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21

,
2013
2008 Tarkio February
&February
Fairfax
12,FFA,
2015 FCCLA & FBLA Recognition - Page 16
Page
Page1616 FBLA, FCCLA & FFA

FBLA, FCCLA & FFA

FFAAccepts
Accepts
FFA
The
FFA Accepts The
ChallengesThe
of Tomorrow
Challenges of Tomorrow
Challenges
Of Tomorrow

Do’s and Don’ts for Proper Fertility

Set Yield Goals

• Yield goals should be set for each field
• Set “realistic and challenging” yield goals
Know the Plant Nutrients
• Start with analysis of past yields
• Evaluate management decisions and inputs that can be improved or changed
• Primary nutrients: Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (used in the largest quan• Start a 3-5 year yield improvement program with a goal to improve yields 10-20
tities by plants)
percent per year
• Other nutrients: Zinc and sulfur, calcium sometimes being important as a nutrition
problem
Consult Local Fertility Experts

Review Crop Production Records
• Review last year’s yield data and crop notes
• Review past deficiency symptoms and other growth problems
• Define all yield limiting factors from last year’s crop
• Correct soil pH as needed
• Consider insect, weed, and soil compaction potentials

Finalize Nutrient Management Plans
• After considering all factors, the nutrient management plan should include the
quantity, placement and timing of nutrient applications
• It is a Best Management Practice to ensure adequate but not excessive nutrients
are available to the growing crop
• Develop a plan to achieve production and environmental goals

Many factors influence crop response to fertilizers. Our certified crop advisors can
provide invaluable advice when making fertilization decisions.

Options for Starter Fertilizer
• Methods of application and placement should be considered
• Starter band placement may provide benefits in cool, wet springs, low fertility situations, early planting and other high stress situations
• The “starter effect” generally disappears during the growing season in high fertility
fields

Soil Sampling & Testing
• Single best tool for fertility planning
• Use proper sampling procedures. Determine within-field variability
• Aids in avoiding under- or over-fertilization

Back to
Basics

Soil Sampling
Soil sampling and testing provides an estimate of the capacity of the soil to
supply adequate nutrients to meet the needs of growing crops. The tests results
are compared to standard response data to estimate the need to supply additional nutrients for optimum crop production.
With site-specific management being implemented on many farms, there is a
growing need to characterize the variability in nutrient needs across the field.
Think about why you are sampling the soil. The goal is to estimate
the capacity of the soil to provide adequate amounts of the necessary nutrients
to meet the needs of the crop (or crops) to be grown. The samples should be
collected in such a way as to best meet that goal. The sampling pattern should be
set to best characterize the variability within the field.

Not all cows produce
the same amount of
milk. Sound dairy herd
management
practice tells us we
should feed each cow
a rate and blend that
corresponds to their
milk producing ability.
It’s the same with your
fields. Input redistribution is the basic “logic”
behind Site-Specific
fertilizer application.

MO Valley
We’llAgmake
“On the Hill at Rock Port”

your money
grow..

We’ll make your money

GROW

Fertility
Fertility Prescriptions
Prescriptions:
“Making Crops Healthier”
“Making
Healthier
For Crops
Better Yields
For Better Yields”
Rock Port, Missouri
660-744-5325
660-744-5325

Talk to-Wally
- Tim - Josh
Wally Riebesell
Manager