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User Manual for

HE500OCS100, HE500OCS200, HE500OCS250
and HE800RCS210

Control Station
Hardware Manual

28 December 2000

MAN0227-04

PREFACE

28 DEC 2000

PAGE 3
MAN0227-04

PREFACE
This manual explains how to use the Horner APG Control Station Modules.
Copyright (C) 2000 Horner APG, LLC., 640 North Sherman Drive Indianapolis, Indiana 46201. All rights
reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval
system, or translated into any language or computer language, in any form by any means, electronic,
mechanical, magnetic, optical, chemical, manual or otherwise, without the prior agreement and written
permission of Horner APG, Inc.
All software described in this document or media is also copyrighted material subject to the terms and
conditions of the Horner Software License Agreement.
Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on
the part of Horner APG.
Cscape, SmartStack and CsCAN are trademarks of Horner APG.
DeviceNet is a trademark of the Open DeviceNet Vendor Association (OVDA), Inc.

For user manual updates, contact Horner APG Technical Support
Division, at (317) 916-4274 or visit our website at www.heapg.com.

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MAN0227-04

28 DEC 2000

PREFACE

LIMITED WARRANTY AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITY
Horner APG,LLC. ("HE-APG") warrants to the original purchaser that the Control Station Modules manufactured by
HE-APG is free from defects in material and workmanship under normal use and service. The obligation of HE-APG
under this warranty shall be limited to the repair or exchange of any part or parts which may prove defective under
normal use and service within two (2) years from the date of manufacture or eighteen (18) months from the date of
installation by the original purchaser whichever occurs first, such defect to be disclosed to the satisfaction of HE-APG
after examination by HE-APG of the allegedly defective part or parts. THIS WARRANTY IS EXPRESSLY IN LIEU
OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED INCLUDING THE WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR USE AND OF ALL OTHER OBLIGATIONS OR LIABILITIES AND HEAPG NEITHER ASSUMES, NOR AUTHORIZES ANY OTHER PERSON TO ASSUME FOR HE-APG, ANY OTHER
LIABILITY IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE OF THIS Control Station Modules. THIS WARRANTY SHALL
NOT APPLY TO THIS Control Station Modules OR ANY PART THEREOF WHICH HAS BEEN SUBJECT TO
ACCIDENT, NEGLIGENCE, ALTERATION, ABUSE, OR MISUSE.
HE-APG MAKES NO WARRANTY
WHATSOEVER IN RESPECT TO ACCESSORIES OR PARTS NOT SUPPLIED BY HE-APG. THE TERM
"ORIGINAL PURCHASER", AS USED IN THIS WARRANTY, SHALL BE DEEMED TO MEAN THAT PERSON FOR
WHOM THE Control Station Modules IS ORIGINALLY INSTALLED. THIS WARRANTY SHALL APPLY ONLY
WITHIN THE BOUNDARIES OF THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES.
In no event, whether as a result of breach of contract, warranty, tort (including negligence) or otherwise, shall HEAPG or its suppliers be liable of any special, consequential, incidental or penal damages including, but not limited to,
loss of profit or revenues, loss of use of the products or any associated equipment, damage to associated equipment,
cost of capital, cost of substitute products, facilities, services or replacement power, down time costs, or claims of
original purchaser's customers for such damages.
To obtain warranty service, return the product to your distributor with a description of the problem, proof of
purchase, post paid, insured and in a suitable package.

ABOUT PROGRAMMING EXAMPLES
Any example programs and program segments in this manual or provided on accompanying diskettes are included
solely for illustrative purposes. Due to the many variables and requirements associated with any particular
installation, Horner APG cannot assume responsibility or liability for actual use based on the examples and diagrams.
It is the sole responsibility of the system designer utilizing the Control Station Modules to appropriately design the
end system, to appropriately integrate the Control Station Modules and to make safety provisions for the end
equipment as is usual and customary in industrial applications as defined in any codes or standards which apply.

Note: The programming examples shown in this manual are for illustrative
purposes only. Proper machine operation is the sole responsibility of the
system integrator.

3. 5. 2. Revised Figures 4. Revised drawings (Graphical OCS250: Figures 1.7) depicting battery replacement for Graphical OCS250. and 2. Revised drawing (Figure 4.2) by changing the ground from a mounting screw to a dedicated ground screw on the back cover. 6.2b.4. item 6 to include Panel Mounting Clamp in mounting orientation procedures. Revised drawing (Figure 2.PREFACE 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 5 MAN0227-04 Revisions to this manual 1. .6.11) of RS-485 Connector for Graphical OCS250. Added Figure 4. 4.4. Revised drawings (OCS100. Revised Section 4. 3. 4.2 and 4. 2.5 to show the new mounting/ground plan and panel cut-out for the Graphical OCS250. 200 Figures 1.6b to show the new Panel Mounting Clamp for the Graphical OCS250.2) by changing the ground from a Spade terminial to a screw connection. and 4.

PAGE 6 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 PREFACE .

.........................................................................................32 2........................................................1 Products Covered in this Manual ..13 1...... 9 1........................... Connectors and Wiring......................26 2.................2.......................................1.............................................................................................................................1 Panel Layout Design and Clearance Checklist:.....................................................20 1...............................................12 1. 9 1..........................5 OCS / RCS Specifications ............................4 SmartStack Product Description........4 Installing and Removing a SmartStack Module (Shown with the OCS)............2 Mounting Orientation..........39 3................................40 3...........................................................3 OCS / RCS Resources.....................6 LEDs............................................................................5 Battery Replacement for the OCS100 / 200 (HE500BAT005) ...........................................................................................................37 CHAPTER 3: OCS100 AND OCS200............................................................................................................3..................... 9 1...23 2................................1 Overview...................12 1.............................9 1......................................................1 Power.....................26 2.....................................3......32 2.............3.43 CHAPTER 4: GRAPHIC OCS (OCS250)..............1 General......................................................3 RCS Product Description...15 1....................................................................2...........................................3...........................................4 ABOUT PROGRAMMING EXAMPLES ..34 2........................................................................ and Programming Ports ....... and Wiring ..............3............................................3.....................................................................40 3...........................................1...........................................2........................................................................................................................................................................................45 4..........6......26 2.................2......6.......................3 Resource Definitions ..1 LEDs for OCS / RCS......................................................................................................................5 Relationship of SmartStack Modules.....23 2....................................................................................6 Differences Between OCS and RCS ............................2....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3 RS-232 Programming Port and Wiring...................2 Resource Limits ..................................................................................................................................................13 1........1 General...........40 3............................................ 9 1........................... Network.3......................................................................................................... Connectors..........................................14 1......................4 Cscape Software.4..................................2 Operator Control Station (OCS) / Remote Control Station (RCS) ..11 1.......................................2.............35 2.....................................2 Mounting Orientation...........................................................................2 CAN / DeviceNet Network Port and Wiring ......4 RS-485 Connector (Graphic OCS250 only) ..................................................................PREFACE 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 7 MAN0227-04 Table of Contents PREFACE.......................................2 Factors Affecting Panel Layout Design and Clearances.................................................................................................................................................3 Mounting Requirements .................................................................25 2.................................4 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION ................................2 OCS and SmartStack Dimensions and Panel Cut-outs .......................................................................3 LIMITED WARRANTY AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITY ............................................42 3............................2 Additional References ...............................................................................................39 3......................................3................45 4..................................1 OCS100 / 200 Product Description............................1 Scope .........................20 1.....3 Ports........................................................21 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION...................11 1.30 2...............................................1 Mounting Procedures .....5 Modem Setup........................7 Technical Support ....35 2..3 Battery Replacement for the Graphic OCS (OCS250) (HE500BAT005) .45 4...............................5 Selecting DeviceNet Network (Firmware Update Wizard) ....................35 2.........................................................................................................39 3....................4 OCS Ports....................................21 1............................................2 LEDs for Graphic OCS (OCS250) ................................................................................1 General.....................3.........1 Primary Power Port ..................................................... OCS and RCS Devices ..............................................................................................................3..............................................2 OCS250 Product Description................................23 2.................49 ..42 3........................ 9 1..........

....................................................................................................................................................................69 CHAPTER 8: SMARTSTACK CONFIGURATION .................................................71 8....................1 OCS100 Keypad Description.........83 .....................................................................52 5......................................3 Setting RCS Network ID.................................................51 5............69 7...................................................................................................4 RCS Optional Mounting Bracket (HE800ACC210)....................................................3...................................................................................................................................65 7...................................................1 Order of the Configuration Process...................57 6......................3 Graphic OCS250 Keypad Description.......................................................................................5......................51 5........75 APPENDIX B: DISTRIBUTED CONTROL SYSTEMS (DCS) .................................................................68 7.......................................................................................................................................3 Mounting Instructions ......................53 CHAPTER 6: OCS/RCS CONFIGURATION (SYSTEM MENU) .....................57 6...........................1 General.............................................51 5........................................PAGE 8 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 PREFACE CHAPTER 5: REMOTE CONTROL STATION (RCS) ...............2 OCS200 Keypad Description...........................................................................................................1 General.......................................................................................71 8........................................................................................1 Configuration Screens............................................2 Preliminary Configuration Procedures ........................................................................................................................................4 Operation.............5 User Screens ........................................................................................................................................................63 CHAPTER 7: OCS KEYPAD AND SCREEN .........2 Mounting Orientation..81 INDEX .....................1 Cursor Types .............................65 7.........................................................................................................................................................................................67 7......................................71 8..................73 APPENDIX A: NETWORKS ...................73 8...............3 Configuration of Specific SmartStack Modules.......................................................66 7...............................................................57 6..........................................................2 System Menu...................................

the Graphical Operator Control Station (HE500OCS250).1 Scope 1. the system acts like a large parallel-processing controller.2. Cscape Programming and Reference Manual (MAN0313) – Topics in this manual have been specifically selected to assist the user through the programming process. To obtain specific information regarding SmartStack Modules. a. b. which is common to all SmartStack Modules. 1 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 9 MAN0227-04 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 1.) Operator Control Stations have Serial and CAN (Controller Area Network) communication abilities. SmartStack Modules User Manual (SUP0246) . networking.Contains individual data sheets for each module and covers specifications. and configuration. The OCS100 and OCS200 CAN features include CsCAN (pronounced “Sea-scan”) peer-to-peer network. The units contain a standard 9-pin RS-232 port for programming/debugging. I/O and operator interface capabilities in one unit. refer to the individual data sheets created for each module in the SmartStack Supplement.2 Additional References For further information regarding products covered in this manual. and configuration procedures of the Operator Control Station (OCS) and the Remote Control Station (RCS) are covered in detail in this user manual.2 Operator Control Station (OCS) / Remote Control Station (RCS) 1. the focus of the Control Station User Manual is to provide general installation and configuration data. Information is also provided for the use of the products in CsCAN or DeviceNet Networks. the Remote Control Station (HE800RCS210) and the SmartStack Option Modules.2 in this manual. DeviceNet Implementation Using Control Station Modules (SUP0326) . To use the OCS in a DeviceNet network. ease of configuration. (See Section 1. c. monitoring and network administration from an IBM-compatible PC. wiring. When several Operator Control Stations are networked together to achieve a specific purpose.Covers the implementation of Control Station products in a DeviceNet network. refer to the following references: a. The OCS can be used in CsCAN or DeviceNet networks.1. CAN-based network hardware is used in the controllers because of CAN’s automatic error detection.5. Because there is a wide variety of SmartStack Modules.CH. (Refer to Section 2. low-cost of design and implementation and ability to operate in harsh environments. . 1. installation.1.1. a DeviceNet file can be downloaded from Cscape’s Firmware Update Wizard.1 OCS100 / 200 Product Description The Operator Control Station (OCS100 & OCS200) provides controller.) 1.1 Products Covered in this Manual The Control Station Hardware User Manual provides information about the Operator Control Station (HE500OCS100 and HE500OCS200). It also covers procedures for creating graphics using the Graphic OCS. b. Networking abilities are built-in to the OCS and require no external or additional modules. The specifications.

One Cscape package (connected to one OCS unit) can program all OCS units on the network. . Figure 1.. Cscape and the OCS automatically provide the pass through connection. The OCS100 features a 2x20 LCD. The OCS200 features a 4x20 LCD. Each unit is a highly integrated operator interface and controller with expandable I/O and networking capabilities.1 The OCS combines several desirable functions in one compact package. After that. OCS100 OCS200 Figure 1.Front View of OCS100 / OCS200 The OCS product line features the ability to pass through programming commands. When attached to an OCS serial port. Cscape). Both devices have standard features consisting of the following: • • • • • • • 24 VDC powered SmartStack I/O Expansion RS-232 Programming Port Integrated Bezel Removable Keypad Inserts Real-Time Clock Flash Memory for easy field upgrades Note: The OCS200 has a larger keypad than the OCS100.e. a programming package (i.PAGE 10 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 CH. 17 keys and fieldbus communications.1 . 32 keys and fieldbus communications.2 – Pass-Through Function (Available in CsCAN Networks Only) After making a physical serial connection to one OCS. the user must indicate which node is to be connected (called the TARGET). can access other OCS units connected to a network by passing the programming command through the serial port to the network port.

it does support a remote operator interface through a PC connected to the RCS unit’s serial port or built-in network.2 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 11 MAN0227-04 OCS250 Product Description In addition to the features listed in Section 1.RCS in Panel Box (Shown with Four SmartStack Modules) . and a controller into a single product.2. a DeviceNet file can be downloaded from Cscape’s Firmware Update Wizard. To use the RCS in a DeviceNet network. Unlike the OCS. the OCS250 has graphical capabilities.CH.5.2.) RCS Figure 1.3 Figure 1. the RCS is not equipped with a display and keypad.3 –Orientation of Graphic OCS (Shown in Panel Box) 1.) The RCS can be used in CsCAN or DeviceNet networks. 1 1. (The OCS is mounted on a panel door. The RCS is designed for backplate mounting.1. (Refer to Section 2.2. Although the RCS does not have a local operator interface.4 –Back View of Graphic OCS (Shown in Panel Box) RCS Product Description The RCS is similar to an OCS in that it combines local I/O (analog and digital). O C S 2 5 0 -2 Figure 1. networking.5 .

