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MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 1 ADMINISTRATION

SEE HIGHLIGHTS ABOVE

MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 2 DEFINITIONS


Section MC-201. General. This section describes the meaning of the words and terms
contained in this chapter. For the purposes of this code, these terms shall have the
meanings indicated in this chapter. The current Building Code Sections 27-229 and 230
have similar provisions. Section 27-230 of the current Building Code also states that the
definitions that appear in the Building Code Reference Standards shall apply to the
provisions of those Reference Standards only.
This section states that words used in the present tense include the future, words used in
the masculine gender include the feminine and neuter gender, singular numbers includes
the plural, and vice versa. Section 27-231 of the current Building Code has similar
statements of interchangeability. This section also states that when a word or term that
appears in this proposed code is not defined in this chapter, other references may be used
to find its definition, such as other NYC Construction Codes and applicable standards.
The current Building Code has similar provisions.
The current NYC Building Code states in Section 27-229 that where terms are not
defined in the code, they shall have their ordinarily accepted meanings or such as the
context may apply.
This section also states that when terms are not defined in the proposed code or other
references, their ordinarily accepted meanings shall be used.
27-229, 27-230, 27-231
Section MC-202. General Definitions. This section provides the meanings for terms to
be used throughout the proposed code. The current Building Code does not provide
meanings for the majority of the terms introduced in this section.
27-232
MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 3 GENERAL REGULATIONS
Section MC301. General. This section sets the parameters for applying the proposed
New York City Mechanical Code, setting its scope as the approval and installation of all
equipment and appliances that comprise parts of building mechanical systems. It
references the Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State and the New
York City Fuel Gas Code for related issues. The proposed code requires that equipment
regulated by the code be listed by nationally recognized testing laboratories and be
labeled according to the listing terms. The code further requires that structural, plumbing,
electrical, and fuel issues surrounding the systems and equipment regulated by the code

conform to their respective construction codes, and that in flood hazard areas, equipment
be installed consistent with design flood conditions. Rodent proofing in the proposed
code is also similarly covered in the Multiple Dwelling Law. These provisions are
consistent with those in the current Building Code, except that the Building Code requires
acceptance of materials by the Commissioner of Buildings (through the MEA Division)
before equipment can be used. 27-130, 27-131, 27-288, 27-569(b), 27-771, MDL 80(6),
RS 4-5
Section MC302. Protection of Structure. This section regulates the penetration or
notching of structural and non-structural members for the installation of mechanical
systems and the penetration of fire-rated elements for such installations. Neither the
structural integrity nor the required fire resistance of structural and nonstructural
members and assemblies may be compromised. Empirical specifications have been added
for both wood and steel studs which are not covered in the current Building Code. Other
than these provisions, any penetration or notching must be designed by a registered
design professional and the required fire resistance must be maintained. The current
Building Code generally requires adequacy of structural design. 27-327(a), 27-585, 27596
Section MC303. Equipment and Appliance Location. This section establishes general
parameters for the location of equipment and appliances, for which additional specific
requirements may apply under other sections or under conditions set by listing
laboratories or the Department of Buildings. In general, equipment and appliances may
not be located in hazardous or outdoor locations, or in closets or alcoves, unless they are
listed and approved for same. Fuel-fired equipment and appliances are not permitted in
specified rooms, nor are they permitted to obtain combustion air from these rooms, with
some exceptions and are limited by the provisions of the Energy Conservation
Construction Code of New York State. When appliances or equipment are located in a pit
or excavation, equipment or appliances may not come into contact with soil. The
proposed code specifies both clearances and concrete/masonry construction for this type
of installation. The current Building Code has similar provisions. Mechanical systems
are not permitted in elevator shafts, and there is no comparable provision in the current
Building Code.
27-792, 27-805, 27-806, 27-817, 27-819, 27-820, RS 13-1, RS 14-15
Section MC304. Installation. This section requires that equipment and appliances be
installed in accordance with the manufacturers instructions, terms and conditions of the
accepted listing agency, and this code. In the event of a conflict between the proposed
code and either the manufacturers instructions or the terms and conditions of an accepted
listing agency, the proposed code shall govern. Equipment in hazardous locations and
garages shall have an elevated ignition source. Natural ventilation requirements are stated
for louvers that are similar to those of the current Building Code. The code establishes
minimum or maximum heights and clearances for ignition and fuel-burning equipment,
clearances to combustible construction, clearances above grade, and guardrail criteria
where required. The code requires that equipment or appliances serving areas of a
building remote from their location be identified as serving such area(s). This section is

consistent with the current Building Code.27-419(b), 27-792, 27-804, 27-805, RS 13-1,
RS 14-1, RS 14-15, RS 14-17
Section MC305. Piping Support. This section requires that piping support hangers and
other devices be of materials that can sustain static and dynamic loads and do not induce
galvanic action. The code provides that piping supports shall be attached to the building.
Rules for spacing are given. Non-ferrous piping that passes through studs or joists must
be protected by steel shield plates. No comparable provisions exist in the current Building
Code. Section MC306. Access and Service Space. Minimum clearances for the
maintenance and replacement of equipment and appliances are established in this section.
In general, clearances must be sufficient to permit inspection, service, repair, or
replacement of the equipment without compromising either permanent construction
including other equipment and appliances) or required fire resistance of any permanent
construction. The section addresses clearances around central furnaces, appliances in
rooms and attics, and their requisite access passageways and level service spaces. It
requires minimal electrical lighting in attics. It also addresses appliances located under
floors, requiring electrically lit passageways and service spaces, and concrete or masonry
walls and four-inch curbs around passageways and service spaces more than 12 inches
below grade. Finally, it addresses equipment and appliances mounted on roofs or elevated
structures greater than 16 feet above grade, setting minimum standards for permanent
access ladders and landings, catwalks, and for platforms on roofs with a slope of 25% or
greater.
The current Building Code deals more generally with access and service space
requirements, and so the adoption of the proposed code will result in added safety
provisions.
27-776, 27-782, 27-792, 27-805, RS 13-1, RS 14-1, RS 14-15
Section MC307. Condensate Disposal. This section sets forth the requirements for
disposal of condensate produced both as a byproduct of fuel-burning appliances and by
evaporators and cooling coils. The code provides that condensate shall not be discharged
to a public street, alley, or otherwise create a nuisance. This section of the code defines
acceptable materials, minimum sizes, and slopes for condensate piping. It requires a
secondary drainage system in some cases and trapping of condensate where indicated by
the manufacturer of the equipment or appliance. Unlike the proposed code, the current
Building Code does not permit the use of plastic piping for condensate piping (except for
residential buildings of three stories or less), and also is much less detailed in its
requirements in that it provides only that condensation shall not cause deterioration of a
chimney or vent. Both window and wall air-conditioning units are exempt from the
requirements of this section, and the current Building Code does not mention this point.
27-854, RS 16
Section MC308. Clearance Reduction. Clearance requirements for fire safety are
established for hot or heat-producing equipment in subsequent sections of the code;
however, both the proposed code and the current Building Code allow for reduced

clearances provided positive barriers are introduced. The language in the current Building
Code states that clearance reduction is permitted when exposed combustible construction
is protected with noncombustible material. The clearance reductions in the proposed code
are greater than those in the current Building Code.
Reduced clearances are not permitted for masonry chimneys, chimney connector passthroughs, masonry fireplaces, or kitchen exhaust ducts enclosed in a shaft, and are limited
to a minimum clearance of 12 inches around solid fuel-burning appliances. 27-806, RS
14-16
Section MC309. Temperature Control. The proposed code states that interior spaces
intended for human occupancy shall have space-heating systems that can maintain a
minimum temperature of 68F at a point 3 feet above the floor on a design heating day.
The current Building Code requires that a minimum temperature of 70F be maintained in
habitable rooms, and provides additional minimum temperatures for other types of
rooms, mostly for industrial use. 27-740
Section MC310. Explosion Control. The proposed code states that structures involving
explosion hazards shall be provided with explosion control systems in accordance with
Fire Department regulations. The current Building Code also refers to Fire Department
regulations for explosion control and, therefore, the codes have equal provisions.
27-401
Section MC311. Smoke and Heat Vents. This section of the code requires smoke and
heat vents in the roofs of one-story buildings in accordance with Fire Department
regulations. The present Building Code is much more detailed in that it gives venting
specifications and provides venting requirements for different types of buildings.
27-353
Section MC312. Heating and Cooling Load Calculations. Under the proposed code,
heating and cooling system design loads for the purpose of sizing systems, appliances,
and equipment shall be calculated in accordance with the requirements of the ASHRAE
Handbook, or in accordance with Chapter 3 of the Energy Conservation Construction
Code of New York State. These codes call for an outdoor design temperature of 13oF for
New York City. The current Building Code calls for using an outdoor temperature of 5oF
and a wind velocity of 15 mph as the design criteria for sizing the heating system
equipment. This results in larger heating loads and larger equipment in comparison to the
proposed code design criteria. RS 13
MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 4 VENTILATION
Section MC-401. General. This section describes the scope of ventilation design
requirements for spaces within a building intended to be occupied. It does not include the
requirements for a smoke control system; those are included in Chapter 5. This section
further requires that all occupied spaces be ventilated either by natural or mechanical
means or a combination of both, while occupied. It specifically addresses the

requirements for exit enclosure ventilation, outside air exhaust and intake opening
locations, natural and mechanical ventilation requirements including ventilation of
enclosed parking garages, mechanical ventilation systems control, and ventilation of
uninhabited spaces including crawl spaces and attics.
The requirements mandated in this section for minimum distances between exhaust and
intake openings in the same building and in other buildings, lot lines, combustible
construction, grade level and other intake and exhaust openings including the ones in the
flood hazard areas are comparable with the requirements in the current Building Code.
The requirements for protecting the outdoor termination points of intake and exhaust
openings by screens, louvers or grilles and for handling stationary local sources
producing air-borne particulates, heat, odor, fumes, vapors, smoke or gases, etc., which
are injurious to health, are also addressed in this section. The current Building Code
addresses similar issues in several different subchapters throughout the proposed code.
27-745, 27-752 thru 27-767; RS 13-1:2-2.1
Section MC-402. Natural Ventilation. This section merely cross-references Chapter 12
of the proposed Building Code.
Minimum requirements for dimensions of openings (doors, windows, louvers, grills, etc.)
to provide natural ventilation are specified in Chapter 12.
The proposed code allows for spaces to be ventilated through an adjoining space,
provided certain minimum requirements are met. The current code does not cover this
issue for occupied spaces, but prohibits ventilation through adjoining spaces in nonresidential applications.
The provisions for ventilation of residential bathrooms and kitchens mandated in Chapter
12 are generally similar to the current Building Code, including reference to the Housing
Maintenance Code (HMC) and Multiple Dwelling Law (MDL) for more details. The
provisions governing openings on to yards and courts are generally similar in both codes.
The proposed code includes standards for ventilating attic spaces, whereas the current
code does not address this issue.
27-745 thru 27-751
Section MC-403. Mechanical Ventilation. This section establishes certain minimum
requirements with regards to mechanical ventilation of occupied spaces. It addresses the
required quantities of supply air and return or exhaust air for various spaces of occupied
buildings in a tabular form, and also addresses the issue of where and how much quantity
of recirculated air (transfer air) is permitted for various sections (parts) of an occupied
building space. The required ventilation rates (the minimum outdoor airflow rates) are
specified in tables based on the type of occupancy and size, and the occupant load or
other parameters as stated in the tables. Where both the outdoor air and the recirculated
air are combined to meet the make-up air requirements, certain minimum quantity of
outdoor (fresh) air must be provided as specified in the code tables.

