You are on page 1of 166

Table of Contents

Foreword
Razz Poker Rules
The Top Twenty-OneRazz Poker Hands
Starting Hands Rules to Know
Stealing An Essential Ingredient for Winning
3rdStreet Play Dont Be the Azz in Razz
Razz Starting Hand Point System
Reading Players and Hands
4thStreet Heads-up Play
3rd and 4thStreet Advanced Concepts
5thStreet A System to Make the Right
Decision
6th Street Play It Usually Pays to Stay
6th Street Play Advanced Concepts
7thStreet When in doubt, call!
Strategies into Action: Actual Play on Full Tilt
Poker
Razz PokerPlayer Cheat Sheet
Razz Poker Tips
Appendix: Simulations
Does your online site include PokerSurance?

Foreword
You will be a winner at poker...Razz poker.
Razz Poker is the easiest way to consistently be a
winner because its the only game left where you can
get an edge.
Remember when poker tournaments appeared
on TV, and the same players kept getting to the final
tables. Those players (the Pros) had the edge
because they already knew the strategies to winning
No Limit poker, and were playing against others who
didn't. Now, though, with hundreds of books, articles,
videos and online sites devoted to No Limit poker,
their edge is gone, and amateur players are winning
big. The same advantage the Pros have for Limit
poker and Omaha are also going away.
Razz poker is the one remaining game where the
knowledge base remains small because most
players have climbed on the bandwagon of the
bigger and better known games. Yet, to win at Razz
poker and in the R in HORSE poker, you need to
know what the other players still don't.
Play Razz Poker to Win is going to give you
that winning edge. It is the first book dedicated to the
game of Razz poker. It builds on the accumulated
knowledge about Razz poker from the top poker
pros:
Championship Stud by Dr. Max Stern and Linda
Johnson (chapter on Razz)
Full Tilt Poker Strategy Guide-Tournament
Edition (chapter on Razz)
Play Poker Like the Prosby Phil Hellmuth, J
(chapter on Razz)
Sklansky on Poker, by David Sklansky (chapter on
Razz)
Super/System (original book) by Doyle Brunson (a
few pages on Razz)
Theory of Poker, by David Sklansky (Razz used to

support some key theories)


And creates new strategies that are often based
on simulations and probablilites using the
ProPokerTools
Razz
simulator
(ProPokerTools.com)
In Play Razz Poker to Win, you will find:
A new Starting Hand Point System that allows you
to calculate the strength of your hand as it relates to
the exposed cards on board, the betting action of
your opponents and your position.
How to steal the antes by taking advantage of both
passive and aggressive players.
A new strategy for 4 th street play when you are
dealt a mediocre or bad card, called the Two-Level
Rule
Proof that the best drawing hand after five cards is
not always the favorite over an already made 9 low!
A new strategy for 5 th street play that determines if
and how you should continue to play your hand; and
its not as simple as the best hand versus the best
draw.
How the pot odds on 6th street is usually big
enough to see the last card.
How being a calling station is not a bad concept
when it comes to 7th street play.
Play Razz Poker to Win is a new look at a
game that is going to be more important than ever
as the champion at HORSE poker is seen as the
best poker player in the world. Yet, you dont have to
be a champion poker player to be a consistent
winner at Razz poker. All you need is the winning
strategies that youll find in this book.
Acknowledgements: In writing this book, I want
to thank Marc Johnson, who was able to convert
playing card clip-art into fifty-three usable, black and
white images.
Importantly, I want to dedicate this book to the
people who have contributed the most to my poker

play. First, my Mom and Dad who encourage me to


play poker and believe that poker is not a sin but an
enjoyable game of skill. Second, Andrea Siegel who
was my poker manager for years when I started
playing poker, and who just wants a small piece of
the action. Finally, to the tournament directors in the
San Francisco Bay Area card rooms that spend so
much time and effort in providing a great
environment for poker players.
Thanks!
Mitchell Cogert, 2008

Razz Poker Rules


The objective of Razz poker is to make the
lowest possible hand from the seven cards you are
dealt. The cards are dealt just like in 7-card stud,
except that an Ace is always low and straights and
flushes have no effect on the value of your hand. The
lowest hand in Razz poker is A-2-3-4-5, and this is
called a wheel, a bicycle or a bike.
Razz is played with two to eight players, and is a
fixed limit game. In a fixed limit game there is a set
amount that can be bet by each player in each round.

The sequence of action in a hand of Razz


poker is the following:
1. At the start of each hand, every player must
ante a set amount. This is often about 1/5 of the low
limit bet size.
2. Each player is dealt three cards; that is, two
cards facing down, and one card facing up. This is
known as 3rd street. The player with the highest card
facing up must start the action, which is called the
bring-in bet. The bring-in bet is a set amount, and
is lower than the low limit bet size. The bring-in bettor
has the option to raise the bring-in bet and make a
bet that is equal to the low limit bet size. (Note: If two
or more players have the highest ranked cards, the
bring-in bet is determined by which player has the
highest suit of that rank. The suit order is spades,
hearts, diamonds, and clubs. Therefore, the King of
spades would be the bring-in bet, when tied with
another card that has a rank of King.)
3. Action proceeds clock-wise from the bring-in
bettor. Each player can fold, call, or raise the bring-in
bet. All bets are equal to the low limit bet size.
4. After this first round of betting, the players still
in the hand get dealt another card face up. This is
called 4thstreet, as each remaining player has four
cards. The player with lowest hand showing acts

first, and the action proceeds clock-wise. Each


player has the choice to fold, call, or raise. All bets
are equal to the low limit bet size.
5. After this round of betting, the players still in
the hand get dealt another card face up. This is
called 5thstreet, as each remaining player has five
cards. The player with the lowest hand showing acts
first, and the action proceeds clock-wise. Each
player has the choice to fold, call, or raise. All bets
are equal to the highest limit bet size, which is
double the low limit bet size.
6. After this round of betting, the players still in
the hand get dealt another card face up. This is
called 6thstreet, since each remaining player has six
cards. The player with the lowest hand showing acts
first, and the action proceeds clock-wise. Each
player has the choice to fold, call, or raise. All bets
are equal to the highest limit bet size.
7. After this round of betting, the players still in
the hand get dealt another card face down. This is
called 7thstreet, since each remaining player has
seven cards. The player with the lowest hand
showing acts first, and the action proceeds
clockwise. Each player has the choice to fold, call, or
raise. All bets are equal to the highest limit bet size.
8. The player with the lowest hand wins the pot.

The Top Twenty-One


Razz Poker Hands

(1) 5-4-3-2-A
(2) 6-4-3-2-A
(3) 6-5-3-2-A
(4) 6-5-4-2-A
(5) 6-5-4-3-A
(6) 6-5-4-3-2
(7) 7-4-3-2-A
(8) 7-5-3-2-A
(9) 7-5-4-2-A
(10) 7-5-4-3-A
(11) 7-5-4-3-2
(12) 7-6-3-2-A
(13) 7-6-4-2-A
(14) 7-6-4-3-A
(15) 7-6-4-3-2
(16) 7-6-5-2-A
(17) 7-6-5-3-A
(18) 7-6-5-3-2
(19) 7-6-5-4-A
(20) 7-6-5-4-2
(21) 7-6-5-4-3

Starting Hands
Rules to Know
Razz poker is the one game left where you can
get an edge against your opponents. While
thousands of books, articles, and videos have been
devoted to No Limit Hold'em, Hold'em, and Omaha,
little has been written about the game of Razz. But,
the best Razz players know how to win because they
realize that knowing how to play starting hands is
crucial. If you follow the rules below, you will be on
your way to cashingin on the game of Razz.

Razz Poker Starting hand classification:


In Sklansky on Poker, Sklansky provides a simple
but excellent classification of the hands you should
consider playing in Razz:
Excellent hand: 3-2-A; this is called a bike.
Good hand: Three cards to a 6 or a 7-4. This is
called a smooth 7.
Fair hand: Three cards to a rough 7 or smooth 8.
Poor hand: Three cards to a rough 8 or a three
card 9.
The definitions of smooth and rough are very
important in understanding Razz. A rough 7 starting
hand is 7,6,5, while a smooth 7 starting hand is
7,2,A. A rough 8 starting hand is 8,7,6 while a
smooth 8 starting hand is 8,2,A.

Rule #1: Consider playing all hands with cards


between A-8. On average, youll receive one of
these hands once in about every 6 hands.
When you get dealt a hand, you need to
immediately notice the following:

Your three cards


Your exposed card
The exposed cards of your opponents
How many of the exposed cards are duplicate
cards to your hand

How many of the exposed cards make your low


hand
Your position to the bring-in bettor and opponents
who have low cards showing
The actions of the players who act before you.
It sounds like a lot, but it's really not that hard with just
a little practice.

Rule #2: As the number of duplicate cards to your


hand increases, so does the power of your hand.
Example: You have a (4-5) 6 and your opponent
has the best starting hand (A-2) 3. But, you have four
duplicate cards exposed on board 4,4,5,5,9,J and
your opponent has none. You are a 61% favorite
against this opponent. With three duplicate cards,
you are a 57% favorite.
On the other hand, if your opponent has 3 duplicates
on board to your none, he is a 63% favorite.
Board:

You:

Opponent:

Your (4-7) A is a favorite over (2-3) 5 if three


duplicate cards are exposed for your hand. Your
edge is 56%. If there are only 2 duplicates, your

edge is only 53%. And, if you have just one duplicate


your edge is gone, as it is 50%/50%.

Rule #3: In Razz, when two players who both


have an 8 or better starting hand go to 4th street,
neither player will typically have a significant edge.
In hold'em, a starting hand like pair over pair can
give a player an 80% edge going to the flop. In Razz,
a player will have a big edge if he starts with a
58%/42% lead going to 4th street.

Rule #4: To increase your chances of winning a


pot, try to get headsup from the start by raising the
bring-in bettor.
It is important to realize that your chance of
winning a hand in Razz is reduced as the number of
players in a pot increases. Since the edges in
starting hands are not that great, you want to reduce
the number of opponents to one (or better yet, get
everyone to fold). For perspective, if you are a big
underdog against two opponents, youll probably be
at worst a 40%/60% underdog heads-up if you get
the third player to fold.

Example:
Player A: (2-4) 6 Odds: 42%
Player B: (A-5) 8 Odds: 22%
Player C: (4-6) 7 Odds: 35%
If Player B folds on 3rdstreet, the odds for Player
A/Player C is 55%/45%.
If Player C folds on 3rdstreet, the odds for Player
A/Player C is 56%/44%.
Example: You have (A-2) 6, your opponent has
(3-5) 8, and the board shows you have 2 duplicates
in A,2,9,9,J,J. You are a 63% favorite.
However, you add a third opponent in this same
situation with a (3-5) 7. The odds of winning the hand
have declined dramatically to only 39%.

Rule #5: When there are 4 or more cards on


board that will help you make your 8 low, and 2 or
more players have shown strength by raising and

re-raising, fold your hand.


Since players get three cards 8 or lower only one
in six hands dealt, they often jump at the opportunity
to play their hand. This is a mistake.
Board:

Player A:

Player B:

You:

You have (A-2) 8 and the board has 4 cards you


need to make an 8 or better and no duplicates. The
first two players show cards you need for an 8 low,
and the first raises and the next reraises. Now, of the
20 cards you need to make an 8 low hand, 4 cards
are definitely gone and it is probable that there may
be another 4 or more cards you need hidden. This
means that your chance of getting an 8 low has been
reduced by 40% or more. And, given the strength of
the board, you may even need to hit a 7 low or
better.

In addition, you are going to be against at least two


opponents, so your odds of winning are reduced
even further.

Rule # 6: When there are 3 cards or less


exposed on the board that will help you to make
your 8 low, and there has only been one raise, you
should play your hand.
Example: You have (A-2) 8 and an early position
player with (x-x) 5 raises. The board has 3 exposed
cards that will help you make your 8 low. Should you
call the raise? Yes. Assuming your opponent has the
best starting hand with his 5, an (A-2), he is only a
54% favorite. Again, given the pot odds its an easy
call. And, you have the benefit of being heads-up
against your opponent; being heads-up significantly
increases your chance of winning.

Rule #7: When you have three cards to a bike, play


your hand even if there has been a raise and a reraise.
Example: You have (A-2) 5 and there are two
duplicates on board. If the first player with a
duplicate card raises, and the next player with a
duplicate card re-raises, it should not effect your
play. While your opponents have strong hands, you
must play this hand. While their actions indicate
some of your cards may be in their hole cards, you
have the potential to hit the best low hand, a
A,2,3,4,5, and you can still win with a higher, low
hand.

Rule #8: Raise or re-raise with your excellent


and good hands (a smooth 7 or better) in any
position. However, if there has been a raise and reraise in front of you, and you have no duplicate
cards exposed, consider folding your smooth 7.
Rule #9: Raise or fold your fair hands (rough 7 or
smooth 8) depending on the number of players
behind you who have low cards exposed.
Example: The reason to raise with a hand like a

smooth 8 with three low cards behind you is that by


raising you give yourself a chance to win the pot right
away, plus you may only be called in one place and
end being heads-up going to 4thstreet. If your
opponent raises your bet, you should call his raise
as you will not be that far behind going into 4th street.
However, with four or more players with low cards
behind you, fold these hands.

Rule #10: A poor hand (rough 8 or three card 9)


should always be folded if you have three players
behind you with low cards showing.
Rule #11: Re-raise a player when you know you
have a better hand than him.
Example: A player to your left with a 7 showing
comes in with a raise. You have a (2-4) 6. Raise.
You want to isolate against this opponent as you are
in the lead. And, if you have duplicate cards
exposed, you have even more reason for a raise as
your edge has improved.
In fact, you should consider raising the player
who comes in with a raise even if you think he has a
better hand than you to get heads up. For example, if
the first player raises and has a 6 showing, you may
want to raise with your smooth 7, if you can get
heads-up. This allows you to find out if your opponent
is really that strong and to have proper odds to call
on 4thstreet even if you hit a bad card.

