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BLUR MAGAZINE 23

video by Igor Kalendari

BLUR 23 PRESENTS
http://www.youtube.com/user/MagazineBlur

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

photo: Riccardo Giordano

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photo: Sacha Goldberger

lur magazine magazine is an


international e-magazine founded
in 2007 with the mission to
promote creative photography
worldwide. It represents a meeting place
for photographers, both prominent
professionals and talented amateurs yet
to be discovered, and photography lovers
from around 180 counties.
In these times of photographic hyper
production, BLUR magazine aims to
slow the pace and encourage its readers
to reflect more on the images and to
experience photography more profoundly.
This is why BLUR omits technical specifics
of photographs and focuses instead on
creative, impactful photography and its
creators.
BLUR magazine is published quarterly in
an interactive PDF format, free of charge.
BLUR magazine is a completely voluntary
project run by photography enthusiasts
from Croatia, USA, Canada, and Germany.

impressum
Robert Gojevi
founder | chief editor | design | art director
e-mail: robert.gojevic@blur-magazine.com
Ivana Krnji
executive editor | marketing and PR
e-mail: ivana.krnjic@blur-magazine.com
Tomislav Mari
editor | columnist
e-mail: tomislav.maric@blur-magazine.com
Denis Plei
columnist | translator | proofreading
e-mail: denis.pleic@blur-magazine.com
Jennifer Henriksen (Holga Jen)
editor of Playstick
e-mail: jennifer.heriksen@blur-magazine.com
Jennifer Rumbach
editor of Instantion
e-mail: jennifer.rumbach@blur-magazine.com
Michael McAllister
proofreading
Igor Kalendari
video producer

BLUR magazine is published by Photography


Association CREATUS (F.U.C.*), a nonprofit
association founded in August 2009 with the
aim of contributing to the development of the
photography scene in Croatia, while promoting
and connecting Croatian photographers with
their international colleagues.

elimir Koevi
expert associate

ISSN: 1847-7410
Publisher: F.U.C.*
Address: street Ljubiica 19, 10 360 Sesvete
Contact: info@blur-magazine.com
Bank account: Zagrebaka banka 2360000 1102112539
MB: 2580837
OIB: 39145219372

G r e e t i n g
Dear BLUR magazine reader,

f r o m

t h e

E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f

It is my pleasure to welcome you to our e-zine dedicated to


creative photography.
While launching BLUR several years ago, I was guided by the idea
of creating a magazine focusing only on stunning, high-impact
photographyregardless of photographic techniqueand on
its creators, the photographers. My intention was to use BLUR
as a response to current photographic hyper-production and
through it to encourage readers to reflect more on the images
and to experience photography more profoundly.

and collaborators who voluntarily support BLURs mission of


promoting creative photography worldwide. Together, we use
the free distribution advantages of the Internet to reach readers in
more than 180 countries and to present to them the inspirational
work of both prominent artists as well as less-known, but very
talented, photographers from around the world.
I invite you to join us and enjoy the diversity of creative
photography.

Today, Im glad to work with an international team of editors


Robert Gojevi, editor in chief
robert.gojevic@blur-magazine.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

march

june

september

COVER PAGE

03

IMPRESSUM

06

EDITORIAL COLUMN

07

CONTENTS

08

GALLERY 24

11

PORTFOLIO | Franjo Bahovec

37

INTERVIEW | Paolo Roversi

65

INTERVIEW | Jaime Ibarra

69

PROJECT | Sacha Goldberger

94

WET PLATE | Jacqueline Roberts

111

ANALOG WABI SABI BY DENIS PLEI I Nagano Toyokazu

126

TETRA | Lionel Orriols

143

INSTANTION | Dan Isaac Wallin

160

PLAYSTICK | Jennifer Shaw

180

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200

december

20 11
CONTENTS

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

CONTENTS
Jacqueline Roberts
WET PLATE

Sacha Goldberger
PROJECT

Jaime Ibarra
INTERVIEW

Paolo Roversi
INTERVIEW

FRANJO BAHOVEC
PORTFOLIO

CONTENTS
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CATALOG

Jennifer Shaw
PLAYSTICK

Dan Isaac Wallin


INSTANTION

Lionel Orriols
TETRA

DENIS PLEI
COLUMN

11

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PHOTO

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The mission of BLUR magazine is to promote and celebrate creative photography and to
provide worldwide exposure to outstanding photographers, both professionals and amateurs.
Gallery 24 is a collectionspecifically, an online exhibitionof 24 outstanding and impactful photographs put together with the aim of demonstrating the diversity and beauty
found in the world of photography. Photographs presented in Gallery 24 are selected for
their high aesthetic quality, composition, and wow factor.
Your photograph can also be part of this collection. Make your work visible to thousands
of people from all over the world by submitting your photo here:

Submission Instructions:

http://www.blur-magazine.com/submission/photo-submission/

Send your photos through an online submission tool.


Send each photograph separately. If you are submitting 2 photographs, use the online submission tool twice.
The resolution of your photo needs to be 72 dpi.

Resize your photo to 1,500 pixels at its longest dimension.

Send a maximum of 2 photos per issue of BLUR magazine.

The maximum size for each photo is 1MB.


Send photographs in JPG format.
Name the image file as follows: artist name-artist surname-photograph name.jpg.
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

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Italy
http://brixart.deviantart.com/
Fabrizio Tedde

Trapped

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India
http://fineart-portugal.com/saibal gupta

Saibal Gupta

Dongarbabu

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Indonesia
http://www.flickr.com/photos/knox_wade

Marthony Mandra

Mencari Nafkah

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USA
http://sharpimages.yolasite.com/
alex sharp

Entombent of christ

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The Netherlands
http://www.carmengonzalez.org

Carmen Gonzalez

Lonely in your nightmare

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Italy
http://brixart.deviantart.com/
Fabrizio Tedde

The evil inside

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Croatia

Karlo argonja

My last show is over

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Poland
http://marcinmatyja.pl

Marcin Matyja

Karolina

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USA
http://www.adriandavisphotography.com
Adrian Davis

Across The Golden Gate

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France
http://www.wix.com/ericfrey/ericfreyphoto

Eric Frey

No mans land

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UK
http://www.lomography.com/homes/phoenix1206

Phoenix Tse

Seaside

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USA
http://maiak-photo.com
Max Buriak

