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:Follow the

(}reen ru'lrrow
VOLUME II
THE HISTORY OF THE GARDEN CLUB
OFVIRGINIA, 1970-1995

THE DIETZ PRESS


Richmond, Virginia
1997

FIFTEEN HUNDRED COPIES OF THIS


FIRST EDITION OF

Follow the Green Arrow, Volume II


HAVE BEEN PRINTED

Copyrighted by The Garden Club of Virginia 1997


LCCN: 79-16009

Article IX-The Garden Club ofVirginia Seal


The Official Seal of The Garden Club of Virginia is devised in three parts.
The Center is taken from the seal of the Province of Virginia in America showing a queen receiving the gift of tobacco plant from an Indian Princess. The
four petals of Dogwood, the State Flower, form the second part, and the last
part is made up of the lettering: "The Garden Club of Virginia" and "En Dat
Virginia Quartam. "The latter signifies that Virginia formed the Fourth part of
the Crown Dominions which also included Britain, France, and Ireland Qournal of the House Burgesses [1702-03 - 1712]).

FOREWORD

ince its founding seventy-five years ago, The Garden Club of Virginia has enriched the
lives not only of its members, but also of millions of fellow Virginians as well as visitors to
our state. The programs, projects, and passions of its members have had an immeasurable
impact on the Virginia landscape.
The organization was founded in 1920 as a loose confederacy of local clubs with common
interests in horticultural pursuits. Soon, thanks to the creation of Historic Garden Week as an
annual fundraising project, the group coalesced into a statewide organization with a noble sense
of mission and an astounding capacity of energy and persistence. Virginia, unlike many other
historically rich states, does not put major ongoing state funding into the ownership of historic
properties. In fact, almost all of the historic places of national significance are privately funded.
The programs funded by Garden Week revenue, which either restore historic gardens or provide appropriate settings for historic sites, fill a vital need in complementing the efforts of others who undertake the bricks-and-mortar elements of historic preservation. Thanks to the leadership of The Club's Restoration Committee, the list of projects accomplished over the past
quarter of a century is a most distinguished one. Residents or visitors with only a passing interest in visiting historic places are certain to encounter the good works of The GCV again and
again.
The accomplishments of the first fifty years were related in the Follow the Green Arrow
published in 1970. The last quarter century is chronicled in the present volume. In it we can see
the successors of the founders carrying forward The Club's mission and expanding it. During
this period, a new widespread interest in garden history (not new for The GCV, of course)
rendered a number of projects especially relevant to scholars, horticulturists, landscape architects, and gardeners at all levels. Two of these were major publications. The first, Historic Virginia Gardens by Dorothy Hunt Williams, a massive volume published in 197 5, included detailed information and drawings of the projects of the Restoration Committee up to that time.
This invaluable source book was followed in 1993 by Gardens & Landscapes of Virginia, a handsome, full-color pictorial survey by noted photographer Richard Cheek. It included The Club's
projects as well as the major historic gardens regularly open for Garden Week. The discipline of
garden history was further enhanced by the impressive research accomplished in conjunction
with GCV projects at Prestwould and Bacon's Castle. These combined fascinating documentary material with archaeological investigation. In the case of Bacon's Castle, The Club, working in conjunction with the owner, the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities,
revealed the plan of the oldest recorded garden in English America, a milestone in the annals of
garden archaeology. To further the study of historic Virginia gardens, The Club instituted in
1995 an annual fellowship to record through measured drawings historic features of ornamental
Vil

Follow the Green Arrow


grounds in private ownership. This program promises to be one of the most important projects
planned for the next quarter century.
The period covered in this volume began and ended with major plans for what is certainly
one of The GCV's most visible and influential undertakings. These were the purchase in 1971
of Richmond's Kent-Valentine House as a headquarters for The Club and for Historic Garden
Week and the beginning in 1995 of a major expansion and upgrading of the house facility. The
commitment of The Club for the last quarter of a century has not been just to that particular
building, but to downtown Richmond in general and to historic Franklin Street in particular.
The presence and influence of The GCV has catalyzed others to champion the preservation of
other noble buildings in the proud neighborhood that was once Richmond's finest. It is to The
GCV's eternal credit that not a single major building in the area has been lost since The Club
settled there. In fact almost every other building between The Club and Monroe Park has been
restored. It is fitting that The Garden Club of Virginia has led in the preservation of the main
.
approach to Capitol Square.
No other statewide organization rivals The Garden Club of Virginia in commitment to the
common good, a vision for a better Virginia, and dedication to its own worthy goals. The citizens of our Commonwealth should be forever grateful.
John G. Zehmer

viii

PREFACE

his publication presents another chapter in the continuing history of The Garden Club
of Virginia. Guy Friddell, well known and beloved columnist, noted, "It was second
nature for members of The Garden Club of Virginia to take up as their cause the art of
gardening. One art flourished in Virginia 1607, and that was the art of gardening. Not an art,
you say? Jefferson, who was the patron saint of everything in Virginia, thought it was. 'Gardening as a fine art,' Jefferson wrote his granddaughter, 'was not horticulture but the art of embellishing grounds by fancy."'
The 1929 dream of the early members of The Garden Club of Virginia to restore the
Commonwealth's historic landmarks is being transformed year-after-year into a splendid reality. The contribution of The Garden Club of Virginia over the years has been adopting a serious purpose and endowing it with zest.
This 25-year-history (1970-1995) could not have been put on paper without the information contributed by the member clubs and Presidents of The Garden Club of Virginia. As the
Committee approached publication, we were conscious of all the varied fashions in writing
styles, influenced by "one-liners" of television and the "no punctation" of E-mail, but since we
believe that style outlasts fashion, we present with pride this history in the style of The Garden
Club of Virginia and its member clubs.
Gratitude is but a lame sentiment; thanks, when expressed, are often more embarrassing
than welcome; and yet we must set forth ours to Charlotte Taylor Massie for her guidance and
dedication.
The Committee understands the feeling of the author of Don Quixote, Miguel de Cervantes,
when he wrote, "He that publishes a book runs a very good hazard, since nothing can be more
impossible that to compose one that may secure the approbation of every reader." We hope this
one will became a valuable reference for you.

Mrs. Charles H. Schutte, Jr.


President of The Garden Club of Virginia

Committee:
Mrs. Hugh L. Hagan, Jr.
Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.
Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.
Mrs. J. Robert Massie, Jr.
Mrs. P. William Moore, Jr.
Mrs. W: TayloeMurphy,Jr.
Miss Jean Printz
Mrs. Charles H. Schutte, Jr.
Mrs.John D. Varner
ix

CONTENTS

FOREWORD

vu

PREFACE

ix

INTRODUCTION

THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA PRESIDENTS


Mrs. Lucius]. Kellam
Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr.
Mrs. George M. Cochran
Mrs.John D. Varner
Mrs. Toy D. Savage
Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr.
Miss Jean Printz
Mrs.James B. Montgomery
Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.
Mrs.Jam es C. Godwin
Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley
Mrs. Henley L. Guild
Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr.
Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.

3
4
7

THE MEMBER CLUBS


Albemarle Garden Club
The Garden Club of Alexandria
The Ashland Garden Club
The Augusta Garden Club
The Blue Ridge Garden Club
The Boxwood Garden Club

10
19

23
26
32
40
44
49

52
66
72
83

90
92
94

96
98
99
xi

Follow the Green Arrow

The Brunswick Garden Club


The Charlottesville Garden Club
Chatham Garden Club
The Garden Club of Danville
Dolley Madison Garden Club
Garden Club of the Eastern Shore
The Elizabeth River Garden Club
The Garden Club of Fairfax
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club
The Franklin Garden Club
Gabriella Garden Club
The Garden Study Club
The Garden Club of Gloucester
Hampton Roads Garden Club
Harborfront Garden Club
Hillside Garden Club
The Hunting Creek Garden Club
The Huntington Garden Club
The Jam es River Garden Club
Leesburg Garden Club
The Little Garden Club of Winchester
The Lynchburg Garden Club
The Martinsville Garden Club
The Mill Mountain Garden Club
The Nansemond River Garden Club
The Garden Club of Norfolk
The Garden Club of the Northern Neck
The Petersburg Garden Club
The Princess Anne Garden Club
The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club
Rivanna Garden Club
Roanoke Valley Garden Club
The Spotswood Garden Club
Three Chopt Garden Club
Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton
The Virginia Beach Garden Club
The Garden Club of Warren County
The Warrenton Garden Club
The Williamsburg Garden Club
Winchester-Clarke Garden Club
APPENDIXES

102
103
105
107
108
110
112
114

116
119
122
123
125
127
129
130
132
134
137
140
142

144
147
148
150
152
154
156
158
160
162
163
165
166
168
169
173
175
178
180

183

INTRODUCTION TO THE
GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA

rs.James Bland Martin, a member and accomplished writer, laced fact with wit in her
fine story of The Garden Club of Virginia's first fifty years (1920-1970) in Follow the
Green Arrow.

The Garden Club of Virginia felt the years from 1970 to 1995 should be recorded. This
twenty-five-year history could not have been "put on paper" without the important information
provided by The Garden Club of Virginia Presidents and member clubs.
When one era ends, it is important to remember that studying the past helps to guide the
future.
The Garden Club of Virginia started in a simple fashion in 1920. It was formed, according
to Mrs. Fairfax Harrison, "to enjoy our neighbors' gardens, to meet our garden neighbors, and
to absorb new ideas and methods of gardening. In short, it was just a pleasant gathering of
kindred souls, all speaking the same language horticulturally and socially, and I doubt if any
more charming association ever existed. But, before long, it became apparent that unless we did
have some reason for existence other than just pleasurable, our organization would die a natural
death."
As interest began to grow and more garden clubs came into existence, The James River
Garden Club invited the Albemarle Garden Club, The Augusta Garden Club, The Garden
Club of Danville, Dolley Madison Garden Club, Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club, The
Garden Club of Norfolk, and The Warrenton Garden Club to a conference in Richmond. This
conference on May 13, 1920 resulted in the formation of The Garden Club of Virginia.
Mrs. Thomas S. Wheelwright, President of The Jam es River Garden Club, reported to the
garden lovers attending, "The main purpose of the Federation is to gain. through contact with
the leaders of the various garden clubs knowledge of practical value about all plants, and all that
pertains to their history, growth and increase; and the various kinds of gardens, large landscape
effects, civic gardens and civic planting. This increased knowledge may be gained by visits to
the well-planned gardens of the different types, and through discussion and interchange of
information."
Mrs. Malvern C. Patterson was elected the first President of the newly organized Federation. The second Annual Meeting of the organization was held in Warrenton June 2, 1921,
with The Warrenton Garden Club as host.
Mrs. Patterson closed her report with the following: "If by our efforts we add to a state,
which is full of historic interest, the charm oflovely gardens, and insure for tourists good roads,
and roadside planting which pleases the eye, by preserving our native shrubs, the dogwood, our
native flower, and holly, and other evergreens, no other state would have greater attractions."
In 192 4, Dr. J. A. C. Chandler, president of the College of William and Mary, appealed to

Follow the Green Arrow


the small four-year-old organization for help in restoring the grounds of the college and enclosing the old brick buildings with a brick wall. He also asked The Club to help to buy a line of
trees along the Jamestown Road which were to be destroyed, if not moved. The trees were
saved by The Club, but the brick wall was too expensive an undertaking for the small organization. A member, Mrs. George Blow, agreed to finance the construction of the wall and The
Garden Club of Virginia assumed the responsibility oflandscaping the grounds.
The planting of the grounds had just begun when The GCV was advised that the landscaping would be taken over by The Rockefeller Foundation. Although The Club did not complete
the project, its willingness to do so may have sparked The Foundation's interest in the restoration ofWilliamsburg as it is today.
The Board of Governors of The Garden Club of Virginia met in Fredericksburg on October 14, 1928. Mrs. Thomas S. Wheelwright, Chairman of the Kenmore Committee, reviewed
the history of the keen interest of The Garden Club of Virginia in Kenmore, the home of Col.
Fielding Lewis and his wife, Betty, only sister of George Washington. The Committee believed
a picture of life in the past was not complete with the restoration of the buildings alone, but
would be a vivid one if the grounds were restored as well.
The Committee felt the means for the planting of the grounds at Kenmore could be raised
by inviting friends to a springtime tour of a few homes and gardens and charging a small admission fee. The plan for the tour was approved.
At a meeting of the Board of Governors of The Garden Club of Virginia in Winchester on
June 29, 1929, Mrs. Wheelwright reported the tour had been unbelievably successful. The
proceeds totaled $14,000 and the restoration of the grounds at Kenmore was assured.
At the meeting the next day, Mrs. William Massie moved and Mrs. Kenneth Gilpin seconded the motion that "The Garden Club of Virginia would be sympathetic to appeals for the
restoration of historic gardens."
The members had captured the true spirit of preservation, and since that time The Garden
Club of Virginia has been inseparably involved in the history of historic gardens in Virginia.
The Club's restoration projects for 75 years have preserved for this and future generations the
beauty of Virginia's historic gardens.
The goal of The Garden Club of Virginia could not be more aptly expressed than it is in
Daniel Webster's simple inscription in the House of Representatives in our nation's capital,
"Let us develop the resources of our land, call forth its powers, build up its institutions, provide
for its great interest and see whether we in our day and generation may not perform something
worthy to be remembered." The last phrase, "perform something worthy to be remembered,"
has been the hallmark for 75 years of The Garden Club of Virginia.
Mrs.John Robert Massie, Jr.

THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA PRESIDENTS


1970-1980

he Garden Club of Virginia moved


into the 1970s with exciting plans for
the future. The James River Garden
Club welcomed The Garden Club of Virginia
to Richmond in 1970 where it all began fifty
years ago. Mrs. Lucius]. Kellam (Dot) opened
the meeting with her special heart-warming
grace. Much had been accomplished under
her fine leadership for two years (1968-1970).
Her skill in coordinating the activities of this
statewide organization resulted in its continued growth and unique contributions.
The GCV Calendar was adjusted to show
The Garden Club of Virginia's 50th Anniversary. The GCV Board of Governors' Meeting took place in Martinsville on October 14
and 15, 1970.
Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr. (Mary
Frances), The GCV President, announced
Mr. Lewis F. Powell, Jr., The GCV attorney,
had reported The Garden Club of Virginia
was tax-exempt under 50l(c)4 of the Internal
Revenue Code as a social welfare organization and recommended thatThe Garden Club
of Virginia amend the charter to qualify under 50l(c)(3) making gifts and expenses deductible. The club would not be able to lobby for
legislation or support candidates for office.
Money or property willed to the club would
be exempt from estate taxes. Members' club
dues and expenses would qualify for deduction though expenses incurred by an owner in
preparing for Historic Garden Week would
not be allowed.
After fifty years of moving files and infor-

mation from one place to another, Mrs. Flowers echoed Mrs. Kellam's belief that The Garden Club of Virginia needed a "home" of its
own.
The first issue of "Conservation Headlines" was published, and copies of the revised
Flower Shows Handbook were available.
The Garden Club of Virginia joined the
Conservation Council of Virginia.
Duplicates of the files at the Alderman Library at the University of Virginia were moved
to Richmond (another reason The GCV
needed more space).
Mrs. John D . Varner (Betsy), The GCV
Treasurer, explained member clubs' constitutional memberships and dues to the member
clubs.
The Garden Club of Virginia was nominated for the Crowninshield Award of the
National Trust for Historic Preservation.
Governor Albertis Harrison wrote, "Were it
necessary for me to select one organization in
Virginia that has made the most outstanding
and valuable contribution to this state, it would
be The Garden Club of Virginia."
Ralph E. Griswold, landscape architect,
was elected an Honorary Member of The
GCVin 1971.
Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall, Jr. (Katie),
Chairman of Historic Garden Week, announced with real regret that Mrs. Irving L.
Matthews, after twenty-five years as Executive Director of Historic Garden Week, had
resigned because of ill health. Mrs. Richard
B. Williams (Ginny) had been appointed Sec3

Follow the Green Arrow


The Garden Club ofVrrginia in 1979 for outstanding achievement in historic preservation
in the United States.
The Garden Club of Virginia was presented the Society of American Travel Writers
Award in 1979 as "The Garden Club of Vrrginia had helped preserve a sense of stability in
an increasingly transient society."
The Common Wealth Fund was established in 1979 to provide an annual grant or
grants, when merited, and to promote projects
in the areas of conservation, beautification,
horticulture, preservation and education.
These projects could be sponsored by a Committee or a member club of The GCv:
Mrs. James Bland Martin (Teen) took a
step back in time to "write it down" for The
Garden Club of Vrrginia in 1970. Fo/Jow the
Green Arrow traces the life of a statewide organization from its founding in 1920 to its 50year anniversary in 1970. It is a rich story of
the accomplishments of The Garden Club of
Vrrginia during this time. Mrs. Powell Glass,
President ofThe Garden Club ofVrrginia during the war years, 1942-1944, wrote "Perhaps
the strength of The Garden Club of Vrrginia
lies essentially in the appreciation each one
gratefully attaches to the contribution of others." This is brought out in every page in Mrs.
Martin's Fo/Jow the Green Arrow.
Mrs. Wyatt Aiken Williams (Dorothy
Hunt Williams) captured the beauty in word
and picture of the first 23 restorations of The
Garden Club of Vrrginia in her scholarly Historic Virginia Gardens, published by The Garden Club of Virginia in 197 5. A valuable
source of garden information, Mrs. Williams
lists the plants, trees, shrubs, flowers, and supplies working designs and sketches of fences
and gates in each garden. With each restoration, Mrs. Williams added its historic importance which makes these gardens unmatchable
anywhere else.

retary ofHGW:
In January 1972, The General Assembly
voted that property taxes be removed from the
Kent-Valentine House. The Governor signed
into law Section NH 58-12-4, providing the
Kent-Valentine property be exempt from state
and local taxes. After re-working a historic
easement, the deed to the Kent-Valentine
House was signed and sealed on January 29,
1972. Two funds were established- The Presidents Fund and the Endowment Fund.
In 1973 all garden restoration records,
books, and files from the Alderman Library at
the University ofVrrginia were sorted, moved
and restored at the Richmond City Library.
The Garden Club of Virginia received the
Mary Mason Anderson Williams Award from
the APVA for the preservation of Vrrginia antiquities.
The Honorable Lewis E Powell, Jr. was
elected an Honorary Member of The Garden
Club ofVirginia in 1974.
In 1975 The Elizabeth River Garden
Club was elected the 45th member of The
Garden Club of Virginia.
The motion to have a needlepoint rug
made for the Kent-Valentine House with
squares showing the logo of each member club
of The GCV was approved.
The number of The Board of Directors of
The GCV was returned to those named in the
Charter plus the Chairman of the Restoration
Committee and the Chairman of the Historic
Garden Week Committee.
In 1976 The Garden Club ofVrrginia received The Vrrginia Travel Council Award.
The Bylaws were changed to include the
Editor of The JOURNAL and the Executive
Secretary ofHGW as members of The GCV
Board of Governors.
The needlepoint rug was completed and
placed in the library at the Kent-Valentine
House.
August Dietz III was elected an Honorary
Member of The GCV for his outstanding service to The GCV for so many years.
In 1978 final payment was made on the
loan to purchase the Kent-Valentine House.
The National Trust for Historic Preservation awarded the David E. Finley Award to

MRS. LUCIUS J. KELLAM


President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1968-1970
In the beginning, there were eight gar4

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


den clubs that came together in 1920 to form
The Garden Club of Virginia. They were
Albemarle, Augusta, Danville, Dolley Madison, Fauquier and Loudoun, James River,
Norfolk and Warrenton. It was due to the
vision and forethought of The James River
Garden Club that these clubs were so pleasantly brought together in Richmond and
formed into a federation. Mrs. Thomas S.
Wheelwright, President of The James River
Garden Club, invited each club to send its
president and one delegate to a conference on
May 13, 1920.
The following program was planned:
9:30 (prompt) Start from the Jefferson
Hotel in autos to visit gardens at
Meadowbrook, Minnaborya and Norcroft.
1:30 p.m. Luncheon at Country Club of
Virginia (subscription).
4:00 p.m. Drive and visit Tuckahoe Plantation in Goochland County.
6:00 - 8:00 Buffet supper at Hillcrest.
On May 19, 1970, forty-four member
clubs of The Garden Club of Virginia sent
presidents and one delegate to Richmond for
an Annual Meeting to celebrate the Fiftieth
Anniversary of The GCV as guests of The
James River Garden Club.
The following program was planned:
2 p.m. Registration and Horticultural exhibits, Roof Garden, John Marshall Hotel.
3 p.m. Board of Directors' Meeting in
Byrd Room, John Marshall Hotel. Cocktails,
Virginia House, guests of the Boxwood Garden Club. Dinner in private homes.
May 20, 1970:
9:30 a.m. Business Meeting Roof Garden, Luncheon at Shooter's Hill, guests of the
Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton, visit
to Tuckahoe Plantation for designation as a
Registered National Historic Landmark, annual banquet at the Virginia Museum of Fine
Arts.
May 21, 1970:
9:30 a.m. Business meeting Roof Garden,
Luncheon at Windsor, guests of Miller and
Rhoads.
There was an air of rare excitement as the
delegates arrived at the John Marshall Hotel
Tuesday, May 19, 1970. This was a very spe-

cial meeting and all felt privileged to attend


this anniversary meeting. They were greeted
by James River Garden Club members clad
in yellow smocks. Each received a dogwood
tree and a tote bag adorned with the logo in
needlepoint, the work of club members.
The Board of Directors met for its final
meeting with Mrs. Lucius}. Kellam as President. The members had a preview of business to be brought to the organization later.
The proceeds from Historic Garden Week in
1970 were $91,794, an increase of nearly
$5,500 over 1969. This deep secret was under wraps until announced in the business
meeting. Mrs. George H . Flowers, Jr., announced the disbanding of the Associated
Clubs of Virginia due to lack of interest, difference of objectives, and lack of success in
procuring officers. She reported that the Conservation and Beautification Committees
would be combined and the Chairman would
be a member of the Board of Directors.
A cocktail party at Virginia House as
guests of The Boxwood Garden Club began
the gala evening. Dinners were held in the
homes of members of The James River Garden Club. Mrs.James W. Rawles entertained
the Board of Directors, the Directors-at-Large
and the Past Presidents. Other dinner hostesses were Mrs. Robert M. Jeffress, Mrs.
Samuel M. Bemiss, Mrs. John Lee McElroy,
Mrs. Edward C. Anderson, Mrs. Thomas P.
Bryan, Jr., Mrs. Fred G. Pollard, Mrs. Leslie
Cheek, Jr., Mrs. H. Coleman Baskerville, and
Mrs. Zack Toms.
Following dinner, Mrs. Kellam invited the
Past Presidents, Mrs. Herbert McK. Smith,
Mrs. W. Allan Perkins, Mrs. Powell Glass,
Mrs. Frank]. Gilliam, Mrs. W.W. S. Butler,
Mrs. Arthur B. Collins, Mrs. Thomas E.
Thorne, Mrs. R Whitney Godwin, Mrs.James
Gordon Smith, Mrs. Burdette S. Wright, Mrs.
James Bland Martin and Mrs. Wyatt Aiken
Williams, to her suite for nightcaps served by
the ladies-in-waiting, Lee Cochran and Betsy
Varner. Here they were to receive the first
numbered copies of Follow the Green Arrow.
There was delight, chatter, and much
autographing of books.
On Wednesday, May 20, 1970, at 9:30
5

Follow the Green Arrow


Mrs. W. Hugh Peal, Mrs. Elias Richards, Jr.,
Mrs. Landon Hilliard, Mrs. William Weedon,
Mrs. Alexander Hamilton, Jr., and Mrs. Henry
]. Richardson.
The banquet at the Virginia Museum of
Fine Arts was a magical setting with great bouquets of spring blooms and elegant women in
ball gowns. Mrs. Arthur B. Collins in a pink
bouffant gown said a simple grace before the
feast. The twelve Past Presidents shared a
lively table. The deLacy Gray Medal was
awarded to Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr. and
Mrs. William A. Johns. In making the award,
Mrs. Edwin B. Vaden, Conservation Chairman, noted that in 1967 the two began the
study of the James River, its Richmond banks,
and plans to beautify it for recreation. With
the help of the Richmond Jaycees and many
slides, they presented the program to over 60
groups, about 5,000 people.
Mrs. Kellam murmured quietly, "The
awarding of the Massie Medal has been postponed." Twelve Past Presidents frowned in
disapproval.
The evening program was held in another
section of the Museum where Mrs. Kellam and
the Past Presidents snuggled on a small stage
while Mrs. James Bland Martin (Teen) made
her debut as a playwright. With intricate lighting and slides the history was relived. Teen's
husband, who suffered the many months of
her authorship, was in attendance for the finis. Amid the applause, standing ovation and
confusion on stage, Mrs. Edward L. Alexander
pushed her way (in spite of Teen) to the microphone and announced the Massie Medal
had been awarded to Teen Martin for her dedication, her leadership, and her book Follow the
Green Arrow. It was an evening of jubilance.
The business meeting reconvened at 9:30
a.m. Thursday, May 21. Mrs. Kellam congratulated Mrs. Martin on receiving the
Massie Medal and for her program. She congratulated Mrs. Flowers and Mrs. Johns for
receiving the deLacy Gray Medal.
Mrs. Wyatt A. Williams, Restoration
Chairman, presented plans for the landscaping of Scotchtown. Researched since 1968 by
archaeological studies, the site revealed no
evidence of a former garden. The research was

a.m., the meeting was called to order by Mrs.


Kellam. The meeting was presented to Mrs.
Henry A. Converse, President of The James
River Garden Club. Mrs. Converse welcomed
the members with grace and the words: "It is
a privilege to be host at this 50th anniversary
meeting. We hope you will come in 2020."
In her final report, Mrs. Kellam summarized happenings in the past two years:
Mrs. Harry Carter Stuart, mother of Lee
Cochran, was made a Member-at-Large of
TheGCV.
The Garden Club ofThe Northern Neck
became the 44th member club of The GCV.
Mrs. Irving Matthews retired as Executive Director of Historic Garden Week. The
GCV was indeed fortunate to have had Mrs.
Matthews serve in this position since 1946.
Minutes of the Annual and Board of Governors' Meetings were taken now on machine
instead of by a court stenographer.
The Board of Directors met now at 3:00
p.m. the first day of the Meetings instead of
9:30 p.m. (or later) after dinner that first night.
Horticultural workshops were held by
Mrs. D. H. Patteson-Knight.
A committee, with Mrs. Thomas W.
Murrell, Jr. as chairman, was appointed to find
a house for headquarters for The GCV and
an office for Historic Garden Week.
Follow the Green Arrow, a history of the
first fifty years of The GCV was researched,
written, and published by Teen Martin.
Mrs.Jam es Bland Martin reported: "This
book will be an important tool of future Chairmen and Officers. It is full of guidelines and
precedent. It is a reference book, it is a social
history of Virginia, but perhaps most of all, it
is a memory book chock full of memories,
beautiful, amusing, sad memorials. It is us on
paper." She reported that she also had written of the Great Ladies of The GCV, cutting
them off at 1960. This may never be printed,
but will be special information in the files.
Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall, Jr., Historic
Garden Week Chairman, reported record receipts amounted to $91,794.
Mrs. Patteson-Knight presented horticulture awards to Mrs. Hamilton Baskerville,
Mrs. Frank McGovern, Mrs. John M. Clark,
6

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


done concurrently with the restoration of the
Mary Washington House in Fredericksburg.
She explained that the planting would be informal with native trees and plants inside surrounding fences. She moved and it was passed
that the landscaping of Scotchtown near
Ashland would be the next project of The
GCV.
The final business of the "Great Anniversary" approached as the Nominating Committee with Mrs. Thomas E. Thorne, Chairman,
presented the slate ofofficers for 1970-1972.
Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr., President; Mrs.
Leon Dure, First Vice President; Mrs. John
D. Varner, Treasurer; Mrs. Thomas W.
Murrell, Jr., Recording Secretary; Mrs. A. T
Embrey, Jr., Corresponding Secretary. Mrs.
Robert E. Latham and Mrs. Toy D. Savage,
Jr. were elected Directors-at-Large. The slate
was adopted. Mrs. Kellam presented the gavel
to Mrs. Flowers with reference to her brilliance at Sweet Briar, "She didn't even have to
go to classes her senior year," and the comment, "She was a Tarheel, a fishing addict, had
a country home and six boats, four for sale."
With gavel in hand, Mrs. Flowers called
on Mrs. W. W. S. Butler, who thanked Mrs.
Kellam for her leadership, and the meeting
was adjourned. The group, as guests of Miller
and Rhoads, was served lunch at Windsor.
Editor's Note: Mrs. Kellam was awarded
the Massie Medal in 1990.

Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr.


things which I was responsible for orchestrating into being during these two eventful years
(1970-1972) in The Garden Club of Virginia.
The members of my Board of Directors deserve great credit for their loyalty, support, and
direction in all that was accomplished.
1 - Parts of the Constitution and Bylaws
were changed so that The Club could apply
for and get tax-deductible status from The
Internal Revenue Service. Already the Historic Garden Week income was free of taxes
(by act of U .S. Congress). But after we, with
the guidance of Lewis F. Powell, Jr., changed
only a few words in the Constitution and Bylaws, dues and any gifts or bequests became
tax deductible for the donor. The approval
ruling was made by the IRS in December
1970, a happy Christmas gift for The Garden
Club of Virginia.
2 - The new tax status facilitated the acquisition by The Garden Club of Virginia of
its own historic landmark, The Kent-Valentine House at 12 East Franklin Street in the
heart of downtown Richmond, to be used as
its headquarters.
3 - Two endowment funds for the benefit
of the headquarters were set up and immediately began to grow. Also helping The Club's

MRS. GEORGE H. FLOWERS, JR.


President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1970-1972
What happened when I was President? I
learned to spell Fauquier and Loudoun, the
location of Hillside, Little, Huntington, Garden Study, and Rivanna Garden Clubs. But
what happened to The Garden Club of Virginia? Six great Flower Shows (beautiful, spectacular), two wonderful and profitable Historic
Garden Weeks, four exciting statewide meetings, many visits among the clubs, and a new
Honorary Member, Mr. Ralph Griswold, all
to be mentioned in glowing terms.
However, history will need to record three
7

Follow the Green Arrow


The member club presidents were invited to
see the Kent-Valentine House when they came
to the Rose Show in Richmond in early October 1971.
The Kent-Valentine House (1845) is a
Virginia Historic Landmark and on The National Register of Historic Places.
Some of the good financial heads in The
GCV got together and figured out a method
of buying the house by borrowing the money
from Mrs. Reed and repaying it with Historic
Garden Week proceeds of six years at $2 5,000
a year without interest. The Restoration
Committee proposed to the membership that
it would finance necessary restoration of the
house and grounds as a project.
This all enabled the Directors to propose
for a subsequently approving vote at the Board
of Governors' Meeting in Franklin in October 1971 that the Kent-Valentine House be
acquired as the headquarters of The Garden
Club of Virginia for $150,000, $25,000 a year
to be repaid to Mrs. Reed for 6 years from
Historic Garden Week proceeds. Further, two
funds were established: The Kent-Valentine
House Endowment Fund and The Presidents
of The GCV Fund. The income from the
former would become the support (or part of)
of the yearly operating budget of the KentValentine House. The latter fund, to be given
by, in honor of, or in memory of Presidents of
The Garden Club of Virginia, would be used
to support special projects or acquisitions for
the Kent-Valentine House. (The first gift to
this fund was made by the Honorary President, Mrs. Herbert McKelden Smith). The
headquarters would be supported by Historic
Garden Week donations until the Kent-Valentine House Endowment Fund became large
enough to carry it.
That Board of Governors' Meeting was a
joyful one for most of us, but many had genuine reservations about the wisdom of our acts.
The purchase was an act of faith in historic
preservation and in the future of The GCV.
In being the catalyst, in being the one to make
a hard choice to fight to get the Kent-Valentine House, my future in The GCV was decided. It was up to me to make it work. I
have done so up to the present.

Mrs. Douglas G. Lindsey, Mrs. Flowers and Mrs.


Thomas R. Nelson, 1970 Board of Governors'
Meeting, Martinsville.
finances, the Virginia General Assembly
passed unanimously, after strategic prodding,
a bill exempting The GCV from property tax
on the Kent-Valentine House (March 1972).
How did all this happen? In May 1971 at
the Annual Meeting in Charlottesville, The
GCV voted to purchase an historic house in
Richmond to be used as its headquarters. Why
an old house? The Club's attorney, then,
Lewis F. Powell, Jr., had advised that a proper
use of Historic Garden Week income (The
Club's only source then) would be for purchase, restoration, and preservation of an old
property for headquarters but not a new one.
Two major needs were to relocate the Historic Garden Week office and to get The GCV
records centralized (and not under the
President's bed).
Mrs. William T. Reed, Jr. (Mary Ross)
came to me in June and offered to buy the
Kent-Valentine House for The GCV in an
arrangement whereby it could then repay Mrs.
Reed gradually. The Valentine family owners
would sell only to The GCV and no one else
at a reduced price of $150,000 and then only
with a scenic (historic) easement attached.
8

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents

Mrs. Flowers with Past Presidents: (back row) Mrs. Ujatt Aiken Williams, Mrs. Lucius J. Kellam,
Mrs. James Bland Martin, Mrs. Thomas E. Thorne, (front row) Mrs. W. Allen Perkins and Mrs.
James Gordon Smith.

By December 1971 the legal wrinkles


were ironed out and in January 1972 actual
deed to the property belonged to The GCV
with a historic easement attached, the first in
Virginia. The Club promised to keep the
house and grounds in good condition, not to
change the first floor rooms or alter the exterior facade, to open it to the public at least
once a year, to carry adequate insurance, and
always to have two magnolia trees growing in
the front yard.
History includes credits also to many who
worked hard on the headquarters project while
I was President. Much is owed to Mrs.James
0. Burke (Alice) who headed a house-hunting committee and served on the Renovation
Committee. Extra special credit goes to Mrs.
Spotswood B. Hall, Jr. (Katie) who was chairman of the Renovation Committee. The
members who worked with her were Mesdames Benjamin Parrott, Jr. (Mary Wise),

Robert Massie, Jr. (Charlotte), Wyatt A. Williams (Dottie), Robert Latham (Ella), Toy D.
Savage, Jr. (Hunter), Leon S. Dure (Kathy),
Harry C. Stuart, Mrs. Burke and myself.
Lewis Powell, Jr. and David Peters of the law
firm of Hunton, Williams, Gay and Gibson
were of inestimable help as were advisors
Charles T. Rose and J. McCaw Parrish (Mac
Parrish donated his services as contractor).
Mrs. James B. Martin (Teen) used her level
head wisely in working out the financial details and especially in winning over the Virginia General Assembly.
Of course, we could not give enough
credit to Mrs. Reed and her sister, Mrs. John
H. Bocock, who was also a special friend. The
generosity of the Valentine family should be
noted, for they not only reduced the price of
the house $100,000 for The GCV but also
donated all of the beautiful mirrors in the
house and many rugs and other furniture.
9

Follow the Green Arrow


MRS. GEORGE MOFFETT COCHRAN
President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1972-1974
Mary Frances Flowers (Mrs. George H.
Flowers, Jr.) was a tough act to follow. During her term as President she led (or pushed),
when necessary, The Garden Club ofVrrginia
through two of its most productive years. Almost single-handedly she engineered the purchase and restoration of the Kent-Valentine
House. She started us all on a brave new road
and in the process revitalized the entire membership. Just before she ended her term, Mary
Frances told the 1972 Annual Meeting in Alexandria what Dot Kellam (Mrs. Lucius J.
Kellam) had said about her two years earlier.

Mr. Granville G. Valentine, Jr., presents the KentValentine House keys to Mrs. Flowers and Mrs.
Spotswood B. Hall, Jr.
As the house was owned over the years by
three prominent Richmond families, we have
not made it a museum or a period house (what
period?). All furnishings have been donated.
As I prepared to turn my office over to
my successor, Lee Cochran, work was progressing rapidly on restoration of the house
and funds were coming up fast. My pleasure
and satisfaction were enhanced when she asked
me to be the first Kent-Valentine House
Chairman. This Chairman came to the end
of The GCV Annual Meeting May 1972 with
a happy fulfilled feeling.
Editor's Note: Mrs. Flowers was awarded
the Massie Medal in 1974. In 1987, Mrs.
Flowers became Honorary President of The
Garden Club of Virginia.

Mrs. Cochran with her mother, Mrs. Harry Carter


Stuart, Member-at-Large ofThe Garden Club of
Virginia.
It was reported that in 1970 Mary Frances
owned seven boats and wanted to sell six of
them. She happily announced to one and all
IO

The Gardm Club of Virgina Presidmts

Photograph courtesy of The Richmond News Leader

Mrs. Richard B. Williams (front desk) and Mrs. John Robert Massie, Jr. on opming day of the new
Historic Gardm Week office in the Kent-Valmtine House.
that she had done it. It could have been her
theme song. She did it all.
Lucy Rhoads (Mrs. Webster S. Rhoads,
Jr.) said it better two years later. "Throughout sixteen productive years on the Board, she
brought to every problem keen intelligence
and foresight. The 1974 Massie Medal is presented to one who, crowning a lifetime of service, became the guiding spirit of the KentValentine House - Mary Frances Flowers."
However, in one way my two-year program was made easier. We had bought but
not paid for, and restored, but not moved into,
our handsome new headquarters. My mission
was to carry the ball that Mary Frances tossed
to me. A great deal had been done, but more
was needed.
My first official outing as President was
in June to Harrisonburg where The
Spotswood Garden Club, assisted by the
North American Lily Society, was to sponsor
The Garden Club of Virginia Lily Show for
the second year. Emily Smith (Mrs. Herbert
McKelden Smith) went along to hold my hand

as. I presented the handsome trophies to the


wmners.
Being President gave me my first chance
to be a part of The GCV Restoration Committee. It was an awesome group and I was
definitely awed! In June Emily Smith, assisted
by her daughter-in-law, Anne (Mrs. McKelden
Smith), invited the committee to begin one of
its tours in Staunton. The committee members and my Board were entertained at a lovely
luncheon at Waverley Hill. Emily was always
my mentor, sponsor, and very dear friend. I
owe so much to my years of observing and
sometimes helping the most remarkable lady
I have ever known. That she was made Honorary President of The Garden Club of Virginia in 1963 shows that others appreciated
her too. Twenty years after her death hardly
a day goes by that I am not reminded of her. I
still miss her unfailing vision, enthusiasm, and
good advice.
Dot Kellam was the able Chairman of the
Restoration Committee and Mr. Ralph
Griswold, the landscape architect for The
11

Follow the Green Arrow

Mrs. Cochran sluncheon at Kent-Valentine House for the Past Presidents: (standing) Mesdames Lucius

J. Kellam, Arthur B. Collins, Burdette S. Wright, Cochran, F. Whitney Godwin, Benjamin F. Parrott,

George H. Flowers, Jr., (seated) James Bland Martin, W.W.S. Butler, James Gordon Smith, Herbert
McKelden Smith. W. Allen Perkins, Wyatt Aiken Williams, and Powell Glass.
GCV, was the matchless guru. They went
about their business with assurance, knowledge, good taste and good humor. And they
accomplished a great deal.
The move into the Kent-Valentine House
was also begun during the summer of 1972.
Katie Hall (Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall, Jr.) and
her committee, including my mother (Mrs.
Harry C. Stuart), saw to it that we had a tastefully decorated and arranged home from the
first day. Charlotte Massie (Mrs. J. Robert
Massie, Jr.) and Ginny Williams (Mrs. Richard B. Williams) set up shop to run Historic
Garden Week, and Mary Frances Flowers
began her term as the first Chairman of the
newly formed Kent-Valentine House Committee. All committee members were anxious
to see and use their own headquarters, and
chairmen were eager to relocate their files

from under their beds.