2.13” (181.7 ms.. per 1K of boolean logic. Esc. The material also holds up well in most industrial conditions.00” (50. The material is resistant to most corrosive substances found in industrial environments. monitor and debug to any node on the network.80 mm) 17 10 user-programmable keys + Shift. monitoring. Cscape stands for Control Station Central Application Programming Environment.60 mm) 2.4 28 DEC 2000 CH. 12 – 25 VDC 75mA maximum Standard 9 pin RS-232 for programming. CsCAN Network).PAGE 12 MAN0227-04 1.06h mm characters 0°C to +60°C ** 180mA @ 24VDC 270mA @ 24VDC for 1S 7.00” (50. 1. and network administration from a IBM compatible PC -Port Reserved for Future UseRS-485 or RS-232 – Application Communication Port CsCAN Network / DeviceNet Maximum of four (4) SmartStack Modules per OCS Faceplate made of Autotex polyester by Autotype. programming user displays for the OCS.00” (228. configuring the network for global digital and analog data.84w x 8.2.250 and RCS210 Humidity NEMA Rating Primary Power Range* Ladder Execution Typical Execution Speed CAN Power Range CAN Power Current Primary Serial -Port Reserved for Future UseSecondary Serial (OCS250 only) CAN Input / Output Keypad (For all models below) UL CE OCS 100 Operating Temperature Typical Power Draw (OCS100)* Inrush Current (OCS100)* Height (OCS100) Width (OCS100) Mounting Depth (OCS100) User Keys (OCS100) Keypad (OCS100) Display (OCS100) OCS 200 Operating Temperature Typical Power Draw (OCS200)* Inrush Current (OCS200)* Height (OCS200) Width (OCS200) Mounting Depth (OCS200) User Keys (OCS200) 5% to 95% non-condensing NEMA 4-12 10-30VDC 0. 4. download.5 OCS / RCS Specifications Table 1. Provided there is one serial connection to one node on the network (i.e. the operator has control over the entire system. Enter and 4 direction keys 2x20 LCD w/backlight. The operator can upload. setting system-wide security and monitoring controllers in the system.78 mm) 9. The Windows-based software package is easy to use and aids in the integration of a CAN-based Distributed Control System.07” (128.200. If used outdoors. See SUP0259 See MAN0005 0°C to +60°C ** 160mA @ 24VDC 200mA @ 24VDC for 70mS 5.10 mm) 9. Cscape is also used for programming OCS ladder logic.1 Cscape Software Cscape Software (pronounced “Sea-scape”) is used with the OCS and RCS products (Part # HE500OSW232).80 mm) 32 .60 mm) 2. the material can yellow or crack.00” (228. The program is used for configuring controllers and SmartStack I/O Modules.1 – Specifications OCS 100.

75“ (44. 240 x 128 Graphic LCD w / backlight 0°C to +60°C 150mA @ 24VDC 1A @ 24VDC for 8mS 7. and the RCS210. it supports a remote operator interface through a PC connected to the RCS unit’s built-in network or serial port. Enter. An RCS is a repackaged OCS.00” (177. In addition. * These specifications are for OCS. .3. it supports a remote operator interface through a PC connected to the RCS unit’s built-in network.45 mm) 4. Enter.06h mm characters 0°C to +50°C 350mA @ 24VDC 800mA @24VDC for 50mS.57 mm) 5 3/16” (131. and controller.8 mm) 1. 32-Key (Remote Only) Display (RCS210) Although the RCS does not have local display. Although the RCS does not have a local operator interface. it supports a remote operator interface through a PC connected to the RCS unit’s builtin network. 1. the OCS250 has graphical capabilities.76 mm) 10 user-programmable keys + Esc. The controller portion of the OCS/RCS products is programmed in ladder logic via the Windows-based Cscape (Control Station Central Application Programming Environment) package.02 mm) 11 1/8” (282.00” (101. Esc. such temperatures may decrease the life of the display.3 OCS / RCS Resources 1.60 mm) Although the RCS does not have a local operator interface.1 Overview This section defines the resource limits that a programmer needs to know when writing a program using the OCS100.1 – Specifications Keypad (OCS200) Display (OCS200) OCS 250 Operating Temperature Typical Power Draw (OCS250)* Inrush Current (OCS250)* Height (OCS250) Width (OCS250) Mounting Depth (OCS250) User Keys (OCS250) Keypad (OCS250) Display (OCS250) RCS210 Operating Temperature Typical Power Draw (RCS210)* Inrush Current (RCS210)* Height (RCS210) Width (RCS210) Mounting Depth (RCS210) Keypad (RCS) 12 user-programmable keys + Shift. designed for back-plate mounting.2. OCS250. OCS200. 1 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 13 MAN0227-04 Table 1. The specifications for the SmartStack Modules can be found in the applicable SmartStack Data Sheets.84w x 8. 4 direction keys and a full numeric keypad 4x20 LCD w/backlight . networking. Graphical OCS. ** Although the OCS100 and OCS200 withstands the temperature range of 0°C to +60°C. 7 7/8” (200. Each OCS or RCS product provides a set of resources for use by the ladder logic control program as indicated in Table 1. The recommended rating is 0°C to +50°C. An OCS combines operator interface (display and keypad). without the operator interface. local I/O (analog and digital). 4. and RCS products without any SmartStack I/O Modules attached. into a single product.CH. 4 direction keys and a full numeric keypad + 8 soft keys.

Note that although each register type inherently consists of either 1-bit or 16-bit registers. Resource %S Registers %SR Registers %T Registers %M Registers %R Registers %K Registers %D Registers %I Registers %Q Registers %AI Registers %AQ Registers %IG Registers %QG Registers %AIG Registers %AQG Registers Network Port Controllers Per Network SmartStack I/O Modules Table 1.2 28 DEC 2000 CH. 8.3.OCS/RCS Resource Limits OCS100 OCS200 OCS250 8 192 2048 2048 2048 10 200 2048 2048 512 512 64 / 0 64 / 0 32 / 16 32 / 16 CsCAN / DeviceNet 253 / 64 4 Slots 64K 200 128x240 Pixels (Graphics LCD) 1024K 300 32 Keys (Remote Only) 4x20 Characters (Remote Only) 64K 200 10 10 50 10 200 200 200 200 20 20 20 20 64K 64K 64K 64K Keypad 17 Keys (Membrane) 32 Keys (Membrane) Display 2x20 Characters (Text LCD) 4x20 Characters (Text LCD) 64K 200 Screen Memory User Screens Data Fields Per User Screen Text Tables Items Per Text Table Ladder Code RCS210 36 Keys (Membrane) . 16 or 32-bit values or as ASCII character strings.2 .2 shows the resources available in the OCS100.PAGE 14 MAN0227-04 1. and RCS210 products.1 Resource Limits Table 1. all registers can be accessed via User Screens and/or Ladder Code as 1. OCS250. OCS200.

3 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 15 MAN0227-04 Resource Definitions This section defines the resources listed above in Table 1. the lower numbered %SR is the low word. Off for 5 mS On for 50 mS. implemented as shown in Table 1. Off for 500 mS On if SmartStack I/O is configured properly Always On Always Off %SR Registers %SR Registers are 16-bit memory locations.%S Registers Description On during first scan after entering RUN mode On if Network is functioning properly On for 5 mS.4 . and is also available to the operator via the System Menu. a. System Registers System Registers (%S and %SR) are used to store general OCS or RCS status information. 1 1.3. Register Name Table 1. containing system status information. containing system status information.2. This information is used internally. Name FST_SCN NET_OK T_10MS T_100MS T_SEC IO_OK ALW_ON ALW_OFF Table 1. using the Control Station’s display and keypad.CH. The System Registers are also available for User Screens and can be accessed by Ladder Code. %S Registers %S Registers are 1-bit memory locations. 2=Run) Average Scan Rate (in tenths of mS) Minimum Scan Rate (in tenths of mS) Maximum Scan Rate (in tenths of mS) Data Field Edit Buffer Ladder Code Size 0 65535 0 2 0 2 1000 1000 1000 32 2 -1 64K . 1=Do I/O.%SR Registers Description Min %SR1 USER_SCR Current User Screen Number (0=none) 0 %SR2 ALRM_SCR Current Alarm Screen Number (0=none) 0 %SR3 SYS_SCR Current System Screen Number (0=none) 0 Max 200 (OCS100 and 200) 300 (OCS250) 300 12 (OCS100 and 200) 1 (OCS250) %SR4 SELF_TEST %SR5 CS_MODE %SR6 %SR7 %SR8 %SR9-10 %SR11-12 SCAN_RATE MIN_RATE MAX_RATE EDIT_BUF LADDER_SIZE Bit-Mapped Self-Test Result Control Station Mode (0=Idle. implemented as shown in Table 3. Note: Where 2 %SRs are combined to make a 32-bit value. while the higher numbered %SR is the high word. Off for 50 mS On for 500 mS.3: Register %S1 %S2 %S3 %S4 %S5 %S6 %S7 %S8 b.3 .

3=36 Keys) Real-Time-Clock Second Real-Time-Clock Minute Real-Time-Clock Hour Real-Time-Clock Date Real-Time-Clock Month Real-Time-Clock Year Real-Time-Clock Day (1=Sunday) Network Error Count Watchdog-Tripped Error Count Bad Ladder Code Error Index Filtered Bit-Mapped Self-Test Result Key Code of Last Key Press or Release LCD Backlight On/Off Switch (0=Off.1 Min 4 16 34 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Max 64K 64K 32K 65535 65535 65535 65535 65535 253 63 0 3 0 2 0 3 0 0 255 1 0 4 0 0 0000 0000 000 20 240 2 128 2 -1 65535 9999 9999 255 20 240 4 128 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 1996 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0000 0000 1 1 - 59 59 23 31 12 2095 7 65535 65535 65534 65535 255 1 65535 9999 9999 253 1 - 32 . 2=500KB) Network Mode (0=Network Not Required. 3=Network Required and Optimized) LCD Display Contrast Setting Function Key Mode (0=Momentary. 4=Modbus ASCII) This Station’s 32-bit Serial Number This Station’s Binary Model Number Main CPU Engine Firmware Rev Number x 100 Main CPU BIOS Firmware Rev Number x 100 FPGA Image Rev Number x 10 LCD Text Display Number of Columns LCD Graphics Display Number of Columns LCD Text Display Number of Rows LCD Graphics Display Number of Rows Keypad Type (0=16 Keys. 2=Generic (Ladder.%SR Registers Description User Text Screen Table Size I/O Configuration Table Size Network Configuration Table Size Security Data Table Size Ladder Code CRC User Text Screen Table CRC I/O Configuration Table CRC Network Configuration Table CRC Security Data Table CRC This Station’s Primary Network ID (CsCAN) This Station’s Primary Network ID (DeviceNet) Network Baud Rate (CsCAN) (0=125KB. 3=Modbus RTU. 1=Network Required. 1=CsCAN.Controlled). 2=500KB. 2=Reserved. 1=250KB. 3=1MB) Network Baud Rate (DeviceNet) (0=125KB. 2=32 Keys.4 .PAGE 16 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 Register %SR13-14 %SR15-16 %SR17-18 %SR19-20 %SR21-22 %SR23 %SR24 %SR25 %SR26 %SR27 %SR28 Name UTXT_SIZE Reserved IO_SIZE NET_SIZE SD_SIZE LADDER_CRC UTXT_CRC Reserved IO_CRC NET_CRC SD_CRC %SR29 NET_ID %SR30 NET_BAUD %SR31 NET_MODE %SR32 %SR33 LCD_CONT FKEY_MODE %SR34 SERIAL_PROT %SR35-36 %SR37 %SR38 %SR39 %SR40 SERIAL_NUM MODEL_NUM ENG_REV BIOS_REV FPGA_REV %SR41 LCD_COLS %SR42 LCD_ROWS %SR43 KEY_TYPE %SR44 %SR45 %SR46 %SR47 %SR48 %SR49 %SR50 %SR51 %SR52 %SR53-54 %SR55 %SR56 %SR57 %SR58 %SR59 %SR60 RTC_SEC RTC_MIN RTC_HOUR RTC_DATE RTC_MON RTC_YEAR RTC_DAY NET_CNT WDOG_CNT BAD_LADDER F_SELF_TEST LAST_KEY BAK_LITE USER_LEDS S_ENG_REV S_BIOS_REV %SR61 NUM_IDS %SR62-192 Reserved Table 1. 1=On) User LED Control / Status Slave CPU Engine Firmware Rev Number x 100 Slave CPU BIOS Firmware Rev Number x 100 This Station’s Number of Network IDs (CsCAN) This Station’s Number of Network IDs (DeviceNet) - CH. 1=250KB. 1=Toggle) RS232 Serial Protocol Mode (0=Firmware Update (RISM). 1=17 Keys.

c. %M Registers A %M Register is a retentive 1-bit memory location.CH. which together fill the LCD display screen. but it still supports Cscape’s Remote Display Terminal function. using Cscape’s Remote Display Terminal function. used to store application-specific values. %K Registers A %K Register is a non-retentive 1-bit memory location (contact). OCS100 and OCS200 have membrane keypads and text-based LCD displays. These screens are defined via Cscape dialogs and are then downloaded and stored into the Control Station’s Flash memory. User Screens A User Screen is a combination of fixed text or graphics. This same information can be entered and displayed via a remote PC. This data can be accessed via User Screens and/or by Ladder Code. 1 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 17 MAN0227-04 User Registers User Registers (%T. User Screens can be selected for display by operator entries on the keypad. The source data for a Data Field can be any of the Control Station’s Register resources as defined above. along with variable Data Fields (called Graphics Objects in the OCS250). %D Registers A %D Register is a non-retentive 1-bit memory location (coil). if the PC is connected as a CsCAN Host device. c. a. a function key’s associated %K register will be ON as long as the function key is pressed. If the function keys are set for momentary mode. The MiniOCS. . b. used to store application-specific state information. or by Ladder Code. allowing the operator to enter and display general and application-specific information. The OCS250 has a membrane keypad and a graphics-based LCD display. which can be turned ON by Ladder Code to cause the corresponding User or Alarm Screen to be displayed. used to store application-specific state information. The field size and display format is programmable via Cscape dialogs. used to store the state of a function key on the Control Station’s keypad. Data Fields A Data Field is an area on a User Screen where variable data is displayed and edited. a. %R Registers A %R Register is a retentive 16-bit memory location. d. %T Register A %T Register is a non-retentive 1-bit memory location. b. but it does not yet support the Cscape Remote Display Terminal function. The RCS210 does not have a local keypad or display. HMI Registers HMI Registers (%K and %D) give the user access to the OCS or RCS keypad and display. If the function keys are set for toggle mode. a function key’s associated %K register will toggle each time the function key is pressed. %M and %R) are used to store application-specific OCS or RCS data.

