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PEB 1102: INDOOR CYCLING 2.1.1 Getting On the Bike • Stand next to the bike facing

PEB 1102: INDOOR CYCLING

PEB 1102: INDOOR CYCLING 2.1.1 Getting On the Bike • Stand next to the bike facing

2.1.1

Getting On the Bike

Stand next to the bike facing the handlebars.

Place the inside leg over the center of the bike frame and

stand with both feet on the floor, straddling the bike. Place the right pedal in the downward six o’clock position.

Clip the right foot into the pedal or place it into the pedal

cage. Stand up on the pedal and sit on the saddle. Put the left foot on the pedal and strap or clip in.

DO NOT attempt to mount by putting one foot in the pedal and swinging the leg over the bike. This may cause the bike to tip or put undue stress on the crank arm and pedal.

2.1.2

Getting Off the Bike

Unclip or loosen the pedal straps.

Remove one foot at a time and step down to the floor

straddling the center of the bike. Lift one leg over the center frame of the bike and carefully

step back DO NOT attempt to dismount by keeping one foot in the pedal and swinging the leg over the bike. This may cause you to twist your ankle, kick your neighbor or cause the bike to tip or put undue stress on the crank arm and pedal.

PEB 1102: INDOOR CYCLING 2.1.1 Getting On the Bike • Stand next to the bike facing
PEB 1102: INDOOR CYCLING 2.1.1 Getting On the Bike • Stand next to the bike facing
2.1.3 Proper Cycling Posture. Basic riding techniques start with the posture on the bike. Maintaining proper
  • 2.1.3 Proper Cycling Posture.

Basic riding techniques start with the posture on the bike. Maintaining proper cycling posture is very important not only for efficiency but also for preventing pains in the long term.

Sit towards the back of the saddle and avoid riding the nose of the saddle. Pull in the abdominal muscles and keep your core solid.

2.1.3 Proper Cycling Posture. Basic riding techniques start with the posture on the bike. Maintaining proper

Relax the arms and shoulders. Release a hunched back and keep the spine in a neutral position while leaning forward from the hips at a 40 to 50 degree angle (see picture). Avoid a hunched back and shoulders that can cause neck fatigue, destroy proper cycling posture and make riding miserable. Place the hands lightly on the handlebars without hyper extending the elbows or holding a death grip. Keeping the thumbs on top or in line with the fingers can reduce the tendency to want to put a death grip on the bars.

Keep the head up and look to the horizon.

  • 2.1.4 Hand Positions.

During the ride it is helpful to vary the hand positions to relieve stress on the neck, arms, and hands. NEVER use an “under handed” position. Palms should always face in or down while on the handlebars. AVOID leaning on the handlebars; use handlebars only to balance your position.

Narrow Grip

Rest your hands lightly on the extenders in the center of the

handlebars. Place your elbows in a wider position at the straight part of

the handlebars (like forming a triangle). Relax your shoulders and elbows This position is suitable for seated sprints.

2.1.3 Proper Cycling Posture. Basic riding techniques start with the posture on the bike. Maintaining proper
Center Grip. • Hands are placed lightly on the straight part of the Wide Grip. •

Center Grip.

Hands are placed lightly on the straight part of the

Wide Grip.

handlebars. Relax your shoulders and elbows.

Do not lean on the handlebars

This center grip position is used in seated climbs, running,

jumping and sprinting in the standing positions.

Hands are placed lightly on the wider position of the

Extended Grip.

handlebar. This wide grip position is suitable for seated and standing

climbs. Most riders also prefer this grip position during seated and

standing sprints: running or jumping.

Arms are extended with the hands at the far ends of the

handlebars. Shoulders and elbows are relaxed.

The extended grip is used in standing climbs or low racing positions.

Center Grip. • Hands are placed lightly on the straight part of the Wide Grip. •
Center Grip. • Hands are placed lightly on the straight part of the Wide Grip. •
Center Grip. • Hands are placed lightly on the straight part of the Wide Grip. •
2.1.4 Proper Pedaling Techniques. Pedaling is the single most important part of cycling where your body

2.1.4 Proper Pedaling Techniques.

Pedaling is the single most important part of cycling where your body is in action, producing power for turning the pedals in a continuous circular motion. Without any doubt we can say that efficient cycling depends on controlled and proper pedal strokes. Complete pedaling action has been described in four interconnected phases;

Push down (1), pull back (2). Both the push down and pull back phases occur simultaneously by opposing legs (see figure 1).

Pull up (3), push forward (4). Both Pull up and push forward phases occur simultaneously by opposing legs (see figure 2).

It is essential to perform smooth and synchronized leg and feet movements which cause the feet “spin” in an efficient circular rotation.

Riders should try to “feel” the pedals during the entire movement (trying to avoid loss of control which especially occurs when pedal speeds become faster than the leg speeds).

2.1.4 Proper Pedaling Techniques. Pedaling is the single most important part of cycling where your body
Figure 1 Figure 2
Figure 1
Figure 2

DO NOT stroke the pedals when your ankle is in plantar flexion
DO NOT stroke the pedals when your
ankle is in plantar flexion

This smooth and symmetrical spins achieved by equal propulsions from the right and left legs.

Most people have decidedly dominant left or right leg, whereby they derive considerably more propulsion from one or the other. This propulsion asymmetry should be avoided as much as possible.

Figure 3

References Bloom, J. “Cyclistics: The Art and Science of Teaching Cycling.” Instructors Manual, 3 ed. Augusthttp://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEnotes/node/1071 http://bikedynamics.co.uk/fit02.htm " id="pdf-obj-4-2" src="pdf-obj-4-2.jpg">

References

Bloom, J. “Cyclistics: The Art and Science of Teaching Cycling.” Instructors Manual, 3 rd ed. August 10, 2008.

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