Mine was the best of all possible Boards.
The members were not only efficient and energetic - they were fun. Our first gathering,
the Summer Board Meeting, was at Nags
Head as guests of Mary Frances Flowers. It
was a perfect setting for our shakedown cruise.
Jane and Tommy Murrell, Dot and Luke
Kellam, Betsy and Cacti Varner and George
and I all stayed at the Buchanan Cottage.
Others were at nearby inns so we could easily
assemble for fabulous food and sun and surf.
I am sure we did some business, but my memories are of the pleasure of the house party.
By fall and The GCV Board of Governors' Meeting in Winchester we were a good
team. Dot Kellam was the hard-working Restoration Chairman. Sue Neal (Mrs. Alexander
W Neal, Jr.) was preparing for the 40th His12

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


toric Garden Week. Jean Printz had successfully edited the first Register and Betsy Varner
(Mrs. John D. Varner) and Mary Stuart
Gilliam (Mrs. McCluer Gilliam) had our finances in good shape. Lula Hopkins (Mrs.
Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.) was valiantly trying
to publicize our good works while Martha
Embrey (Mrs. A. Thomas Embrey, Jr.) was
keeping The JOURNAL running smoothly.
Misty Seipp (Mrs. William Seipp) was an inspired Horticulture Chairman. She began
early to plan exhibits for each meeting that
would educate as well as add beauty to meeting rooms. Her climactic finale at the Boar's
Head Inn was to revive the Philadelphia
Flower Show.
As Chairman of the Conservation Committee, Dot Montgomery (Mrs. James B.
Montgomery) began a new approach by working to get a meaningful program on environmental education into the public school system and thereby address a bad problem at its
source. Bunny Vaden (Mrs. Edwin B. Vaden)
was busy sending out schedules and other correspondence while Virginia Perry (Mrs. W. J.
Perry) wrestled with the pre-tape recorder
minutes. Each Director was made a liaison to
committees not represented on the Board.
Jane Murrell (Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr.)
was First Vice President and Jo Ray (Mrs.
James W. Ray, Jr.) Second Vice President.
They called themselves "Lee's Lieutenants!"
While we were in Winchester we were
royally entertained. The first night we had
cocktails at Amber Hill, the home of Mr. and
Mrs. George Smith, and dinner at the Wayside Inn with Emily and Sloan Kuykendall.
We visited the Burwell-Morgan Mill to see a
restoration in progress, were wined at Glen
Burnie, and dined at the Wmchester Country
Club. The meeting ended with a picnic luncheon at Belle Grove.
As the business of The GCV became
more routine at the Kent-Valentine House, I
spent more and more time there. George's
Court (The Supreme Court of Virginia) met
in Richmond for about two weeks out of every six. I tried to schedule all sorts of Garden
Club activities to take advantage of what was
for me otherwise wasted time. Even today

Helen Murphy says she finds her time in Richmond with Legislative husband, Tayloe, most
helpful. We both lacked the private airplane
that got Dot Kellam around the state!
Members of the Court and members of
the various committees of The GCV formed
fast friendships and Rudy Favretti became a
regular at almost every term of Court. The
first night I invited him to have dinner with
the "Supremes" he thought I meant the singing group!
One of my most memorable luncheons at
the Kent-Valentine House was in December
1972 when I invited all the Past Presidents of
The Garden Club of Virginia to see their new
house. Thirteen got there, some for the last
time. Their pleasure and pride was something
I will never forget.
Another personality from our early days
was Jack Gregory. This stately older gentleman kept the house and grounds in pristine
condition. For meeting days and other offi13

Follow the Green Arrow


cial gatherings he was resplendent in his white
coat. His blessings for the "nice Ladies" were
legendary, and we all felt more secure on our
homeward ways after Jack's obvious familiarity with the Lord.
However, in spite of my Court time in
Richmond, I was on the road a lot. I figured I
drove about 1,000 miles a month as I visited
Flower Shows, restorations, and member clubs
across the State. Club members were universally interested in hearing of our new headquarters and many were expressing this interest financially. In addition to a wealth of gifts
in kind, by the end of 1972 we had over
$14,000 toward our endowment goal of
$150,000.
At the mid-winter Board Meeting in Richmond in January 1973, The Garden Club of
Virginia took its first public stand against proposed plans to expand the State Capitol. The
newly-unveiled plan was for a six-story terraced addition on the south of the Capitol
building. We quickly passed a resolution decrying any such desecration. This particular
scheme was soon abandoned, but it was a harbinger of things to come.
The Lynchburg Garden Club celebrated
its 50th Anniversary by sponsoring the Annual Meeting of The GCV in 1973. And quite
a meeting it was! Events were planned at
members' homes, Sweet Briar, Randolph-Macon Woman's College, and the Fine Arts Center.
The whole three days' events inspired
Jane Murrell to verse for her "thank yous."
In part:
"Relax, dear ladies, to breakfast in
bed.
The sincerest words that can be said:
There's no place nicer than the Hill
City;
No hostesses better or as pretty.
We loved each moment, thought,
You were dears,
And you don't have to do it
again for years."
However, before these gracious words
were spoken, there were several matters of importance for the business sessions. It was announced that Ellen Wallinger (Mrs. Melvin

Wallinger; Mrs. Charles A. Rueger) had


agreed to become chairman of the newly
formed Kent-Valentine Library Committee.
Newly named United States Supreme Court
Justice Lewis F. Powell, Jr., was enthusiastically elected to Honorary Membership in an
attempt to convey our thanks for his guidance
as counsel of The Garden Club of Virginia
for 20 years and our pride at his most recent
honor.
Grace Battle (Mrs.John S. Battle, Jr.) reported another record-breaking Garden Week
grossing $119,971.34. Amine Kellam (Mrs.
E. Polk Kellam) was awarded the deLacy Gray
Memorial for Conservation and Elizabeth
Jeffress (Mrs. RobertM.Jeffress) received the
Massie Medal. Jo Ray resigned as Second Vice
President to marry her Prince Charming and
to move to Vermont to begin her new life as a
doctor's wife. We quickly elected Hunter Savage (Mrs. Toy D. Savage,Jr.)whowas just finishing her term as Director. Dot Montgomery gave an optimistic report on her efforts to
push environmental education in the public
schools. She also reported on the continuing
fight against billboards. Dot Kellam reported
the Restoration Committee had inherited two
approved projects: The Burwell-Morgan Mill
and the Kent-Valentine House. One had yet
to sign contracts, the other still required decisions. Kenmore requested approval of a location near the mansion for a new building.
Both committee members and neighbors disapproved plans. Dot said, "Many historic
shrines are prepared for the Bicentennial celebration in 197 6. One plans to rebuild a newly
located kitchen, another plans an information
center, another a kitchen garden. The Restoration Committee plans to return to each restored garden with suggestions and the money
required to have the gardens perfect for 197 6.
This is the restoration project for 1973-1974."
Rosalie Bell (Mrs. Stewart Bell, Jr.) and
Wisey Bullington (Mrs. N . W. Bullington,Jr.)
were elected Directors-at-Large to succeed
Ella Latham (Mrs. Robert E. Latham) and
Hunter Savage.
Since there was growing concern that we
were losing the involvement of the bright,
young potential members, a new statewide
14

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


organization had been
formed. Spurred on by
Virginia Gunnell (Mrs.
Bruce C. Gunnell) and
Lib Kerr (Mrs. John Y.
Kerr), both of The Garden Club of Alexandria,
the Club decided to promote the first Annual
Meeting of The Garden
Club ofVirginiaJuniorProvisional members.
Held in Alexandria in
May 1973, it was a wonderful success, and plans
were made for the second meeting to be held
in Roanoke in May
1974.
Cutting the Kent-Valentine House ribbon, October 9, 1972: Mrs. George
The Lily Show in H. Flowers, Jr., Mrs. William T. Reed, Jr., Mrs. Cochran, the Rev. W. Holt
Lexington, sponsored by
Souder, and Mrs. Lucius J. Kellam.
the Blue Ridge Garden
Club, inJune was splendid. The handsome wall hanging of The GarParks, the Chairman Emeritus of the National
den Club ofVrrginia seal, which we still use at
Trust, the President of the National Parks
meetings today, was created by Mrs. Malcolm
Conservation Association, the Executive Director of the National Trust and Senator
Campbell, Jr. (Gillie; Mrs. C. C. Tutwiler, Jr.)
for this show.
Harry F. Byrd, Jr., our speaker, all of whom
July 7 found the Restoration Committee
made this a day to remember. We presented
a "setting" for this ancient mill and in so doon the Eastern Shore with husbands. The
ing added another dimension to our planting
members worked, the men fished. George
called it "the land of pleasant living." July was
of historic grounds.
further highlighted by the Summer Board
On October 9th at 2 p.m. we gathered at
Meeting of The GCV in Charlottesville. All
our new headquarters, the Kent-Valentine
House, to celebrate our success in saving this
hands were present for a lovely dinner party
at Wilton, handsome home ofJ ean and "Uncle
fine old house. Junius R. Fishburne, Jr., Executive Director of the Virginia Historic
Walter" Schuyler. Cacti and Betsy Varner had
the group to lunch at the Boar's Head Inn on
Landmarks Commission, gave the history of
Saturday and then we all went back to Wilton
the house, and Stanley W. Abbott, Chairman
of the Commission, congratulated The GCV
to enjoy a relaxing evening and poolside supper.
for preserving this important piece of Richmond history. The Rev. W. Holt Souder
The Restoration Committee, accompablessed the house and Mrs. William T. Reed,
nied by husbands, met September 23 in
Berryville as guests of Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Jr. (Mary Ross), the godmother of the house,
who lent purchase money interest-free, cut the
E. Byrd before the presentation of the
ribbon. We were officially home!
Burwell-Morgan Mill landscaping. We were
joined by an impressive array of dignitaries,
The housewarming was planned to be the
opening event of The GCV Board of Goverincluding the Director of the National Park
nors' Meeting in Richmond. The Tuckahoe
Service, the Keeper of the National Register,
the head of Historic Preservation of National
Garden Club of Westhampton had the respon15

Follow the Green Arrow


sibility for this gathering which met at the John
Marshall Hotel. First Lady of Virginia, Jinks
Holton (Mrs. Linwood Holton), gave us the
thrill of lunch at the Executive Mansion followed by a tour of the John Marshall House
and the Valentine Museum. While in that
section of the city, club presidents were made
aware of the intrusive plan to ruin Capitol
Square by enlarging the Capitol building underground. Word of this threat was just beginning to be generally known. In anticipation of Governor Holton's presence at The
GCV annual dinner at the Country Club of
Virginia, a plan was hatched. Teen Martin
(Mrs. James B. Martin) called it "Operation
Devious." Mr. Griswold was asked to prepare
a plat of the existing trees in Capitol Square.
Additionally, The James River Garden Club
was asked to mark each major tree with the
proper American Horticultural Society label.
The presentation of this gift to the Governor
was to be the coup of the evening. Douglas
Durden wrote in the Richmond Times Dispatch, "Governor Linwood Holton may have
given the speech for The Garden Club of
Virginia's Board of Governors last night, but
The Garden Club gave the surprise." The
article continues - "In her speech to the Governor, Mrs. Cochran said The Club believes
it would be harder to destroy forever a tree
that you know by its proper name. So please
hear tonight our assembled and gentle voices.
Governor, governor spare these trees." The
Richmond papers loved it, and we felt we had
focused attention on a dangerous idea favored
by some of our most influential legislators.
However, the battle was far from over, and
success was by no means assured.
Twenty years later it is hard to imagine
that a plan so flawed could have been so seriously considered. There are only a few delegates who know how perilously close we came
to having both the Senate and the House
Chambers moved underground and the Capitol building reduced to a museum of bygone
days. The Garden Club of Virginia can take
pride in its leadership role in defeating this
idea, but we could not have done it without
lots of outside help.
Two stalwarts in the development of a

concerted and organized plan of attack were


the late Harrison Mann, a former member of
the House of Delegates, and State Senator
William Parkerson. They met with us, advised us, helped define like-minded people,
and generally provided some much needed
muscle. In addition we had the support of
several other statewide organizations and a
number of strong individuals. In November
1973, we had an impressive group - The
APVA, the Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission, the Federation of Garden Clubs, several architects, and many historic preservationists. George told me I could not appear before any Legislative Committee. He felt that
his position on the Court made it "inappropriate" for me to be publicly in front. That
meant that Dot Montgomery as Conservation
Chairman was the spokeswoman for The Garden Club of Virginia. We could not have done
better.
I wrote letters. My files are filled with
pleas for help from every conceivable source.
Lots of luncheons were given for assorted
groups at the Kent-Valentine House, and we
tried hard to have our own club members do
their informed best with any contacts they
might have. Another powerful ally was Delegate Philip Morris. He saw to it that we were
kept informed about all Legislative hearings
and parliamentary maneuvers. But the citizen who deserves a lion's share of the credit
for success is Lawrence Lewis. He realized
that a group of prominent businessmen could
make more impression on the General Assembly than all of the women's organizations rolled
into one. He offered his help and it was readily
accepted.
In January 1974 a meeting was called by
Lawrence in the Board Room of that famous
bastion of male privacy, the Commonwealth
Club in Richmond. After lookouts reported
no one in sight, I was smuggled into this sanctum sanctorum. Remarkably, the sky did not
fall. There I met with Ed Hudgins, Powell
Harrison, Cliff Miller, Harvie Wilkinson,
Richmond Gray, Luke Kellam, Virginius
Dabney, Waller Barrett and Lawrence. Not
surprisingly, all of these men were Garden
Club of Virginia husbands. This powerful
16

The Gardro Club of Virgina Presidrots


Knight). I can still remember driving up and
down the George Washington Parkway in the
pouring rain trying to find the entrance. We
finally made it but we were very late and very
wet. Naturally, most of our talk was about
Capitol Square.
We heard of the revision and reprinting
of the Flower Shows Handbook. Dawn Woltz
(Mrs. Charles K. Woltz), Francis PattesonKnight and Vtrginia Bowen (in absrotia) were
thanked for their hard work.
We began The GCV 54th Annual Meeting in Charlottesville with a tribute to Ella
Smith (Mrs.James Gordon Smith). The Garden Club of Virginia had lost one of its greatest "Great Ladies." How she would have loved
all of the special events planned for our pleasure in her hometown! The Albemarle Garden Club welcomed us at Monticello to begin
our three-day meeting. Dinner followed at
Flordon, the home of Norma and Francis
Brawley.
During the next day's business meeting
there were two special additions to the agenda.
Because of the gas shortage the March Conservation Forum had been cancelled. As a result we had the presentation of our first ever
Award for Meritorious Achievement in Conservation. This award had been established
to recognize a nonmember for outstanding
contribution. The presentation was made to
Union-Camp Corporation for its gift in 1971
to the Nature Conservancy of 50,000 acres of
the Dismal Swamp so that it could be preserved as a natural wilderness. Jack Ray, President and member of the Camp Family, received the award.
We also heard from Harry Porter, Chairman of the Division of Landscape Architecture at the University of Virginia (Mr.Porter
was later to become Dean of the School of
Architecture). He reported that the school
had grown from zero in 1969 (when he came
to the University) to a full complement of 80
students for the 1973-1974 session. He paid
tribute to The GCV in general and to Mrs.
James Gordon Smith in particular for help and
encouragement in creating this important program.
Another departure from the usual was a

group decided to hire professional help to


print a brochure stating the case and to see
that it was delivered to each member of the
Legislature. A group of such impressive allies
gave our cause an influence that we had not
previously enjoyed.
Soon others were recruited from across
the State and the Save Capitol Square Committee was born. Almost immediately one
member wrote to Luke Kellam: "Several proponents of the North Lawn Proposal had
come to the conclusion that the only vocal
opposition was coming from the garden club
ladies. The fact that you and other prominent businessmen have taken up the fight on
economic as well as aesthetic grounds has had
its effect on the Rules Committee of the
House."
The tide was beginning to turn.
On February 22nd Dot Montgomery
spoke at a Legislative hearing of "the irreparable damage" the Capitol expansion would
do to "the symbol of our rich Virginia heritage."
She was followed by Mrs. Albert E. Martin for The Wayside Garden Club; Mrs. Joseph A. Massie for several Winchester area
groups; Mrs. Cabell Mayo Tabb (Maria), for
the National Society of Colonial Dames in the
Commonwealth of Virginia; Mrs. Frances
Carr for The Vtrginia Federation of Garden
Clubs; William T. Reed III, for the Vtrginia
Conservation Council, and James A. Bear,
curator of Monticello. Opposition summary
was given by Lawrence Lewis.
On March 1 the House of Delegates
agreed not to expand the Capitol.
Delegate Lewis A. McMurran, one of the
chief proponents of the hated plan, was quoted
in the paper as saying "this plan has been hotly
opposed by garden clubs, historical groups,
and a newly organized Save Capitol Square
Committee. This opposition is enough to halt
any plans for the present."
We had finally won!
The Midwinter Meeting of the Board of
Directors was held at Wellington Headquarters of the American Horticultural Society.
We were there through the courtesy of Francis
Patteson-Knight (Mrs. D. H. Patteson17

Follow the Green Arrow

Mrs. Cochran and Mrs. John D. liarner arrive at Westover Farm


Horticultural Forum following the luncheon
at Morven. Misty Seipp had a blue ribbon
panel to inform and instruct: Mrs. Clifford
Fifield, Flower Show Chairman for The Garden Club of America; Gordon Tyrrel, a graduate of the Royal School of Horticulture in
England, former Director of Horticulture at
Winterthur and currently at Callaway Gardens; Sylvester March who was in charge of
all growing and propagation at the National
Arboretum in Washington. It was an opportunity for learning afforded to only a few.
Wednesday evening was one I will never
forget. At the appointed time and after all the
others had left by bus, Betsy Varner and I were
called for at the Boar's Head Inn with an open
carriage and two lovely horses. It was
Cinderella all over again. We were driven in
style to the Hunter Faulconers' Westover
Farm. Betsy and I were fearful we might be

an embarrassment to our University of Virginia sons. We created lots of excitement on


the road. As we rolled into the wide circular
drive all of The GCV ladies were waiting for
us under the large pillared portico. What a
thrill!
From the Faulconers we were driven on
to Farmington and a gala dinner. Bernard
Mayo, Professor Emeritus of history at the
University, was the banquet speaker in a room
breathtakingly beautiful with flowers galore.
The Massie Medal was presented to Mary
Frances Flowers and the deLacy Gray Medal
to Anne Fogler (Mrs. Mayor Farthing Fogler).
Both awards received enthusiastic acclaim
from one and all.
On Thursday, Charlotte Massie reported
on another perfect Historic Garden Week.
"As the checks rolled in we realized by some
kind of miracle we had topped last year." An18

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


other all-time high of $134,870.34. Even in
spite of a lack of gas, we could celebrate another banner year.
Dot Kellam reported on two years made
memorable by two completed restorations and
revisits to almost all previous projects. This
"spruce-up: revisitation" was to continue for
another year to make sure that all sites were
in the best condition for the coming National
Bicentennial in 197 6.
Only one major report remained. After
years of discussing the great need for such a
volume, Dottie Williams had agreed to undertake the research and preparation of what
was to be Historic Virginia Gardens. The Restoration Committee agreed to provide funding. It was a laborious project in which she
was ably assisted by Ralph Griswold. Dottie
told The GCV 1974 Annual Meeting of her
aims and outlines of this special volume. I have
always felt pride that this unmatched contribution to historic garden research and restoration was begun on my watch.
And now my watch was over. Two wonderful years filled with pleasant memories of
people, places and events. It was the most rewarding experience of my life. Now all that
was left was to hand over the seal and gavel to
Betsy Varner with the certainty that she would
be more than equal to every challenge and that
The Garden Club of Virginia would continue
to enjoy success in its many fields of interest.
As Mary Frances had done for me, I, as
Retiring President, came home to plan Betsy's
Summer Board Meeting in Staunton with
Mother as co-hostess.
Editor's Note: Mrs. Cochran was awarded
the Massie Medal in 1980. George and Lee
Cochran were awarded the 1995 Outstanding Virginian Award, the first couple to be so
honored.

Mrs. John D. i-tirner


knew we could easily have drifted along for
two years. However, a wonderful cooperative
Board aided me.
On receiving the gavel and seal at The
GCV Annual Meeting, I confessed: "Little did
I ever dream when I was a little girl as a hostess for Historic Garden Week at Mirador... that
the great honor of being President of The
Garden Club of Virginia would ever come my
way. I would like to thank my husband for so
generously agreeing to my serving the twoyear term. In fact, when I approached him on
the subject, he answered, 'I think it is your
duty.' So, there was no way out."
The Albemarle Garden Club sponsored
The GCV Annual Meeting in 1974. My
mother belonged to this club and was present
when I was installed as President. I was born
only 20 miles to the west.
The previous evening, Lee Cochran and
I arrived (in formal attire by carriage) at Polly
and Hunter Faulkner's Westover Farm for
cocktails. On the byways we were secretly
hoping our sons (students at WA) would notice us passing!
During a two-year term of severe gas
shortage which hindered traveling from
Roanoke to various parts of the state and at a
time of great inflation in the economy, both
budgets and meetings were trimmed:

MRS.JOHND. VARNER
President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1974-1976
I was Treasurer during Lee Cochran's
(Mrs. George M. Cochran) term so I was well
aware of her many fine accomplishments and
19

Folkrw the Green Arrow


The GCV 38th Annual Rose Show, sponsored by the Wmchester-Clarke Garden Club
and assisted by the American Rose Society, was
held atthe Burwell-Morgan Mill (1782-1785)
in Millwood. Hunter Savage (Mrs. Toy D .
Savage, Jr.) filled in for me as I was out of the
country. Again, Roanoke Valley Garden Club
won Best in Show arrangement by Mrs. Harry
Yates.
The GCV 55th Board of Governors'
Meeting (1974) was sponsored by The Mill
Mountain Garden Club and held at the Hotel
Roanoke. Directors had dinner with Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin F. Parrott (Mary Wise). Delegates were entertained at dinner in the homes
of Mr. and Mrs. Abney Boxley, Jr., Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Boxley, Mrs.John D. Carr, Judge
and Mrs. Dirk Kuyk, and Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur
Hazlegrove. Sally Fulton entertained at a luncheon the next day with a tour afterwards of
the Kegley House, Monterey. The Roanoke
Youth Symphony Orchestra, conducted by
Gibson Morrissey, was outstanding entertainment at the banquet. The Roanoke Valley
Garden Club had basket lunches the next day
at the home of the Thomas Rutherfoords.
The February Board of Directors meeting was held a week late due to bad weather.
Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr. and Mrs. McCluer
Gilliam were hostesses at the Kent-Valentine
House.
The innovation of the Judging School at
The GCV three Flowers Shows was initially
successful and worth perpetuating in subsequent years. The GCV Inter-Club Speakers
Bureau Booklet was revised. The labels for
trees in Capitol Square were financed by The
GCV with The James River Garden Club
overseeing the project.
The Flower Shows Handbook was revised
by Mrs. Patteson-Knight and her committee.
The Conservation Forum was moved from
Richmond to the Boar's Head Inn in
Charlottesville for two years and was a sellout.
Conservation Chairman, Mrs. William R.
Miller,Jr., was busy educating everyone on the
Bottle Bill.
It was suggested that nominating ballots
be sent to Board members and Past Presidents,

Mrs. Mirner with Mr. Richard Bale, conductor of


the National Gallery Orchestra, at the 1975 Annual Meeting.

l. The Register was printed every other


year with a supplement for alternate years.
2. Four pages were cut from The JOUR-

NAL.
3. The number of Registers ordered was
cut back and distributed from the Kent-Valentine House to save postage.
4. Because of the Kent-Valentine House's
tight budget and rising maintenance costs,
$1,000 was voted for unusual repairs which
could accrue.
My first Flower Show was The GCV Lily
Show in Lexington. For the second time in a
row my Roanoke Valley Garden Club won the
Inter-Club and the Tri-Color for its arrangements.
In July 1974, The GCV Board of Directors met in Staunton at the Ingleside Hotel
and were royally entertained by Lee Cochran,
her mother, Mrs. Harry Stuart, and Virginia
Perry (Mrs. William J . Perry).
20

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents

Mrs. Lucius J. Kellam, Mrs. i1Jrner and Mrs. Benjamin J. Mears, The Eastern Shore, 197 5.
and this was done.
with Mrs. Maury and Mrs. Boothe to show us
the gardens. The Elizabeth River Garden
The Kent-Valentine House was getting
Club of Portsmouth, organized in 192 7, was
spruced up, and I chose to have enlarged picaccepted as the 45th member club of The
tures of the interior and exterior with me when
GCV with 60 members.
I visited member clubs. We needed money
and gifts in a big way! A committee composed
The Massie Medal was awarded to ] ane
Norris Birchfield and the deLacy Gray Medal
of Mrs. Wright Harrison, Mrs. C. Harrison
to Mrs. B. Powell Harrison.
Mann, Jr., and the Directors-at-Large was
formed to explore increasing the Kent-ValenHorticulture Chairman, Mrs. Robert W
tine House Endowment Fund. The first year
Massie III, displayed ferns raised by her and
the Fund increased $50,000.
evergreen cuttings rooted by member clubs.
The GCV 4lst Daffodil Show was sponThe Garden Club of Virginia was sadsored by our "baby club" -The Garden Club
dened by the death this year of its famous
Honorary President, Mrs. HerbertMcKelden
of the Northern Neck at the Rappahannock
Community College in Warsaw. The theme
Smith.
was "The First Hundred Years." To quote
Several Bylaws changes were made. The
members on the Restoration Committee inDaffodil Test Chairman, Mrs. Karl F. Hehl,
"our
creased from 8 to 10. The Committee Chairbaby club grew up and bloomed with great
men of Public Relations, The JOURNAL,
success."
Kent-Valentine House, and Conservation
The 55th Annual Meeting of The GCV
were deleted from the Board membership.
was held in Old Town Alexandria. The hostChairmen of the Restoration Committee and
the Historic Garden Week Committee reess club, The Garden Club of Alexandria, was
celebrating its 50th birthday. Mrs. Matheson,
mained on the Board. This change is going
back to the Charter. Directors-at-Large were
Mrs. Gunnell, Mrs. Latham and Mrs. Smith
assigned to committees of their choice.
received special thanks. Lunch by The GarThe Restoration Committee was busy
den Club of Fairfax was served at Woodlawn
21

Follow the Green Arrow


copies of their current club yearbook to the
Annual Meeting of The GCV.
The Ashland Garden Club sponsored
The GCV 33rd Annual Lily Show with the
28th Annual International Lily Show of the
North American Lily Society. It was a scorching hot day, and The Ashland Garden Club
did a wonderful job, but it was heard some
said this would be the one and only!
Mrs. Harrison and Mrs. Miller were the
hostesses for the summer meeting at Virginia
Beach of the Board of Directors.
Topics for clubs at the meeting:
l. Plans for celebrating the Bicentennial.
2. Plans for contribution to Kent-Valentine House Endowment Fund.
The Historic Garden Week Committee
reported that the response from homeowners
for tours of Richmond for 1976 was so great
that the tour would be extended from three to
four days.
So many wonderful donations, monetary
and otherwise, had been received for the KentValentine House, but members were urged to
give and not lend.
The GCV Award for Meritorious
Achievement in Conservation was given to
Mrs. Hiram B. Eley for saving the Historic
Green Spring District.
Retirement benefits for HGW employees were studied, and Jean Printz, after long
research, implemented a plan with Southwestern Life Insurance for employee retirement
at no cost to the employee.
Mrs. John M. Maury represented The
GCV at Woodlawn at the International Conference on the Preservation and Restoration
of Historic Gardens and Landscapes sponsored by Dumbarton Oaks, The National
Trust for Historic Preservation and American
Horticultural Society. The GCV gave a donation for refreshments.
The GCV 56th Board of Governors'
Meeting was held at Cape Charles on the Eastern Shore. Mr. and Mrs. George F. Parsons
entertained at an oyster roast on the beach
which was great. Lunches were held at the

Photograph courtesy of The Richmond Tunes Dispatch

Mrs. Wyatt Aiken Williams shows Mrs. VD:rner


Historic Virginia Gardens.
"Sprucing Up for the Bicentennial." The
Committee traveled to Smithfield in Montgomery County and to Fincastle Churchyard
where needed work was done on brick walks,
boxwood, wall crumbling and ground grading.
The Club voted to give $3,400 to Virginia
Polytechnic Institute as a matching grant to
continue the research project of the "Boxwood
Root Rot Disease" - payable in 1977.
Mrs. Melvin Wallinger (Ellen; Mrs.
Charles A. Rueger, Jr.) and Mrs. Louis A.
Wright (Sarah) catalogued the 750 books in
the Kent-Valentine House Library- the oldest book is dated 1668. Mrs. Whitney Godwin
gave an extant copy of the 1952 Calendar to
the library. It now had a complete collection
of all publications of The GCV.
Horticulture Field Day at the National
Arboretum was a sellout with 65 members.
Tappahannock and Portsmouth were opened
for the first time, and over $100,000 was raised
by the Historic Garden Week tours.
Clubs were asked to bring five or more
22

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


centennial Flower Show in Roanoke. Slides
would be shown of The GCV restorations.
In the spring of 197 6 our latest publication, Historic Virginia Gardens by Dorothy
Hunt Williams, was circulated. This was to
be The GCV's outstanding contribution to the
Bicentennial. What a fantastic volume it was!
Another birthday present was a Liberty
Bell requested by the Smithsonian Institution's
Centennial of 1876. Our talented member,
Georgia Vance, made a dried Liberty Bell of
red celosia and white sprays of dogwood which
was lovely.
Dr. Robert Lambe from VPI was a guest
speaker and showed slides on "Boxwood Rot
and Decline." The Massie Medal was awarded
to Mrs. Wyatt A. Wiliams and the deLacy
Gray Medal to Elisabeth Aiken Nolting.
The gorgeous needlepoint rug was unveiled. Each member club did a needlepoint
square of its seal or logo. The rug will go in
the library at the Kent-Valentine House. The
luncheon was given by The Garden Club of
the Northern Neck.
Editor's Note: Mrs. Varner was awarded
the Massie Medal in 1996.

homes of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Webster at


Eyreville, Judge and Mrs. George Willis at
Elkington and Mrs. Harry Baldwin at Eyre
Hall. Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Turner treated us
with cocktails at Kendall Grove, and Mr. and
Mrs. Lucius Kellam entertained us at dinner
under a big tent at Mount Pleasant. Lunch
before departure was with Mr. and Mrs. T.
Hume Dixon at Point Pleasant.
Mrs. Stewart Bell kept on top of billboard
legislation. The news from The JOURNAL
was that Mrs. John M. Stetson and Mrs. T.
Robert Vermillion traveled to Staunton and
Roanoke to meet with journalists in District 2
and4.
Bacon's Castle opened for Historic Garden Week in 1975 for four days and one-half
day Sunday with 3,000 visitors.
Conservation Chairman, Mrs. Miller, suggested that individuals should lobby, but that
committees of The GCV must be careful to
keep The GCV tax free status.
Mrs. Bell was hostess to The GCV Board
of Directors Meeting at the Kent-Valentine
House in January. An engraved cup was presented to "Lawrence Percy Gregory 0ack)
with affection and appreciation from The
Garden Club of Virginia and the Kent-Valentine House, Jan. 197 6."
An award was presented to The GCV by
the Richmond Urban Design of the City of
Richmond for outstanding contribution to the
visual and physical quality of the Richmond
Community in 197 5.
The GCV 56th Annual Meeting was held
at the Sheraton in Fredericksburg. Mrs.
George Benoit entertained the Board for dinner at Snowden. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas E.
Quarles had a cocktail buffet for the delegates.
Thanks went to Mrs. Smoot, Mrs. Embrey and
Mrs. Rose.
Mr. Robert P. Nelson, Executive Vice
President of the Virginia Travel Council,
wrote thanking The GCV and especially Mrs.
James B. Martin whose excellent speech at the
awards lunch in Williamsburg "stole the
show." The award was for helping tourism in
Virginia.
A request was approved for an exhibit for
the Virginia Federation of Garden Clubs Bi-

MRS. TOYD. SAVAGE,JR.


President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1976-1978
Mrs.John D. Varner of the Roanoke Valley Garden Club presided over The Garden
Club of Virginia 1974-1976. The wife of a
prominent surgeon in Roanoke, Betsy was a
highly capable, intelligent and forceful leader.
She first came to the Board of The Garden
Club of Virginia in 1966 as Secretary to Mary
Wise Parrott (Mrs. Benjamin F. Parrott), and
then moved tlirough the ranks of several offices to Treasurer. Her fame grew in this job,
not only by her excellence in handling The
GCV accounts, but also in her determination
to explain to us the oft-misunderstood term
"constitutional membership."
This new President stepped into her role
with the ease and confidence of one well-prepared by eight years of in-depth Garden Club
Work. Reserved and conservative, Betsy ran
23

Follow the Green Arrow


love and devotion to this organization whose
members are Virginia's finest.
The forerunner of cellular phones in cars
was the CB (Citizens Band) radio. It was the
rage in the 1970s, when along with all truck
drivers many of us used the machine as we
drove long distances. The jargon of CB communication was a language apart, and tuning
in on fellow travellers was highly entertaining. The man with the mike had the stage,
and anyone in the surrounding two miles was
his audience. Each CBer had a "handle" (call
name) - mine was "Flower Pot."
Really bright spots: installing the needlepoint rug worked by each member club in the
library at the Kent-Valentine House; accepting the James Finley Award from the National
Trust to The GCV for historic preservation,
the inauguration of the restored Rotunda at
an elegant dinner dedicating The GCV gift
of the North Forecourt landscape to the University of Virginia, Brick Terrace at Lee
Chapel, Visitors Reception Center at
Woodlawn Plantation, the restoration of the
landscape at Point of Honor, and the encouraging and supportive smiles of the Past Presidents sitting on the front row at The GCV
Annual and Board of Governors' meetings.
There were two areas of business in which
the Board engaged that are not fully reeognized in the records. First, the Finance Committee, under Alice Burke (Mrs. James 0.
Burke), arranged a schedule of salary for the
two employees in the Historic Garden Week
office. Previously, their salaries had been a
questionable figure.
The other matter for study was the increasing concern voiced by many members
that The GCV did not give enough attention
and support to the broad field of conservation. There were even cries for HGW funds
to support conservation! Elizabeth Scott (Mrs.
Frederic W. Scott) chaired an ad hoc study
group for this issue. Its answer was a proposal
for establishing an endowment fund geared
to support conservation as well as other
projects of the member clubs and the GCV
committees. This endowment was established
under Jane Murrell (Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell,
Jr.), my successor, by a gift of $20,000 from

..
...J
.. '

i_., .

Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr.

a tight ship those two years, steered us into


the coming National Bicentennial celebration,
and pledged to renew our goals and to dedicate our resources to refurbishing our existing Restoration projects. A hard act to follow. And scary.
My memory has dimmed in these 18
years, but I doubt that even total recall would
bring forth much to comment upon during
my term as President of The Garden Club of
Vrrginia. My predecessor, Betsy Varner, is tall,
handsome and regal. I am 5'2" and certainly
not regal. On the occasion of the change of
office at The GCV Annual Meeting in
Fredericksburg, the newspaper people were on
hand to photograph Betsy and me. We were
posed at the bottom of stairs leading to a high
porch and, feeling rather insecure, I was inspired to step up two steps in order to face
Betsy on the same level. That routine was
more or less the story of my tenure - I kept
having to jump up two steps in order to keep
even!
It was a lovely two years. The fun of the
meetings and gatherings across the state and
the excitement and challenge of the programs
and projects that these (then 2800) women
were accomplishing inspired in me a lifelong
24

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


the Restoration Committee. It is known as
the Common Wealth Fund and has grown to
provide an annual award of about $5 ,000 to
the winning project.
One of the most stimulating parts of my
job has been visiting the member clubs of The
GCV. It was a pleasure to meet the members,
and the meetings were thoroughly interesting, and the coffees, lunches, and teas delicious. How could I battle my own personal
Bulge in such good company?
The GCV Annual Meeting is the arena
for the Officers, Chairmen, and club presidents to tell of the many activities of The
GCV. One day in March driving home from
such a committee, I amused myself by making a rhyme. I keyed all of this verse to the
pentameter of "Twas the Night Before Christmas" and I recall just a bit, with apologies to
Clement Moore.
So off to Kent-Valentine, these Committees they flew
With correspondence-filled files, and
bright ideas too.
As I turned down the thermostat
And put chairs around
In front door and back door
They came with a bound.

Mrs. Savage.