This section differs from the current code in the method of determining the minimum
ventilation rates and outdoor air requirements. The current code uses a ventilation index
based on the volume of an occupied space, whereas this section of the proposed code
requires the ventilation rates to be calculated based on certain formulae for individual as
well as common ventilation systems.
27-752 thru 27-754
Section MC-404. Enclosed Parking Garages. This section establishes certain minimum
requirements for ventilation of enclosed parking garages. Mechanical ventilation systems
for such garages are not required to operate continuously where the system is arranged to
operate automatically upon detection of concentration of carbon monoxide (CO) gas of
25 parts per million (ppm) by approved automatic CO detection devices. A minimum
ventilation rate of 0.05 cfm/sq. ft. of the garage floor area is required, and any system
must be sized for a minimum ventilation rate of 1.5 cfm/sq. ft. of floor area. Connecting
offices, waiting rooms, ticket booths, etc. which are accessories to a public garage shall
be maintained at a positive pressure, and shall be ventilated at a minimum rate of one cfm
per square foot of the floor area.
The current Building Code has similar requirements with the following variations which
are less stringent compared to the requirements in the proposed code. The current
Building Code calls for automatically operated mechanical ventilation systems for
enclosed parking garages to maintain an average CO concentration not to exceed 100
ppm compared to 25 ppm CO concentration under the proposed code. Also the current
code requires any mechanical ventilation system to be sized for not less than one cfm per
square foot of the floor area of a garage compared to a minimum ventilation rate of 1.5
cfm/sq. ft. under the proposed code.
27-456
Section MC-405. System Control. This section establishes the design criteria for manual
and automatic control of mechanical ventilation systems and the associated airconditioning systems for occupied spaces. Each air distribution system is required to have
at least one manually operable means to stop the operation of supply, return, and exhaust
fans in an emergency.
In addition, this section requires that in office buildings with a height of 75 feet or more
where a system serves multiple floors a manual control for individually operating each air
supply and exhaust fan from the fire command station as well as the room containing the
air handling fans shall be provided. This section also calls for providing manual controls
for operating individually or in groups each remote controlled reversible fire shutter or
each smoke damper in accordance with the provision of the current Building Code. These
remote manual controls are to be located at the fire command station.
27-777.1; RS 13-1: 4-2, 4-3, 4-4; RS 13-4:4-3

Section MC-406. Ventilation of Uninhabited Spaces. This section requires that


uninhabited spaces, such as crawl spaces and attics, be ventilated either by natural
ventilation or mechanical ventilation using exhaust and supply air systems. Natural
ventilation, if used, should meet the requirements of the proposed NYC Building Code.
If mechanical ventilation is used, then the exhaust rate should not be less than 0.02 cfm
per square foot of horizontal floor area of the crawl space or attic. The mechanical
ventilation system should be automatically controlled to operate when the relative
humidity in the space exceeds 60 percent.
The current Building Code addresses natural ventilation requirements of crawl spaces,
but does not address uninhabited spaces such as attics. The current Building Code makes
no mention of any mechanical ventilation system application for crawl spaces or attics.
27-762
Section MC-407. Ventilation of Non-production Chemical Laboratories. This section
references NFPA 45 for the requirements of mechanical ventilation systems serving nonproduction chemical laboratories that are in compliance with the hazardous quantity
limitations of Section 419 of the New York City Building Code. This section modifies
the requirements of NFPA 45 by prohibiting the use of ducts constructed of combustible
materials. The equivalent requirements do not appear in the current code.
MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 5 EXHAUST SYSTEMS
Section MC501. General. This section sets forth the scope of the chapter for standards
of exhaust systems. It provides that air shall be exhausted so that it will not create a
nuisance and cannot be drawn in to an air intake system. The code also provides that an
exhausted space be maintained at a neutral or negative pressure, and that bath, toilet, and
similar rooms having exhaust systems be independent. These requirements are similar to
those in the current Building Code.
27-759(c)(2), 27-771, 27-776, RS 13-1
Section MC502. Required Systems. This section lists the types of industrial equipment
that shall be exhausted, and provides that the system be designed so that contaminants do
not spread to other parts of a building. The code provides that the air intake to the exhaust
system be located near the source and, in the case of fuel dispensing, that the inlet be no
more than 18 inches above the floor. The areas to be exhausted include aircraft, batterycharging areas, dry cleaning plants, cleaning equipment, spray booths, projection rooms,
tanks, areas containing various hazardous materials, gas-generating facilities, and
garages. The proposed code is highly detailed and gives limitations for hydrogen
concentration, ventilation rates for various systems, required air velocities, and
termination points. For example, the proposed code states that rooms containing
flammable liquids shall be exhausted at a minimum rate of 1 cfm/sq. ft. of area. In
addition, the proposed code requires that spray booths have a minimum of 100 fpm of air

velocity. In contrast, the current Building Code requires rooms that are used for storage
of flammable equipment using mechanical ventilation to be exhausted at the rate of 2 air
changes per hour. The requirements for spray booths are identical to those in the current
Building Code. For dry cleaning establishments, the proposed code refers to Federal
Regulations, while the current Building Code states that 10 air changes per hour are
required for moderate hazard plants, and that 4 air changes per hour are required for low
hazard plants. For garages, the proposed code refers to Chapter 4 of the proposed code
for exhaust requirements of 1.5 cfm/sq.ft., and the current Building Code generally
provides for a rate of 1 cfm/sq. ft. for garage exhaust. The proposed code is somewhat
more stringent. For non-residential buildings, both codes provide for a 16 gauge thickness
for kitchen exhaust ducts, and a thinner 18 gauge for residential buildings. However, the
current Building Code allows for an even thinner 20 gauge duct thickness for one and
two-family dwellings when stainless steel is used, unlike the proposed code, which
requires 18 gauge for similar circumstances. Since the thickness of the material decreases
as the gauge increases, the current Building Code is less restrictive because it allows for a
thinner and cheaper material for stainless steel ductwork for one and two-family
dwellings. 27-405, 27-410, 27-428, 27-446, 27-453, 27-456, 27-478, 27-766, RS 13-1,
RS 13-2, RS 13-3, RS 13-5
Section MC503. Motors and Fans. This section requires that motors and fans be
approved for the environments and applications for which they are used, including those
used in areas containing flammable vapors or dust. Fans installed under these conditions
must be manually controlled from a remote location. Fans in such areas shall be
interlocked with the ventilation system. Motors and fans shall be accessible for
servicing. Fans and casings must be of material approved for their function. Motors and
fans used to exhaust explosive or flammable vapors, fumes, or dust must have an
identification plate stating the ventilation rate for the system. Fans that exhaust corrosive
fumes shall be of corrosion-resistant materials. Fans that exhaust noxious, toxic, hot
vapor, or grease-laden air shall be placed as close to the terminus as possible. None of
these provisions in the proposed code are dealt with in the current Building Code.
However, the Building Code provides similar provisions for vibration isolation, and
provides for clearances for fan equipment. 27-770(b)(4), RS 13-1
Section MC504. Clothes Dryer Exhaust. Clothes dryers must be independently
exhausted to the outside, and shall comply with the manufacturers instructions. Clothes
dryer exhaust ducts shall not be connected to a vent connector, vent, or chimney, and may
not pass through fire-rated construction except with restrictions to maintain the fire
resistance rating. Fire dampers are prohibited, as well as screens, sheet metal screws or
other obstructions to the airflow. Backdraft dampers at the outdoor terminal are required.
Make-up air is required if the exhaust rate is more than 200 cfm. The section covers both
commercial and residential clothes dryers. Ducts for domestic clothes dryers shall be
properly supported and have a smooth finish. The current Building code generally states
that exhaust should not create a nuisance, fire, or health hazard. The Reference Standards
state the required exhaust location, along with materials of construction for ducts, i.e.,
iron, steel, copper, concrete, masonry, or clay tile.