Traveling with Mum

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Macedonia
http://peco.fotolom.info/
Peco Kolchkoski

Grown Out

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Croatia

Lili Zaneta

Paula

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Lithuania

Andrius Mulvinskas

Still Waiting

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Lithuania
http://vaidasbradauskas.daportfolio.com/

Vaidas Bradauskas

Cant live Without

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Lithuania
http://www.fotomindo.eu

Mindaugas Navickas

Friendship

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Lithuania
http://www.behance.net/gretadite/frame

Greta Diciunaite

Quietly

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Lithuania
http://www.flickr.com/photos/39092558@N04/

Gintare Dainelyte

***

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France
http://sergebouvet.com/blog/

Serge Bouvet

Under the shadow of storks

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2
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India
http://humansaibal.fineart-portugal.com

Saibal Gupta

Laughter

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R
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Italy
http://salvinsa.blogspot.com/
Salvatore Insana

Final sky

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R
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UK
http://www.samlongphotography.com

Sam Long

And All That Could Have Been

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Lithuania
http://www.fotopoezija.com
Zilvinas Valeika

Hope dies last 1

Three years ago, Croatian photography became


richer for the unique work of Franjo Bahovec
which was discovered by Mr. Josip Horvat, a lo
cal collector of antiquities, and first presented to
the public by an adviser of the Museum of Arts
and Crafts in Zagreb, Mrs. Marija Tonkovi.
Franjo Bahovec was a successful businessman
from Samobor, a small town in Croatia, and a
passionate amateur photographer. Due to his
wealthy position, enabled by his job, Bahovec

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WORLD

had the opportunity to capture different mo


ments through stereography, at that point, in the
late 19th and early 20th century, a new medium of
photography. This photography technique was
capturing images on glass which, when viewed
through a stereoscope, resulted in an optical illu
sion and turned into a 3D experience.
Collection of Franjo Bahovec is truly versatile.
In it, you can find cities like New York, Vienna,
London, Prague, Trieste, Samobor and Zagreb,
as well as stories from his intimate life such as

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family, sports and romantic moments. Because


of its documentary and artistic value, it is indi
sputable the importance of this photography
collection to the Croatian heritage.

Stories from the past

Franjo Bahovec (Samobor, 1851.-1924.)

This is why we decided to present you the work


of Bahovec and, through them, tell you some
interesting stories from the past, which consist
of four parts:

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PEOPLE

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BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Franjo Bahovec (Samobor 1851.- 1924.)


In this last installment, Foto Galerija Lang and BLUR
magazine are pleased to present the intimate side of Franjo
Bahovec, this unique amateur from Samobor, who, through
his all-encompassing interest in the medium of photography
at the beginning of the 20th century, contributed so much
to Croatian photographic heritage. An extraordinary chapter
in his photographic opus, precisely in this context, can be
found in the photographs (again, these are stereoscopic
glass slides) taken in the privacy of his home in Samobor.
The issue is not only the technology and the technique of the
medium; stereoscopic photography was extremely popular
in amateur circles in the last decades of the 19th century,
and sometimesas is the case with Franjo Bahovecat the
beginning of the 20th century.
Photos selected by: Robert Gojevi and elimir Koevi.

As we reach the conclusion, this deserves repeating, lest we forget:


If we take a look at the biographies of the Croatian masters of photography, well find
physicians, pharmacists, students, bankers, engineers, and so on, and only very recently we
will find those who in their biographies can list degrees in photography from the universities
in Prague, Dsseldorf, or Zagreb. In short, more or less, everything thats worth anything
and whats interesting in the context of the medium, we owe to amateurs. One of them is
Franjo Bahovec (Samobor, 1851-1924). In the historical retrospective mentioned above in
1994, he is not mentioned because he was not yet known. The credit for finding this precious
materialand its salvation (almost at the last minute)goes to Mr. Josip Horvat of Samobor,
a passionate collector of local antiques, and to Mrs. Marija Tonkovi, curatorial advisor of the
Museum of Arts and Crafts, who presented Horvats findings at the Cro-Art club in Zagreb in
2007.

portfolio

Introductory text: elimir Koevi

FRANJO BAHOVEC
SAMOBOR | Croatia

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

In this last installment, Foto Galerija Lang and BLUR magazine are pleased to present
the intimate side of Franjo Bahovec, this unique amateur from Samobor, who, through
his all-encompassing interest in the medium of photography at the beginning of the 20th
century, contributed so much to Croatian photographic heritage. An extraordinary chapter
in his photographic opus, precisely in this context, can be found in the photographs (again,
these are stereoscopic glass slides) taken in the privacy of his home in Samobor. The issue
is not only the technology and the technique of the medium; stereoscopic photography
was extremely popular in amateur circles in the last decades of the 19th century, and
sometimesas is the case with Franjo Bahovecat the beginning of the 20th century.
The significance is in the understanding of the medium, its potential and the ability to
turn reality into a poetic and aesthetic whole. Franjo Bahovec certainly did not make these
intimate photos for the pornographic market, which was common in Europe at the time
(where else but in FranceFelix Moulin or Camille dOlivier, for example); the uniqueness
of Bahovecs photographs is the best indicator of their non-profit purpose, first as a
marvelous photographic image, i.e. as a medium, then as a sweet remembrance for old
age, and, lastly, as a theme and motive. As the fine lady in Bahovecs photos has exposed
herself in the privacy of the home, Bahovecs photos remained practically untouched for
almost a hundred years, stored solely in the emotional memory of the subject and the
object. Today, when we look at these photos, we do not associate them with pornography,
but think only of masterly usage of the photographic medium in, so to speak, studio
conditions. The medium was used in the same way almost simultaneously by the Croatian
painter Bela Csikos-Sessia (1864-1931), but for the purpose of creating templates for his
symbolist paintings. Bahovec, however, does not think at all about the elevated artistic
creation, but of the medium and the voluptuous lady in front of his lens.