Stealing
An Essential Ingredient for Winning
Stealing is a key part of Razz poker. You cant sit
back and wait forever, since the antes and bring-in
bets will slowly erode your money. Dont bleed-out at
the poker table. If you want to win, you must steal the
antes.

1. Look for opportunities to steal the antes and


bring-in bets. Online Razz players hit their fold
button too fast. Wait for your turn before you decide
your action, as a stealing opportunity may present
itself.
It is agonizing when the bring-in bettor shows a
King, and everyone folds. The player to his right had
a 10 showing, but hit his fold button without waiting to
see the action. Wait. Dont put yourself on autopilot,
theres money to be won!

2. Look to steal when you are to the right of the


bring-in bettor. If everyone folds to you, raise with
your lower exposed card.
Example: If you have a 9 showing and everyone
folds to you, you must raise the bring-in bettor who
shows a Q, even if you have pocket 9's as your hole
cards. 3. Look to steal when your exposed card is

lower than all other player's exposed cards.


Example: If your exposed card is an 8, and all the
players have higher cards showing, you should raise
to steal.
Of course, if you are first to act, your exposed
card is a 3, and all the other players show 4s and
5s, it is not smart to steal without very strong hole
cards.

4. Look to steal when everyone folds to you, you


have an exposed low card, and you only have to
get past one other player.
Example: You have (J-5) 4 and your opponent
has a (10-7) 2. Everyone folds to you, so you raise

as a steal with one low card in the hole. Your


opponent calls your raise. Even though your steal
hasnt been successful, your opponent only has a
57% edge. You can still win on 4 thstreet if you hit a
low card, and bet as a semi-bluff.
Example: You have (K-Q) 4 and your opponent
has a (10-7) 8. Everyone folds to you, so you raise
as a steal with two high cards in the hole. This is a
riskier play. If your opponent calls, he is an 82%
favorite, and if he re-raises, you should fold.
You may want to randomize this play to the times
where you have one low card in the hole. In addition,
note that your opponents exposed card can be
higher or lower than your exposed card.

5. Look to steal when you show an Ace


Since you have the best low card showing, your
opponents cant determine the true strength of your
hand. Again, you may want to try this play only when
you have one low card in the hole.

6. Look for a limp-steal, especially from an early


position.
Example: You have a playable hand in early
position but there are two or more lower exposed
cards behind you. When you limp, it looks to your
opponents that you have a good but not great hand
(like three cards to an 8-low), and you are concerned
about the players who have those lower exposed
cards. Often, youll be heads-up with the bring-in
bettor and youll win the pot with almost any card on
4th street.

7. If you believe a player is stealing, and you are in


position, re-raise the stealer to get heads-up or get
him to fold.
If you think a player is stealing, always look to raise
and reraise.
Example: The bring-in bettor is to your left, and
everyone folds to the player on your right who shows
an A, and raises. If you have (2-J) 4, and believe

your opponent is stealing, re-raise. The stealer may


fold to your raise, or you will win the pot when you hit
good and he hits bad on 4th street.

8. If you notice a player who raises too often on 3rd


street, re-raise him since he cant always have a big
hand.
Some players are very aggressive, especially
when the table is short-handed. Against these
players you need to re-raise and get heads-up. If the
stealer calls your bet, you should even consider
using his aggressive play against him, and slow-play
your hand if you hit good cards.

9. If you notice a player re-raises too often on 3rd


street, you should try to get heads-up against him.
A few players almost always re-raise a player
who raises on 3rd street. Try to get heads-up with
this player. You can often steal the pot on 4 thstreet.
Or, if you get good cards, you can even slow-play to
win a bigger hand. The bully at a Razz poker table
wins a lot of pots, especially when the table is shorthanded.

10. If you notice a player is so tight that he never


defends his bring-in bet, look to raise him.
Example:If your exposed card is a 9, and the bringin bettor has a 10, he will fold even if you are last to
act and are stealing.

3rdStreet Play
Dont Be the Azz in Razz
There are many things Razz players do, which
they should not do. As a result hands that can be
won, instead are lost. Hands that should be folded,
instead end up being costly. Dont chase without the
proper odds. Don't be the azz in Razz.

1. Don't ignore the action when you have folded


your hand on 3rd street.
Watch how your opponents' play their hands:

Do they come-in with a raise all the time or do they


just call?
How often do they raise?
How strong are their hands when they call and
when they raise?
How often do they steal? Too often or not at all?
How often do they defend their bring-in bet? In what
situations?
Do they chase when they are behind?
Which street do they decide to fold when they
seem behind?
Do they ever slow-play? With which hands?
Do they check-raise or check-raise bluff? On what
streets?
All players have tendencies that you can use to help
you make the right decision.
2. Don't defend your bring-in bet when your

exposed card is two-levels higher than your


opponent.
Razz players will defend their bring-in bet too
often, especially when their hole cards look good.
This is a mistake. When you are the bring-in bettor,
here are the odds you are getting to call if you have
two good hole cards and your opponent has the
hand he is representing:

Your exposed card is four-levels higher than


your opponent (like 9 versus 5). You are 10-1 to
catch up on 4th street.
Your exposed card is three-levels higher than your
opponent (like 10 versus 7). You are 6-1 to catch up
on 4th street.
Your exposed card is two-levels higher than your
opponent (like J versus 9). You are 4-1 to catch up
on 4th street.
Your exposed card is one-level higher than your
opponent (like 9 versus 8). You are almost 3-1 to
catch up on 4th street.
Example: You are the bring-in bettor with (A-2)
K, and everyone folds to the player to your right who
shows a 4 and raises. You believe he is stealing,
and want to call. The problem is that you may be
wrong, and you may be chasing a strong hand. Also,
you are hoping to hit good on 4thstreet, and your
opponent to hit a K on 4thstreet. And, even if he hits
a King on 4thstreet, you are hoping to hit better than
your opponent on 5thstreet as well. The combination
of these outcomes points to a clear fold.
Example: You are the bring-in bettor with (A-2)
10, and everyone folds to the player to your right who
shows an 8 and raises. While there is a better
chance your opponent will get a card 10 or higher
than in the previous example, it is still a bad play.
Example: You are the bring-in bettor with (A-2)
9, and everyone folds to the player to your right who
shows an 8 and raises. If the board shows you have
three duplicates, you should call. If it does not, and
you believe your opponent is stealing, you can call
just to mix up your play. You don't want to always fold
your bring-in bet to the player to your right.
3. Don't get carried away with trying to win with your
bring-in bet hand, even though one or more players
just called.

Sometimes you will see this bring-in bettor try to


win the hand with a bet on 4thstreet hoping his
opponents will fold. They don't fold and when he
misses on 5th street, he has wasted a bet.
Example: You have (7-9) J and bring it in. Two
players call, one showing a 6 and the other showing
an 8. On 4thstreet, both players hit bad cards
each with a Q, and you hit a 5. While you have
improved your hand, don't bet since your opponents
will not fold. Wait to see what happens on 5 thstreet. If
the same thing happens on 5thstreet, you can bet
and have confidence that your opponents will fold.

4. Don't rule out slow-playing your starting


hands. Slow-playing a strong hand with just a call is
often a very profitable play in Razz. The benefits to
slow-playing are the following:
when you just call, opponents believe your hand
is weaker than it is
when you just call, any opponent who raises,
defines the strength of his hand. But, he does not
know the strength of your hand which gives you an
edge.
if you both hit good cards on 4thstreet, your
opponent will think you are chasing when you may be
ahead
if you hit a good card on 4thstreet and your
opponent does not, when you bet your opponent will
mostly likely call and be the one chasing. This is an
ideal situation for you to win a big pot.
Slow-playing is even more powerful against the too
aggressive Razz player. You can trap this player for
a big pot by allowing him to bet all the way to
7thstreet, and calling or raising on the end.

5. Don't be one of those players who always raises


with an Ace showing.
While it is a good play to try to steal with your
Ace up card, dont do it every time. Your opponents

will notice, and they will take advantage of this play.


A good way to randomly decide when to raise with
your exposed Ace is to wait for when you have one
low card in the hole.

6. Don't forget that players can't see your hole


cards.
This seems obvious but players give a winnable
pot away when all they look at is their own hand. On
3rdstreet, it is most obvious with stealing
opportunities like the example above. On 4thstreet
and later streets, the player who checks a hand when
in the visible lead often loses the hand.

Example:

You have (2-3) 5 and raise. Another player with


an A showing re-raises you, and you call. On the flop
you get an 8, and your opponent hits a 4. He acts
first and checks! Is he setting a trap? Most likely he
is not. Most likely the 4 has paired his hand, so you
can bet as you have the lead.

9. Don't forget to adjust your starting hand


requirements for shorthanded play and look to
steal more often.
The value of your exposed card and position

increases as the number of players decrease. For


example, when you are at a four handed table, the
first player to raise with a low exposed card will raise
as a steal, as he only has to get past two other
players and the bring-in bettor.

Razz Starting Hand Point System


Here is a simple point system to give you an
edge in playing the first three cards dealt to you in
Razz. Follow the five steps below as it will properly
value the strength of your hand given the cards
exposed on board, your position in the hand, and the
betting action taken by your opponents. It works!
1. Assign the following points to your hand using
the chart below (assumes 8 players):

2. Add or subtract points based on the exposed


cards on board:
Each duplicate card to your hand: +1 point
Each card needed to make your hand: -1 point
3. Subtract points based on the action of your
opponents:
Each call of the bring-in bet: - 1 point
Each raise of the bring-in bet: -2 points
4.Subtract -1 point for each player who has a low
card after your potential action in a hand:
5. Total the points and act as follows:
If the total points are:

Example:
Board:

You:

You have (A-6) 7. And the board is Q, 9, 6, 2,7, J,


10, 5.
Points: Your hand is 7-6 low=6 points. One
duplicate=+1 pt., Two cards needed=-2 pts.
One player behind you with a low card: -1 pt.
Total before there is action on the hand: You have 4
points.
Everyone folds to the player with the 2 showing. He
raises. Subtract 2 points.
Total: You have 2 points, so you need to call the
raise.
Example: Using the same hand, but your
opponents actions are different.
You have (A-6) 7. And the board is Q, 9, 6, 2, 7, J,
10, 5.
Points: Your hand is 7-6 low=6 points. One
duplicate=+1 pt.,
Two cards needed=-2 pts.

One player behind you with a low card: -1 pt.


Total before there is action on the hand: You have 4
points.
Everyone folds to the player with the 6 showing. He
raises. Subtract 2 points.
The next player with the 2 showing, re-raises.
Subtract 2 points.
Total: You have 0 points, so you need to fold.

Example:
Board:

You:

You have (A-7) 8 and the board is K, J, 10, 8, 2,


A, 5, 9. Points: Your hand is 8-7 low=3 points. One
duplicate=+1 pt.,
Two cards needed=-2 pts.
Three players behind you with a low card: -3 points.
Total before there is action on the hand: You have
1 point.
Everyone folds to you.
Total: You have -1 point, so you need to fold.

Example:
Board:

You:

You have (A-2) 5. And the board is K, 9, 2, A,5, J,


3, 9. Points: Your hand is 5 low=10 points. Two
duplicate=+2 pts., One card needed=-1 pt.
One player behind you with a low card: -1 pt.
Total before there is action on the hand: You have 10
points.
Everyone folds to the player with the 2 showing. He
raises. Subtract 2 points.
The next player with the A showing, re-raises.
Subtract 2 points.
Total: You have 6 points, so you need to re-raise.

Example:
Board:

You:

You have (A-7) 6. And the board is K, 9, 2, A,6, J,


3, 9. Points: Your hand is 7-6 low=6 points. One
duplicate=+1 pt.,
Two cards needed=-2 pts.
One player behind you with a low card: -1 pt.
Total before there is action on the hand: You have 4
points.
Everyone folds to the player with the 2 showing. He
raises. Subtract 2 points.
The next player with the A showing, re-raises.

Subtract 2 points.
Total: You have 0 points, so you need to fold.

Reading Players and Hands


It is important to try to get a read on your
opponent and his hand. Here are tips to help you
figure out if your opponent is strong, weak or
somewhere in between.

1. Players have tendencies when playing Razz


poker. Watch how your opponents play their first
three cards, as it will help to determine how to play
against them:

Tight players: Always wait for three low cards,


and raise when they are first in the pot. They miss
many stealing opportunities.
Aggressive players Raise too often on 3 rdstreet,
and like to steal too often.
Limpers: Like to get in cheap on 3rdstreet to see
the next card.
Slow-players: Like to trap by limping in with their
big starting hands.
Razz poker winners: They win more often. They
know when to make a play, and who to make a play
against. If they get past 5thstreet, they bet
aggressively either because they have the best hand
or they are bluffing.
In addition, you should notice the following:
Which players defend their bring-in bet too often,
and the relative strength of their exposed cards to
the raiser on 3rd street
At showdown, notice the players hole cards and
evaluate how they played their hand
Finally, dont forget that your good opponents are
also evaluating your table image. Based on how you
are playing, try to understand your own table image
as it may effect how you play against different
opponents.

2. The first raiser in a hand does not necessarily


have a good low hand, but the caller will almost

always have a good starting hand.


Example: If a player raises with a 4 showing and
a player calls with a 6 showing, the raiser may be on
a steal but the caller most likely has three cards to an
8 or better.

3. A player who calls the raiser on 3 rd street tends


to have a good but not great hand.
Example: If a player raises with a 7 showing and
a player calls with an A showing, the caller probably
has a good, but not a great hand. If he could beat the
7 low, he would have re-raised.
4. In general, the higher the up card, the lower the

hole cards.
Example: A player that comes in with an 8
showing will likely have small cards in the hole. So, if
he catches an A or 2 on 4 th street, there is a better
chance he has paired up than if he hit a 7 on
4thstreet. And, if the player comes in with a 9
showing, you can be fairly certain he has the smaller
low cards in the hole.

5. If your opponent has raised on 3rd street with


a low card showing that is higher than two or more
players with lower exposed cards, he probably is
perfect (A-2) or near perfect in the hole.
Example: If a player raises on 3rdstreet with (x-x)
8, and he has players behind him showing better low
cards, like A, 3, A, it's highly like his hole cards are
perfect or near perfect.