which is normally used to store the value of one of the analog outputs associated with a SmartStack I/O module. which is normally used to store the state of one of the digital inputs associated with a SmartStack I/O module. The maximum number of Text Tables and Text Items per Text Table is shown in Table 1. would allow the strings “OFF” and “ON” to be displayed. d. A simple example of this. instead of 0 and 1. instead of displaying numeric values. %AI and %AQ) give the user access to the SmartStack I/O Module data. 28 DEC 2000 CH. but the number can be further limited by overall User Screen memory usage. are retentive. to describe the state of the %I4 digital input. SmartStack I/O Registers SmartStack I/O Registers (%I. which is normally used to store the state of one of the digital outputs associated with a SmartStack I/O module. which are not associated with SmartStack inputs. %AI registers are non-retentive. and can be used just like %R registers. This data can be accessed via User Screens and/or by Ladder Code. %I registers are non-retentive. When used in this way. When used in this way. which can be used in a Data Field. and can be used just like %M registers. %I Registers A %I Register is a 1-bit memory location. are retentive. . All extra %AI registers. c. %AI Registers A %AI Register is a 16-bit memory location. a. b. %Q Registers A %Q Register is a non-retentive 1-bit memory location.1 Text Tables A Text Table is a list of Text Items. %Q. which are not associated with SmartStack inputs. %AQ Registers A %AQ Register is a non-retentive 16-bit memory location. which is normally used to store the value of one of analog inputs associated with a SmartStack I/O module.PAGE 18 MAN0227-04 e. All extra %I registers. to display descriptive words and phrases to describe the value of a Register.

to be executed each controller scan. and/or intelligent I/O. %AQG Registers A %AQG Register is a retentive 16-bit memory location. and implements the CsCAN Protocol which is designed to take maximum advantage of the global data broadcasting capability of CAN. which is normally used to store a digital state to be sent as global data to the other Control Stations on the network. d. the OCS or RCS becomes a DeviceNet Slave device. e. which is supported by products from multiple vendors. which is normally used to store a global digital state obtained from another Control Station on the network. Network Port The CsCAN Network is based on the Bosch Control Area Network (CAN). %QG Registers A %QG Register is a retentive 1-bit memory location. %QG. 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 19 MAN0227-04 SmartStack I/O Modules Up to 4 SmartStack I/O Modules can be plugged into an OCS or RCS. For more information regarding DeviceNet Protocol. For more information regarding CsCAN Protocol. or contact the DeviceNet governing body (ODVA). DeviceNet is an “open” higher layer protocol. refer to the OCS and RCS Communication Capabilities document.CH. 1 e. refer to the CsCAN Protocol Specification document. which is normally used to store a global analog value obtained from another Control Station on the network. Ladder Code The Ladder Code. Note that the OCS or RCS still implements the CsCAN Protocol Command Layer with respect to the RS232 programming port. This data can be accessed via User Screens and/or by Ladder Code. a. In an OCS or RCS. %AIG and %AQG) give the user access to the Network Port’s Global I/O data. and up to 253 Control Stations can be linked by using 3 repeaters. c. to provide local digital and analog I/O. This Ladder Code is downloaded and stored into the Control Station’s Flash memory. DeviceNet can be loaded as a replacement for the CsCAN Protocol Message Layer. Stepper Motor Indexer. %AIG Registers A %AIG Register is a retentive 16-bit memory location. Using this network protocol. Power Monitor and Ethernet communication. which is normally used to store an analog value to be sent as global data to the other Control Stations on the network. High-Speed Counter. such as ASCII-Basic. up to 64 Control Stations can be linked without repeaters. when the controller is in RUN mode. b. %IG Registers A %IG Register is a retentive 1-bit memory location. Global Data I/O Registers Global Data I/O Registers (%IG. and as a result. . stores ladder instructions generated by Cscape.

1 SmartStack Product Description The SmartStack Modules provide a wide variety of I/O options for all OCS models and the RCS. Table 1. The OCS and RCS have networking capabilities allowing communication with each other. . Yes SmartStack Modules Requires little space and are easy to install. Figure 1. SmartStack Modules are used in a multitude of control applications. OCS and RCS Devices SmartStack Modules provide all models of the OCS and RCS210 with I/O capability. RCS and SmartStack Modules Device Operator Control Station (OCS) OCS100/200 Graphic OCS250 Remote Control Station (RCS) RCS210 Control Yes Functions Display Network and Keypad Yes Yes I/O Yes Remote Yes Yes Only Provides a wide variety of I/O options for the OCS and RCS.5 provides a summary of the functions of each device and the SmartStack Modules. Up to four Smart Stack Modules can be installed in each device.PAGE 20 MAN0227-04 1.5 . Table 1. Compact and easy to install.6 .5 Relationship of SmartStack Modules.Functions of OCS. Up to four SmartStack modules can be used with each OCS and RCS.Back View of OCS (Shown with Four SmartStack Modules) 1. Up to four option modules are used in each device.4 28 DEC 2000 CH.

The RCS has a 3-pin power connector while the OCS has a 2-pin power connector.7 Technical Support For assistance. but it still supports Cscape’s Remote Text Term function. 1. Europe: (+) 353-21-4321-266 . two switches on the RCS are used. the OCS models have two key features that the RCS does not have including a keypad and a display interface. This same function is available on a remote PC (using Cscape’s Remote Text Term function) if the PC is connected to the CsCAN network. In place of a keypad to perform functions such as setting the Network ID. Two additional LEDs have been added to the RCS (MS and NS lamps) to provide diagnostic information.CH. The OCS incorporates alphanumeric LCD displays with backlights for the purpose of conveying information to the operator.com. The RCS does not have a local display.heapg. contact Technical Support at the following locations: North America: (317) 916-4274 or visit our website at www.6 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 21 MAN0227-04 Differences Between OCS and RCS Although the OCS models and RCS have control capabilities (via Ladder Logic programming). 1 1.

PAGE 22 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 NOTES CH.1 .

Dimensions and panel cut-outs Mounting instructions and orientation Some types of connectors and other hardware It is important to consult both this chapter and the individual product chapter for installation information. Product-specific information is covered in individual chapters for the various products discussed in this manual.) Figure 2.1. b. c. (4 SmartStack Modules shown. 2.2 – OCS Models on Panel Door O C S 2 5 0 -2 .CH. A convenient checklist is provided in Section 2. Examples of product-specific information includes: a. The designer of a panel layout needs to assess the requirements of a particular system and to consider the following design factors.1 General Installation information is covered in Chapter Two that applies to one or more models of the OCS or the RCS.2 Factors Affecting Panel Layout Design and Clearances Warning: It is important to follow the requirements of the panel manufacturer and to follow applicable electrical codes and standards.2. RCS Figure 2. 2 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 23 MAN0227-04 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION 2.1 – RCS in Panel Box (Shown with Four SmartStack Options) Graphic OCS250 OCS100 or OCS200 mounted on panel door.

Warning: Be sure to meet the ground requirements of the panel manufacturer and also meet applicable electrical codes and standards. Remove the paint (to bare metal) around the screw holes where star washers will be placed when installing the device.80 mm) Minimum Distance between base of device and wiring ducts If more than one device installed in panel box (or on door): Minimum Distance between bases of each device When door is closed: Minimum distance between device and closed door (Be sure to allow enough depth for SmartStack Modules.10 mm) 4 inches (101. Panel door: Tie a low impedance ground strap between the panel box and the panel door to ensure that they have the same ground reference. 2 Clearance / Adequate Space Install devices to allow sufficient clearance to open and close the panel door. b.1 –2. 3.1 – Minimum Clearance Requirements for Panel Box and Door Minimum Distance between base of device and sides of cabinet 2 inches (50.) To allow optimum use of the SmartStack Module Options: Up to four SmartStack Modules may be installed in each OCS or RCS. which includes star washers. It is important to consider the depth required in a panel box to allow optimum use of the SmartStack Options.80 mm) Refer to Figures 2. 2. Use the mounting hardware provided with the device.9 for OCS and SmartStack dimensions. Clean the bare metal and ensure that it is free of dust and other particles. These locations are where the star washers actually come in contact with the bare metal. 1. Note: Remove paint from screw holes located inside the panel box and the interior of the panel box door.60 mm) between bases of each device 2 inches (50. Panel box: The panel box needs to be properly connected to earth ground to provide a good common ground reference.5 inches (38. Devices in panel box and on the panel box door: 1. 28 DEC 2000 CH. Grounding Warning: To provide maximum noise immunity and to insure minimum EMI radiation. the Vsignal (DC power return) need to be connected to earth ground at the power supply. Use the star washers on the mounting stud of the device to provide better contact between the mounting hardware and the panel surface. Ensure that a good solid contact is made against bare metal for proper grounding. The user must ensure that the power supply selected is compatible with this method of grounding. .PAGE 24 MAN0227-04 a. Table 2.

____Meets the electrical code and applicable standards for proper grounding.) The OCS devices are mounted on the door of a panel box.) ____Are the device bases oriented correctly? (See Section 2.? ____Is the panel box properly connected to earth ground? Is the panel door properly grounded? Has the appropriate procedure been followed to properly ground the devices in the panel box and on the panel door? (See Section 2. 2. etc.-e. which need to be considered? . etc.? ____Meets the panel manufacturer’s requirements for grounding. For example. Consider the impact on the design of the panel layout if operating at the extreme ends of the ambient temperature range.).]) ____Are minimum clearance requirements met? (See Table 2. Note: Do not route power and signal wires in the same conduit.2 [b. Noise Consider the impact on the panel layout design and clearance requirements if noise supression devices are needed. if it is determined that a cooling device is required.3.1. (Refer to individual product chapters. e.) Proper orientation helps to ensure a good connection when SmartStack Modules are installed into the devices. Orientation Observe guidelines for proper orientation of the bases when mounting the OCS and RCS.2 (a.) Can the panel door be easily opened and closed? Is there adequate space between device bases as well as the sides of the panel and wiring ducts? ____Is the panel box deep enough to accommodate the optimum use of the SmartStack Option Modules? Up to four SmartStack Modules may be installed in each OCS. d. 2 c.1 Panel Layout Design and Clearance Checklist: The following list provides highlights of the panel layout design factors discussed in Section 2. 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 25 MAN0227-04 Temperature / Ventilation Ensure that the panel layout design allows for adequate ventilation and maintains the specified ambient temperature range. (Refer to individual product chapters containing dimension figures and panel cut-outs. ____Are there other requirements that impact the particular system. etc. ____Is there adequate ventilation? Is the ambient temperature range maintained? Are cooling or heating devices required? ____Are noise suppression devices or isolation transformers be required? Is there adequate distance between the base of the OCS or RCS and noisy devices such as relays or motor starters? Ensure that power and signal wires are not routed in the same conduit. motor starters.CH. Be sure to maintain an adequate distance between the OCS or RCS and noisy devices such as relays.1. allow adequate space and clearances for the device in the panel box or on the panel door.2.

3. 2. Network Connector Table 2.2 – Primary Power Port Pins Signal Description V+ Input power supply voltage VInput power supply ground Pin 1 2 Pin 1 Pin 2 Pin 1 Figure 2. 2.PAGE 26 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 CH.6 – As viewed at the OCS .2 CAN / DeviceNet Network Port and Wiring a. the Vsignal (DC power return) need to be connected to earth ground at the power supply. The user must ensure that the power supply selected is compatible with this method of grounding.4 As viewed looking at the OCS models Note: Power Supply Voltage Range is from 10-30 VDC.5 – Network Connector V- 2 3 4 5 V+ SHLD CN_L CN_H Figure 2.4.3. The user must ensure that the power supply selected is compatible with this method of grounding.1 Primary Power Port Table 2. the Vsignal (DC power return) need to be connected to earth ground at the power supply. 2.3 Ports.3 Power Connector (Primary Power Port) Pin 2 Figure 2. refer to Section 5. Warning: To provide maximum noise immunity and to ensure minimum EMI radiation.3 – CAN Port Pins Signal VCN_L SHLD CN_H V+ Pin 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 Description Power Signal Shield Signal + Power + 1 5 V+ CN_H SHLD CN_L VFigure 2. Connectors and Wiring Note: For RCS Primary Power Port. 2 Warning: To provide maximum noise immunity and to ensure minimum EMI radiation.

7 – Grounding Method (OCS shown in this example.CH. the Vsignal (DC power return) need to be connected to earth ground at the power supply. 2 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 27 MAN0227-04 Warning: To provide maximum noise immunity and to ensure minimum EMI radiation. The user must ensure that the power supply selected is compatible with this method of grounding. b.60mm) long. . Grounding DC Power Supply + OCS Frame (Earth) Ground Connect DC V.to earth ground at the power supply. Figure 2. use 12 AWG or larger stranded wire which is no more than 24” (609.) Note: For an earth ground connection for the Graphic OCS (OCS250.

2.8. 4. Use data conductors (CN_L and CN_H) that are 24 AWG shielded twisted pair for “thin cable” and 22 AWG shielded twisted pair for “thick cable.and V+) that are 18 AWG twisted-pair for “thin cable” and 15 AWG twisted-pair for “thick cable. Use power conductors (V. 6. 28 DEC 2000 1 21 Ω 1 21 Ω + 1 2-2 5 V D C BLK BLU W HT RED BLU W HT RED S H IE LD VC N_L S H IE L D C N_H V+ BLK BLU 121Ω WHT RED BLK BLK BLU 12 1Ω WHT RED S H IE L D VC N_L S H IE L D C N_H V+ S H IE L D C N_H V+ VC N_L S H IE L D C N_H V+ VC N_L - S H IE LD + 1 2-2 5 V D C Figure 2.” They must also have 120-ohm characteristic impedance. use a Belden wire #3084A (“thin”). the cable shield is connected to the cable shield input at one end of the cable only. The two nodes at the physical end-points need to have 121 ohm 1% terminating resistors connected across the CN_L and CN_H terminals. For a section of cable between two nodes. Place data conductors (CN_L and CN_H) into a twisted pair together. preferably physical endpoints. Use #3082A (“thick”) for network cable lengths greater than 100 meters environments where noise is a concern.PAGE 28 MAN0227-04 CH.8 – CAN Wiring a. 3.) Wire the CAN network in a daisy-chained fashion such that there are exactly two physical endpoints on the network. 5. CAN Wiring Rules (See Figure 2. In typical industrial environments. 1. Connect the V.power conductor to a good earth ground at one place only on the network. .” Place power conductors (V. 2 VC N_L S H IEL D C N_H V+ VC N_L S H IEL D C N_H V+ VC N_L S H IEL D C N_H V+ Wiring VC N_L S H IEL D C N_H V+ c.and V+) into a twisted pair together.