The photography as a medium does not know local specifics, which could then be used to
characterise it as specifically belonging to Samobor, or to New Orleans. Today, everything
is known about E.J. Bellocq and very little about Franjo Bahovec. Bellocqs legacy is today
regarded and preserved as a valued treasure. The legacy of Franjo Bahovec is hidden in
a box in the cellar of a private house in Samobor. This is the end of all discussion on the
position of Croatian photography within the context of global culture, the global culture to
which a little town in Croatia used to belong once, but, thanks to local disregard, belongs
no more.

portfolio

Those wishing to do so can imagine what actually went on between the handsome
gentleman and his lady. This belongs in another context. What belongs to the
photographic context is the mastery with which Franjo Bahovec shapes the theme and
motive using light. He uses the direct and indirect light artfully, uses the reflection from
the mirror in which not only he multiplies the subject, but also places himself within the
boundary of the chosen frame. The preserved double exposure photo clearly illustrates his
interest in experimentation, however nave it might be. Bahovec notices and places into his
photos a certain quantity of the symbols (typical for that time) as, for example, a clock,
or the mirror in the corner, in which the clock is reflected (impermanence), the light that
creeps in through the open door (uncertainty), an image of a mother and child (innocence),
etc. The symbols are contrasted with a rather lascivious image of a lady on a billiard table,
which could easily be compared to E.J. Bellocq and his contemporaneous ladies from New
Orleans.

FRANJO BAHOVEC
SAMOBOR | Croatia

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interview | Tomislav Mari

Exploring
depth of the eyes
Paolo Roversi

Italy |http://www.paoloroversi.com/
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Everybody knows Paolo Roversi. Actually, everybody knows


his photographs. Hes a bit of an enigma, even to his fellow
photographers. Thats why he received a great deal of attention at
the FEP congress in Lyon. Paolo is an old-school photographer, born
way before social media took over our (photographers) lives. He
believes that his work comes first, not him.
I have known him forever, since my early beginnings as
a photographer. If you are in business, or simply like fine art
photography, there is no way to overlook his photo artistry. His
work is published in all major fashion magazines and many books.
I especially admire his work for Depeche Modethe magazine, not
the band :-) . He has also done many campaigns for famous fashion
designers, his first one for Christian Dior cosmetics.
Born in Ravenna in 1947, he set up a darkroom in a cellar with
another amateur, the local postman, Battista Minguzzi, and started
making his own black-and-white prints. He spent many hours
learning in the studio of local professional photographer Nevio
Natali. In 1970, he started collaborating with the Associated Press,
and during the same year Paolo opened, with his friend Giancarlo
Gramantieri, his first portrait studio in Ravenna. The next year, he
met, in Ravenna, Peter Knapp, the legendary art director of Elle
magazine. At his invitation, Paolo visited Paris in November 1973
and never left. At first, he started working as a photojournalist, and
later he discovered the work of Penn, Avedon, Newton, and other
fashion photographers. He started doing small jobs for magazines
likeElle andDepeche Mode.Marie Clairepublished his first major
fashion story. His favorite setup was an 8x10 Deardorff with a
360mm Goerz f6.8, doing cross processing, 804/809 chocolate
Polaroids, mostly in studio and rarely on location. Polaroid materials
are what he is famous for, giving to his models a dreamy, ethereal
look against simple backgrounds. As a great portraitist, he is using
long exposures to emphasize the depth of the eyes, which look
more human that way. He learned this from the old master painters
and photographers who used only natural light and long exposures
with low-sensitivity materials. Window light in his studio is the best
light for him because it never looks the same. HMI is next best.
He has also experimented with tungsten spotlights, UV light, and
Maglite flashlights. Light gives the main quality to his models. In
that moment, even his nudes lose erotic charge and become fragile
human beings with soul-revealing eyes and renaissance bodies. He
is a man with a unique perception of light.

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You are, it seems, a very good friend with light. At this point you
have a lifetime of experience with it. Are you still experimenting
with it? Do you have any new experiences you would like to
share?
Its true, I work with light every day, and Im discovering new things
every day. It is always surprising me. It is an endless inspiration. The
most important thing is the relationship of light with your subject,
with the face if you are making a portrait, or with the landscape if
you are making some landscape photography. The sky is always
different, it changes every day. You dont see the same light twice.
That change in light is the most important thing.
Yes, but some photographers dont like that change in
light. Is that the main difference between the masters of
photography, who understands the light, and ordinary snapshot photographers, that ability to adapt to light and use it for
their purposes?
But can you tell me the difference between good and bad light? You
cant say this is good light or this is the bad light. I think you have to
accept the light as it is. Thats life. You manage the light with your
camera, with your technique, but you dont possess the light and
cant dominate it. You have to be...
Humble?
Yes, thats a very good word: humble. You have to be very humble
with light. Light is something very big.
It is coming from the very big distance...

interview

I agree, the light is coming from such a great distance to the face of
my subject, and then to the lens of the camera. It is such a big trip,
very mystical to me.

Exploring
depth of the eyes

Paolo Roversi

Italy |http://www.paoloroversi.com/

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

What do you think about new Polaroid materials. I know you


were dependent on Polaroid once.
I tried them, but Im not sure there is anything similar to the Polaroid
I was using. It is very far from the original. In the moment, I cant
find a way to use it. Maybe I will in the future, but for now, I am not
interested.
And what is your relationship with digital photography?
Im using a digital camera; Im learning. It is the new technique. I
have nothing against new techniques, even if they are very different
from the old ones.
The only thing that disturbs me is that the photographs are now
only on the computer screen, and not on the paper. I dont care
if the print is digital or analog; what disturbs me is that you cant
touch photographs anymore. I dont like that.
I dont like images floating on the screen; they look very different
from those on paper. For me, a photograph is an object that you
should hold in your hand to look at.
Do you like digitally printed photographs?
Yes, I think ink-jet printing has made great progress. I dont think it
is better, just different. A few years ago, it was not comparable to
analog prints, but now it is more and more. There is a lot of money
in this business. Thats why Polaroid went bankrupt, and Epson is
getting very rich as the leader in the field.

Paolo, thank you very much for presenting your work and sharing
your thoughts with us. It was a pleasure meeting you here in Lyon.
(Paolo was a guest lecturer at the FEP Congress in February 2011 in
Lyon, presenting his work to FEP membersEuropean professional
photographers.)

