Core courses:
Introduction to Curriculum Theory &Practice
Classroom Assessment: Principles & Procedures
Education Foundations
15 credits
The Practicum is double weighted
Practicum
10 credits
TOTAL
30 credits

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PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
COURSE
CODE
EDIP
6000

COURSE TITLE

HOURS

CREDIT

Introduction to Curriculum Theory &


Practice

39

EDIP
6001

Classroom Assessment: Principles &


Procedures

39

EDIP
6002

Education Foundations

39

Methods Courses
One of the following:
The Teaching of English,
The Teaching of Geography/Social
Studies/History,
The Teaching of Mathematics
The Teaching of Modern Languages,
The Teaching of Science
The Teaching of Business Studies
Art & Craft Education

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Practicum

20 weeks
over 2
terms

10

EDIP
6090

Summer
Institute
4 weeks

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TEACHING PRACTICUM
DURATION: 20 Weeks
Students will be supervised in the practicum for approximately
twenty (20) weeks in the performance of their normal
classroom duties. Each student will be expected to work
closely with at least one other student teaching the same
specialist subject in his own or in another school. Where it is
considered desirable, special arrangements may be made for
students to teach in a school other than that to which they have
been assigned.
The attachment is intended to
a.

help students broaden their experience

b.

expose those experiencing difficulty at their own


schools to a different setting.

The final practicum assessment will take place during the


second semester between January and March of the programme
year. External assessors will be involved in this assessment.
However, where there is any uncertainty over a student's
performance, that student's assessment may be postponed to a
convenient time during the third term.
Goal
The practicum is designed to provide a range of opportunities
for teachers to develop as competent classroom practitioners,
possessing high quality skills in planning, delivering

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instruction and in conducting evaluation in secondary


classrooms in their area of specialization.

Objectives
Participants will
1.

plan lessons and units of work which accord due


consideration to the variety of learning styles and learner
needs which pupils present;

2. use a variety of classroom management techniques in


order to keep students on task, enhance motivation and
maintain a stimulating, engaging classroom environment
conducive to learning, teaching and enquiry;
3. demonstrate competence in
designing, using and
evaluating a wide variety of learner - centred resources in
order to promote the attainment of conceptual, skill and
attitudinal objectives by students;
4. integrate technology effectively in their teaching;
5. exhibit and promote the use of high quality, positive
interpersonal skills in classroom interactions with and
among students;
6. experiment with and develop confidence in using a range
of teaching approaches which are especially relevant to
their area of specialization;
7. develop relevant skills in
diagnosing, treating and
evaluating gaps/deficiencies in student learning;
8. use action research and
practice;
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other

related data to inform

9. observe good teachers in action;


10. make effective use of approaches designed to help pupils
develop skills related to critical thinking and problem
solving;
11. exhibit the ability to develop student competencies in
cognitive, skill and affective domains;
12. reflect objectively on their teaching performance and
identify, consistently, the actions which they will take in
order to enhance performance.
These objectives will be used as benchmarks for student
assessment. In that context they will serve as the main
criteria to be used for the assessment of the final practicum.
Practicum Structure
The practicum is so structured as to maximize opportunities for
students to closely integrate education theory with practice.
The revised practicum structure is as follows:

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TERM 1
Embedded Practicum
Duration: 10 weeks
FOCUS:
Experimentation,
inquiry and reflection.
Closely tied to Methods
courses i.e. English,
Mathematics etc. and to
the Foundations of
Education. Students will
be given short activities
which focus on the
practical application, on site, of teaching
approaches discussed in
class.