27-776, 27-880, RS 13-1, RS 14, RS 14-6, RS 15-2


Section MC505. Domestic Kitchen Exhaust Equipment. With certain exceptions,
residential appliances equipped with downdraft exhaust shall be discharged to the outside
through ducts constructed of galvanized steel, stainless steel, aluminum, or copper. These
ducts shall be air tight, equipped with smooth inner walls and be equipped with a
backdraft damper (505.1). The materials of construction provided in the current Building
Code are the same, except that the current Building Code allows for iron, concrete,
masonry, and clay tile ducts, in addition to the materials listed above. A major change
between the codes is that the proposed code allows the use of Schedule 40 PVC plastic
pipe under certain circumstances, while the current Building Code does not allow the use
of plastic pipe. 27-880, 27-881, RS 13-1, RS 13-2, RS 13-3, RS 15-2
Section MC506. Commercial Kitchen Hood Ventilation System Ducts and Exhaust
Equipment. The proposed code provides that ducts shall be designed for the type of
service installed for and shall terminate at the outside of the building. The proposed code
states that exterior ducts shall be constructed of stainless steel with a minimum thickness
of 0.043 inches, and shall be adequately supported on the exterior. Clearance
requirements are such that a minimum of 24 inches shall be provided to any door,
window, or exit. On the other hand, , the current Building Code requires that duct
thickness conform to good industry practice, and further allows the materials of
construction as stated in Section 505 above. The proposed code states that Type I hoods
shall be independent of other exhaust systems, except under certain conditions. Both duct
joint types and duct to hood joints are specified. Both codes allow for flexible
connections. The proposed code provides for vibration isolation as does the current
Building Code. The proposed code has extensive provisions for grease duct systems,
providing for the method of construction and clearance specifications. It also provides
for access openings, as does the current Building Code, and states that grease shall be
prevented from accumulating in ductwork. The proposed code provides that fan discharge
will not impinge on the roof or other adjacent structures, and provides clearance and
termination locations. This extensive section is more detailed than the current Building
Code. 27-770, RS 13-1, RS 13-3
Section MC507. Commercial Kitchen Hoods. This section requires hoods on
commercial cooking appliances. The code specifies the materials of construction along
with hood thickness, and provides that the hoods be supported adequately. The code
specifies clearances for grease filters. It states the minimum net airflow for hoods
depending on hood type and gives ventilation requirements in cfm for various types of
appliances. The code provides that filters be serviced properly. The current Building
Code refers to a modified version of ANSI/NFPA 96 for removal of smoke and vapors
from commercial cooking equipment. RS 13-3
Section MC508. Commercial Kitchen Makeup Air. This section requires that an
equal amount of makeup air be supplied as the amount of air exhausted. In general, a
temperature differential of not more than 10F shall be maintained, except for makeup air
that is part of an air-conditioning system, or makeup air that does not decrease the

comfort conditions in the room. On the other hand, the current Building Code states that
replacement air shall be provided to prevent a negative pressure in the room of not less
than 0.02 inches of w.c. While the proposed code differs from the current code, it reflects
national standards and industry practice. RS 13-3
Section MC509. Fire Suppression Systems. The proposed code requires that a fire
suppression system be installed when Type I hoods are required. Fire suppression
systems required for cooking equipment are covered in the current Building Code, in that
it lists types of equipment and requires portable fire extinguishers. Operating
requirements are given in detail, and include means of activation along with automatic
shut-off. RS 13-3
Section MC510. Hazardous Exhaust Systems. This section regulates the design and
construction of hazardous exhaust duct systems. The proposed code provides that a dust
collection system to be provided for lumber yards and woodworking facilities where
combustible dust is produced. It requires makeup air equal to the amount of air exhausted
by the duct system, and provides that the system be independent. Penetrations of
structural elements shall be enclosed in a fire-resistance rated shaft. The proposed code
includes requirements for a fire suppression system, and provides minimum thickness
requirements, along with combustible clearances. Air recirculation is not permitted. The
current Building Code does not specifically regulate hazardous exhaust systems, but does
prohibit the recirculation of air containing hazardous materials.
RS 13-1
Section MC511. Dust, Stock and Refuse Conveying Systems. The proposed code
states that cyclone separators shall be constructed of noncombustible material, and
provides that exhaust shall be discharged to the outside. The discharge may not be piped
into another appliance. The code gives the methodology for spark protection and
explosion relief vents. The location of ducts and other outlets are given. The current
Building Code provides only for fire protection for ducts passing through floors
27-987(c)
Section MC512. Subslab Soil Exhaust Systems. This section states the materials that
may be used for ducts, including cast iron, galvanized steel, brass or copper pipe, and
plastic pipe. Slope and termination requirements are given, and the code provides that
ducts shall be marked. There is no equivalent provision in the current Building Code..
Section MC513. Smoke Control Systems. This section establishes the minimum
requirements for the design, installation and acceptance testing of smoke control systems
that are intended to provide a tenable environment for the evacuation or relocation of
occupants. The current code does not devote an exclusive section to smoke control
systems and, furthermore, applies the nomenclature smoke control to systems for
controlling smoke within ventilation systems, not within building spaces. The
components of smoke control systems as described by this section, including ventilation,
exhaust, smoke barriers, and draft curtains are addressed in different subchapters

throughout the current code to a substantially equivalent extent, although the details may
not necessarily correlate exactly with this section.
This section provides the requirements for smoke proof enclosures for internal stairs,
including construction specifications and ventilation alternatives. The equivalent does not
appear in the current code.
This section provides the requirements for underground building smoke exhaust systems.
The equivalent does not appear in the current code.
27-353, 27-353.3, 27-396.4, 27-777.1(a)(6), RS 13-1, RS 5-11, RS 5-18, RS 17-3, RS 175
Section MC514. Energy Recovery Ventilation Systems. This section sets the
requirements for energy recovery ventilation systems, and provides that the systems shall
comply with the provisions of the Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York
State. This section allows the use of energy recovery ventilation systems except in
designated locations, such as hazardous exhaust, dust, stock, and refuse systems, smoke
control systems, and kitchen or dryer exhaust systems. It further provides that access
shall be maintained. There is no comparable provision in the current Building Code.
Section MC515. Post-Fire Smoke Purge Systems. This section is a duplicate of
Section 912 of the proposed Building Code.
MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 6 DUCT SYSTEMS
Section MC-601. General. This section establishes the scope and governs duct systems
design for movement of air for heating, ventilating, air conditioning and exhaust systems
except as required by Chapters 5 and 7 of this code. The requirements for the installation
of supply, return and exhaust air systems are included in this chapter. It also addresses the
structural integrity and fire-safety aspects of duct system design. However, it does not
govern parameters for duct system design such as duct sizing, efficiency, occupants
comport, etc. Air movement in exit access corridors and in ceiling plenums above exit
access corridors is treated similarly to the provisions in the current code. RS 13-1
Section MC-602. Plenums. Except in one- and two-family residences, supply, return,
exhaust, relief and ventilation air plenums are only permitted in crawl spaces, areas above
finished ceilings or below finished floors, attic spaces and mechanical equipment rooms.
This is a broader range of areas than the current code permits for plenums. Under the
proposed code, a plenum must be limited to a single fire area. Fuel-fired appliances are
not permitted in plenums, and the maximum air temperature is limited to 250F, similar
to the current code. As in the current code, the materials of construction must be
appropriate for the environmental conditions, including temperature, humidity and
pressure, to which the plenum will be exposed, except that the proposed code has certain
limitations on gypsum board. Under both codes, firestopping must be maintained. The
current and proposed codes have similar criteria for materials permitted to be exposed

within plenums with some exceptions. The proposed code allows the use of rigid and
flexible ducts and connectors, combustible materials either enclosed in rated assemblies
or labeled for the application, wet plastic fire sprinkler piping, and foam plastic insulation
separated from the plenum by a thermal barrier. Stud wall cavities and the spaces
between floor joists may be used as plenums with certain fire protection limitations. In
flood hazard areas, plenum spaces must either be located above the design flood elevation
or be capable of resisting the added loads imposed during a design flood.
RS 13-1
Section MC-603. Duct Construction and Installation. Duct construction and
installation must serve the requirements of the air distribution system, must not interfere
with the fire protection system and must meet strength and durability requirements,
similar to current code provisions. For duct sizing, the Reference Standards in the current
Building Code provide equivalent requirements. Materials and conditions of use for air
ducts and air connectors are identical between the two codes, except that the proposed
code adds certain humidity limitations for gypsum board ducts. With regard to
underground ducts, the proposed code provides more regulation, requiring that they be
sloped to a drainage point with access and allowing the use of PVC ducts and plastic
fittings. Requirements for air ducts at heat sources are identical to those in the current
code. The proposed code prohibits condensation formation on the exterior of any duct
and has similar requirements as the current Building Code regarding location of ducts
relative to the design flood elevation, the protection of ducts from damage and the
requirements for grilles and registers. The proposed code is identical to the current code
regarding vibration isolation connectors.
RS 13-1, RS 14-1, RS 14-22, 27-316.1, 27-777
Section MC-604. Insulation. As in the current code, the proposed code requires duct
insulation to conform to the Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State.
This section requires that ducts operating at temperatures exceeding 120F be insulated
such that the exterior surface is limited to 120F, which is more stringent than the 140F
in the current Building Code. It is similar to the current code in its requirements for duct
coverings and linings, penetration of rated assemblies, lining installation and thermal
continuity where fire dampers are required, access to service openings, weatherproof
barriers and the durability of internal duct insulation. In addition, the proposed code
permits the use of foam plastic insulation and accepts appliance listing and labeling when
insulation is internal to the product. It requires that external duct insulation and factoryinsulated flexible ducts be clearly identified with specific data. It requires a vapor retarder
or equivalent on the outside of insulation covering ducts used for cooling.
RS 13-1, RS 14-1, 27-335.1, 27-792
Section MC-605. Air Filters. Central heating and air conditioning systems must have
approved air filters installed in the return air system. This section has similar or identical
requirements to those of the current Building Code.

RS 13-1, RS 14-6, RS 13-15


Section MC-606. Smoke Detection Systems Control. The provisions of this section are
similar to those in the current code. This section states the requirements for smoke
detectors in various air systems. It provides that installation shall be in accordance with
the New York City Electrical Code.
RS 13-1
Section MC-607. Ducts and Air Transfer Openings. This section regulates the
protection of duct penetrations and air transfer openings in fire-resistance-rated
assemblies, largely though not entirely through the use of fire and/or smoke dampers. The
proposed code provides that alternative protection be provided if the dampers interfere
with the operation of a smoke control system. The standards for testing and rating of the
dampers are identical to those of the current code, as are the actuating temperatures for
fire dampers. As in the current code, smoke dampers in the proposed code shall isolate
air-handling equipment in systems with a capacity greater than 15,000 cfm. Smoke
dampers are located in conjunction with smoke detectors and the proposed code lists the
requirements for their placement. As in the current Building Code, fire dampers are
required at ducts and air transfer openings in firewalls without exception. The proposed
code provides that fire dampers are required in penetrations of fire barriers except if the
penetrations are tested, if the ducts are part of a smoke control system, and if the walls
are penetrated by a ducted HVAC system. In contrast, the current Building Code requires
fire dampers and has exceptions stating that dampers are not required if other openings
through the wall are not required to be protected, if the ducts are in a store, office, or a
hospital, if a sprinkler system is in use, if the duct is less than 3 square feet in area, or if a
sleeve is provided. The proposed code states that fire dampers are also required in fire
partitions except where a sprinkler system is in use or the duct materials are of a specified
construction. The proposed code requires smoke dampers at each point where a duct or
air transfer opening penetrates a smoke barrier wall or corridor enclosure, except when a
smoke control system is in use or if the ducts are of a specified construction. In contrast,
the current Building Code provides that smoke dampers are required under the same
conditions, except that they are not required when a smoke control system is in use, if the
ducts provide air to other parts of the building during a fire emergency, and if the
building is an apartment house. At duct penetrations and air transfer openings in shaft
enclosures, the requirements for fire and smoke dampers are similar between the
proposed code and the current Building Code, except that under the proposed code fire
and smoke dampers are not required at the penetration of exhaust and supply shafts in
parking garages that are separated from other building shafts by a 2-hour fire-resistance
rated construction. With respect to penetrations by air ducts of floor, floor/ceiling
assemblies, or the ceiling membrane of a roof/ceiling assembly, the proposed code is
similar to the current Building Code with minor exceptions. Both codes permit ceiling
radiation dampers to be used where the duct or air transfer penetrates the ceiling of a fireresistance rated floor/ceiling or roof/ceiling assembly. The proposed code does not permit