Exploring
depth of the eyes

Paolo Roversi

Italy |http://www.paoloroversi.com/

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

interview | Robert Gojevi

My super power
Jaime Ibarra

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com
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USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

In which period of your life did you create the photographs we see
on your web page?
My photography experience began in 2004, when I bought my first SLR
camera, even though I dont feel I produced any images worthy of being
seen during those first two years. The earliest photos I display on my site
probably date back only as far as two, perhaps three, years at most. Part
of the evolution of my photography is the evolution of my aesthetic. It is
fairly consistent that I do not care for images from more than a couple of
years ago, although that number is growing, as I see more consistency in
my work.
In your opinion, who is more successful: photographers who have
built up a recognizable style or those who constantly adapt to
current trends?
Most of the artists I admire have one thing in common: an instantly
recognizable style. For example, after only a few seconds of listening to
flamenco guitarist Vicente Amigo, I know its him playing. From the corner
of my eye, I can catch a one-second glimpse of an image showing the
body painting artistry of Mirabai Wagner, and know its her work. Such is
the case with most of the artists I admire most.
But does having an instantly-recognizable style translate into being
successful? It depends on your definition of successful, really. If you
define success as being known for the uniqueness of your work, then I
would say, yes, that will get you far.
I can only speak from my personal experience, but most of the people
who hire or commission me have an interest in the specific style of my
work, not because of the breadth or wide range of my work.

interview

Jaime Ibarra

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

personal style?
The colors in my work are the same colors I have felt a connection with
my entire life. Ive been drawn to them inexplicablyor at least it was
inexplicable until about 10 years ago, when it was discovered that I have a
condition known as Synaesthesia (syn - joined, aethesia - sense).
Synaesthesia is an uncommon neurological condition in which stimulation
of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary
experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway. Kind of like a wire
is crossed between sensesone sense triggers another in a normally
unrelated manner. For example, music might be seen in colors and
patterns, taste may be seen in shapes, or letters and numbers may have
textures, etc.
In my case, I hear colors, almost as if they were musical notes.
Combinations of colors are like combinations of notes and become
chords. And just as in music, some chords are dissonant and tense, and
some chords are complex and beautiful. In my workmore or lessI just
choose colors that make the nicest music together.
It is referred to as a condition, but I kind of see it as a super power. :)

My super power

We live in a time of fast consumption of everything, including


photography. How do you deal with this issue? Would you like to
slow down the pace or are you fond of this rhythm?
I often think its a bit disappointing that we live in an age of instant
gratification at the press of a button. I see art being regarded with the
same brevity, but there is not likely anything I can do to change that. My
work takes a good deal of time to produce; therefore, there is little I can
do to keep up with this rapid pace of consumption. I feel that my work
can appeal to those who sprint through life, but it also attracts those who
are willing to indulge in a moment to pause. It makes me happy to create
images that invite people to slow down for a bit.

Digital colors can sometimes be too strong and reduce the mood
of photography. By avoiding this, results can resemble analog
photography. How would you describe the results of your postproduction process? Did you ever do analog photography?
That is a good question. I never really thought about it until you asked me.
I fell in love with photography at a very young age, almost 30 years before
I owned an SLR camera worthy of allowing me to pursue the craft. I do
not have any real experience with film photography, but it was the look of
film photography I fell in love with. Now, years later, I am fulfilling an early
fascination, but with digital tools. I am a hyper-nostalgic person, so I feel
that the look of my work is an externalization of my early dreams of doing
photography. Those dreams are now, of course, combined with almost 30
years of life experiences since then. There are too many variables in place
to make an absolute assessment of why my work looks as it does, but it
started very early in my life.

Your photos are very recognizable by their colors. How much time
did you spend in search of the style you currently have? Could you
describe what phases you went through before you defined your

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

How do you find your models? What are the main selection criteria
when you choose whom to photograph?
Finding models was the biggest obstacle in my first year of doing
this. How can you get an amazing model when you have no images
of amazing models to show them? How do you entice an agencyrepresented model to work with you when none of your photos are of
agency caliber? This was my conundrum.
Luckily, I have some strikingly beautiful friends. I was eventually able to
convince several of them to let me photograph them. After the first year
of doing that, my portfolio was starting to look pretty good, which gave
me some much-needed leverage when approaching models. It grew

Jaime Ibarra

In your opinion what is it that makes a successful photograph?


What is it that you need to feel or see to include a photo on your web
page?
I can only address my definition of successful, of course, and Im speaking
only of my personal work, but there absolutely must be a connection with
the person I am photographing. That connection must be established
before I even pick up the camera. Without it, I am simply looking at a
pretty girl, in front of a pretty tree, wearing a pretty dress, and I find myself
looking at a rather lifeless, non-compelling image.
To me, there must be a narrative, a story, a human moment. Basically, it
must be real.

interview
USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

exponentially within a year, and the tables were turned to the point where
models were contacting me.
These days, finding models is seldom a problem, but, admittedly, it took
a while to get to this point. Like most growth endeavors, you have to pay
your dues.

My super power

Which element, besides your models, is the most important in


your photography? Would you be pleased by a photo of a stunning
model, but with less attractive styling or location?
With commercial/commissioned work, the most important thing is what
the client wants. If the dress the model is wearing is the real subject
of the photo, then the dress is most important. In my personal work,
the most important thing is a palpable connection with the person Im
photographing.
I learned a long time ago, a photograph has much more impact, for
me, if I spend some time getting to know the person I am going to be
photographing. There is a human in front of my camera, a human with
feelings, a human with stories to tell. It is to my advantageand the
photos advantageto connect at all costs. I wont even pick up the
camera until that connection is established. Its a deal breaker for me.
Often, in my professional work, I only have a few minutes to accomplish
that. Over the course of the past few years I have fine-tuned the way I
communicate with the people I photograph. I consider myself more of a
human behaviorist than a photographer.
In my personal work, which is 90 percent of what you see on my website, I
photograph people Im very close to in my life. That connection is already
there. It has been for a long time. There is an inter-subjective space that
exists only between me and the person I am photographing. The smile on
the face of that person does not exist because I asked them to smile; they
are smiling because of the funny thing the cat did with the peanut butter
about 5 months ago. If they look sad, its not because I asked them to, but
because they received news that they wouldnt be able to fly back to the
UK for the holiday season this year. Its all very real and quite personal.
There is a world of difference between someone simply looking at the
camera, and someone looking at the person holding the camera. Often in
the photos I create with someone there are several years of history behind
those eyes, a history that I am very much a part of.

Do you shoot alone or with the help of an assistant?


