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Math Words and Ideas

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How Many? (0, 1, 2)


zero

zero balls

one

0
1

one ball

two

two balls
Note to Teacher: Encourage students to count and compare multiple representations of the
same number: the word (e.g. two), the numeral (e.g. 2) and the quantity (e.g. 2 dots, 2 balls,
2 pencils) to make sure they are the same amount.

four

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

How Many? (3, 4)


three

three balls

four

four balls

Note to Teacher: Encourage students to count and compare multiple representations of the
same number: the word (e.g. four), the numeral (e.g. 4) and the quantity (e.g. 4 dots, 4 balls,
4 pencils) to make sure they are the same amount.

five

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

How Many? (5, 6)


five

five balls

six

six balls
Note to Teacher: Encourage students to count and compare multiple representations of the
same number: the word (e.g. six), the numeral (e.g. 6) and the quantity (e.g. 6 dots, 6 balls,
6 pencils) to make sure they are the same amount.

six

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

How Many? (7)


seven

seven balls
Note to Teacher: Encourage students to count and compare multiple representations of the
same number: the word (e.g. seven), the numeral (e.g. 7) and the quantity (e.g. 7 dots, 7 balls,
7 pencils) to make sure they are the same amount.

seven

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

How Many? (8)


eight

eight balls
Note to Teacher: Encourage students to count and compare multiple representations of the
same number: the word (e.g. eight), the numeral (e.g. 8) and the quantity (e.g. 8 dots, 8 balls,
8 pencils) to make sure they are the same amount.

eight

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

How Many? (9)


nine

nine balls
Note to Teacher: Encourage students to count and compare multiple representations of the
same number: the word (e.g. nine), the numeral (e.g. 9) and the quantity (e.g. 9 dots, 9 balls,
9 pencils) to make sure they are the same amount.

nine

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

How Many? (10)


ten

10

10

ten balls
Note to Teacher: Encourage students to count and compare multiple representations of the
same number: the word (e.g. ten), the numeral (e.g. 10) and the quantity (e.g. 10 dots, 10 balls,
10 pencils) to make sure they are the same amount.

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Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Numbers: 0 to 10
0

zero

one

two

three

four

five

six

seven

eight

nine

10

ten

eleven

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Math Words and Ideas

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Numbers: 11 to 19
11

eleven

12

twelve

13

thirteen

14

fourteen

15

fifteen

16

sixteen

17

seventeen

18

eighteen

19

nineteen

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Math Words and Ideas

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Numbers: 20 to 25
20

twenty

21

twenty-one

22

twenty-two

23

twenty-three

24

twenty-four

25

twenty-five

thirteen

13

Math Words and Ideas

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Numbers: 26 to 30
26

twenty-six

27

twenty-seven

28

twenty-eight

29

twenty-nine

30

thirty

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Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Calendar
A calendar is a tool for keeping track of time and events.
month

days of
the week
Sunday

September 2008
Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

10

14

15

16

21

22

23

28

29

30

First
Day of Fall

Field
Trip to the Park

year

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

11

12

13

17

18

19

20

24

25

26

27

Family
Breakfast

First Day
of School

What will happen on Tuesday, September 16?


What day of the week is the first day of school?
When is the first day of fall?
Note to Teacher: Use this page to help students make sense of the calendar as tool for keeping
track of time and events.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Who is First? Who is Next?


ninth, 9th

tenth, 10th
eighth, 8th
seventh,
7th

first, 1st
sixth,
6th

second,
2nd

fifth, 5th

third, 3rd

fourth, 4th

Note to Teacher: When they line up, ask students to use ordinals to identify their position in line
(e.g. first, second, etc.).

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Math Words and Ideas

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Counting
People count every day. They count to find out how many.
How many balls?

7
10 balls

10

When do you count? What do you like to count?


Note to Teacher: Because counting is the foundation for much of the number work that
Kindergarteners do, encourage them to discuss why they count.

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Math Words and Ideas

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More Counting
How many students are here today?

20 students are here today.

How many students are in your class?

Note to Teacher: Who Is in School Today? Session 1.1. Use this page to show that we use
numbers both to count a set of objects (1, 2, 3, . . . 20) and to describe the quantity of those
objects (the total is 20).

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Math Words and Ideas

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Ways to Count
When you count, you say one number for each object.
You need to keep track of what you are counting.
The last number you say is the total. The total tells you
how many are in the group.
Look at how some children count.
Jack puts each button in a cup
as he counts it.