flexible ducts or air connectors to pass through any fire-resistance rated assembly, while
the current code limits them to 2 stories.
27-777.1, RS 13-1, RS 14-1
Section MC-608. Air Outlets and Air Inlets. This section is taken entirely from the
current code. The proposed code does not have any additional information on air outlets
and air inlets.
RS 13-1
Section MC-609. Service openings. This section provides the requirements for service
openings for horizontal air ducts and plenums. It provides that openings shall be provided
at 20 feet intervals, except that openings are not required if removable inlet/outlet devices
are provided, or if the air has been previously filtered, or if combustible material is not
present in air ducts. The current Building Code has a similar provision.
RS 13-1 Section 2-3.4.3
MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 7 COMBUSTION AIR
Section MC701. General. This section gives the requirements for combustion and
dilution air for fuel-burning equipment other than gas-fired; the rules for gas-fired
equipment are in the New York City Fuel Gas Code. The general requirements for
provision and circulation of air sufficient for combustion, equipment heat reduction, and
flue gas dilution are given. The proposed code generally prohibits combustion air from
being drawn from hazardous locations, refrigeration equipment rooms, or below the
design flood elevation. The current Building Code gives only a list of industry standards
to be followed for heating and combustion equipment.
RS 14
Section MC702. Inside Air. As in the current code, the proposed code permits
combustion and dilution air to draw entirely from inside air if the building is not of
unusually tight construction and the space in which the equipment is located is an
unconfined space, a defined term in the proposed code (50 or more cubic feet per 1000
BTU/HR input rating) but not in the current code. The provisions of both codes for a
minimum of 1 square inch per 1000 BTU/HR of input rating of the equipment are
identical. If the space is not unconfined, regardless of construction tightness, the
proposed code requires that the room be permanently opened to adjacent space(s) which
will allow it to meet the criterion for unconfined space, and it also requires two openings,
one high and one low in the room, sized similarly to the requirement in the current
Building Code for a confined space..
RS 14-3

Section MC703. Outdoor Air. In conditions where all air is drawn from the outdoors,
the proposed code and current Building Code have identical provisions. Openings shall
be provided near the ceiling and floor, and the size of openings is given.
RS 14-3
Section MC704. Combined Use of Inside and Outdoor Air (Condition 1). This
section governs combustion and dilution air for equipment in confined spaces in
buildings not of unusually tight construction. As provided in MC-702 above, these rooms
must be permanently joined with adjacent spaces to provide the minimum volume of air
relative to the heat input of the equipment, as also provided in the current Building Code.
However, unlike the current code, they must be opened to the outdoors to provide a mix
of inside and outdoor air. Openings shall be provided near the ceiling and floor, and the
ratio of openings is stated. This section establishes the method of prorating the
combustion air drawn from the inside air and the outdoor air through each opening.
RS 14-3
Section MC705. Combined Use of Inside and Outdoor Air (Condition 2). This
section governs combustion and dilution air for equipment in unconfined spaces in
buildings of unusually tight construction and is identical to the provisions of the current
Building Code. Requirements for location and size of openings are provided.
RS 14-3
Section MC706. Forced Combustion Air Supply. This section provides that forced air
(such as a fan) provided for combustion equipment shall be supplied at a rate of 1 cfm per
2400 BTU/HR. The current Building Code provides that air shall be supplied at a rate of
36 cfm per each gallon of oil fired. The concept of fresh air supply is shown in both
codes with some minor differences
27-807
Section MC707. Direct Connection. This section governs appliances listed and labeled
for direct combustion air connection to the outdoors, and provides that the equipment
shall be installed in accordance with the manufacturers instructions. This section is
comparable with the current Building Code.
RS 14-3
Section MC708. Combustion Air Ducts. This section is consistent with the current
Building Code giving requirements for combustion air ducts, except that unlike the
current Building Code it prohibits the upper and lower openings required in confined
spaces from being served by the same duct.
RS 14-3

Section MC709. Opening Obstructions. Where screens or louvers are installed at


openings required for combustion and dilution air and the percentage of free net area
specified by the manufacturer is not known, both codes assign louver efficiencies. While
the louver efficiencies specified in the proposed code appear to be more stringent than
those of the current Building Code, they agree with the louver efficiencies stated in NYC
DEP regulations. Both the current Building Code and the proposed code require that any
volume, smoke, or fire dampers installed at the openings be electrically interlocked so
that the equipment cannot fire when the damper is closed.
27-807, RS 13-1, RS 14-3.
Section MC710. Opening Location and Protection. This section simply requires
compliance with section MC401.
MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 8 CHIMNEYS AND VENTS
Section MC801. General. This section is similar to the current code, but it provides
additional regulations for sealing of inlet openings in abandoned chimneys. It also
prohibits solid-fuel burning appliances from connecting to a chimney venting another
appliance, permits options for lining of low-temperature chimneys, and prohibits
common venting of appliances located on more than one floor. The current Building
Code is much more detailed regarding chimney construction materials and specifications,
differentiating among low, medium, and high temperature chimneys. The section on
adjoining chimneys is identical to the current Building Code. The proposed code provides
additional requirement for sealing of abandoned chimneys.
27-849, 27-854, 27-855, 27-856, 27-860, 27-867, Table 15-4, RS 15-4, RS 15-16
Section MC802. Vents. Listed and labeled prefabricated vent systems and fieldconstructed vent systems are permitted. Those that are prefabricated shall be installed in
accordance with the conditions of their listing and the manufacturers instructions. These
rules are similar for both the current Building Code and the proposed code. However,
unlike the current code, vent termination caps are not permitted. It should be noted that
the current Building Code deals with gas vents, and the vents in the proposed code are for
oil burning equipment.
27-855, RS 14-18*, RS 15-14*, *Both refer to ANSI/NFPA 211-1988
Section MC803. Connectors. The requirements in the proposed code are similar to
those of the current Building Code, except that the thickness of galvanized steel for
connectors is greater in the proposed code. In addition, the proposed code permits the use
of copper and aluminum, which is not allowed in the current code. Both codes permit the
use of galvanized steel as a connector material.
27-870 through 27-874

Section MC804. Direct-Vent, Integral Vent and Mechanical Draft Systems. This
section governs the removal of flue or vent gases from solid or liquid fueled appliances
and is consistent with the current Building Code. The proposed code prohibits vent
termination caps, which are required for masonry chimneys under the current code. The
proposed code requires a drain of a minimum of 3 inches for condensate, and a similar
provision does not exist in the current Building Code. The proposed code permits a
mechanical draft system for manually fired appliances and fireplaces, but only with a
visual and audio alarm system and a smoke detector. There is no comparable provision in
the current Building Code.
27-859, 27-865, RS 14-18
Section MC805. Factory-Built Chimneys. This section has similar requirements to
those in the current code for factory-built chimneys. The proposed code requires
compliance with the provisions of UL 959 at a lower temperature of flue gas than does
the current Building Code.
27-855, 27-869.01, RS 14-18*, RS 15-14*, RS 15-8[A], RS 15-9, RS 15-10, RS 15-11,
RS 15-12, RS 15-15, *Both refer to ANSI/NFPA 211-1988
Section MC806. Metal Chimneys. This section relies on ANSI/NFPA 211, as does the
current Building Code. However, the proposed code requires that the exterior of metal
chimneys be either galvanized or painted, which is not required in the current Building
Code. The current Building Code provides requirements for chimney clearances and
methods of construction for enclosures.
27-861, RS 14-18*, RS 15-14*, Both refer to ANSI/NFPA 211-1988
Section MC807. Changes in Appliance Fuels. This section was copied from the
current Building Code, with slight changes to ensure clarity.
27-869.02
Section MC808. Reduction of Flue Size. This section was copied from the current
Building Code, and provides that a flue can be reduced in size provided that it meets the
criteria for fuel and chimney type found in the code (808.1). However, the current
Building Code provides rules for fireclay flue linings and cast in place chimney linings.
27-869.03
Section MC809. Chimney Supported from Equipment. This section was copied from
the current Building Code, and provides that chimneys shall not be supported by the
equipment they serve unless specifically designed for such loads.
27-864

Section MC810. Test Run and Smoke Test. This section was copied from the current
Building Code, with slight changes to ensure clarity. In addition, the last section of the
proposed code provides the methodology for testing, which is not included in the current
Building Code.
27-856, 27-868
Section MC811. Exhaust Gases from Internal Combustion Engines. This section
was copied from the Current Building Code, with slight changes to ensure clarity. The
new code references NFPA 37 for the requirements for discharge openings, and states the
required vertical termination requirements.
27-869
MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 9 SPECIFIC APPLIANCES, FIREPLACES
AND SOLID FUEL-BURNING EQUIPMENT
Section MC901. General. This section sets forth the scope of the chapter, which
addresses the specific appliances and equipment listed, precludes installation of fireplaces
and solid fuel-burning appliances in hazardous locations, and requires that equipment be
installed in accordance with the product listing. The section also sets forth general
requirements for fireplaces, and refers to the New York City Fuel Gas Code for all gasfired appliances and equipment. The code provides that inspection of appliances shall be
in accordance with the requirements of the proposed New York City Building Code. This
section is similar to the current Building Code.
27-848.01
Section MC902. Masonry Fireplaces. This section simply references the proposed
New York City Building Code. The current Building Code has detailed requirements for
construction, and states the requirements when steel fireplace units are installed, along
with clearance requirements, hearth extensions, fireplace dampers, and accessories. The
provisions are identical.
27-848.07
Section MC903. Factory-Built Fireplaces. Factory-built fireplaces and hearth
extensions are required to be listed and installed in accordance with the terms of their
listing. Unvented gas-fired appliances are prohibited from factory-built fireplaces, as they
are in the current Building Code. The proposed code references the Energy Conservation
Construction Code of New York State for ventilation requirements, while the current
Building Code states generally that sufficient air shall be provided. The flue requirements
are the same for both codes, providing that separate flues shall be installed for each
fireplace. The current Building Code provides detailed requirements for mounting and