6. If your opponent has raised in a steal position on


3rd street, his hole cards are probably weak.
Example: On 3rdstreet, after the bring-in bettor
everyone folds to a player who has (x-x) 4. The next
player shows (x-x) 3 and the following player is the
bring-in bettor with a (x-x) Q. If this first player raises
it doesn't mean his hand is strong, as he is in a
stealing position.

7. Knowing which cards have been exposed can

help you to determine if your opponent has paired


up or not paired up his hole cards on later streets.
Example: If you have a 3 in the hole, two 3's
have been exposed, and your opponent hits a 3 on
5thstreet, you know for sure that his hand has
improved.

4thStreet Heads-up Play


There are more mistakes on 4thstreet than any
other street in Razz. This is because Razz players
hate to fold a hand when they get to 4thstreet. These
players are so happy to have a playable hand, they
are willing to go to 5thstreet regardless of the cards
dealt out on 4thstreet. It's important to try to read your
opponent's hand, and to evaluate the relative
strength of your hand compared to his hand. The
following scenarios in heads-up 4thstreet play will
help guide you to make the right decisions.

A. You are in the lead going into 4thstreet:


Scenario #1-Both hit good cards: Both you and
your opponent are heads-up on 4th street, after he
called your raise on 3rd street. You both hit good
cards on 4th street. If you are still in the lead, you
should bet.
Even though you are in the lead going into
4thstreet, it is never a big lead. So, when you hit
another low card, and still lead on 4thstreet, you need
to make your opponent pay if he wants to try and
catch up. A bet here also gives your opponent the
opportunity to fold. Clearly, the same situation exists
when you hit good, and he hits a bad card on
4thstreet bet out as you have the lead.

Scenario #2-Both hit good cards: Both you and


your opponent are heads-up on 4th street, after he
called your raise on 3rd street. Both of you hit good
cards on 4th street, but he is in the lead. In most
cases, you should call.
In Razz, the pot odds on 4thstreet are usually
good enough in close situations where you should
make the call. In a $5-$10 game, you will be getting
around 5-1. Plus, there is the chance that you can
take the lead on 5th street.

However, the game doesn't end on 5 thstreet, and


you need to look at your hole cards compared to his
exposed cards, plus try to read his hand.

Example:

If you have (A-2) 5,8 and your opponent has (x-x)


7, 4 it looks like your opponent is working on a 7
low, a strong hand. But, with the right card on
5thstreet, and given the strength of your hole cards,
you should call.

Example:

If you have (7-6) 2, 8 and your opponent has (x-x)


5, A your opponent may be working on a bike and
you are hoping to catch an 8 low. Here is where you
need to have a good read on his hand. If you think he
is weaker than it appears, of course, you should call.
If you think it is strong, you can fold here, because
even if you catch up on 5thstreet, your opponent will
decide that his draw is worth going to 7th street.

Scenario #3-He hits good, you hit a hidden pair:


Both you and your opponent are heads-up on 4th
street, after he called your raise on 3rd street. He
hits good, but you pair one of your hole cards. You
should bet out as you are in the visible lead.
Example:

You have (A-2) 5 and raised on 3 rdstreet. Your


opponent called your raise with a 6 showing. On
4thstreet, you are dealt an A and he is dealt a 7. You
don't like the pair, but he doesn't know you have a
pair. Don't take your foot off the pedal when you are
in the visible lead. Give your opponent an
opportunity to fold.
If you check your pair, your opponent will bet out
to see if you are setting a trap. If he does bet, you will
need to decide the strength of your hand relative to
your opponents. If your hand is a long shot to catch
up, you should fold. But, if you have perfect hole
cards to a bike, for example, you should call. This will
be explained more on the chapter on 5th street play.
Even with an exposed pair, you will probably be
getting the right pot odds to call, in hopes of hitting a
perfect card for a drawing hand on 5th street.

Example:

You have (A-2) 5, 5 and your opponent has (x-x)


6, 7. Your opponent maybe a 3-1 favorite, but the pot
odds may be more than 5-1 on your call. If you hit
your card on 5thstreet, and your opponent hits a bad
card like a 10, you will be the favorite to win the pot.

Scenario #4-He hits good, you hit bad: Both you


and your opponent are heads-up on 4th street, after
he called your raise on 3rd street. Your opponent
hits a good card and you hit a bad card. In most
cases you should fold, but a call may be right

depending on your hole cards relative to his


exposed cards, along with your read on his hand.
Example:

You have (A-2) 5 and raised on 3 rdstreet. Your


opponent called your raise with a 6 showing. On
4thstreet, you are dealt a Q and he is dealt a 8. Your
opponent bets. You have (A-2) 5,Q and your
opponent has (x-x) 6,8. He is a favorite with the 8,
but you are working at a bike for a low. Call the bet.

Example:

You have (7-8) 5, Q and your opponent has (x-x)


6, 8. You are working on an 8 low, but your opponent
looks to be working on a better 8 low. This hand can
be costly to you, so fold.

Scenario #5-You both hit bad: Both you and


your opponent are heads-up on 4th street, after he
called your raise on 3rd street. You both hit bad
cards. Use the Two-Level Rule: If your 5 th street
card is twolevels lower or more than your opponent,
you should bet. If not, you should check, and call if

your opponent bets.


Example: You are in the lead on 3 rdstreet, and
you hit a Q and your opponent hits a K. Don't bet
here. Most players will call your bet, and the cards on
5thstreet will often determine the winner.
Example: You are in the lead on 3 rdstreet, and
you hit a 10 and your opponent hits a Q. Bet. You
have a big enough lead where you should bet.

Example:

You are in the lead on 3 rdstreet, and you hit a K


and your opponent hits a pair. Don't bet here. While
you are in the lead, you will be acting first on the later
rounds putting you at a positional disadvantage.
Wait till 5 thstreet to decide the relative strength of
your hand. Otherwise, if he hits good on 5thstreet
and you hit bad, you have wasted a bet.

B. You are behind going into 4th street:


Scenario #6-Both hit good cards (but you are
still behind): Both you and your opponent are
heads-up on 4th street, after you called his raise on
3rd street. You both hit good cards on 4 th street. If
he is still in the lead, when your opponent bets, you
should call.
Example:

Your opponent raised on 3rd street with a 6


showing, and you called with (2-4) 8. On 4thstreet, he
is dealt a 5 and you are dealt a 6. Your opponent has
the lead and bets. You should call for the following
reasons:
a) Assuming he has two low cards, the pot odds
are good enough for a call. Assuming he has an (A2) in the hole, he has almost a 2-1 lead. But, in a $5$10 game, where the antes are a $1.00, and the
bring-in bet is $1.50, the pot odds are going to be
about 5-1 for you to call. ($5 to call with a $24.50

pot).
b) He may have paired up his hand. If so, you are
about a 69% favorite.
c) If you hit good on 5thstreet and your opponent
does not, you will have the lead. For example, if on
5thstreet, your opponent has (A-2) 6,5,J and you
have (2-4) 8,6,3, you are now a 67% favorite.

Scenario #7-Both hit good cards (you are now in


the lead): Both you and your opponent are headsup on 4th street, after you called his raise on 3rd
street. You both hit good cards on 4 th street. If you
are in the lead, you should bet. This is true even if
you paired your hand, as you have the visible
lead.
Scenario #8-You hit good, he hits bad: Both you
and your opponent are heads-up on 4th street, after
you called his raise on 3rd street. He is dealt a bad
card, and you get a good card. You are in the lead,
so bet. This is true even if you paired your hand, as
you have the visible lead.
Scenario #9-He hits good, you hit bad: Both you
and your opponent are heads-up on 4th street, after
you called his raise on 3rd street. Your opponent hits
a good card and you hit a bad card. In most cases
you should fold, but a call may be right depending on
your hole cards relative to his exposed cards, along
with your read on his hand. (see Scenario #4 above
for the explanation.)
Scenario #10-You both hit bad cards: Both you
and your opponent are heads-up on 4th street, after
you called his raise on 3rd street. You both hit bad
cards. Use the Two-Level Rule: If you take the lead,
and if your 4th street card is two-levels lower or more
than your opponent, you should bet. If not, you should
check, and call if your opponent bets. If you are still
behind, and if your opponent's fourth-street card is
twolevels lower or more than yours, if he bets, you

should fold depending on your hole cards relative to


his exposed cards, along with your read on his hand.
Example: You are behind on 3 rdstreet, but you
take the lead when you hit a Q and your opponent
hits a K. Don't bet here. Most players will call your
bet, and the cards on 5thstreet will often determine
the winner.
Example: You are behind on 3 rdstreet, and you
hit a 10 and your opponent hits a Q. You have a big
enough lead where you should bet.

Example:

You are behind on 3 rdstreet, and you hit a Q and


your opponent hits a 10. If your opponent bets, you
need to decide the strength of your opponents hand.
If your opponent raised pre-flop with the A showing,
and he is likely to raise whenever he has an A
showing, you should call. However, if this player is
tight you may want to fold and not get into a
potentially, costly showdown.
Example: You are behind on 3 rdstreet, and your
opponent hits a J and you hit a pair. Call if your
opponent bets, and check if your opponent checks.
You are going to have a positional advantage in this
hand. Wait till 5thstreet to decide the relative strength
of your hand.

3rd and 4thStreet


Advanced Concepts
Here are a few advanced Razz Poker concepts
for 3rdand 4th street play. You may want to avoid
trying these plays until you feel you have mastered
the basics. These plays require that you have a good
feel for the game of Razz and a good read on your
opponents.

1. Look to get heads-up as it improves your


chance of winning the pot. However, do not take this
concept too far on 4th street, as it can cost you
more money when your read on your opponents is
wrong.
Recall that your odds of winning your 8 low
starting hand increases as the number of opponents
decrease. On 3rdstreet, look to raise when you are
first in the pot. On 3rdstreet, after a limper has called
the bring-in bettor, look to raise. You want your
opponents to fold, but if there is a call you want to be
against just one player.
The same desire to be heads-up is true on 4th
street play. On 4 th street, if you are against two or
more opponents, and the pot is big, use your betting
to narrow the competition to one (or none, of
course.)
Example:You have two opponents on 4th street.
Opponent A:

You:

Opponent B:

On 3rdstreet, opponent B acted first and limped


in, and opponent A just called the limp in bet, and
you are fairly certain opponent A is not that strong.
So, if he bets out on 4thstreet, a raise by you should
not only get opponent B to fold, but opponent A to
just call your raise.
However, if you believe opponent A is strong, your
raise may backfire in two ways:.

1) Opponent A may have a stronger hand than you,


and will re-raise your bet.
2) Opponent B may stay in the hand, as the pot is
now big. Youll often find players who don't want to
be pushed out of pots on early streets. As a result,
you have an outcome you wanted to avoid: putting in
three bets on 4th street and still having two
opponents.

2. Here is a 3rd street bluff that is effective


against one opponent: If a player in middle to late
position is first in the pot with a raise, and you are
sure no player is strong enough to call your reraise, you should reraise with a low card showing
even if you only have one low card in the hole.
The reason this is an effective play is that you are
going to be heads-up on 4thstreet, in a situation
where your opponent believes you have a very
strong hand: more importantly, a stronger starting
hand than his hand. If on 4thstreet you hit good and
he hits bad, a bet will often get your opponent to fold.
Even if he calls, he believes he needs two perfect
cards to beat you.
Note that the 3rdstreet semi-bluff is more
effective when your exposed card is lower than his
exposed card, as it looks like you know you are in
the lead. In addition, this play is especially effective
in Razz tournaments at the higher blind levels; where
your opponent can not add more chips, and his chip
stack will be badly damaged if he goes deep in the
hand against your stronger hand.

3. If your table is tight, limping with a low card


showing when in early position, often allows you to
be heads-up against the bring in bettor. This limpsteal is a positive outcome as it allows you to win
with a bet on 4th street.
Sometimes you will be in a Razz game where
players are folding hand after hand, waiting for
strong starting hands. In these games, the tactic of

limping with a low card showing will often induce


other players to fold their 9 low or higher hands, and
as a result, you will end up against the bring-in
bettor. Being heads up against the bring-in bettor is
a very favorable outcome and allows you to win with
a 4thstreet bet with almost any card.

4. If you have aggressive players behind you, limp


in with a strong hand with the intention of re-raising.
At times, you will find players who are always
aggressive against a player that limps into the pot. It
allows the aggressive player to semi-bluff; meaning,
that he is giving himself two ways to win: 1) the
limper folds to the raise or 2) the raiser hits a good
card and the limper hits a bad card on 4thstreet,
forcing the limper to fold. By sometimes limping with
a strong starting hand against this player, you can
trap him when he is actually weak by re-raising, and
getting him to fold.

5. If one player limps into a pot, and if you have


a low card showing, and you are sure no other
player except the bring-in bettor will be in the hand
on 4th street, you can call this bet given the
favorable pot odds.
The odds the limper is giving you is very
favorable, as it can be 10-1. When you call, you will
have an opportunity to beat both opponents if you hit
a better card than your opponents on 3rd street.
Risking a small bet with such goods odds is
something to look for in Razz.
However, if you hit a bad card and one of your
opponents hits a good card, you should fold. Dont
chase with a weak draw.

6. When there has been a raise and a re-raise


on 3rd street, the pot size is now large enough that if
you hit bad on 4th street, it is worth calling a bet on
4th street to try to catch up on 5th street.
Example:

You have (4-2) 3 and your opponent shows (x-x)


A. You raised and he re-raised on 3 rdrd $10 razz
game, the pot size is now $29.50, and it will only
cost you another $5 if your opponent hits a good
card and leads out on 4thstreet. Even with your bad
card, you are betting $5 on 4th street to win $34.50.
You should call and hope to take the lead on 5 th
street.

7. If you think a player in a back position is trying to


steal with a raise, you must re-raise.
You need to be aware of the times your opponent
is trying to steal. When you are in the right position
relative to this stealer, you must re-raise and not call.
A re-raise states to your opponent that you have a
strong hand and if you hit good on 4th street, he will
have to fold.
If you just called his raise, you are allowing your
opponent to take the lead on 4thstreet with a bet,
which lets him have control and puts doubt in your

read of his hand.