Three . . .

Abby moves each button as she


counts it.
Four . . .

Kiyo puts the buttons in a row


to count them.

Eight . . .

What do you do when you count?


Note to Teacher: Who Is in School Today? Session 2.5. Use these examples in your first
discussion about strategies for counting the objects in the Counting Jar and whenever you
discuss how students count.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Counting Jar
Step 1. Count how many.
Cubes

Step 2. Make the same amount.

Hugo

Beth

Step 3. Show how many.

Note to Teacher: Who Is in School Today? Session 2.1. Encourage students to use this page
when they are working on the Counting Jar to help them remember the steps of the activity.

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Math Words and Ideas

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More
Who has more?
Emmas card

Jasons card

Jason has more than Emma. 6 is more than 3.

Who has more?


Hugos cube tower

Lisas cube tower

Hugo has more than Lisa. 5 is more than 2.


Who has more? How do you know?
Rebeccas cube train
Russells cube train
Note to Teachers: Counting and Comparing, Sessions 2.4 and 2.5. As you review this page
and the following two pages with students, ask them to find a card or create a cube tower that is
more, fewer, or equal to a given quantity.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Fewer
Who has fewer?
Jaes card

Kaitlyns card

Jae has fewer than Kaitlyn. 4 is less than 8.

Who has fewer?


Tammys cube tower

Mitchells cube tower

Mitchell has fewer than Tammy. 3 is less than 6.


Who has fewer?
Carmens cube train

Kyles cube train

Note to Teachers: Counting and Comparing, Sessions 2.4 and 2.5. As you review this page,
the previous page, and the following page with students, ask them to find a card or create a cube
tower that is more, fewer, or equal to a given quantity.

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Equal
Who has fewer?
Mias card

Victors card

Mia and Victor have the same amount.


5 is the same amount as 5. 5 is equal to 5.
Tammys cube tower

Mitchells cube tower

Sarah and Yoshio have equal amounts.


6 is the same amount as 6. 6 is equal to 6.
Can you show the same amount as Beth?
Beths cube train
Note to Teachers: Counting and Comparing, Sessions 2.4 and 2.5. As you review this page
and the previous two pages with students, ask them to find a card or create a cube tower that is
more, fewer, or equal to a given quantity.

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Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Ordering Fewest to Most


Brad grabbed four handfuls of cubes.

He built towers and counted the cubes.

7
4
5
3
He put the towers in order from fewest to most.
Green is the
smallest tower.
3 is the fewest.

Yellow is the
biggest tower.
7 is the most.

Build a tower that has more than 7 cubes. How many


cubes are in your tower?
Note to Teacher: Counting and Comparing, Sessions 2.10 and 2.11. Use this example to help
students think about ordering quantities from fewest to most.

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Math Words and Ideas

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One More
Here are five stars.

One more is six.

Here are seven crayons.

6
One more is eight.

Here are 4 apples. If you


had 1 more, how many
apples would you have?
Note to Teacher: Measuring and Counting, Session 2.3. As students work on the concepts
of one more and one fewer, find and use other contexts, including the number line, that illustrate
what happens when you add one more or take one away.

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Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

One Fewer
Here are five stars.

One fewer is four.

Here are seven crayons. One fewer is six.

Here are 4 apples. If you


had 1 fewer, how many
apples would you have?
1

Note to Teacher: Measuring and Counting, Session 2.3. As students work on the concepts
of one more and one fewer, find and use other contexts, including the number line, that illustrate
what happens when you add one more or take one away.

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Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Five Tiles
These students are looking at
this arrangement of 5 tiles.
Heres how they know that
there are 5.
1
3
1
2

I counted
5 tiles.

1
1 and 3
and 1 is 5.

5
2

I saw 2,
2, and 1.

First I saw
3, then 4, 5.

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How do you know that there are 5?


Note to Teacher: Measuring and Counting, Sessions 4.1, 4.2, 4.4, 4.7, 4.9 and How Many
Do You Have?, Sessions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6, and 1.7. Use this page to discuss the fact that
there are different ways to arrange a certain quantity of tiles, and to show students that there
are different ways to see and describe the arrangements numerically.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Ways to Make 6
There are different ways to make a number.
Here are some ways to make 6.

Toss the Chips


These students tossed 6 two-color counters.
Some landed on the red side. Some landed on the
yellow side.