On commercial/commissioned shoots, yes. On personal shoots, almost
never. The presence of another usually ruins the mood.
Are you using the help of a stylist or make-up artist or do you
arrange all these details together with the model?
In my personal work, yes, but only around 20 percent of the time. The
people I photograph regularly are quite adept at doing these things
themselves.
Do you keep up to date with the world of photography? Do you
search for inspiration from certain sources, or is your creativity
entirely the result of your own thoughts?
To be honest, I dont really keep up with the world of photography. When
I look elsewhere for inspiration, it is usually in movies and music. I rarely
suffer from a creative block though, and the models I work with are
creative people themselves. If I need a creative nudge, they are usually
able to provide me with that.

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

USA |www.ibarraphoto.com

Jaime Ibarra

My super power

interview

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

P.S.

project
project submission

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

The mission of BLUR magazine is to provide a venue for unique and extraordinary photographs without
insisting on the use of specific techniques, tools, or themes. Do you have a photo project the world needs
to see? You can submit your whole seriesits simple:
1. Tell us about your project: where it was taken, what inspired you, what was the idea behind the project, and how many photos are in the series.
2. Send us a URL where the project can be seen.
3. If your project is selected, you will be contacted and asked to provide more information about the
project and yourself (brief bio).
http://www.blur-magazine.com/submission/project-submission/

P.S.
project submission

What kind of projects are we looking for?


A photo project can be submitted by any photographer
who develops a good idea and then makes it a reality, Were
looking for photographersprofessional or amateurwho
can plan and execute.
Although we always publish each photo on a separate
page for the best viewing, its expected that all photos in
a series will work as a cohesive whole. We also expect the

photographer to communicate something in his or her work


thats not found in their biography.
There are no limits when it comes to theme or subject matter.
While technical ability is important, what we value most is
a well-thought-out project that clearly communicates the
photographers vision.

Robert Gojevi, editor in chief


robert.gojevic@blur-magazine.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

project | Robert Gojevi

Mamika

Sacha Goldberger

France |http://www.sachabada.com
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

PROJECT STATEMENT
Mamika is the continuation of the love
story Sacha always had with his 91-yearold Hungarian grandmother, Frederika
(Mamika means my little grandmother
in Hungarian). Frederika was born in
Budapest 20 years before World War II.
During the war, she risked her own life to
courageously save the lives of 11 people. A
survivor of Nazi and Communist regimes,
she illegally immigrated to France, leaving
behind all of her belongings.
Five years ago, with the aim of cheering
up his grandmother, Sacha suggested
they shoot a series of unique photographs.
Since 2010, he has been shooting his
Mamika in unusual superhero costumes,
poses, and locations. In the series Mamika,
Sacha photographs his grandmother as
a powerful woman with an incredibly
wry sense of humor. Once they started
shooting, Mamika couldnt remove the
smile from her face.
The Mamika project was a huge success
and is now available as a book. Sacha
and Frederika continued developing the
project by introducing two new characters:
Papika, Dark Papouka, and Dark Mamika.
Sacha will be presenting Mamika in an
exhibition at the Bailly Contemporain
gallery in Paris beginning on September
16 as well as in his new book, which will be
available at the end of this year.

BIOGRAPHY
Sacha Goldberger is a professional photographer from France. After earning a degree in advertising, Sacha started working as an artistic director
for 10 years. He left advertising to become a photographer five years ago. His best-known series of work is Mamika, although Goldberger did many
freelance campaigns as a photographer for Hotmail, Orange, Bnp, Societe Generale, Harley Davidson, and K2r, to name a few. He also has experience
as a fashion photographer, which he gained through his work with Elle, Wad, Dealer Deluxe, and So Chic. Some of his fashion series, such as Age
Perfect and Playmobil, can be found on his official Web site.

Mamika

Sacha Goldberger

France |http://www.sachabada.com

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Wet Plate is an antique photographic technique discovered in the mid 19th century. Also, it
was the primary method of photographing until the 1880s.
Wet Plate is a process of pouring Collodion onto a plate of thin iron or glass, then placing
the plate into a camera and exposing it to the light and, at the end, developing that plate
while it is still wet. Although quite demanding and lengthy process, Wet Plate technique creates images of mystical atmosphere and of high aesthetic level.
Today, this technique is used by many photographers, and some of the best artists will be
presented to you within the following issues of BLUR magazine under section Wet Plate.
More about Wet Plate technology

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

interview Robert Gojevi

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Children are your most common models and not only in the wet
plate technique. If we take into account the complexity of the wet
plate process of photography and the duration of exposure, how
do you manage to calm the children and have them patiently pose?
Making ambrotypes of children is probably not the easiest route, I
agree. But whether I am using an old wooden camera or a digital one,
for me one of the most important things is to build trust with the
sitter. Most of my collodion work is done with my own children; they
are used to being in front the camera and, more importantly, we have
a strong connection. On the other hand, I have been photographing
children for some time now, and their behavior in front of these old
wooden cameras is totally different from that of a digital one. Making
ambrotypes is almost like a ceremony; children usually remain posed
and calm, almost solemn. The set-up, the framing, the focusit is all
part of a magical process that captures childrens imagination. They
seem to grasp the unique nature of collodion, and that gives a sense of
occasion to the whole process.

interview

Nevertheless, you have to be patient; the collodion process itself


requires endless patience. But at the end of the day, their short
attention span is what is inspiring ... they will not hold a fake smile ...
and that is exactly what I expect from them. I agree with Sally Mann
when she says, You dont take a picture; it is given to you ... and
children have a lot to give.

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Does it happen sometimes that these small models become restless


so that the photography fails?

interview

Absolutely! My little models are as young as four years old, full of


energy, and lets say it, with better things to do than standing in front of
a big old camera. So I have my share of failed plates.

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

What is it that you like most about the wet plate technique? Is it the
charm in the process or only in the result?

interview

The wet plate collodion process is fascinating on so many levels.


From preparing the chemistry, cutting the glass, flooding the plate,
developing and fixing, to holding in my hands a beautiful glass
photograph. As I mentioned earlier, I love the ceremonial aspect of it
as much as the craft involved. I love the fact that each plate is unique.
I love the imperfections that belong to the plates, the drips, the
comets, the pinholes. I love the serendipity that comes with it. I love
the juxtaposition between past and present, the ethereal and timeless
quality of collodion images.