They were dressed all in suede, as in Ultra, that is,


And they spoke but a few words, then got
down to biz.
Molly Dodson (Mrs. E. Griffith Dodson,
Jr.) reported thatThe Tuckahoe Garden Club
of Westhampton had recommended to the
Admissions Committee that August Dietz ill,
a best friend and long supporter of The GCV,
be made an Honorary Member of The Garden Club ofVll'ginia. Seconded by The James
River Garden Club, the motion received a
chorus of hearty "Amens," and "Sonny" Dietz
was elected Honorary Member of The Garden Club of Virginia.
The Conservation Forum was held at St.
Paul's Church in Richmond February 14. It
was an honor to have Governor and Mrs. Mills
Godwin as luncheon guests.
On the first of December 1977 the final
payment was made on the loan to purchase
the Kent-Valentine House. To bring this
about in six short years was remarkable and a
tribute to Mary Frances Flowers (Mrs. George
H. Flowers, Jr.), Teen Martin (Mrs. James B.
Martin), and to those others who had first the
dream, then had the good sense to plan and
arrange for The GCV to have a home of its
own.
The Massie Medal was awarded to The
Blue Ridge Garden Club of Lexington in 1977
"for its creation and maintenance of the Bertha Whitney Townes Memorial Courtyard
Garden at the Stonewall Jackson Hospital,
Lexington."
The deLacy Gray Medal was awarded to
"Mrs. Georgia Shrum Brown in 1977 for her
outstanding efforts in furthering the knowledge of our natural resources and encouraging their wise use."
Special awards in 1978 included the
Massie Medal given to Mrs. Arthur A. Dugdale
(Betty) of Ashland "for outstanding achievement in horticulture and her readiness to teach
and help others."
The deLacy Gray Medal was awarded
Mrs. Hope Wallach Porter "for her continuing actions against opposing forces in the
struggle to preserve and maintain the quality
of life enjoyed in Fauquier County."
25

Follow the Green Arrow


Mrs. Murrell said, "I can only hope to
follow, not succeed, Hunter Savage, and now
I'd like to call on Mrs. James Montgomery
(Dot) who will express this better than I."
"Several years ago, The Garden Club of
Norfolk sponsored The GCV Annual Meeting, and as we drove up in front of our hotel, a
petite blond, smiling, sparkling-eyed and vivacious, burst through the double doors and
came forward to bid us welcome. Twas one
Hunter Hankins Savage by name, and I
thought I had never seen a happier face. Today, as that same Hunter Savage takes her leave
as our President, a similar thought comes to
mind: There have never been two happier
years.
Hunter, this morning, as you take your
first long breath in two years, do so in the
knowledge of a job beautifully done, and that
you take with you into your retirement the
love, appreciation, and admiration of each of
us. And may you never lose that sparkle, for
truly you light up our lives. God Bless!"
Editor's Note: Mrs. Savage was awarded
the Massie Medal in 1994.

Roxie and Lawrence (Jack) Gregory in the Kent


Valentine House dining room.
The Garden Club of Virginia Award for
Meritorious Achievement in Conservation was
given to Dr. E. Spencer Wise of Christopher
Newport College "for his unselfish service to
the Commonwealth ofVirginia and for timely
and constructive action in the conservation of
our natural resources."
The Garden Club of Virginia Award for
Meritorious Achievement in conservation
given to Danville Group, Dan River, Inc., "for
improvement of the environment and conservation of resources. Programs included management, planning, allocation of funds, extensive engineering and implementation."
As my last act, I saluted and turned the
gavel over to the very capable hands of the
incoming President of The Garden Club of
Virginia, Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr.
Mrs. Murrell received it saying: "I was at
a dinner recently seated next to the Honorable Andrew P. Miller, Attorney General, and
someone congratulated me on being the new
President of The Garden Club of Virginia. I
replied 'but I'm not the President, I haven't
been elected yet.' They said "Yes, but you will
run unopposed." Andy Miller said "How on
earth do you do that?"

MRS. THOMAS W. MURRELL, JR.


President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1978-1980

When I was elected President of The


Garden Club of Virginia at its Annual Meeting in Lynchburg in May 1978, I was fortunate that the Nominating Committee, following the suggestions of the member clubs, had
already named a fine Board for me to work
with. My first task was probably my most
important - getting the right people to chair
committees. With the wealth of talent in The
GCV this was no problem, but I was unusually fortunate, and I can brag about these without being immodest, as I know they took on
these responsibilities because of the past accomplishments of The Club. Of course I knew
that I had to run as fast as I could to keep up
with people such as these, and that is exactly
what I did.
The years 1978-1980 offered real challenges. Throughout the country there were
26

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


many signs that
volunteers were
being more
careful
in
choosing how
they would
spend their
spare time. To
begin with,
there was precious little of it,
as domestic
help had become a thing of
the past for the
majority, and
many women
Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr. had taken jobs.
However, even
though time for all of us was limited, some
important and interesting issues were being
examined. Concern for the environment had
become a constantly talked-about issue. How
to find a balance between supporting conservation and allowing progress for a vastly expanding population was the big question.
Organizations such as The GCV felt more
than ever an obligation to its members to approach these questions in an informed way.
It was also a time of constantly-rising inflation for the whole country, and for eleven
years The GCV had been operating on $5
dues from each member! The GCVhad been
as economical as possible, printing the minutes on both sides of the paper and single spacing them. In order to economize, the summer edition of The JOURNAL had been
eliminated. It finally became apparent that a
drastic step had to be taken, and the dues were
raised to $10. To begin a term by raising the
dues for the first time in over a decade requires
strong support, and I was even more grateful
for a superb Board and Officers.
The members met the changing times
with the ingenuity and spirit they had always
shown. The Board of Directors pondered
ways to simplify meetings and make them as
little burden as possible for hostess clubs. Although there were fewer formal dinners and
more picnics, none of the fun, attractiveness,

or unmatched hospitality was lost. From the


fall of 1978 when, as the early pioneers had
done, we traveled the "Philadelphia Road"
near Martinsville in the southwestern part of
our state, to May 1980 when we met in Fairfax,
the northeastern tip of Virginia and the fastest growing metropolitan area of our country,
we saw the diversity of the Commonwealth's
problems and challenges. The unifying factor was always the 3,000 energetic, interested
members determined to improve the quality
oflife. And what meetings they were! Thinking of them would bring so many pleasant
memories to me. Our first Board Meeting was
at the Toy Savage Cottage at Virginia Beach,
where we could tell at once the group would
be congenial throughout the two-year term.
With a full moon over the ocean, backfin crab
and beef tenderloin, no wonder it was memorable!
Each meeting that came in the next two
years had highlights that would always be remembered. My initialed "Gucci" bag and a
still flourishing ponytail palm from
Martinsville would remind me of the Board
of Governors' Meeting as guests of The Garden Study Club. Who could ever forget our
stay at the John Marshall Hotel in Richmond
in the spring of 1979 when The Boxwood Garden Club held the Annual Meeting? No one
could have predicted that there would also be
a large Lions' Club Convention at the same
time, plus the confusion of rebuilding the hotel around us!
The second summer meeting was at Nags
Head as guests of Mary Frances Flowers (Mrs.
George H. Flowers, Jr.) and Ellen Godwin
(Mrs. James C. Godwin), where we enjoyed
exceptional hospitality in a really relaxed atmosphere with the added treat of having our
friends Jack and Roxie Gregory from our own
Kent-Valentine House with us.
In all the meetings The Garden Club of
Virginia held over the years, however, probably none would be more memorable than the
Board of Governors' Meeting in early October 1979 as guests of The Spotswood Garden
Club. Our visit to the Valley began with a
wonderful picnic supper in a fine barn owned
by one of the members. We had taken a hay27

Follow the Green Arrow


publicity appeared in countless publications
and produced "Springtime in Virginia," a
supplement to The Richmond Times-Dispatch. An issue of "Southern Accents" had
beautiful color photographs of the Lynchburg
Tour and a fine article and drawing of Charlotte Massie appeared on the editorial page of
the Richmond News Leader. A superb tour
was mapped out for the Garden Club of
America Visiting Gardens Committee, tours
and parties were arranged for a plane-load
from the Denver Garden Club, and a cocktail
party for people who opened their homes was
held at the Kent-Valentine House.
As had been done since 1929 when Historic Garden Week began, the proceeds from
these very successful tours were used to restore the grounds of historic places, the total
expenditure now being approximately three
million dollars used for work on 32 projects.
Work at Point of Honor in Lynchburg
was finally completed, so that new projects
could be undertaken. For some time the Restoration Committee had been searching for a
successor to our friend, Ralph Griswold, a
landscape architect who was expert in historic
work in the classic sense. At this time we began our association with Mr. Rudy J . F avretti,
head of the landscape architecture department
of the University of Connecticut. Mr. F avretti
had published countless articles and books on
historic landscape design, agronomy, and horticulture, had been a speaker at the
Williamsburg Garden Symposium and an advisor on many notable projects including replanting Jefferson's grove at Monticello.
The Committee visited several new proposed projects and began work at Prestwould
in Mecklenburg County. This place, home of
Sir Peyton and Lady Jean Skipwith, is in a section of Virginia where we had not worked before and is also of special historic interest. It
is owned by and owes its preservation to a
foundation which saved it through real devotion. Lady Skipwith, who lived there as a
widow for over 20 years, had one of the finest
libraries in Virginia in the late 18th and early
19th centuries. She was a remarkable gardener
and left complete records of her extensive garden. The work began by restoring the stone

ride through rolling meadows where the cows


gave us the most puzzled expressions imaginable. Back to the motel we went for a few
nightcaps, chats, and to bed. We were awakened by the most ominous silence and soon
learned that 14 inches of snow had paralyzed
the whole community and cut off all power.
Undaunted, everybody began coping with
holding a meeting under such circumstances.
Meetings were held with all of us huddled in
blankets. The only room in the hotel where
artificial light was not required was around the
indoor swimming pool, so it was there we
gathered sans loud speaker or tape recorder.
The thought of feeding everyone was the
greatest challenge. The Spotswood girls got
in their four-wheel drive buggies used on
mountain roads and managed to get all the
necessary food to James Madison University,
where, happily, gas was used for cooking. The
snow and ice were extremely destructive because of the weight on trees still in green leaf,
but except for this, it was a unique experience
which was filled with fun and showed us again
what ingenious members we have.
Ingenuity and hard work also continued
to characterize the planning and execution of
Historic Garden Week, our most important
longtime activity. Despite some hesitancy and
WO{ry over opening houses in times when the
crime rate rose in a frightening way, excellent
tours were held, and in both years previous
records for admission were broken.
In the fall of 1978 the Society of Travel
Writers, meeting in New Delhi, India, presented one of its international awards to The
Garden Club of Virginia for all it had done
for tourism in Virginia over the years by conducting Historic Garden Week. At the Wrnter Board Meeting inJ anuary 1979, Mrs.John
Dalton, wife of Governor Dalton, presented
the award. Among other comments about the
far-reaching effects of The GCV work, she
said, "The Garden Club ofVrrginia has helped
preserve a sense of stability in increasingly
transient times."
The continued success of Historic Garden Week was due in large part to the work of
the Historic Garden Week office, operated by
Charlotte Massie and Ginny Williams. Their
28

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


wall around the property and pruning the
trees, thereby opening a vista to the river
which had disappeared from view. Because
Lady Jean's garden had been so accurately recorded, it was a real temptation to try to reproduce it exactly, but both The Garden Club
of Virginia and the Prestwould Foundation
knew that maintaining such a garden would
be totally impossible today. A new approach
was undertaken - a delineation of the original
garden with labels and explanatory material
to describe it. In this we were aided by Mrs.
Robert Jeffress (Elizabeth) of Richmond, a
member of The James River Garden Club, a
former member of the Restoration Committee, and a well known preservationist. Because
of her generosity, the summerhouse at
Prestwould was restored with a model of the
garden and descriptive panels in it. Descendants of Lady Jean's original plants were still
on the grounds and traces of her "horseshoe
beds" could still be seen. A wonderful picnic
lunch and dedication marked the completion
of this project.
We next turned our attention to two other
new areas - Petersburg and Portsmouth. We
were particularly pleased to be working in
parts of our state where we had not previously
worked. This gave The GCV an opportunity
to show its appreciation to the clubs in those
areas. Each project presented an entirely new
situation with a distinctive interest of its own.
Centre Hill in Petersburg is a fine 19thcentury house, home of the Bolling family,
which has played a large part in many phases
of Petersburg history and now is part of an
urban area being maintained by the city. It is
the home of the Victorian Society in Virginia,
has been beautifully restored and is used as a
community center for cultural events. A
simple planting appropriate to the house and
an improvement to the Adams Street entrance
were carried out here.
The Greek Revival Courthouse at Portsmouth was built in 1846 and is a very important feature of restoration work in the core of
this city, where it serves as a cultural and community center. At our Annual Meeting in May
1979 slides were shown of the proposed renewal and planting of the courtyard of this

building, and this project was approved. Work


was delayed because the building was still being worked on, but it promised to be a valuable addition to the work being done there.
From its beginning The Garden Club of
Virginia had been concerned with conservation and beautification. All over our country
at this time particular attention was being focused on conservation issues. The GCV constantly tried to evaluate what its role should
be in this. In October 1978 the presidents of
member clubs were asked to make this the
subject of their reports. Nationally and internationally, conservation, energy, and the sharing of the world's resources had become vital
issues. Saving endangered species and preserving the beauty of our country were in constant conflict with the necessity for development. Through the Conservation Committee, members tried to keep informed and to
speak effectively and moderately. Since The
GCV early days, members have been concerned with our highways and have attacked
the billboard problem. In 1965 the Federal
Highway Act, subsequently known as the
"Lady Bird Act" because of support from Mrs.
Lyndon Johnson, was passed. Improvements
were seen in the scenic beauty along our roads,
but the outdoor advertisers never give up and
soon began lobbying in Congress to whittle
away the effectiveness of this act, so that it
became virtually useless. During this time The
GCV had a representative on the Governor's
Committee on Outdoor Advertising and thus
expressed the views of those who were opposed
to commercialization of our roadsides.
As an answer to a request from many
members who felt that conservation should be
emphasized more in The GCV, the Conservation Chairman was put back on the Board
of Directors, the Committee was enlarged and
a system of rotation of members was instituted.
The Committee concentrated on several issues before the Legislature, instead of scattering its fire too broadly and kept the membership informed on legislation through the
club conservation chairmen and also through
The GCV Annual Conservation Forum. A
one-day workshop for the public was held at
the Kent-Valentine House with Virginia's Riv29

Follow the Green Arrow


ers and Coastline as its subject. A study of
environmental education in the public schools
was undertaken. Another way in which the
Conservation Committee investigated opportunities for environmental education was
through visits to and a study of the Virginia
Coast Reserve and its work with the Nature
Conservancy at Brownsville near Nassawadox.
It was felt that its potentialities should be explored further. During these years awards
were made to the Dan River Mills for its fine
work in conservation and to the Reynolds
Metal Company for its preservation and conservation work.
Because of interest in conservation shown
by many members, a brand-new activity came
into being in The Garden Club of Virginia at
this time. Immediately before this term the
Conservation Chairman had come to the
Board of Directors with a request that we show
a more concrete interest in conservation causes
by regularly using part of the funds raised by
Historic Garden Week to support such work,
rather than have all these funds go to restoration work. This had been carefully considered and turned down for a number of sound
reasons, but out of this grew an ad hoc committee to study how we could sponsor other
projects in a more concrete way. After much
discussion and thought, the Common Wealth
Fund was born. This was a fund which we
had to raise, the interest from which would be
awarded annually to a project sponsored by a
club or committee in the fields of beautification, conservation, education, horticulture, or
preservation, the winner to be decided by a
vote from each club. In this way, The GCV
would be encouraging local projects and giving some financial help to clubs that had
worked so long and hard to make Garden
Week a success. The fund was started by an
appropriation of $20,000 from the Restoration Committee. The inspiration had been
the Founder's Fund of The Garden Club of
America, and, to our delight, the fund was further augmented by a contribution of $2500
from the Visiting Gardens Committee of that
organization which we had entertained the
previous spring.
The first award of $1500 would be given

at the Board of Governors' Meeting in the fall


of 1980. Another happy connection yielded
$10,000 more for the fund. The late Ann
Cocke Cole had been a valuable member of
The Blue Ridge Garden Club and the first
recipient of The GCV Massie Medal for her
Memorial Garden at VMI. At her death she
provided that the Windsor Foundation be set
up to contribute to worthwhile causes. When
we explained the Common Wealth Award to
this foundation, it made this fine contribution
in her name and, I am honored to say, in mine.
During the first summer that this fund was
set up many applications describing fine
projects were received from clubs.
Other activities (almost too varied to enumerate) occurred during these years. The
Inter-Club Speakers Bureau Booklet was revised, The Journal continued its interesting
publication, horticulture programs were a
source of new ideas at all our meetings, guidelines for Horticulture Certificates of Merit
were set down, a grant was given to VP! for
the study of boxwood, our slide collection was
sorted and improved, records were put in order for a future history, programs were held
for junior members, Follow the Green Arrow
and Historic Virginia Gardens were almost sold
out, and we saw to it that our activities were
given good coverage in the press.
Many meetings were held at our headquarters, the Kent-Valentine House, which
continued to grow more attractive and to acquire more lovely things through gifts from
friends. The lower floor was done over and
added valuable meeting space. It became a
true home to all of us. No account of these
years would be complete without saying that
our dear friend] ack Gregory, who worked for
us there, always made us welcome and happy
to be a part of it. His inimitable way of blessing us before each meal there will never be
forgotten.
In the spring of 1980 near the close of my
term of office, The Garden Club of Norfolk
was hostess to the Garden Club of America
and its president asked me to welcome the
group. I told them that I did not think I was
immodest when I said that what I thought it
was to the nation we were to Virginia and that
30

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


enormous opportunity, for she is largely the
person who will determine for her term
whether being in her club is meaningful. We
must adapt to today's world. As I have said before, perhaps Darwin's finches should be our
symbol. We must constantly evolve and develop. We must show young people particularly that interesting, important issues are part
of the garden club member's quest for a better
quality of life. This quest which we follow together can include as many vital issues as we
choose, and we have the wonderful advantage of
following it in the most enjoyable company
possible - the members of The Garden Club of
Vrrginia."
Editor's Note: Mrs. Murrell was awarded
the Massie Medal posthumously in 1984.
THE GARDEN CLUB
OF VIRGINIA 1980s

Jack Gregory
Though the winds of change have
whistled tlrrough The Garden Club of Virginia, it believes, like Josiah Bunting, former
president of Hampden-Sydney College, "You
don't mess with a successful product." The
Garden Club is carrying the same load, only
the train is going a little faster in the 1980s.
For reasons of economy, a supplement to
the Register was published for 1979-1980.
During the 1980s, The Garden Club of
Virginia was the recipient of more than 12
awards from preservation, historic, community, state and tourist organizations for its contribution to the preservation of the history and
beauty of Virginia. Among these commendations were The Garden Club of America's
Medal for Historic Preservation, The Southeast Tourist Society Award to Historic Garden Week as one of the Top Twenty Events in
the Southeast, The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities' Historic Preservation Award for its preservation of the 17th
century garden at Bacon's Castle, Commonwealth of Virginia Certificate in Recognition
and Appreciation of Volunteer Services to Virginia, Award from Richmond on the Jam es by
the Commonwealth of Virginia Award Committee, Certificate from Mayor of Portsmouth
for Courthouse Landscape.

we shared many of the same concerns and interests.


Let me close this account with a quote
from my report when my term ended at the
Annual Meeting in Fairfax in May 1980:
"When I began traveling tlrrough Vrrginia to
visit clubs, I wondered ifl had any real message
to give them. I could say pleasant things and
they would be sincere, because the people and
the circumstances were pleasant, but it seemed
to me people want more than pleasantries
when they give their time today. I began to
search my mind as to what being a garden club
member means in our changing world, and I
continually came up with the conclusion that it
can mean what you want itto, because it is concerned with the quality of life, and that is so allinclusive, it need never be dull or meaningless.
Every time I made a talk before a club it had to
be revised, changed somewhat because external events were in such a state of flux - the energy situation, tax hearings, bills before the
General Assembly or Congress, the gas situation as it might affect Garden Week or holding
meetings, the economic picture. I soon decided that our concerns are serious and that we
are in a unique position to make our opinions
felt. Here is where each club president has an
31

Follow the Green Arrow


tine House.
Three thousand copies of Historic Virginia
Gardens were reprinted by the Restoration
Committee and the University Press in 1986.
Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr. was elected
Honorary President of The Garden Club of
Virginia in 1987. Mrs. Richard B. Williams
resigned as Secretary of Historic Garden
Week and Mrs. William W. Flowers was hired
as Secretary.
The Kent-Valentine House property was
proclaimed a Historic Area by the Architectural Review Board.
Sally Stetson retired after 27 years as Editor of The Garden Club of Virginia JOURNAL in 1988. Mrs. Lewis F. Jolly became
EditorofTheJOURNAL and the UPDATE,
which were combined under one umbrella.
The Garden Club of Virginia promoted
the Constitution Oak project in conjunction
with the Department of Forestry and supported the/Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act
with the General Assembly.
Mrs. Kellam announced the bequest of
the remainder of the Catesby prints by Robert H. Talley,Jr. who died March 10, 1987.
Two computers were purchased for the
Historic Garden Week office in 1989, and the
postal service was being contacted in regard
to a lower postage rate for Historic Garden
Week.
A magnificent diamond brooch was given
to The Garden Club of Virginia by Mrs.
Clayton B. Ethridge, of The Garden Club of
Fairfax, to be worn by the club member during her term as President.

Miss Jean Printz, Mrs. D.H. Patteson-Knight and


Mrs. Murrell, 1980 Annual Meeting.
Robert H. Talley, Jr. and William G.
Pannill were elected Honorary Members of
The Garden Club of Virgina.
Lawrence (''Jack") Gregory, beloved caretaker of the Kent-Valentine House, died in
August 1980.
The Garden Club of Virginia Award for
Meritorious Achievement in Conservation was
awarded to The Virginia Department of Highways and Transportation.
The Garden Club of Virginia passed a
resolution that all Garden Club of Virginia
judges must pass a Garden Club of Virginia
Artistic Judging School every five years.
In 1983 the Members' Handbook was
printed, the Inter-Club Speakers Bureau
Booklet was revised, a brochure printed with
the history of Kent-Valentine House, and
Kent-Valentine property was proclaimed an
Historic Area by the Architectural Review
Board of Richmond.
The Garden Club of Virginia sponsored
the visit to Virginia of 22 members of the
Worshipful Company of Gardeners of London. The Freedom of the Company was conferred on Jean Printz, GCV President.
In 1984 the basement of the Kent-Valentine House was water-proofed for a dry and
useful meeting space and a mildew proof storage space for Historic Garden Week and Garden Club of Virginia records. A sprinkler was
installed on the grounds of the Kent-Valen-

MISS JEAN PRINTZ


President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1980-1982
At the Annual Meeting held in Fairfax
May 1980, in her remarks upon accepting the
gavel as the 31st President ofThe Garden Club
of Virginia, Miss Printz stated-''This administration will give special emphasis to the precepts set forth by our founders. The Garden
Club of Virginia is a unique organization and
this group has a rare privilege of service .... to
32

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


complete projects begun, to strengthen committees, and never to be
satisfied with less than
the best. We have a responsibility to carry on
the fine work of the previous administrations
and to guard and nurture
the solid values bequeathed to us. Our horizons are ever broadening with the changing
times and we must meet
present and future challenges with knowledge
and vision; expanding
the work through our
committees and fostering a new generation of
leadership building
around their strength."
Following Jane
Murrell (Mrs. Thomas
W. Murrell,Jr.) as President of The Garden
Club of Virginia pre- :.;;~.'
sented a formidable task.
.
.
In addition to being an
avid gardener, ] ane had
been active in the affairs
of The Garden Club of
Virginia for many years
- Chairman of Historic
Garden Week, Chairman of the Restoration
Committee, Vice President and President, all
positions demanding re118082'
sponsibility and having
the element of chal- Miss Jean Printz and "The Hloomin' Board"
lenge.
An innovation came during Jane's presiconservation, horticulture, preservation, and
dency when she, in her special way, convinced
education in the state of Virginia. Her term
the members of The Garden Club of Virginia
was marked by her conviction that The Garof the importance of establishing a Common
den Club of Virginia is and should continue
Wealth Fund to enable The Garden Club of
to be a moving force, not only in preserving
Virginia to make an annual financial award to
gardens of the past, but also in stimulating the
a member club or Committee of The Garden
creation of new areas of beauty in Virginia.
The Garden Club ofVrrginia has benefitClub ofVrrginia for projects of beautification,

.. :. " a
~

33

Follow the Green Arrow

wife of VMI's Superintendent and winner of the first Massie Medal for the
Memorial Garden at VMI. The Common Wealth Fund was also the recipient of $10,000 as a grant from The GCV
Restoration Committee, augmenting its
previous grant of $20,000.
The Restoration Committee Chairman reported that the work on various
projects was going apace and new sites
were being considered. Work on the
plans for the delineation of Lady Jean
Skipwith's garden at Prestwould would
Mrs. Hunter H. McGuire, Jr. and Mrs. Benjamin w. begin September first. The summer
Mears, Jr., 1980 Board of Governors' Meeting.
house at Prestwould had been completed and plans for the display of a
model garden to be housed there had been
ted from the special talents of this gracious
initiated.
and able lady.
Another successful Historic Garden Week
The Board of Directors met at
Tour was held in April, and plans for the 1981
Farmington Country Club in Charlottesville
Tour were under way. The hard work of local
July 26, 1980, and were guests of Dr. and Mrs.
chairmen was noted and thanks extended.
Murrell for dinner and guests of Mr. and Mrs.
The Board responded enthusiastically to
Charles K. Woltz for brunch on Sunday.
The President announced that she
the request for The GCV co-sponsorship in a
planned to prepare a notebook containing
symposium on historic gardens to be held at
guidelines for each Officer and each CommitKenmore.
The papers of Mr. Charles F. Gillette, a
tee Chairman as well as a calendar of activiwell-known landscape architect who assisted
ties. A copy of this notebook would be given
The GCV with restoration projects, were
to the new President at the end of this term.
It was also hoped that the notebook would be
given to the Fiske-Kimball Fine Arts Library
updated annually and passed along.
at the University of Virginia to be preserved
The Lily Show inJune sponsored by the
for future researchers.
Sponsored by The Blue Ridge Garden
Leesburg Garden Club was outstanding and
Club, the Board of Governors' Meeting was
much appreciated by those attending.
The Common Wealth Award Commitheld in Lexington October 14, 15, 16, 1980.
At the Board of Directors' Meeting precedtee announced plans to present four finalists
ing the full meeting, several recommendations
for the first award, the winner to be decided
regarding membership in conservation groups
by the presidents of the member clubs at the
were discussed and decisions reached. A moBoard of Governors' Meeting in October.
tion to endorse the National Coalition to PreThis Committee, which started as an ad hoc
serve Scenic Beauty carried. The Historian
committee during Mrs. Toy Savage, Jr.'s
requested a condensed version of member
(Hunter) term, was continued by Mrs. Murrell
and became a standing committee in 1979,
clubs' histories for the period 1970-1980 to
be placed in each club's file at the Kent-Valwith Mrs. Frederic W. Scott (Elizabeth) as its
entine House along with subsequent annual
first Chairman. Mrs. Scott agreed to continue
histories. This material would be a valuable
in this capacity. It was noted that a contriburesource when the next history is written.
tion of$10,000 to the Common Wealth Fund
The death of Jack Gregory, friend and
had been made by the Wmdsor Foundation,
employee of The GCV, was reported with reInc., of Richmond, given in memory of Mrs.
gret. Jack was truly an "Institution" at the
Anne Owen Cole, who as Mrs. Cocke, was the
34

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents

At the Annual Meeting Mrs. John M. Stetson received the Massie Medal from Mrs. Ben B. Pickett, and
Mrs. William R. Miller received the deLacy Gray Medal from Mrs. James C. Godwin.
Kent-Valentine House and his blessings pronounced at meetings were special and long
remembered.
The Finance Committee recommended
some increases in allowances for Committee
Chairmen because of ever-rising prices.
In an effort to include the Junior and Auxiliary members in GCV activities, a flower
show preview was conducted by Mrs. J . H.
Cunningham (Mary) of the Fauquier and
Loudoun Garden Club, and it was announced
that the Conservation Forum would be open
to them in January.
At this meeting, Mrs. John M. Stetson
(Sally), JOURNAL Editor, reported on the
occasion ofTheJOURNAL's twenty-fifth anniversary. The JOURNAL was founded during the presidency of Mrs. Thomas E. Thorne
(Lelia). Following Mrs. Stetson's delightful
report, the President made a surprise gift to
her-a quill pen set fashioned by Lewis Glaser
of Charlottesville, appropriately engraved.
Members continue to present gifts for the
enhancement of the Kent-Valentine house
furnishings. The most recent gifts were two
handsome pillows designed after the pattern
of an antique Imari plate. These were given

by The Petersburg Garden Club, the needlepoint having been done by Mrs. Edward Williams (Judy) and Mrs. Berkeley Carrington
Bidgood (Happy) of the Gabriella Garden
Club. An attractive hand-made wastebasket
made by Mrs.James C. Spangler (Jane) of the
Gabriella Garden Club was another gift.
The current projects of the Restoration
Committee-the interpretation of the garden
at Prestwould and the historic Portsmouth
Courthouse-were going apace. The Chairman noted that members of the Committee
periodically visit past and current sites of restorations and encouraged members to visit
also, saying that they would find a well-deserved reward for their labor and love for Historic Garden Week Tours in Virginia.
The Rose Show sponsored by The Garden Club of Alexandria was beautifully staged
and was appreciated by those attending. The
work of the individual clubs in presenting these
annual shows was acknowledged with much
gratitude.
The annual banquet was held at VMI,
with the Washington and Lee Choral Group
serenading guests throughout the evening.
The Harvest Buffet at VMI's Marshall Library
35

Follow the Green Arrow

Mrs. Hugh H. Chatham (Anne Stanley), Governor and Mrs. John N. Dalton and Miss Printz at the
Governor's Mansion.
his 18th-century Catesby prints to The GCV
for display in the Kent-Valentine House. A
special meeting was held in Danville with ten
representatives of the Junior, Provisional and
Auxiliary groups for the purpose ofhaving the
group know who and where other juniors were
as well as the organization and projects of others.
The work of Charlotte Massie (Mrs. J.
Robert Massie, Jr.) with publicity for Historic
Garden Week was praised by the HGW
Chairman. In addition to the acceptance of
articles for a number of magazines, information was sent to 670 newspapers. A formi dable task!
The Conservation Committee continued
its activities in many areas of the environment.
The Committee supported the protection of
the non-vegetated wetlands of the coast and
of the productive farmlands of the state and
hoped to facilitate communication in all aspects of environmental education among
members and to promote environmental education through the schools and public at large.
A revised version of the Handbook for
Annual and Board of Governors' Meetings was
authorized.

and the elegant luncheons added to the enjoyment of the occasion. The first Common
Wealth Award was made to The Blue Ridge
Garden Club for landscaping the entrance to
the C&O walking trail.
The Conservation Committee was off and
running with its many projects and concerns,
including litter control, the formation of Nature Camps, shoreline erosion and the loss of
farmland to development. The theme for the
January 1981 Forum was announced-''The
Atlantic's Last Frontier."
An item of historical interest was announced: "At the Meeting of the Board of
Governors held in Fredericksburg October 27,
192 5, the name of the Federation, which we
were originally called, was changed from
"Clubs" to The Garden Club of Virginia signifying the unity and harmony existing among
the member clubs."
The Winter Meeting of the Board of
Directors was held January 15, 1981, at the
Kent-Valentine H ouse in Richmond.
On recommendation of the Admissions
Committee, Mr. Robert H. Talley, Jr. was
elected to Honorary Membership in The
GCV. Mr. Talley had presented a number of
36

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


Meetings' Chairman announced that work had
begun on the revision of the Handbook and
requested suggestions or thoughts from the
members.
The speaker at this meeting was Parke
Rouse, journalist and writer of note recently
retired from Jamestown who is now working
with the Yorktown Bicentennial. Mr. Rouse
centered his remarks on some of the early
English botanists/horticulturists who collected
flora and fauna from Virginia and the New
World, primarily plants not found in England.
He cited the work of John Tradescant, English gardener to Charles I, and the Tradescant
family whose collection is now in the
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Mr. Rouse cited
the contributions made by The GCV to the
Tradescant Trust at the Museum and concluded with the words, " ... the good works
started by the Tradescants are very much alive

The death of Mrs. Powell Glass (Anne),


The GCV President from 1942-1944 was reported with regret.
The Board of Directors met in Newport
News May 19, 1981, before the opening of
the Annual Meeting. The loss of three valuable members was noted: Mrs. Robert Jeffress
of Richmond; Mrs.Joseph Mercer of Orange;
and as reported at the Winter Board Meeting, Mrs. Glass.
Two new perpetual awards for the Daffodil Shows were accepted: the Louise Morris
Goodwin Bowl, given by the Roanoke Valley
Garden Club, and the Jennette H. Rustin Trophy given by Mrs. Howard B. Bloomer, Jr.
Sixteen of The GCV's 26 restorations
were visited during the year. The Restoration Committee reported co-sponsoring a
scholarship paper on the Kenmore Gardens.
The GCV was the recipient of the Forest
Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture 75th
Anniversary Award and a Certificate of Appreciation from the Historic Richmond Foundation "in grateful recognition of outstanding contributions to the preservation of the
architecture and heritage of the City of Richmond."
The 61st Annual Meeting of The GCV
was held in Newport News May 19, 20, 21,
1981, sponsored by the Hampton Roads Garden Club.
The Horticulture Field Day on wildflowers was held in Roanoke with a visit to the Mill
Mountain Wildflower Garden with many participants. The next Field Day would be held
at River Farm, headquarters of The American Horticultural Society in Alexandria.
The Restoration Committee's two new
projects-Smithfield in Blacksburg and Kerr
Place on the Eastern Shore-were accepted
by the membership.
The Conservation Committee continued
to be a force in the study of the environment
and promotion of increased knowledge of
natural resources, especially water.
It was announced that the dedication ceremony of the garden at Prestwould would take
place September 27 with the annual picnic of
the Foundation to follow.
The Annual and Board of Governors

The Conservation Committee logo.


in Virginia and throughout the world today."
The many plans made by the Hampton
Roads Garden Club for our comfort and pleasure during the Meeting were properly acknowledged and appreciation expressed.
The Board of Directors met at Chatmoss
Country Club in Martinsville July 25, 1981,
as guests of Mrs.James B. Montgomery (Dot)
and Mrs. Edward H. Ould (Betty Barr).
The Warrenton Garden Club held a most
successful and beautiful Lily Show in June.
The Chairman reported that the Restoration Committee had agreed to place a plaque
37

Follow the Green Arrow


15, 1981.
As had been the practice for many years,
the Treasurer once again explained constitutional membership to the club presidents.
This is the basis for dues paid by member clubs
and seems never to be fully understood.
The Rose Show held in October at the
Science Museum in Richmond, sponsored by
The James River Garden Club and the Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton, was expertly staged and was an outstanding event.
By popular request, the annual Artistic
Judging School would be resumed next Spring.
The Flower Shows Chairman praised the work
of the three Test Chairmen as well as the splendid cooperation received from the national
societies.
The Historian again reminded club presidents that their club histories are needed.
These will be placed in individual boxes in the
Kent-Valentine House for the use of future
historians or those who would write the sequel to Follow the Green Arrow.
Gross returns for the 1981 Historic Garden Week Tour were $220,265.07 and in the
words of the HGW Chairman, " ... it is easy
to see what an important part each has played
in HGW, making it the brightest jewel in the
crown of tourism in Virginia."
A new sketch of the history of the KentValentine House was prepared this year and
was printed in bulk for distribution to visitors.
The brochure was the gift of the President.
At a ceremony held on September 2 7,
1981, the interpretive garden of Lady Jean
Skipwith at Prestwould was presented to the
Prestwould Foundation.
Members of the Restoration Committee
participated in a ceremony October 28th at
the Governor's Mansion when Mrs. Dalton
presented the newly-planted North Garden
in memory of Anne Bassett Stanley.
Mrs. Richard D. McComas, Administrative Officer at the Smithsonian Institution's
Conservation and Research Center in Front
Royal, was the speaker at this meeting. She
showed an interesting film on the center's work
with special emphasis on the research being
conducted there on animals of endangered
species.

in the North Garden of the Governor's Mansion in Richmond, as requested by Mrs.