3 red and 3 yellow

2 red and 4 yellow

Six Tiles
These students arranged 6 tiles.

3 and 3

1 and 5

2 and 2 and 2

3 and 3

1 and 2 and 3

Can you think of another way to make 6?


Note to Teacher: How Many Do You Have?, Session 4.6. Use these pages to help students
see that there are certain combinations that make a number, no matter which material they are
using or what game they are playing. Encourage students to find combinations that appear more
than once.

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Math Words and Ideas

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More Ways to Make Six


Here are some more ways to make 6.

Total of Six
These students made 6 by using two number cards.

5 1

2 4

Six Crayons in All


These students made 6 with red and blue crayons.

1 blue and 5 red

2 blue and 4 red

Can you think of another way to make 6?


Note to Teacher: How Many Do You Have?, Session 4.6. Use these pages to help students
see that there are certain combinations that make a number, no matter which material they are
using or what game they are playing. Encourage students to find combinations that appear more
than once.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Solving Story Problems


1. Listen to the story.

2. Tell the story in your own words.

3. Solve the problem. You can:


Act it out

Draw pictures

Use cubes

4. Show your solution.

Note to Teacher: How Many Do You Have?, Session 2.5. Encourage students to use this
page in order to remember the steps for solving story problems.

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Math Words and Ideas

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A Library Story Problem


Here is a story about children at a library.
Three children were reading books at the library.

Then two more children came to the library to read.


What happened in this story?

Was this story about putting groups together or about


taking away part of a group?
Note to Teacher: How Many Do You Have?, Sessions 3.3 and 3.5. After reviewing this
page and the following three pages, ask students to visualize, act out, and solve these story
problems, as well as the others you create.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Solving a Library Story Problem


Heres the story.
There were 3 children reading books at the library.
Then 2 more children came to the library to read.
How many children in all were reading at the library?
Here are some ways students solved this problem.
These students acted
out the story.
1, 2, 3;
4, 5

Mia used cubes.


1

Jack drew a picture.

I drew the kids.


3 and 2 is 5.

I took 3 cubes. Then


I took 2 more cubes.
Then I counted them.

How would you solve the problem?


Note to Teacher: How Many Do You Have?, Sessions 3.3 and 3.5. After reviewing this page,
the previous page, and the following two pages, ask students to visualize, act out, and solve these
story problems, as well as others you create.

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Math Words and Ideas

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A Story Problem
About Books
Here is a story about books.
Corey was looking for books in the library.
She saw 5 books on the table.

Corey took 2 of the books from the table to read.


What happened in this story?

Was this story about putting groups together or about


taking away part of a group?
Note to Teacher: How Many Do You Have?, Sessions 3.3 and 3.5. After reviewing this
page, the previous two pages, and the following page, ask students to visualize, act out,
and solve these story problems, as well as others you create.

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Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Solving a Story Problem


About Books
Corey was looking for books in the library.
She saw 5 books on the table.
Corey took 2 of the books from the table to read.
How many books were left on the table?
These students acted
out the story.
1, 2, 3

I put 5 cubes
together.

Manuel
used cubes.
1

Then I took off


2 cubes and counted
the cubes left.

Cindy drew a picture.


I drew 5 books. Then
I crossed out 2 books
and counted how many
books were left.

How would you solve the problem?


Note to Teacher: How Many Do You Have?, Sessions 3.3 and 3.5. After reviewing this page
and the previous three pages, ask students to visualize, act out, and solve these story problems,
as well as the others you create.

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Math Words and Ideas

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How Many of Each?


Here is a story problem.
I have 6 crayons.
Some are red. Some are blue.
How many of each could I have?
How many red? How many blue?
There are many solutions.
Here are some solutions.

4 red and 2 blue

5 red and 1 blue

1 red and 5 blue


Can you find other combinations of blue and
red crayons?
Note to Teacher: How Many Do You Have? Session 4.4. Use this page to help students
make sense of a new type of problem, called How Many of Each?, that they will solve in this
Investigation and throughout first grade.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Measurement
You can measure to find out . . .
How big is
my shoe?

Who is
taller?

How long is
the table?

What else can you measure?


Note to Teacher: Measuring and Counting, Investigation 1. Use this page to facilitate a
discussion about the many purposes of measurement.