Further, if you hit a good card on 4 thstreet and
bet, and your opponent calls your bet, you need to
re-think your read. His call will often mean that he
actually has a hand, and is not stealing.

8. When two or more players enter the pot on 3rd


street in front of you, it is important that you realize
your chances of winning the hand has decreased
and play your hand accordingly.
Example: After the bring-in bet, Opponent A
limps with (xx) 6, the next player raises with (x-x) 2,
and everyone folds to you in front of the bring-in
bettor. You need a good hand to call this bet, since
you will be against two opponents, and one of those
players may have an excellent hand.

9. If you hit a great draw on 4th street you should


consider slow-playing your hand. It can set you up
for a bigger win in the hand.
Example: You have (2-4) A, and your opponent
shows (x-x) 6. On 4th street, you hit a 3 and your
opponent hits a 7. If you check here, your opponent
may think you paired your hole card, and bet. Just
call and let him take the lead to the river. If all goes
according to plan, you will win a big pot. If you bet out
on 4thstreet, your opponent may fold when he doesn't
catch up by 5th street.

10. While you should always be evaluating the


play of your opponents, don't forget to think about
the image you are presenting to your opponents.
It is always a good feeling to win a pot when your
opponents fold on 3rdand 4thstreet. In fact,
sometimes you will be surprised when they fold as
they have a weaker hand than expected or pair up a
hole card on 4thstreet. In addition, its even better to
win a big pot, when your opponent misreads your
hand and tries to chase you down on 7th street.
By creating an image as a strong Razz player,
your opponents will make mistakes and fold when

they should call, and call when they should fold.

5thStreet
A System to Make the Right
Decision
5thstreet is the key decision point in Razz poker
since not only does the betting size double from this
point forward, but also in most cases, if your hand is
good enough to play on 5thstreet, it's good enough to
go all the way to the end. This is where you need to
know if it's worth investing more money in your hand.
If not, you are chasing without the proper odds. Don't
be the azz in Razz.
This introduces a new system to properly
evaluate the strength of your hand compared to your
opponent's hand. Many headsup simulations were
completed to develop this system (see appendix for
details). Importantly, if you have a strong read on
your opponent, follow your read first.

1. There are two key questions to ask when you


get to 5th street. On 5th street, look at your
opponent's exposed cards and your hand, and ask
yourself the following questions:
A. Who is in the lead?
Definition of in the lead:
Unless you can read your opponent's hand extremely
well, assume that his hole cards help and don't hurt
his hand. Therefore, the player whose exposed
cards are lower than their opponent's exposed
cards, are assumed to be in the lead.
Action:
The player who is in the lead should bet his hand to
try to win the pot on 5th street.

B. Whose four-card draw is better?


Definition of a four-card draw:
Take away the highest-ranking card from the player
with the leading hand, and these four cards are his
four-card draw. Assume that his hole cards help

and don't hurt his hand. Of course, the player whose


hand is behind will use his best four cards to
establish his four-card draw, or simply his draw.
Action:
If the player in the lead also has the better four-card
draw, he is a big favorite. He should bet and his
opponent should fold. If the player who is behind has
the better four-card draw, he will either be a small
underdog or a small favorite. When he is a dog, he
should call and check his hand. When he is a small
favorite, he should jam the pot.

Here are some common situations you will


face on 5th street and how this system is put
into action:
1. You hit a bad card on 5th street:
Example: You have (4-5) 7,9,10 and your
opponent has (x-x) 6,8,9.
Situation: You started the hand with three good
cards, but fell behind on 4thstreet. On 5th street, both
you and your opponent hit bad cards.
Analysis: Your opponent looks to have a made hand
with a 9 low, and a better four-card draw than you
with an 8-6 to your 9-7. This means he is a big
favorite.
Action: When he bets, fold. Don't chase. Don't be the
azz in Razz.

Example:

You have (4-5) 7,8,Q and your opponent has (x-x)


6,8,10. Situation: You started the hand with three
good cards. You and your opponent hit the same
card on 4thstreet, so you decided to see one more
card. Unfortunately, the 5 th street card was bad for
you.
Analysis: Your opponent looks to have a 10 low,
made hand and a better four-card draw with 8-7 to
8-6. It looks close, but its not.
Action: When he bets, don't chase. Fold. Don't be
the azz in Razz.

Example:

You have (A-4) 5,J,Q and your opponent has (x-x)


6,K,7. Situation: Here you started with three cards to
a bike. On 4th street, both you and your opponent hit
bad. On 5thstreet, you hit bad again, while your
opponent hit a good card.
Analysis: Your opponent has four cards working to a
good low, while you only have three cards working.
This is an awful situation for you, since it puts you
way behind in the hand. Action: Check and if he
bets, fold. Don't chase. Don't be the azz in Razz.

Example:

You have (4-6) A-9-J and your opponent has (x-x)


8-4-10. Situation: You started with three good cards,
but fell behind on 4thstreet. Your opponent bet, and
you called on 4thstreet. On 5th street you both hit bad
cards.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with a 10 low,
and has a better four-card draw.
Action: If your opponent bets, fold. Don't chase. Don't
be the azz in Razz.

2. You hit a good card on 5th street


Example: You have (4-8) 6,2,4 and your
opponent has (x-x) A,J,9.
Situation: You started with three good cards, and
improved on 4thstreet. When you bet on 4thstreet,
your opponent called your bet since he had a strong
draw. On 5thstreet, you hit good and he hit bad.
Analysis: This is sweet when it happens. You are in
the lead and you have the best draw.
Action: Bet and your opponent should fold.

Example:

You have (A-3) 7,2,4 and your opponent has (x-x)


A,8,6. Situation: You started with a good low, and
you took the lead on 4thstreet. On 5thstreet, both you
and your opponent hit good cards, but you are in the
lead.
Analysis: Here you both look to have made hands.
You have a 7-4 and your opponent an 8-6. You even
have a better fourcard draw with your 4-3 to his 6-x.
Action: Bet and your opponent should fold. A trickier
play is to slow-play the hand, and check it. The check
may look like you paired your hole card. If so, your
opponent will want to protect his lead and bet. While
this play puts you at risk of losing since he can catch
up, you'll win a bigger pot than if you simply bet out
on 5th street.

You have (A-2) 5,A,3 and your opponent has (x-x)


6,7,10. Situation: This is the example mentioned in
the chapter on 4th street. You started with three
strong cards, but paired your A in the hole on
4thstreet. You checked on 4 thstreet and called when
your opponent bet. On 5thstreet, you have a bike
draw, while your opponent has a 10 low.
Analysis: You have a draw to the best possible low
and your opponent probably has a made hand with a
10 low. You are at least a 58% favorite.
Action: Jam the pot.

3. You paired up on 5th street


Example: You have (4-8) 6,2,4 and your
opponent has (x-x) A,6, J.
Situation: You started with a good low, and improved
on 4th street. However, your opponent also got help
on 4thstreet. When he bet on 4thstreet, you called. On
5thstreet, you paired up one of your hole cards, while
your opponent hit bad. Analysis: Pairs are bad news
in Razz poker. However, the pair is hidden, which
means you have the visible lead. Your opponent,
though, has a better draw with his 6-A to your 6-4.
Action: Usually when you have the visible lead, you

should bet as a bluff. But, since he led with a bet on


4th street, he is not going to fold. In this situation,
your opponent is actually both in the lead and has a
better four-card draw. Therefore, your best play is
to check and your opponent will most likely check
behind with his J low. Save your money and see
what happens on 6th street.

Example:

You have (A-2) 5,A,2 and your opponent has (x-x)


4,7,8. Situation: You started with three strong cards,
but paired your A in the hole on 4 thstreet. You bet on
4thstreet and your opponent called. On 5thstreet, you
paired up again, and your opponent hit a good card.
Analysis: Bummer. You made two pair. However,
you have the visible lead and your board looks so
strong you may actually have a bike or 6 low. Your
opponent is going to fear your board.
Action: You have the visible lead, and even a better
visible four-card draw. Plus, your board is so
strong it looks like you have a bike. Bet this hand as
a semi-bluff. Your opponent is going to fold, unless
he has an incredible read on your play.

You have (4-7) A,6,6 and your opponent has (x-x)


4,7,8. Situation: You started with three good cards,
and hit a good card on 4thstreet. When you bet on
4thstreet, your opponent called. On 5thstreet you
paired up one of your exposed cards, while your
opponent hit good.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with a made
low of 8-7. He also may have a better four-card
draw with a 7-4 to your 7-6. An exposed pair hurts
your hand more than a hidden pair, since you have
no opportunity to bluff with a bet.
Action: You can get into a lot of trouble in this hand.
When he bets, just fold.
Example: You have (6-7) A,6,7 and your
opponent has (x-x) 4,7,8.
Situation: You started with three good cards, paired
your hole card on 4thstreet. When you bet on
4thstreet, your opponent called. On 5thstreet you
paired up again, while your opponent hit good.
Analysis: You are in the visible lead with your 7-6 to
your opponent's 8-7. You also have a better visible
four-card draw. While your opponent may be weary
that you have a made low of 7-6, it is not as scary as

a made bike hand. Action: You can get into a lot of


trouble in this hand. If you bet on 5thstreet, it's a bluff.
And, most likely, your opponent is going to call. It
looks like you are going to end up losing a lot of
money so don't bet your hand. If he bets, just fold. Or,
if you read that your opponent is weak, check-raise
bluff; this bet will say you have a 7-6 made low hand,
and he will only call your bet if he can outdraw you.

2. It is NOT true that any drawing hand is a


favorite over a made 9 low hand, and therefore the
player with the draw should jam the pot. Here are
guidelines as to how a made hand of a 9 low
compares to drawing hands:
a) The player with a made low of 9-8, is a slight
underdog to a player who has any 7, 6, or 5 low
draw, but a big favorite over an opponent with any 8
low draw.
b) The player with a made low of 9-7, is a slight
underdog to a player who has any 5 low draw, but a
big favorite over an opponent with any 8 low draw.
Against a player with a 7 or 6 low, the results vary
depending upon the cards each player holds.
c) The player with a made low of 9-6, is a slight
favorite over a player who has any 7, 6, or 5 low
draw, and a big favorite over an opponent with any 8
low draw.
d) The player with a made low of 9-5, is a slight
favorite over a player who has any 5 or 4 low draw,
and a big favorite over an opponent with any 8, 7 or
6 low draw.
e) The player with a made low of 9-4, is a big
favorite over an opponent with any 8, 7, 6, or 5 low
draw, and a slight favorite over an opponent with a 4
low draw.

Here are some common situations with a made


9 low hand:
Example:

You have a (A-3) 4,7,Q and your opponent has


(x-x) 6,8,9. Situation: You started with a good hand,
and both you and your opponent hit good cards on
4thstreet. When you bet on 4thstreet, your opponent
called. On 5thstreet, he hit good and you hit bad.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with a 9-8 low
hand, but you have a better four-card draw with a 74. Based on the strength of your draw, you are the
favorite to win the hand. Action: Jam the pot. You are
the favorite and want to take advantage of your
edge.

You have a (5-A) 4,7,Q and your opponent shows


(x-x) 4,7,9. Situation: You started with a good hand,
and both you and your opponent hit good cards on
4thstreet. On 5thstreet, your opponent hit good and
you hit bad.
Analysis: Your opponent has the leading hand with a
9-7 low made hand. You both have the same fourcard draw with a 7-4. It is not clear who is the
favorite, so you need to be cautious.
Action: Just call his bet, and see what develops on
6th street.

Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,5,Q and your opponent has


(x-x) 5,6,9. Situation: You started with a strong hand,
and hit a good card on 4thstreet. Your opponent
called your bet on 4thstreet. On 5th street, your
opponent hit a better card than you.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with a 9-6 low
made hand, but you have a better four-card draw.
Action: When he bets, just call. He is a slight favorite
despite your bike draw.

Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,6,Q and your opponent has


(x-x) 4,5,9. Situation: You started with a strong hand,
and hit a good card on 4thstreet. Your opponent a
good card on 4thstreet, and you called his bet. On
5thstreet, your opponent hit a better card than you.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with a 9-5 low
made hand, and he has a better low four-card draw
than you with a 5-4 against your 6-3.
Action: It depends. A fold is a play that will keep you
out of trouble. You need a good read on your
opponent, because he could have a worse four-card
draw than you. Given the pot odds, a call in this
situation is an acceptable play to see what happens
on 6th street.

You have a (A-3) 2,5,J and your opponent has (xx) 3,4,9. Situation: You started with a strong hand,
and hit a good card on 4thstreet. Your opponent hit a
better card. He bet and you called his bet on
4thstreet. On 5thstreet, your opponent hit a better
card than you.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with a 9-4 low
made hand, and he may also have a better fourcard draw. Action: With a bike draw, and the good
pot odds, you should call his bet. See what develops
on 6th street.

3. The player with a made 8 low is a favorite to


any drawing hand. Therefore, the player who has
the drawing hand should never jam the pot on 5th
street.

You have a (A-3) 2,5,J and your opponent has (xx) 3,8,6. Situation: You started with a strong hand,
and hit a good card on 4thstreet. Your opponent
called your bet on 4thstreet. On 5th street, your
opponent hit a better card than you.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with an 8-6
low made hand. But, you have the better four-card
draw with a 5-2 to your opponent's 6-3.
Action: When your opponent bets, you should call.

Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,7,J and your opponent has (xx) 3,8,6. Situation: You started with a strong hand,
and hit a good card on 4thstreet. Your opponent
called your bet on 4thstreet. On 5th street, your
opponent hit a better card than you.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with an 8-6
low made Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with
an 8-6 low made 3 to your 7-3.
Action: It depends. A fold is a play that will keep you
out of trouble. You need a good read on your
opponent, because he could have a worse four-card
draw than you. Given the pot odds, a call in this
situation is an acceptable play to see what happens
on 6thstreet. But, you should make your decision on
what happens on 6th street.