Dalton, in memory of Anne Bassett Stanley.
The plaque will read: "In recognition of her
contributions to the Commonwealth of Virginia this garden is dedicated in memory of
Anne Bassett Stanley, First Lady of Virginia,
1954-1958. Plans given by The Garden Club
of Virginia - 1981."
The first GCV Nature Camp was held
August 17-21 at Brownsville on the Eastern
Shore under the guidance of The Garden Club
of the Eastern Shore.
The GCV lost two special friends-Mr.
Ralph E. Griswold, landscape architect for
GCV projects during the 1960s and early
1970s, and an Honorary Member of The
GCV; and Mrs. W. Allen Perkins, 8th President of The GCV:
A letter of thanks was received from the
Tradescant Trust for the copy of Historic Virginia Gardens by Dorothy Hunt Williams,
which had been placed in the library at the
Ashmolean Museum in England.
Fallowing a comprehensive report on the
Marline Corporation's uranium exploration in
Virginia, members were encouraged to use
their influence to have this incompatible industry banned from the Commonwealth.
The Garden Club of Warren County was
hostess club for the 62nd Board of Governors'
Meeting in Front Royal on October 13, 14,
38

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


and Adelia Matthews (Mrs. Irving L.
Matthews), former Editor and Director of
Publicity for Historic Garden Week, were reported with great sadness.
The Board of Directors met before the
Annual Meeting in Virginia Beach May 18,
1982. There were positive reports from the
Chairmen present and from the liaison members for Committees not represented on the
Board. The HGW chairman reported a gross
figure of $236,990.47 for 1982. The figure
improves each year!!!
At this meeting the registration fees for
the Annual and Board of Governors' Meetings were raised to $30.00 and $25.00 respectively.
The 62nd Annual Meeting of The GCV
was held in Virginia Beach May 18, 19, 20,
1982.
The Annual and Board of Governors'
Meetings Committee was thanked for the revised Handbook which is a streamlined outline for future Meetings, adapted to today's
world.
The first two awards by the Common
Wealth Award Committee were won by The
Blue Ridge Garden Club for the C&O Walking Trail entrance in Lexington and The Princess Anne Garden Club for its project, Educating Youth for Environmental Service
(EYES) in Virginia Beach. The third award
would be $5 ,000 - twice as large as the first
one two years ago.
The Conservation Committee continued
its policing of many areas of concern, and the
members were thankful for their dedication
to the many facets of this Committee's work.
A resolution in support of the reauthorization
of a strong Clean Air Act as outlined by the
National Clean Air Coalition and its Virginia
Chapter was adopted by the General Assembly. A logo designed by Rosalie Bell and Kate
Schultz was accepted and will be used on envelopes to accent our interest in conservation.
The long-planned visit of the Worshipful Company of Gardeners of London became
a reality when for one week in April we entertained twenty-two members of the Company.
This was a most pleasant and interesting experience. At a dinner held in the Common-

The oft-postponed Winter Board Meeting was finally held in Richmond the 30th of
March, 1982 . The severe weather in January
caused the cancellation of many scheduled
meetings.
The President reported the highlights of
the fall and winter events including the dedication of the Anne Bassett Stanley Garden,
followed by luncheon with Governor and Mrs.
Dalton; the Common Wealth Meeting; an
excellent conservation Forum the next day
which was well attended; a day spent with
members of the Conservation Committee at
the State Legislature; and the Artistic Judging School.
In discussing the activities of the JOURNAL Editor and Assistant Editor, it was suggested that the member clubs' JOURNAL
chairmen be invited once every two years to
attend one of the JOURNAL Committee
meetings in Richmond. It was agreed that this
idea should be implemented beginning the
next September.
The Horticulture Field Day, held at River
Farm with Dr. Marc Cathey, Director of the
National Arboretum as speaker, was most enjoyable and informative.
Lead articles to 670 newspapers
throughout the country were sent out in December. Special articles had been submitted
to magazines and newspapers. "Springtime
in Virginia" supplements were distributed in
the Sunday Times-Dispatch on April 18th and
articles would appear in COUNTRY LIFE,
THE VIRGINIA RECORD, ANTIQUE
MONTHLY, COLONIAL HOMES and others, as well as travel magazines. Gratitude
was expressed to Charlotte Massie and Virginia Williams (Mrs. Richard B. Williams)
for all of their hard work for Historic Garden Week.
Since the Auditor's report is no longer
being printed in the minutes, it was the decision of the Board to have the Treasurer give a
more detailed report at the Board of Governors' Meeting and the Annual Meeting. The
brevity of the summary apparently caused
some concern among members.
The deaths of Rosalie Bell (Mrs. Stewart
Bell, Jr.), an outstanding member of The GCv,
39

Follow the Green Arrow

MRS. JAMES B.
MONTGOMERY
President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1982-1984
Both my big feet are inadequate to fill even one of] ean
Printz's li'l bitty spike-heel
shoes!
That was my first thought
when I was asked, in the waning days of 1981, to be President of The Garden Club of
Virginia, 1982-1984. But the
best part about following Jean
was that I would have Jean as
mentor, back-up, and good
right arm, jobs she filled for me with as much
finesse as she fills all others. Jean not only
knows all there is to know about The Garden
Club of Virginia, but she has an instinct born
of years of involvement with every facet of The
Club's work. She is a financial wizard, has an

Mrs. James B. Montgomery.

wealth Club, the Freedom of the Company


was conferred on the President of The Garden Club of Virginia. An exquisitely etched
crystal bowl honoring The Garden Club of
Virginia was presented. The bowl is in the
Kent-Valentine House and several articles,
written by Teen Martin (Mrs.
James B. Martin), giving details
of the visit, have appeared in The
JOURNAL.
In the President's closing remarks,
Miss
Printz
complimented the Officers,
Chairmen, and members with
whom she worked and thanked
them for their dedication. She
then said, "Travelling throughout the state visiting member
clubs has been a rewarding experience-although not without
incident. Eating lunch on the
street in Norfolk following a
bomb threat at the Chrysler Mu- M-rs. Hugh L. Patte-rson, M-rs. Edward H. Quid III, Mn Frederic
seum while a guest of the five W. Scott, Mrs. Montgomery, Mrs. William H. Parker and M-rs.
area clubs, a slashed tire that self- James C. Godwin.
destructed just 14 miles from
Charlottesville, and microphones (that lli pluinsight that predicts, usually accurately, the
ral) which mysteriously went dead as the pooutcome of any initiative and she knows where
the bodies are buried! I counted upon her not
dia were approached, were a few of some
to let me go too far astray.
rather strange happenings."
Editor's Note: Miss Printz was awarded
So with Mighty Mouse at my side, I waded
the Massie Medal in 1991.
10.
40

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


Immediately after taking office, I was
felled by a rampant case of salmonella. Writhing on my bed I wondered how, if I lived at
all-it seemed unlikely-I would ever make it
to Warrenton for the Lily Show, my first obligation. But fresh out of the hospital and as
pale as any lily in the room, I was there to
hand out the awards. I hoped this was not a
harbinger of things to come.
When I first became a member of a Garden Club ofVirginia club, way back in the dark
ages, I found it an arcane world. There was
something called Historic Garden Week (what
in the world was that?) and something called
the Massie Medal and something else called
the deLacy Gray Medal. There were the "The
Restorations." There was "the Legislative arm
of the Conservation Committee." (You just
had to know that.one was a biggie!) And much
more. Good manners, we Juniors felt, rather
dictated that we be seen and not heard; questions, especially stupid ones, would not be
welcomed. So we kept quiet, sat in the meetings trying to look knowing, and after awhile
a sort of scanty knowledge began to seep in
by osmosis. But far too much time had been
wasted waiting for ignorance to blossom into
enlightenment.
With this experience under my belt, I had
thought for years that it was rather a lack that
new members had no reference book to which
they could turn for answers to these mysteries. Why not a Handbook, containing not only
the official rules, but also the little nuances
and subtle unwritten do's and don'ts that have
evolved over the years and are so much a part
of us.
The idea of such a publication was put
before the Board early in my term and was
met with a stony silence. "Why do we need
it?", asked a few so steeped in knowledge of
The GCV they had forgotten what it was like
not to know. But then voices of support began to be heard. "Why haven't we thought of
this before?", asked one. I think it's a splendid idea," said another. "How will we finance
it?", asked another thoughtful one, raising a
very good question. It was decided the thing
was worth pursuing.
Mrs. William H . Parker (Peyton), Second

Mrs. Hugh L. Patterson, Mrs. William L.


Gilliam, Jr. and Mrs. Montgomery.
Vice President, and a member of Danville's
Gabriella Garden Club, was asked to take on
this formidable task, for which there was no
precedent to guide her. If she ever felt cowed
at any time, she hid it well. She thought it all
through, established priorities, gathered her
team, consulted with me regularly and worked
out a tentative financial plan with the "Money
Mavens." In short, she took the ball and ran
with it and before you could say Handbook,
we had an exquisite and informative one with
its cover a melange of scenes of the Kent-Valentine House and grounds. We were gratified at its reception by the clubs. As you read
this, it will have just undergone its first revision and reprinting. The GCV owes Mrs.
Parker a great debt for a job beautifully executed.
For many years, The Garden of Virginia
Journal had filled the need for which it was
established - gardening, articles, information
about the club's work, book reviews, lists of
gifts, notifications of deaths and much much
more. But as time went on, it was becoming
obvious that something else was needed. The
JOURNAL was published six times a year, an
elegant and expensive magazine, growing
more expensive all the time. Why not a less
costly, less formal, more informative "flyer"
41

Follow the Green Arrow


exquisite flower arrangements; some were less
elaborate, but just as lovely, with only one or
two clubs, often held at our impressive KentValentine House, where Mary Frances Flowers (Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr.) made us all
feel very special. And there were the small
meetings in someone's cozy living room with
a big fire going and a glass of wine before
lunch, just talking. Perhaps 20 of us just getting to know each other. It's hard to say which
of these types of gatherings were my favorites. When I relive those joyous days, my heart
returns to them all with smiles and great affection.
However, not all the days were golden.
"Into each term, some rain .... " For during my
two years, we lost four of our treasured Past
Presidents. It was a blow that left a permanent gap in our ranks. Mrs. Burdette S.
Wright (Elizabeth), Mrs.WW S. Butler (Sarah), Mrs. Thomas W Murrell, Jr. (Jane), and
Mrs. James Bland Martin (Teen). Of these
four, the latter three died between one Meeting and the next! Oh, help!
After the shock and grief, the next most
immediate concern was how to handle the
eulogies at the upcoming Meeting. Each of
these Presidents deserved to be remembered
individually, deserved a separate time in which
to recall her enormous contribution. But three
eulogies all in a row at the same meeting?
Whew! I dunno ....
Enter the 'Delta Force'-the remaining
Past Presidents. They all agreed: If these
Departed Ones could be given voice they
would say collectively, "Don't you dare! Good
Heavens, it will ruin the Meeting."
"Leave it to us," said the Past Presidents,
and oh! how gratefully I passed into their capable hands this delicate matter. The Past
President who had been closest to each of the
deceased composed a eulogy, then they put
them all together into one glowing tribute,
presented at the next Meeting. Timid about
possible slights or seeming slights, I was vastly
relieved that this one beautiful articulated accolade, encompassing all four, seemed actually more effective than a separate one for each.
And I don't believe any but the Past Presidents
would have been adroit enough to carry it off!

Mrs. Montgomery with Mrs. John M. Stetson and


Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.
type publication, to be interspersed between
fewer issues of the JOURNAL? The idea was
tossed around in Board meetings for many
months during which I was increasingly impressed with the active minds and innovative
ideas of my Board. There has never been such
a group. What detail one didn't think of, another did. And in the end, voihi! The Garden
Club of Virginia UPDATE. It was exciting
to be in on the advent of a new GCV creation,
one that now, thirteen years later, still seems
to be filling a definite need.
The days flew by. There were committee meetings, most of which I had never darkened the door of before. As President, I was
expected to attend all of them, except Nominations, whether they wanted me or not!
Those meetings were learning experiences. I
always left with renewed awe at the talent that
was encompassed under the banner of The
Garden Club of Virginia and at how quietly
and effectively each member played her role.
And there were visits to The GCV clubs
- in my opinion the most important function
the President fulfills. I was invited to speak to
42 of the 45. Each of these meetings was
unique, as individual and attractive as the
clubs. Some included two or three large clubs,
held in lavish locations with gourmet food and
42

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


It was not the first nor the last occasion I had to be in debt to the "Front
Line."
During my term, the Conservation and Beautification Committee
won the Common Wealth Award. It
was the first time ever that the award
had been won by a Committee instead
of a club or individual, and it was an
exciting time for this group and its
imaginative Chairman, Mrs. Edward
L. Dashiell (Charlotte) of The Vir- Mrs. Montgomery, Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr. and Mrs.
ginia Beach Garden Club. She and Benjamin W. Mears, Jr. with Mr. Rudy]. Favretti, The GCV
her Committee conceived the idea of Landscape Architect, at the Kent-T'ltlentine House.
planting greenery and flowering
plants around the "Welcome to Virginia" signs
In my two years, there were two successful Historic Garden Weeks, four exquisite
across the state. The GCV had always enjoyed a most cooperative association with the
GCV Meetings, eight challenging Board
Virginia Department of Highways and Transmeetings, six breathtaking Flower Shows, two
portation, so Mrs. Dashiell asked if it would
stimulating Conservation Forums, two proud
undertake the planting and maintenance, if
Restoration presentations - and red-letter
The GCV provided the plant material. The
days too many to mention. On each of these
Department quickly agreed and drew up atoccasions I was made to feel like "Queen for a
tractive plans for various locations, advised us
Day." The weeks were full: often I would
on which plants would best withstand the asleave home at daybreak on Monday and resault of automobile traffic and found special
turn after dark on Friday night. I travelled
prices on the plants. With this valuable help,
through sunrise and sunset, rain and shine,
we were able to plant thirteen entrances to the
sometimes in exhilaration, sometimes in frusstate. It was an endeavor that encompassed
tration, with a goal in mind, or a problem. But
both conservation and beautification - the
always, I was sure with the goodwill of the
charge of this committee.
membership, even when some were not in
There was, I believe, another 'first' durcomplete accord with me and my Board. It
ing my term: the awarding of the Massie
was an enviable position.
Medal posthumously. At my final meeting in
The Presidency of The Garden Club of
Danville, Jane Murrell's daughter Page
Virginia is a unique experience. There are
Murrell Woltz was present to receive the
legions in this organization who are capable
award for her mother. In the decision to honor
of doing the job. The choosing of one is not a
Jane, the Massie Medal Committee took into
task for the faint-hearted. No President, I
account] ane's own straight-forward and amusthink, comes into the office with the universal
ing remark of years previous: "Good Heavapproval of the membership. There is always
ens, the Past Presidents just can't sit around
another whom some would have preferred.
giving the Medal to each other!" Jane's enorBut once the choice is made, everyone's shoulmous contribution to the advancement ofThe
der is laid to the wheel to smooth the
Garden Club of Virginia could not be ignored,
President's path and further the work of The
however, and the Committee members, notGarden Club of Virginia. There is always
withstanding that dear Jane was probably lookplenty of input, many varying ideas of how
ing down upon them shaking her head in disbest to resolve any problems, to reach any goal.
approval, decided it was appropriate to do what
If we were forever in agreement we would be
they did. As it turned out,J ane was the ONLY
a less powerful force than we are. From our
one who disapproved.
differences evolves a strong consensus and out
43

Follow the Green Arrow


her, served The GCV well in the years 19821984.
When Mrs. Mears received the gavel from
Mrs. Montgomery in Danville in 1984, she
spoke of beginnings and endings and this indeed was the beginning of her long love affair
with The GCV. When her father, accompanied by her mother, seated at the rear of the
audience, informed her that he could not hear
a word she said, she determined henceforth
to project loud and clear. Intimidated by the
aforesaid eloquence of Mrs. Montgomery, she
was also prompted to compensate for this lack
of words by speaking "en francais" on occasion to "ses amies."
The new administration convened, with
husbands, at the mountain-top resort, Trillium
House, at Wintergreen for the summer board
meeting. Between being entertained by extensive wildflower walks and squirrels being
catapulted from squirrel-proof bird feeders,
it was business as usual. Mrs. Mears reported
on the presentation of the landscaped courtyard at the old Courthouse in Portsmouth to
the city of Portsmouth, at which occasion Mrs.
William Spong, mother of the beloved Bill
Spong, and a ninety-some year resident of the
city, spoke. A Restoration Committee meeting at Jean Printz's Wilton was described as
was a Lily Show given by the Chatham Garden Club at Hargrave Military Academy on
the hottest imaginable day in June.
Cocktails and dinner under the Eiffel
Tower at Kings Dominion set the tone for the
Board of Governors' Meeting sponsored by
The Ashland Garden Club in October. Lunch
at Scotchtown followed by cocktails that
evening at Williamsville, home of Mrs. Robert W. Cabannis (Florence), were culminated
by dinner in the Estes Dining Hall at
Randolph-Macon College. Trains, being the
symbol of Ashland and the theme of this meeting, were evident in miniature as we entered
the building and we were greeted by a pretend conductor and train devotee, Dr. Hill
Carter, Jr. The Past Presidents' table was especially lively on this occasion with Judith
Godwin (Mrs. F. Whitney Godwin) in her
glory.
At the business meetings, which were at-

of the sometimes-chaos comes a body of work


and accomplishment of which 3000-plus Virginia women can be justifiably proud. And
for which Virginians in general are grateful.
There have been many gratifications in
my seventy-plus years. But one of the proudest is being asked to serve in this happy capacity.
On my tombstone they should write:
"Not all good, not all bad. Wife of Jim,
Mother of Lisa and Lou. President of The
Garden Club of Virginia."
That's plenty.
MRS. BENJAMIN W. MEARS, JR.
President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1984-1986

Following in the soft and easy footsteps


of the gracious, gentle lady from Martinsville,
originally from South Carolina, would be a
mean feat for Mrs. Mears as she assumed the
role of the presidency. Mrs. James B.
Montgomery's eloquence in speaking and her
command of the English language were widely
recognized, and her
determination to protect at all costs the
sanctity of the
50l(c)(3) status ofThe
GCV epitomized the
iron fist in a velvet
glove theory. The attractive and indispensable new GCVHandbook was her brainchild, and all members
are indebted to her for
this service, as well as
for her accomplishMrs. Benjamin W.
ment in persuading
Mears, Jr.
the Virginia Department of Transportation to allow The GCY, with Common Wealth
Fund money, to plant "Welcome to Virginia"
entrances to the state.
Mrs. Montgomery's immaculately attired
and coifed appearance, coupled with her genuine and sincere appreciation for each mem44

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents

eager to learn all about The GCV. Mrs.


Henley L. Guild (Virginia), Restoration
Chairman, described the outstanding event
which took place at Smithfield Plantation
where the newly restored kitchen garden,
fences and walks were presented to the Montgomery County Branch of the APVA. The
delight of the Branch members by this gift
from The GCV was evidenced by the tremendous appreciation expressed as this restoration
joins Fincastle and Barter Theatre as our western most endeavors.
Mrs. Parke F. Smith (Alice), Historic Garden Week Chairman, announced that this year
two especially interesting areas, Wintergreen
Ski Resort and an 18th Century Quaker Community in Loudoun County, would be open
for Historic Garden Week for the first time.
The highlight of the meeting was the report on the Conservation F arum given by Mrs.
John Clarkson (Kirk), Conservation Chairman. "Lady Bird" Johnson was the keynote
speaker at the Forum and her talk on wildflowers was to a full house. Dealing with
25,000 varieties of wildflowers, she had as her
goal the promotion of the indigenous flowers
of America. "We want Maine to look like
Maine and Virginia to look like Virginia."
With her daughter, Lynda Robb, by her side
at the speakers' table, Mrs.Johnson proved to
be an attractive, intelligent and informative
speaker and easily won the approval of the 380
ladies present.
Jean Printz's lovely home, Wilton, was the
setting for the Board Meeting in May preceding the Annual Meeting sponsored by the
Rivanna Garden Club at the Boar's Head Inn
in Charlottesville. Jean's faithful Ruby welcomed the members graciously and prepared
a sumptuous feast. The meals at Wilton always have that wonderful Cuban touch.
Members were welcomed to the 65th
Annual Meeting of The GCV by Mrs. William Edwards who said, "the spirit of
Charlottesville, as you well know, centers
around the genius of one remarkable man,
whose personality lives and permeates this area
as vibrantly today as when he actually lived
here two centuries ago." The Jefferson permeation was quite obvious as members were

Mrs. Wyatt Aiken Williams presents the Massie


Medal to Mrs.]. Robert Massie, Jr., 1985 Annual Meeting.

tended by The GCV Honorary Member, Mr.


Robert Talley, Jr. in addition to the regular
members, members were informed by Mrs.
George H. Flowers, Jr. (Mary Frances) that
the Kent-Valentine House had been painted
and that the glass slides which had been catalogued by Mrs. Wyatt A. Williams (Dottie)
and which provide, as she says, "a rare intimate appeal for a specific group" have been
copied with the originals sent to Dumbarton
Oaks library in Washington. Mrs. Jam es W.
Perkinson (Siggie) described an outstanding
rose show presented by The Garden Club of
Norfolk with the majority of awards won by
members of The Garden Club of the Eastern
Shore. Mrs. William Parker (Peyton) announced the winner of the Common Wealth
Award was The Garden Club of Fairfax. Dr.
Betty Diener, then Secretary of Commerce
and Resources, was the guest speaker at Round
Table discussions. Her topic was "The Chesapeake Bay and Its Importance" and it was met
with lively and enthusiastic response.
At the Board Meeting at the Kent-Valentine House in January, Mrs. Mears compared
her role to that of a freshman in her first semester of college with much to learn. In comparison with Mrs. Mears' role, Mrs. Edward
Barham, Jr. (Susan) told of a gathering she had
for Junior Garden Club members in November at the Kent-Valentine House where her
guests, all under 40, were also interested and
45

Follow the Green Arrow


Historic Virgi,nia Gardens was announced as was
the fact that The GCV had received an award
from the Department of General Services of
the Commonwealth of Virginia in recognition
of its outstanding contributions to the State,
in particular the labeling of trees in Capitol
Square and help in planting the Colgate
Darden Garden adjacent to the Square, this
latter feat largely done with the expertise of
Mrs. George M. Cochran (Lee).
Members were advised of the importance
of protecting Virginia's unique natural lands
by a spokesman for the Nature Conservancy
at one of the business meetings and were excited by Nick Lucketti, archaeologist for The
Research Center for Archaeology in
Yorktown. He spoke on the progress of the
dig at the gardens at Bacon's Castle, funded
by The Garden Club of Virginia Restoration
Committee.
Ending the idyllic stay in Charlottesville,
Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr. (Pat) in her
thank-you to the Rivanna Garden Club said,
"The Rivanna Garden ladies were our hostesses supreme, and Mr.Jefferson our host, this
is surely not a dream."
With gallant and ever-patient husbands
again in tow, the members met for the summer Board Meeting atThe Homestead in Hot
Springs. It appears that the members enjoy
keeping the best resorts in Virginia busy. Between tennis and golf games and an occasional
massage, compounded by delicious meals, the
meetings of the Board were conducted as
usual. Mrs. Lilburn Talley (Nancy), former
editor of UPDATE, has passed the reins on
to Mrs. Lewis F. Jolly (Betty) who will be our
second editor of that publication. Appreciation was expressed to Mrs. Talley for her fine
job in getting the newsletter off the ground.
Mrs. W. TayloeMurphy,Jr. (Helen) reported
that "in a parking lot in Richmond on one of
the hottest days of summer, the official roster
of The GCV was transferred from the hands
of the Treasurer (Mrs. Jam es C. Godwin;
Ellen) to those of the Parliamentarian and
Editor of the Register (Mrs. Murphy). Air
conditioning has been installed on the second
and third floors of the Kent-Valentine House
and reports are that it is "whisper quiet." This

Mrs. Mears and Mrs. William S. Edwards at the


65th Annual Meeting.
treated to lunch in the Rotunda, a tour of the
Pavilion Gardens of his "Academical Village,"
and cocktails at his beloved mountain-top
home, Monticello. At the banquet we learned
that Charlotte Massie (Mrs. J. Robert Massie,
Jr.) had won the Massie Medal Award. To see
her children come forward to share in her
honor was a moving sight. One associate remarked on her nomination for this award,
"Charlotte has made Historic Garden Week
big business for The GCV because she is willing to work full time in a part-time job."
The social events were only slightly
dimmed by the business meetings as Mrs.
Mears recounted tales of a daffodil-filled airplane hanger, the site of the Daffodil Show in
Charlottesville presented by the Albemarle
Garden Club. A "Day of Wine and Roses,"
thanks to Mrs. Robert Wood (Mina), Horticulture Chairman, was the theme for the Field
Day in early May. A tour of Ingleside Nursery and Vmeyards, a winery sampling, and
lunch and tour at Stratford made for a delightful outing - with gracious hospitality extended
by the Flemer family and their intriguing
French winemaster and Mr. Ronald Wade, the
English gardener at Stratford.
A long-range planning committee with
Mrs. William Gilliam (Anne) at the helm has
been appointed to discuss upcoming needs and
issues that might face The GCV in the future. A decision to reprint 3,000 copies of
46

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


was made possible
by the gracious generosity of the Restoration Committee
of The GCV.
Mrs. Mears reported on an outstanding Lily Show
in the Old Colony
Hotel in Alexandria
presented by The
Hunting Creek
Garden Club. A
glimpse of our
Capital's landmarks
was reflected in the
interpretations of
"Washington Reflections."
The
66th
Board of Gover- Mrs. Mears with Mrs. George]. Savage, Jr. and Mrs. Wilkox Ruffin, Jr.
nors' Meeting convened amidst the glorious fall foliage at Airlie
individual ideas.
The members heard about a well-atin Warrenton with the Fauquier and Loudoun
Garden Club. Members were assigned rooms
tended luncheon which the President had held
in various converted farm buildings with the
for the member club presidents at the KentValentine House where there was a lively exPresident firmly ensconced in the silo. Afternoons were spent with trips to Meredyth Vmechange of ideas. Mrs. John Clarkson, Conyards where the group learned about Virginia
servation Chairman, reported that her Committee is still fighting for the bottle bill, fightwine production and to Willow Oaks, the
home of Governor and Mrs. Averell
ing against uranium mining in the state and
Harriman. Tea was served in the guest house
supporting a phosphate ban to aid in the presand members were warmly received by their
ervation of the Chesapeake Bay. She further
host, Mr. Harriman. Travel to dinners at the
urged the members to attend the Conservation Forum where the topic would be "Crehomes of retired ambassadors among others
was by stretch limo, and a feeling of luxury
ative Land Conservation" and the lead speaker
prevailed. The banquet at Airlie House, at
would be Dr. El Ashry.
which time it was announced that the HillMrs. Murphy announced that the newly
revised GCV Bylaws had been accepted by the
side Garden Club won the Common Wealth
Award for the restoration of the Anne SpenBoard. Mrs. Guild delighted members with
the information that the third stage of the arcer Garden, was complete with a presentation
from the "East Virginia Toadsuckers."
chaeology was being undertaken at Bacon's
Castle's Garden with a video being made to
Michael Gore, Director of Belle Grove,
record work being done there.
spoke at one of the business meetings, and the
A significant event which occured at the
other was devoted to reports from the presidents of member clubs with the topic this year
Rose Show given by The Rappahannock Valbeing "What is the most important contribuley Garden Club in Fredericksburg in early
tion your club has made to the community in
fall was the winning of a very special award by
the past two years?" This gathering is a wona little old lady in town who had only one rose
derful arena for the presidents to express their
bush. What a thrill for her.
47

Follow the Green Arrow

Following the recommendation of Mrs.


Gilliam's long-range planning committee,
"that The GCV needs a professional financial
profile including advice on money management and diversification of investments," two
representatives from an investment firm in
Richmond were the first on the agenda at the
Winter Board Meeting inJ anuary. The GCV
has surely progressed into the wave of the future with this new approach and with the idea
of buying a computer for The Club under investigation.

and dinner in her charming Bridgeway Road


home. Husbands of Three Chopt Garden
Club members, hostesses for the Annual
Meeting, were commandeered into serving as
bartenders, and a great feeling of informality
and camaraderie prevailed. Mrs. George M.
Cochran (Lee), currently a member of the
Board of Visitors of The University of Virginia, brought to the morning meeting Mr.
Robert M. O'Neil, President of the University ofVirginia, who complimented The GCV
for its contribution of beauty to the state and
especially to the University where further
work on the Pavilion Gardens is in progress.
Lunch and the afternoon were spent at the
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, which afforded
members a chance to view the Mellon and
Lewis collections. Cocktails and dinner were
held at the stateliest of all clubs, The Commonwealth.
Mrs.Jam es C. Godwin, treasurer, began
the morning meeting by stating that after her
four years in office "the money was all intact,
thank God." Mrs.Joel Crenshaw (Pat), Daffodil Test Chairman, described the recent
Daffodil Show in Martinsville, the home of
Honorary Member and daffodil expert, Mr.
William Pannill, and expressed thanks to The
Martinsville Garden Club for its endeavor.
A double-decker bus was the mode of conveyance at the recently held Field Day with a
visit to Dumbarton Oaks with its splendid
gardens and to The National Arboretum for
lunch and a tour with emphasis on the bonsai
collection.
The APVA presented to the Restoration
Committee of The Garden Club of Virginia
its Historic Preservation Award for the year
at its Annual Meeting in Williamsburg in
1986. Mrs. Mears gratefully accepted the
award under a tent at the Dora Armistead
House in the historic area.
As the meeting drew to a close, Mrs.
David Peebles, Chairman of Public Relations,
presented Mrs. Mears with a scrapbook compiling activities of her two years as President
of The GCV. Mrs. Mears said in her final
remarks to the assembly, "to be President of
The GCV is to labor in the knowledge that
the charge you bear was defined for all time

1984-1986's "Top Blossom".

The Historic Garden Week guidebook


under the supervision of Mrs. John Robert
Massie, Jr. was due to go to press immediately
and would include two intriguing new tours
this year - miniature houses in Fairfax and
houses on the Norfolk Naval Base which were
built for The Jamestown Exposition in 1907.
Richmond was the site for the Annual
Meeting in 1986 with the Hyatt House as
headquarters for lodging and meetings. Mrs.
Hunter H. McGuire, Jr. (Alice) was hostess at
her lovely home on Rothesay Circle for the
Board luncheon, and Mrs.James C. Hamilton
(Helen) entertained all visitors with cocktails
48

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


by the former Presidents of this organization.
It is my hope that the past two years have dignified our traditions, brought honor to the
members I was elected to serve, and truly made
this Club's future worthy of its past."
Following these remarks and in accordance with the acceptance of the report of the
Nominating Committee Chairman, Mrs.
Frederic Scott (Elizabeth), the gavel was duly
passed from Mrs. Mears to the new President,
Mrs.James C. Godwin. As a grand finale, Mrs.
Mears' sister, Mrs. Murphy, presented the
outgoing President with a flower bedecked hat
and the words:
"Roses are red,
Violets are blue,
To our dear top blossom,
These buds are for you."

The new
President, Mrs.
James
C.
Godwin, received the gavel
from her dear
friend, Katty
Mears, and announced .that
"Thin is no
longer in, as
Mrs. Mears
shoes would be
hard to fill, and
her clothes impossible."
Ellen Godwin
said when she
took office,
"What we share
is very precious
to me. What I
will represent is
very important Mrs. James C. Godwin.
to us all so, with
the help of a great Board of Directors, expert
Chairmen, and tinder the watchful eye of the
Past Presidents, I will try very hard to be a
LADY."
The two Presidents, past and present,
having roomed together for many years (BBP)
before being President, shared their hopes and
dreams for The Garden Club of Virginia.
Five days later Mrs. Mears and Mrs.
Godwin forayed to Pittsburgh to receive the
Historic Preservation Award of The Garden
Club of America on behalf of The Garden
Club of Virginia. The GCV was nominated
for this award by The Garden Club of Norfolk and seconded by The James River Garden Club.
Mrs. Godwin admitted that having her
first meeting sponsored by her own club, The
Nansemond River Garden Club, in October
1986, offered great challenges. Mrs. Lawrence
N. Smith agreed that even Mrs. Godwin's
husband had been pressed into service as he
had handpainted the tote bags given to all participants.
At the fall Board of Governors' Meeting,

The Garden Club of America presented


its medal for Historic Preservation to The
Garden Club of Vrrginia at its annual meeting in Pittsburgh in May 1986. Mrs. Mears
and Mrs. Godwin flew to Pittsburgh to accept the Medal at The GCA banquet which
was held at the Architectural Hall at the
Carnegie Museum. It was a thrilling moment
for these two ladies which culminated the end
of the term of one and addressed the beginning of the term of the other. Especially pleasing was the statement on the presentation that
"this nation and all who seek to preserve the
best of the past, are richer for the foresight,
dedication and teamwork of the members of
The Garden Club of Virginia."

MRS. JAMES C. GODWIN


President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1986-1988
Mrs. Mears was greatly admired for her
creativity as a flower arranger, her knowledge
of horticulture, and her work in restoration
and preservation. She was truly a member's
President, extraordinary in her support, upto-date in her knowledge and inspiring with
her leadership. Katty Mears stepped down to
thundering applause and stepped into the
APVA as its next President.
49

Follow the Green Arrow


that a brochure on the archaeology of the garden at Bacon's
Castle had been printed and distributed. Major work was being
done on the Pavilion Gardens at
the University of Virginia,
Smith's Fort in Surry County, the
Kent-Valentine House, plans for
the front grounds at Carlyle
House in Alexandria and an installation of an Educational Exhibit to interpret the grounds
were underway.
The Massie Medal was
awarded to Mrs. Charles K.
Woltz (Dawn) of Charlottesville
Mrs. Godwin with Mrs. Herbert Carden (The Garden Club ofthe for her gift of beauty and her joy
Northern Neck), Mrs. William C. Trenary III (The Garden Club in the giving. Mrs.John W Clark
of Warren County), and Mrs. William L. Gilliam, Jr. (Chair- (Sally) was awarded the deLacy
man, Common Wealth Award).
Gray Medal for her lifelong dedication to the beautification of
The Board of Directors met at
Whitehall, the home of Mrs. F.
Whitney Godwin Oudith). Entertained as only Judith can do, the Directors were served a six course luncheon, including three kinds of libation. After the luncheon, the President conducted the meeting and all
were surprised when reading the
Secretary's minutes how much had
been done.
Mrs. Godwin announced that a
magnificent diamond brooch had
been given to The Garden Club of
Virginia by Mrs. Clayton B.
Etheridge, of the Garden Club of
Fairfax, who requested that it be worn
by the President of The Garden Club
of Virginia during her term of office.
Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr.
(Mary Frances) was made Honorary Mrs. Godwin tells Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr. of her new
President ofThe Garden Club ofVrr- position, Honorary President of The Garden Club of Virginia.
ginia for her distinguished service and
Martinsville. The Common Wealth Award
inspirational and untiring work at the Kentwas given to the Rivanna Garden Club of
Valentine House.
Charlottesville for the Miller School ArboreDuring Mrs. Godwin's term, The GCV
tum.
received a bequest of Mark Catesby prints
With the help of a professional archivist,
from Mr. Robert H. Talley, Jr.
the Kent-Valentine records and files were reThe Restoration Committee reported
50

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


to Mrs. C. Harrison Mann,
Jr. (Betty) of Alexandria for
"heart and mind and talents
... in service to The Garden
Club of Virginia." The
deLacy Gray Medal was
awarded to Mrs. S. W. Rawls,
Jr. (Ami Peace), "a dedicated
conservationist who, during
her lifetime, opened her
home to young people for
the study of conservation and
horticulture." The Common
Wealth Award was given to
The Mill Mountain Garden
Club in Roanoke for the Mill
Mountain Wildflower Garden.
The Garden Club of Virginia promoted
the Constitution Oak Project with the Virginia
Department of Forestry, and 1,000 seedlings
were planted.
The Inter-Club Speakers' Bureau Booklet was updated and reprinted.

The GCV Auxiliary at Stratford Hall, 19 87.

viewed, consolidated and purged, when necessary.


Mrs. Richard B. Williams (Ginny) resigned as Executive Secretary of Historic Garden Week and Mrs. William Washington
Flowers (Susan) was hired as Executive Secretary of HGW.
Mrs. Godwin announced at the
68th
Annual
Meeting
in
Williamsburg that The Garden Club
of Virginia and
Colonial
Williamsburg began in the same decade 1920.
Mrs. John W. Stetson (Sally) retired after 27 years as Editor of the
GCV JOURNAL and Mrs. Lewis F.
Jolly (Betty) was appointed Editor of
TheJOURNALandUPDATE. An
Editorial Board was established to
work with the new Editor.
Mr. Rudy]. Favretti was elected
an Honorary Member ofThe Garden
Club of Virginia. Approval was given
to begin the restoration of the 17th
Century Garden at Bacon's Castle.
The Garden Club of Virginia encouraged the passage of The Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act in the
1988 General Assembly.
Horticulture Field Day was held
at the garden at Oatlands.
Mrs. C. Harrison Mann,
The Massie Medal was presented Lily Show.
51

Jr. and Mrs. Godwin at the 1986

Follow the Green Arrow

Mrs. Edward A. Barham, Jr. gives Mrs. Godwin the traditional picture of her Board.
Mrs. Godwin announced some highlights
and headlines of her administration:

6. After Black Monday on Wall StreetGCV Assets Pruned.

1. "We hire a new secretary and a new


editor. Headlines read- GCV Pick Flowers
JOURNAL Editor is Jolly

7. After a trip to Elizabeth Arden FarmThe GCV President loses at Maine Chance."
Upon Mrs. Godwin's retirement, Mrs.
Benjamin W Mears, Jr., paid tribute to "the
grace, diligence, faithfulness, humor, intelligence, and charm with which she served like a
great lady."

2. Conservation Forum Ladies discuss wastes at Delicious Luncheon


in Charlottesville.
3. Harry Byrd speaks at the dedication
of the Belle Grove Project - Byrd heard at
Belle Grove.

MRS. LILBURN TRIGG TALLEY


President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1988-1990

4. Late winter affects her daffodils Bad Weather keeps Flower Show Committee
in their cups.

Mrs. Godwin's keen wit and high humor


masked an ability to move mountains. In leading The Garden Club of Virginia to take a
public stand on Virginia legislation, she
opened the door for those activists among the

5. Last year's Garden Week HGW in Virginia draws Record Clouds.


52

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


Jekyll.
In addition, The GCV 46th Annual Lily
Show, sponsored July 22-23 by The Little
Garden Club of Winchester, attracted nearly
twenty-five percent more blooms than usual.
Mrs. Talley had represented The Garden Club
of Virginia at a Governor's Mansion reception on June first, when Governor Charles S.
Robb announced Commonwealth support for
a campaign to restore Poplar Forest.
Restorations were going swimmingly, according to Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr. (Lula),
Chairman of the Restoration Committee. The
Committee met July 6-7 at Royal Orchard,
on Afton Mountain, with Mrs. Hunter H.
McGuire, Jr. (Alice), as hostess, and reported
the refurbishing of the University of Virginia
Pavilion Gardens, being done in tandem with
a major renovation of the pavilion buildings,
and the letting of contracts underway at
Bacon's Castle. This restoration was being
video-taped as it progressed, the first Restoration Project so recorded.
Board members at the July 23 meeting,
held at the Tides Lodge, Irvington, were delighted by Mrs. Arthur S. Brinkley,Jr.'s report
for the Historic Garden Week Committee.
The preliminary gross receipt report of
$341,130.86 was updated at the fall Board of
Governors' Meeting to a final figure of
$349,617.58. With such good news, the Historic Garden Week office request for a rented
postage meter was unanimously approved, and
Mrs. Austin T. Darden, Jr. (Mary Hart) was
asked to chair an ad hoc committee to study
computers for the office also.
Mrs. Lewis F.Jolly (Betty) had begun her
term as Editor of The JOURNAL and UPDATE after The GCV 1988 Annual Meeting. At the summer Board Meeting, Mrs.
Charles H. Schutte, Jr. (Betty), Parliamentarian, initiated steps to bring the Chairman of
the newly established Editorial Board, which
would provide hands-on help to Betty J ally,
to The GCV Board of Governors' and Annual Meetings. A jazzier format for three,
rather than six, issues of The JOURNAL, with
three issues of UPDATE to back it up, was
planned; the first issue would appear in the
fall.