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Shorter or Longer
These students used a tower of 10 cubes to measure
some objects in their classroom.
Some objects were shorter than the 10 cubes.
Some objects were longer than the 10 cubes.

Shorter

Longer
This crayon
is shorter.

My hand
is shorter.

This book
is longer.

My arm
is longer.

What can you find that is shorter than 10 cubes?


What can you find that is longer than 10 cubes?
Note to Teacher: Counting and Comparing, Session 2.1. Students can consider these
visual representations of the concepts of shorter and longer either before or after they
have looked for objects that are shorter or longer than ten cubes.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Measuring with Cubes


These students used cubes to measure the length of
some objects in their classroom.
This book is
13 cubes long.

This comb is
7 cubes long.

How long is the shoe?

Note to Teacher: Measuring and Counting, Session 1.2. Students can consider these
examples of using cubes to measure objects. Ask them to compare the lengths. Which object
is the longest? Which is the shortest?

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Patterns All Around Us


Look at these patterns.

What do you notice about these patterns? Do you see


any patterns around you?
Note to Teacher: What Comes Next? Session 1.1. This page includes a variety of patterns.
Ask students to describe the images and to explain why they think each is or is not a pattern.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Cube Train Patterns


Look at these cube patterns.

What comes next?

What comes next?

What comes next?

What comes next?

Make your own cube train pattern.


What color cube comes next?
Note to Teacher: What Comes Next? Sessions 2.1 and 2.2. After students have had
some opportunities to create their own patterns, you can use these examples of AB, ABC,
and AAB patterns to give students practice describing patterns and determining what
comes next in the sequence.

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Making Patterns
These students used many different objects to make
patterns. They describe their patterns in different
ways. How do they describe their patterns?

Cube Train Patterns


This is red, yellow,
red, yellow, over and
over and over.

Pattern Block Patterns

I put down a triangle


and a trapezoid and then
did it again and again.

Two-Color Counter Patterns

Yellow comes after red and


red comes after yellow.
How are these patterns alike?
Note to Teacher: What Comes Next? Sessions 2.1 and 2.2. Once students have had the
opportunity to construct their own patterns using a variety of materials, you can read them
the students descriptions of these patterns, ask them to determine what comes next, and
ask them to compare the patterns.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Making More Patterns


These students used different objects to make patterns.

Square Tile Patterns

What comes next?

One-Two Patterns

What comes next?

Arrow Patterns

What comes next?

What patterns can you make with other things?


Note to Teacher: What Comes Next? Session 2.9. Once students have had an opportunity to
make patterns using a variety of materials, they can describe patterns, determine what comes
next, and compare patterns.

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Break the Train


The unit is the part of a pattern that repeats.

The unit is red, blue.

The unit is brown, orange, yellow.

What is the unit for this cube train pattern?

Note to Teacher: What Comes Next? Sessions 3.1 and 3.2. Use this page to help students
understand how to identify the unit of a pattern.

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Todays Question
Here are some data from a Kindergarten class.
Todays Question
Would you rather play inside or outside?
Inside

Outside

What do the data tell you about this class?


Note to Teacher: After students have had a number of opportunities to do Todays Question,
they can examine a set of data about another group of people. Then, ask, What do you think
wed find out if we answered this question? Collect and discuss the data.

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Marys Survey
Do you like to
play soccer?

Mary likes to play soccer.

She decided to survey her class to


find out who else likes soccer.
Mary recorded their responses on
this chart.
Do you like to play soccer?
YES

NO

Mary found out that more students like to play soccer.

How many of Marys classmates like to play soccer?


How many do not like to play soccer?
Note to Teacher: Sorting and Surveys, Sessions 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3. Use this and the following
page to review the data collection process: choosing a topic, asking a survey question, collecting
and recording responses, and describing the resulting data. Encourage students to compare the
different ways to record data.

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Math Words and Ideas

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Jacks Survey

Do you like
spaghetti?

Jack likes spaghetti.

He asked his classmates if they


like spaghetti.
Jack recorded their responses
on a class list chart.
Do you like spaghetti?
Y

Abby
Beth
Brad
Carmen
Corey
Cindy
Dennis
Emma
Hugo

Y
N
Y
N
N
N
N
Y

Jack
Jason
Jennifer
Kaitlyn
Kyle
Manuel
Mary
Russell
Timothy

N
Y
N
N
Y
Y
Sometimes
N
N

Yes: 7
No: 10
Sometimes: 1

What did Jack find out from his survey?