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

How did your adventure with this technique begin, and where did
you learn it?

interview

I first saw a collodion image watching a documentary about Sally Mann


and was instantly fascinated by it all. I knew then that I had to make
plates, so I did some research on the Internet and read everything I
found. But this is a rather crafty technique, so I attended a workshop
last April in Paris with Quinn Jacobson, a master in the technique and a
very talented artist. That is how I started my long (and steep) learning
curve in this collodion adventure.

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Each wet plate photograph has its own imperfections that give
special charm to this technique. Can you conclude by looking at
a photo which photographer is better and which is worse in this
technique?

interview

For me, the imperfections are inherent to the process, and I do


not strive to achieve the perfect plate. I am more interested in the
emotional and aesthetic content of an image rather than technical
refinement. The debate around artistic versus technical achievements
fills forum threads in the collodion world, and it will probably remain
unsettled. You could certainly tell from an ambrotype that is technically
better, but technical merit is not on par with artistic value.

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

In what light conditions do you prefer photographing, natural or


artificial?

interview

Natural light is definitely my favorite light, whenever possible. I have


taken my studio camera outside, across a field opposite my house, and
that was a big adventure to carry the heavy and bulky equipment. As
I have no portable darkroom, I had to run with the wet plate back and
forth. So, for the moment, I prefer to work in my studio. I use cool lights,
which allow me to make exposures of around four or five seconds. If
I had to work with only natural light from a window, exposure times
would be too long, particularly when working with children.

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

How affordable is this technique in terms of finances, buying


materials, and all the conditions you need to meet to work in this
technique?

interview

To acquire all the equipment, chemistry, and paraphernalia associated


with the process, some financial (and time) investment is necessary. You
can spend as little or as much as you want, but it does not have to be
more expensive than working with digital technology if you consider
the price of digital cameras, lenses, computers, and software. Sourcing
materials and chemistry can be testing too, in Europe at least. But
collodion requires patience and determination.

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Do you photograph only for yourself or do you also do some


commercial work? If someone wanted a portrait in the wet plate
technique, what price could they expect approximately?

interview

I photograph mostly for my self, and I have only recently started to take
commissions to do collodion portraits. It is difficult to put a price on
such unique pieces. Prices can vary greatly according to practitioners,
but I would say that charging between 100 and 200 for an 8x10
portrait would not seem unreasonable, considering the time and skill
the process requires.

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

interview

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

interview

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

interview

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

interview

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

interview

Magical process that


captures imagination
Jacqueline Roberts

Germany | http://www.jacquelineroberts.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

g
The Analo WabiSabi

by Denis Plei
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

For this installment of our journey through Japanese photography,


I decided to go somewhat lighter than usual. Its still summer
(at least where I live), and the temperatures simply do not lend
themselves to a heavy art critic approach. Besides, I think Im
beginning to take myself too seriously: I think its time to bring
some fun back into my photography musings.
So the season is right for something slightly amusing, slightly
nostalgic, but also very definitely Japanese: I am pleased to present
Toyokazu Nagano, a photographer from Kanazawa in Ishikawa
prefecture, Japan. Toyokazu is also a father of two charming little
girls, Miu and Kanna, who feature prominently in his photography,
along with the rest of his family and, sometimes, his friends.
Heres what Toyokazu says about himself:

Photogenic Heavy Smoker

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

How old are you?


Im 36 years old.
Are you a professional photographer?
No. I am merely a photography lover.
How long have you been photographing?
I got seriously involved in taking photos with a single lens reflex
camera after my second daughter was born. That means Ive been
doing this for something like three years.
And I began shooting with PENTAX 67 about a year and a half ago.
Is there any special reason why you use film and a medium format
camera?
I wanted to appreciate the process of taking photographs, since it is
so valuable for me, and therefore I began using a film camera.
How long have you been doing these funny conceptual photos,
as seen on your Flickr pages?
Well, about the same time I joined Flickr thats about a year and a
half ago.
What else can you say about your photography? What is
important in photography for you?
When I started, I was taking photos with a camera in order to keep
family memories, but I now take photos to create family memories.
Therefore, I do not take photos of my familys facial expressions
during everyday moments, or of their natural movements. I take
photos by creating fictional scenes after setting up a certain theme
in advance and then thinking about what kind of pose would be
interesting.
I want to take family photos which are different from the usual,
normal, and sometimes boring, family photos. At the same time, I
would like not only my family, but also people all over the world to
enjoy my family photos.
What do you think about BLUR magazine?
I think it is very good. Connecting people around the world through
this magazine is indeed wonderful. I expect the popularity of your
magazine to grow.

Toyokazu Nagano
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Toyokazu Nagano

Toyokazus photos are light, funny, and charming. At first, they seem like simple snaps of people and kids goofing around, nothing more. But they are often deeper than what is first visible: most of his
photos are tongue-in-cheek, but also ambiguous and often ironic.
Although Toyokazu says that his photos are just simple records of the fun of childhood with a little creative twist, I believe his photos are more than that. Perhaps unintentionally, Toyokazu has created
some extraordinary work: definitely funny at first sight, but also quirky, and sometimes even a little unnerving. Conceptual? Perhaps, but never conceited or pretentious, always light-hearted and with a
tinge of irony.
Although Im a proponent of the notion that photos should stand on their own without any captions, explanations, or wider context, Toyokazus captions usually add another, hilarious, dimension to
the photos. He has a whole series of Photogenic photos, which are posed and quite intentionally off-kilter. Photogenic Heavy Smoker, which is included in his set here, is a typical example. Some
other photos are a bit strange until we read the captions: Respect to Stevie Wonder or Psycho are examples. On the other hand, the caption Heavy Drinker adds quite another dimension, ripe with
double meanings, to an already hilarious photo.
So, without further ado, and without further and deeper (and probably unnecessary) reading into his photos, I present you a selection from the work of Toyokazu Nagano: a father and a photographer
with a peculiar sense of humor.
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

The Samurai Spirit

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Going My Way

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Japanese Igloo

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Tandem

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Abbey Road

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Respect to
Stevie Wonder

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Humming a tune
in the bathtub

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Shedding

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Peaceful days #3

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Photogenic
charming figure

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Heavy Drinker

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

After the festival ~


episode-2

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

Delicious

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toyokazu | Japan

Toyokazu
Nagano

ARTET
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portfolio | Robert Gojevi


portfolio

T
T

An oneiric vision
Lionel
Orriols
An oneiric
vision

Lionel Orriols
France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

SHORT BIOGRAPHY

portfolio

Born in 1972 in Gap (France). Currently lives


in South France.