clearances of chimneys. While there are some differences, both codes have substantially
equivalent provisions.
27-848.08, 27-848.09, RS 14-19, RS 15-15
Section MC904. Pellet Fuel-Burning Appliances. These appliances shall be listed and
installed in accordance with their listing, and comply with the Air Pollution Control
Code. No comparable provision exists in the current Building Code. Section MC905.
Fireplace Stoves and Room Heaters. The proposed code provides that fireplace stoves
and room heaters shall be listed and installed in accordance with the terms of their listing.
The proposed code states that ventilation shall be provided in accordance with the
requirements of the Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State, the
manufacturers recommendations and Chapter 7 of the proposed code, while the current
Building Code states generally that sufficient air shall be provided. The proposed code
states that the equipment shall comply with the provisions of the New York City Air
Pollution Control Code.
27-848.08, 27-848.09, RS 14-20
Section MC906. Factory-Built Barbecue Appliances. The proposed code states that
these appliances shall be installed as provided by the code, the manufacturers
instructions, and the New York City Fuel Gas Code. It further provides that barbecue
appliances meet the requirements for fireplaces as stated elsewhere in the code. The
current Building Code has similar provisions, and states that only natural gas may be
used as a fuel.
27-826.01
Section MC907. Incinerators and Crematories. The current Building Code does not
regulate crematories. The proposed code provides that incinerators and crematories shall
be installed in accordance with industry standards and the manufacturers installation
instructions. It also provides that this equipment shall comply with the Administrative
Code of the City of New York and the New York City Air Pollution Control Code. The
major provisions of the Administrative Code of the City of New York referring to
incinerators, 24-117(j) and 24-118, provide that incinerators are not allowed in New York
City except for equipment installed in hospitals, and equipment operated by the New
York City Departments of Sanitation and Transportation.
27-833 - 27-848
Section MC908. Cooling Towers, Evaporative Condensers, and Fluid Coolers. The
current Building Code requires that cooling towers be constructed of noncombustible
materials, with certain exceptions including locations outside fire districts. The current
Building Code also provides that filling and drift eliminators be constructed of
combustible materials if a sprinkler system is provided. On the other hand, the proposed
code prohibits the use of combustible materials for indoor equipment, but permits the use

of combustible construction in the same manner as the current Building Code... The
requirements for vibration isolation are identical in both codes.
27-297(g), 27-338(i), 27-770(b)
Section MC909. Vented Wall Furnaces. The current Building Code does not
specifically address the requirements for vented wall furnaces; however, the testing of
wall furnaces is covered in the Reference Standards, and refers to UL 730 as does the
proposed code. The proposed code states that furnaces shall not be installed to become a
fire hazard, and prohibits the installation of ducts into a furnace. The proposed code states
that a furnace door cannot swing within 12 inches of an air inlet or outlet, and it states
that access is to be provided for cleaning. The additional requirements in the proposed
code will result in enhanced safety.
RS 14-6
Section MC910. Floor Furnaces. The proposed code states that floor furnaces shall be
installed in accordance with the terms of their listing and the manufacturers installation
instructions. Bracing and clearance rules are given. The requirements for floor furnaces
in the proposed code are similar to those in the current Building Code.
27-817 - 27-823, RS 14-6
Section MC911. Duct Furnaces. The current Building Code does not specifically
address the requirements for duct furnaces. The proposed code prohibits the installation
of unvented furnaces, and contains requirements for panels, location of draft controls, air,
and duct temperature.
RS 14-6
Section MC912. Infrared Heaters. The current Building Code does not specifically
address the requirements for infrared heaters. The proposed code requires that infrared
heaters be supported and located so as not to create a fire hazard. The code also provides
that clearances from combustible materials shall be as stated in the manufacturers
instructions.
RS 14-6
Section MC913. Clothes Dryers. The current Building Code refers to various industry
standards for clothes dryers. The proposed code states that the equipment shall be
installed in accordance with the manufacturers instructions, and has UL requirements for
testing. The proposed code provides for a drain connection for condensate.
RS 14-6, RS 14-15

Section MC914. Sauna Heaters. The current Building Code refers to various industry
standards for sauna heaters. The proposed code lists safety requirements for the
equipment and provides that they shall be installed in accordance with the manufacturers
installation instructions. The proposed code also states the requirements for heat and time
controls.
RS 14-6
Section MC915. Engine and Gas Turbine-Powered Equipment and Appliances.
These are not covered in the current Building Code except for exhaust gases from internal
combustion engines; the construction of exhaust pipes and locations of exhaust are given
in the current Building Code. The proposed code references NFPA 37 and Chapter 13 of
the proposed code. These changes from the current code will simplify the requirements.
27-869
Section MC 916. Pool and Spa Heaters. The current Building Code does not
specifically address the requirements for pool and spa heaters and references national
standards. The proposed code states that the equipment shall be installed in accordance
with the manufacturers instructions. The proposed code refers to UL standards for
testing.
RS 14-6
Section MC917. Cooking Appliances. The current Building Code does not specifically
address the requirements for cooking appliances but refers to national standards for the
removal of vapors. The proposed code states that cooking appliances shall be listed,
labeled, and installed in accordance with the manufacturers instructions. The proposed
code prohibits the installation of oil-fired cooking appliances, and prohibits the use of
commercial appliances for domestic use. The proposed code states requirements for the
use, installation, clearances, and ventilation for domestic appliances.
27-777(d), RS 13-2, RS 13-3
Section MC918. Forced-Air Warm-Air Furnaces. The current Building Code refers
to various industry standards for warm air furnaces. The proposed code is much more
detailed, providing for UL testing and for installation as provided by the manufacturer
and NFPA 31. The code prohibits the installation of unvented furnaces. It provides
specifications for ducts and heat pumps. It also lists prohibited sources where outside air
may not be drawn.
RS 14-6
Section MC919. Conversion Burners. The current Building Code does not specifically
cover conversion burners. The proposed code states that conversion burners shall comply
with the requirements of ANSI Z21.8. The proposed code requires compliance with
industry standards.

Section MC920. Unit Heaters. Unlike the proposed code, the current Building Code
provides that unit heaters be accepted for use by the Department of Buildings. The
proposed code provides that unit heaters shall be installed in accordance with the
manufacturers instructions, and refers to various industry standards for inspection and
testing. The requirements for support are similar in both codes.
27-813, 27-814, 27-815, 27-816, RS 14-6
Section MC921. Vented Room Heaters. The current Building Code refers to warm air
heaters and provides that they be installed in accordance with Reference Standards. The
proposed code simply states that the equipment shall be installed in accordance with the
conditions of their listing and the manufacturers instructions. The provisions are similar.
27-812, RS 14-6
Section MC922. Kerosene and Oil-Fired Stoves. The proposed code prohibits the
installation of these appliances. Although this equipment is not covered by the current
Building Code, the installation of kerosene heaters is prohibited in New York City.
Therefore, both codes are similar.
Section MC923. Small Ceramic Kilns. This equipment is not specifically addressed in
the current Building Code. The proposed code covers small kilns that are used for hobby
purposes, and provides that they be installed in accordance with the manufacturers
instructions.
Section MC924. Stationary Fuel Cell Power Plants. This equipment is not
specifically covered in the current Building Code. The proposed code deals with
relatively small plants that have a power output not exceeding 1,000 kW, and provides
for testing in accordance with industry standards. The proposed code states that only
hydrogen may be used as a fuel, and prohibits on-site storage of flammable gases. This
section basically refers to safety provisions and industry standards.
Section MC925. Masonry Heaters. This equipment is not specifically covered in the
current Building Code. The proposed code simply states that the equipment shall be
installed in accordance with the proposed New York City Building Code.
Section MC926. Noise Control Requirements. Proposed regulations for noise control
are the same as those required by the current code. Additionally, practitioners must
adhere to the DEP Noise Control Code as is currently required.
27-768, 27-769, 27-770
MECHANICAL CODE - CHAPTER 10 BOILERS, WATER HEATERS AND
PRESSURE VESSELS

Section MC-1001. General. This section establishes the minimum safety requirements
for the installation, alteration, and repair of boilers, water heaters and pressure vessels.
Portable unfired pressure vessels, interstate commerce commission containers, containers
used for bulk oxygen and medical gas, and certain small unfired pressure vessels (5 cubic
feet or less in volume) are exempted from these requirements. The current code has
similar requirements and similar exceptions for the boilers and pressure vessels described
above.
27-787, 27-793, RS 14, RS 15
Section MC-1002. Water Heaters. This section describes the applicable codes and
standards for various potable water heaters and hot water storage tanks including electric
water heaters and oil fired water heaters. These heaters shall be installed in accordance
with the manufacturers installation and the New York City Plumbing Code and the
proposed code. This section also addresses water heaters utilized both to supply potable
hot water and to provide hot water for space heating applications. Such heaters shall be
manufactured in accordance with ASME Code Section IV requirements and installed in
accordance with the manufacturers recommendations and the New York City Plumbing
Code. In addition this section calls for installing a tempering valve for water heaters used
for space heating applications to limit the maximum potable hot water temperature to
140F for scald protection.
There is no direct mention of potable water heaters in the current Building Code;
however, the reference standards listed below include all the water heaters addressed in
the above paragraph. The design and installation requirements are similar in both the
proposed and current New York City codes.
RS 12, RS 14 and RS 16
Section MC-1003. Pressure Vessels. This section states that all pressure vessels shall
bear the label of an approved agency and shall be installed according to the
manufacturers instructions. All piping, fittings, joints and connections associated with
pressure vessels shall be designed for specific applications, and all welding on pressure
vessels and associated piping shall be performed by certified welders in compliance with
nationally recognized standards, such as ASME Section VIII and IX and 12 NYCRR Part
14.
The current Building Code has the same requirements.
27-825, RS 13-5, RS 14-4
Section MC-1004. Boilers. This section addresses the listing and labeling requirements
for oil-fired and electric boilers, and lists the applicable UL standards. It also lists the
applicable ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code sections, New York State Department
of Labor Code Rules and NFPA codes. It specifies working clearances required to allow
access for inspection, maintenance, and repair around and on top of the boilers for