4. The player with a made 10 low is an underdog to


a drawing hand to a 7 low.
Example:

You have a (4-6) 7,3,J and your opponent has (xx) 3,8,10. Situation: You started with a strong hand,
and hit a good card on 4thstreet. Your opponent
called your bet on 4thstreet. On 5th street, your
opponent hit a better card than you.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with a 10-8
low made hand. But, you have the better four-card
draw with a 7-6 to your opponent's 8-3.
Action: When your opponent bets, you should jam
the pot as you are a slight favorite to win the pot.

5. When you are in the lead on 5th street, consider


a check-raise when your opponent is aggressive.
Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,6,7 and your opponent has (xx) 3,8,6. Situation: You started with a strong hand,
and hit a good card on 4thstreet. Your opponent
called your bet on 4thstreet. On 5th street, your
opponent hit a better card than you.
Analysis: You are in the lead, and your opponent
may have a made hand with an 8 low. You can bet or
try to make it look like you paired up by checking.
When your opponent bets, you check-raise signaling
that you are in the lead.
Action: If your opponent is aggressive, try to use it
against him by checking and then raising his bet.

6. A raise on 5 th street when you have a draw


against what looks like a made 9 hand can be
advantageous.
First, your opponent may not have made a 9 low.
Second, if you hit a good card on 6thstreet, your
opponent may fold to your bet. Third, it may get you a
free card on 6th street.

6th Street Play


It Usually Pays to Stay
Once you've made your decision on how to play
on 5thstreet, 6thstreet almost plays itself...almost. If
you are in the lead, you are going to want to make
your opponent pay to continue to chase. If you are
behind, and still think you will win if you hit your draw,
it pays to continue to 7thstreet with the right pot odds.
Of course, if your opponent has you drawing dead,
it's time to fold.

1. If you are still in the lead on 6th street, bet and try
to get your opponent to fold.
Example:

You have (A-5) 8,7,6,J and your opponent has (xx) A,3,9,K. Situation: You had a good starting hand,
fell behind on 4th street but decided to call to see
5thstreet. On 5thstreet, you took the lead, bet and
your opponent called. On 6thstreet, you both hit bad
cards.
Analysis: Your opponent wouldn't have called your
bet on 5th street without a strong draw.
You are still in the lead, and don't want him to catch
up. Action: Bet your hand.

2. If you are not sure if you are still in the lead


on 6th street, you should check. If your opponent
bets, and you can still outdraw him, look at the pot
odds. If the pot is giving you about 7-1 odds, you
should call his bet. (In most cases, you will have
the right odds to call his bet.)
Example:

You have (3-2) 8,A,6,K and your opponent has (xx) 6,7,J,5. Situation: You had a good starting hand,
fell behind on 4th, but was called by your opponent
when you bet your made 8-6 low. On 6 th street, he hit
good and you hit bad.
Analysis: You know that your opponent wouldn't have
made a call to your bet on 5thstreet without a draw to
a 7. The 5 on 6th street now puts you behind in the
hand, but you could outdraw your opponent on 7th
street.
Action: When you go to 7thstreet needing to hit your
hand to win, you usually have about a 15% chance to
win. Therefore, when he bets his hand, if the pot is
giving you about 7-1 odds call his bet.

You have (3-2) 5,7,6,J and your opponent has (xx) 6,4,J,3. Situation: You had a good starting hand,
fell behind on 4th, but was called by your opponent
when you bet your made 7-6 low. On 6 th street, he hit
good and you hit bad.
Analysis: You know that your opponent wouldn't have
made a call to your bet on 5thstreet without a draw to
a 6 or possibly a 7 low. So, that 3 on 6 thstreet for
your opponent may have you drawing dead as the
best low hand you can get is a 6-5. Action: You can't
be sure where you are on this hand. Folding is a
safe play, but you may actually be in the lead if he
has a 7-5 as his hole cards or paired up. You should
call.

3. If your opponent hit his card on 6th street, and it


looks reasonably certain that you are drawing dead,
fold.

You have (3-7) 6,8,7,Q and your opponent has (xx) A,2,J,5. Situation: You had a good starting hand,
and decided to call your opponent's bet on 4thstreet
with your 8-7 low draw. On 5 thstreet you took the
visible lead, but your opponent called your bet.
When he called your bet, he had a draw that could
beat an 8 low. On 6 thstreet your opponent hits a
good card and you hit a bad card.
Analysis: You have a draw to an 8 low, but your
opponent probably has hit his 7 low.
Action: When your opponent bets his hand, you
should fold.

Example:

You have (3-7) 6,8,Q,Q and your opponent has


(x-x) A,7,J,5. Situation: You had a good starting
hand, and decided to call your opponent's bet on
4thstreet with your 8-6 low draw. On 5 thstreet you
both hit bad cards. You both checked. On 6 th street
your opponent hit a good card and you hit a bad
card. Analysis: You have a draw to an 8 low, but your
opponent probably has made his 7 low.
Action: When your opponent bets his hand, you
should fold as you may be drawing dead.

4. If you had the best four-card draw on 5th


street, and missed, the pot odds will usually be big
enough for you to chase if you still can outdraw
your opponent.
Example:

You have (A-2) 3,4,8,K and your opponent has (xx) 6,7,3,5. Situation: You had a good starting hand,
had the lead on 4th street, but fell behind on 5thstreet.
You called your opponent's bet on 5thstreet since you
had a bike draw. On 6thstreet your opponent looks to
have a made hand with a 7-6 low. Analysis: You are
behind in the hand, but can win if you hit the right
card.
Action: When you go to 7thstreet needing to hit your
hand to win against a made low hand, you usually

have about a 15% chance to win. Therefore, when


your opponent bets his hand, if the pot is giving you
about 7-1 odds call his bet.

Example:

You have (4-6) 3,A,9,K and your opponent has (xx) 6,7,5,A. Situation: You had a good starting hand,
had the lead on 4th street, but fell behind on 5thstreet.
You called your opponent's bet on 5thstreet since you
had the better four-card draw with your 6-4 to his 65. On 6thstreet your opponent hit good, and you hit
bad.
Analysis: You are behind in the hand, but can win if
you hit the right card.
Action: When you go to 7thstreet needing to hit your
hand to win, you usually have around a 15% chance
to win. Therefore, when your opponent bets his hand,
if the pot is giving you about 7-1 odds call his bet.

5. If you missed your draw on 6th street, you


need to determine if you are now drawing dead. If
you are drawing dead, fold. If you think you can
outdraw your opponent, call his bet if the pot is
giving you 7-1 odds.

You have (A-2) 6,8,Q,K and your opponent has


(x-x) 4,7,9,A. Situation: You had a good starting
hand, but were still behind on 5thstreet. You called
your opponent's bet on 5thstreet since you had an 86 draw against the 9-7 made hand. On 6thstreet your
opponent hit good, and you hit bad.
Analysis: Now, your opponent may have a made 7
low hand, and if so, you are drawing dead.
Action: If you think you are drawing dead, fold to his
bet. If not, call his bet given the pot odds.

Here are some examples on how to play on


6th street: 1. You hit a bad card on 6 th street:
Example:

You have (4-5) 7,9,10,K and your opponent has


(x-x) 6,8,9,K. Situation: You should have folded this
hand on 5thstreet, but you decided to go to 6th street.
Both you and your opponent hit a bad card on 6th
street.
Analysis: You have one more shot at winning the
hand, and the odds are probably close to 4-1. Once
you called on 5thstreet, you might as well go to the
river.
Action: Call the bet, and hope to get lucky.

Example:

You have (4-5) 7,9,10,K and your opponent has


(x-x) 6,8,9,4. Situation: You should have folded this
hand on 5thstreet, but decided to go to 6thstreet. You
hit bad and your opponent hit a good card on 6th
street.
Analysis: If your opponent has what he's
representing, you are drawing dead.
Action: Fold when he bets. If he checks, just check
as he is simply trying to suck you into a bet on 7th
street.

You have (4-8) 6,2,4,Q and your opponent has (xx) A,6,J,J Situation: Your opponent checked behind
you on 5thstreet, since he was not sure if you were
trying to trap him. On 6th street, you and your
opponent hit bad cards.
Analysis: Your opponent may actually be the favorite
to win the pot, but now he is thinking he is on a one
card draw. Action: Bet, since you want to take the
pot down now.

Example:

You have (4-8) 6,2,4,Q and your opponent has (xx) A,6,J, 8 Situation: Your opponent checked behind
you on 5thstreet, since he was not sure if you were
trying to trap him. On 6th street, you hit bad and your
opponent hit a good card. Analysis: Your opponent
may think you have the better hand, but will not fold to
a bet here.
Action: Check and try to get a free card. If he bets,
you should fold.

Example:

You have (A-3) 7,2,4,K and your opponent has (xx) A,8,6,5. Situation: You bet on 5 thstreet since you
had the lead and your opponent called.
Analysis: You hit bad and your opponent hit a good
card on 6th street. Your opponent either has made
an 8 or 6 low. In either case, you have a draw to a
bike on 7th street.
Action: If your opponent bets, just call. If your
opponent checks, you should bet. Its rare that a
player will try to trap you on 6thstreet. Even if he has
a 6 low, you are getting the right odds to get lucky on
7th street.

You have a (A-3) 4,7,Q, J and your opponent has

(x-x) 6,8,9,K. Situation: You jammed the pot with your


7-4 draw, against his 9-8 made hand on 5 thstreet.
On 6thstreet, you both hit bad cards.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with a 9-8 low
hand, but you still can win if you hit your draw. You
jammed the pot on 5thstreet, which committed you to
go all the way to 7thstreet. You are 2-1 at winning the
hand, and the pot is giving you a lot more than that.
Action: When your opponent bets, just call.

Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,5,J,K and your opponent has


(x-x) 3,8,6,Q. Situation: On 5thstreet your opponent
bet his hand and you called. On 6th street, you both
hit bad cards.
Analysis: Your opponent is in the lead with his 8-6. It
doesn't matter since you have the bike draw and the
right pot odds to call.
Action: When your opponent bets, just call.

Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,7,J, K and your opponent has


(x-x) 3,8,6,5. Situation: On 5thstreet when your
opponent bet, you decided to call. On 6th street, he
hit a good card and you hit a bad card. Analysis:
Your opponent is in the lead with a made 8-5 or
possibly a 6-5 low hand. You are hoping for a 7 low.
Your call on 5th street was a marginal one.
Action: When your opponent bets, you should fold.
You could be drawing dead.

2. You hit a good card on 6th street:

You have (4-5) 7,9,10, A and your opponent has


(x-x) 6,8,9,K. Situation: You should have folded this

hand on 5thstreet, but decided to go to 6thstreet. You


hit a good card on 6thstreet, and your opponent hit
bad.
Analysis: You now have the lead on 6 thstreet with a
9-7 made hand. Your opponent knows he has to
beat that hand, and will call if he has a draw to an 8
low since he is about 3-1 and the pot will be offering
much better odds. Action: Bet.

Example:

You have (A-4) 5,J,Q,8 and your opponent has (xx) 6,K,7,Q. Situation: You checked on 5 thstreet, and
your opponent bet. You called.
Analysis: You were going to fold this hand, but you
decided to try to get lucky. On 6 th street, you hit
good, and your opponent hit bad. This looks like a
coin-flip now.
Action: Check and call if he bets. It's worth seeing
one last card.

Example:

You have (A-3) 7,2,4,5 and your opponent has (xx) A,8,6,5. Situation: You bet on 5 thstreet since you
had the lead and your opponent called.
Analysis: You both hit good cards on 6 thstreet, and
for you it gives you a bike. Your opponent may have
a 6 low, and will be reluctant to let that hand go.
Action: Bet, as your opponent will call. Or, go for a
checkraise.

>-->
You have (4-6) A,9,J,2 and your opponent has (xx) 8,4,6,5. Situation: You called on 5 thstreet when
your opponent bet, hoping to hit your 9 low draw. On
6thstreet, you hit a good card, as did your opponent.
Analysis: You hit your draw to a 6 low, but your
opponent is in the lead with an 8 low. You can't be
sure you have a better draw than your opponent.
And, even if you hit a 3, you may lose the pot.
Action: When your opponent bets, you need to
consider the pot odds. If the pot odds are 9-1, you
should call. If not, fold.

Example:

You have a (5-A) 4,7,Q,8 and your opponent

shows (x-x) 4,7,9, J.


Situation: You called your opponent's bet on
4thstreet. On 5th street, your opponent hit bad but you
hit a good card. Analysis: You hit your draw, which
puts you in the lead. If your opponent can't outdraw
you, he will fold. But, most likely, he will call your bet.
Action: When your opponent checks, bet your hand,
and see what he does.

Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,5,Q,8 and your opponent has


(x-x) 5,6,9,7. Situation: You just called your
opponent's bet on 5thstreet, since you are a slight
dog. On 6thstreet, you hit a low card, as did your
opponent.
Analysis: It's unclear how strong your opponent's
hand is now. When he bets, you are probably looking
at beating a 7-6. With a bike draw, you have to call. If
he checks his hand, you can take the free card.
Action: Your opponent bet. Call his bet. Even if he
has the 7-6 low, you are getting the right pot odds.

You have a (A-3) 2,6,Q,4 and your opponent has


(x-x) 4,5,9,3. Situation: On 5th street, when your
opponent bet you called his bet. On 6th street, you
both hit good cards.
Analysis: You have a 6-4 made low hand. Your
opponent could already have a bike. If he bets into
you, you need to call. If he checks, you don't want to
be check-raised, so check behind him.
Action: Your opponent bets. You have to call on
6thstreet, and it's going to be automatic call on
7thstreet with your 6-4 low. If your opponent has the
bike, that's just the way it goes.

Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,5,J, 8 and your opponent has


(x-x) 3,8,6, Q. Situation: On 5thstreet your opponent
bet his hand and you called. On 6thstreet, you hit
good and your opponent hit a bad card.
Analysis: You are in the lead with a made 8-5 low.
Your opponent may be able to pass you on 7 th
street. Action: Bet your hand.