Mrs. Lilburn Trigg Talley.


membership who wished to do so to stand up
and be counted with greater credibility. In
adapting The Garden Club ofVrrginia's sound
fiscal policies to contemporary standards of
prudent management, she paved the way for
ever wiser use of GCV resources. She and
the new President engaged in a mock-battle
of the colleges, for Mrs. Godwin's RandolphMacon Woman's College degree, she contended, was far superior to Mrs. Talley's from
Sweet Briar College. Although Mrs. Talley
could not agree, she could admire Mrs.
Godwin's intellectual powers. She spent two
years building upon Mrs. Godwin's accomplishments as President of The Garden Club
of Virginia.
The new administration began with the
summer meeting of The GCV Board of Directors, held July 23 at the Tides Lodge with
a number of husbands attending.
Already the outgoing Horticulture Committee Chairman, Mrs.Jack C. Fuson (Georgia), had masterminded a stunning Horticulture Field Day in the gardens-and in the
houses-at Oatlands, near Leesburg, where
horticulturist Alfredo Siani evoked ghosts of
George Carter the builder, Mrs. Corcoran
Eustis the owner-gardener, and even Gertrude
53

FolloW the Green Arrow


York River, placed members near the
Yorktown Victory Center, where horticulture exhibits (a live wreath of succulents or herbs) were displayed and
the final banquet was staged. Crossing the York the first morning, members were bused to the charming village of Gloucester to meet in the old
courthouse just as the sun was lifting
th.e early morning fog. Three majestic homes were open for luncheon
with Mrs. William Ingles (Connie) of
White Marsh, Mrs. Bolling Powell
(Mary) of Warner Hall and Mrs.
David Peebles (Mary) of Lisburne as
hostesses. That morning was capped
by a slide presentation by Col. Cecil
Wray Page about Rosewell, where
members were taken after luncheon
to view the impressive vine-covered
Mrs.RobertCarterandMrs. WilkoxRuffin,Jr. , 1988Board ruins and imagine the grandeur of
of Governors' Meeting.
what was in its day called the finest
house in all Virginia.
The GCV fall Committee meetings were
Piped into the Victory Center with fife
and drums, members entered a banquet hall
punctuated by the 52nd Annual Rose Show
decorated with flags and patriotic arrangesponsored by the Hillside Garden Club in
ments to hear an address by Mrs. Catesby G.
Lynchburg. Outstanding meetings were held
Jones, Jr. (Spotswood), a Gloucester Garden
at the Kent-Valentine House by the ConserClub member and well-known historian. Divation Committee for member club chairmen,
minutive Spotswood Jones, who looked as if
with Joseph Maroon of the Chesapeake Bay
she might be made of porcelain, wore a silk
Foundation and State Senator Joseph
suit with a mink collar; in a rare feat of afterBenedetti as speakers, and by the Publications
dinner speaksmanship she made the Virginia
Committee, withMrs.JohnA. Hugo (Nancy),
Convention of 1775 at once accessible and
a horticulture writer and Ashland Garden
entertaining.
Club member, as speaker.
The Meeting was noted not just for pagThe Directors met again on October 11
at Glarus, the home of Mrs. Robert L. Trim pi
eantry, but also for accomplishment. The
Board of Directors, having approved the rec(Pauline), gathering on a terrace overlooking
ommendation of the Admissions Committee,
the river to enjoy the cool October sunshine
its Chairman, Connie Ingles, announced
before luncheon - they requested, and later
therefore a new Honorary Member, Mrs.
were sent, the recipe for that sinful chocolate
Charles E. Pennebaker, and reported, "Kay
pie - and met in the dining room after lunPennebaker has since 1969 made all those
cheon.
The Garden Club of Gloucester set a high
charming sketches for our Historic Garden
Week guidebooks. She now lives in Pennsylstandard indeed when it sponsored The GCV
Board of Governors' Meeting October 11, 12,
vania and is an honorary member of the Garden Club of The Eastern Shore. We are de13. The first evening the entire meeting was
welcomed for dinner at Purton, the home of
lighted that she is also an Honorary Member
Mr. and Mrs. David Stifel (Ann). Staying at
of The Garden Club ofVirginia."
Mrs. Edward A. Barham, Jr. (Susan),
the Duke of York Motel, with its views of the
54

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science,
Chairman of the Common Wealth Award
with a lecture by the Director, Dr. Frank 0.
Committee, reported at the banquet that the
Perkins, followed by a tour, and box luncheons
Mill Mountain Wildflower Garden was named
from The Williamsburg Garden Club. Mrs.
the 1988 Common Wealth Award winner.
Carroll W. Bartlett (Joanne), president of The
Following a vote by The GCV Board of
Garden Club of Gloucester, was everywhere,
Directors the day before, Mrs.John D. Varner
justly proud of the executive committee for
(Betsy) announced that an increase in dues,
the Meeting: Mrs. Ingles, Mrs. Peebles, Mrs.
from $10 to $15 per member, would be
Ben B. Pickett (Kay) and Mrs. H. C. K.
brought to the 1989 Annual Meeting. Poor
Spotswood (Mickie). The bags from the meetBetsy Varner was Finance Committee Chairing, with screen prints of Gloucester views and
man ten years earlier, the last time the dues
smart navy-and-red trim, remained in eviwere raised.
dence across Virginia for years.
Mrs.JereM. H. Willis (Barbara) reported
her project as Historian and Custodian of
As Mrs. Talley began her visits to memRecords was to sort
through all the papers in
the Kent-Valentine
House attic and basement, labeling them and
storing them in acid-free
folders and boxes. That
this was completed over
a two-year period was a
major contribution.
Mrs. Spotswood B.
Hall, Jr. (Katie), KentValentine House Chairman, reported that Jon
Philippe was our tenant
in the house, all the
Mark Cates by prints had
been hung, the Linden
Row Inn had opened,
and insurance had cov- Mrs. E. Carruthers Bruce, Mrs. Douglas E. Quarles, Jr. and Mrs. George
ered the sprinkler system H. Flowers, Jr. visit at a Conservation Forum.
struck by lightning.
Mrs. David Diller (Genie), The GCVLily
ber clubs, she studied the membership and
Test Committee Chairman, announced Board
found it filled with leadership of all sorts.
During her term she pointed this out in her
approval for lily judges being allowed to exhibit at The GCV Lily Shows.
addresses to them, praising The Garden Club
Mrs. Robert Carter (Bessie), Conservaof Virginia for the accomplishments of its in
tion Committee Chairman, reported a Forum
dividual members.
"This is an institution whose members'
that all agreed was exceptional. Dr. John
lives have changed with changing times, but
deGrove, an internationally known consultwhose commitment to beauty, and whose pleaant, was brought from Florida to keynote land
sure in association, has not changed," she told
use problems, addressed also by the Hon. W.
each club group. "The first woman to serve
Tayloe Murphy, Jr., for the Chesapeake Bay
Commission and Katherine Imhoff for the
on a bank board in Virginia is a member of
The Garden Club of Virginia and has served
Piedmont Environmental Council.
The final session of the Meeting was held
it as President. The first woman to serve as
55

Follow the Green Arrow


chairman of a bank board in Virginia is a member of The Garden Club of Virginia. The
mayor of Winchester is a member of The
Garden Club of Virginia; a leading member
of Winchester's City Council is on our Daffodil Test Committee and is an ADS horticultural judge. A past president of my own club
has for years held a job as a computer consultant to a large corporation doing highly classified government work. The present president
of one of our member clubs is a practicing physician-she's married to a surgeon, and three

fields."
Mrs. Thomas T. Tullidge (Flo) and Mrs.
Robert C. Wood ill (Mina) were hostesses for
The GCV Board of Directors winter meeting
Tuesday, January 17, 1989, at the Kent-Valentine House. Mrs. Talley had represented
The GCVat the Miller and Rhoads Forum,
not knowing it would be the last of them, and
at the gala opening of the architecturally lush
auditorium of the Woman's Club in Richmond.
The Restoration Committee had approved two new projects at its
meeting earlier in the month.
The Committee Chairman,
Mrs. Hopkins, reported that a
tree-planting plan for Virginia
Union University and the restoration of the Grace Arents
Garden at Bloemendaal, the
Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, both awaited approval of
their respective boards; these
were subsequently granted.
The new telephone system for
the Historic Garden Week ofAt the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden with Director Robert Hebb, fice was explained. Technology
May 1989.
was catching up with The
GCV-and vice versa.
of their five children are doctors. The judge
Mrs. Carter announced for the Conserof the Domestic Relations Court in
vation Committee a gift of $1,000 from The
Lynchburg is a member of The Garden Club
Ashland Garden Club, the income to pay for
of Virginia. The owner and operator of the
the Meritorious Achievement Award made
largest Charolais cattle farm east of the Misannually at the Forum to an industry, organisissippi is a member of The Garden Club of
zation, or individual not a member of The
Virginia.
Gcv. On the.Conservation Committee's rec"You are realtors, teachers, and nurses.
ommendation, the Board approved a new desYou are published authors and painters exhibignation, the Elizabeth Cabell Dugdale Award
for Conservation, to honor a lifelong conserited nationally. You started and run successful vineyards. You serve on local school boards
vationist who organized the first Conservaand on the boards of colleges and universition F arum and served as Chairman of the
ties. You have helped establish and led countConservation Committee, 1956-1958.
less institutions that are the pride of the ComSnow did not cause schedule problems for
monwealth; among them are the Chesapeake
the January meetings in 1989, but waited unBay Foundation, the Preservation Alliance, the
til March 8, the day of the annual Judging
Conservation Council, and numerous local
School, which had to be rescheduled. March
historical societies, hospital auxiliaries and inmade up for this on the 28th, however, when
dependent schools. The Garden Club of VirHorticulture Field Day at Bloemendaal
ginia is proud to claim you, and proud that
danced with daffodils in full bloom. Daffoyou include its work among your chosen
dils danced also in Danville April 12 and 13,
56

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents

Mrs. Talley, the Rev. Cotesworth P. Lewis, Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr., Mr. Ivor Noel Hume, Mrs.
Benjamin W. Mears, Jr. and Governor Albertis S. Harrison at the Bacon Castle's presentation, May
1989.
would be solved only by a second radical
change in the publication. On the bright side,
Jody Brinkley announced at the Board Meeting a record preliminary Historic Garden
Week gross of$368,583.20 for 1989, her final
figure to report as Chairman of Historic Garden Week.
The 69th Annual Meeting of The Garden Club of Virginia, held in Richmond after
this Board Meeting, was a time to remember.
Headquartered in Hotel Jefferson, with tours
of Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, the Valentine Museum, and the White House of the
Confederacy, tea at the Executive Mansion,
dinner at Brandon with the Hon. and Mrs.
Robert W. Daniel, Jr., and a banquet decorated in black and white with mirror-covered
tables and favors from Chanel, the Meeting
was masterfully planned and executed. Mrs.
FitzGerald Bemiss (Margaret), President of
The James River Garden Club, with Mrs. E.
Reed Carter (Elisabeth), chairman, and Mrs.
John K. Burke (Archer), assistant chairman,
seemed to orchestrate the proceedings without effort. The only hitch added to the enter-

when the Gabriella Garden Club sponsored


the 55th Annual Garden Club of Virginia
Daffodil Show.
The GCV Board of Directors meeting
that preceded theMay9, 10, 11 Annual Meeting in Richmond was held at Upper Brandon,
with luncheon as guests of the James River
Corporation. Mid-term difficulties in this
administration were largely money-oriented.
The income from the deLacy Gray Medal
endowment was no longer sufficient to pay for
the medal. At the May meeting the Board of
Directors asked Miss Jean Printz to investigate a different material for the medal. More
serious, the Common Wealth Fund, placed in
a Kemper Government-Plus Bond Mutual
Fund in 1986, was losing money, and was in
1989 placed with other GCV endowed funds
in Sovran Bank's Trust Department, where the
capital would build up as income use was reduced. After a shake-down year, publishing
two issues of The JOURNAL and three of
UPDATE, the Publication Committee recognized that the new format was too costly. In
spite of cost-cutting measures, the problem
57

Follow the Green Arrow


tainment: a bus driver misunderstood his directions, and drove to Brandon empty to pick
up ladies at 3:30 Tuesday afternoon rather than
meeting the waiting ladies at the Hotel
Jefferson. Scheduled for 4 p.m. registration

of The Garden Club of Virginia and long an


effective leader in conservation for the Commonwealth. To take home was a bag trimmed
in navy with The James River Garden Club
logo and happy motto, "Blessed Be God for
Flowers."
After the 1989 Annual Meeting was adjourned,
Gardens
&Landscapes of Virginia
was born. Members of
the Restoration Com~ mittee present at the
Annual Meeting joined
Lula Hopkins at luncheon with Richard
Cheek, ultimately photographer for the book.
On a terrace at lovely
Redesdale, home of Mr.
and Mrs. (Ann) Charles
Larus Reed, Jr., where
the Boxwood, Three
Chopt and Tuckahoe Garden clubs were providing box lunches, the details of sponsoring
a book were discussed at length.
Glorious late-spring sunshine at Bacon's
Castle for the presentation of the landscape
restoration at "the largest, earliest, best-preserved, most sophisticated garden that has
come to light in North America,'' as Mr.
Favretti is frequently quoted, drew a large
crowd of Garden Club of Virginia and Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities members Sunday afternoon, May 14.
With Mrs. Talley presiding, former Goverp.or
Harrison delivered an address, Rudy J. F avretti
remarked upon the restoration, and Mrs.
Hopkins made the presentation from The
GCV to the APVA. Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears,
Jr. (Katty), Past President of The GCV, accepted the gardens on behalf of the APVA, of
which she was president. Initiated when Mrs.
Henley L. Guild (Virginia) was Chairman of
the Restoration Committee, the project had
consumed five years and brought national recognition to both organizations. It would have
its share of problems as a garden-indeed, the
presentation was made before planting was
established, causing Mrs. Talley to ask, "Who-

Horticulture Day at Wintergreen.


and a tour of the lovely gardens overlooking
the James River at the family home of the Hon.
and Mrs. Daniel, the ladies were a little late.
The gardens were magnificent nonetheless,
Linda and Bobby Daniel unflappable in their
welcome, and dinner in a tent outside the Playhouse elegant in spite of unseasonably cool
weather.
At the Annual Meeting, Rudy J. Favretti
presented his plan for the Grace Arents Garden at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden and for
the trees at Virginia Union University, which
were approved as restoration projects. Four
outstanding speakers were presented at sessions open to the public: Robert P. Winthrop
on Richmond's historic architecture, William
G. Pannill on Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden,
A. Howe Todd on the Haxall Canal and David
Bailey on the Evironmental Defense Fund.
Mrs. Kenneth S. White CJ ane) of the Hillside
Garden Club was awarded the Massie Medal
for the reclamation of the Anne Spencer Garden in Lynchburg. A writer and rosarian,J ane
White became one of the youngest recipients
of this prestigious Garden Club award. The
deLacy Gray Medal was given to Mrs.James
C. Godwin (Ellen), immediate Past President
58

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


ever said we needed a garden for a presentaduction costs of The JOURNAL and UPtion?"-but it would continue to be a source
DATE. This group will meet again on Auof pride.
gust 29." Betsy Varner added, "Publications'
Under the leadership of Mrs. William L.
financial problems seem to mount. We have
Roberts,Jr. (Gale), the Horticulture Committried to find ways to cut costs as The GCV
cannot continue subsidizing our publications."
tee sponsored a second Horticulture Field Day
For the Restoration Committee, Lula
May 18 at Wintergreen, with guided woodland walks and a wildflower lecture at a time
Hopkins reported concern about Bacon's
Castle. "There are a number of problems,
when the wild azaleas were in bloom on the
most of which are related to severe soil comBlue Ridgeway Parkway.
The 47th Annual GCV Lily Show was
paction. Mr. Favretti and representatives of
marked by a horrendous storm. Sponsored
the Committee and the APVA will meet with
by The Garden Club of Warren County in
Nick Luccketti (the project archaeologist) to
the gymnasium at Randolph-Macon Academy
decide what must be done to establish proper
in Front Royal, the show was attractively
drainage. Once the situation is corrected the
staged and well-attended. June 14 remained
garden work can continue."
calm. However, just as the show opened, the
On a more cheerful note, this Meeting
heavens did, too. While awards were being
approved Gardens & Landscapes of Virginia and
made, thunder rolled. Lightning flashed first
learned that with the advice of Mrs. Maurice
outside, then in the gym's vast ceiling, as lightP. Duffey (Lillian) of the Winchester-Clarke
ning fixtures attracted lightning. Upper winGarden Club the Historic Garden Week ofdows blew open, bringing the driving rain infice was almost ready to choose a computer
side also. No one panicked, by some miracle
system.
the electricity did not go out, and every award
The Virginia Department of Transportawas made.
tion invited representatives of several organiAirfield, the woodsy 4-H Center near
zations interested in highway beautification to
Waverly, was the setting
for The GCV Summer
Board of Directors
meeting July 15. Mrs.
Hopkins, Mrs. Herbert
W Jackson III (Betsy;
Mrs.JackM. Parrish,Jr.)
and Mrs. H. Gordon
Leggett, Jr. (Pat) were
the hostesses. Two new
members, Mrs. Paul W
Mengel (Lois) and Mrs.
William C. Trenary III
(Melba), were welcomed. Reports from Round table discussion, 1989.
two ad hoc committees,
one on member club membership procedures
a work session at VDOT headquarters Friand one on simplifying The GCV Annual and
day,July 28. It was a meeting punctuated by a
Board of Governors meetings, were added to
bomb scare, so that the participants were
the committee reports. Mary Hart Darden,
crowded on a sidewalk while the building was
Director-at-Large and liaison to the Publicainspected. The real shocker for Mrs. Talley,
tions Committee, reported, "Representatives
who represented The GCV, was to hear the
of the Publications and Finance Committee
president of the Virginia Federation of Garmet June 20 to explore ways of cutting proden Clubs, seated across the conference table,
59

Follow the Green Arrow


praise billboards if properly landscaped. Mrs.
Talley put The GCV on record as opposing
billboards, landscaped or not.
The following month, Mrs. Talley represented The GCV in the Circuit Court at Virginia Beach, at a hearing on a special plea that
The Garden Club of Virginia was entitled to
charitable immunity in connection with an
accident that occurred during Historic Garden Week 1987. The judge delivered an immediate decision dismissing The GCV from

GCV's insurance portfolio by Johnson &


Higgins, Inc. Facing the fact of a litigious
society, The GCV increased its coverage for
the Kent-Valentine House and for the
institution's liability, as advised by the insurance experts and by legal counsel.
Fall got underway early with Mrs. Talley's
luncheon for member club presidents at the
Kent-Valentine House Thursday, September
7. To have the Chairmen of both the Restoration and Common Wealth Award Committees present was a
plus, for club presidents had an opportunity to ask questions about how the
money they helped
raise was being
husbanded
and
spent.
The
Judging
School, held September 20 at the
Virginia Museum of
Fine Arts with
Georgia Vance of
Staunton as instructor, drew more than
200 to learn more
about period arrangements. The
Mrs. James B. Murray and Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr. with Mr. Fred Krupp, Septem her
28
1989 Forum.
workshop for club
conservation chairmen focused on recycling. Speakers were
this action at law. The lawyers involved beBetty Byrne Ware (Mrs. H. Hudnall Ware Ill)
lieved this judgment would set a precedent
and Judith Kator, active in recycling in Richprotecting The GCV and Historic Garden
Week in the future.
mond, Roanoke and Williamsburg.
The Boxwood Garden Club sponsored
The proceedings were not publicized, and
the 53rd Annual Garden Club ofVirginia Rose
Mrs. Talley attended the hearing with no other
GCV members present. She remembers that
Show, October 4-5, in the Virginia Science
Museum, a superb example of adaptive use for
the lawyer for the plaintiff seemed surprised
those who remember catching the train in
that no GCV member and no homeowner
Richmond's venerable Broad Street Station.
receives money for Historic Garden Week.
Mrs. Talley joined the President of the
She was grateful that she could answer all the
Virginia Federation of Garden Clubs in the
questions asked her on the stand, particularly
receiving line for the October 23 opening gala
that she could be positive about the disposiof Fine Arts and Flowers, which the two ortion of all Historic Garden Week funds .
ganizations joined to sponsor at the Virginia
Before the hearing, one result of the suit
had been the independent examination of The
Museum of Fine Arts. This biennial event
60

The Gardro Club ofVirgi.na Presidrots


drew an enormous crowd for a glamorous
party.
The fall meeting of The GCV Board of
Directors was held Tuesday, October 24, in
the Board Room of the Chesapeake Bay
Bridge and Tunnel Commission, prior to The
GCV Board of Governors' Meeting for which
the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore was
hostess. Mrs. Lucius J. Kellam (Dot) and Mrs.
Mears, Jr., were luncheon hostesses as well as
Board of Governors' Meeting co-chairmen.
Reporting for an ad hoc committee on
investment procedures, of which she was chairman, Mrs. Guild said, "As you know, the Board
of Directors voted in 1986 to have Sovran
Bank manage our capital funds. Prior to 1986
these funds were maintained by The GCV
Treasurer. At that time an investment committee was appointed to guide us through this
transition period. The committee still meets
periodically to monitor the account. Our committee recommends the discharge of the ad
hoc committee, to be replaced by a Special
Committee under Article K. Section 1-B of
the Bylaws." Mrs. Schutte recommended, and
the Board adopted, this change in the Bylaws,
following her Parliamentarian's report.
As liaison to the Publications Committee, Mrs. Darden reported with regret the resignation ofBettyJolly as editor of The JOURNAL and UPDATE. Mrs. Charles C. Freed,
Jr. (Nan), Publications Chairman, had worked
with Mrs. William W. Old III (Marguerite),
Chairman of the newly formed Editorial
Board, to make the transition from long-time
Editor Sally Stetson's tenure, and although
Mrs. Jolly's professional background lent an
expert's hand to the enterprise, her commitments as principal in a Harrisburg marketing
firm became conflicts.
A dehumidifier in the vault at the KentValentine House, a jeweler to supply the
deLacy Gray Medal at a more reasonable cost
than the former supplier's, and the replacement (and bolting) of insured benches stolen
from the Kent-Valentine House porch were
behind the scenes accomplishments since The
GCV Board of Directors last met. A computer system for the Historic Garden Week
office had been installed, to become equip-

The Sisters : Mrs. Brojamin W. Mears, Jr. and


Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. at the 1990 Annual
Banquet.
ment as everyday-and as indispensable-as
the old Royal typewriter.
The GCV 70th Board of Governors'
Meeting, October 24, 25, 26, opened with an
oyster roast on the beach at America House,
Cape Charles. The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore was hostess for the meeting, and
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Parsons were hosts
for the informal evening, a beautiful time from
dusk into a crisply star-studded evening. The
business meeting the next morning was held
at the Northampton County Courthouse at
Eastville; Thursday's meeting took place at the
Wildlife Center in Cape Charles. The horticulture exhibit, "berried treasure," filled
America House entrance rooms. The Historic
Garden Week 1989 final tally in the firstpublic report by Mrs. Merritt W. Foster, Jr.
(Mary), 1989-1991, Chairman, was a whopping $393,657.14. While Virginia gardeners
had enjoyed a summer without drought, Mrs.
Hopkins bemoaned the continuing problem
of soil compaction at Bacon's Castle, where
unusual rains had slowed work to a halt. As
club presidents voted among Common Wealth
Award finalists, they heard reports from win61

Follow the Green Arrow


mittee at the Board of
Governors' Meeting
car-pooled to meet the
rest of the Committee in
Annapolis, where they
planned tours as well as
the regular quarterly
Committee meeting.
Mrs. Talley, who was
driving, stuffed The
Garden Club of Virginia
gavel with her papers in
the back seat. When she
stopped to let Mrs.
George M. Cochran
(Lee) out at her bedand-breakfast, the gavel
came to the floor with
Mrs. Cochran's luggage
and somehow became
lodged in the door as it
closed. The gavel is
made of chestnut from a tree at Kenmore and
Mrs. Talley was crushed along with its handle.
She remembers the moment as the low point
in her term. In a bit ofluck, the owner of the
bed-and-breakfast was a handyman who insisted on taking the gavel to see ifhe could fix
it. He could, and did.
The 1989 Conservation Forum, held
Wednesday, November 1, at the Commonwealth Club, addressed air quality and featured
Environmental Defense Fund National Director Fred Krupp, an authority on global warm-

Mrs. Henley L. Guild with Mrs. Talley.


ners and finalists in 1987 and 1988.
After luncheon at Oakwood with Mrs.
Carlton L. Byrd (Clare) and Mrs. Richard F.
Hall, Jr. (Pete), Meadville with Mrs. Henry P.
Custis, Jr. (Linda), or Bailywicke with Mrs.
Mildred M. Scarborough, participants visited
Kerr Place, headquarters of the Eastern Shore
Historical Society and a recent 0982) restoration of The GCV. Cocktails at Kendall Grove
Point, home of Mr. and Mrs. C. A Turner, Jr.
(Cecile), in Eastville, were followed by a banquet at Eyre Hall. Furlong Baldwin, whose
family has owned Eyre Hall since the 18th
century, opens the mansion for Historic Garden Week each year, and was present to welcome guests that evening. Although the house
was crammed upstairs and down with properly appointed round tables, its spirit of elegance was not lost. The announcement that
The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore had
won the 1989 Common Wealth Award seemed
particularly fitting in such surroundings.
Thursday's round-table discussions on
individual club programs were stimulating,
with excellent give-and-take, allowing presidents to share and take home ideas for enriching members' minds and clubs' coffers alike.
The members of the Restoration Com-

ing.

The winter meeting of The GCVBoard


of Directors was held Thursday, January 18,
1990, at the Kent-Valentine House, with Mrs.
Guild and Mrs. Murphy as hostesses. "Perhaps the happiest report I have for you today
comes from the lawyer representing our insurance company in the suit against The Garden Club of Virginia," Mrs. Talley said, in her
first mention of the matter on record. "Although there are still some loose ends to be
tied, it appears certain that the judgment of
last August, that the plaintiff has no case, will
stand. This judgment will be useful to The
Garden Club of Virginia."
There were additional encouraging as62

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


pects at that meeting. The Flower Shows
Committee had made several important policy
changes at its December 7, 1989, meeting, according to Mrs. Hugh]. Hagan, Jr. (Alice),
Committee liaison. These included deleting
the professional classification listed in show
schedules for The GCV members; removing
the Inter-Club Class from consideration for
the Tri-Color Award at all three shows, and
adding a fourth team of judges at each show,
in or~er to give judges more opportunities for
experience.
Mrs. Hopkins reported that the Restoration Committee, as it had announced at the
Conservation Forum, made a $10,000 donation to replace trees destroyed by Hurricane
Hugo in Charleston. "When Mr. Favretti returned from the area," Mrs. Hopkins said, "he
was so enthusiastic about the two possible
projects presented to him, telephone calls were
made and the Committee, without waiting for
its winter meeting unanimously accepted his
recommendations. A donation of $8,000 was
given to fund LowCountry RELEAF's ceremonial Arbor Day tree planting throughout
the tri-county area ....A gift of $2,000 was made
to the Confederate Home and College to replace the gigantic elm and Deodar cedar in
the Home's courtyard and garden, which is
used as a mini-park by 12,000 to 20,000 of
Charleston's citizens and visitors each year; any
money left will be used to replace other plants
in the borders. In addition, Mr. Favretti is
providing a landscape plan for the restoration
of the Home's courtyard."
Mrs. Hopkins reported also a gift from
theAPVAin excess of$28,000 for the Bacon's
Castle work. This gift consisted of a grant
from the Scott Foundation and a donation in
memory of John W. Riely. Mrs. Hopkins
noted that Dr. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr. was
chiefly responsible for the gift. She asked the
Board's endorsement of new work at the
Woodrow Wilson Birthplace in Staunton to
fund landscaping of the connector area between the Woodrow Wilson House complex
and the newly acquired administration building adjacent to it.
Mrs. Carter outlined plans for General
Assembly Day in February and received Board

approval to support three recycling bills, three


bills relating to Chesapeake Bay oil drilling, a
bill to protect wetlands, a bill to establish a
study commission on Scenic Highways and
Byways, and two national recycling bills.
Bessie Carter's careful study of such bills, and
others she did not recommend, had been a
hallmark of her widely admired Chairmanship
of the Conservation and Beautification Committee. Her manner in presenting these legislative matters, calm and authoritative,
charming and intelligent, did much to explain
her success in working with legislators in Virginia and in Washington.
At the end of the winter Board of Directors' Meeting, Mrs. Talley proposed a toast to
the next President of The Garden Club of
Virginia and announced the nomination of
Mrs. Henley L. Guild to this office.
Among several qualified candidates Mrs.
Clarkie Patterson] ester of Lynchburg, a member of the Hillside Garden Club, was chosen
editor of The JOURNAL and UPDATE.
Mrs. Talley dug the first sod when The Garden Club of Alexandria planted a Cornus
kousa at the American Horticultural Society
headquarters, River Farm, in her honor.
Spring weather in January and February, and
winter in March, demolished daffodils statewide, but The Mill Mountain Garden Club
produced a splendid, although smaller-thanusual, 56th Annual GCV Daffodil Show.
The GCVBoard of Directors met Thursday, May 9, at the home of Mrs. Raymond H.
Brown in Hampton. Among reports abbreviated at the Annual Meeting the next day was
that of Mrs. William C. Trenary III, liaison to
the Historian and Custodian of Records. The
Historian and Curator of Records, Mrs. Jere
M. H. Willis, had asked Lee LangstonHarrison, curator of the James Monroe Museum in Fredericksburg, to visit the Kent-Valentine vault and make recommendations about
the preservation of The GCV records. Mrs.
Langston-Harrison was given permission by
Mary Washington College, administrator of
the Monroe Museum, to consult without
charge. "On March 27, 1990, Barbara Willis
and Lee Langston-Harrison spent several
hours in the Kent-Valentine House in the vault
63

Follow the Green Arrow


establishment of the Virginia Commission on
Population Growth and Development; newly
formatted JOURNAL and UPDATE, and
now a new Editor.
In her Conservation Committee report,
Mrs. Carter congratulated a number of clubs
on activities from city-wide recycling to the
establishment of summer nature camps, from
adopting a highway to publishing a conservation brochure to be distributed during Historic Garden Week. Mrs. Varner, reporting
for the Finance Committee, recommended a
budget of $51,735, and said, "Ten years ago
our budget was $30,485. From thattime The
Club has seen a $21,2 50 increase and a $5 dues
raise. Quite a few categories have more than
doubled-many have remained the same. Our
largest increase has been Publications. Insurance was $3 ,000 and is now $7 ,000. Audit was
$2,000andisnow$5,250. In the 1980-81 budget we were also repaying past budget deficits
-$5,485 worth. We raised the dues then and
again now."
Mary Foster pointed with pride to initial
gross Historic Garden Week receipts of
$349,492.23, and Lula Hopkins recommended
two new properties for landscape restoration:
additional work at the Woodrow Wilson
House endorsed by the Board of Directors in
January, and the two-and-a-half-acre walled
garden at Montpelier, home of James Madison. Mr. Favretti explained the work that
would be done at both sites, which was unanimously adopted.
The group welcomed David West, Curator of Horticulture at the Virginia Living Museum, who gave a colorful presentation about
wildflowers. The meeting was recessed for
luncheons in the homes of members and an
afternoon tour of the Virginia Living Museum,
where an ailing bald eagle being nursed back
to health was an exhibit all will remember.
Sovran Bank was host to a lavish banquet at
the Radisson, where not one but two Massie
Medals were awarded, to Mrs. Lucius J.
Kellam, of the Garden Club of the Eastern
Shore, and Mrs. J. Robert Walker (Edith) of
The Martinsville Garden Club. For its landmark Operation Plant-a-Tree, The
Lynchburg Garden Club received the deLacy

Gardens & Landscapes of Virginia: photography


by Richard Cheek, text by Rudy]. Favretti.
and in the third floor records room," Mrs.
Trenary reported. "Mrs. Langston-Harrison
wrote a six-page report on archival recommendations, ending with 'Don't despair-The
Club's records are in better condition than
most!"'
After a festive gathering on the patio of
the Radisson Hotel, with an hors d'oeuvres
table that resembled a banquet, most of the
participants in the 70th Annual Meeting of
The GCV went on to a Dutch-treat dinner at
the James River Country Club.
Mrs. Talley's report that opened the business meeting the next morning was a summary
of the past two years. She cited especially two
banner Historic Garden Weeks and four successful restoration projects; maintenance and
a new highboy at the Kent-Valentine House;
computer, postage meter and upgraded telephone system for Historic Garden Week; work
in conservation, particularly support for the
64

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA

Gray Medal.
Next morning, meeting participants heard
proposals for the Common Wealth Award to
be made the following fall. Before naming
seven recipients of Horticultlure Awards of
Merit, Horticulture Chairman Gale Roberts
complimented clubs on a tricky exhibit, saying, "You are all winners with iris! But The
Brunswick Garden Club captured the flag
when Mr. Favretti discovered in that exhibit a
variety he has been trying to find the name of
for years."
Clarkie Jester made her debut as Editor
of The JOURNAL and UPDATE at the 1990
Annual Meeting of The GCV. "A number of
you have expressed, 'Wow, what a job!' and
you're right: Wow, what a wonderful job!" she
said, projecting the combination of youth,
competence, and enthusiasm she would bring
to the publications. "I look forward to an exciting future with you and your club members as we share our interests, our ideas and
our talents."
Mrs. Talley announced the retirement of
Mrs.James W. Perkinson ofThe Garden Club
of Danville, Rose Test Chairman since 1978.
"A native of North Carolina, a Phi Beta Kappa
graduate of Duke, the mother of three and a
devoted grandmother, Siggie possesses a passion for gardening," said Mrs. Talley. "She
has always been an extremely strong member
of The Garden Club of Danville, serving on
its board from before her presidency, 19671969, until this illness, ever generous with her
knowledge and her talents. We are grateful
that she shared them with The Garden Club
of Virginia."
An interesting address by Karen Wible of
the Mariner's Museum preceded the report of
Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears,Jr., Chairman of the
Nominating Committee. Referring to the
passing of the torch for games in ancient
Greece, Mrs. Talley turned over the wellmended gavel and the diamond pin given by
Mrs. Clayton B. Etheridge for the President
to wear during her term of office, to Mrs.
Henley L. Guild, saying, "Having the light,
carry it on. For two years, I have run with the
torch. Now I light the next runner's torch.
The next runner will never flag."

1990-1995
The Garden Club of Virginia is a success
story. The early planners knew that no wind
blows in favor of a ship without a destination.
So they charted a course which The Garden
Club of Virginia has sailed without mishap for
75 years. The wind blew in many exciting
plans for The Garden Club of Virginia in the
early 1990s.
The Garden Club of Virginia received a
wonderful bequest from Mrs. Jam es Bland
Martin in 1992. Teen, the 22nd President of
The Garden Club of Virginia, died in 1983,
and, at the death of her husband, James Bland
Martin, in 1992, The Club received a choice
of the lovely furnishings in their home, Kittery
Point in Gloucester, and a bequest of $2 5,000
to the Past Presidents' Fund.
The fund and various gifts were used to
enclose the porch on the west side of the KentValentine House and furnish it with their
handsome iron furniture. The porch was completed in 1992 and adds a touch of elegance to
the house.
Possible changes in the Board of Governors' and Annual Meetings of The Garden
Club of Virginia were discussed at the Board
of Governors' Meeting in 1992.
Charlotte Massie resigned as Editor of the
Historic Garden Week of Virginia Guidebook
and Director of Publicity in 1992. Suzanne
Munson was hired to take her place.
Mr. Ron Chiabotta was elected an Honorary Member of The Garden Club of Virginia.
Long-Range Planning Committee Chairmen Lee Cochran and Barbara Catlett worked
long and hard with Fred Cox of Marcellus
Wright Cox and Smith Architectural Firm,
with Peter Knowles of Taylor and Parrish Inc.,
and with Jack Zehmer, Executive Director of
Historic Richmond Foundation, on the longrange plans for the Kent-Valentine House.
With the completion of Phase I, the Martin
Room, the committee moved ahead with
Phase IL A definite plan was approved for
the construction of an elevator wing on the
east side of the Kent-Valentine House. The
65

Follow the Grem Arrow


Club of Virginia.
At the 70th Annual Meeting of The Garden Club of Virginia in Newport News May
10, 1990, Mrs. Henley L. Guild accepted the
gavel and diamond pin from outgoing President, Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley.
Virginia
Guild,
past
president of
The Hunting
Creek Garden
Club, was well
known to most
of the members
of The Garden
Club of Virginia
as she had been
giving talks to
other member
clubs for a long
time on flower
shows, flower
arranging, and
the restorations
of The GCV.
In July the Mrs. Hmley L. Guild
new Board of
Directors of The Garden Club of Virginia
traveled with husbands to Mountain Lake for
its first meeting. While the ladies carried on
the business of The GCV, husbands relaxed
in the serenity of this beautiful part of the
Commonwealth.
During the summer the Editorial Board
worked with Clarkie Jester, the new editor of
The JOURNAL and UPDATE, to prepare
The JOURNAL for publication. To the delight of the entire membership, this informative magazine with a new look arrived in our
mailboxes in September.
The Restoration Committee met in the
Tidewater Area inJulywith visits to the Adam
Thoroughgood House, Portsmouth Courthouse, Smith's Fort, and Bacon's Castle.
With the spectacular GCV Lily Show in
June sponsored by The Garden Club of Warren County still a fond memory, October
found us at Westminster-Canterbury in
Irvington for the 54th Annual Rose Show cleverly produced by The Garden Club of the

tower wing would include necessary and required fire safety stairs and handicapped
restrooms for all levels of the house. Now
the Long-Range Planning Committee could
approach individuals and foundations for gifts
and grants.
Researching the history of the Kent-Valentine House was another aspect of the master plan. Laura Carr, a graduate student in
Museum Studies at VCU, was appointed to
research the history of the house under the
supervision of Dr. Charles Brownell, professor of Art History at VCU.
The Junior Garden Club of Norfolk was
invited in May 1992 to join The Garden Club
of Virginia. Renamed the Harborfront Garden Club, it became the 46th member club of
The Garden Club of Virginia.
The Garden Club of Virginia Members'
Handbook was revised and updated in 1993.
A General Assembly Resolution of Recognition of 60 years of Historic Garden Week
in Virginia was given to The Garden Club of
Virginia.
Among the outstanding gifts to the KentValentine House were 2 5 serving pieces of
Georg Jensen Silver from Mrs. Clayton
Ethridge, a former member of The Garden
Club of Fairfax.
The Garden Club of Virginia gave garden lovers and historians a sumptuous volume,
Gardens & Landscapes ofVtrgi-nia, in 1993. The
richness and variety of these Virginia gardens
lent credence to the talent of Richard Cheek,
a genius behind the camera. Rudy J. Favretti,
noted American landscape architect, matched
in word the beauty of the gardens highlighted
in this unique publication.