The 5-wire. may be connected together using three CAN repeaters. 3. One power power pair (#22) black/red. Some devices draw all of their power from the network supply. blue/white.g. which adhere to the above rules. CsCAN or DeviceNet Cable Note: For more details about DeviceNet networks. Cabling is available in a variety of current-carrying capacities.CsCAN / DeviceNet Cable Specifications Thick Cable – general specifications (e. Thick cable: Use for long distances and more power. b. at 125KBaud. at 125KBaud.g. a CAN network may be extended to 253 nodes with a total cable distance of 6000 ft.4 .. every device must. refer to DeviceNet Implementation Using Control Station Modules (GFK-1763). multi-conductor copper cable used in CsCAN or DeviceNet network include: 1. data pair (to keep propagation delays to a minimum). general specifications One signal pair (#24). Two wires used to transmit network power. 2.. power its network transceivers from the network power supply. High Speed (Vp=75% min). Overall foil/braid shield with drain wire (#22). blue/white. One signal pair (#18). Thin cable: Use for shorter distances. High Speed (Vp=75% min). 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 29 MAN0227-04 A CAN network (without repeaters) is limited to 64 nodes (with 63 cable segments) with a maximum cable length of 1500 ft. Usually used for drop cables or where cable flexibility is needed. Separate aluminized mylar shields around power pair and signal pair. at least. bare*. Overall foil/braid shield with drain wire (#18). One power power pair (#15) black/red. In CsCAN or DeviceNet. . In this manner. 8 amp maximum current capacity. data pair (to keep propagation delays to a minimum). Table 2. low distortion. High flexibility. Industrial temperature range. 8. Belden 3082A) Two twisted shielded pairs –Common axis with drain wire in center. low distortion.CH. High flexibility Network Topology Bus with limited branching (truckline / dropline) Redundancy Not Supported Network Power for Node devices Nominal 24 VDC ±4% Allowed Nodes (Bridging excluded) 64 nodes Data Packet Size 0-8 bytes with allowance for message fragmentation Duplicate Address Detection Addresses verified at power-up Error Detection / Correction CRC – retransmission of message if validity not acknowledged by recipient. Up to four CAN network segments. thick and thin cable is used as indicated: 1. Belden 3084A) Separate aluminized mylar shields around power pair and signal pair. Industrial temperature range. Usually used for Trunk cable. 2 7. * The drain wire connects shields within the cable and serves as a means to terminate the shield into the connector. low loss. PVC insulation on power pair. 3 amp maximum current capacity. One conductor used as an electromagnetic shield. bare*. Thin Cable – Two twisted shielded pairs –Common axis with drain wire in center. low loss. Two wires used as a transmission line for network communications. PVC insulation on power pair. On a CsCAN or DeviceNet fieldbus. (e. 2.

2. Thick Cable: Network Data Rate Maximum Total Cable Length 1Mbit / sec.5 . 200m (656 feet) 125Kbit / sec. it can have multiple ports.3. Total Cable Length Note: The following values apply to both CsCAN or DeviceNet except as indicated. Table 2. only one power supply must have V.6 – RS-232 Port Pins Signal Description DCD Always high RXD Received Data TXD Transmitted Data DTR Data Terminal Ready GND Ground DSR Data Set Ready RTS Request to Send CTS Clear to Send RI Ring Indicate Pin 1 Direction Out Out In In Out In Out Out Pin 9 Figure 2. A branch can not exceed 6 meters.9 – RS-232 Port .CAN Network Baudrate vs. Ground the CsCAN / DeviceNet network power supply at one point only. Although a branch is limited to one network per drop. If multiple power supplies are used. 28 DEC 2000 CH. Thin cable has a maximum of 3A.connected to Earth Ground. All cable shields must be tied to ground at each device connection by tying the bare wire of the cable to pin 3 (shield) of the connector. To do this. The V. RS-232 Programming Port and Wiring Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Table 2. cable type.640 feet) Thin Cable Maximum Total Cable Length Maximum bus length is independent of network data rate. 5. transfer rate and the number of drop lines. 4. Bus Power and Grounding When using CsCAN or DeviceNet: 1.PAGE 30 MAN0227-04 c. the power supply needs to be located in the center of two network segments. 500m (1. 2.3 A power supply of 24VDC (±4%) at 16A maximum is required for use in a CsCAN / DeviceNet network With thick cable.signal must be connected to Protective Earth Ground at the power supply only. Maximum bus length is 100m. (Does not apply to DeviceNet. 3. 100m (328 feet) 250Kbit / sec.) 40m (131 feet) 500Kbit / sec. d. a single network segment can have a maximum of 8A. 2 Bus Length Several factors affect the maximum length of the bus including the accumulated length of drop lines.

) Both primary and secondary RS-232 port pin-outs are shown in Table 2.CH. etc.6. This port can also be used for general ladder logic controlled serial communications to printers. This port is used for the purposes of Graphic OCS programming.OCS to PC Wiring Diagram b. modems. 2 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 31 MAN0227-04 a. OCS100 and OCS200 The OCS units feature an RS-232 port (Programming/Debug) for connection to a personal computer.24 meters (50 feet) enables proper performance. The secondary serial port is reserved for future use. monitoring.24 METERS MAX (50 FEET MAX) DB9 FEMALE Figure 2. .15. Only one of these secondary ports can be selected for use at any given time. and debugging. The wiring diagram for the RS-232 ports is shown in Figure 2. Note: A shorter cable may be required when using the port at baud rates above 9600. The primary RS-232 port (Programming/Debug) is for connection to a PC. the use of a shielded. SHIELDED MULTI CONDUCTOR OCS RS-232 9-PIN PC COM DCD 1 1 DCD RXD 2 2 RXD TXD 3 3 TXD DTR 4 4 DTR GND 5 5 GND DSR 6 6 DSR RTS 7 7 RTS CTS 8 8 CTS RI 9 9 RI DB9 MALE 15. This port can also be used for general ladder logic controlled serial communications to printers.10 . modems. the use of a shielded. For connection between the Graphic OCS and the PC. The primary RS-232 port (Programming/Debug) is for connection to a PC as well as application communications.24 meters (50 feet) enables proper performance. multiple conductor wire with a maximum length of 15. The wiring diagram for the RS-232 ports is shown in Figure 2. (See Figure 2.24. configuring. If a permanent connection is to be made between the OCS and the personal computer. terminals. When ladder has control of this port. monitoring. it is not available for programming or debugging. The secondary serial port is used for application communications such as bar code readers. etc. and debugging. multiple conductor wire with a maximum length of 15.7. it is not available for programming or debugging. When ladder has control of this port. terminals. It includes an RS-232 or RS-485. This port is used for the purposes of OCS programming. configuring. etc. Graphic OCS (OCS250) The Graphic OCS features primary and secondary RS-232 ports.

PC Modem Modem Telephone System Telephone System Figure 2.5 Modem Setup A modem can be used for remote communications between a computer (using Cscape Software) and the OCS.RS-485 Connector (Graphic OCS only.3.PAGE 32 MAN0227-04 2. The modem must operate at 9600 baud or higher. 2 RS-485 Connector (Graphic OCS250 only) 1 2 RXD+ RXD- 3 4 5 6 GND TXD+ TXD- Figure 2.11 –. A modem can be used for remote communications between a computer (using Cscape Software) and the Graphic OCS. 9600 baud 8 data bits No parity 1 stop bit disable error checking disable compression Graphic OCS .3.12 – Modem Setup a.4 28 DEC 2000 CH. The modem must operate at 9600 baud or higher. Setup Parameters Setup the modems to match the default serial port characteristics of the OCS.) (Reserved for Future Use) 2.

the cable must be shielded multi-conductor with conductors of at least 20 gauge. However. Warning: To connect a modem to the OCS the controller to modem cable must be constructed or purchased. 2 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 33 MAN0227-04 b. preferably less than one meter. a special low capacitance cable must be used. The grayed connections is required. are used only if hardware handshaking between the controller and modem The wire type used in not overly critical except where the length of the cable must be between 30 and 50 feet (10 to 15 meters).26 – Modem Wiring Note: If the modem has a DB25 connector. and in no case. Cable Wiring OCS MODEM 9-PIN DCD RXD TXD DTR GND DSR RTS CTS RI N/C N/C N/C N/C 25-PIN DCD RXD TXD DTR GND DSR RTS CTS RI Figure 2. . In all cases. The modem must be located as close as possible to the OCS. If cable lengths longer than 30 feet (10 meters) are required. EIA-232 specifications allow for cable runs up to 50 feet (15 meters). The length of the cable must be as short as possible. longer than 50 feet (15 meters).CH. Using a Null Modem cable can cause damage to the OCS. Warning: Damage can result if the CD and RI lines are connected to each other or to any other signal on the connector or through the cable to the other unit. a 9-to-25-pin adapter may need to be supplied. modem or both.

) 2. Removing SmartStack Modules 1. Lift out the tabs of the module. Press the SmartStack Module into the “locked” position. Each SmartStack Module has two tabs that fit into slots located on the OCS. Hook the tabs. do not install more than four Smart Stack Modules per OCS or RCS. pry up the end of the SmartStack Module (opposite of tabs) and swing the module out. b.90) For additional information regarding the use of modems with Control Station products. Recommended Modem U. contact Technical Support. making sure to align the SmartStack Module fasteners with the SmartStack receptacles on the OCS. 2 c. Caution: To function properly and avoid possible damage.14 – Installing a SmartStack Module in an OCS . SmartStack Tab Fastener Mating Pins OCS Back Cover Figure 2.4 Installing and Removing a SmartStack Module (Shown with the OCS) The following section describes how to install and remove a SmartStack Module. (Refer to Section 1.7. Using a flathead screwdriver.) 2.PAGE 34 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 CH. (The slots on the OCS are located on the back cover.S. Installing SmartStack Modules 1. Robotics Sportster Modem (Model 0701) (56K v. 2. a.

Select File.16 – OCS100 LEDs (OCS200 LEDs are located on its front panel. press Send. 2 2. On the next screen. use Cscape’s Firmware Update Wizard. Firmware Update Wizard from the pull-down menu. Figure 2.CH.1 LEDs for OCS / RCS Refer to the following diagrams and LED table for OCS / RCS LEDS.15 – Using Firmware Update Wizard Select the product type and click on the circle next to the desired network. 2. Press OK. Firmware is now updated.6 LEDs 2.) .5 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 35 MAN0227-04 Selecting DeviceNet Network (Firmware Update Wizard) To use the OCS in a DeviceNet network. The following screen appears. 2 LEDs OK R UN 1 F1 2 F2 6 F6 3 F3 7 F7 4 F4 8 F8 + /- F5 9 F9 5 0 F10 S y s tem Figure 2.6.

Red light ON indicates transmit data being transferred on the CAN Network port. During Self-test: • • • • Network Status (NS) NS monitors CAN port activity. Orange flashing light when communication activity (send and receive) occurs between the RCS and the CAN Network port. Solid Red Light ON: Indicates non-critical selftest error is detected. ON indicates all self-tests passed.7 – LEDs (OCS and RCS) OCS RCS OFF indicates OCS is in IDLE/STOP mode. • • Flashing Red light at 1Hz rate: critical self-test error is detected. ON indicates ladder code running. Flashing indicates DO / IO mode or RUN with no ladder program. • Orange flashing light indicates communication activity (send and receive) between the RCS and the RS-232 serial port.17 – RCS LEDs LED RUN OK Module Status (MS) • • • • • Table 2. • Green light ON indicates receive data being transferred on the RS-232. . • Red light ON indicates transmit data being transferred on the RS-232 port. • OFF indicates no communication. OFF indicates no communication. MS monitors RS-232 activity. Green light ON indicates receive data being transferred on the CAN Network port. OFF indicates one or more self-tests failed. 2 A close-up of LEDs OK RUN NS MS Power LED Figure 2.PAGE 36 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 CH.

2 2.CH. . LEDs are controlled via %SR LED_1 to LED_10. OK G raphicO CS RUN S y ste m QZ 1 _QZ F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 1 QGZH I 41 PQRZ S F6 F7 F8 F9 F10 71 QZ +1/- Figure 2.18 – OCS250 LEDs ABC 2 DEF 3 JK L 5 MNO 6 TUV WXY 8 9 0 .6. If desired. LEDs can be tied to the function keys of the Graphic OCS.2 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 37 MAN0227-04 LEDs for Graphic OCS (OCS250) The Graphic OCS (OCS250) has ten user-controlled LEDs.

2 .PAGE 38 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 NOTES CH.

Proper orientation helps to ensure a good connection when SmartStack Modules are installed. c. the above orientation provides for optimum readability of the screen and ease of use of the keypad. Orientation of the OCS100 and OCS200 OCS100 OCS200 NOTE: There are NO orientation restrictions on the OCS.2 Mounting Orientation The base of the OCS needs to be mounted with the proper orientation. Improper operation or damage to the OCS and SmartStack Modules could result. Examples of product-specific information includes: a. Figure 3. Mounting orientation and instructions Dimensions and panel cut-outs Some types of connectors and other hardware Note: It is important to consult both this chapter and Chapter Two for installation information. The OCS is mounted on a door of a panel box. However. a.OCS100 and OCS200 Orientation . Caution: Do not install more than four SmartStack Modules per OCS. 3. Product-specific information is covered in this chapter pertaining to the OCS100 and OCS200.1 General Installation information is covered in Chapter Two that applies to one or more models of the OCS or the RCS. Up to four SmartStack Modules can be installed per OCS. 3 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 39 MAN0227-04 CHAPTER 3: OCS100 AND OCS200 3.1 . b.CH.