3. You paired up on 6th street:


Example:

You have (4-8) 6,2,4, 8 and your opponent has (xx) A,6, J, J Situation: Your opponent checked behind
you on 5thstreet, since he was not sure if you were

trying to trap him. On 6th street, you hit an 8, and your


opponent paired his J. Analysis: Your exposed cards
give you a strong board, despite having two pairs.
Action: Bet, since you want to take the pot down
now.

You have (4-7) A,6,6,4 and your opponent has (xx) 4,7,8,J. Situation: You decided to call your
opponent's bet on 5thstreet, since you liked your
draw. On 6 thstreet, you hit a 4 and your opponent hit
a J.
Analysis: You now have two pairs, while your
opponent has a made low of 8-7. It looks like you
could have a 6-4 made hand, so your opponent will
probably check.
Action: If your opponent bets, fold. If he checks, take
the free card.

Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,5,J,J and your opponent has


(x-x) 3,4,9,4. Situation: On 5thstreet your opponent
bet and you called with your bike draw. On 6 thstreet,
you both paired up your exposed cards.
Analysis: Your opponent is still in the lead with a 9-4
low made hand, and is going to bet his hand. Notice
that he has two of the 4's you need to make your
bike. Fortunately, you don't the 4's you need to make
your bike. Fortunately, you don't 1.
Action: Your opponent bets, and you call.

6th Street Play


Advanced Concepts
Here are some advanced concepts that may come
in handy as you work on your Razz poker game.

1. The chances of hitting that one perfect card


you need to outdraw your opponent on 7th street:
If all 4 suits of that card are live=12%
If only 3 suits of that card are live=9%
If only 2 suits of that card are live=6%
If only 1 suit of that card is live=3%
This is important for making the right decision on
6thstreet, since you need to compare those odds to
the odds of hitting that perfect card on 7thstreet. And,
if you expect to be paid off when you hit that perfect
card on 7thstreet, your implied odds are better: that
is, the additional money you will win when your
opponent calls you down.

2. When both you and your opponent's hands


turn into mediocre lows on 6th street, you often want
to check on 6th street rather than risk losing two
bets.
Example:

You have (4-6) 3,7,10,10 and your opponent has

(x-x) 2,3,J,K. Situation: You had the lead on 5 thstreet


and bet your hand. Your opponent called your bet,
and you both hit bad on 6th street. On 6th street he
checks to you.
Analysis: You opponent called you on 5 thstreet since
he was hoping to hit his draw; its a draw that looks
to be a 6 or 5 low. If you bet here, your opponent will
call. In fact, he is only a slight underdog given your 10
low. On 7 thstreet, he will check and call if he hits a
7,8,9 or maybe even a 10. If he hits a 5 or 6, he will
probably bet or check-raise your bet.
If you check your mediocre low on 6thstreet, your
opponent will bet with a 5,6,7, or 8 low. You will have
to call this bet, even if you improve. If he checks, you
will bet if you hit your 7 low, and he will have to call
with his 9, 10 or even a Jack low. Therefore, if you
bet, you are risking two bets with a mediocre low. If
you check, you are risking just one bet which may
allow you to win that same one bet from your
opponent. Action: Check your mediocre low on 6 th
street.

Example:

You have (4-8) 3,7,Q,10 and your opponent has


(x-x) A,6,J,K. Situation: Your opponent was leading
on 5thstreet and bet his J low. You called. On 6 th

street, you hit a 10 and he hit a K. Analysis: You and


your opponent both have mediocre lows. You have a
10 low and your opponent has a J low. If you bet on
6th street, he will call your hand. He is only a slight
dog. By betting on 6thstreet you are risking losing
two bets. While you are leading on 6thstreet, by
checking you are risking less and most likely,
winning the same number of bets.
Action: Check your hand.

3. When both you and your opponent's hands


turn into poor lows on 6th street, it is okay to check
and call when you are behind since the pot odds
are usually right.
Example:

You have (4-7) A,J,Q,K and your opponent has


(x-x) 6,10,Q,Q. Situation: Your opponent bet on
5thstreet, hoping you would fold your Q-J to his Q-10.
You called, and on 6 thstreet, neither you nor your
opponent improved.
Analysis: You need to check this hand, and if your
opponent bets on 6thstreet, the pot odds will require
you to call his bet. You are probably 4-1 to win this
hand, and the pot odds are probably better.
Action: Check and call your opponent's bet.

4. Raising your opponent on 6th street when

three of your exposed cards are stronger than your


opponent's exposed three cards is an advanced
play that gives you an opportunity to win more bets,
without costing you more.
Example:

You have (8-2) A,6,J,5 and your opponent has (xx) 7,6,10,5. Situation: You lost the lead on 5 thstreet.
On 6thstreet, your opponent shows a 7-6 and acts
first with a bet. You have a made low of 8-6 and your
opponent may have you beat with his 7-6 made low.
Analysis: When he bets, you can call and hope to hit
a good card to make a 6 low on 7thstreet. Or, if you
raise, he may fold to you if he has paired up, and if
not, he will check to you on 7thstreet. If you hit your 6
low, you will most likely win another bet on 7 th street.
If not, you lose the same two bets. Action: Raise.

7thStreet When in doubt, call!


In most cases, once you've reached 7thstreet you
are committed to the hand. Why? Your opponent
may have paired up once, twice or three times in the
hand. Or, maybe your opponent is bluffing. Or,
maybe you have the better hand. On 7thstreet, if you
have any shot at winning the pot, call your opponent's
bet. Remember this: To lose one bet is acceptable,
but to lose the entire pot for that one bet is just
wrong.

1. When you act first on 7th street, you need to


determine whether to bet or check-raise, and
check-call or check-fold.
Bet or check-raise: If you believe you are ahead,
bet your hand. However, if you believe your opponent
will bet his hand when you check, go for the checkraise if you have a strong hand.

Example:

You have (A-3) 2,9,4,5 (J) and your opponent has


(x-x) A,10,6,5 (x)
Situation: You have a bike and your opponent called
your bet on 5th and 6th streets.
Analysis: If you bet, your opponent will call you if he
hit a 6, 7 or maybe even an 8 low, but most likely fold
any other hand. So, you win one bet. But, if you
check, your opponent will bet his 6, 7 and maybe

even 8 low, and you can check-raise. When you


check-raise, he will most likely call you, especially if
he hit his 6 low. So, if you check-raise you have an
opportunity to win two bets instead of one.
Action: Check, with the hope of check-raising.

Example:

You have a (A-3) 4,7,Q, J (5) and your opponent


has (x-x) 6,8,9,K (x).
Situation: You hit a great card on 7 thstreet, as you
now have a 7-5 low.
Analysis: If your opponent has a 9 low, he will check
fearing you hit your draw. If he has an 8 low, he may
or not bet. Since you have the winning hand, and
your opponent may not bet, you must bet your hand.
Action: Bet, as your opponent will most likely call you
with his 8 or 9 low.
Check-call or check-fold: When you check your
hand in these situations, you are hoping to see the
cards on 7thstreet without a bet. When your
opponent bets after you check, if you have a shot at
winning you need to call the bet given the pot odds.
Only fold when you absolutely, positively know you
are beat.

You have a (A-3) 4,7,Q,J (J) and your opponent


has (x-x) 6,8,9,K (x).
Situation: You jammed the pot with your 7-4 draw
against his made 9-8 low hand on 5thstreet since
you were a statistical favorite. On 6th street, you both
hit bad cards.
Analysis: You missed your draw on 7 thstreet. Brickbrickbrick...it's what makes Razz a pain in the azz.
Action: Check your hand. If your opponent bets, just
fold.

Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,5,J,8 (K) and your opponent


has (x-x) 3,8,6,Q (x).
Situation: You were in the lead on 6 thstreet, so you
bet your hand. You didn't improve on 7 thstreet, but
still have a nice 8-5 low.

Analysis: If you bet and your opponent didn't hit his 8


low, he will fold. If he improved, he will call. If you
check, you may induce a bluff, or he may have you
beat with a 6 low. Action: Check your hand, and call
if he bets.

2. When you act second on 7th street, you are


reacting to your opponent's action. If he bets, you
can fold, call or raise. If he checks, you can check
or bet.
Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,5,J,K (Q) and your opponent


has (x-x) 3,8,6,Q (x).
Situation: You called hoping to hit your bike. Instead
you have a J low.
Analysis: It is almost certain your opponent has you
beat, and will come out betting. When he bets, you
can fold being almost certain he has better than a J
low. But, even in this situation, a call is not an awful
play
Action: When your opponent bets, fold.

You have a (A-3) 2,5,J,K (9) and your opponent


has (x-x) 3,8,6,Q (x).
Situation: Here you end up with a 9 low.
Analysis: Your opponent has been betting on 5 thand
6thstreet, so you are fairly certain he has an 8 low.
However, marginal calls are acceptable plays in
Razz poker since the pot is usually big on 7th street.
Action: When your opponent bets, call his bet and
hope for the best. If your opponent checks his hand,
check it down.

Example:

3,8,6,Q (x).
Situation: Here you end up with a 7 low.
Analysis: Your opponent checks his hand, and you
have to decide to check or to bet. In this case, when
he checks you should bet, as he would bet his 6 low.
He may be trapping you, but he has to be concerned

that you have a monster since you called him when


you hit bad on 5th and 6th street.
Action: When your opponent checks, bet your hand.
He will have to call your bet with an 8 low, or fold if he
missed. Example:

You have a (A-3) 2,5,J,K (6) and your opponent


has (x-x) 3,8,6,Q (x).
Situation: Here you end up with a 6 low.
Analysis: Your opponent bets his hand, which could
mean he is bluffing, or has an 8 low, or maybe even
a 6 low. Given these different outcomes, you should
raise with your 6-5 low. Action: He bets, and you
raise. If he re-raises, you'll call. If he just calls, you
probably won.

3. If there is any chance your opponent's bet on the


end is a bluff, you must call.

9-J (x).
Situation: You called on 6 thstreet hoping to outdraw
your opponent.
Analysis: Your opponent bets his hand. Since he
wouldn't bet a 9 low, it seems he has an 8 low. He is
acting like he doesn't fear your draw, which means
he may be bluffing. Giving the pot size on 7th street,
you are going to have to call.
Action: When he bets, call and hope he is bluffing.

4. Players tend to avoid betting on the end when


they only have a 9 low and the opponent shows two
low cards on the board. They fear their opponent
has outdrawn them on 7th street.
Example:

You have (2-3) A,8,Q,K (x) and your opponent


has (x-x) 7,8,9,J (x).
Situation: You called on 6 thstreet hoping to outdraw
your opponent.
Analysis: Your opponent checks his hand since he
has a 9 low and is afraid you hit your draw.
Action: If you can beat a 9, bet your hand.

5. When the pot has gotten big on 7th street, if there


is any chance of a bluff working when you miss, bet.
The pot is so big on 7th street, if you had the lead
and have been betting throughout the hand, you must
bet again on the end and hope your opponent folds.

Example:

You have (4-8) 6,2,4, 8 (8) and your opponent


has (x-x) A,6, J, J (x)
Situation: Your opponent checked behind you on
5thstreet, since he was not sure if you were trying to
trap him. On 6th street, you bet and your opponent
called your bet.
Analysis: You have a full house and have no chance
of winning this hand. However, you have a strong
board and your opponent will fold if he hit bad on 7th
street.
Action: Bet, and unless your opponent hit a good
card, you will win the pot.
In this last hand, if you were the opponent and had
a J low, would you call the bet on the end?

Strategies into Action:


Actual Play on Full Tilt Poker
The game is $5/$10 limit Razz poker. I
recommend playing with a buy-in of 20 times the big
blind. The antes are $1 and the bring-in bet is $1.50.
While you can follow every hand, to make it easier I
highlighted in bold the hands I played.
*********** # 38 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571448143: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:26:01 ET 2007/12/20
Board: 9 8 2 8 4 T J 6
Me: (10-2) 8. I fold after there is a raise and re-raise.
$199.
*********** # 39 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571458291: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:26:59 ET 2007/12/20
Board: 2 3 3 5 8 8 4
Me: (10-10) 3. I fold.
$198
*********** # 40 **************

FullTiltPoker Game #4571465242: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:27:38 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: Q A 10 7 8 2 Q
Me: (2-8) A. The Q to my left brings it in. I have 6
points plus 2 duplicates, minus 1 card needed,
minus 3 low card behind me.
Total 4 points. Acting first in the hand, I raise. I get
two callers.
*** 4TH STREET *** Me: (2-8) A,5
Opponent A: (x-x) 8,5 Opponent B: (x-x) 2,K
Im in the lead and bet. Both players call.
*** 5TH STREET *** Me: (2-8) A,5,2
Opponent A: (x-x) 8,5,5 Opponent B: (x-x) 2,K,K

We all pair up on 5th street. But, Im in the


visible lead. I bet and both opponents fold.
$230
*********** # 42 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571483750: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:29:22 ET 2007/12/20
Board: K 2 4 7 4 A 5
Me: (7-Q) 2. I fold, after there is a raise of the bringin bet. $229
*********** # 43 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571489293: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:29:53 ET 2007/12/20
Board 7 J 7 J 3 5 2 J
Me: (2-3) J. I fold after the player with the 2 calls the
bring-in bet.
FullTiltPoker Game #4571494634: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:30:23 ET 2007/12/20
Board: 3 9 7 8 3 K 3 K
Me (J-4) 9. I fold after the player with the 3 raises.
$227
*********** # 45 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571499755: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:30:52 ET 2007/12/20
Board 2 9 K 3 10 9 5
Me: (3-10) 9. I fold after the player with the 3 calls the
bringin bet.
$226
*********** # 46 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571511176: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:31:58 ET 2007/12/20
Board 5 K J 3 K J 2
Me: (8-10) K. Im the bring-in bettor. I get raised and
fold. $223.50

*********** # 47 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571515490: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:32:23 ET 2007/12/20
Board Q 9 8 Q 3 10 J A
Me: (5-6) 9. I fold after the player with the 3 raises.
$222.50