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

portfolio

Ive been looking ways to express my


sensibility and my vision of the world thats
surround us for a long time. And then I
discovered the photography in 1999. Im a
self-taugh person. My focus goes onto nature,
ephemeral moments and the footprints of the
human being on our nature. Long exposures
associated with Black and White allow me to
create timeless images, between reality and
imagination. An oneiric vision, sometimes
dark, Its a wide mix of personal feelings that I
try to reveal by writing with the light.

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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portfolio

An oneiric vision
Lionel Orriols

France | http://www.elements-terre.fr/
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Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
Jennifer Rumbach
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

First, Dan, tell us something about


yourself, where you live, and what
kinds of things you do when youre
not working on photography
My name is Dan Isaac Wallin. I was born
in 1977. I live in a small fishing town
named Grebbestad on the west coast
of Sweden. This is where I spent all my
summers as a child. My father grew up
here, and I moved here a year ago to
get away from the stress of the modern
world. Here, I can focus on my art in
a different way. I still have my studio
in Gothenburg, which is the second
largest city in Sweden and only an hour
and a half away.
Walking along the water here makes
me feel alive; feeling the breeze, the
fresh air, and the smell of the ocean. Its
quiet, and calming. Nothing actually
happens here in this small town.
Apart from taking pictures, Ive also
been studying fine carpentry here for
the past year, and I just love it. Its great
to work with my hands. Right now the
plan is to make a working desk for
myself with elm. And, of course, my first
wooden camera is already built.

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Are you a full-time photographer?


I was a full-time photographer while I
was running a small analog shop and
gallery from 2003 until 2008. During
that time, I held a lot of workshops in
alternative photography processes.
I used to work a lot with Van Dyke
brown, salt prints, and gum dichromate
prints. I loved that it could take up to
a week to make a gum print. Im very
lucky to know some old photographers
in Sweden that are world famous in
these processes, and they have been
my teachers.
Since last year, Ive done some freelance
work, but mainly try to focus on my
art photography, exhibitions, and my
carpentry. Im also working on my
Polaroid book right now, which will be
released sometime in 2012.

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

What does photography mean to


you?
Why do I do photography? Sometimes
I know and sometimes I dont. I love the
work process, mostly working slowly
with 4x5 cameras, but of course, other
ones also. Sometimes the 4x5s are just
too heavy to carry.
Im trying to freeze a world that I feel I
belong in myself, a dreamy melancholic
feeling, where my mind often ends up.
I return a lot to my roots, and many of
my pictures are from journeys I took as
a child; from the blue of Sweden, to the
black and white desert landscapes of
Israel.
My pictures are, for me, a reflection
on the human need for silence and
reflection. Far away are the quick
impressions and the daily stress of
everyday life, leaving only our original
values, roots, and tranquility. What is
more elementary then the sea, the
mountains, and the earth?

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Philosophy is not static: gravel roads,


bridges, and waves move us forward.
There are clear contrasts between
regions, but, for me, there is a strong
bond and similarity between them.
Like watercolors, the colors, landscapes,
and images flow together. The wide
open space flows into nothing or
everything depending on how you
interpret them. Landscapes echo of
emptiness, but beneath the surface
you always feel or sense the human
presence. Thats what Im looking for
with my photography, the traces of
myself in my childhood places. The
presence of the person I was.

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Why do you like instant materials so


much?
The last 4 years Ive used only Polaroid
film, and mostly very old, expired
Polaroid film. Ive spent a lot of money
during these years to stock up on the
film, but now, Im safe for many years,
and that feels great. I love all the
different ways I can work with the film.
Theres no stop in the process and I
gently treat and mistreat the Polaroid
film while its developing until I get the
soft other world look that Im looking
for. And the colors are just outstanding
on the old Polaroid film. It feels more
like a painting than a photograph
sometimes.

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

How long have you been using


instant materials?
I used Polaroid film a lot in school
around 2001, but no more than anyone
else did, mostly just to check the light.
In 2003, I bought my first SX-70 camera
and got hooked. And a few years later,
I started using pack film and 4x5 film,
mostly the 55 because I worked very
much in the darkroom during those
days.

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Which film do you like the most and


why?
Wow, thats a hard question, and I dont
have a favorite. There are so many
different ones that I like: 669, 689, 665,
sepia, chocolate, 55, 59, 79, 809, and, of
course, SX-70, the original. On different
days I use different films, and it also
depends on which project Im working.

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

You mainly photograph landscapes


and people. What is so fascinating
for you about landscapes? What
about people? Is there a connection
between the two?
Everything is so unpredictable in the
landscape. If you stay in the same place
for a long time and really focus, you can
see it. I love that feeling. And no day
is like another. For me, its almost like
meditation to be out in nature, and to
photograph it and translate it into my
way of seeing it.
People are interesting. Every person has
a story to tell and, thats so wonderful.
Some people are harder then others to
get close to. Thats why I mostly take
portraits with 4x5 camerasbecause it
relaxes the person and you slowly get
closer to them.
I want to get inside the person and
make all their inner thoughts come
out.
Of course, there is a connection
between landscapes and people.
Everything is the same, and everything
goes together, and no place or person
is like another one.

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

What do you think about the


Impossible Project?
I think the team is doing amazing work.
I love when people have such a passion
for something and put their whole
heart into it. Im really looking forward
to what they will bring us in the future.
And I would love to test shoot their
8x10 film soonIm very curious.

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

What do you think the future


will bring us in regard to instant
materials?
I have no idea what the future will
bring. I hope that 4x5 film will be back
in business some day, even if I know the
machines are gone. There will always
be some fanatics like me. And Im not
worried at all if there will be Polaroid
film or not in the future; if there isnt
any Polaroid, there will be something
else.

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Trying to freeze a world


that I feel I belong in myself
Dan Isaac Wallin
Sweden
http://www.danisaacwallin.com/

stant
IN stantion
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

PLAYSTICK
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick | Jennifer Henriksen

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

How long have you been involved in


photography, and how long with toy
cameras?