various types of boilers. It calls for mounting of boilers on a level base for equal
distribution of weight of the equipment, and mandates that equipment requiring vibration
isolation be designed by a registered design professional. Boiler room enclosures shall
comply with the proposed New York City Building Code and the proposed code. This
section also describes burner control systems for gas and oil modulating burners for
various burner oil consumption rates and boiler sizes.
The current code has similar requirements in its reference standards.
27-180, 27-182, 27-418 through 27-424, 27-824, 27-825, RS 14-5A, RS 14-5B, RS 14-6,
RS 14-9
Section MC-1005. Boiler Connections. This section calls for providing a shut-off valve
in all supply, discharge and return piping, depending on the type of boiler. For multiple
boiler installations, it calls for each boiler or modular boiler to have individual shut-off
valves in all supply, discharge and return lines to and from boilers. However, shut-off
valves are not required in a system having a single low pressure steam boiler of 350,000
Btu/h heat input or less. This section requires that the water supply to all boilers be
connected in accordance with the New York City Plumbing Code.
The current code has similar requirements.
RS 14-5A, RS 14-5B, RS 14-6
Section MC-1006. Safety Pressure Relief Valves and Controls. This section lists the
requirements for safety valves, safety relief valves, pressure relief valves and pressurelimiting devices for steam boilers, hot water boilers, and pressure vessels respectively to
protect them from over-pressure. It calls for utilizing listed and labeled valves only, and
specifies the minimum electric power supply and control system requirements for boiler
system applications. It calls for locating the remote control shut-down switches outside
all means of egress from the boiler room if practical, to cut-off the oil and/or gas fuel
supply and combustion air in case of an emergency.
The current code has similar requirements..
27-825, 27-830(b), RS 16 P107.26(b)
Section MC-1007. Boiler Low-Water Cutoff. This section mandates that all steam and
hot water boilers be protected with dual low-water cutoff controls, and that the low water
cutoff devices be mounted on separate (isolated) steam side and water side connections
independent of other control devices or valves, such as other switches, gauges, etc. It
requires the low-water cutoff control to automatically stop the combustion operation by
cutting off the fuel supply when the water level drops below the lowest safe water level
as required by the ASME codes and boiler manufacturers instructions.
The current code has similar requirements.

RS 14-5A, RULE HG-614


Section MC-1008. Boiler Blowoff/Blowdown Valves. This section mandates that
boilers be equipped with blowoff/blowdown valve(s), as recommended by the boiler
manufacturers, and in accordance with the applicable ASME code. It requires that the
blowdown valves discharge to a safe location in accordance with the New York City
Plumbing Code.
The current code has similar requirements.
RS 14-5A, 5B, RS 14-6
Section MC-1009. Hot Water Boiler Expansion Tank. This section specifies the
minimum requirements for installing hot water boiler expansion tanks in hot water
system applications. It includes both closed-type and open-type expansion tank sizing
requirements, and specifies minimum height and overflow pipe diameter requirements for
open-type expansion tanks. It calls for tank overflow discharge to be routed to the
drainage system in accordance with the New York City Plumbing Code.
There is no direct mention of hot water expansion tanks in the current code; however, its
reference standards cover hot water system design.
RS 14-5A, RS 14-5 B
Section MC-1010. Gauges. This section specifies pressure gauge, temperature gauge,
and water gauge glass requirements for hot water and steam boilers. It also describes
specific requirements for installing water gauge glass and pressure gauges for steam
boilers.
The reference standards for the current code have similar requirements.
RS 14-5A, RS 14-5B, RS 14-6
Section MC-1011. Tests. This section describes the requirements for initial acceptance
test of boilers and pressure vessels upon completion of assembly and installation, as well
as periodic boiler inspection requirements. The periodic boiler inspection requirements
are specified in detail in Section 28-303 of the Administrative Code of the City of New
York. It calls for a qualified boiler inspector to perform all final inspections and tests
upon completion of construction, and to perform annual boiler inspections on boilers in
accordance with Section 204 of the Labor Law of the State of New York.
The current code has identical inspection and testing requirements for both, the initial
acceptance test and the periodic boiler inspections.
27-793, 27-794

MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 11 REFRIGERATION


Section MC-1101. General. This section addresses the scope of this chapter, which
governs the design, installation, construction, and repair of refrigeration systems
including permanently installed refrigeration storage systems. It mandates that
refrigeration systems comply with the requirements of this code, and ASHRAE 15,
entitled Safety Standard for Refrigeration Systems, except as modified by this code. This
section addresses the issues of changing refrigerant in existing systems, and gas and oil
fired absorption systems. It calls for testing factory built refrigeration equipment in
accordance with applicable UL standards. It also specifies appropriate sections of the
code for signs, name plates, and operation and emergency shutdown instructions for
refrigeration systems.
The current Building Code with a revised Reference Standard 13-6 has identical scope.
27-771, 27-777(f), RS 13-6 revised April 27, 2005, ANSI/ASHRAE 15-2001
Section MC-1102. System Requirements. This section addresses the refrigeration
system classification, allowable refrigerants, maximum quantity permitted, enclosure
requirements, location limitations, and field pressure test requirements criteria based on
type of refrigerant to be used and building occupancy type. It also addresses the issues of
mixing refrigerants including refrigerant blends, and purity requirements of new,
recovered and reclaimed refrigerants. It references various sections of the proposed code
for compliance.
The current Building Code with the revised Reference Standard 13-6 dated April 27,
2005 addresses all of the above topics and issues.
RS 13-6 revised April 27, 2005, ANSI/ASHRAE 15-2001
Section MC-1103. Refrigeration System Classification. This section addresses the
various building occupancy classifications and system classifications of refrigeration
systems. Locations of refrigerating systems are determined by building occupancy
classifications that consider the ability of people to respond to potential exposure to
refrigerants in case of a refrigerant leak. It addresses building occupancy classifications
of institutional occupancy, public assembly, residential and commercial occupancies, and
mercantile, industrial and mixed occupancies.
The refrigeration system classifications are based on the degree of probability of
refrigerant leakage from a failed connection, seal, or component that could enter an
occupied area. This distinction is based on basic design or location of the components.
The systems are classified as low probability systems or high probability systems based
on their system design such as double indirect open spray system, indirect closed system,
direct system and indirect open spray system, etc.

The current Building Code addresses the same refrigeration system classifications.
RS 13-6 revised April 27, 2005, ANSI/ASHRAE 15- 2001
Section MC-1104. System Application Requirements. This section addresses
refrigeration system application requirements and imposes certain restrictions on the use
of high flammability and high toxicity refrigerants for certain applications. It states that
use of Group A3 or Group B3 refrigerant is generally prohibited, except for certain
industrial occupancies where it may be permitted on a case by case basis by special
approval from the commissioner of the Department of Buildings and the commissioner of
the Fire Department. It states that a total of all Group A2, B2, A3, and B3 refrigerants
shall not exceed 550 pounds in occupied areas or machinery rooms of institutional
occupancies. It prohibits the use of Group B1, B2, B3, A2, and A3 refrigerants for human
comfort application in high-probability systems. It calls for the use of a machinery room
where the quantity of refrigerant in an independent circuit of a system exceeds the
quantity listed in refrigerant classification Table 1103.1. It provides details on when
machinery rooms are not required for industrial occupancies and requirements for
refrigerated rooms for manufacturing, food, beverage, meat cutting and other processes
and storage.
The current code addresses similar requirements, but does not have as much detail. The
overall scope of both codes is the same, and restrictions on use of certain refrigerants are
similar.
RS 13-6 revised April 27, 2005, ANSI/ASHRAE 15-2001
Section MC-1105. Machinery Room General Requirements. This section addresses
refrigeration machinery room requirements including room design and construction,
refrigerant detector requirements, ventilation, make-up air, and room exhaust air
discharge location. It calls for dedicated supply and exhaust ducts to and from the
machinery room which will serve only the machinery room and no other occupied area,
except in hardship cases. Common supply and exhaust ducts shared with human occupied
areas may be permitted in hardship cases for existing buildings retrofit utilizing
refrigerant Group A1 or R123 with special permission from the commissioner. Special
permission is also required for discharge of Group A2, B2, A3, and B3 refrigerants from
the both the Buildings Commissioner and the Fire Commissioner. In addition, clearly
identified switches of the break-glass type are mandated to provide off-only control for
the compressors, and on-only control for machinery room ventilation fans. Such switches
shall be located outside each entrance to machinery rooms, or located immediately inside
the machinery room if the outside location is impracticable.
The current Building Code has similar requirements.
RS 13-6 revised April 27, 2005, ANSI/ASHRAE 15-2001

Section MC-1106. Machinery Room, Special Requirements. This section specifies


additional special requirements and restrictions for machinery rooms in addition to the
general requirements addressed in Section 1105. These special requirements are
mandated generally for Group A2, B2, A3 and B3 (higher flammability and higher
toxicity) refrigerants systems. It calls for machinery room design to conform to Class 1,
Division 2, and hazardous location classification requirements of the New York City
Electrical Code. It also calls for a clearly identified break-glass type switch to provide
off-only control for all electrically energized equipment and appliances in the machinery
room. It calls for self-closing, tight fitting fire doors, and at least one hour fire resistive
construction with tight walls, floors and ceiling for machinery rooms.
The current code has similar requirements.
RS 13-6 revised April 27, 2005, ANSI/ASHRAE 15-2001
Section MC-1107. Refrigerant Piping. This section addresses refrigerant piping
requirements including piping installation and testing. It specifies the acceptable pipe
materials for piping and tubing including pipe wall thickness requirements for various
pipe sizes and refrigerant Groups A1, B1, A2, B2, A3 and B3. It specifies acceptable
ASTM specifications for various materials for piping and tubing, and mandates that all
joints and refrigerant containing parts located in air ducts of air-conditioning systems
carrying conditioned air to and from human occupied space be constructed in a manner
which results in approved, gas tight, leak proof connections.
The current Building Code has similar requirements.
RS 13-6 revised April 27, 2005, ANSI/ASHRAE 15-2001
Section MC-1108. Field Test. This section mandates that all refrigerant-containing parts
of refrigeration system erected on premises (field erected) be field tested except for listed
and labeled factory tested equipment (such as compressors, condensers, pressure vessels,
evaporators, safety devices and gauges). The field assembled components should be field
tested and proved tight after the system installation, and before the system operation.
Certain small systems using Group A1 refrigerant have less stringent testing
requirements. This section also addresses test gases, test apparatus, and field test
documentation requirements.
The current Building Code has similar requirements.
RS 13-6 revised April 27, 2005, ANSI/ASHRAE 15-2001
Section MC-1109. Periodic Testing. This section mandates that periodic testing of
emergency devices and systems be conducted and the result logged in accordance with
the manufacturers instructions and as required by the Fire Commissioner. The periodic
testing shall include treatment and flaring systems, valves and appurtenances necessary
for the operation of emergency refrigeration control boxes, fans and associated equipment