FullTiltPoker Game #4571522560: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:33:04 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: 7 5 9 Q 8 5 9 7
Me: (3-2) 5.
The player with the Q brings it in. The player with the
7 calls. Another player with a 7 raises. I have 10
points plus 1 duplicate, and I caller and I raiser.
Total points is 8 points, so I re-raise.
*** 4TH STREET ***
Me: (3-2) 5,8
Opponent A: (x-x) 7,8
Opponent B: (x-x) 7,Q
Im in the lead and bet. Both players call.
*** 5TH STREET ***
Me: (3-2) 5,8,6
Opponent A: (x-x) 7,8,A
Opponent B: (x-x) 7,Q,A
Im in the lead and would like to have at most one
opponent. I bet and only Player B calls.
*** 6TH STREET ***
Me: (3-2) 5,8,6,9
Opponent B: (x-x) 7,Q,A,7
I bet expecting my opponent to fold. He calls.
*** 7TH STREET ***
Me: (3-2) 5,8,6,9,7
Opponent B: (x-x) 7,Q,A,7 (x)
My only hope to win more is if my opponent made a
7 low, or decides to bluff. I check and he checks. He
mucks as I have a 7-6 low.
FullTiltPoker Game #4571539392: Table Hollywood

- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:34:42 ET 2007/12/20


Board: 8 5 9 K 6 7 10 K Me: (5-Q) 5. I fold to a
raise. $277
*********** # 50 **************

FullTiltPoker Game #4571545068: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:35:14 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: 7 9 8 7 2 3
Me: (2-6) 7. The player to my left is sitting out. The
player to my right brings it in, the player with the 7
calls, as does the player with the 3.
I have 6 points plus 3 duplicates, minus 1 card
needed, minus 2 callers.
Total 6 points, so I raise. Both players call.
*** 4TH STREET ***
Me: (2-6) 7,5
Opponent A: (x-x) 9,4
Opponent B: (x-x) 7,8
Im in the lead and bet. Only Player B calls.
*** 5TH STREET ***
Me: (2-6) 7,5,8
Opponent B: (x-x) 7,8,6
Im in the lead. I bet and get called. Me: (2-6) 7,5,8,K
Player B: (x-x) 7,8,6,2
My opponent is in the lead and bets. I decide to call
since he limped into the pot, and may have a 9 low
plus I may outdraw him, plus the pot odds were fairly
good at over 6-1.
*** 7TH STREET ***
Me: (2-6) 7,5,8,K,J
Player B: (x-x) 7,8,6,2 (x)
My opponent bets. I decide to call with my 8 low. My
opponent shows a 7-6 low. I lose.
$236
*********** # 51 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571566355: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:37:16 ET -

2007/12/20
Board 8 A Q 3 9 5 4 Q
Me: (A-K) 8. A player raises and I fold. $235
*********** # 52 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571571382: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:37:45 ET 2007/12/20
Board: J 10 7 9 A 4 6
Me (K-3) J. Im the bring-in bettor, get raised and
fold. FullTiltPoker Game #4571575987: Table
Hollywood - $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:38:11
ET - 2007/12/20
Board J 8 3 A 9 Q Me (Q-5) J. I fold. $231.50
*********** # 54 ************** FullTiltPoker Game
#4571580185: Table Hollywood - $5/$10 Ante $1 Limit Razz - 23:38:36 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: 9 J 3 4 4 Q
Me: (A-5) 9. I fold to the player who raises showing a
3. $230.50
*********** # 55 ************** FullTiltPoker Game
#4571585586: Table Hollywood - $5/$10 Ante $1 Limit Razz - 23:39:07 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: 10 6 9 A Q 8 Q
Me: (6-7) 10. The player with the Ace raises. I fold.
$229.50
*********** # 56 ************** FullTiltPoker Game

#4571594194: Table Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 Limit Razz - 23:39:57 ET - 2007/12/20


Board: 7 3 J 2 Q 10 4 7
Me: (6-4) 3. The player to my left returns. The player
with the Q brings-it in, and the 7 folds to me.
I have 9 points plus 2 duplicates, minus 1 card
needed, and 3 low cards behind me.
Total points is 7 points, so I raise. The player with the
2 calls, Me: (6-4) 3,7
Player A: (x-x) 2,J I bet and he folds. $243
*********** # 57 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571600408: Table Hollywood

- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:40:33 ET 2007/12/20


Board: J J 3 10 9 K 4 Me: (2-Q) J. I fold. $242
*********** # 58 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571606057: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:41:05 ET 2007/12/20
Board 10 7 4 A J 8 Q 9 Me: (J-Q) 7. I fold $241
*********** # 59 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571615337: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:42:00 ET 2007/12/20
Board: 7 Q 5 9 6 J 8 3
Me: (2-7) Q. I am the bring-in bettor. There are two
callers. So, I have to see 4th street. I hit a pair on 4th
and fold to a bet.

FullTiltPoker Game #4571621112: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:42:32 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: J 3 2 6 K J 4 9
Me: (6-5) 3. The K brings it in, and everyone folds to
me. I have 9 points plus 2 duplicates, minus needing
2 card, and 2 low cards behind me.
Total points is 7, so I raise. Everyone folds
$247
*********** # 61 **************

FullTiltPoker Game #4571627559: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:43:10 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: 10 6 8 Q J 8 7 5
Me: (K-2) 6. The Q brings-it in, and everyone folds to
me. I have to get by one player to steal the blinds
and I have one low card in the hole. I raise. The
player with the 8 calls me. If I dont hit good and my
opponent hits bad, Im folding.
*** 4TH STREET ***
Me: (K-2) 6, 2
Opponent A: (x-x) 8, 3

I check. My opponent checks.


*** 5TH STREET *** Me: (K-2) 6,2,K
Opponent A: (x-x) 8,3,J We both check.
*** 6TH STREET *** Me: (K-2) 6,2,K,Q
Opponent A: (x-x) 8,3,J,4 He bets and I fold.
$241

FullTiltPoker Game #4571637256: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:44:05 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: 7 4 9 2 5 4 8 7
Me: (6-3) 4. The player to my right brings it in, and
the player with the 8 raises.
I have 9 points plus one duplicate, minus 2 cards
needed and minus 2 for the raiser.
Total is 6 points. I re-raise, and my opponent calls.
*** 4TH STREET ***
Me: (6-3) 4, 3
Opponent A: (x-x) 8, Q
I have the visible lead and bet. My opponent folds.
Given the re-raise, he should have called.
$258.50
*********** # 63 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571643123: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:44:39 ET 2007/12/20
Board 7 A 3 5 9 6 A Q Me: (10-Q) 7. I fold.
$257.50
*********** # 64 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571646824: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:45:00 ET 2007/12/20
Board: 10 3 6 J 8 4 5 8
Me: (7-9) 3. There are two callers before it gets to
me. I have negative points. I fold.
FullTiltPoker Game #4571656934: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:45:58 ET 2007/12/20
Board: Q 8 7 10 10 10 K

Me: (3-J) 8. The last King brings it in. I have to get by


the player with the 7 to steal the pot. I decide to fold.
Turns out everyone folds to the bring-in bettor. I hate
when this happens.
$255.50
*********** # 66 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571659846: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:46:15 ET 2007/12/20
Board: 3 A 10 K J 8 10 4
Me: (3-8) A. The last King brings it in. I have 6 points,
plus 2 duplicates, minus one card needed and 2 low
cards behind me. Total points is 5 points, so I raise.
Everyone folds. $264.
*********** # 67 **************

FullTiltPoker Game #4571663921: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:46:38 ET - 2007/12/20
Board 5 6 8 9 A 3 7 8
Me: (2-5) 6. The 9 brings it in, and the player with the
5 raises. I have 9 points, plus 2 duplicates, minus 1
card needed, and 1 player behind me.
Total points is 9 points. I re-raise, and get called.
Me: (2-5) 6,6
Opponent: (x-x) 5,6
My opponent bets. Since I re-raised, Im getting pot
odds to call and see another card.
*** 5TH STREET *** Me: (2-5) 6,6,2
Opponent: (x-x) 5,6,10 My opponent bets. I fold.
$248
*********** # 68 **************

FullTiltPoker Game #4571672485: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:47:28 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: 5 5 J 6 K 10 4
Me: (4-2) 5. The King brings it in, and the player with
the 4 calls. I have 10 points, plus 3 duplicates, 1
player behind me, and 1 caller.

Total points is 11 points, so I raise. The player with


the 6 showing re-raises. The callers fold, and I reraise again. I am heads-up.
*** 4TH STREET ***
Me: (4-2) 5,7
Opponent: (x-x) 6,3
He has the lead and bets. I call.
*** 5TH STREET ***
Me: (4-2) 5,7,3
Opponent: (x-x) 6,3,10
I have the lead and bet. He calls. Me: (4-2) 5,7,3,A
Opponent: (x-x) 6,3,10,8
I bet when I see his 8 hit. I should have waited
because I noticed I hit a wheel after I made the bet. I
acted too fast. The right play may have been to
check, and try to win more on the river. He folded.
$285
*********** # 69 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571689627: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:49:06 ET 2007/12/20
Board 8 10 8 3 9 10 6
Me: (6-6) 10. I fold. I was not the bring-in bettor.
$284.
*********** # 70 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571701739: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:50:18 ET 2007/12/20
Board 4 7 7 5 J
Me: (Q-K) 7. I fold.. Three players sat out. $283
*********** # 71 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571705428: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:50:39 ET 2007/12/20
Board K 9 Q 3 6 4 Me (9-2) 9. I fold. $282

FullTiltPoker Game #4571708707: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:50:59 ET - 2007/12/20

Board 4 9 4 2 2 8 6
Me: (2-6) 9. I have to bring it in. I get one caller.
*** 4TH STREET *** Me: (2-6) 9, 6
Opponent: (x-x) 2,8 He bet and I fold.
$279.50
*********** # 73 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571713174: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:51:24 ET 2007/12/20
Board: K 9 J Q 3 9 4 Me: (J-3) 9. I fold $278.50
*********** # 74 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571716572: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:51:44 ET 2007/12/20
Board: Q 2 Q 3 3 A 4
Me: (6-9) 2. The bring-in bettor was the Q to my left. I
had negative points. I fold.
FullTiltPoker Game #4571725423: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:52:35 ET 2007/12/20
Board: 7 4 Q K 3 9 K
Me: (8-6) 4. The K to my right brings it in. I raise as
everyone folds to me.
$284
*********** # 76 ************** FullTiltPoker Game
#4571729143: Table Hollywood - $5/$10 Ante $1 Limit Razz - 23:52:57 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: 2 6 Q Q 4 8 7 Me: (6-2) 6. I fold. $283
*********** # 77 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571732923: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:53:19 ET 2007/12/20
Board: 10 A J J K 10 5
Me: (10-5) A. The K brings it in, and gets called by
the player with the 5. I fold.
$282
*********** # 78 **************

FullTiltPoker

Game

#4571740090:

Table

Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:54:01 ET - 2007/12/20


Board: J 7 8 2 8 4 9 2
Me: (4-A) 7. The J to my left brings-it in. I have 8
points, plus one duplicate, minus 2 cards needed on
board.
Me: (4-A) 7,2
Opponent: (x-x) 4,3 He bets and I call.
*** 5TH STREET *** Me: (4-A) 7,2,6
Opponent: (x-x) 4,3,9 I bet and he calls.
*** 6TH STREET *** Me: (4-A) 7,2,6,Q
Opponent: (x-x) 4,3,9,Q I bet and he calls.
*** 7TH STREET ***
Me: (4-A) 7,2,6,Q, (3)
Opponent: (x-x) 4,3,9,Q (x)
I bet and he calls. He mucks when I show the 6 low.
$327.50
*********** # 79 ************** FullTiltPoker Game
#4571757331: Table Hollywood - $5/$10 Ante $1 Limit Razz - 23:55:42 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: 10 4 5 K 9 6 7 8
Me: (3-Q) 4. I fold, after the player with the 6 showing
raises. $326.50
*********** # 80 ************** FullTiltPoker Game
#4571761972: Table Hollywood - $5/$10 Ante $1 Limit Razz - 23:56:09 ET - 2007/12/20
Board K A 4 2 8 J 2 J
Me (A-A) A. First time Ive ever gotten rolled up
Aces! I fold.

FullTiltPoker Game #4571769299: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:56:53 ET - 2007/12/20
Board 10 4 Q 9 8 7 8 9
Me: (9-6) 4. The Q is the bring-in bettor, and gets
called by the second player with the 8 showing. I
decide to call given the favorable pot odds.
*** 4TH STREET ***
Me: (9-6) 4,5

Opponent A: (x-x) Q,K


Opponent B: (x-x) 8,7
I bet with the visible lead. Both players fold.
$335.50
*********** # 82 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571778686: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:57:48 ET 2007/12/20
Board: 3 10 8 6 2 J 9 Me: (10-5) 10. I fold.
$334.50
*********** # 83 **************

FullTiltPoker Game #4571783603: Table


Hollywood $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz 23:58:17 ET - 2007/12/20
Board: 7 2 J 3 K 9 Q
Me: (5-A) 2. The K brings it in. The 7 raises. I have
10 points plus one duplicate, one card needed, and
one low card behind me.
Me: (5-A) 2, 10
Opponent: (x-x) 7, A
He bets and I call.
*** 5TH STREET ***
Me: (5-A) 2,10,4
Opponent: (x-x) 7,A,9
He bets. He has a 9-7 made hand, but with a bike
draw Im the favorite. I raise and he calls.
*** 6TH STREET ***
Me: (5-A) 2,10,4,3
Opponent: (x-x) 7,A,9,J
I hit a wheel. I decide to bet since he is going to be
chasing his money. He calls.
*** 7TH STREET ***
Me: (5-A) 2,10,4,3 (K)
Opponent: (x-x) 7,A,9,J (x)
I bet and he calls. I win with my wheel.
$394
*********** # 84 **************
FullTiltPoker Game #4571797205: Table Hollywood

- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 23:59:38 ET 2007/12/20


Board A J Q K 5 4 10 3
Me: (8-6) J. I fold, after the player with the 5 raises.
$393.
*********** # 85 ************** FullTiltPoker Game
#4571805045: Table Hollywood - $5/$10 Ante $1 Limit Razz - 0:00:24 ET - 2007/12/21
Board: 10 10 Q Q 10 4 8
Me: (A-8) 10. I folded after the player with the 4
raises. $392
FullTiltPoker Game #4571809701: Table Hollywood
- $5/$10 Ante $1 - Limit Razz - 0:00:52 ET 2007/12/21
Board: A 7 K Q 10 8 7 8 Me: (Q-3) 7. I fold
$391.