TERM 2
Final Practicum
Duration: 10 weeks
EMPHASES:
(a) Portfolio - Experimentation, inquiry,
reflection and the use of action research to
inform practice.
(b) Students will also be expected to
demonstrate competence in actual
classroom teaching as set out in the
practicum objectives.
The Action Research Project will be an integral
aspect of this Term II practicum and will serve as
the platform/scaffolding for the practicum.
Students will be required to submit a portfolio
at the end of this practicum. The portfolio will
constitute a cumulative representation of the
teachers teaching. The items will be selected by
the teacher and will comprise materials
developed over the two practicums. The focus
of the portfolio is to illustrate the teachers
continuing professional growth over time.
The Action Research project will be a key
component of the portfolio.
The portfolio will constitute 40% of the overall
mark for the practicum.
External assessment of classroom teaching of this
practicum will occur during the last four weeks of
the period.
The external assessment component, i.e.
classroom teaching aspect, will be equivalent to
60% of the overall mark for practicum.

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Participants must successfully complete EACH of the


practicum activities in order to be deemed to have successfully
completed the practicum component of the programme.
THE TEACHING PORTFOLIO
A portfolio can be described as a purposeful selection of
materials related to teaching, varying in nature but
representative of the teachers practice. More critically,
teachers use the portfolio development process to assist in
reflection and self-evaluation of strengths and weaknesses in
order to deliberately develop self-regulated goals and strategies
for the improvement of their teaching competencies.
Participants in the programme will be required to submit one
teaching portfolio which shows evidence of their evolving
teaching competence from a multifaceted perspective. The
development of the portfolio should begin early during term I
and should be continuous.
. It is expected that in their portfolios participants will
articulate their philosophy of teaching and that this
will be influenced by their exposure to the programme
illustrate how they have experimented with and
applied various
pedagogical,
planning and
assessment approaches in their teaching:
present a teaching unit report which highlights their
competence to use the action research process to
inform teaching
demonstrate how they engaged in reflection in order
to identify their strengths and address weaknesses
in their teaching
provide evidence of their ability to integrate
technology in the curriculum
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The above represent the key indicators which will guide the
preparation of the Practicum Portfolio as well as its assessment.

ASSESSMENT OF THE PRACTICUM PORTFOLIO

Table of Contents

Presentation

Use of English

Philosophical Platform
10
Current philosophy of teaching
Did it change?
View of teaching, education, teaching at the secondary
level
Can it be reasonably accepted?
Ability to Integrate Available Technologies appropriately in
the Curriculum
10
attempt to use a range of technologies
provide opportunities for students to use technology
for inquiry - use internet to find information
Reflections Journal Entries
15
Objective?
Indicative of deep thinking of the practice
Did the student make use of thin thinking in further
action
Evidence of critical thinking

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Ability to Employ Research Data to Inform Teaching as


Represented in a Research/Teaching Report
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(to be conducted in one of the classes in which the student is
being assessed)
This should contain
a clear statement of the problem which was investigated
research questions which guided the activity (3 questions
maximum)
literature review and unit plan (3-4 pages)
range of student-centered teaching approaches as reflected in
lesson plans/materials (at least eight lesson plans)
student outcomes e.g. test results samples of students work,
students evaluations
For each portfolio selection, a brief summary should be
provided by the teacher as to why it was included.

Action Research Component of the Portfolio


The planning for the Action Research component and its
execution will begin early in Term II. Data collected will
inform unit planning, lesson planning and assessment.
Participants would have already completed relevant modules
pertaining to the conduct of Action Research. The exposure to
these modules would have equipped them with skills to
conduct an Action Research Project with a clearly delimited
scope.

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REGULATIONS
1. Students will be examined in
(a) the Theory of Education i.e. Education core
courses, Methods courses
AND
(b) the Practice of Education
2. In order to qualify for the award of the Postgraduate
Diploma in Education, a candidate must satisfy the
examiners in BOTH the Theory AND Practice of
Education.
3. In order to be deemed to have passed in the Practice of
Education a candidate must have achieved at least a grade
of B in Practicum II.
4. To be deemed to have passed in the Theory of Education a
candidate must satisfy the examiners by achieving a grade
of at least B in each component of the examination.
5. The Diploma may be awarded with Distinction. A
distinction will be awarded on the basis that :
- the student has earned an A in the Practice of Education
- the student has earned an A in the Theory of Education
- in this context no grade in any component of the Theory of
Education should be less than B+.