MRS. HENLEY L. GUILD


President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1990-1992
To know Nancy Talley is to admire her.
She is poised, articulate, and superbly organized. Her keen mind and exceptional command of the English language make her a natural leader. She can be proud of her many contributions to further the goals of The Garden
66

The Garden Club ofVtrgina Presidents


Northern Neck.
On October 7 Mrs. Guild
presided over the presentation of
the 33rd restoration of The Garden Club of Virginia, The Grace
Arents Garden, at the Lewis
Ginter Botanical Garden,
Bloemendaal. Here her threemonth old granddaughter, Molly
Adair Guild, attended her first
event of The GCV and promptly
upstaged her grandmother.
The 71st Board of Governors' Meeting of The GCV was
sponsored by the Leesburg Garden Club October 16, 17, and 18.
The Board of Directors was wel- Mrs. Richard J. Cabaniss receives an award from Mrs. Guild at
corned at a delicious luncheon the 1990 Rose Show.

followed by a meeting Tuesday


afternoon at the home of Mrs. 0. Leland
thor of Growing Up and Good Times.
Mahan. That evening everyone was enterThe very next week the 32nd Annual
tained at small dinner parties in the homes of
Conservation Forum was held at the Comclub members - a real treat.
monwealth Club in Richmond with a record
Wednesday morning Mrs. Guild called on
attendance of 300. Later that same week the
former President Ellen Godwin (Mrs. James
Restoration Committee met in Charlottesville
G. Godwin) for a tribute to Mrs. F. Whitney
with visits to Monticello and the Pavilion
Godwin, President of The Garden Club of
Gardens at the University of Virginia. That
Virginia 1956-1958, who died August 11,
evening the Committee was entertained by
1990. In her tribute, Ellen said, "She was
Mrs. Hunter H. McGuire,] r. (Alice), at Royal
charming, witty and loved to dance and sing.
Orchard. As it happened the date was OctoShe had more beaux at 70 than most girls did
ber 31, Halloween, and the entire Committee
at 17, for she loved attention and was a master
including Mr. Favretti, the Landscape Archiat getting it."
tect for The Garden Club of Virginia, ap1990 proved to be a record year for Hispeared for dinner in costume! A great time
toric Garden Week. Mrs. Merritt W Foster,
was had by all.
Jr. (Mary), Chairman, reported a final gross
Just as clubs were winding down for the
figure of $3 64, 706.88.
up-coming holidays the President caused some
Before recessing for lunch and an afterexcitement when she underwent emergency
noon tour of Oatlands Plantation Mrs. Willheart surgery in November. Mrs. W Tayloe
iam L. Roberts (Gale), Common Wealth
Murphy,Jr. (Helen), First Vice President, and
Awards Chairman, announced that "WildMrs. Robert C. Wood ill (Mina), Second Vice
flowers by the Sea,'' a project of The Virginia
President, were on stand-by until Mrs. Guild
Beach Garden Club had won the Common
had fully recovered in time to preside at the
Wealth Award. Since 1979, this award had
Winter Board of Directors Meeting in Januhelped launch eighteen club projects throughary 1991. At this meeting the Board voted to
out the state.
affiliate The GCV Daffodil Show with the
Guest speaker at the Awards Dinner at
American Daffodil Society at the request of
Rockland, home of Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. R.
Patricia Crenshaw (Mrs.Joel Crenshaw), DafBrown, was Russell Baker, columnist, New
fodil Test Chairman.
York Times, and Pulitzer Prize winning auMrs. H. Gordon Leggett,Jr., Restoration
67

Follow'the Green Arrow

Mrs. Herbert L. Aman III, Mrs. Guild and Mrs. Edward A. Barham, Jr. at Judging School.
make everyone welcome. T he Board met at
the home of Mrs. Nicholas G. Wilson ill for
a delicious lunch and long afternoon meeting.
Lucy Ellett (Mrs. Frank T. Ellett), Conservation Chairman, made a motion that The
GCV adopt a resolution strongly supporting
energy policies, on both the state and the national level, that encourage conservation, energy efficiency, and development of renewable
energy sources. The motion passed.
Mina Wood, Second Vice President, reported that the Inter-Club Speakers' Bureau
Booklet had been completed and would be
distributed to the membership at the general
meeting.
During a wonderful evening at the Marine Science Museum, members had the opportunity to enjoy The Marsh Walk and to
see "Wildflowers by the Seaside," The Vll'ginia Beach Garden Club project that won the
Common Wealth Award in October.
One of the first announcements at the
Meeting the next morning was that Joseph C.
Carter, Jr., a senior partner in the law firm of
Hunton and Williams, had been made an
Honorary Member of The Garden Club of
Virginia. Mr. Carter had served The Garden
Club of Virginia for over 20 years without remuneration.

Chairman, reported that Mr. Richard Cheek


would begin photographing in the spring for
the new book to be published by the Restoration Committee.
In March the Artistic Judging School was
held at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in
Richmond. April was a busy time with The
GCV Daffodil Show sponsored by The Mill
Mountain Garden Club where the Roanoke
ladies handled 9 51 stems of horticulture and
66 gorgeous arrangemnts. The gross proceeds
for Historic Garden Week in 1991 were
$395,646.98 in spite of the torrents of rain in
some areas. We were awed by the beauty of
acres of trillium in bloom at the Horticulture
Field Day at Thompson Wildlife Management Area in Linden.
On May 3rd, Mrs. Guild took part in the
ceremony to commemorate the opening of the
new museum at the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace in Staunton. Landscaping the museum
was the third major garden improvement
project provided to the Birthplace by The
Garden Club of Vlrginia.
The Virginia Beach Garden Club sponsored the 71st Annual Meeting of The Garden Club of Virginia May 14, 15, 16. Cochairmen, Anne Gilliam (Mrs. William L.
Gilliam, Jr.) and Betty Jo Bruce (Mrs. E.
Carruthers Bruce) left no stone unturned to
68

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


in 1966.
George Mason University was the scene
of The GCV 1991 Lily Show beautifully
staged by the Garden Club of Fai~fax. That
same morning was the presentation of the
landscape setting provided by The GCV to
Carlyle House, a property of the Northern
Virginia Regional Park Authority.
The summer meeting of The GCV Board
of Directors was held in Charlottesville. The
Board met at Farmington with hostesses Ellen
Godwin, Lois Mengel (Mrs. Paul W Mengel),
and Bessie Carter. Including husbands at this
meeting had become a tradition over the years.
This year the President's husband, Henley
Guild, designed golf hats for all the members
of the "GCV Men's Auxiliary."
Since this year marked the 20th Anniversary of the purchase of the Kent-Valentine
House, the Kent-Valentine House Committee decided to seek the advice of John G.
Zehmer, Executive Director of the Historic

Mrs. John H. Bocock.


Pat Leggett, Restoration Committee
Chairman, presented a new project for the
membership's approval: to restore a 60-foot
section of the north wall in the garden at
Oatlands Plantation in Leesburg. The wall,
thought to have been
designed by Thomas
Jefferson, is of great historic interest in the annals of Virginia garden
history.
After a wonderful
afternoon, beginning
with a luncheon at the
Royster Cottage and
ending with a cruise of
Linkhorn Bay, the group
returned to the hotel to

dress for a gala dinner at Mrs. Charles H. Schutte, Jr., Mrs. Guild, Mrs. Paul W Mengel and Mrs.
the Virginia Beach Cen- Frank T. Ellett, 1991 Summer Board Meeting.
ter for the Arts. The climax of the evening was
Richmond Foundation. Mr. Zehmer stressed
the awarding of The GCV's highest honors.
the importance of planning for all the future
A very surprised and disbelieving Jean Printz,
use at the time a structure's physical and masa former President of The GCVand a memter plan is formulated. He indicated that a
ber of the Rivanna Garden Club for 31 years,
"team project is absolutely vital" and referred
was the recipient of the Massie Medal for her
to a team as an architect, engineer, and conoutstanding work in gardening and the comtractor. The Committee voted to pursue the
munity. An equally surprised Bessie Bocock
formulation of a master plan and to use the
Carter (Mrs. Robert Carter) was awarded the
interest from the General Maintenance Fund
deLacy Gray Medal for championing Envifor the necessary study and survey by Taylor
ronmental Action in Virginia. Bessie's mother,
and Parrish, Inc. of the Kent-Valentine House
Mrs.John H. Bocock, had received the medal
structure and all systems. The study and sur69

Follow the Green Arrow


vey were made during the summer months when the house was
closed.
Publications Committee liaison, Anne Rowe (Mrs. Josiah P.
Rowe III), informed the Board
that The GCV Members Handbook was obsolete. She was authorized to work on a revision to
be completed in the spring.
Helen Murphy announced
that the topic for the presidents'
Round-Table Discussion at The
GCVBoardofGovernors' Meeting in October would be "How Mrs. Guild and Mrs. Arthur P. Sibold, Jr., 1991 Conservation
the Kent-Valentine House can Forum.
mg.
better serve The GCV Membership."
All Board of Governors participants enThat evening we joined Bobby and Bessie
joyed
an informal dinner in the garden at the
Carter at their home, Redlands, for cocktails
Courtland home of Mr. and Mrs. J. Matthew
and dinner, a highlight of the meeting.
Pope. The evening was brisk with a bonfire,
A number of fall meetings were scheduled
hot barbecue, and blue grass music.
to take place in The Kent-Valentine House.
At the end of the business meeting the
The club historians met with Millicent West,
next morning, the Chairman of the Common
Historian and Custodian of Records, for an
Wealth Award Committee announced that the
inspiring meeting with guest speaker, Mrs.
winner of the Common Wealth Award was the
Catha Grace Rambusch, Curator and Direcproject of The Huntington Garden Club for
tor of Wave Hill, which houses "The Catalog
its Backyard Habitat Educational Garden at
of Landscape Records in the United States."
the Virginia Living Museum.
Mrs. Rambusch emphasized the importance
Mrs. St.Julian Oppenhimer,Jr. (Emma),
of keeping records of an organization, and the
Historic
Garden Week Chairman, reported a
club historians returned home with a clearer
highly successful 1991 Tour. At the end of
idea of what was expected of a club historian.
her report, she read the following quote from
In September Mrs. Guild gave a luncheon
the Virginia Division of Tourism: "The Virfor member club presidents. For some it was
ginia Division of Tourism is keenly aware of
their first visit to the Kent-Valentine House
the huge positive tourism and economic dewhere they were treated to a tour and history
velopment impact that Historic Garden Week
of the house by Mary Frances Flowers (Mrs.
has on the Commonwealth and we look forGeorge H. Flowers, Jr.), Honorary President
ward
to continuing our mutually beneficial reof The GCV.
lationship."
The following week all club conservation
Fallowing the meeting, members boarded
chairmen were invited to the house for a workbuses for a luncheon at the Smithfield Station
shop. These popular workshops are an imMarina. After lunch we had a special tour of
portant means of communication for environthe house and garden at Bacon's Castle. Cockmental ideas.
tails at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hanes Byerly
Franklin was the site of the 72nd Board
and
a banquet at the Cypress Cove County
of Governors' Meeting of The Garden Club
Club
climaxed a long and busy day.
of Virginia October 8, 9, 10. The Board of
At the morning meeting the next day, Mrs.
Directors gathered at noon for a delicious lunGeorge H. Flowers, Jr. gave an informative
cheon at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W: M.
history of the acquisition of the Kent-ValenCamp,Jr. before the afternoon business meet70

The Gardm Club of Virgina Presidmts

tine House by The GCV in 1971. Mrs. FlowJam es Bland Martin. Teen Martin was the
22nd President of The Garden Club of Virers said: "In spite of its growth in importance,
ginia and the author of Follow the Grem Arthere are only two major changes in The Garden Club of Virginia over the years since 1920.
row. She died in 1983 and her husband,James
One was founding Historic Garden Week in
Bland Martin, died in 1992. At his death, her
will directed that The GCV receive such items
1929 and using revenue from this yearly
of furnishings in their home as desired for use
project to restore historic Virginia gardens.
The other was buying in 1971, restoring, and
in the Kent-Valentine House. In a letter to
using the Kent-Valentine House for The GCV
Hunter Savage (Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr.) in
Headquarters. Who knows what exciting ven1978, Teen wrote; "The greatest joy in my life,
tures are ahead for us!" Following Mrs. Flowaside from my husband, has come from my
ers' history, the club presidents began their
association with The Garden Club of Virginia
Round-Table Discussions on the Kent-Valenand it will give me great satisfaction to have
tine House.
the things I love come to rest at the Kent-ValThe GCV Board of Directors met in
entine House." The will further stated that a
cash amount would be left to the Past PresiRichmond inJ anuary 1992. Bessie Carter, Lidents' Fund of The GCV.
aison to the Admissions Committee, moved
Mrs. Guild then announced that the
that The Garden Club of Virginia invite the
Board of Directors had authorized her to apJunior Garden Club of Norfolk to membership. The motion carried and would be taken
point a Long-Range Planning Committee to
to The GCV Annual Meeting in May as a recwork with an architect to implement a master
ommendation from the Board to be
voted upon by the membership.
The Board discussed the fact that
the rising cost of having Annual and
Board of Governors' Meetings was a
concern to many clubs and that the
registration fee for these Meetings was
unrealistic. A motion was made to increase each of these to $50.00, and the
motion carried.
Mrs. Guild ended the meeting by
announcing the 1992-1994 slate of
Officers submitted by the Nominating Committee. The new President
of The Garden Club of Virginia
would be Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr.
The 72nd Annual Meeting of
The Garden Club of Virginia was
held in Lynchburg. The Board met
at Shan-Shui, the mountain-top home
of Pat and Gordon Leggett. A picnic
under yellow and white tents at
Pharsalia, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Mrs. Guild, Mrs. Charles H. Schutte, Jr. and Mr. Rudy J.
George Flippen, Jr., with the rain Favretti at the 1992 Annual Meeting.
clearing as the buses drove in was a
plan for the Kent-Valentine House. Mrs.
rare treat.
In her report to the membership, Mrs.
George M. Cochran (Lee) and Mrs. Richard
Guild told of a wonderful and generous beCatlett, Jr. (Barbara), were appointed Chairmen of the Committee.
quest to The GCV from the estate of Mrs.
71

Follow the Green Arrow


Mrs. Guild told the membership; "You have chosen wellher keen mind, unyeilding integrity, and wonderful sense of
humor give Helen the steady
hand to take the helm for the
next two years." In presenting
Mrs. Murphy with the gavel
Mrs. Guild said; "And now,
Helen, it is with mixed emotions that I turn over to you the
72nd Annual Meeting of The
Garden Club of Virginia, and
with it our admiration, our support and our love."

MRS. W. TAYLOE
MURPHY, JR.
President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1992-1994

Mrs. Guild and Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr.

When Mrs. Lilburn T.


Talley (Nancy) introduced the
new President of The Garden Club of Virginia, Mrs. Henley L. Guild (Virginia), to the
Annual Meeting in Hampton in May of 1990,
she said in part: "She is a Barbara Bush type
who knits beautifully, cooks expertly, grows
fine flowers and sews clothes a designer would
be proud to wear-I suspect she understood
more than most of us what Mrs. Bush told the
Wellesley seniors last week: 'If I'd done any
more I'd have died.'" Mrs. Guild, expert
flower arranger and artistic judge, supplier of
exquisite dried flower arrangements for the
State Department, and popular lecturer, held
many chairmanships and offices in The Garden Club of Virginia and was an extremely
popular choice to be President. Shortly after
her election, she said, "I consider this the
greatest honor I have ever received .... As a
native Vrrginian, I was born knowing about
The Garden Club of Virginia." Her successor, Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. (Helen) said
of her: "She is the personification of grace and
class. In her unpretentious way, she has led
The Garden Club of Virginia during the past
two years, and her very evident love for the
organization is matched by its members' de-

She said surely among the accomplishments of the past two years was the acceptance
of the Junior Garden Club of Norfolk (soon
to be known as the Harborfront Garden Club)
as the 46th member club of The GCV was
among the top.
Luncheons in members' homes and a tour
of Poplar Forest followed the morning meeting.
At the banquet at the Boonsboro Country Club the Massie Medal was awarded to
The Garden Club of the Northern Neck, an
outstanding member club of The GCV, and
the deLacy Gray Medal to Mrs. Russell
Arundel, a conservation leader who had demonstrated a love for the natural environment
and a responsibility for its preservation.
The speakers the following morning were
Barbara Hill, President of Sweet Briar College, and Linda Koch Lorimer, President of
Randolph-Macon Woman's College. They
spoke on women's education.
A motion was made that the slate presented by the Nominating Committee be accepted and the Secretary be instructed to cast
a unanimous ballot.
In her introduction of the new President,
72

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


mitring that she knew very little
about Flower Shows, she requested, and received, permission from the Chairman, Mrs.
James F. Tyler (Lynn), to stay
on the floor during the judging. She continued this practice for all of the shows during
her term, and not only did she
learn a great deal, but also the
Flower Shows Committee was
most appreciative of her interest in this important aspect of
TheGCV.
The Summer Board Meeting in 1992 was held at
Farmington Country Club in
Charlottesville. On Friday
evening we had cocktails in
Earlysville at Panorama Farms,
home of The Honorable and
Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. with her mother Mrs. George L. Turner Mrs.James B. Murray (Bunny),
and her sister Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.
and dinner in Charlottesville at
the home of a gracious Past
President of The GCV, Miss Jean Printz. Satvotion to her."
urday night we were the guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Mrs. Murphy's club, of which she was a
Robert Carter, Jr. (Bessie) at Redlands. In
founding member, The Garden Club of The
between we swam in the pool, enjoyed getNorthern Neck, received the Massie Medal
ting to know the members of the "Men's Auxat the banquet the night before she was elected
iliary" (our supportive husbands), and had a
President of The Garden Club of Virginia
meeting of the Board. In her report Mrs.
which made the 1992 Annual Meeting even
more special for her. Her mother, Mrs.
Murphy said that a fantastic par~ had been
George L. Turner (Wilson) a charter memgiven in her honor by The Garden Club of
the Northern Neck at which she received a
ber of The Boxwood Garden Club, and her
leather briefcase, a variety of American holly
sister, Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr. (Katty),
called "Miss Helen," and a pair of running
President of The GCV 1984-1986, were
shoes decorated with jewels and flowers!
present to see Mrs. Turner's second daughter
Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr. (Pat), First
receive the gavel. Mrs. Murphy not only acknowledged their presence, but also attributed
Vice President, reported on the first meeting
to them her interest in The Garden Club of
of the Kent-Valentine House Long-Range
Virginia. In her remarks Mrs. Murphy said,
Planning Committee with Mrs. George M.
"This club is much like a family in that I have
Cochran (Lee) and Mrs. Richard H. Catlett,
Jr. (Barbara) Co-Chairmen. She said, "The
a strong sense that its members are as anxious
Committee is in consultation with three exfor me to succeed as I am." She continued to
perts: Mr. Fred Cox, architect with the firm
feel this support throughout her term and cite
Marcellus Wright Cox and Smith; Mr. Jack
its responsibility for any successes she might
Zehmer, Executive Director of the Historic
have enjoyed.
Richmond Foundation; and Peter Knowles,
The GCV Lily Show, sponsored by The
President of Taylor and Parrish, Inc. which
Garden Club of Fairfax, was Mrs. Murphy~
has been in charge of past repairs to the
first big, official function as President. Ad73

Follow the Greerz Arrow


house". Among the issues to be considered
by this Committee were the installation of an
elevator, handicapped access, and improved
usage of space to accommodate The GCV
needs.
Mrs. Leggett also reported that "Mrs.
James Bland Martin in her will gave The Garden Club of Virginia first choice of her home
furnishings, including a lovely collection of
wrought-iron furniture. She also left a gift of
$2 5,000. Because of these two acquisitions, it
was decided Phase I of the Long-Range Plan
would be to enclose the west porch."
Mrs. Murphy had known for months of
Mrs.]. Robert Massie, Jr. (Charlotte's) desire
to retire as Editor of the Guidebook and Director of Publicity for Historic Garden Week.
Mrs. Massie had given 27 years of dedicated
service to The Garden Club of Virginia. The
Chairman of the Historic Garden Week Committee, Mrs. St. Julian Oppenhimer, Jr.
(Emma) announced at the July meeting that
Mrs. Edwin P. Munson (Suzanne) had been
hired, and the Board voted to change the Bylaws so that her title would be Editor of the
Guidebook and Executive Director of Historic
Garden Week. In September a lunch was
given in Mrs. Massie's honor at the Commonwealth Club in Richmond, and she was presented with a pearl necklace with a gold disk
bearing the seal of The Garden Club of Virginia in the center.
At the Board of Directors' Meeting at the
home of Mrs.]. H. Tyler Wilson (Bambe) near
Warrenton in October 1992, Mrs. Murphy
announced the death of one of our "Great
Ladies," Mrs. Benjamin F. Parrott, President
of The Garden Club of Virginia from 1966 to
1968. She told the Board that The Club followed the tradition of giving the altar flowers
at the funeral. The next day Mrs. John D.
Varner, Past President, gave a lovely tribute
to Mrs. Parrott.
The liaison to the Kent-Valentine House
Committee, Mrs. Talley, announced that the
House Chairman, Mrs. George H. Flowers,
Jr. (Mary Frances) had reluctantly agreed to
raise to $5 the price of the delicious lunches
at the house.
In 1992 the Board of Governors met in

Virginia's "Hunt Country" at Airlie near


Warrenton and enjoyed three days of perfect
fall weather. After lovely dinners at private
homes on Tuesday evening, Mrs. Murphy announced at the business meeting the next day
that if she "had to chose one word to describe
the office of the President of The Garden Club
ofVirginia, it would be 'fun'." She hoped that
it was obvious how much she was enjoying her
new job.
Mrs. Charles H. Seilheimer, Jr. (Mary
Lou) wore many hats at the 73rd Board of
Governors' Meeting. She was chairman of the
Meeting, hostess for a dinner at her gorgeous
home on Tuesday night, and, as The Garden
Club of Virginia Horticulture Chairman, in
charge of the plant exchange. She announced
in her report that the Horticulture Field Day
would be at James Madison University in
March 1993. We were invited to "see an exhibit from the British Museum of thirty herbarium specimens collected in Virginia in the
early 1700s by the botanist, James Clayton."
The plans also included two speakers of unusual intellectual calibre, a box lunch, and a
tour of the Jam es Madison Arboretum.
Various Chairmen reported that Historic
Garden Week continues to bring in record
sums ($419,795.24), that Virginia Shepherd,
Editor of Virginia Wildlife, spoke to the Publications Workshop, and that the member club
presidents had voted the Common Wealth
Award of $5,000 to the landscaping and beautification at Shalom et Benedictus project of
Winchester-Clarke Garden Club and $1500
to the Central Rappahannock Regional Library, a project of the Rappahannock Valley
Garden Club.
After a delicious lunch at Fauquier Springs
Country Club, the group was treated to a tour
of three fascinating houses: North Cliff,
Farley, and Salubria, and then the banquet at
Airlie. One can be assured of being well-fed
at Garden Club meetings.
The business meeting the next day was
held in a church, the Warrenton Bible Fellowship, and Mrs. Murphy said that it was the most
unusual place in which she had presided over a
meeting since she did so on board the "Miss
Ann" in the middle of the Rappahannock River
74

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


staying for the General Assembly Session to
preside over the January 1993 Board Meeting
at the Kent-Valentine House. The Board was
pleased to see the new FAX machine in the
Garden Week office and to learn that the first
message received was from Kenmore.
Mrs. Murray reported that the Conservation Forum held in November was so successful financially that our dues as a member
of the Steering Committee of the Virginia Environmental Network could be paid from the
proceeds. Saying that "there is certain uncertainty about any individual piece of legislation," she asked that the Board not support
certain specific bills, but broad concepts such
as recycling and "standing" which she so ably
explained to us. Mrs. Murray's dedication to
and vast knowledge of conservation, together
with her familiarity with the environmental
community and gracious manner, made her a
well-respected and popular Conservation
Chairman.
Mrs. Talley's motion that the President
appoint an ad hoc Committee to study the possibility of a sequel to Follow the Green Arrow
passed. Mrs. Leggett reported on the recommendations of a committee which studied ways
to lessen the financial burden of Member
Clubs when sponsoring Annual or Board of
Governors' Meetings. The Board voted to
have prepaid "Dutch Treat" dinners on the
first night of the Meetings and to raise the
registration fee to $100 for two-night Meetings.
Later in January of 1993 during the Legislative Field Day, Mrs. Murphy and Mrs.
Oppenhimer stood in the center aisle of the
House of Delegates to receive not only a resolution commending the 60th Anniversary of
Historic Garden Week, but also a standing
ovation for The Garden Club of Virginia as
well. It was a thrilling moment!
The Artistic Judging School at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts featured abstract
and free form taught by Dr. David Diller,
noted husband of our Lily Test Chairman.
Many ladies braved pouring rain to attend and
learn.
The Conservation Committee made the
front page of the Richmond Times-Dispatch

Mrs. Murphy ready for the famous James River


Raft Trip.
when she was president of The Garden Club of
the Northern Neck.
Club presidents made reports on "Innovative Ideas for Annual and Board of Governors' Meetings" and those present were particularly charmed by the cleverness and vivacity of Mrs. Townsend Brown, Jr. (Candy),
President of Harborfront Garden Club, our
brand new member club. We had high expectations for these young Norfolk women
and were certainly not disappointed. After a
quick box lunch, many of us joined the Restoration Committee as it presented a restored
wall to Oatlands, Inc., a part of the National
Trust for Historic Preservation. A garden
party followed in one of Virginia's most delightful gardens on one of the prettiest days
of the year.
Mrs. Murphy's husband served in the Virginia House of Delegates while she was President of The GCV. She walked the two short
blocks from the Jefferson Hotel where she was
75

Follow the Green Arrow


a sizable contribution was made to the KentValentine Long-Range Plan Fund!
The Board met at the charming home of
Mrs. John Paul C. Hanbury. A well-known
hybridizer of lilies, one of the country's top
judges, and a great friend of The Garden Club
of Virginia, Mr. Ron Chiabotta, was elected
an Honorary Member of our organization.
Mrs. Charles H. Schutte, Jr. (Betty) and
her Committee which had been exploring the
possibility of a sequel to Follow the Green Arrow were authorized to go forward to publication. The Restoration Committee Chairman, Mrs. Mears, reported that "the challenge
to restore the three sites voted on by you at a
meeting of the Board a year ago had been accomplished. These were the public garden of
Robert E. Lee House at Washington and Lee
University, the grounds at Belmont, and the
wilderness walk at Kenmore."
The informal dinner on a cruise boat, to
which we walked from our hotel, was an exciting way to begin the Annual Meeting. The
next morning at the business meeting, the
Executive Director of Historic Garden Week,
Mrs. Munson, told us that each homeowner
had received a letter from the Virginia Division of Tourism expressing its gratitude for
participation in this springtime event. Its billing as "America's Largest Open House" had
been picked up by the media nationwide, and
visitors came from many states and countries.
The Chairmen of the Kent-Valentine
House Committee, Mrs. Flowers, announced
a gift of 25 serving pieces of Georg Jensen silver from Mrs. Clayton B. Ethridge, a member of The Garden Club of Fairfax then living in Texas. She had made other nice gifts to
The Garden Club of Virginia, including the
exquisite diamond pin which is worn by the
President during her term.
The will of Mrs. James W. Denton,
deLacy Gray Medal for Conservation winner
from Warren County, left a collection of 1100
slides of wildflowers to her club, and at the
Annual Meeting, the president of The Garden Club of Warren County presented this
valuable gift to The Garden Club of Virginia.
The Honorable William B. Spong, Jr.
gave a delightful talk on the history of Ports-

when members donned wet suits at the KentValentine House and went rafting through the
rapids of the James River in Richmond. We
visited Williams Dam and learned about the
proposed breaching of it to allow the passage
of anadromous fish to the upper branches of
the river. Mrs. Murphy's interest in conservation and the out-of-doors had prompted her
to ask the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay to
arrange the adventure. She was gratified by
the many comments favorable to The Garden Club of Virginia which she heard.
One of the most embarrassing moments
of Mrs. Murphy's term (if not of her life) occurred when, within one minute of her arrival
at the Daffodil Show in Harrisonburg, she
knocked over a flower arrangement and broke
the vase. The Spotswood Garden Club members could not have been more gracious to the
mortified President and soon had another pair
of arrangements on either side of the place
where the trophies were presented.
The enclosure of the porch on the west
side of the Kent-Valentine House was completed for Garden Week and received raves
from everyone who saw it. It was not only
architecturally pleasing, but also added light
to the library and "opened up" the House.
The Martin furniture from the porch at
Kittery Point looked as though it was made
for our new porch which immediately became
the favorite location for small meetings.
During the Spring of 1993 many members went to a tea in Staunton to celebrate 60
years of The Garden Club of Virginia's relationship with Woodrow Wilson's Birthplace
and also to Orange County for the presentation of the restoration of the walled garden at
Montpelier, followed by a lovely garden party
on a gorgeous Sunday afternoon.
The Annual Meeting in May 1993 was
held in Portsmouth with The Elizabeth River
Garden Club as hostess. Although this club
was no longer the newest Garden Club of Virginia Member Club, it had never sponsored a
meeting before. With Mrs. Edward A.
Barham, Jr. (Susan) and Mrs. Richard S. Bray
Q"udy; Mrs. Stephen S. Perry, Jr.) as co-chairmen, the two-day event was pure pleasure.
There was even enough money left over that
76

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


At the business meeting the next morning ~s. Cochran, Co-Chairman of the KentValentine Long-Range Planning Committee,
made a motion "that the membership accept
the conceptual presentation of an elevator
wing addition to the northeast corner of the
Kent-Valentine House." The motion passed,
and Mrs. Cochran assured the membership
that no building would begin before funds
were in hand to pay for it.
The Summer Board Meeting in 1993 was
held at the Princess Anne Country Club in
Virginia Beach. Mrs. Mears reported that the

Mrs. Charles R Urquhart receives the deLacy Gray


Medal from Mrs. James B. Murray.
mouth before our lunches in private homes
and tea at the quarters of the Commandant of
the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. The banquet
that night at one of our restorations, the Historic Portsmouth Courthouse, was absolutely
spectacular! The flower arrangements were
smashing and
the
food
beautiful as
well as delicious. After
dinner, the
Conservation
Committee
awarded the
deLacy Gray
Medal
to
IJ1C::::::::-.-a~-::
Mrs. Charles
<:J,,.
F. Urquhart,
M rs. H u~h J. H.agan,.J'. gives J (D t)fr
Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr; the Fr.anklino. i: om
.
r
10ra
Massze Medal.
1ong lieie 0.me
of service in conservation to her garden club
and the community. The excitement of Mrs.
Robert L. Hopkins, Jr. (Lula) being awarded
the Massie Medal was heightened when we
learned that exactly 33 years ago her mother
and father were given the same award. The
choice of Mrs. Hopkins was a popular one,
and the Past Presidents, Board, and Committee Chairmen gathered in Mrs. Murphy's suite
after the banquet and toasted Lula with a glass
of Northern Neck wine.

Mrs. Murphy with her club's ribbon winning entry, 1993 Lily Show.

Restoration Committee had granted Mrs.


Cochran's request that it underwrite the major portion of the cost of schematic drawings
for the Kent-Valentine House. The new Historic Garden Week Chairman, Mrs. Robert
A. Bristow (Anne), reported that the title of
Mrs. William W. Flowers (Susan) had been
changed from Secretary to Administrator to
better reflect the many additional duties which
she has so capably and willingly assumed. The
Board adopted a resolution of appreciation for
our long-time tenant and friend, Mr. Robert
W. Stewart, who was quite ill. The Kent-Valentine House liaison, Mrs. Talley, reported
that Mrs. John Tyssowski (Catherine), a beloved member of Fauquier and Loudoun Gar77

Follow the Green Arrow


ings" issue, and Kat
Imhoff, Executive Director of the Commission on Population,
Growth and Development, discussed the need
for a strategic plan for
the Commonwealth's
anticipated growth. The
Princess Anne Garden
Club again sponsored
the Rose Show in Virginia Beach. The theme
was "By the Beautiful
Sea," and a local television station gave the
show extensive coverage.
The Board of Di~~'~
Mrs. Murphy, Mrs. Arthur S. Brinkley, Jr., and and Mrs. William T. rectors met at the Old
Tucker, 1993 Rose Show.
Towne Holiday Inn in
Alexandria on October
den Club, had died at age 103 and left to The
12, 1993. Mrs.JosiahP.Roweill(Anne)preGarden Club of Virginia three pieces of fursented the outstanding new Members' Handbook on which she and her Committee had
niture: a small sideboard, an empire chair, and
a very fine antique sewing table. Earlier she
worked so hard. Mrs. George A Horkan, Jr.
(Ann Mari), liaison to the Horticulture Comhad given the club $1000 to buy the dining
room chairs now used at the Kent-Valentine
mittee, reported that an attempt was being
made to formulate a list of plants which could
House.
After the meeting some of the Board
be incorporated in the gardens of members to
Members joined their husbands for a dip in
produce material for our Historic Garden
the ocean before a delightful dinner at the
Week flower arrangers.
ocean-front cottage of Mrs. Arthur S. Brinkley,
Mrs. Mears, Restoration Committee
Jr. (Jody).
Chairman, reported that tornadoes had caused
Right after Labor Day the calendar once
extensive damage at both Prestwould and
Mary Washington House and that the Comagain was crowded with committee meetings.
The club historians were inspired by Mrs.
mittee intended to render assistance to both
of these properties as soon as their needs could
Catesby G.Jones,Jr.'s (Spotswood) talk at the
be completely assessed. She then said that "the
Kent-Valentine House. The Restoration
Committee met at Monticello.
moment we have all been waiting for" has arrived and showed to the Board for the first
The first Awards Workshop was held at
time the Committee's book, Gardens & Landthe Kent-Valentine House in the fall of 1993.
scapes of Virginia. This beautiful volume with
Newly appointed awards chairmen of the
member clubs met to hear about the qualifiphotographs by Richard Cheek and text by
cations and procedures for proposing candiRudy J. F avretti, Landscape Architect for The
Garden Club of Virginia, met with raves, and
dates for the Massie and deLacy Gray Medals, the Common Wealth Award, and the Horthe Board was pleased to hear that distributiculture Award of Merit.
tion and sales would begin shortly.
At the Fall Workshop of the ConservaMrs. Talley, liaison to the Kent-Valentine
tion Committee Teri Cofer of the Virginia
House Committee, reported that "an invenEnvironmental Network described the "taktory of the Kent-Valentine House contents has
78

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


been taken, the gift of Committee member,
Mrs.]. Paul Bullock, Jr. (Betsy), who offers
this service as a professional. With the help
of Mrs. Carlton P. Moffatt, Jr. (Camilla), she
has made a written and pictorial record of the
Kent-Valentine House Collection."
There was a discussion about how the
expenses of Historic Garden Week could be
decreased, and the consensus was that the office in Richmond had a very tight budget
which could not be cut any further. The member clubs were urged to withhold for expenses
as little of their profits as possible. Some clubs
find it advantageous to hold parties for
homeowners, but the expenses for these events
should be taken from club treasuries. The
Board approved a motion recommended by
the Restoration Committee that no proceeds
from Historic Garden Week should ever be
used for the purchase of alcoholic beverages.
After a Dutch Treat Dinner at the 219
Restaurant Tuesday evening, the business
meeting was opened on Wednesday, October
13, with a prayer by Past President, Mrs.
Lucius]. Kellam (Dot).
Mrs. Arthur F. Sibold,Jr. (Lib), president
of The Hunting Creek Garden Club, welcomed everyone but especially those who were
present in 1972 when Hunting Creek sponsored the Annual Meeting. She told about
what positions they had held then which
brought back many memories.
Mrs. Murphy said in her report: "The
Garden Club of Virginia is filled with exciting and talented women who seldom confine
their interests to one field. The thing that
unites us all is a love of beauty and a dedication to enhance appreciation of it in others.
Some of us grow flowers, some arrange them,
some work to try to save native plants, and
some do all three. To me the strength of The
Garden Club of Virginia is in its diversity."
Mrs. Mears unveiled the new Restoration
Committee book to loud applause, but was
sorry to report that delays in customs made it
unavailable for distribution at the Meeting. As
part of her Finance Committee report, Mrs.
Talley said: "One reason The Garden Club of
Virginia can run a tight ship is the generosity
of its Officers and Committee Chairmen, who

give not only of their time and talents, but also


their resources in their work for The Garden
Club of Virginia."
Mrs. William W Flowers, Historic Garden Week Administrator, displayed the 1994
brochure, the first ever on recycled paper and
in two colors. Mrs.Jester, Editor of The Garden Club of Virginia JOURNAL, distributed
a new, easy reference publication booklet.
Mrs. David Diller, Lily Test Chairman,
said that she had bad news: "Gilbey's Gin is
turning to plastic bottles! The square frosted
glass bottles will be no more. I'm asking you
and your club members to collect these old
bottles for the Lily Test Committee and bring
them to The Lily Show next year. Ask your
friends and bartenders to save these bottles for
you. This is serious."
Mrs. Catlett, Co-Chairman of the KentValentine House Long-Range Planning Committee, described Phase II "which will include
the addition to the house on the east side of a
tower wing.... which will contain necessary and
required fire safety and handicap access stairs,
and handicapped rest room facilities.... An
elevator will also be included."
Miss Julia Claypool, Historic Site Administrator of Carlyle House, a Garden Club of
Virginia restoration, spoke on the history of
the house. Mrs. Murphy called on Mrs. David
F. King (Bev) to announce the results of the
vote for the Common Wealth Award. The
Princess Anne Garden Club received $6,000
for its project to restore the garden at the
deWitt Cottage in Virginia Beach. The group
then recessed and enjoyed a delicious lunch
in several private homes followed by walking
tours of Old Towne. That night a Scottish
piper welcomed us to Carlyle House where
we enjoyed a feast under a huge tent.
The Thursday morning business meeting
was predominantly round table discussions on
"Educating Ourselves ... Educating Others,"
followed by Mr. L.John Trott, Jr., who spoke
on Virginia's native birds. After Mrs. Hugh].
Hagan's (Alice) clever tribute to The Hunting Creek Garden Club, Mrs. Murphy declared the meeting adjourned. It was not until the box luncheon sponsored by The Garden Club of Alexandria that she realized she
79