Total: Win $191: Played 49 hands in 29 minutes.

Razz Poker
Player Cheat Sheet
3rd street:
Is it a playing hand, stealing hand or a folding hand?
If its a playing hand: Use the Starting Hand Point
System
If its a stealing hand and you get called, prepare to
fold

4thstreet:
You hit a good card: Bet or Call
You hit a mediocre or bad card: Use the Two-Level
Rule You have the visible lead: Bet

Two-Level Rule:
When your 4th street card is two-levels lower or more
than your opponent, you bet. If not, check or fold.
(Corollary: When your card is two-levels higher or
more than your opponent, check or fold.)
Important: Exceptions to folding on 4th street:
There was 2 or more raises on 3rd street, call
You have 3 cards to a bike, call

5thstreet:
Use the Lead or Four-card draw rule:

If you are ahead in both: Bet.


If you are ahead in one: Call
If you have neither: Fold
Should you jam the pot?
Made 10 hand: No. Its never a favorite against
a drawing hand
Made 9-8, 9-7: Yes, but only against any 8 draw
(ties with 7 or 6 low)
All other made 9 hands: Yes. Favorite against all
draws
Made 8 Hand: Yes. Favorite against all draws
(Corollary: Use the above info to know when to jam
as the drawing hand)

6thstreet:
Give yourself a chance to get lucky on the river if:

You are not drawing dead and


You are getting 7-1 odds.
7thstreet:
What your read? You make the call....

Razz Poker Tips


Dont forget pot odds. A pot that has been raised
and re-raised will usually give you the right pot odds
to call even if you hit bad on 4th street.
The Slow-play. Limp in first with a good hand,
especially with one or more lower cards behind you.
If you get raised, call the raise. The raiser wont put
you on a good hand. As a result, you can win a big
pot if you hit good cards.
Take advantage of the aggressive players to
your right. You notice a player to your right who
always raises with the lowest or 2ndlowest card.
When you have position, you should re-raise even
with a higher exposed low card to get heads-up. If
you hit good, youll win with a bet on 4th street if he is
stealing.
The Short-handed Limp. When the table is shorthanded, be more inclined to limp into the pot with a
good hand. It will give you an opportunity to win a
bigger pot, and it will cost you little to fold if you miss.
The Limp/Re-raise. Limp in first with a good
hand, another player limps in as well, and a third
player raises. Since the limper is between you and
the raiser, re-raise to get heads-up. Even if the
raiser has a lower exposed card than you, make this
play. Getting heads-up significantly improves your
chance of winning. Also, if the original raiser doesnt
raise, he may not be that strong after all.
Take advantage of the bad players. A player who
calls a raise as the bring-in bettor with a picture card
exposed. Raise that player when he is the bring-in
bettor, if you have the chance to get heads up.
Take advantage of the bad players. A bad player
is one who limps in or calls a raise with an exposed
card 10+. Try to get heads-up with this player.
Take advantage of passive players to your left.
When you have the lowest or 2ndlowest exposed

card compared to the passive players to your left,


raise as a steal. If you get re-raised, you can fold. If
you have one low card in the hole, call the raise. If
you hit good on 4th street, you may win with a bet.
Dont chase without proper odds on 4thstreet.
When there is only one raise on 3rdstreet, and you
are heads up, if you hit bad on 4thstreet, fold when
your opponent bets. The pot odds will not be right for
a call.
Take advantage of the aggressive Ace-raisers.
A player who always raises with an exposed Ace
can be taken advantage of heads-up. Re-raise that
player with a low exposed card to get heads-up. If
you hit good, you will win with a bet on 4thstreet if he
was trying to steal.
The Winning hand check. When you are headsup on 6thstreet, and your opponent cant catch up
with you, check your hand. Your opponent will most
likely check as well. On 7thstreet, bet out. If your
opponent is aggressive and hits a good card, he
may raise you. Now, you can re-raise and win a big
pot.

Appendix: Simulations
The following simulations compare player A's
draw against Player B's made 9-low hand:
Example: 9-4 low against Bike draw
Player A: (A-2) 3,4,10
Player B (3-4) A,2,9
Player B is a 55% favorite.
Example: 9-4 low against Bike draw
Player A: (A-2) 3,5,10
Player B (3-4) A,2,9
Player B is a 61% favorite.
Example: 9-4 low against Bike draw
Player A: (A-2) 4,5,10
Player B (3-4) A,2,9
Player B is a 61% favorite.
Example: 9-4 low against 6-4 draw
Player A: (A-2) 4,6,10
Player B (3-4) A,2,9
Player B is a 63% favorite.
Example: 9-4 low against 6-5 draw
Player A: (A-2) 5,6,10
Player B (3-4) A,2,9
Player B is a 64% favorite.
Example: 9-4 low against 7-4 draw Player A: (A2) 4,7,J
Player B (3-4) A,2,9
Player A: (A-2) 5,7,J
Player B (3-4) A,2,9
Player B is a 68% favorite.
Example: 9-4 low against 7-6 draw Player A: (A2) 5,7,J
Player B (3-4) A,2,9
Player B is a 69% favorite.
Example: 9-5 low against Bike draw Player A:
(A-2) 3,4,10
Player B (3-4) 2,5,9
Player B is a 52% favorite.

Example: 9-5 low against Bike draw Player A:


(A-2) 3,5,10
Player B (3-4) 2,5,9
Player B is a 52% favorite.
Example: 9-5 low against Bike draw Player A:
(4-2) 3,5,10
Player B (3-4) 2,5,9
Player B is a 55% favorite.
Example: 9-5 low against Bike draw Player A:
(4-2) 3,5,10
Player B (3-4) 2,5,9
Player B is a 55% favorite.
Example: 9-5 low against 6-4 draw Player A: (A2) 6,4,J
Player B (3-4) 2,5,9
Player A: (A-2) 6,5,J
Player B (3-4) 2,5,9
Player B is a 61% favorite.
Example: 9-5 low against 7-4 draw Player A: (A2) 4,7,J
Player B (3-4) 2,5,9
Player B is a 65% favorite.
Example: 9-5 low against 7-5 draw Player A: (A2) 5,7,J
Player B (3-4) 2,5,9
Player B is a 65% favorite.
Example: 9-5 low against 7-6 draw Player A: (A2) 7,6,J
Player B (3-4) 2,5,9
Player B is a 68% favorite.
Example: 9-6 low against Bike draw Player A:
(A-3) 4,5,Q
Player B (A-2) 3,6,9
Player B is a 54% favorite.
Example: 9-6 low against a Bike draw Player A:
(A-3) 4,5,Q
Player B (4-3) 5,6,9
This is a coin-flip.

Example: 9-6 low against 6-5 draw Player A: (A3) 5,6, Q


Player B (A-3) 4,6,9
Player A: (A-3) 5,6, Q Player B (4-5) 6,2,9
Player B is a 53% favorite.
Example: 9-6 low against a 7-4 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 4,7,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,6,9
Player B is a 63% favorite.
Example: 9-6 low against an 8-3 low draw
Player A: (A-2) 3,8,K
Player B (4-3) 5,6,9
Player B is a 69% favorite.
Example: 9-6 low against an 8-7 low draw
Player A: (A-2) 7,8,K
Player B (4-3) 5,6,9
Player B is a 74% favorite.
Example: 9-7 low against Bike draw Player A:
(A-3) 5,4,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,7,9
Player A is a 53% favorite.
Example: 9-7 low against Bike draw Player A:
(A-3) 5,4,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,7,9
Player A is a 53% favorite.
Example: 9-7 low against 6-4 draw Player A: (A3) 6,4,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,7,9
Player A: (A-3) 5,6, Q Player B (A-3) 4,7,9
Player B is a 52% favorite.
Example: 9-7 low against a 6-5 draw Player A:
(A-3) 5,6, Q
Player B (4-5) 6,7,9
Player A is a 53% favorite.
Example: 9-7 low against 7-3 draw Player A: (A2) 3,7, Q
Player B (A-3) 4,7,9
Player B is a 52% favorite.

Example: 9-7 low against a 7-4 low draw Player


A: (A-3) 4,7,Q
Player B (A-3) 6,7,9
Player A is a 52% favorite.
Example: 9-7 low against a 7-4 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 4,7,Q
Player B (4-5) 6,7,9
Player A is a 53% favorite.
Example: 9-7 low against a 7-5 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 7,5,Q
Player B (2-3) 4,7,9
Player B is a 61% favorite.
Example: 9-7 low against a 7-5 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 7,5,Q
Player B (2-3) 4,7,9
Example:9-7 low against a 7-5 low draw Player A:
(A-3) 7,5,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,7,9
Player B is a 60% favorite.
Example: 9-7 low against 7-6 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 7,6,J
Player B (2-5) 4,7,9
Player B is a 64% favorite.
Example: 9-7 low against 8-3 low draw Player
A: (A-2) 3,8,J
Player B (4-5) 6,7,9
Player B is a 68% favorite.
Example: Rough 9 low against 6-4 draw Player
A: (A-3) 4,6, Q
Player B (A-3) 4,8,9
Player A is a 56% favorite.
Example: Rough 9 low against 6-5 draw Player
A: (A-3) 5,6, Q
Player B (A-3) 4,8,9
Player A is a 54% favorite.
Example: Rough 9 low against a 7-4 low draw
Player A: (A,3) 4,7,Q
Player B (A,3) 4,8,9

Player A is a 54% favorite.


Example: Rough 9 low against a 7-5 low draw
Player A: (A-3) 5,7,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,8,9
Example: Rough 9 low against a 7-6 low draw
Player A: (A-3) 6,7,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,8,9
Player A is a 51% favorite.
Example: Rough 9 low against an 8-3 low draw
Player A: (A-3) 8,2,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,8,9
Player B is a 53% favorite.
Example: Rough 9 low against an 8-4 low draw
Player A: (A-3) 8,4,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,8,9
Player B is a 55% favorite.
Example: Rough 9 low against an 8-5 low draw
Player A: (A-3) 8,5,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,8,9
Player B is a 69% favorite.
Example: Rough 9 low against an 8-6 low draw
Player A: (A-3) 8,6,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,8,9
Player B is a 63% favorite.
Example: Rough 9 low against an 8-7 low draw
Player A: (A-3) 8,7,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,8,9
Player B is a 69% favorite.

A made 8 low hand is a favorite against any


drawing hand:
Example: 8-7 low against Bike draw Player A: (A-3)
5,4,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,7,8
Example: 8-7 low against Bike draw Player A: (A-2)
3,4,Q
Player B (A-3) 4,7,8
This is a coin flip.
Example: 8-7 low against Bike draw Player A:

(A-2) 3,4,Q
Player B (4-5) 6,7,8
Player B is a 55% favorite.
Example: 8-7 low against 6-4 draw Player A: (A3) 4,6, Q
Player B (A-3) 4,7,8
Player B is a 54% favorite.
Example: 8-7 low against 6-5 draw Player A: (A3) 5,6, Q
Player B (A-3) 4,7,9
Player B is a 52% favorite.
Example: 8-7 low against 6-5 draw Player A: (A3) 5,6, Q
Player B (4-5) 6,7,8
Player B is a 52% favorite.
Example: 8-7 low against a 7-4 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 4,7,Q
Player B (4-5) 6,7,8
Player B is a 53% favorite.
Example: 8-7 low against a 7-6 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 6,7,Q
Player B (4-5) 6,7,8
Player A: (A-3) 6,7,Q Player B (4-5) 3,6,8
Player B is a 53% favorite.
Example: 8-6 low against a 6-5 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 6,5,J
Player B (4-5) 3,6,8
Player B is a 55% favorite.
Example: 8-6 low against a 6-3 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 6,2,J
Player B (4-5) 3,6,8
Player B is a 56% favorite.
Example: 8-6 low against a 5-3 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 5,2,J
Player B (4-5) 3,6,8
Player B is a 56% favorite.
Example: 8-6 low against a 4-3 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 4,2,J

Player B (4-5) 3,6,8


Player B is a 56% favorite.
Example: 8-5 low against a 7-3 low draw Player
A: (A-3) 4,2,J
Player B (4-5) 3,2,8
Player B is a 72% favorite.
Example: 8-5 low against a 6-5 low draw Player
A: (A-2) 5,6,J
Player B (4-5) 3,2,8
Player A: (A-2) 5,4,J
Player B (4-5) 3,2,8
Player B is a 56% favorite.
Example: 8-5 low against a 4-3 low draw Player
A: (A-2) 3,4,J
Player B (4-5) 3,2,8
Player B is a 56% favorite.

New! Now you can get poker


insurance with PokerSurance.

Does your online site include


PokerSurance?
Youve seen poker professionals on TV buy
insurance when they move all-in on a hand of poker.
Its a smart bet since it protects them from a bad
beat and losing all their money. But, everyday
players dont have this option and experience the
real pain of going broke.
A new side bet called PokerSurance gives every
poker player the insurance option formerly reserved
only for high-limit poker pros.

Heres a typical example:


You move all-in with pocket Aces and get called
by another players inferior hand. But, the poker
gods are against you and your aces get cracked.
You are busted and leave a loser.
With a PokerSurance bet, when you are all-in, the
dealer offers you PokerSurance. Now, if you lose to
this players inferior hand, you still win your
PokerSurance bet. You play longer, and win more.
While poker insurance has been around for
decades, it was something negotiated on the side
between the high rollers of poker. Casinos didnt
offer it to their players since they never figured out
how to make money on it. A Pokersurance bet
solves the problem as it sets up a consistent way for
the dealer to offer an attractive wager for players.
PokerSurance is available for on-line poker sites,
casinos and card rooms. Ask your online poker site
to include PokerSurance in their games today.
To find out more about PokerSurance, contact
mcogert@gmail.com.