My first darkroom class was in 1988 (at


age 15), though Id been shooting for
several years before that. I got serious
about toy cameras in 1999 when I
bought my first Holga. Within a year or
two, it became my primary camera.

playstick

What is your current favorite toy


camera and why?
Right now Im into two: my macro-ized
Holga, which allows me to get up close
and personal with small things, and a
vintage Diana clone the Raleigh. Its
lens angle is not as wide as the Holga
and offers a really nice perspective; more
intimate and reminiscent of vintage
snapshots.

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

What are the biggest challenges you


have encountered while shooting with
toy cameras?
Scratched film, loose rolls, and parallax
issues.

playstick

Please tell me a bit about your


Nature/Nurture portfolio and why
you chose to use a toy camera for this
project.
Nature/Nurture is really about me
blissing out on natural wonders bugs,
plants, minutia, both living and not. Its
about looking, finding, collecting and
cataloguing. For this series, Im using
my modified Holga. The close-up lens
and limited depth of field force a real
intimacy both in the act of capturing
(Im shooting blind at a distance of 1
3/8 away from the subject) and in the
resulting images.

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

What inspires you to pick up your


camera?
In a broad sense, the simple joy of
seeing and the urge to explore and
communicate those experiences.

playstick

What is the biggest creative obstacle


you have faced?
Time. Trying to balance family, work, and
art is a real issue for me lately. I shoot
pretty prolifically, but Im not getting
to see things to fruition as quickly as I
might like. There is much film waiting to
be contacted, many prints begging to be
proofed, etc.

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

One creative person you admire:


Keith Carter. I love his use of metaphor
and narrative, and his gorgeously toned
prints.

playstick

What subjects really speak to you?


These days Im dividing my
photographic time between these
nature studies and kids an ongoing
(though still rather loose and undefined)
series focused on my own children and
their friends.

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Do you have any words of advice for


those interested in shooting with
plastic cameras?
Each camera has its own personality and
will require time and practiceto learn its
tics and attributes. Its also a good idea
to process the film as you go, so you can
keep up on (and adjust for) any issues
that crop up, such as new light leaks
or flaky shutter mechanisms. I would
also recommend Michelle Bates book
Plastic Cameras: Toying With Creativity.
Its an excellent comprehensive guide
to the world of lo-fi photography,
filled with practical and well-illustrated
information, plus lots of examples for
inspiration.

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

playstick

Nature/Nurture
Jennifer Shaw

USA | http://www.jennifershaw.net

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

DONT MISS US..

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newsletter and we will keep you informed!

NEWSLETTER
BLUR MAGAZINE 23

11

BLUR
PHOT O
Exhibition of international creative photography,
9/6-6/7/2011, Gallery of Croatian National Post, Zagreb

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

BLUR PHOTO 011


BLUR PHOTO is an annual exhibition of international creative
photography established to celebrate the diversity and
beauty of photography while promoting BLUR magazines
photographers from all over the world. The first edition,
entitled BLUR PHOTO 011, took place from June 9 to July 6,
2011, at the exhibiting gallery of the Croatian National Post
Office in Zagreb, Croatia.
At the first BLUR PHOTO exhibition, 44 photographs by
39 artists from 18 countries were presented. Exhibited
photographs were created using a variety of photographic
techniques, from digital to a number of analogue
photography techniques, including Polaroid, toy camera,
and wet-plate collodion using a wide range of traditional
analogue cameras.
The exhibition was established in line with BLUR magazines
character. Therefore, the official catalogue was available
online through a QR code at the exhibiting gallery. In
the same way, by reading QR codes with their mobile
devices, visitors could easily access the websites of the
photographers on display. Also, to bridge the distance
between artists and the local audience, video interviews with
the photographers were presented at the opening night in
which they introduced themselves and their photographs
to those attending.
The BLUR PHOTO 011 exhibition was made possible by the
generous support of the Croatian National Post and Epson.
Media partners were Fotografija.hr, DigitalFoto, Fotomag,
Fotogard, and Fotozine.

Artists presented at BLUR PHOTO 011:


Pascal Baetens, Belgium
Antonio Barros, France
Evan Brearey, USA
William Castellana, USA
Olivier De Rycke, France
Carmen De Vos, Belgium
Tamara Dean, Australia
Alain Etchepare, France
Sven Fennema, Germany
Denis Greti, Croatia
Oscar Hagbard, Sweden
Jennifer Henriksen, Canada
Mike Hoban, USA
Joji Iwasaki, Japan
Max Katsen, Israel
Uldis Krusts, Latvia
Alexey Kurbatov, Russia
Maciej Leszczyski, Poland
Manuel Jr. Librodo, The Philippines
Phillippe Marchand, France
Akihisa Nakamura, Japan
Karmen Orli, Croatia
Daniele Pezzoli, Italy
Goran Popovi, Croatia
Jessica Reinhardt, USA
Xavier Rey, France
Jennifer Rumbach, Germany
Deyan Stefanov, Bulgaria
Vadim Stein, Russia
Hkan Strand, Sweden
Zora Strangefields, Germany
Martin Stranka, Czech Republic
Ella Sverdlov, Israel
Noelle Swan Gilbert, USA
Tomislav mider, Croatia
Riccardo Testolin, Italy
James Thorne, England
Igor Vasiliadis, Russia
Karel Vojkovsk, Czech Republic

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

11

BLUR
PHOTO

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

11

BLUR
PHOTO

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

11

BLUR
PHOTO

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

11

BLUR
PHOTO

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

AL art limited
BE CREATIVE,
BE IMAGINATIVE
BE YOURSELF!
photography

painting

drawing

3D

design

digital

models

sculpture

www.artlimited.net is an elegant high-featured community for creative artists, art lovers and critics. It features
personal and original creative works that are well recognized and appreciated. If you wish to only comment on the
art and take advantage of the message center and forums to engage in dialog with the artists (art dealer, gallery director, curator, artist agent, publisher, gallery representative, image researcher, collector, press, communication),you
can do so through an "observer" account. If the quality of your work is recognized and original, join us now

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

MAKRO

digitalfoto.mbi.hr

arobni
Na svim
kioscima
od 15.9.

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

BLUR MAGAZINE 23

Lets keep
in touch

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BLUR MAGAZINE 23