6. The University of the West Indies requires regular


attendance at classes as well as on-site (a minimum of
75% attendance) as a condition of the award of the
Postgraduate Diploma.

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7.

FAILURE TO SUBMIT ASSIGNMENTS OR


PROJECTS BY THE DATES DETERMINED WILL
NORMALLY LEAD TO REFERRAL IN THAT PART
OF THE COURSE, UNLESS A MEDICAL
CERTIFICATE IS SUBMITTED PRIOR TO THE
DEADLINE.

8.

In the event of unusual or extenuating circumstances, a


candidate may apply in writing for an extension of time for
submission of an assignment, addressing the application to
the Principal of the college and must supply supporting
evidence.

9.

All students are expected to attend tutorials in connection


with written studies, projects, practicum activities, and
such other aspects of the programme as may be determined
from time to time.

10. Students are expected to dress professionally both in


college and school classrooms.
11. STUDENTS ARE ADVISED TO CONSULT THE U.W.I.
REGULATIONS HANDBOOK FOR GRADUATE
DIPLOMAS AND DEGREES FOR THE COMPLETE
SET OF REGULATIONS WHICH PERTAIN TO
GRADUATE DIPLOMAS OFFERED BY THE
UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES.

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ASSESSMENT
Assessment in this programme will be on a continuous basis
and, as such, there will be no formal examination at the end of
the programme. Each student must complete assignments in the
following areas:
Theory of Education
Foundations of Education
Classroom Assessment: Principles & Procedures
Introduction to Curriculum, Theory & Practice AND
The Methods Course
Practice of Education
Practicum Portfolio AS WELL AS the Final Practicum AND
other short assignments and presentations as may, from time to
time, be determined by tutors.
All assignments/papers are expected to demonstrate students'
understanding of the relationship between theory and practice.
The Grading Scheme for Written Studies and for the Practice of
Education is as follows:

GRADE
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
FAIL-E
FAIL

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GRADE
% RANGE
POINT
4.3
90-100
4.0
80-89
3.7
75-79
3.3
70-74
3.0
65-69
2.7
60-64
2.3
55-59
2.0
50-54
1.3
35-49
0.0
0-34

Grade Definitions for the Practice of Education


A:

Pass with distinction. Performance reflects overall


excellence including a superior mastery of teaching
technique, sound conceptual understanding of the
structure of the subject, a superior ability to apply these
both routinely and originally, good pupil/teacher
relationships, an outstanding ability to meet the needs of
individual students, to maintain a stimulating, engaging
classroom environment conducive to learning and
teaching and to developing higher order thinking skills
with students. Several strengths and no significant
weaknesses.

B+:

A high standard/very competent in techniques and


knowledge and in the ability to apply these, but short of
the degree of originality and flexibility which marks the
distinction candidate; good pupil/teacher relationships, a
definite ability to meet the needs of individual students
and to maintain high levels of student motivation for
learning. Considerable strengths and no significant
weakness.

B:

Competent. No serious doubt about the student's


craftsmanship. Performance reflects a mastery of
techniques and understanding of knowledge and an
ability to apply these appropriately and consistently in
teaching, sound pupil/teacher relationships and better
than average ability to meet the needs of individual
students and to stimulate and maintain interest . No
insurmountable weaknesses.

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F(R):

Serious/very serious doubts about student's ability to


become a 'satisfactory' teacher for one or more reasons,
such as
(a) performance reflects very little knowledge or
technique and/or very little ability to apply these
(b) generally unimaginative teaching
(c) inability to relate/communicate with children or to
promote efficient learning
(d) very poor class control and management
(e) very poor planning skills
(f) apparent failure to make an effort to present
lessons satisfactorily
(g) or an apparent degree of irresponsibility

For more information visit:

The university of the West Indies at Cave Hill;


School of Education website

www.cavehill.uwi.edu/gradstudies/resourses/brochu
res/dip-education.aspx

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