Note to Teacher: Sorting and Surveys, Sessions 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3. Use this and the previous
page to review the data collection process: choosing a topic, asking a survey question, collecting
and recording responses, and describing the resulting data. Encourage students to compare the
different ways to record data.

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Describing Attribute Blocks


These students are describing attribute blocks.
Its big.
This block
is blue.
Its thin.
Its a square.
This block is red.

Its small.
Its a circle.

Its thick.
How would you describe
this attribute block?
Note to Teacher: Who Is In School Today?, Session 2.2.
After reviewing this page, ask students to carefully examine
and describe other attribute blocks that you hold up.

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Same and Different


Cindy and Hugo compared their bicycles.

Cindys Bike

Hugos Bike

How are the bicycles the same?

My bike has two


wheels and your bike
has two wheels.

Both of our
bikes have long
seats.

How are the bicycles different?


I have a basket
on my bicycle. Yours
doesnt have one.
Our bikes are different
colors. Mine is silver
and yours is green.
Look at these two buttons.
How are they the same?
How are they different?
Note to Teacher: Sorting and Surveys, Session 2.4. Ask students to compare other pairs of
objects, and to describe what is the same and different about them.

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Sorting Buttons
Timothy sorted these buttons in different ways.

Round

Not Round

Blue

Not Blue

4 holes

2 holes

Can you find a button that is round, is blue, and has


4 holes?
Note to Teacher: Sorting and Surveys, Session 2.3. Ask students if they can think of
another way to sort these eight buttons. They can also do some sorting of buttons themselves.
Ask student if they can make up a Can You Find questions for a button in their collection.

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Shapes in the World

What shapes do you see in this picture?

Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Sessions 1.1 and 3.1. This is an opportunity
for students to recognize shapes in their environment and for them to look, as a class, for
shapes in an outdoor scene.

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Where Is It?

The clock is over the chalkboard.


The trash can is under the table.
The flag is between the chalkboard and the door.
The rocking chair is next to the library books.

Where are these items?

Note to Teacher: Use this page to provide students with practice in describing spatial
relationships (e.g. near, far, above, below, etc.)

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2-D Shapes
2-D, or two-dimensional, shapes are flat. They can
be drawn on a sheet of paper or other flat surface.
Here are some 2-D shapes.

Circle

Oval

Triangle

Square

Rectangle

Rhombus

Look around you. What 2-D shapes do you see?


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Investigation 1. Encourage students to
discuss why they think a shape does or does not belong in a particular category.

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Describing Triangles
These students are describing the triangles they made.

This triangle
has 3 corners.

Mine has
3 sides.

I used the triangle


to make the roof
of a house.

What do you notice about these triangles?


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Investigation 1. Ask students to consider
these descriptions of 2-D shapes. Encourage them to describe these and other 2-D shapes,
and to notice attributes, such as the number of corners (or vertices), the number of sides, and
whether the sides are straight or curved.

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Describing Squares
These students are describing the squares they made.

I made a square.
It has four sides.

This square
has 4 corners.
1, 2, 3, 4.

My shape
looks like a slice
of bread.

What do you notice about these squares?


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Investigation 1. Ask students to consider
these descriptions of 2-D shapes. Encourage them to describe these and other 2-D shapes,
and to notice attributes, such as the number of corners (or vertices), the number of sides, and
whether the sides are straight or curved.

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Describing Circles
These students are describing the circles they made.
I made a circle.
It doesnt have any
corners. It is curved,
not straight.

This circle
is round.

This looks
like a wheel on
my bike.

What do you notice about these circles?


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Investigation 1. Ask students to consider
these descriptions of 2-D shapes. Encourage them to describe these and other 2-D shapes,
and to notice attributes, such as the number of corners (or vertices), the number of sides, and
whether the sides are straight or curved.

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Describing Rectangles
These students are describing the rectangles they made.
This rectangle
has 4 corners.
1, 2, 3, 4.

This rectangle has


four sides but theyre
not all the same.
My shape looks
like a door.

What do you notice about these rectangles


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Investigation 1. Ask students to consider
these descriptions of 2-D shapes. Encourage them to describe these and other 2-D shapes,
and to notice attributes, such as the number of corners (or vertices), the number of sides, and
whether the sides are straight or curved.