Do not over-tighten. 3.35 mm) 3.1 Mounting Procedures The OCS is designed for permanent panel mounting. Cut the host panel as described in the Figures 3. Begin configuration procedures for the OCS and then the SmartStack Modules. Connect the communications and power cables to the OCS ports using the provided connectors. 3. 3 Mounting Requirements To ensure the proper operation of the OCS Modules. Insert the OCS through the panel cutout (from the front).32mm) 5. A checklist is provided for the user’s convenience in Section 2.27 mm) . Observe requirements for the panel layout design and adequate clearances.2 – 3.061 (128. 3.1 2. follow the installation guidelines and procedures covered in Chapter Two. Read Chapter Two prior to mounting the OCS.800 (20.124 (79.3– Back View of OCS100 (Shown with SmartStack Modules installed) . 1.7.3. 6.861 (47.5 mm) 6. 4. OCS100: Install the six washers and hex nuts on the six mounting studs of the OCS.049 (128. follow the instructions below and use the provided template.049 (229.84 mm) Figure 3. The gasket material needs to lie between the host panel and the OCS panel. Install and tighten washers and nuts until the gasket material forms a tight seal.2 OCS and SmartStack Dimensions and Panel Cut-outs OCS100 5.3 28 DEC 2000 CH. 5.24 mm) 1. OCS200: Install the eight washers and hex nuts on the eight mounting studs of the OCS. Install up to four SmartStack Modules in the OCS.2 –Side View of OCS100 (Shown with Four SmartStack Modules) Figure 3. Warning: Make sure the power and network connectors are removed from the OCS.250 (6.86 mm) 9.963 (176.35 mm) .3.PAGE 40 MAN0227-04 3.2. To install the OCS.

20 mm) 7.CH.6 – Back View of OCS200 (Shown with SmartStack Modules installed) .323 (8. .062 (15.5–Side View of OCS200 (Shown with Four SmartStack Modules) 6.124 (79.40 mm) 3.27 mm) 0.75 mm) R.061 (128.063 (179.250 (6.84 mm) Figure 3. TYP.53 mm) PAGE 41 MAN0227-04 3.91 mm) .35 mm) 1.225 (81.35 mm) Figure 3.35 mm) 3.74 mm) 3.86 mm) 9. 3 28 DEC 2000 3/16 (4.250 (6.730 (94.963 (176.861 (47.32 mm) 5.049 (229.800 (20.76 mm) DRILL THRU 6X 0.730 (94.4 – Panel Cut-out for the OCS100 OCS200 3.74 mm) Figure 3.643 (92.55 mm) .

The Config/Debug port and the SmartStack I/O Module receptacle are located on the backside of the back cover metal.224 (81.730 (94.53 mm) CH.4. and Programming Ports The OCS100 and OCS200 Power and Network Ports are located on the bottom side of the back cover metal as depicted in Figure 3.38 mm) 3.89 mm) .40 mm) 3.323 (8. TYP.080 (52. Front Panel Power Port Network Port Figure 3.251 (6.20 mm) 7. Connectors.4 OCS Ports.9. 2.730 (94.7 – Panel Cut-out for the OCS200 3.643 (92.PAGE 42 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 0.8 and 3.74 mm) 3.83 mm) 0.062 (1.063 (179.57 mm) R.8 – Power and Network Ports for the OCS100 / 200 . Network. 3 3/16 DRILL (4.1 Power. and Wiring 3.76 mm) THRU 3X 3.74 mm) Figure 3.

Be sure to only use the authorized part number to replace the battery.9 – Config/Debug Port and SmartStack I/O Receptacle 3. U6 J4 Figure 3. In addition. and local regulations. do not re-charge. Be sure to consult with the appropriate regulatory agencies before disposing batteries. Note that U6 has text written upon it. Be sure to replace the battery so that the text is oriented in the same direction as the original battery. disassemble. pull U6 in an upward motion. Use only the authorized battery part number shown above.5 Battery Replacement for the OCS100 / 200 (HE500BAT005) To replace the battery in the OCS100 / 200. 3 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 43 MAN0227-04 Config/Debug Port SmartStack I/O Receptacle Figure 3. heat or incinerate lithium batteries. Warning: Do not make substitutions for the battery. state.CH. Warning: Disposal of lithium batteries must be done in accordance with federal.10 – Battery Replacement for the OCS100 / 200 .

3 .PAGE 44 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 NOTES CH.

2 Mounting Orientation The base of the Graphic OCS needs to be mounted with the proper orientation. c. . 4.1 – Orientation of Graphic OCS (Shown in Panel Box) Figure 4. 4 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 45 MAN0227-04 CHAPTER 4: GRAPHIC OCS (OCS250) 4. the above orientation provides for optimum readability of the screen and ease of use of the keypad. b.1 General Installation information is covered in Chapter Two that applies to one or more models of the OCS or the RCS. Up to four SmartStack Modules can be installed per Graphic OCS. Orientation of the Graphic OCS (OCS250) O C S2 50 -2 Figure 4. Examples of product-specific information includes: a. The Graphic OCS is mounted on a door of a panel box. and SmartStack Modules could result. Mounting orientation and instructions Dimensions and panel cut-outs Some types of connectors and other hardware It is important to consult both this chapter and Chapter Two for installation information. Caution: Do not install more than four SmartStack Modules per OCS. a. Proper orientation helps to ensure a good connection when SmartStack Modules are installed.2 –Back View of Graphic OCS (Shown in Panel Box) NOTE: There are NO orientation restrictions on the OCS. RCS. Improper operation or damage to the OCS. Product-specific information is covered in this chapter pertaining to the Graphic OCS (OCS250).CH. However.

3 – Side View of Graphic OCS(Shown with four SmartStack Modules) .4. Insert the Graphic OCS through the panel cutout (from the front).7 9 m m ) 0.98m m ) 0 .0 3m m ) 6 .98 4” (5 0. Over-tightening can potentially damage the case. programming. (2 0. Begin configuration procedures for the Graphic OCS models.80 0" TY P. The gasket material needs to lie between the host panel and the Graphic OCS panel. 3.7. Cut the host panel as described in the Figures 4. 6.2. Warning: Make sure the power and network connectors are removed from the Graphic OCS.3 . 4.12 5” (1 55 .6b) that is provided with the Graphic OCS) until the gasket material forms a tight seal.PAGE 46 MAN0227-04 b. Prior to mounting the Graphic OCS.72 m m ) 1 . and power cables to the Graphic OCS ports using the provided connectors.09 6” (7 8.3 2 m m ) 5 . 3 .3 9 m m ) 0 . 1.87 5” (2 00 .1 2. observe requirements for the panel layout design and adequate clearances.7 08" (17 . follow the instructions below.6 7m m ) Figure 4. 4 Graphic OCS (Installed in Panel Door) The Graphic OCS is designed for permanent panel mounting.18 4" (1 31 .53 5" (8 9.6 4 mm) 7 .6a) or mounting clamp (Figure 4. Caution: Do not over-tighten. 5. Connect the communications. 28 DEC 2000 CH. A checklist is provided in Section 2.5 8m m ) 3 . To install the Graphic OCS. Install and tighten the mounting clips (Figure 4.22 5" (5 .

CH. 4

28 DEC 2000

PAGE 47
MAN0227-04

6 .66 4"
(1 69 .2 7m m )

4 .16 2"
(1 05 .7 1m m )
2 .94 0"
(7 4.6 8 m m )

5 .61 8” (14 2 .70 m m )
7 .25 0" (18 4.15 m m )
1 0.1 64 " (2 58 .1 7m m )
11 .12 5 " (28 2.57 m m )
O C S 2 50 -1

Figure 4.4 – Back View of Graphic OCS
.45 9
(11.6 6m m )

6 3 /4
(1 7 1.4 5m m )

.66 6
(1 6 .9 2 m m )

.51 6
(1 3 .1 2 m m )

1 0 3 /1 6
(2 5 8.7 6m m )

PAN E L C U T-O U T D IM E NS IO N S FO R O C S 250 (W / M O U N T IN G S C R E W S )
(O C S 250 S H O W N F R O M R E AR V IE W )

Figure 4.5 – Panel Cutout of Graphic OCS

.42 1
(1 0 .6 9 m m )

PAGE 48
MAN0227-04

28 DEC 2000

M ountin g
C lip
A ss em bly

CH. 4

M ountin g Ta b

F ron t P ane l

Panel Retaining C lip Installation

Figure 4.6a – Using Panel Retaining Clip

Figure 4.6b – Using Panel Mounting Clamp

CH. 4

4.3

28 DEC 2000

PAGE 49
MAN0227-04

Battery Replacement for the Graphic OCS (OCS250) (HE500BAT005)

To replace the battery in the Graphic OCS, pull U6 in an upward motion. Note that U6 has text written
upon it. Be sure to replace the battery so that the text is oriented in the same direction as the original
battery.
Use only the authorized battery part number shown above.
Warning: Do not make substitutions for the battery. Be sure to only use the authorized part number to
replace the battery.
Warning: Disposal of lithium batteries must be done in accordance with federal, state, and local
regulations. Be sure to consult with the appropriate regulatory agencies before disposing
batteries.
In addition, do not re-charge, disassemble, heat or incinerate lithium batteries.

P1

J1

U6

Figure 4.7 – Battery Replacement for the Graphic OCS

PAGE 50
MAN0227-04

28 DEC 2000

NOTES

CH. 4

Up to four SmartStack Modules can be installed per RCS.1 General Installation information is covered in Chapter Two that applies to one or more models of the OCS or the RCS. Proper orientation helps to ensure a good connection when SmartStack Modules are installed. The RCS is mounted inside a panel box. Product-specific information is covered in this chapter pertaining to the RCS. The RCS is installed in a panel box. 5. RCS Figure 5. Caution: Do not install more than four SmartStack Modules per RCS.2 Mounting Orientation The base of the RCS need to be mounted with the proper orientation. c. b.CH. Mounting orientation and instructions Dimensions and panel cut-outs Some types of connectors and other hardware Note: It is important to consult both this chapter and Chapter Two for installation information. Examples of productspecific information includes: a. 5 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 51 MAN0227-04 CHAPTER 5: REMOTE CONTROL STATION (RCS) 5.1 – RCS Orientation . Improper operation or damage to the RCS and SmartStack Modules could result.

Do not over-tighten. 5. 5 * * Note: The pin connector labeling on the RCS is upside-down if the base of the device is installed as shown in the third view. A checklist is provided for the user’s convenience in Section 2. Figure 5. To install the RCS in a permanent panel mounting. Warning: Make sure the power and network connectors are removed from the OCS.2 – RCS Orientation (Shown with four SmartStack Options) 5. Install up to four SmartStack Modules in the RCS.2. Drill holes as described in the Figures 2. 3.PAGE 52 MAN0227-04 28 JDEC2000 CH.1 2. 4. .3 Mounting Instructions The RCS is designed for permanent panel mounting. Install and tighten washers and nuts. use the instructions that follow: 1. Connect the communications and power cables to the RCS ports using the provided connectors. Observe requirements for the panel layout design and adequate clearances. Read Chapter Two prior to mounting the RCS. An optional mounting bracket is available for use.9.7 – 2.

3 – Optional Mounting Bracket for Use with the RCS.) Figure 5.4 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 53 MAN0227-04 RCS Optional Mounting Bracket (HE800ACC210) The optional mounting bracket is used with SmartStack Modules that have connectors located on two sides. Figure 5.3 depicts how to mount the bracket to an RCS. (Note that many SmartStack Modules only have connectors on one side. 5 5.CH. .

4 .250 (31.773 (45. .RCS Power Connector looking at the RCS (Front and Side Views Shown) Note: Power Supply Voltage Range is from 10-30 VDC.Front View of the RCS (Includes Four SmartStack Modules & Dimensions) Figure 5.32 mm) 6.800 (147.898 (99. the Vsignal (DC power return) need to be connected to earth ground at the power supply.7 .28 mm) NOTE: Use #8-32 mounting hardware consisting of four 8-32 pan head screws with external tooth lock washers.75 mm) 1.937 (176.200 (81.01 mm) .Side View of the RCS PIN 1 PIN 2 PIN 1 PIN 3 PIN 2 PIN 3 Figure 5. Warning: To provide maximum noise immunity and to insure minimum EMI radiation. The user must ensure that the power supply selected is compatible with this method of grounding.20 mm) 5.PAGE 54 MAN0227-04 28 JDEC2000 CH. 5 RCS 6.32 mm) 1.RCS Power Connector Figure 5.5 .32 mm) 3.03 mm_ 3. Figure 5.312 (160.6 .800 (20.

32 mm) 1.CH.250 (31.75 mm) Figure 5.8 – Panel Cut-out for the RCS PAGE 55 MAN0227-04 .312 (160. 5 28 DEC 2000 6.

5 .PAGE 56 MAN0227-04 28 JDEC2000 NOTES CH.

use ↑ and ↓ keys to select appropriate value. Some fields in the system screens are editable. .use ← and → keys to adjust value. . The OCS250 model indicates an editable field with the → indicator while the Text models use a solid cursor (_) under the first character in the field. use the System Menu to set the following configuration parameters: • Network Baud • RS232 Mode • Time/Date For OCS only devices. the following configuration parameters may also need setting: • Network Id • LCD contrast • Fkeys mode 6. access to the System Menu must be made through the Cscape Remote Terminal Function. establish communications and start the Remote Text Terminal. . Refer the field description to determine which method to use. click on the specified key in the display representation. Pressing the Enter key selects the system screen that the indicator arrow is pointing to. Then click on the System key in the display representation. Pressing the ↑ and ↓ keys scroll up or down through the menu options.use Numeric keys or ↑ and ↓ keys on the appropriate digit. both configuration and status fields are covered in this section a. Once in a system screen. To change a value in an editable field press the Enter key to select edit mode. The OCS250 model indicates edit mode by hi-lighting the field while the Text models will go to a flashing cursor. the System Menu also provides power-up and runtime status. With the exception of the RCS Network Id parameter. 2. these fields will require one of the following methods for modifying the value. 6 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 57 MAN0227-04 CHAPTER 6: OCS/RCS CONFIGURATION (SYSTEM MENU) 6.CH. 4. To emulate the System Menu for an RCS device. start Cscape. To enter the System Menu on the OCS200 press the System key.1 General Chapter Six describes system configuration for OCS/RCS devices. For OCS/RCS devices. 2. 3. Editing System Screen Fields 1. To enter the System Menu on the OCS100 and the OCS250 press the ↑ and ↓ keys (at the same time). b. 3. Notice that the two keys are surrounded by a white outline and the word “System” on the silkscreen of the keypad.2 System Menu In addition to providing access to the OCS/RCS configuration parameters. • • • Enumerated entry Numeric entry Bar graph entry . In the following descriptions. both OCS/RCS systems use the System Menu to set configuration parameters. Once in edit mode. the user may press ESC (if not currently modifying a field) to return to the main System Menu. Since RCS devices provide no keypad or screen. Navigating the System Menu 1. For brevity. 5.