Follow the Green Arrow


had conducted the
whole meeting with
the price tag hanging from the sleeve
of her brand new
suit!
Fine Arts and Flowers at the Virginia
Museum of Fine
Arts took place later
in October. Mrs.
Murphy and her
husband were proud
to stand in the receiving line to represent The Garden
Club of Virginia.
The Conservation
Mrs. Murphy and the Forum at the Comprice tag.
monwealth Club in
Richmond late in
the month had as its topic "Environmental Cooperation-Three Perspectives."
Mr. and Mrs. Murphy and the Restoration Committee Chairman, Mrs. Mears, enjoyed the fine hospitality of the National Trust
for Historic Preservation at a reception followed by dinner at the Sulgrave Club in Washington. The Garden Club ofVirginia was recognized for its contributions to all four Trust
properties in Virginia (Belle Grove, Montpelier, Oatlands and Woodlawn) and a plaque
bearing The Garden Club of Virginia name,
along with other generous donors, had been
placed in the Trust headquarters building.
The President had a heavy schedule of
engagements to speak to member clubs and
was described by the president ofThe Augusta
Garden Club as having been "on the road
more than Charles Kuralt and Willie Nelson
put together." Each visit to a club was a special occasion, but the joint meeting of her own
club, The Garden Club of the Northern Neck,
with The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club
in the Council House at Stratford was a moving experience for Mrs. Murphy. Her 90-year
old mother, Mrs. Turner, and her sister, Mrs.
Mears, surprised her by coming to be with her
on that day.
The new year (1994) began with many

committee meetings, followed by the Board


of Directors' Meeting, all held at the KentValentine House within a week. Mrs. Rowe
reported that almost 800 of the new Members' Handbooks had been sold, and the Board
also learned that the new Flowers Shows
Handbook, which Mrs.John R. Eagle (Sandra)
masterminded, would be available atJudging
School. Mrs. Mears reported that brochures
for the sites that wanted them have been written by Mr. F avretti and would soon be printed
and distributed. She also said: "Due to various circumstances, including the acquisition
of additional property necessitating the need
for a new master plan of the property, Poplar
Forest has withdrawn its request for our help
with screen planting on the property. This is
a disappointment, but we shall respect its decision."
Mrs. Bristow reported that advertising
fees cover nearly 70% of the printing costs of
the Guidebook. Mrs. Leggett, liaison to the
Kent-Valentine House Long-Range Planning
Committee, told the Board that the next step
is to raise money for Phase II, installation of
the "tower" addition to the house, and that
Past President, Mrs.James C. Godwin (Ellen)
would be the financial advisor. Mrs. Schutte
announced that a grant had been received from
the Perry Foundation which, together with
funds on hand, would enable us to proceed
with the sequel to Follow the Green Arrow. Mrs.
Robert C. Wood III (Mina), Parliamentarian,
proposed numerous Bylaws changes, and the
Board expressed i~ gratitude not only to her,
but also to her husband on whose legal knowledge she had relied. The Board adopted a
Resolution in appreciation of Mrs. Bullock for
her documentation of the Kent-Valentine
House contents. At the close of the meeting,
Mrs. Murphy announced that a new garden
club, The Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula, had been formed and that The Garden
Club of the Northern Neck was helping it to
get started. She was the liaison between the
two clubs. Just before adjournment, the President read the Nominating Committee's proposed slate of Officers for 1994-1996. She
said that she was beginning to feel a bit like a
lame duck, but many exciting occasions
80

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


awaited her still.
Legislative Field Day, an event sponsored
by the Conservation Committee during the
General Assembly Session, drew a large group
of members from most of the member clubs.
There was an unusual amount of cold weather
and several ice storms during the winter of
1994, but the Artistic Judging School was the
only event that had to be cancelled and was
re-scheduled for September.
The raft trip on the James River in the
spring of 1993 had been so successful that the
Conservation Committee planned two trips
in early spring: a canoe trip in the North Landing River property of the Virginia Nature
Conservancy and an overnight stay on Hog
Island, one of the Eastern Shore's Barrier Islands held by the Virginia Coast Reserve. Both
events were educational, but also a pleasant
reward for this dedicated Committee.
The Restoration Committee met in early
April at Christ Church and Stratford Hall in
the Northern Neck. The next week The
Ashland Garden Club had a one-day Daffodil
Show that attracted an unusually large number of blooms which had evidently thrived
during the harsh winter. Historic Garden
Week grossed over one-half million for the
first time in 1994. The success was attributed
to both outstanding publicity and pleasant
weather. The President fulfilled her customary role as Chief Hostess at Mount Airy, the
Tayloe home in Richmond County, went to
four other tours, and was thrilled to be asked
to pass out ribbons to young children who
brought flowers (and also those who did not)
to a tea held for them, their mothers, and
grandmothers at the Woman's Club in Richmond.
The presentation of the garden at
Belmont, the Geri Melchers Estate, took place
on one of the loveliest days in April. The
President presided and watched her sister,
Mrs. Mears, present the garden to her cousin,
Dr. William M. Anderson, Jr., President of
Mary Washington College, which owns
Belmont.
The May, 1994, meeting of the Board of
Directors took place at Panorama Farms, Mrs.
Murray's lovely home near Earlysville. The

Board presented the soon-to-be-retired President with a composite picture of all those who
served on "her" Board, a mug, and a sweatshirt
with The Garden Club of Virginia seal on
front, the Kent-Valentine House on the back,
and Murphy down the sleeve. Lunch was
served by Mrs. Murray and Mrs. T. Austin
Sydnor, Jr. (Peggy). The meeting came next,
and in her final report to the Board, Mrs.
Murphy said: "Being President has been more
work, more time-consuming, and far more fun
than I could ever have imagined."
Mrs. Sydnor reported on the activities of
the Junior Virginia Beach Garden Club, the
only remaining junior garden club to be affiliated with The Garden Club of Virginia.
Mrs. Mears announced that at its April meeting, the Restoration Committee voted to
pledge $200,000, payable over a four-year pe. riod, to the East Tower addition to the KentValentine House. She said, "Although the
major portion of Garden Week funds will still
be designated toward our ongoing restoration,
the members of this Committee felt that this
gift will ultimately benefit the community as
well as all Garden Club of Virginia members
and, with the enthusiasm it would generate,
would serve as an impetus for additional gifts."
After Mrs. Leggett gave the report of the
Kent-Valentine House Long-Range Planning
Committee, the Board voted unanimously to
support this project financially.
Dinner following the Board Meeting was
in the private homes of several Albemarle
Garden Club members, and everyone had a
delightful evening.
The two business sessions of the Annual
Meeting took place at the Omni Hotel. In
her report, Mrs. Murphy said: "Two years ago
when I was elected President at the Annual
Meeting in Lynchburg, I said that I approached my duties with some apprehension.
I thought of all those who had been President since I attended my first Annual Meeting and was sure that the job required the business sense of Jean Printz, the charm of Dot
Montgomery, the style of Katty Mears, the
sense of humor of Ellen Godwin, the intelligence of Nancy Talley, and the talent and grace
of Virginia Guild. While all of these qualities
81

Follow the Green Arrow

Mrs. Murphy and her Board, 1993 Board of Governors' Meeting.


The report from the Publications Committee was given by Charlottesville Garden
Club member, Mrs. William D . Bayles (Mavis), who had been Treasurer and Circulation
Manager of The JOURNAL since 1980 and
one of The Garden Club of Virginia's unsung
volunteers. The Horticulture Committee
congratulated the clubs on their fine exhibits
of "A Basketful of Herbs for Mr. Jefferson"
which they had assembled for the Meeting.
At the conclusion of the business meeting Mr. Edward E. Clark, Jr., President and
Director of the Wildlife Center of Virginia,
gave an informative and hilarious talk on "Life
on the Wildlife Ward," and Mrs. Robert
Carter (Bessie) gave a clever tribute to the
Albemarle Garden Club.
Mrs. Godwin gave the report of the
Nominating Committee, after which Mrs. H.
Gordon Leggett, Jr. was elected President of
The Garden Club of Virginia. In her introduction of Mrs. Leggett, Mrs. Murphy said:
"I am thrilled for this organization I love, because we shall have superb leadership for the
next two years, and I am thrilled for my friend,
Pat, because she will enjoy this job more than
she can imagine." Mrs. Murphy told of Mrs.
Leggett's many qualifications and accomplishments and then continued, "Charlotte Massie,
whom most of you knew as Editor of the
Guidebook and Director of Publicity for His-

are certainly desirable and I covet them, I now


realize that the most needed attribute for a
President of The Garden Club of Virginia is
the constitution of an ox."
One of the highlights of Wednesday
morning's session was the introduction of Dr.
Charles Brownell, Associate Professor of Art
History at Virginia Commonwealth University, and Laura Carr, one of his students, who
reported on her research into the history of
the Kent-Valentine House. Mrs. Cochran,
Co-Chairman of the Kent-Valentine House
Long-Range Planning Committee, presented
the schematic drawings for the improvement
of the house and said: "The long range plan
which includes renovations to the basement,
research and redecoration of the first floor and
renovations to the second and third floors as
well as the new elevator tower came to
$1,478,732." Mr. Peter Hatch, Director of
Horticulture at Monticello, closed the first
morning's meeting with a talk on "Jeffersonian
Plants and Herbs." We then recessed for a
very special visit and lunch at Ash Lawn provided by The Charlottesville Garden Club and
a tour ofTufton and the Historic Plant Center at Monticello. That evening there was a
fabulous banquet at Farmington Country
Club at which Past President, Mrs. Toy D.
Savage, Jr. (Hunter) was awarded the Massie
Medal.
82

The Garden Club ofVirgjna Presidents


toric Garden Week for 27 years, used to say
frequently that The Garden Club of Virginia
always has the right President at the right time.
I cannot imagine any time for which Pat
Leggett would not be right." Mrs. Murphy
then presented the Ethridge diamond pin and
the gavel to Mrs. Leggett and said, "We look
forward to your leadership and pledge to you
our support. Congratulations, Madam President."

physically with the greatest aplomb. She was


our "jogging" President. She ran the country
lanes and city streets throughout Virginia.
During her term, Helen stayed in great shape
and so did The Garden Club!
These two years were very special to The
Garden Club of Virginia, for it was time to
celebrate two important birthdays. On May
13, 1995, The Garden Club of Virginia had
reached 75 years of age, and in this same year,
the Kent-Valentine House was 150 years old.
Time had brought many changes over
these years. The Dow average went from 90
to 5,000, and Babe Ruth was replaced by
Michael Jordan on the sports scene. A
Charleston dancing flapper, who was given the
right to vote in 1920, could not have envisioned a society which would nurture a female
astronaut.
The Garden Club of Virginia is a wonderful success story. Member clubs have increased from 8 to 46. Historic Garden Week
in Virginia has raised over 5 million dollars to
restore 38 historic gardens and landscapes. We
continue to educate our membership on conservation issues and to encourage the protection of the environment.
The Riclmzond Times- Dispatch offered congratulations in the following lead editorial:
Virginia's Gardeners
Call members of the Garden
Club of Virginia that- Virginia's Gardeners - and you won't be wrong. For
in the threescore and 15 years this organization has existed, it has labored
lovingly to make Virginia a garden
spot of pre-eminent aesthetic and historic importance. Now, as it prepares
to celebrate the 75th anniversary of
its founding with a dinner at the
Tredegar Iron Works, is an appropriate time to salute it for its contributions to the Commonwealth.
An alliance of 46 communitybased clubs, the Garden Club of Virginia has been wholly or heavily responsible for the restoration of nearly
40 historic homes and gardens open
for the enjoyment of Virginians and
tourists. Thomas Jefferson's garden

MRS.H.GORDONLEGGETr,JR
President
The Garden Club of Virginia
1994-1996
For an incoming President to receive the
gavel from Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr.
(Helen) was an inspiring moment. Her devotion and dedication to The Garden Club of
Virginia set the highest standards for her successor to uphold. Helen had tremendous pride
in the organization's accomplishments, and
this pride was visible to all who met and
worked with her. The pursuit of her responsibilities was a pursuit of pleasure.
She brought experience and knowledge
to the presidency.
She had the best
credentials for holding office. She
served as a board
member of state organizations involved
in areas of education, conservation
and beautification.
As an active supporter of her husband and his successful political career in Virginia's
legislature, she kept
a reading on the
State's political
pulse.
This 37th President
ran The Garden
Mrs. H. Gordon
Club of Virginia
Leggett, Jr.
mentally and also
83

Follow the Green Arrow


Virginia's most beautiful homes and
gardens from the Atlantic to the Appalachians. Tourists from all over
America travel to Virginia for this
event, which is the largest and oldest
of its kind in the country.
The club can celebrate its 75th
birthday with pride. It has earned
Virginia's gratitude, admiration and
best wishes.
It was a time for celebration and celebrate
we did. On October 10, 1995, we had a Gala
at the Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond
which truly was the social event of the season,
or maybe for the next 7 5 years. Never having
given a Garden Club party, we were not sure
what the response would be. All summer the
President kept dreaming that she and her husband were the only ones on the dance floor in
a building looking much like an airplane
hanger. But the response was overwhelming
and over-subscribed by 150 people whose
checks had to be returned.
The night was magical. Co-Chairmen of
the Gala were Mrs. William T. Tucker
(Nancy), Mrs. Herbert A. Claiborne,Jr. (Kitty)
and Mrs. Hunter H. McGuire, Jr. (Alice) who
called themselves the "troika." The President
called them the "triumvirate," for these ladies
did a magnificent job working throughout the
year and attending to the myriad of details.
They provided the leadership as Co-Chairmen for this Gala and with their committees
deserve our approbation, appreciation, and applause for creating the magic of the evening.
Their sub-committee chairmen and volunteers represented member clubs throughout the Commonwealth. The Patrons Chairmen were Mrs.John E. Clarkson (Kirk), Mrs.
Carter B. S. Furr (Huffy) and Mrs. Clifton A.
Woodrum III (Emily); the Flowers Chairmen
were Mrs. William B. Power (Leslie) and Mrs.
Charles C. Wentworth II (Ann); the Invitations, Mrs. Walter M. Zirkle, Jr. (Widgee);
Treasurer, Mrs. Gus W Dyer, Jr. (Barbara);
Arrangements, Mrs. Peter C. Toms (Blanche);
Reservations, Mrs. Hill Carter, Jr. (Diana);
Programs, Mrs. Richard P. Buckingham IV

<Tlie 9arden Club of Virginia


invites you to a

9ala
in celebration of our

7stfi <Birthday
<Tuesday, October tentli
sir-tliirty in tfie evening

rTredegar Iron Worfi.s


'Riclinwnd
'R.s.v.p.

'Black. tie

at Monticello, the gardens at


Woodrow Wilson's Birthplace in
Staunton, the gardens at Woodlawn
Plantation in Fairfax County, the
Washington and Lee University garden at the Robert E. Lee House in
Lexington, the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond, and the
master tree-planting plan at
Richmond's Virginia Union University are examples of the club's good
works.
Earlier this year, the Virginia
General Assembly praised the club
for its substantial contribution "to the
enhancement of historic properties,
the beauty of communities and highways, and the protection and conservation of natural resources ... " That
resolution was added to a long list of
honors the club has received over the
years.
To finance its projects, the organization raises money primarily
through its unique annual Historic
Garden Week tour featuring some of

(Missy).

The Commonwealth Club catered the


84

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents

0 Alice and Rich


ard Tilghman
(left), visit with
Pa Sydnor of
Charlottesville.

dan of Cbarlottesvil le
before dinner.

Gala organizers
Nancy Tucker (left to
right). Alice McGolre,
Pat Leggett (current
president or The
Garden Club of Vir
ginia) and Kitty
Claiborne savor a
quiet moment art.er 18
months of planning.

0 Fred Pollard of
Richmond. former
lieutenant governor,
settles ln for the
eventnc.
Fisher of Westover
(left) with Kirk

Clarkson of Norfolk.

Photographs and Article taken frrmz: Style Weekly

85

Follow the Green Arrow


dinner, and more than 460 guests dined on
smoked salmon and scallops, filet mignon, and
baby vegetables. The piece de resistance was the
dessert, a white chocolate mousse topped with
a candy medallion inscribed with the number
75.
The Tredegar Iron Works was transformed. Small trees were adorned with lights.
Flowers arrived in vans from all over the state
to be placed on round dining tables and in arrangements cascading from huge urns placed
throughout the room. Roses were in abundance, and with the Rose Show the week before, there could not have been one blooming
rose left anywhere in the Commonwealth.
The flower centerpieces at each table rested
on mirrors on which glass marbles had been
spilled. With the use of votive candles, these
marbles reflected the light giving the illusion
of sparkling diamonds. A 75th anniversary is
often represented by diamonds. This Gala was
a DiamondJubilee.
The invocation was given by the Honorable W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr., a member of the
Virginia House of Delegates and husband of
former President, Helen Murphy. A brief program followed. Eleven Past Presidents representing three decades of leadership were in
attendance: Mrs. Wyatt A. Williams, Mrs.
George H. Flowers, Jr., Mrs. George M.
Cochran, Mrs. John D. Varner, Mrs. Toy D.
Savage, Jr., Mrs.James B. Montgomery, Mrs.
Benjamin W. Mears, Jr., Mrs. James C.
Godwin, Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley, Mrs. Henley
L. Guild, Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. Mrs.
Lucius J. Kellam and Miss Jean Printz were
not able to be present. The dedication to The
Garden Club of Virginia and talents of these
former Presidents are legendary. Each came
forward to receive a huge "diamond" ring
which was given as a token of appreciation for
her service. Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr., the
current President, toasted each "great Lady."
"A diamond is a symbol of your brilliance and
value. You are the real diamonds in our crown.
You have guided our successful course. Thank
you."
Mrs. Cochran gave a brief history of the
past 75 years which closed the program. All
danced to the music provided by the Tommy

Whitten orchestra.
The second important birthday that we
shall be celebrating is that of our headquarters, Kent-Valentine House. This house was
built in 1845 by Mr. Horace Kent, originally
from Connecticut, and the proprietor of a successful dry goods firm. He owned two lots on
Franklin Street, and asked Mr. Isaiah Rogers,
an architect from Boston, to draw plans for a
house to be placed on this land.
The year 199 5 marks the 15 0th birthday
of the Kent-Valentine House. When one
reaches one-and-a-half centuries, a face lift,
corrective surgery and internal support are
necessary undertakings that one must address.
A capital campaign is being conducted - the
first ever by The Garden Club of Virginia.
The goal is to raise $2,000,000 for renovations and the addition of a stair/elevator tower.
Part of this goal will be to raise $500,000 of
additional endowment, because the present
amount does not generate sufficient income
to maintain the building. Our member clubs
and membership have been asked to contribute, and we shall be going outside "our family" for the first time for financial support.
Suggestions made at the 1991 Board of
Governors' round table discussions, a study
made by the Kent-Valentine Long-Range
Planning Committee, and an on-site evaluation of the building by the contractual firm of
Taylor and Parrish revealed the following
needs:
The mechanical and electrical systems
must be upgraded and modernized. A sprinkler system should be extended to all areas of
the house. We run a very successful business
in our headquarters - the business of Historic
Garden Week. The office is located in the
house, and in order to operate a successful
business, the office space and equipment must
be improved. Instant communication is a capability that we should have in order to stay
current on legislative, conservation, and preservation issues.
Because the house is a meeting place for
all our committees, the meeting space must
be improved and enlarged. Adequate climatically-controlled storage for all the records and
historic garden restoration plans which are
86

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents


deposited in the basement is needed. The library of garden history needs a space of its
own.
A stair/elevator tower will make the KentValentine House accessible to the physically
impaired. With the additional entrance in the
tower, a more flexible use of the building will
be realized. The tower elevator will be used
to transport heavy materials to each floor, and
much needed cloakrooms and handicappedaccessible bathrooms will be located on each
level.
The renovations will convert the first
floor to a reception area which can be used by
our members for private parties which provide a source of income. The second floor
will include enlarged Historic Garden Week
offices, a library room, a board room, and an
office for the President. A large meeting room
with a built-in sound and projector system will
be located on the currently unusable third
floor.
The first improvement to the house has
already been made. Enclosing the first floor
porch has provided more interior space and
brought wonderful light into the southwest
corner of the building. This porch is being
used for small meetings and is a handsome
addition made possible through a bequest by
Mrs. James Bland Martin, a former President
and historian/editor of Follow the Green Ar-

(Bev) are overseeing special gifts. Mrs. Carter


is planning special events, and Mrs. Whitney
G. Saunders (Ellen) directs the public relations relevant to the campaign.
Member clubs have been encouraged to
make trips to visit the Kent-Valentine House.
Mrs. Alexander M. Fisher,Jr. (Rossie) and her
committee of docents have provided tours
from the dark basement to the cramped atticlike third floor. Mrs. Charles H . Frischkorn,
J r. (Charlotte), Chairman of the Kent-Valentine House, has graciously orchestrated all visits and planned luncheons for the visiting clubs
and prospective donors.
The Restoration Committee has pledged
$200,000 over a four-year period. Foundations have been solicited with great success.
Two challenge grants of $100,000 have been
met by the previous and present Board of Directors and the former Presidents respectively.
A challenge grant of $50,000 that requires a 3
to 1 match from member clubs is well on its
way to being met which, with the match, will
total $200,000. The response of the membership has been heartwarming. This campaign has brought the membership closer together as they work to achieve the $2,000,000
goal.
The architectural firm of Marcellus
Wright Cox and Smith was chosen to provide
working drawings for the tower and renovations. Taylor and Parrish will be the general
contractors. As soon as funds are raised, construction will begin.
During these two years, business continued as usual. Successful Flower Shows and
Horticulture Field Days were held. In commemorating the 75th anniversary, historical
themes were often used for the Inter-Club arrangements. Heirloom plants and member
clubs' most successful projects of the past were
subjects for horticultural displays. The Artistic Judging School, moved to the month of
September, had greater participation than ever
before. The Conservation Forums were well
attended. The Forum held in Williamsburg
was open to the public and broadcast by National Public Radio. A new format was tried
the afternoon before the Forum with a canoe
trip or visit to the new archaeological dig at

row.

The capital campaign has no development


office, trained personnel or slick brochures.
Mrs. P. William Moore, Jr. (Lisa) and Mrs.
Charles H. Seilheimer, Jr. (Mary Lou) are CoChairmen of the campaign and doing a masterful job. These two ladies are remarkable.
Their organizational skills, intelligence, and
keen perception will guarantee that this campaign is successful.
Foundations have been solicited by Mrs.
Richard H . Catlett, Jr. (Barbara) and Mrs.
James C . Godwin (Ellen). Mrs. Austin T .
Darden, Jr. (Mary Hart) and Mrs. R. Walter
Jones IV (Leila). are in charge of finances and
investments. Mrs. George M. Cochran (Lee)
and Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr. (Katty) are
chairmen of the leadership gifts committee.
Miss Mary Jo Davis and Mrs. David F. King
87

Fol/ow. the Green Arrow

Mrs. Timothy L. Bryan, Mrs. George H. Flowers Jr., Mrs. Hill Carter, Mrs. Henley L. .Guild, Mrs.
Charles H. Schutte, Jr., and Mrs. Josiah Pollard Rowe III have lunch at the 1994 Daffodil Show.
Jamestown interpreted by Bill Kelso.
The Garden Club of Virginia has remained the moving force in preservation and
restoration in the Commonwealth. The Restoration Committee continued to ensure that
Virginia's historic gardens remain a visual
legacy of the past. In the fall of 1994, the garden at the Robert E. Lee House in Lexington
was dedicated. The garden at Kenmore, our
first restoration completed in 1929, has been
revisited, redesigned, and replanted and will
be dedicated on April 28, 1996.
A new project was initiated by the Restoration Committee and approved by the membership at the 1995 Annual Meeting in Norfolk. Garden restorations undertaken by The
Garden Club of Virginia must be open to the
public on a regular basis; therefore, many privately-owned gardens have never been documented. Some of these gardens may be lost
to future garden historians. A Fellowship Program will be instituted whereby graduate students enrolled in an accredited program of
landscape architecture at any university in the
United States will be eligible. A committee
will select a student who will receive a stipend

of $5 ,000 for spending a spring, summer, or


fall term producing measured drawings of a
historically significant garden or landscape.
The Fellow would work during a three-month
period under the supervision of Mr. Rudy J .
Favretti, the landscape architect retained by
The Garden Club of Virginia, or his designated representative. These drawings, upon
completion, would be preserved in an appropriate archive. This Fellowship should create
a complete compendium of historic gardens
and landscapes in Virginia, and this program
will offer an exciting incentive to young professional landscape architects to enter this field
of study.
The Garden Club of Virginia has been
recognized throughout the past 75 years for
its contributions to the Commonwealth. Two
important honors were bestowed during these
two years. First, at the 1995 session of the
Virginia General Assembly, a special Joint
House Resolution honored The Garden Club
of Virginia for its work in championing important historic and environmental programs;
and second, the Society of American Travel
Writers presented its Phoenix Award to The
88

The Garden Club of Virgina Presidents

The Garden Club of Virginia Presidents at the 1995 Board of Governors' Meeting: (seated) Mesdames
Talley, Flowers, Montgomery, Savage, Williams, Murphy, (standing) Leggett, Godwin, Kellam, Mears,
Guild, Tilrner, and Cochran.
Club for "outstanding leadership in conservation and preservation." The nomination was
made by the Virginia Division of Tourism
which stated that "the work of The Garden
Club of Virginia has always been a great asset
to the Commonwealth's tourism program."
When The Garden Club of Virginia was
founded, the world was a different place. Our
founding ladies had definite goals. The main
purpose for forming The Garden Club as
stated in Follow the Green Arrow, was for "increasing their knowledge of plants and the
beautifying of cities, towns, highways as well
as the conservation of the rich endowment of
nature." This organization has changed but

with the original purpose always in mind, it


has grown in size, stature and sphere of influence. Through the years member clubs have
been admitted from almost all geographical
areas of the state. The Garden Club of Virginia is the umbrella, if you will, and these 46
member clubs are its ribs. Each club brings
strength to the overall fabric. One cannot
predict or envision the changes and possibilities that will occur during the next 2 5 years
when the centennial anniversary will be celebrated. Surely the legacy of these 75 years
will give The Garden Club of Virginia the
impetus to continue its rich tradition of service and commitment.

89

THE MEMBER CLUBS

ALBEMARLE GARDEN CLUB

Jr. (Peggy) and Mrs.James B. Murray (Bunny),


received awards from both The Garden Club
of Virginia and The Garden Club of America
in 1975.
Other projects included planting trees - a
lot of trees - at Miller School in the county, at
the Downtown Mall and Jackson Park in the
city, and in the club's botanical collection at
Morea in honor of Albemarle's charter members.
During these busy years the club sponsored the 54th Annual Meeting and the Conservation Forum of The Garden Club of Virginia in 1974. It reorganized its constitution
and in 1976 became incorporated and received
a tax-exempt status which served as a model
for many other clubs. The members still
found time to do what they did best: gardening and flower arranging.
Members continued giving their well-attended Nellie Hough Gardening Course each
fall, offering mini-gardening courses at local
libraries, holding flower arranging workshops
and demonstrations for the elderly, taking
flowers and greens to The Martha Jefferson
House, and providing buckets of flowers and
greens every week to the Time and Talents
Committee.
Garden Club of Virginia Horticulture
Awards were deservedly won by the following
Albemarle Garden Club members during this
decade: Mrs. William S. Weedon (Elizabeth)
1970; Mrs. W. Dimmack Buxton (Polly) 1972;
Mrs. W. Bedford Moore III (Jane) and Mrs.
Sydnor 1974; Mrs. Harry T. Marshall, Jr.

1970-1980
When the Albemarle Garden Club
reached the age of 60 in 1973, it turned with
resolution toward the future and became more
deeply "concerned with the total environment." Club members wisely recognized that
an effort to protect our ecosystem would be
wasted if it were not shared with the younger
generation.
In 1974, a blue-jean clad Albemarle member could be spotted in road ditches leading
trash-picking teen-agers who filled 75 feed
sacks on the very first day of this Battle of the
Bottle. Another member was leading 2 5
youngsters, two of them from Charlottesville,
through the Everglades for an unforgettable
ecological experience. Other ladies from the
Albemarle Garden Club were distributing
conservation packets to each and every local
school, helping students to convert a waste
area into a mini-park, or helping landscape a
University of Virginia dormitory. Every year
the club sent two children to Nature Camp.
The club undertook large civic projects
as well. In the early 1970s it took the first
step in landscaping the regional Piedmont Virginia Community College. Such a large enterprise required the collaboration of the local Council of Garden Clubs and of HANDS.
This endeavor was completed in 197 6 with a
water garden. Its two original planners and
landscape gardeners, Mrs. T. Austin Sydnor,
90

The Member Clubs


(Jane) 1978.
The members produced a wealth of
wreaths and bedside arrangements for the sick
and bedridden every year during Christmas
workshops where good humor was fueled by
a "traditional stew" firmly laced with sherry.
Members serving as club presidents during this decade were Mrs. Daniel G. Van Clief,
Mrs. G. Johnson Blair (Mrs . Amos T.
Hathaway), Mrs. Hunter Faulconer, Mrs. W
Dimmock Buxton, and Mrs. M. Jack Rinehart,
Jr.

More and more, the club became involved


or took the lead in broader projects involving
others. The club helped Virginia's Wildlife
Center at Weyers Cave receive recognition
and funding, fought with many others for the
ecological survival of the Chesapeake Bay, and
with The Charlottesville and Rivanna Garden
Clubs and a start-up from Piedmont Environmental Council, organized a day camp in natural history in 1984. The club bought its own
two acres of tropical rain forest in the Rio
Bravo Conservation Area of Belize, and also
started "Limas for Lima," a modest affair
which grew to an enormous size when commercial seed producers sent the club their leftovers to be shipped to poor Peruvian farmers.
Still Albemarle did not neglect its annual
projects: Nellie Hough Gardening Course,
Time and Talent flower-arranging enterprise,
Christmas workshop, strong participation in
Historic Garden Week, and regular plant exchanges where members sold perennial divisions to each other - an entertaining way to
add to the club's kettle and to insure the dissemination and survival of grand old favorites.
Distinguished visitors to Charlottesville were
offered private guided tours of members'
homes and gardens for the benefit of Time
and Talent. The club planted trees around
the parking lot of the Ivy Creek Natural Area,
where, in 1982, it organized a two-week "Nature Experience" for severely handicapped
young people. In 1987 and 1988, it fenced
the Discovery Museum garden and landscaped
the grounds of the local Learning Center.
Some talented members devised the water
conservation game,"Perils of Pure Water,''
which was presented in fifteen local middle
schools.
The presidents who guided the club
through the 1980s were Mrs. Jack Rinehart,
Jr., Mrs. Alfred C. Kilham. Mrs. F. Bradley
Peyton III, Mrs.James B. Murray, Mrs. Walter
Wadlington, and Mrs. T. Austin Sydnor, Jr.

1980-1990
The Albemarle Garden Club celebrated
a great anniversary, its 70th, in the very house
where it was founded in 1913 - Morven. For
the last time, club members were welcomed
there by a great hostess, Mrs. Whitney Stone,
who until her death had kept her magnificent
gardens open every day of Historic Garden
Weeksincethe 1930s. This was 1983, theyear
the University of Virginia made plans to encroach on the grounds of the club's botanical
collection at Morea. Reluctantly, the club took
the matter to court, but alas, David does not
always win over Goliath. Despite the fact that
Morea was used as a "live classroom" by professors of landscape architecture at the University, the club lost.
During the 1980s the last Albemarle
member who continued to wear a hat at each
and every club meeting finally gave up and
appeared bareheaded. Melancholy years?
Certainly not. Albemarle was turning a page,
with a sigh, but with elan. It revised and modernized its bylaws, consolidated its committees, and created a new award for The Garden Club ofVrrginia, the Jennette Rustin Trophy, which was first given at the 1982 Daffodil Show.
Mrs. Frederic W Scott (Elizabeth) was
elected First Vice President of The Garden
Club of Virginia in 1982 and received the
deLacy Gray Memorial Medal in 1984. The
Albemarle Garden Club sponsored the 5lst
Annual Daffodil Show in 1984, fifty-two years
after it had organized the first "Narcissus
Show" in 1931.

1990-1995
For the Albemarle Garden Club the nineties have been, are, and will be the years of big
projects. Two rummage sales, known as "A
91

Follow the Green Arrow


Whale of a Sale" held in the late 1980s had
already garnered some monies. In the spring
of 1992, Albemarle added the fat proceeds
from a major flower arranging workshop held
at Farmington Country Club. The hero of
the day, the renowned florist artist, J. Barry
Ferguson from New York, had a wealth of
magnificent fresh flowers flown in from California and New York. Still, at the last moment, he asked for more "big things," and several club members with no moral sense at all
rushed through the countryside cutting down
huge branches of blooming paulownias or
eight-foot-long ribbons of ivy wherever they
spotted them. It was for a good cause. It was
good fun, and it was a great success. Another
fund raiser was planned for June 1995 with
the noted gardener Bunny Williams.
Albemarle kept focusing on conservation
and joined others in efforts to amend laws, to
clean up and save our environment, and to
preserve diversity. In 1990, the club's conservation committee and its chairman, Mrs.
William C. Preston (Mary Lyle) received recognition for the committee's study of air and
water pollution in Albemarle County and ways
to remedy the problem.
In 1993, the Albemarle Garden Club organized a public composting site in
Charlottesville's Darden Towe Park and landscaped its surroundings. The Natural History Day Camp flourished, and the club continued to send two youngsters every year to
Nature Camp.
It was the club's pleasure in 1994 to sponsor the 74th Annual Meeting of The Garden
Club of Virginia.
Other club endeavors blossomed. Approaching its 30th anniversary, the annual
Nellie Hough Gardening Course had become
a local mainstay. Time and Talent was busier
than ever, and the Christmas workshop continued to produce prettier-than-ever wreaths
and bedside arrangements for homes, hospitals, and lonely bedridden persons. The club's
test collections and flower arrangements won
ribbons at The Garden Club of Virginia
Shows. The club keeps on trying.
After an unpleasant, protracted war over
the grounds of the club's Botanical Collection,

the University of Virginia recognized the


club's intrinsic interest in Morea and opened
the gardens at no charge to the public.
Historic Garden Week drew more visitors from the farthest corners of the United
States, though the Albemarle, the
Charlottesville and Rivanna Garden Clubs
reduced Historic Garden Week to five days.
(The three clubs had been the only clubs to
open private gardens for eight days of that long
week). Then in 1993, these same three clubs
decided to reduce further our local Garden
Week to three days.
In all these endeavors the many active
young women, often working mothers, who
form Albemarle Garden Club's talented new
generation have taken on more responsibilities and have started to replace their seniors.
Many are daughters, daughters-in-law, or relatives of older members and are keeping the
horticulture, conservation, gardening, and
flower arranging traditions of the Albemarle
Garden Club alive and well. Proof of this lies
in the many awards, ribbons, and honors bestowed on club members.
Able presidents leading the club through
the early 1990s were Mrs. T. Austin Sydnor,
Jr., Mrs.John W. Barber and Mrs. Theodore
E. Loud.

THE GARDEN CLUB


OF ALEXANDRIA
1970-1980
The Garden Club of Alexandria celebrated its 45th Birthday in October 1970.
After years of restoring and maintaining the
18th-century garden at Gadsby Tavern, the
club was delighted to relinquish the responsibility to the City of Alexandria which had acquired the landmark.
In 1971, Mrs. Howard B. Bloomer, Jr.
(Kitty), a distinguished member, was awarded
the Massie Medal. Mrs. Bruce C. Gunnell
(Virginia) was Chairman of The GCV Conservation Forum and served as Recording Secretary of The GCV. Mrs. John M. Maury
(Stuart) served for many years on the Restoration Committee, and Mrs. Robert E .
92

Th~ Member Clubs

Leslie, netting over $8,000. She also designed


bird houses replicating Old Towne houses
which were sold as a fund-raiser.
The firm of Doell and Doell of New York
was engaged to research plans for an authentic 19th-century garden for the Lloyd House.
Members contributed to the research by delving into correspondence in the Library of
Congress. The plan was not implemented, as
archaeological digs did not discover any evidence of a garden.
For education and fun, the club held an
"environmentally friendly" luncheon in which
everything, organic and inorganic, was either
composted or recycled. It also joined The
Garden Club of Fairfax in a three-session
workshop (Interpretive, Free Form, and Abstract) to study and practice the art of modern
flower arranging.
A Cornus kousa was given to the American Horticultural Society in memory of Stuart
Maury and to celebrate Earth Day.
During the 1980s, the club was fortunate
to have as its club presidents Mrs. John H.
Wmant, Mrs. Robert L. Montague III, Mrs.
Frederick A Gage, Mrs. William Seale, Jr.,
and Mrs. William F. Smith.

Latham (Ella) was a GCV Director-at-Large


twice.
Interesting accomplishments of individual
members included a book, The Decorative Art
ofDried Flower Arrangements, written by Mrs.
James D. Vance (Georgia), and Christmas Creativity, written by Mrs. Clyde C. Lamond, Jr.
(Marguerite).
A junior garden club was organized for
members' daughters, and a category of advanced senior class was added to the arrangements for the club's monthly flower shows.
The club joined The Hunting Creek Garden
Club to hold a joint daffodil show which has
become an annual event at Goodwin House.
The club gave a luncheon when The
Hunting Creek Garden Club sponsored the
Annual Meeting in Alexandria in 1972.
On The Garden Club of Alexandria's
50th anniversary in 1975, it sponsored The
GCV Annual Meeting. Members in the
junior garden club were taken into active
membership. The club contributed a
square for the needlepoint rug for the KentValentine House. The club sponsored the
GCV Rose Show in 1979.
Club presidents during this decade
were Mrs. John M. Maury, Mrs. John Y.
Kerr, Mrs. Wilfred]. Smith, Mrs. Owen M.
Jones, Mrs. Russell S. Crenshaw, Jr., and
Mrs. Smith Paul.