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Pattern Block Shape Names


triangle

trapezoid

square

rhombuses

hexagon

What shapes do you see in these pattern


block pictures?
Ricardos picture

Sarahs picture

Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Sessions 1.6 and 2.2. To help students
become familiar with the shapes and names of shapes in the pattern block sets, ask questions
about these pictures, such as, How many red trapezoids do you see? and How many shapes
with 4 sides do you see?

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Pattern Block Puzzles


Shapes can be filled with other shapes.
Small shapes can fit into larger shapes.
These students used pattern blocks to
make this flower.

I used
seven
shapes.
My flower
is all red.

I used
triangles,
trapezoids,
and blue
rhombuses.

What is a different way to fill this puzzle?


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Session 2.2. Ask students to compare the
different ways to fill the flower. Which way used the most blocks? Which way used the fewest
blocks? If students want to find other ways to fill the flower puzzle, provide them with an outline.

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Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

3-D Shapes
3-D, or three-dimensional, shapes are solid objects. If they
are small, you can pick them up and hold them. Here are
some 3-D shapes.

Cubes

Cylinders

Rectangular Prisms

Cones

Pyramids

Spheres

Triangular Prisms

Look around you. What 3-D shapes do you see?


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Investigation 3. Encourage students to
discuss why they think a shape does or does not belong in a particular category.

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59

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Describing Cubes
These students are describing cubes.

This block
looks like a blank
number cube.

This cube also has


square faces, but the
squares are bigger.

It has 6 square faces.


I counted them: front,
back, side, side, top,
bottom. Thats 6.

It has
squares on
the sides.

I can build a
tower with
these cubes.

How would you describe these cubes?


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Session 3.2. Ask students to consider these
descriptions of 3-D shapes. Encourage them to describe these and other 3-D shapes, and to
notice attributes, such as the number of faces, and the shape of faces.

60 sixty

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Describing Triangular Prisms


These students are describing triangular prisms.

It has flat
sides and pointy
corners.
This block looks
like a ramp.

There are 5 faces. I


counted them: 2 triangles
on the front and back, a
long rectangle on top, and
2 rectangles underneath.

This block looks


like a seesaw.

How would you describe these triangular prisms?


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Session 3.2. Ask students to consider these
descriptions of 3-D shapes. Encourage them to describe these and other 3-D shapes, and to
notice attributes, such as the number of faces, and the shape of faces.

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61

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Describing Cylinders
These students are describing cylinders.
It will roll
across the
table.

This looks
like a
rolling pin.

It has
circles on
the ends.

This block
will roll too.

It looks like
a can.

It has big
circles on the top
and bottom.

How would you describe these cylinders?


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Session 3.2. Ask students to consider these
descriptions of 3-D shapes. Encourage them to describe these and other 3-D shapes, and to
notice attributes, such as the number of faces, and the shape of faces.

62 sixty-two

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Describing Cones
These students are describing cones.
This cone
looks like an ice
cream cone.

It looks like one


of those orange
things they use
for construction.
It has a circle
on the bottom and a
point at the top.

This cone
looks like a
noisemaker.

It has a
small circle at
the bottom
and a long,
skinny point.

How would you describe these cones?


Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Session 3.2. Ask students to consider these
descriptions of 3-D shapes. Encourage them to describe these and other 3-D shapes, and to
notice attributes, such as the number of faces, and the shape of faces.

sixty-three

63

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Matching Geoblock Faces


The shapes on the sides of a block are called faces.
These students are looking for faces that are the same.
This side
is a square.

I have one
with a square
face, too.

Our blocks
match.

This block has


a rectangle face
the same size.
My block has
the same
rectangle.
Can you find a Geoblock with
a face that matches this shape?
Note to Teacher: Make A Shape, Build a Block, Sessions 3.2
and 3.5. Encourage students to see if they can find other blocks
with faces that match the ones held by the students on this page.

64 sixty-four

Math Words and Ideas

Read Together

Build a Block
Shapes can be made from other shapes.
Small shapes can fit together to make
larger shapes.
These students used smaller Geoblocks
to build this one.

I used two cubes.


This ramp is covered with an
upside-down ramp.

My blocks look
like a sandwich.

How else can you build this block using the Geoblocks?
Note to Teacher: Make a Shape, Build a Block, Session 3.6. Before or after they do the
Build a Block activity, students can look at these examples of ways to make a Geoblock and
he students descriptions of them. Encourage them to find ways to build this block with
different numbers of blocks.

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65