If the “Network OK?” status changes from “Yes” to “No. the ESC key may be pressed instead.” the new Network ID is a duplicate. the Text models will remain in edit mode with the original value and will require the Enter key to be pressed to exit. and another ID needs to be selected.PAGE 58 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 CH. 1M] [125K. Cscan model: DeviceNet model: [ 1 . A device configured for the wrong baud rate may shut down the network entirely. This action will restore the original value to the display. Each unit on the network needs a unique ID number. After the value is correctly entered. 500K. Set Time/Date • Set Network ID This screen contains two fields. The OCS250 model will also immediately exit edit mode. the second field is numerically editable and is used to configure the Network ID. 250K. the unit stops executing the ladder code (for up to 1 second) while the network is re-tested. however. 6 4. The correct ID number should be entered here before physically attaching the unit to the network. 5. The first field contains the current network status. 250K. System Screens There are up to ten different menu options which include the following: • • • • • • • • • • Set Network ID Set Network Baud Set Contrast View OCS(RCS) Status View OCS(RCS) Diags View I/O Slots View Char Set (Not present on OCS250) Set Fkeys Mode Set RS232 Mode. press the Enter key to accept the value. c. With an RCS device. 500K] Note: All devices on the network must be at the same baud rate. Should the user NOT wish to accept the value before the Enter key is pressed. .253 ] [ 0 . the second field is read-only and configuration of the Network ID is accomplished by setting hardware switches (covered below). Cscan model: DeviceNet model: [125K.63 ] Note: If the Network ID setting is changed. • Set Network Baud This screen contains an editable enumerated field allowing the user to select the current baud rate of the network. With an OCS device. The second field contains the current Network ID of the model.

6 • 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 59 MAN0227-04 Set Contrast This menu contains an editable bar graph entry allowing the user to set the contrast of the LCD display. Shows the number of bytes used by bitmaps. In this mode the green “RUN” LED flashes. Shows the number of bytes used by Legend and State strings. c. Scan-Rate Shows the number of milliseconds for the scan. Shows the number of bytes used by text tables. DoIO). • View OCS (RCS) Status This screen contains both a single enumerated editable field that sets the OCS/RCS’s scan mode and status fields that display information about the internal state of the OCS/RCS. Run. In Run mode. f. DoIO mode is similar to Run mode. Shows the FPGA Image version. When the OCS is in DoIO mode. b. Shows the BIOS firmware revision.CH. Shows if the power-up self-test passed or failed by displaying Ok or Fault. Scan inputs Solve logic Write outputs Handle network communications Handle host communications request Process data for operator interface Ladder Size Config Size Shows the number of bytes used by the ladder program. d. The green “RUN” LED is OFF. Pressing Esc returns to the System Menu. Parameter Description OCS(RCS) Mode Displays the current scanning mode (Idle. Shows the number of bytes used by the I/O configuration (Text Models) Text Size Shows the number of bytes used by the text screens (OCS250 Model) Graphics Size String Size Bitmap Size Text Tbl Size Shows the number of bytes used by the graphical ‘objects’. Firmware Rev BIOS Rev FPGA Rev Self-Test Shows the execution engine firmware version. . except the ladder logic is not solved. e. This feature is a valuable troubleshooting tool. the user is able to exercise all of the I/O from Cscape. the ladder program executes and the green “RUN” LED illuminates. In Idle mode. without interference from the ladder program. the I/O is not scanned and the OCS ladder program does not execute. Pressing the ↑ and ↓ keys will scroll through the different items. The scan-rate is the sum of the time required to execute the following items: a.

Warn Power is not being applied to the network or no other devices were found to be communicating on the network.This test checks for resets caused by hardware faults. No unintentional resets have occurred. Ok Fault The controller firmware is invalid. Logic Error Ok Fault This test checks for problems with the user program while running.This test validates the controller firmware.This test checks that the network sub-system is powered and operating correctly. User Program . . (Network models only. W-Dog Trips .This tests for a valid user program and configuration data. The network ID is not valid for the selected protocol.) This controller's ID was not found to be a duplicate. The loaded BIOS firmware is valid Ok Fault The loaded BIOS is invalid. 6 View OCS(RCS) Diags This screen displays a list of self-test diagnostics results (no editable fields). (Network models only. Ok Fault The user program and/or configuration are not valid. System BIOS . Fault indications will prevent the loaded application from running. The firmware is valid.) The network ID is valid. No errors have been encountered while running a user program. The user program and configuration is valid. The RAM is functioning correctly. power brownouts or large amounts of electrical interference.) No network errors were counted Indicate serious networking problems exist. (Network models only. Warn(ing) indications allow the application to run but inform the user that a condition exists that needs correction. Network ID Ok Warn This test checks that the network ID is valid. (Engine) Firmware .PAGE 60 MAN0227-04 • 28 DEC 2000 CH.) The network system is receiving power and has determined other devices are Ok communicating on the network.This test checks for a valid BIOS portion of the controller firmware. Network State . Each item describes a test and shows a result of Ok if the test passed or Fault/Warn if an error was found while running the test. Indicates the user program contained an instruction that was invalid or unsupported. Another controller on the network was found with the same ID as this controller. (Network models only. 0 Indicates a fault with xx showing the number of occurrences. System RAM . xx Net Errors 0 xx This test checks for abnormal network operations while running.This test checks the functionality of the controller RAM at power up. Ok Fault The RAM is not functioning correctly. xx indicates the number of occurrences. Dup Net ID Ok Warn This test checks for duplicate IDs on a network.

the message “ I/O: Empty” is displayed in the appropriate slot. Refer to Master documentation for more information.) Clock Error Ok Warn This test checks that the real time clock contains valid data.) If a module that is not supported by the OCS firmware is physically attached. The module is either defective or a MODULE firmware upgrade is required.CH.. The module is either defective or a ENGINE firmware upgrade is required to support the module. If the OCS is not configured for a SmartStack Module and a module is physically attached to the OCS. the message “fI/O: [module number]” is displayed in the appropriate slot irregardless of whether the OCS contains a configuration for that slot. If a module that is physically attached that has a configuration error. the message "?I/O: [module number]" is displayed in the appropriate slot (Note that the "module number" is the actual product number of the attached SmartStack Module.) Ok Warn • View I/O Slots This screen allows the user to view the currently installed SmartStack I/O. Ok Warn The DeviceNet master is no longer maintaining a polled connection or sending IDLE. the message "+I/O: [module number]" is displayed in the appropriate slot.(DeviceNet model only. keypad (number of keys) and the type of LCD display being used (character/or graphic resolution). Indicates the downloaded configuration and attached modules do not match. (Note that the "module number" is the actual product number of the attached SmartStack Module.) DeviceNet master is maintaining a polled connection and not sending IDLE. there are eight possible displays: If the OCS is not configured for a SmartStack Module and no module is physically attached to the OCS. When viewing the I/O slots in the OCS. (IDLE is a network state in which ‘some’ masters maintain a polled connection but sends zero data if an associated PLC controller is in IDLE mode. If a module that is physically attached that has a firmware error. 6 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 61 MAN0227-04 DeviceNet In . (See View I/O Slot system screen for more information. If the OCS is configured for a different module than what is physically attached to the OCS. The I/O configuration matched the installed modules. I/O System - This test checks that the I/O configuration downloaded and the physical devices (SmartStack) attached to the controller match. the message "-I/O: Missing" is displayed in the appropriate slot.) If the OCS is configured for a SmartStack Module and the module is not physically attached to the OCS. the message “*Unsupported” is display in the appropriate slot irregardless of whether the OCS contains a configuration for that slot. the message “cI/O: [module number]” is display in the appropriate slot. The real time clock contains valid data. . Indicates invalid data in the real time clock. The configuration data for that module is incorrect.

(Note that the "module number" is the actual product number of the attached SmartStack Module). The character set range is from 8-255. Press Enter and then Esc to return to the System Menu. By using Cscape to perform firmware updates. . • View Char Set (Text models only) The View Char Set allows the user to view the entire character set available in the OCS. Each field is subdivided and allows the ↑ and ↓ key to modify the value. Note: The module number is presented as ‘aaannn’ where aaa is the module definition prefix and nnn is the module number. When a function key is pressed. The CsCAN mode allows Csape to connect to the serial port for uploads. 6 If the SmartStack Module that is physically attached to the OCS matches what the OCS configuration. • Set Time/Date This screen contains two editable enumerated fields for displaying and modifying the OCS’s time and date. the message " I/O: [module number]" is displayed. When Update mode is selected. • Set RS232 Mode This screen contains an editable enumerated field that allows the mode of the serial port to be set to one of two modes. press Enter and then use the ↑ and ↓ keys to scroll through the character set. downloads.PAGE 62 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 CH. • Set FKeys Mode This screen contains an editable enumerated field that allows the Function keys to be configured to operate in one of two modes. it can TOGGLE the point associated with the key or it can MOMENTARILY turn the point ON when the key is pressed. monitoring and control. To select a character for viewing. The Update mode allows a firmware update and factory test utility to be used. the firmware is ready to download when the OK LED flashes. the “Update” mode is not necessary.

) • Setting DeviceNet Network IDs (MAC ID) DeviceNet Network MAC IDs are set on the RCS using the decimal number system (0-63).3 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 63 MAN0227-04 Setting RCS Network ID Since the RCS does not have a screen or keypad. Close-up of RCS Switch Figure 6.1) CsCAN Network IDs are set on the RCS using the hexadecimal number system from 01 to FD. 3. (The decimal equivalent is 01-253. Set a unique Network ID on the RCS by inserting a screwdriver into two identical switches located on top of the RCS.CH. Use this RCS switch to set the Low Digit. 6 6.1 – Setting Network ID using RCS Switches . 1. • Setting CsCAN Network IDs: (Refer to Conversion Table 6. Use this RCS switch to set the High Digit. the Network ID is set by using switches located on the RCS. 2.

1 shows the decimal equivalent of hexadecimal numbers. 6 Table 6. Refer to the table when setting Network IDs for RCS devices used in CsCAN networks.1 – Hexadecimal (H) to Decimal (D) Conversion Table H 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 1A 1B 1C 1D 1E 1F D 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 H 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 3F D 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 H 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 4A 4B 4C 4D 4E 4F 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 5A 5B 5C 5D 5E 5F D 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 H 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 6A 6B 6C 6D 6E 6F 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 7A 7B 7C 7D 7E 7F D 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 H 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 8A 8B 8C 8D 8E 8F 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 9A 9B 9C 9D 9E 9F D 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 H A0 A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 A7 A8 A9 AA AB AC AD AE AF B0 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 B9 BA BB BC BD BE BF D 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 H C0 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 CA CB CC CD CE CF D0 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 DA DB DC DD DE DF D 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 H E0 E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6 E7 E8 E9 EA EB EC ED EE EF F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8 F9 FA FB FC FD FE FF D 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 .PAGE 64 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 CH. Table 6.

Similar to the operation of the function keys. Depending on the configuration of the OCS100 and the field needing to be edited. The standard OCS100 insert (removable) has printing on both sides.CH.function. The other side of the insert has a split field that contains the function key in one field and digits from 0-9 and alphabetic characters in the other field (not shown). function. The ← and → keys are used to move the cursor from one character to another in an editable field and to switch from one editable field to another editable field.1. Function keys F1-F10 are available (%K registers). One side has split field keys that contain the function key number in one field and a digit from 0-9 in the other field (as shown by the following diagram). The ↑ and ↓ keys contain split fields.1 OCS100 Keypad Description The OCS100 keypad contains 10 user-programmable keys. The ↑ key also contains the +/. The ↓ key also contains the . OK RUN 1 F1 2 F2 6 F6 3 F3 7 F7 4 F4 8 F8 +/- F5 9 F9 5 0 F10 S y stem Figure 7. the OCS100 “automatically knows” if a decimal point or a positive or negative indicator is required. The ↑ and ↓ keys are also used to increment and decrement fields. There is no need to press the Shift key. 7 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 65 MAN0227-04 CHAPTER 7: OCS KEYPAD AND SCREEN 7. Shift. Esc. It is up to the user to decide which side of the insert they want displayed (the latter side is standard). respectively. There is no need to press the Shift key and then the corresponding digit or alphanumeric character. or function keys. The user-programmable keys. also serve the purpose of numeric and alphabetic character entry. the OCS “automatically knows” what type of digit or alphanumeric character needs to be entered. The OCS100 keypad also contains four direction keys. Enter and four direction keys.OCS100 Keypad .

The inserts for the OCS200 function keys are removable. The Enter key can also be used to escape out of some selected fields. respectively. When there are no errors present in the OCS100 and the Self-Tests have passed. The Enter key is used to select a field for editing and for sending data to the OCS100. The ↑ and ↓ keys are also used to increment and decrement fields. The ← and → keys are used to move the cursor from one character to another in an editable field and to switch from one editable field to another field. a Shift and an Enter key. Shift. These keys are used as function keys only (%K registers). The OCS100 keypad has OK and RUN indicators. There are 12 user-programmable keys.2 OCS200 Keypad Description The OCS200 keypad contains 12 user-programmable keys. Shift and an Enter key. The Enter key can also be used to escape out of some selected fields. 7 The OCS100 features an Esc.PAGE 66 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 CH. The Esc key is used to exit out of several different menus and fields or abort an editing operation. The Shift key is used to enter a space in an alphanumeric field. The Enter key is used to select a field for editing and for sending data to the OCS200. F1 F7 F2 F8 F3 OK F9 RU N F4 F10 F5 F11 F6 F12 Figure 7. The Shift key is used to enter a space in an alphanumeric field. the RUN LED flashes.2 – OCS200 Keypad . 7. four direction keys and a full numeric keypad. Esc. When the controller is running logic. The OCS200 keypad contains four direction keys. The Esc key is used to exit out of a number of different menus and fields or abort an editing operation. If the controller is in the RUN mode with no logic loaded or if it is in the DO I/O mode. the RUN LED illuminates. Enter. The OCS200 features an Esc. the green OK LED illuminates. These indicators are green LEDs that are built into the keypad.