required to operate emergency purge ventilation systems, and refrigerant leak detection
and alarm systems.
The current code is not very specific regarding such periodic testing requirements and it
leaves periodic testing of critical components and equipment to the discretion of the
refrigeration system owner/operator. However, such periodic testing is always
recommended by the equipment manufacturer and the Fire Department.
MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 12 HYDRONIC PIPING
Section MC1201. Scope. This section sets forth the scope of the chapter, which applies
to piping systems that are a part of heating and cooling systems. For systems providing
drinking water, the provisions of the New York City Plumbing Code shall apply. The
code states that hydronic piping systems shall be sized for the load. This section is
compatible with the current Building Code.
27-830, 27-896, RS 16
Section MC1202. Material. The proposed code allows for the re-use of piping
materials, and provides that the material shall be rated for the temperature and pressure of
the intended use. All materials shall be approved for use with the intended system. For
specific materials, the proposed code provides standards for the use of hydronic piping
including plastic materials. The current Building Code does not provide any standards for
the materials to be used for hydronic piping.
RS 16
Section MC1203. Joints and Connections. This section of the proposed code states the
requirements for joining piping materials. For dissimilar piping materials, the code
provides that adapter fittings shall be used, while the current Building Code is much more
detailed, giving requirements for each connection, such as a ring for a cast iron to clay
connection. The proposed code states that pipe terminals shall be prepared for
construction; a similar provision is lacking in the current Building Code. The proposed
code allows the use of plastic fittings, in contrast to the current Building Code which has
no similar provision.
RS 16
Section MC1204. Pipe Insulation. The proposed code states that pipe insulation shall
comply with the requirements of the Energy Conservation Construction Code of New
York State, with a maximum flame spread index of 25 and a smoke-developed index not
exceeding 450. The current Building Code requires that insulation shall have a maximum
flame spread rating of 25, with a maximum smoke developed rating of 50. The current
Building Code has detailed requirements for insulation of piping at temperatures
exceeding 165F.

27-809, 27-811, RS 16
Section MC1205. Valves. This section provides that shutoff valves shall be provided on
both supply and return lines of heat exchangers, except if they are integral with a boiler
unit. In contrast, the current Building Code provides for a relief or pressure relief valve
on the heater side of the shutoff valve. The proposed code requires shutoff valves on
building supply lines, pressure vessels, and connections to mechanical equipment. Relief
valves are required on reduced pressure line piping. The current Building Code also
requires that relief valves discharge at not more than 1 times the system pressure, and
this provision is lacking in the proposed code.
27-830, RS 16
Section MC1206. Piping Installation. This section provides that piping systems shall
be designed so that they may be drained. Potable water systems shall be protected from
backflow, and this is also provided for in the current Building Code. The proposed code
also states that penetrations shall be protected, as does the current Building Code. The
proposed code states that water flow shall be controlled to prevent water hammer. Both
the proposed code and the current Building Code provide that piping shall be adequately
supported.
27-809, 27-830, RS 16
Section MC1207. Transfer Fluid. This section provides that the flash point of a
transfer fluid in a hydronic piping system shall be a minimum of 50o F above the
maximum system temperature, and also states that the transfer fluid shall be compatible
with the makeup water. No equivalent provision exists in the current Building Code. This
section reflects industry practice. Section MC1208. Tests. This section requires that
piping shall be hydrostatically tested at a rate of 1 times the operating pressure, or a
minimum of 100 psi, for a period of 2 hours. Ground source loop systems shall be tested
at a pressure of 100 psi. No comparable provision exists in the current Building Code.
This section reflects industry practice. Section MC1209. Embedded Piping. This
section provides that piping for heating panels may be of steel, copper or plastic. Unlike
the current Building Code, plastic piping is allowed. The proposed code requires that
piping embedded in concrete shall be tested, and maintained at the operating pressure
during concrete pouring. No comparable provision exists in the current Building Code for
embedded piping. The proposed code lists joint requirements for steel, copper and plastic
piping. Brazing is required by both the proposed code and the current Building Code for
copper piping, but the current Building Code does not regulate steel and plastic piping
joints.
RS 16
Section MC1210. High Pressure Steam Piping. This new section on high pressure
piping was copied from 1 RCNY 20-02, and contains rules for expansion joints,
anchorage, and guides. It provides for a maintenance schedule, and states that prior

approval must be secured from the Department of Buildings before piping work is
performed. New piping systems shall be designed by either a Licensed Professional
Engineer or Registered Architect , and approved by the Department of Buildings. The
system shall be hydrostatically tested at a pressure of 1 times the design pressure.
Although no comparable provision exists in the current Building Code, the Rules of the
City of New York contain this provision.
1 RCNY 20-02
MECHANICAL CODE - CHAPTER 13 FUEL-OIL PIPING AND STORAGE
Section MC-1301. General. This section addresses the scope of Chapter 13 which
governs the design, construction, installation, and repair of fuel-oil storage and piping
systems. The storage of flammable liquids shall be in accordance with the New York City
Fire Code. It states that fuel-oil storage systems including fuel-oil tanks shall comply
with this code. In addition, this section calls for fuel-oil tanks over 1100 gallons to
comply with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Petroleum
Bulk Storage Code; 6 NYCRR Parts 612, 613 and 614. This section also mandates that
fuel-oil spill and overfill prevention equipment comply with Part II of the Federal
Environmental Protection Agency Technical Requirements for Underground Storage
Tanks, 40 CFR Part 280 Final Rules. Fuel oil piping systems utilizing transfer pumps to
pump the oil to equipment or tanks located above the lowest floor of buildings are
required to have qualified personnel to operate the system. These personnel shall have a
certificate of fitness from the Fire Department.
The current New York City Building Code does not provide as much detail compared to
the proposed code for fuel-oil piping and storage issues, but generally has similar
requirements.
27-827(3), 27-828, 27-829, 27-830
Section MC-1302. Material. This section specifies acceptable materials for fuel-oil
storage, piping and tubing applications, and lists material standards. It calls for all
materials to be rated for the maximum operating temperatures and pressures of the
system. In addition, it calls for all nonmetallic pipes to be listed and labeled for the
intended applications, and permits the use of nonmetallic pipes only for outdoor
underground applications. This section also requires that fuel-oil pumps be of a positivedisplacement design, and that they shall be listed and labeled in accordance with UL 343.
It calls for utilizing listed and labeled flexible metal connectors and hoses where rigid
connections are impractical, or to reduce the effect of jarring and vibrations. The flexible
connectors and hoses shall meet the requirements of Standard UL 536.
The current New York City Building Code has similar requirements.
RS 14-4, RS 14-5A

Section MC-1303. Joints and Connections. This section addresses the requirements for
various types of fuel-oil-piping joints and connections. The joints and connections shall
be of an approved design for fuel-oil system applications for various piping materials
including steel, brass, copper, copper-alloys, and nonmetallic piping. It calls for all
threaded joints and connections to be made tight with suitable lubricant or pipe
compounds, and unions requiring gaskets or packings, couplings, and sweat fittings
employing solder to have a melting point of at least 1,000F for fuel-oil lines. Use of cast
iron fittings is not permitted for fuel-oil-piping system applications. In addition, this
section addresses the design requirements for joints between different piping materials
including the use of dielectric fittings or brass converter fittings, and specifies applicable
codes and standards for threaded joints, welded connections, brazed joints, mechanical
joints, nonmetallic pipe joints, etc.
The current New York City Building Code Reference Standards address the joints and
connections described in the above paragraph.
RS 14-1, RS 14
Section MC-1304. Piping Support. This section addresses the requirements for fuel-oilpiping system pipe hangers and supports. It calls for designing the pipe support system
such that it is secured from undesirable movements, and prevents undue stress on the
connected equipment nozzles such as storage tanks, fuel-oil pumps, boiler connections,
etc. The fuel-oil-piping system shall also be designed to isolate the piping system from
any undue vibrations originating from the connected equipment. The current New York
City Building Code addresses fuel-oil-piping support systems design and installation
requirements in its Reference Standards.
These requirements are similar to the requirements described above for the proposed
code.
RS 14-5A, RS 14
Section MC-1305. Fuel-Oil System Installation. This section addresses the design and
installation requirements of fuel-oil piping systems and fuel-oil storage tanks. It provides
the system design criteria for piping including oil supply and return piping, oil fill and
vent piping, emergency relief vent piping, and fuel-oil transfer piping from fuel pump
discharge to the fuel-burning equipment and fuel-oil storage tanks. It specifies minimum
acceptable pipe sizes for oil supply, return and vent lines, and calls for protecting the
piping against physical damage. It calls for oil supply and return piping to enter from the
top of the fuel-oil storage tanks except for tanks located inside a building on the lowest
floor or above ground tanks with a capacity of 330 gallons or less. It specifies the
minimum vent size requirements for various oil tank capacities, and provides specific
guidelines for routing vent lines including emergency relief vent piping. It also provides
details of vent piping termination outside of buildings including requirements for
weatherproof vent caps and wire mesh screens. It calls for minimum oil fill pipe size of 2
inches, and specifies the oil fill terminal location criteria. It also specifies system design