+/. The ↑ and ↓ keys are also used to increment and decrement fields. the OCS “automatically knows” what type of digit or alphanumeric character needs to be entered. Note that the RUN LED also flashes when the OCS is in the RUN mode if there is no ladder program loaded into the OCS. the OCS “automatically knows” what type of digit or alphanumeric character needs to be entered. There are 12 numeric entry keys. There is no need to press the Shift key and then the corresponding digit or alphabetic character. the green OK LED illuminates. are available. The Enter key can also be used to escape out of some selected fields. flashes when the OCS is in DO I/O mode and is on when the OCS is in RUN mode. The OCS200 keypad has OK and RUN indicators. respectively. The ← ↑ and → ↓ keys are used to move the cursor from one character to another in an editable field and to switch from one editable field to another field. 7. The Graphic OCS250 keypad contains four direction keys. The RUN LED is off when the OCS is in idle mode. are available. The indicators are green LEDs that are built into the keypad. The Graphic OCS250 keypad contains a full numeric keypad. four direction keys and a full numeric keypad. . The indicators are green LEDs that are built into the keypad. The Graphic OCS250 keypad has OK and RUN indicators. The Graphic OCS250 features an Esc and an Enter key. Esc. Enter. the green OK LED illuminates. When there are no errors present in the OCS200 and the Self-Tests have passed.and .3 Graphic OCS250 Keypad Description The Graphic OCS250 keypad contains 10 user-programmable keys. +/. Depending on the configuration of the OCS200 and the field needing to be edited. Numbers 0-9. 7 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 67 MAN0227-04 Unlike the OCS100 keypad. The keys with numbers 0-9 have split fields with alphabetic characters. The inserts for the Graphic OCS250 function keys are removable. These keys are used as function keys only (%K registers). the OCS200 keypad contains a full numeric keypad.and . The RUN LED is off when the OCS is in idle mode. Numbers 0-9. flashes when the OCS is in DO I/O mode and is on when the OCS is in RUN mode. There are 10 user-programmable keys. When there are no errors present in the Graphic OCS250 and the Self-Tests have passed. The Enter key is used to select a field for editing and for sending data to the Graphic OCS250. The keys with numbers 0-9 have split fields with alphabetic characters. Depending on the configuration of the Graphic OCS250 and the field needing to be edited. The Esc key is used to exit out of several different menus and fields or abort an editing operation. There is no need to press the Shift key and then the corresponding digit or alphabetic character.CH. Note that the RUN LED also flashes when the OCS is in the RUN mode if there is no ladder program loaded into the OCS.

The network is disabled. The message No Network Power Network Disabled is displayed. the OCS continues to check for duplicate IDs during operation. Four different scenarios can occur: Scenario #1: No power is supplied to the CAN port.PAGE 68 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 CH. If another device is placed on the CAN network. Scenario #3: If a unit powers-up and finds another unit with the same node number as itself. there is a Fault Code of 80 displayed in View OCS Info in the System Menu (see Chapter 3). Scenario #2: No other units are on the CAN network (or this is the first device to power-up on the network). Figure 7. The green OK light does not illuminate. When the OCS200 unit first powers-up. After the OCS displays this message. the message clears and operation continues.4 Operation When the OCS100 unit first powers-up. If both devices are powered-up at the same time. Also. and the unit displays the message Self-Tests Failed. The message Waiting for Net: F1 = Disable Net is shown. In this case. the message OCS Self-Tests In Progress appears. Note: The ID checking works when one of two devices with the same ID is powered-up more than 1 second before the other. this method of ID checking may not work.3 – OCS250 Keypad 7. The green OK light does not illuminate. The green OK light illuminates. Assuming the controller is configured to require the network. The message Self-Tests Passed is displayed. Next. the OCS then displays the message Self-Tests Failed. it displays OCS200 Operator Control Station. . it displays OCS100 Operator Control Station. 7 OK G raphicO CS RUN S y ste m QZ 1 _QZ F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 1 QGZH I 41 PQRZ S F6 F7 F8 F9 F10 71 QZ +1/- ABC 2 DEF 3 JK L 5 MNO 6 TUV WXY 8 9 0 . The green OK light does not illuminate. the unit performs tests to examine the current state of the network. If F1 is pressed the message No Net Response Network Disabled appears and is followed by the message Self-Tests Failed. the display shows Duplicate ID Network Disabled.

c. In this mode. a cursor appears on one digit of the editable field. A blinking underline cursor appears under an editable field which is being edited in single digit edit mode. the cursor changes from a blinking block to a blinking underline. Press Enter to start editing the selected field. the previous screen that was being viewed before the alarm is returned. Note: If the OCS displays >>>>>> in a text field. the screen associated with this coil is displayed and overrides the normal user screens. the user can press the Enter key to enter the edit mode. 7 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 69 MAN0227-04 Scenario #4: If a unit powers up and it has network power. and single-digit edit mode is entered. and other units are powered up on the network. Pressing ← or → moves the cursor to the previous or next digit (or character). the value does not change. If the ladder program energizes a text coil. The blinking block cursor indicates that the field will be cleared when a numeric (or alphanumeric for an ASCII field) key is pressed. This allows a new value to be entered for the field just as it would be entered on a PC keyboard or a calculator. This can be done by pressing ↑ or ↓ (increments or decrements) or by pressing a numeric (or alphanumeric) key. →. . Use the ↑ and ↓ keys to increment or decrement the digit or enter the number/data with the alphanumeric keys.5. When the text coil is de-energized. and the green OK light is illuminated. If the screen contains an editable field. Solid underline Blinking block Blinking underline A solid underline cursor appears under an editable field which is not being edited yet. This causes a blinking block cursor to appear. If the OCS displays <<<< in a text field. if required.1 Cursor Types There are three different cursor types which may show on the display: a.↓) is pressed. the value is too big to display in the field or is above the maximum for an editable field. b. the OCS unit can be reset by pressing: ↑ + F1 + F2 (press the keys at the same time) 7. If a direction key (←. Use the direction keys (← and →) to move to the cursor to the desired position. the message Self-Tests Passed is displayed. This is designed to show alarm conditions or to display other ladder-detected events. 7. The value chosen by the user may not exceed the minimum or maximum set by the user program.↑. At any time. the value is too small to display or is below the minimum for an editable field.CH. If the user tries to exceed the maximum point or enter a value below the minimum point. A blinking block cursor appears in an editable field when Enter is first pressed to start editing the field. The ← key and the → key can be used to move this type of cursor to select a different editable field. use the direction keys (← and →) to move the cursor to the desired location.5 User Screens In the normal operating mode there are a set of user-defined screens that can be scrolled through using the ↑ and ↓ keys. If there is more than one field on the screen needing to be edited. When in edit mode. the digit (or character) above the cursor can be modified individually.

7 .PAGE 70 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 NOTES CH.

If it is not selected.CH. Add a SmartStack I/O Module Note: For proper functioning and to avoid possible damage. The user can choose to do the following: a. select Controller|I/O Configure for the following dialog: Figure 8. double-click on the box and select the desired controller from the pull-down menu.1 Order of the Configuration Process Chapter Eight provides preliminary configuration procedures that are applicable to all SmartStack Modules. use the manual configuration. ADD the to the right of the desired . From the Main Menu. do not install more than four SmartStack Modules per controller 1. 8 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 71 MAN0227-04 CHAPTER 8: SMARTSTACK CONFIGURATION 8. After completion. the user can use AutoConfig to determine and set the I/O automatically. To place a SmartStack I/O Module into an EMPTY module. click on the CONFIG button module or double-click on the empty slot. refer to the individual data sheets that contain configuration data that is specific to individual modules 8. Either method invokes the SmartStack Module Selection Dialog: slot. 1. the user needs to perform the following procedures. General information is aiso provided pertaining to the screens that the user encounters when configuring specific modules. If not already completed.2 Preliminary Configuration Procedures The SmartStack configuration is accomplished through the Configure Controller Type Dialog. If the OCS has one or more SmartStack Modules already installed. The SmartStack Modules use Cscape Software for configuration. Press the OK button . From the CONFIGURE I/O Dialog.1 Note: Ensure that the proper controller is selected. If the controller is not physically attached to Cscape or its SmartStack Modules are not available.

Delete a SmartStack Module If the desired SmartStack slot shows a module already installed. 2. From the menu. Select a Different SmartStack Module If the desired SmartStack slot shows a module already installed. click on DELETE MODULE. A floating menu appears. 1. . then click the OK button b. Use the mouse to select the desired module. REPLACE MODULE. . click on 1. Right-click on the picture of the configured slot. Use the mouse to select the desired module and then click OK . A floating menu appears. the module can be replaced with a different module. Right-click on the picture of the configured slot. 8 Figure 8. 1. 3.PAGE 72 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 CH.2 – Add I/O Module 2. the module can be deleted. This invokes the SmartStack Module Selection Dialog. From the menu. 2. c.

3. 8 8. Refer to the following section for information about the screens used during the configuration process for individual SmartStack Modules 8. Note: Because the configuration parameters are different for each SmartStack Module.1 Configuration Screens The following information provides an explanation of the screens used to configure SmartStack Modules. Users make selections based upon requirements. it can be configured. one or two tabs are available for selection. Guidelines that are specific to the module are provided in individual data sheets.e. Double-click on the picture of the module or click on the Config button just to the right of the picture. 2.. refer to the data sheet that is specific to the selected module.CH. The Module Configuration Screen appears. a screen appears indicating the following module information: Figure 8. Although there are no user defined parameters.3 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 73 MAN0227-04 Configuration of Specific SmartStack Modules When the desired module is selected.3 – I/O Map Tab Screen . (The SmartStack Module Supplement (SUP0246) also contains all of the data sheets and is periodically revised. programmer) needs to view the I/O Map to determine where the module is located in the point map. b. a. the user (i. I/O Map Tab Screen The I/O Map describes which I/O registers are assigned to specific SmartStack Modules. 1. Depending upon which module is selected. The screens that appear depend upon which module is selected. Upon pressing the I/O Map tab. Module Setup Tab Screen The Module Setup screen (not shown) varies according to the module selected.

Denotes the starting location of the register type.3) as an example. %I8 0 %I7 0 %I6 0 %I5 0 %I4 In 4 %I3 In 3 %I2 In 2 %I1 In 1 %Q3 Out 3 %Q2 Out 2 %Q1 Out 1 Three output channels: Channels not physically present are ignored. %Q8 Ignored %Q7 Ignored %Q6 Ignored %Q5 Ignored %Q4 Ignored . Four input channels: Channels not physically present show a low (zero) state. Note: Do not confuse the described number of input and output channels with the numbers found in the Type column (i.PAGE 74 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 • • Model number Description • • • Type: Number: Starting Location: CH. Indicates the quantity of a particular register type. note that there are four input channels and three output channels per the description. Using DIQ512 (Figure 8. Displays the register types assigned to the module. Example I/O Map For more information. 8 Provides the part number.e. the following example is provided for illustrative purposes only: All %I and %Q registers are assigned in increments of eight bits regardless of the number of input or output channels. The numbers do not necessarily match. Describes the number of input and output channels and other key characteristics of the module.. c. %I and %Q).

CAN is an ISO (International Standards Organization) . The OSI model is defined in terms of seven ordered layers. Session. The application levels are linked to the physical medium by the layers of various emerging protocols (such as DeviceNet). Network. message framing and data security. CAN networks have the following general attributes: Automatic error detection Easily configurable Cost-effective to design and implement Capable of operating in harsh environments b.APPENDIX A 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 75 MAN0227-04 APPENDIX A: NETWORKS 1 CAN and CsCAN Networks Appendix A describes the Controller Area Network (CAN) and CsCAN/DeviceNet. CAN is documented in ISO 11898 (for high-speed applications) and ISO 11519 (for lower-speed applications). 2 Controller Area Network (CAN) Overview The controller area network (or CAN bus) is a serial communications bus that was originally developed in the late 1980’s by a German company (Robert Bosch) for use in the automotive industry. The physical and data link layers are typically transparent to the system designer and are included in any component that implements the CAN protocols. An open system is a set of protocols that allows any two different systems to communicate regardless of their underlying architecture. These layers consist of the Physical (bottom-most layer). The CAN protocol conforms to the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model. These layers are the physical and data link layers. The physical layer is responsible for functions such as physical signaling.defined serial communications bus for real-time applications. a. dedicated to particular industry areas plus a variety of custom protocols defined and developed by individual CAN users. the International Standards Organization (ISO) is a multinational body dedicated to worldwide agreement on international standards. Transport. high immunity to electrical interference and an ability to detect any errors produced. bit timing and bit synchronization. Data Link. encoding. message validation. Specifically. Presentation and Application (top-most layer). CAN architecture defines the bottom two layers of the model. . Established in 1947. The special features are CAN’s producerconsumer-oriented (or peer-to-peer) principle of data transmission and its multi-master capability. CAN Protocol The CAN communications protocol simply describes the method by which information is passed between various devices. CAN Features CAN-based open automation technology successfully competes on the market of distributed automation systems because of the special features of the CAN protocol. The data link layer performs functions such as bus arbitration. The general design of CAN originally specified a high bit rate. and error detection.