criteria for normal and emergency relief vent piping design including piping for multiple
tanks installations, for both above ground and underground tank installations.
It lists specific system design criteria for fuel oil system piping, tanks and equipment
located in areas of special flood hazard. This section also includes specific safeguards to
prevent potential fires. It mandates the installation of smoke detectors, heat detectors and
fire alarms within certain oil tank rooms and generator rooms, and requires installation of
flow control devices to automatically shut off oil supply to the rooms upon detection of
smoke or fire. It calls for fire rated walls, floors, and ceiling construction for oil storage
tank rooms and diesel generator rooms, and installation of automatic sprinkler systems or
other appropriate fire suppression systems to protect against potential fire hazards. It
calls for ventilation of oil storage tank rooms to limit the concentration of oil vapors
within the room at or below 25% of the lower flammability limit of the fuel oil being
stored in that room.
The fuel oil system design criteria calls for storage tanks having a capacity of 330 gallons
or less, installed above the lowest floor inside a building to be filled by means of a
transfer pump supplied from a primary tank at the lowest level. A separate transfer pump
and piping circuit is required for each storage tank installed above the lowest floor. An
automatic control and alarm system is required to shut-off the transfer pumps to prevent
over flow of oil from these storage tanks. The oil supply header size is limited to 4 inch
nominal pipe size for most applications. Qualified employees or contracted personnel
holding a certificate of fitness from the Fire Department are required to operate and
maintain the fuel oil systems for diesel generator and fuel storage rooms if required by
the Fire Department. The system design criteria also specifies design requirements for
providing a dike or other barrier to contain any oil leaks, thus protecting the diesel
generators and other equipment, and to contain any oil spill. It also calls for the
installation of leak detection systems in fuel oil tank spill containment area with control
system designed to automatically shut-off fuel oil transfer pumps upon detection of oil in
the spill containment area. It provides the design criteria for vertical concrete or masonry
shafts including required shaft wall thickness, fire resistance rating, provisions for oil
piping expansion and supports, and drain pipe requirements at the base of the shafts when
fuel oil pipes are run from basement level to the higher floors.
This section also specifies the design and construction codes for fuel-oil piping, UL listed
fuel-oil tanks as well as alternate high pressure design fuel-oil tanks. It describes the fireresistance-rating and tank capacity separation requirements for various oil storage
capacities inside buildings at various locations and stories of buildings. It limits the
maximum fuel-oil quantity allowed in a building to 100,000 gallons with individual tank
capacity not to exceed 25,000 gallons on the lowest floor for the above ground tanks. It
limits the maximum size of below-ground tanks at 35,000 gallons for inside building
applications. It permits the maximum quantity of fuel-oil storage of 330 gallons per floor
at floors above the lowest level.
The tank design and construction codes listed in this chapter are ASME Boiler and
Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1 or 2, UL 58, UL 80, UL 142 or UL 1316.

The alternate tank design and construction standard for tanks (that is, the standard in the
current code) are also specified in this chapter, specifically for cylindrical and rectangular
tanks which exceed the UL listed tank design pressures and hydrostatic test pressures.
Tank shell and head wall thicknesses are specified for such tanks based on their
capacities, size and method of construction.
The majority of the system design and installation requirements have been copied from
the current Building Code. UL listed tanks have thinner tank wall design compared to the
non-vented alternate high pressure design fuel-oil tanks..
In addition, the proposed code increases the quantity of oil storage permitted per floor to
330 gallons from the current code limit of 275 gallons per floor. This will allow the
backup diesel generator to run for a longer period of time and provide emergency power
if the utility power is lost in a power outage.
27-827, 27-830(a) through (g)
Section MC-1306. Oil Gauging. This section addresses the acceptable methods for
determining the oil level in oil storage tanks. It states that the gauging of oil storage tanks
located inside buildings by means of measuring sticks is not permitted. For all inside
tanks, it calls for providing fill and vent pipes with devices to indicate either visually or
audibly at the fill point when the oil storage tank has reached a predetermined safe oil
level.
The proposed code provides that gauging devices such as liquid level indicators or
signals shall be designed and installed so that oil vapor will not be discharged into a
building from the fuel-oil supply system. Oil storage tanks used in connection with oil
burners shall not be equipped with a glass gauge or any gauge which, when broken, will
permit the escape of oil from the oil storage tanks.
The current New York City Building Code is not very specific regarding the above
requirements but it has been a standard design and operating practice in oil storage tanks
design and installation.
27-830(i), 27-831, RS 14
Section MC-1307. Fuel-Oil Valves. This section addresses the requirements for
installation of fuel-oil system shut-off valves and pressure relief valves at critical points
in the system. These valves are required so that the flow of fuel oil can be stopped in the
event of accidental leakage, and to protect the fuel-oil pumps and equipment from system
overpressure. Shut-off valves shall be installed at the connection to each appliance where
more than one fuel-oil-burning appliance is installed. A relief valve shall be installed on
the fuel-oil pump discharge line where a valve is located downstream of the pump. A
relief valve shall also be installed on the discharge line of fuel-oil-heating appliances. The
oil discharged from the relief valves shall be returned to the storage tank or to the supply
line.

The current code has similar requirements.


27-830(b) and (h), RS 14
Section MC-1308. Testing. This section addresses the pressure testing requirements of
fuel-oil piping systems and fuel-oil storage tanks. It calls for fuel-oil storage tanks, other
than alternate design and construction standard, to be pressure tested in accordance with
NFPA 31 (test pressure of 3 psig to 5 psig). The alternate design and construction
standard tanks shall be tested for tightness at 1 times the maximum system working
pressure, but in no case less than 25 psig. The fuel-oil piping system shall also be tested
at 1 times the maximum system working pressure, but not exceeding the test pressure of
the storage tank if the piping is connected to the tank. It calls for maintaining the test
pressure for at least hour, and mandates visual inspection for detecting any leaks. The
tank should not show any signs of permanent deformation as a result of the pressure test.
The proposed code calls for documenting the test results. The proposed code also calls
for weekly testing of tank level switches for tanks located above the lowest floor.
The current New York City Building Code has similar pressure testing requirements for
alternate design and construction standard fuel-oil storage tanks and piping systems;
however, the proposed code permits the use of UL tanks at certain locations in New York
City depending on the design pressure of the storage tanks.
27-794(a), 27-794(b), 27-829(b)(3)
MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 14 SOLAR SYSTEMS
Section MC1401. Scope. This section gives the scope of the chapter, including the
protection of water supply to a solar system in accordance with the requirements of the
New York City Plumbing Code. Heat exchangers and appliances shall be used as
provided by the manufacturer. Although the Plumbing Code does regulate potable water
systems, solar energy systems and heat exchangers are not covered in the current
Building Code.
RS 16
Section MC1402. Installation. This section provides that access shall be provided to
solar equipment, and that the equipment shall not block fire safety construction such as
fire escapes, doors, and windows. The code provides that equipment shall be at least 6
feet from the floor when it is not protected from vehicle impact, and shall be protected
from condensation. The solar systems shall be constructed of noncombustible material,
which is also provided for in the current Building Code. However, the proposed code
allows plastic provided the plastic is approved for use; the current Building Code does
not allow for plastic roof coverings. The pressure and temperature of solar components
containing fluids are regulated.

27-337, 27-338, RS 5-9


Section MC1403. Heat Transfer Fluids. This section regulates the flash point of heat
transfer fluids, and provides that flammable liquids or gases shall not be used as heat
transfer fluids. There is no comparable section in the current Building Code. This section
requires compliance with generally accepted industry standards.
Section MC1404. Materials. This section provides that both solar collectors and
thermal storage units shall be listed and labeled with information for their intended use.
No comparable provision exists in the current Building Code. This section requires
compliance with generally accepted industry standards.
MECHANICAL CODE CHAPTER 15 REFERENCED STANDARDS
This chapter lists the standards that are referenced in preceding chapters and sections of
this code document. These reference standards are used to regulate materials and methods
of construction.
The proposed code has an alphabetic listing of various standards used throughout the
proposed code. It lists the promulgating agency, its publication designation, document
title, edition year, and section(s) of the proposed code in which the document is
referenced. By comparison, the current Building Code lists the reference standards by
subchapters in Volume II of the code. Each subchapter of the current code lists all
applicable reference standards in Volume II of the code, followed by some specific
changes, in some cases, for certain standards with specific or unique requirements for
New York City. For example, Reference Standard RS 13-3 refers to ANSI/NFPA 961984, Standard for the Installation of Equipment for the Removal of Smoke and GreaseLaden Vapors from Commercial Cooking Equipment, and then modifies the standard
with specific, unique New York City requirements, paragraph by paragraph. Similarly,
RS 13-6, which references ANSI B60.1/ASHRAE 15-2001, Safety Code for Mechanical
Refrigeration, is also modified section by section for specific New York City
applications. There are many examples of such reference standard modifications
throughout the Referenced Standards section of the current New York City Building
Code.
The other significant difference between the proposed code and the current Building
Code is that the Reference Standards used in the current code are outdated, and do not
reflect state of the art technology or technological advancement in the field of interest. By
comparison, the reference standards listed in the proposed code are the most recent and
up-to-date, reflecting the latest improvement and advances in materials and technology.
In addition, the proposed code is expected to be revised every 3 years, thus keeping it upto-date including any revisions of the reference standards contained therein. A significant
number of current code Reference Standards date back to the 1980s and 1990s. ASME,
Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Sections I, IV, VIII-1980, API 1104-77, ANST-SNTTC-1A-1980, are some of the examples of the outdated reference standards included in

the current code. The proposed code references the 2001 editions of the above mentioned
reference standards.
RS 3, RS 4, RS 5, RS 6, RS 7, RS 8, RS 9, RS 10, RS 11, RS 12, RS 13,RS 14, RS 15,
RS 16, RS 17, RS 18, and RS 19
MECHANICAL CODE APPENDIX A COMBUSTION AIR OPENINGS
Figure MC A-1. All air from inside the building. This diagram gives an example of a
furnace and a hot water heater drawing air only from the inside of a building, and is
referred to in Section 702.3 of the proposed code. The provisions of both the proposed
code and the current Building Code are identical.
RS 14-3
Figure MC A-2. All air from outdoors. This diagram gives an example of a furnace and a
hot water heater drawing air only from the outdoors through a ventilated crawl space, and
is referred to in Section 703.1 of the proposed code. The provisions of both the proposed
code and the current Building Code are identical.
RS 14-3
Figure MC A-3. All air from outdoors through ventilated attic. This diagram gives an
example of a furnace and a hot water heater drawing air only from the outdoors through a
ventilated attic, and is referred to in Section 703.1 of the proposed code. The provisions
of both the proposed code and the current Building Code are identical.
RS 14-3
Figure MC A-4. All air from outdoors through horizontal ducts or direct openings. This
diagram gives an example of a furnace and a hot water heater drawing air through either
horizontal ducts or direct openings, and is referred to in Section 703.1 of the proposed
code. The provisions of both the proposed code and the current Building Code are
identical.
RS 14-3
Figure MC A-5. Chimney connector systems. This diagram consists of 4 examples of
chimney connector systems, entitled A, B, C, and D. These systems are referred
to in Section 803.10.4 and Table 803.10.4 of the proposed code. Although there are no
equivalent diagrams of chimney connectors in the current Building Code, the proposed
code does list requirements for area of connectors, clearances, and other construction
requirements.
27-871

APPENDIX B
RESERVED