With the twisted pair. Therefore. Part A allows for 11 message identification bits.870. resulting in 536. Two examples are twisted wire-pairs and fiber-optics. Note: DeviceNet currently specifies Part A only. differential configuration. The use of voltage differentials allows CAN networks to function in very noisy environments. The Philips SJA1000 is a Part A device (11 ID bits) but has the ability to be used with extended CAN without causing any bus errors. There are two descriptor bytes and up to eight data bytes. Extended CAN (Part B) utilizes 29 identification bits. The signaling in CAN is carried out using differential voltages. If Part A devices are used on an extended CAN system in which 29 bit IDs are present. The most common physical medium consists of a twisted-pair with a termination resistance that is applicable to the cable in use (the CsCAN network typically calls for the use of a 121Ω resistor). These two parts are “Part A” and “Part B”. each wire is closer to the noise source (if a noise source is present) for half the time and farther away for the other half. The two signal lines are termed ‘CAN_H’ and ‘CAN_L’. CAN operates at data rates of up to 1 Megabits per second. . the device causes errors and the entire network may not operate correctly. The descriptor bytes are important. This is achieved by ignoring the extended CAN frames. Part A devices are only able to transmit and receive standard CAN protocol. thus canceling the interference.912 separate identifiers.PAGE 76 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 APPENDIX A A p p lica tio n La ye r M 3S L aye r D a ta -link L a ye r P h ysica l L a ye r P h ysica l m e dium D e fin e d b y C A N spe cifica tio n Figure 1 . because they define the priority of the message and the type of message being transmitted. which result in 2032 different identifiers. and the balance of this discussion is specific to Part A only. which are known as "part B passive" devices and are similar to what Horner uses. CAN Operation CAN is capable of using a variety of physical media for transmission purposes. The data link layer defines the format and timing protocol with which the messages are transmitted. the cumulative effect of the interference is equal on both wires. The Full CAN protocol allows for two lengths of identifiers.OSI-Based Model c.

CAN is an excellent network to use in situations where microcontrollers need to communicate with each other or with remote devices. The popularity of CAN has been the result of the automatic error detection capabilities. CsCAN Network Features The CsCAN Network is based on CAN. the ability to operate in harsh environments. and the wide availability of hardware.) Horner Electric found that by developing its own network. it satisfied several important needs. Since the CAN protocol specifies no rules for the assignment of message-identifiers. (For a more detailed description.APPENDIX A 28 DEC 2000 D e scrip to r b yte 1 PAGE 77 MAN0227-04 D e scrip to r b yte 2 Id e ntifie r fie ld R e m ote tran sm issio n re q u est b it D a ta -le n g th co d e Figure 2 – Descriptor Bytes There are 11 bits in the identifier field. All bits of the identifier field define the message priority. Horner Electric developed its own network. The CAN implementation in the CsCAN controller allows up to 64 controllers to be networked with no additional hardware and up to 253 controllers with three CAN repeaters. It is important to note that the data rate is not limited to 125Kbps. The CAN specification guarantees the latency time associated with priority values. The maximum data rate is 1Mbps (limited by the speed of light). To summarize. The priority is defined to be highest for the smallest binary value of the identifier. data is passed at 125Kbps using a differential pair of wires plus a ground. etc. With Horner Electric Controllers. This feature makes it attractive for use within real-time control environments. The bits are used for identification of the message as well as determining its bus access priority. Assignment of the CAN message identifiers therefore is one of the most important decisions when designing a CAN-based communication system. ease of configuration. the relatively low-cost for development tools. 3 CsCAN Network Overview The CsCAN Network was first developed in 1993 by Horner Electric. The CsCAN Network has a “pass-through” feature whereby PC-based programs access other nodes connected to a network by passing the programming command through the serial port to the network port. It was developed for use in a project that Horner Electric completed for the United States Post Office. see below. CAN is currently being used in a very large number of applications in the automotive industry and in many other industrial applications. a variety of different. One very attractive quality of CAN is that it is capable of allocating priorities to messages. . Horner Electric continues CsCAN Network development to satisfy the requirements of today and the requirements of the future. because it needed a network that had a specific set of powerful peer-to-peer and host-to-node capabilities. application-specific uses are possible. which has many desirable features such as ruggedness.

If two controllers start broadcasting information on the network at the same time. Vendors are not required to purchase hardware. Each controller is capable of broadcasting Global Digital Output bits (%QG) and Global Analog Output bits (%AQG). In this way. In applications with a large number of networked controllers. The specification and the protocol are open. a. The coil representations %QG and %AQG may be used in ladder logic like any other coil or register reference. By assigning higher Network IDs to controllers that provide numerous network updates. It allows the interchangeability of simple devices while making interconnectivity of more complex devices possible. when attached to a Control Station serial port. Finally.PAGE 78 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 APPENDIX A For the ladder programmer. if a controller has not transmitted its global data for specific time period. It is an application layer protocol (ISO layer 7) and is defined in terms of an abstract object model. better results may be achieved by assigning lower Network IDs to controllers that have more critical network data than other controllers. one Cscape package connected to one Control Station unit can program all Control Station units on the network. Instead of using master/slave or token passing. However for troubleshooting and optimizing. software or licensing rights to connect devices to a system. the controller's programmable network timer may expire. the following information is helpful. CsCAN Network Operation When a controller needs to send data over the network. little knowledge of networking procedures is needed. which represents the available communication services and the external visible behavior of a DeviceNet node. as part of its power-up initialization sequence. another controller can explicitly request a controller to broadcast its global data. the CsCAN Network is used to exchange data between a controller on the network and a PC-based Host Supervisory Tool such as the Cscape Ladder Editor or an OEM-specific cell controller. the "self-arbitration" causes the controller with the greater Network ID number to cease broadcasting without affecting the message-in-progress of the other controller. All digital global outputs are broadcast to the network each time one of them has a state change. which in turn results in a global data broadcast. DeviceNet Features DeviceNet is a low-cost communications link to connect industrial devices. A programming package (like Cscape). which are periodically broadcasted to the other controllers on the network. In addition. the controllers are prevented from monopolizing the bus time. In addition to global data. it first waits for the network to be idle (currently a maximum of 900uS). A useful feature of the CsCAN network is that it supports a “Host-to-Node” protocol and has the ability to "pass through" programming commands. . can access other Control Station units connected to a network by passing the programming command through the serial port to the network port. Controllers with lower Network ID numbers are given a higher priority than controllers with higher Network ID numbers. the hardware self-arbitrates based on the Network ID. 4 DeviceNet Overview DeviceNet is an open network. DeviceNet is based on CAN.

DeviceNet provides the communication services needed by various types of applications. I/O messages are for time-critical. Master/Slave operation. Capable of Peer-to-Peer exchange capability exists in which any DeviceNet product can produce and consume messages. Some of the features and functionality of the DeviceNet network are described Table A. polled or change-of-state (exception-based) Removal and replacement of devices from the network under power DeviceNet Protocol Some of the communication protocol features of DeviceNet consist of the following: A DeviceNet product can behave as a Client. . Capable of supporting 64 node addresses Each node can support an unlimited number of I/O. This is referred to as the Predefined Master/Slave Connection Set. control-oriented data. They provide a dedicated. Distance 125 Kbps 500m (1. DeviceNet requires packets to have identifier fields for the data. Multi-Master and Master/Slave special case. Many of today's lower level industrial control devices must retain their low cost/low resource characteristics even when directly connected to a network. These two different types are I/O Messaging and Explicit Messaging.DeviceNet Features and Functionality Up to 64 Nodes Selectable end-to end network distance varies with speed Baud Rate Data Packets Bus Topology Bus Addressing System Features b. power and signal on the same network cable Peer-to-Peer with Multi-Cast (one-to-many). DeviceNet takes this into consideration by defining a specific instance of the DeviceNet Model for communications typically seen in a Master/Slave application. The DeviceNet specification defines two different types of messaging. special-purpose communication path between a producing application and one or more consuming applications. a Server or both.APPENDIX A 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 79 MAN0227-04 The DeviceNet Model is application independent. Explicit messages use low priority identifiers and contain the specific meaning of the message in the data field. These messages provide multi-purpose. point-to-point communications paths between two devices.1: Network Size Network Length Table 1 .640 feet) 250 Kbps 250m (820 feet) 500 Kbps 100m (328 feet) 0-8 bytes Linear (trunkline/dropline). They are exchanged across single or multi-cast connections and typically use high priority identifiers.

uploads. When data is sent to a controller from a DeviceNet Master (via the polled connection) this data is mapped to node 64. The Gateway device makes it possible to connect the PC serial port with the DeviceNet network. These correspond to the available nodes 0 to 63 and registers AQG1 to AQG16. Horner is providing a special Gateway device that is based on the OCS hardware. The HE200CGM40x gateway card can not currently be used with DeviceNet communications. Ladder logic downloads. monitoring. Currently. The first 16-words of these observed responses are made available for mapping on the Network Input Assignments page.PAGE 80 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 APPENDIX A c. DeviceNet Operation The following restrictions are placed on operations when using an OCS that is configured as a DeviceNet slave. The part number is HE693DNT250 . Node 64 is used for a special case. Note: Horner APG manufactures the DeviceNet Master module. communication between the PC and the controller is only possible to the device physically connected to the PCs’ serial port. and configuration cannot currently take place over a DeviceNet network. The controller is able to observe network responses (polled connections) from any slave to the DeviceNet Master . Relative addressing is limited to -64 to +64. The local node ID and target controller node ID must be the same. DeviceNet network nodes are in a range from 0 to 63.

Central to the DCS philosophy. Distributed control is becoming ever-increasingly popular. The system should be designed so that it can be maintained without the need for major re-engineering. Maintainable Achieving the required functionality is only part of the solution. 2 Attributes Desirable in DCS Design There are three attributes that are desirable in any DCS design: a. (Also known as Peer-to-Peer Networking). c. 3 Key Factors in Horner’s Automation’s Distributed Control Systems All programmable nodes can be programmed via the network. Currently. With DCS. Network medium is flexible. the Controller Area Network (CAN) is the preferred solution. With DCS. Each node communicates data onto the network that is readable by any other node on the network in the Producer/Consumer network mode. multiple data) parallel processing technique in the CsCAN network. the overall amount of data on the network is essentially reduced. It is common in a DCS for several different modules to be physically distributed in some type of arrangement around a plant. Typically. Ease of Implementation Modern Distributed Control Systems should be able to implement most control requirements without the need for complex or unusual design. It is important that applications are designed so that they are operable in a logical and consistent manner and in a way that complements the general operation of a plant. . As the presence of networks become more common in industrial automation. This is typically the case with devices connected to plant instrumentation since this greatly reduces plant cabling costs. etc. processing is distributed among a multitude of different processors instead of one very large processing system. the processors are located in a wide variety of devices. The name “Distributed Control System” is not a reference to a physical layout but rather to the distribution of the processing. finding better ways to use the networks effectively will become much more important. operator interfaces. Intuitive to the Operator The group of individuals that use DCS most frequently are the operators. Horner Electric uses a MIMD (multiple instruction. This allows for more devices to be installed on a network that have a finite bandwidth. The devices in DCS are connected together via a high-speed communication link.APPENDIX B 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 81 MAN0227-04 APPENDIX B: DISTRIBUTED CONTROL SYSTEMS (DCS) 1 General A Distributed Control System (DCS) is defined as a system for the control and monitoring of an industrial process which shares the computer-processing requirement between several processors. The design must also be maintainable. control needs to be distributed out onto the network so that control is implemented where the process actually takes place. b. Links such as CsCAN and DeviceNet are typical in DCS. conveyor controllers. because only data that has been processed is broadcasted on the network. These devices may take the form of Micro PLCs. Each of these devices serve a specific function. Each processor is capable of sharing data in this system. but it is anticipated that Ethernet will likely be dominant within 1-3 years.

PAGE 82 MAN0227-04 28 DEC 2000 NOTES APPENDIX B .

69 DeviceNet Network. 39 OCS100/200 Battery Replacement. CsCAN Network ID.INDEX 28 DEC 2000 PAGE 83 MAN0227-04 INDEX Battery Replacement Graphic OCS250. 45 Mounting Procedure. 30 CsCAN Network. 17 RS-232 Graphic OCS250. 62 Set Network Baud. 35 DeviceNet Network ID MAC ID. 24 Noise. 33 OCS 100/200 Mounting Procedures. 78 CsCAN Network IDs. 18 System Registers. 47 Panel Mounting Clamp. 26 CsCAN / DeviceNet Bus Power and Grounding. 75 Wiring and Rules. 52 Mounting Orientation. 35 MAC ID. 77 Operation. Connectors. 13 Definitions. 46 Mounting Orientation. 25 Orientation. Wiring. 26 Product Description Graphic OCS250. 25 Requirements. 12 Cursor Types. 24 Minimum Clearances. 78 Features. 28 CAN / DeviceNet Grounding. 15 User Registers. 29 CAN Features. 25 Grounding. 40 OCS100 / 200 Orientation. 63 CsCAN Network IDs. 63 RCS. 9 RCS. 37 OCS/RCS. 9 Set Contrast. 43 Bus Length CsCAN / DeviceNet. 51 Optional Mounting Bracket (HE800ACC210). 11 OCS100 / OCS200. 34 Setup. 31 OCS100/200. 42 Panel Box Design Checklist. Additional. 30 RS-485 (Reserved for Future Use). 48 Keypad Graphic OCS250. 66 LEDs Graphic OCS250. 25 Ports. MAC ID. 9 Resources. 11 SmartStack. 76 Protocol. 65 OCS200. Connectors. 78 Operation. 63 Modem Recommended. 40 Ports. 80 Protocol. 15 Global Data I/O Registers. 31 RS-232 Programming Port and Wiring. 20 RCS Mounting Instructions. 63 Firmware Update Wizard. 23 Ventilation / Temperature. Hex Conversion. 30 Cable CsCAN / DeviceNet. 75 Networks. 14 SmartStack I/O Registers. 35 Graphic OCS250 Battery. 32 Scope. 58 . 49 OCS 100 / 200. 63 References. 79 Selecting. 64 Cscape Software. 49 Dimensions. 67 OCS100. 75 Operation. 27 Network and Wiring. 32 Modem Wiring (Cable). 46 Panel Cut-out. 48 Panel Retaining Clip. Wiring. 19 HMI Registers. 17 Ladder Code. 43 Dimensions/Panel cut-outs. 77 Features. 53 RCS. 59 Set FKeys Mode. 19 Limits.

Cscape. 61 View OCS (RCS) Status. 12 Specifications. 60 . 62 View I/O Slots. 58 Technical Support. 63 Setting RCS Network ID. 62 Setting DeviceNet Network IDs. 12 28 DEC 2000 INDEX Switches. RCS.PAGE 84 MAN0227-04 Set Network ID. 62 Set Time/Date. 63 SmartStack Installing / Removing. 34 Software. 57 System Screens. 21 View Char Set (Text models only). 58 Set RS232 Mode. 59 View OCS(RCS) Diags. 63 System Menu.