1990-1995
The club participated in the Backyard
Demonstration, a recycling project sponsored
by the American Horticultural Society, by
landscaping the area and supplying volunteers.
Mrs. Arthur B. Culvahouse, Jr., (Mari Lou),
was the spark for the project. In 1993-1994,
she engineered the making of a video "From
Garbage to Gold" narrated by Dean Norton,
horticulturist at Mount Vernon. The project
was financed by The Garden Club of Alexandria and several commercial backers. It will
be available free of charge to clubs.
In the fall of 1993, a "Morning in the
Country" was held at the home of Leslie Ariail.
A house and garden tour, plant sale, gourmet
pantry, and commercial booth made the day a
huge financial success.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. William F. Smith, Mrs. F. Brook
Voght, and Mrs. Thomas C. Brown, Jr.

1980-1990
The GCV Rose Show was sponsored
again by The Garden Club of Alexandria in
1980.
Mrs.Jane R. Gunnell made weekly radio
broadcasts for the Piedmont Conservation
Council.
A needlepoint rug, depicting wetlands in
Virginia, which was designed by Mrs.John H.
Ariail, Jr. (Leslie), stitched by members, and
won by a woman in Santa Barbara, California, yielded $4,000 to the club's Civic Projects
Fund. In-club projects were held to cover
costs of projects at the YMCA and American
Red Cross buildings.
From a booth at the Designer Show
House, the club sold tote bags, aprons, and
stationery with Old Towne motifs made by
93

Follow the Green Arrow


and for the third time in 1975. Mrs. Hopkins
was elected Treasurer of The GCV (19781980).
The club planted the area around the
front of the brick sign on the Randolph-Macon College campus and landscaped the old
Railroad Station used by the Ashland Christian Emergency Services.
GCV Horticulture Awards of Merit were
presented to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Dugdale
(Betty) and Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Wright (Sarah) during this decade. Both Mr. Dugdale
and Mr. Wright were dues-paying members
of the club and later were elected to honorary
membership. Mrs. Dugdale was awarded the
Massie Medal in 1978 for outstanding achievement in horticulture and stimulation of knowledge and love of gardening among others.
Members serving as club presidents during the 1970s were Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins,
Jr., Mrs. Rosalie W Priddy, Mrs. Newton
Priddy, Mrs. 0. K. Campbell, and Mrs. Robert W Cabaniss.

THE ASHLAND GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
The Ashland Garden Club continued to
be a vital and energetic club. The club's worthwhile projects included: sending a child to
Nature Camp, joining with neighboring clubs
for presentations by the Presidents of The
Garden Club of Virginia, having plant sales,
and planting living memorials to deceased
members.
Mrs. Donald P. Reid (Edith) designed and
executed a lovely square featuring Scotchtown
for the needlepoint rug in the Kent-Valentine
House. Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr. (Lula)
was appointed Chairman of Admissions (19681970) and Director of Public Relations (19721974) of The Garden Club of Virginia.
The fiftieth anniversary of the founding
of The Ashland Garden Club was celebrated
on October 12, 1972 with a gala evening honoring the charter members. The club's first
president and founder, Miss Mary McDermott
Beirne, was joined by charter members, Mrs.
Hall Canter (Carolina) and Mrs. Charles
Stebbins, Jr. (Ilus). Miss Mary, widely known
for hybridizing daffodils, was one of Ashland's
colorful inhabitants. She will be remembered
also for her colorful attire: blue smock, garden hat, and basket.
The beautiful landscaping of Scotchtown
by The Garden Club of Virginia was completed and presented to the Association for the
Preservation of Virginia Antiquities. Mrs.
Newton Priddy CJ oan), Directress of the APVA
Hanover Branch and member of The AGC,
accepted the magnificent gift. The AGC had
requested The Garden Club of Virginia to
consider landscaping Scotchtown, so it was
with much pride that the club saw the fruits
of its labor. Mrs. Hopkins was elected a Director-at-Large (1974-1977) ofThe GCV.
The GCV Lily Shows were sponsored by
The AGC in 197 5 and 197 6. Rave reviews
were received and the 197 5 Show was declared
the world's largest lily show. The club's outstanding horticulturist, Mrs. Arthur A.
Dugdale (Betty), won the Violet Niles Walker
Memorial Cup for the second time in 1973

1980-1990
Many members were recognized for outstanding service during the 1980s. Mrs.
Hopkins served again as The GCV Treasurer
from 1980 to 1982, Chairman of Finance
(1982-1984), Second Vice President (19841986), Chairman of Finance (1986-1988), and
Chairman of the Restoration Committee
(1988-1990).
Mrs. Larry E. Gilman (Brenda) and Mrs.
William Glave (Felicia) made the arrangement
for the "Fine Arts and Flowers" at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. The arrangement
interpreted Van Gogh's "Wheat Fields Behind
St. Paul's Hospital" and was one of ten to be
featured in Southern Accents.
The AGC sponsored The GCV Board of
Governors' Meeting in October 1984. Kings
Dominion rolled out the red carpet. Dr. Hill
Carter, Jr. donned his railroad conductor's attire and furnished his train collection for table
decorations for the dinner in the Estes Dining Hall at Randolph-Macon College. A good
time was had by all.
Mrs. James W Midyette, Jr. (Tudie) re94

The Member Clubs


cal clubs, including The AGC, in
appreciation of their decorating
Washington-Franklin Hall for
Christmas. The oldest building on
the campus, it had been completely
restored and enhanced the
grounds.
A fund-raising project entailed making paper flowers at
Kings Dominion. The members'
talented fingers made works of art
out of tissue. At the end of each
afternoon, the warehouse looked
like a real garden with its myriad
Courtesy of Herald-Progress
colors. The club decorated
Mrs. Louis A. WrightandMrs. RobertA. Lybrand prepare for the
Scotchtown for the summer seahorticulture exhibit at the 1984 Board of Governors' Meeting.
son and for Christmas candlelight
tours. Members entertained patients at the
ceived the Tri-color Award for the club arConvalescent Center by helping them make
rangement in The GCV Rose Show in
decorations for their rooms and by bringing
Fredericksburg in 1986.
attractively wrapped cookies or candy to be
Mrs. John A. Hugo (Nancy) was the rejudged and distributed among the patients.
cipient of a GCV Horticulture Award of Merit
in 1988. Mrs. Paul McConnell (Helen), 80
The club's daffodil show continued to be
an annual event for Hanoverians. The local
years young, planted a forest of 18 acres
growers displayed their talents at this most
(11,300 trees) in conjunction with the Forestry
enjoyable event.
Service. She read that if everyone planted a
The Elizabeth Cabell Dugdale Award for
tree each year, we would have pure air and
Conservation was presented for the first time
water.
at the 1989 Conservation Forum. The AGC
Betty Dugdale completed updating of
wanted to recognize "its Betty" for her outclassification of the Royal Horticultural Socistanding contributions to conservation.
ety for lilies. She wrote the column, "GarClub presidents during the 1980s were
dening in Virginia" for The Richmond News
Leader. Mr. Dugdale had been the former
Mrs. Robert W Cabaniss, Mrs. Ted C. Staples,
Mrs. Carroll R. Keyser, Mrs. Donald P. Reid,
writer of this column.
Mrs. James W Midyette, Jr., and Mrs. Hill
The club planted four red maples on the
Carter, Jr.
grounds of the Hanover Arts and Activities
Center, a Virginia Historic Landmark. It was
1990-1995
formerly the First Baptist Church and was
used as a hospital during the War Between the
Life goes on and so did The Ashland GarStates. Arbor Day was celebrated with the
den Club. Lula Hopkins, one of the club's
planting of four white dogwood trees at the
and The Garden Club of Virginia's most dediHanover Courthouse Bicentennial Park.
cated members, continued to provide leaderThese new trees, along with the crape myrtle
ship for both. Her list of accomplishments
and two rows of tulip poplars, made a beautiwas awe-inspiring. During the 1990s, she
ful setting for the 250th anniversary of the
building of the Courthouse. The club was inserved The GCV as Chairman of the Massie
Medal Committee (1990-1992), as Recording
strumental in planting 30 Bradford pear trees
Secretary (1992-1994), and Historian (1994along the business section of Railroad Avenue.
1996). When she received The GCV Massie
Mrs. Ladell Payne, wife of the President of
Medal in 1993, it was for "unparalleled dediRandolph-Macon College, gave a tea for lo95

Follow the Green Arrow


cation to the objects of The Garden Club of
Virginia." Her mother, Mrs. Frank]. Gilliam,
a former President of The GCV, and her father, Frank J. Gilliam, Dean of Washington
and Lee University, also received The GCV
Massie Medal.
Members continued to participate in The
Garden Club of Virginia Flower Shows and
provided hostesses not only for the local tour,
but also for homes on the Jam es River, and
for the Executive Mansion during Historic
Garden Week.
Historic Garden Week in 1993 proved to
be one of the most successful. Members did
everything (even more so than usual) including directing traffic so efficiently that the police felt things were in good hands and went
on to attend to other matters.
The club's "Lady Di," Mrs. Hill Carter,
Jr. (Diana), was appointed The GCV Director of Public Relations (1992-1994) and a Director-at-Large in 1994.
The Ashland Garden Club was awarded
the Mrs. Littleton H. Mears Trophy for Best
Inter-Club Arrangement at The Garden Club
of Virginia Annual Daffodil Show in 1993.
The main concern and energy-consuming project for 1993-1994 was preparing for
The GCV 60th and 6lst Annual Daffodil
Shows in 1994 and 1995. Mrs. Elmo G. Cross,
Jr. (Anne) did a masterful piece of engineering such a mammoth undertaking. The club
did it! What a thrill it was to walk midst the
daffodils, and what a relief to store the risers
and bottles until next year!
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Hill Carter, Jr., Mrs. William K.
Glave, Mrs. Cabell Luck, Jr., and Mrs. H.
Augustus Miller ill.

years of providing Officers and Committee


Chairmen for The Garden Club of Virginia.
Mrs. George M. Cochran (Lee) served as The
GCV Second Vice President (1970-1972),
President (1972-1974), Chairman of the Restoration Committee (1976-1978), and Chairman of the Nominating Committee (19781980). Mrs. W.]. Perry (Virginia) was elected
The GCV Recording Secretary (1972-1974),
Mrs. McKelden Smith (Anne) Chairman of
The Garden Club of Virginia JOURNAL
(1976-1978), and Mrs. Thomas H. Tullidge
(Flo) Parliamentarian and Editor of the Register (1978-1980.)
Mrs. W: W Sproul (Helen) won the
Eleanor Truax Harris Cup for lilies in 1978.
Mrs. J. Waller Callison (Tommy) stitched the
needlepoint square, a reproduction of the back
of the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace, for the
rug at the Kent-Valentine House. For Christmas members made decorations for the lobby
at Western State Hospital, wreaths for the
doors of Kings' Daughters Hospital, and arrangements for the mantels at the Woodrow
Wilson Birthplace.
The policy concerning the Elizabeth
Seymour Rawlinson book collection, owned
by the club, was changed to allow members to
take home the rare books while the public
could use them at the library. From the club's
early "Dogwood Campaigns," tree planting
was an important goal. Mrs. Smith presented
an overall planting plan for the Woodrow
Wilson Parkway. At the Conservation Forum
she was honored for her contribution and efforts toward the program "Do Something
Beautiful." Tree planting continued at the Day
Care Center and Johnson Street Parking lot.
Mrs. George M. Cochran, Mrs. Thomas
G. Bell, Mrs. McKelden Smith, Mrs. Thomas
H. Tullidge, Mrs Richard W: Smith, and Mrs.
Colin]. S. Thomas, Jr. served as club presidents during the 1970s.

THE AUGUSTA GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
At the beginning of this decade, a sustaining category and a provisional group were
added to The Augusta Garden Club's active
and associate membership. A first was an orientation class for all new members.
These were the club's most productive

1980-1990
The 1980s came in with a bang. The
Augusta Garden Club sponsored The GCV
Board of Governors' Meeting in October,
1982. Club members felt privileged to have
96

The Member Clubs

Mrs. Sproul won the Eleanor Truax Harris


Cup for lilies in 1981. In 1984, Mrs. Thomas
won the Tri-color for Best Bloom in The GCV
Lily Show, and in 1988 she and her sister-inlaw, Mrs. Wyat B. Timberlake ill (Mary), won
the Tri-color in the Inter-club Class. Mrs.
John R. Hamilton (Dede) won the Tri-color
and blue ribbon in in the Inter-club Division
in 1985. The AGC won blue for its test collection in The GCV Rose Shows for three
years: 1987, 1988, 1989.
All through the years, members enjoyed
the warm friendship in meeting every other
year with The Spotswood Garden Club in
Harrisonburg and The Blue Ridge Garden
Club in Lexington.
Mrs. Malcolm H. Livick, Mrs. T.
Claybrook Elder, Mrs. William F. Sowers,
Mrs. Preston C. Manning, Jr., and Mrs. P.
William Moore, Jr., served as club presidents
during the 1980s.

the opportunity to visit with and enjoy so many


energetic, beauty-loving, and civic-minded
women.
The club continued to provide leadership
to The Garden Club of Virginia. Mrs.
Tullidge was elected The GCV Chairman of
the Finance Committee (1980-1982), and a
Director-at-Large (1987-1990). Mrs.
Cochran was presented the Massie Medal in
1980 for "outstanding dedication, leadership,
and concern for The Garden Club of Virginia
and the Commonwealth of Virginia." Mrs.
Colin]. S. Thomas, Jr. (Susan) was Chairman
of Admissions (1984-1986).
Mrs. Perry had long been known as "Mrs.
Daffodil." For years she divided and distributed bulbs, instructed, and inspired. Two
young and enthusiastic growers, Mrs. Thomas and Mrs. T. Claybrook Elder (Claiborne)
took over this responsibility. Their hard work,
along with Mrs. Gordon C. Page (Mopsy),
took the local show to new heights. It outgrew homes and with an average of 100
blooms, Trinity Parish Hall became the setting. A professional judge was brought in, and
a permanent silver trophy was given by Mrs.
Barbara H. Grant in memory of her mother,
Nellie Crass Hunter.
As a fall public project, the club sponsored
a series of classes on house plants, arranging,
horticulture, and landscaping. Tulip bulbs and
carry cans were sold. Another project was a
"Tasting-tea," with the use of recipes from
Historic Virginia Inns. The proceeds allowed
the club to help with a greenhouse for Western State Hospital, to landscape the sign at
the northern city limits, to be a part of the
plantings project at the Augusta County
Courthouse, to purchase heirloom fruit trees
for the American Frontier Museum, and to
provide summer annuals for the city.
The club was proud that it had three
members, Mrs. Perry, Mrs. Thomas R. Nelson
(Frances), and Mrs. Thomas W. Dixon (Doris)
on The GCV Inter-Club Speakers' Bureau.
During the 1980s, the club went afield to
Fort Defiance, Middlebrook, Waynesboro,
rural Fishersville, and Wintergreen for Historic Garden Week tours. Proceeds increased
to over $12,000.

1990-1995
Conservation went from members attending Conservation Forums to personal and
practical approaches. The club encouraged
recycling, hot lines to state representatives for
environmental legislation, and distribution of
information to public and private schools.
Each year a scholarship was given to a student
for Nature Camp. It was rewarding to get
their appreciative notes.
Mrs. P. William Moore, Jr. (Lisa) was
elected a Director-at-Large from 1992 to
1995, and Mrs. Rudolph Bumgardner Ill
(Deedy) Director of Public Relations 19941996.
On May 3, 1991, representatives of The
Garden Club ofVirginia attended the dedication ceremony of the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace Museum. The gardens, courtyard, paved
alley, and walks were a gift from The Garden
Club of Virginia - its third generous gift to
the Birthplace. Plans, drawn by Rudy J.
Favretti, The Garden Club ofVirginia's landscape architect, included trees, bulbs, boxwood, and perennials.
In the past a working relationship existed
between The AGC and the Staunton Public
97

Follow the Green Arrow


Library. The club did the landscaping, gave
the memorials, and provided tender loving
care. It seemed proper that the club assume
some responsibility for the new public library,
a remodeled school building given by the city.
The club engaged Carlton Abbott, a landscape
architect, to draw a plan for the site, an entire
city block in the heart of town. It was the club's
largest project and a very special one.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Rudolph Bumgardner, Jr., Mrs.
Barbara Hunter Grant, and Mrs. William W.
Gibbs.

(Marguerite) was The GCV Director of Public Relations (1976-1978).


The Garden Club of Virginia completed
the brick terrace and plantings in front of the
Lee Chapel at Washington and Lee University in 1977. The club attended the dedication with pride.
Money was needed for the club to sponsor the Board of Governors' Meeting in October 1980 and to improve the entrance to the
Chessie Trail. Christmas house tours were the
answer.
Club presidents in the 1970s were Mrs.
W. P. Davis, Mrs. Thomas Gentry, Miss Margaret C. Davis, Mrs. William Washburn, and
Mrs. George M. Brooke, Jr.

THE BLUE RIDGE GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980

1980-1990
The Blue Ridge Garden Club prepared
in 1970 for The Garden Club of Virginia Lily
Shows in 1973 and 1974. The members
talked, listened, and planted lilies. The Shows,
held in Evans Dining Hall at Washington and
Lee University, were glorious to behold. The
judges were entertained, exhibitors were cared
for, and visitors were greeted. Frosted Gilby
gin bottles were put on display and guided lilylovers to proper places. Members giggled as
they passed to the next club both the pedestals and the gin bottles used for horticulture.
Having free time after the Shows were
over, members went back to weeding and
pruning in the Bertha Townes Garden at
Stonewall Jackson Hospital. In 1977 The Blue
Ridge Garden Club won the Massie Medal for
the creation and maintenance of the Bertha
Whitney Townes Memorial Courtyard Garden at the Hospital. Bulbs were planted along
Woods Creek to beautify the town. Battles
were fought and letters were written to keep
Goshen Pass as it was (not improved and enlarged). Members helped and encouraged
young people in the community in a "cleanup" campaign to remove litter from the highways.
Mrs. McCluer Gilliam (Mary Stuart)
served as The GCV Chairman of Finance
(1972-1974), Parliamentarian and Editor of
the Register (1974-1976), and a Director-atLarge (1979-1982). Mrs. William W. Old III

In October 1980, the Board of Governors'


Meeting was enjoyed by both members and
visitors. The first GCV Common Wealth
Award was given to The Blue Ridge Garden
Club for landscaping the entrance to the C&O
Walking Trail.
After three days of meetings and entertainments with The GCV Board of Governors, the members took off their party clothes,
put on gardening gloves, and worked on the
trail by the river. The bushes and bulbs the
members planted were washed away when the
floods came in 1985. The next year all were
replanted.
When the hospital garden had to give way
to needed buildings, the interest in plants
moved to cemeteries, to Hopkins Green in
downtown Lexington, to the garden of the
Stonewall Jackson House, and to plantings
along Route 11 North. The GCV advised
learning about wildflowers, so wildflower
walks were held each spring. Members worked
in their gardens and arranged flowers for
shows in Lexington and for The GCV Flower
Shows. They received ribbons twice for Inter-Club arrangements. The BRGC minutes
stated firmly that the 1980s were "not a disaster."
Mrs. Old was appointed Chairman ofThe
GCV Editorial Board 1988-1990.
Club presidents in the 1980s were Mrs.
98

The Member Clubs

1996).
The Blue Ridge Garden
Club prepared to sponsor
The GCVLily Show in 1997
and to work for Rockbridge
County and Virginia in the
future .
Club presidents during the
early 1990s were Mrs. Albert
C. Gordon, Mrs. H. Laurent
Boetsch, Mrs. Thomas Gentry, and Mrs.John Prillaman.

THE BOXWOOD
GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
Theb' Boxwood Garden
Cl
u s 1ast 2 5 years were
filled with learning, doing,
Books on these subjects were
a sizable collection was presented to the Richmond Public Library long
before the Kent-Valentine House became the
headquarters of The Garden Club of Virginia.
The highlight of 1970 was the selection
of Mrs. George H. Flowers,Jr. (Mary Frances)
as President of The Garden Club of Virginia.
Soon after, with Mrs. Flowers as President,
the Kent-Valentine House was purchased by
The Garden Club of Virginia for its headquarters.
The club received the first deLacy Gray
Medal in 1970
as the result of a plan implemented earlier by
Mrs. Flowers and Mrs. William A.Johns (Logan) to develop the James River area as a public park.
In October of that same year Mrs. Benjamin Harrison (Mary) and Mrs. Heth Owen,
Jr. (Margery) presented a program, "Fashions
in Table Settings," for a club meeting. It was
delightful and soon was being shown to other
garden clubs.
With Mrs. Ivor Massey (Anne) and Mrs.
Charles A. Gregory, Jr. (Bess) as co-chairmen,
Boxwood sponsored The GCV 1971 Rose
Show. There was an opportunity for all members to participate in some capacity. Mrs.

an dMrs. Wi.,,
Mrs Thomas H Tullzdge,
Mrs. B. McCluer Gzllzam
111

8
d ,1G
'M
iam W. Old III at the 19 0 Boar, o1 overnors eetzng.
and having fun.
George M. Brooke, Jr., Mrs. Carrington C.
Tutwiler, Jr., Mrs. I. Taylor Saunders II, Mrs.
purchased, and

William Old, Mrs. Farris P. Hotchkiss, and


Mrs. Albert C. Gordon.
1990-1995
To raise funds, members sold Christmas
greens to VMI and W&L, to the Horse Center, and to downtown stores. To enhance the
beauty of the city and the bank account of the
garden club, all Lexington celebrated the holidays with lovely box and balsam. Pickles and
jams were sold at the community festival.
The club continued to tend to the Chessie
Trail, although another flood washed much
of what had been done away. Members saw
that "Welcome to Historic Lexington" signs
were installed at the four entrances to the
town, and plantings around the signs were put
in place. The trees along the road to the Horse
Center were saved from the Virginia Department of Transportation's zeal to cut them
down.
Members continued to hold offices in The
Garden Club of Virginia. Mrs. Old was Chairman of the Editorial Board 1992-1994, and
Mrs. H. Laurent Boetsch (Elizabeth) was
Chairman of the Slides Collection (19921994) and elected Recording Secretary (199499

Follow the Green Arrow


planned programs to visit plantations and
homes.
The four GCV Richmond clubs shared a
project to help landscape the East Terrace of
the Science Museum of Virginia. With Mrs.
William A.Johns as chairman, the clubs sponsored a flower-arranging clinic conducted by
Sheila Macqueen, British authority on the subject. Boxwood's total contributions to the Science Museum project came from these revenues. This project, one segment of the Master Plan for the museum, began in 1977 and
was completed in 1981.
Mrs. Richard P. Hankins (Eleanor) received a GCV Horticulture Award of Merit
in 1981. Mrs. Charles L. Reed, Jr. was appointed Chairman of Historic Garden Week
(1981-1983).
In 1982, the Franklin Street project gave
the club an opportunity to work with the Historic Richmond Foundation, the Junior
League, and a private corporation, Comer
Associates, which owned the property at the
comer of Franklin andJefferson streets. This
project was to create an urban park. Landscaped and planted with appropriate shrubs
and trees, it added greatly to the charm of the
200 block of Historic West Franklin Street.
A flower show program was held in 1983
at the home of Mrs. Bruce C. Gottwald
(Nancy) for members and "our men." It was
called "Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow."
Everyone was supplied with a schedule ahead
of time and the results were most interesting.
To the delight of all, this program was to be
repeated a few years later.
In 1984, Mrs. J. Kimpton Honey (Anne)
brought to the projects committee an idea
from a club in Boca Grande, Fla. She described "Tablescapes," table settings for different social events, which became one of
Boxwood's most ambitious endeavors. After
lengthy discussion and hard work under the
direction of co-chairmen, Mrs. Benjamin
Harrison and Mrs. Richard H. Catlett, Jr.,
"Tablescapes and Fun Settings" was presented
in 1985 for the first time at the Tuckahoe
Woman's Club. It was a complete success in
attendance as well as proceeds.
Mrs. George L. Tumer (Wilson) attended

Walther Maser (Sally) painted roses on pink


aprons for the workers at the show.
Mrs. Edmund W. Hening, Jr. (Emily
Jane), 1973 project chairman, announced that
the City of Richmond Planning Commission
and the Urban Design Committee had approved the Boxwood design for planters for
the Richmond Library. The next year, while
Mrs. Richard H. Catlett, Jr. (Barbara) served
as project chairman, the club supplied three
large cement urns and seven rectangular planters for the library's east side. These were filled
with large attractive shrubs.
In 1974, a third Massie Medal came to
Boxwood when Mrs. Flowers received it as
an award to "Mary Frances Flowers who,
crowning a lifetime of service, became the
guiding spirit of the Kent-Valentine House."
Every two years, the Chairmanship of
Historic Garden Week rotates among the four
GCV Richmond clubs. Mrs. John S. Battle,
Jr. (Grace) ably led this endeavor from 19731975.
Mrs. Charles B. Miller (Anne), GCV
Chairman of Conservation from 1978-1980,
was among those instrumental in starting the
Common Wealth Fund.
Mrs. Charles C. Broaddus, (Carolyn),
widely known for her roses, received The
GCV Horticulture Award of Merit in 1978.
In 1979, Boxwood sponsored the 59th
Annual Meeting of The Garden Club of Virginia. Co-chairmen for the meeting were Mrs.
Ivor Massey, Mrs. Owen, and Mrs. Charles L.
Reed, Jr. (Ann). Mrs. Robert E. Anderson ill
(Polly) received a GCV Horticulture Award
of Merit.
During the decade of the 1970s Boxwood
was ably led by its club presidents, Mrs. Rutherford H. Spessard, Mrs. Ivor Massey, Mrs.
DeWitt F. Helm, Jr., Mrs. Heth Owen, Jr.,
and Mrs. Merritt W. Foster, Jr.
1980-1990
As the 1980s arrived, Boxwood began to
have a great deal of concern and enthusiasm
for the restorations and beautifications of The
Garden Club of Virginia. Members, eager to
expand their knowledge of restorations,
100

The Member Clubs


the 64th Annual Meeting in 1984 and welcomed her daughter, Mrs. Benjamin W.
Mears, Jr. (Katty), as the incoming President
of The Garden Club of Virginia.
Mrs. Charles B. Miller, project chairman,
proposed in 1985 that the club landscape a
small entrance garden at the Virginia Home.
This was done with plantings of azaleas and
low shrubs around the circular drive and added
greatly to the pleasure of the residents of the
Home.
Mrs. Merritt W. Foster, Jr. (Mary) was
elected a Director-at- Large of The GCV
(1986-1989).
Mrs.John W. Bates III (Beverly) and Mrs.
Collins Denny III (Anne) were busy preparing in 1986 for "Tab1escapes II" to be given at
the Carillon in 1987. Mrs. Harrison, artistic
director for the event, acquainted] ohn Loring
of Tiffany's in N ew York with the magnitude
of the show. After seeing the brochure on the
original show, Mr. Loring asked to be allowed
to exhibit along with Boxwood members' 23
vignettes. H e prepared a beautiful entry and
in September 1987 published two pictures of
"Tablescapes" in his magazine, The Tiffany
Bride. "Tablescapes" appeared also in Veranda
Magazine.
The next large project was held at the
Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. The club cosponsored, along with the other three GCV
Richmond clubs, the purchase of garden furniture there. Each club gave $4000 toward
this garden, paying $1000 a year over a fouryear period.
In 1989, The GCV four Richmond clubs
were invited to take part in the Maymont
Flower Show at the Coliseum. With Mrs.
Hubert S. Taylor,J r. (Mary Glen) as chairman,
members filled baskets with beautiful flowers
and sold them at the show.
Boxwood sponsored The GCV Rose
Show at the Science Museum in 1989. Mrs.
Taylor headed "The Orient Express" which
was a beautiful example of the many talents of
all the clubs.
This decade was again ably led by Mrs.
Edmund W. Hening, Jr., Mrs. Richard H.
Catlett, Jr., Mrs. Charles A. Gregory,Jr., Mrs.
Robert E. Anderson III, and Mrs. Hubert S.

Taylor, Jr.
1990-1995

In the early 1990s, the club looked to the


future and made some changes.
In 1991-1992, the members voted to increase membership from 55 to 65.
Historic Garden Week had as its Chairman in 1989-1991 Mrs. Merritt W. Foster, Jr.
Mrs. Hubert S. Taylor, Jr. received a GCV
Horticulture Award of Merit in 1992 .
Since 1953, the club had sent campers to
Nature Camp in Vesuvius. Now summer
campers are sent to nature camps at Maymont
and the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
The club was proud to learn in 1992 that
Mrs. George L. Turner's other daughter, Mrs.
W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. (Helen), was elected
President of The Garden Club of Virginia.
Members worked hard on the Fine Arts
and Flowers Show at the Vtrginia Museum of
Fine Arts in 1992. They have continued to
participate and exhibit in this successful endeavor.
Boxwood began to search for a new fund
raiser. The Bettie Bearden Pardee Lecture/
Luncheon was chosen and held in the spring
of 1993 in the Virginia Historical Society's
beautiful auditorium addition. Mrs. William
H. Neal (Mary Sue) assisted Mrs. Pardee in
countless ways. Mrs. Frank S. Miller III
(Loretta) and Mrs. Collins Denny (Anne)
served as co-chairmen, and the hard work by
members resulted in a tremendous profit for
the club.
From these profits Boxwood was able to
give $5000 to the restoration and renovation
of the Kent-Valentine House in honor of Mrs.
George H. Flowers, Jr. for her dedication and
countless hours of work for the house. Boxwood member Mrs. Richard H. Catlett,Jr. was
serving as Co-Chairman of the Kent-Valentine House Long-Range Planning Committee during this period.
Boxwood's interest in the James River
Park System continues. In 1993, under the
guidance of Mrs. Richard T. Hood III (Molly)
and Mrs. George Cook Howell III (Cissy), a
project was researched to educate children of
101

Follow the Green Arrow


all ages on wildflowers. The end result was
the funding by Boxwood of the publication of
handouts identifying early spring, late spring,
and early summer wildflowers. A scavenger
hunt accompanied by a teacher's guide was also
developed and printed.
The four GCV Richmond clubs came
together once again in 1994 and sponsored
the Maymont Flower Show's opening night
Gala.
As the club approaches the end of this
twenty-five year history, its members are still
learning, doing, and having fun. It still exhibits fine leadership during the first half of this
decade with the following presidents: Mrs.
Frank B. Miller III, Mrs. Walter W. Craigie,
Jr., and Mrs. Charles L. Reed, Jr.

promoter of Prestwould.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. A. R. Meredith, Jr., Mrs. Clarence T.
Orgain, Mrs.James T. Butler, Jr., Mrs. W. H .
Perkinson, and Mrs. Charles A. Perkinson,Jr.
1980-1990
For Historic Garden Week in the 1980s,
the Brunswick Garden Club continued its
policy of opening homes that are far off and
homes that are nigh. With journeys to Amelia,
Mecklenburg, Hampden-Sydney, Blackstone,
Farmville, and Longwood College, it also had
a Brunswick County tour. Club members rallied to the call for hostesses at Brandon Plantation several times and at Prestwould perennially.
The tradition of a Christmas party for
members and spouses was begun with the
home of the lucky hostess completely decorated for the season by club members. One
year the decorations were judged. The party
pushed back into November the annual "Holiday Auction" of baked goods and handmade
items. Proceeds from this auction have gone
to the Kent-Valentine House, Village View
Foundation in Emporia, and The GCV
projects.

In community activities, the club worked


with the Lawrenceville Town Council in cleanup projects at several unsightly spots and purchased bluebird boxes for the Brunswick
Country Club and for Oakwood Cemetery in
Lawrenceville.
In 1987, all hands were called into service when the club was hostess for The GCV
Board of Governors' Meeting. A pool-side
supper with (of course) Brunswick Stew
served, a cocktail party at the home of Governor and Mrs. Harrison, and a slide program
on wildflowers of Brunswick County were
among the offerings.
The club participated in 1988 in the
"Constitution Oak" project of The GCV and
the Vrrginia Department ofForestry. Ten oaks
were planted in the county, including one, with
ceremony, on the Brunswick County Courthouse Square.
During the decade, Mrs. J. T. Butler, Jr.

TIIE BRUNSWICK GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
The deed of the decade for The
Brunswick Garden Club was the 197 5 GCV
Rose Show in Lawrer!ceville. With a small
membership, it took derring-do to bring if off.
With each member serving on an average of
four committees, the results were rosy.
During the 1970s, the club presented nine
Historic Garden Week tours, ranging from
18th-century homes at Hampden-Sydney
College to new residences at Lake Gaston.
The home of Governor and Mrs. Albertis S.
Harrison, Jr. (Lacey Virginia), was included
on the Lawrenceville Tour.
The club cooperated with local organizations in the plantings at the historic Brunswick
County Courthouse and the new County
Government Building.
The club celebrated its 50th anniversary
with a luncheon at the Kent-Valentine House
in March 197 4. The Brunswick Garden Club
seal, stitched in needlepoint by Mrs. A. R.
Meredith, Jr. (Sue) from a design by Mrs. J.
B. Rawlings (Mildred) was donated for the rug
in the Kent-Valentine House. The club presented an inscribed antique brass candlestick
to Prestwould in honor of Mrs. R. W. Bragg
(Virginia) who had worked tirelessly as an early
102

The Member Clubs

Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy,


Harrison, October 1987.

Jr.

ofTransportation in highway plantings. Wildflowers, crape myrtles, magnolia trees, and


canna bulbs have been planted at four sites on
Route 58 in Brunswick County. The club was
aided in this project by grants from Peebles,
Inc.
Historic Garden Week openings featured
old favorites including Prestwould, Amelia,
Hampden-Sydney College, and a newcomer,
Emporia. The club made donations to
Prestwould for two projects, the dining room
wallpaper and a slave building.
The club, for Earth Day 1990, made a
donation to the Nature Trail at Southside Virginia Community College. A few hardy members hiked the trail the day of the presentation. Four bird feeders were installed at a local nursing home in 1991, and club members
have supplied feed.
Twelve presidents, past and present, attended the club's 69th annual birthday party
meeting in March 1993.
In April 1993, members were guests for a
sentimental "return visit" to Carter's Grove
with a business meeting and lunch in a conference building, and a tour of the house and
grounds. Mrs. Archibald McCrea, who had
been a charter member of The Brunswick
Garden Club when it was founded in 1924,
and who with her husband had restored and
renovated Carter's Grove in the late 1920s,
had entertained the Brunswick Garden Club
fifty years earlier at a tea at Carter's Grove in
November 1934.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Lloyd V. Bell, Jr., Mrs. Wilbur H.
Brown, and Mrs. Michael F. Moorman.

and Governor

(Anne) served in three GCV positions: Chairman of the Admissions Committee, Chairman
of the Slides Collection, and a Director-atLarge.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Lucy F. Peebles, Mrs. Charles F. Parker,
Mrs. Clifton R. Long, Mrs. Jam es T. Butler,
Jr., and Mrs. William B. Bishop.
1990-1995
Community projects and a special sentimental journey have highlighted the decade
so far.
In 1990, the Brunswick Garden Club
sponsored four appearances in local schools
by Ed Clarke, President and Director of the
Wildlife Center of Virginia at Weyers Cave.
His program, which featured a golden eagle
that had been treated at the center, stressed
wildlife habitat preservation.
The club began in this decade a program
of participating with the Virginia Department

TIIE CHARLOTI'ESVILLE
GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
Early in this decade members braved hurricane Agnes to meet and approve sending a
check to the newly acquired Kent-Valentine
House. About this time an unusual motion
was passed to extend an invitation to a deceased member's husband (Mr. Charles
103

Follow the Green Arrow


Barham) to become an honorary member of
The Charlottesville Garden Club, and he graciously accepted.
During this decade, the club continued to
work on the landscaping project at Bloomfield,
a home for handicapped children. New
projects included a contribution to "HANDS"
for the landscaping of Piedmont Virginia
Community College. This organization,
sponsored by Sears and dedicated to the beautifying of the community, was coordinated by
the Council of Garden Clubs. The club also
undertook the landscaping of the Rescue
Squad's headquarters and continued this
project for several years. Contributions included funds for the landscaping of the new
addition at the Martha Jefferson Community
Hospital, for the landscaping of Brownsville, a
local school, and for the Bicentennial Center.
Mrs. M. C. Wilhelm CJ ean), who taught
creative drama in schools as a volunteer, conceived the idea of a Bicentennial project. It
consisted of poster boards with a picture and
short history of historic properties restored by
The Garden Club of Virginia. Other club
members made dried arrangements to accompany the pictures. The project was displayed
in elementary schools and exhibited at the
Bicentennial Center during Historic Garden
Week in 197 6.
Each slimmer children were sent to Nature Camp. Flowers were taken on a regular
basis to the University of Virginia Hospital,
and members planted a small plot of the
J effersonia diphylla plant at Monticello. The
club donated books to the Kent-Valentine
House in honor of or in memory of members.
Books dealing with environmental concerns
were purchased for schools. Members made
Christmas wreaths for Bloomfield, libraries,
and Martha Jefferson House, a retirement
home.
Miss Virginia Bowen was Co-Chairman
of The GCVFlower Shows (1973-1974).
In 1973, Historic Garden Week chairmen
considered the difficulties and duplications encountered by the three Charlottesville clubs of
The GCV and decided to cooperate in the
planning. One club would have the responsibility of selecting the homes and overseeing

the total operation. The other two clubs


would obtain ads and take care of the publicity.
The plan was implemented and worked well.
In 197 6, a committee worked with members of St. Anthony Hall, a UVA fraternity
with the oldest house on the grounds, to improve its landscaping. In 1979, the club investigated and established a rooftop garden at
the UVA Hospital. This project was ultimately
named the Common Wealth Award winner.
To finance these projects, flower arrangements
were made for social events in the community, bluebird houses were sold, an annual
pansy and perennial sale was held, a Flower
Conditioning Calendar and needlepoint kits
of theJeffersonia diphylla were sold to members, a gardening handbook, "How Green is
Your Thumb," was compiled and sold, and inclub Christmas auctions of seasonal and handmade items were held.
The J effersonia diphylla, the club's logo,
was chosen for the needlepoint rug representing The GCV member clubs. Mrs. Peyton E.
Weary CJ an) was the artist, and Mrs. William
D . Bayles (Mavis) did the needlepoint.
The five club presidents who gave inspired leadership to The Charlottesville Garden Club during this decade were Mrs.
Bennett H. Barnes, Jr. (Gene), Mrs. Legare
K. Tarrant (Cornelia), Mrs. Byrd S. Leavell
(Nancy), Mrs. Richard M. Brandt (Tice), and
Mrs. Peter C. Manson (Nancy).
1980-1990
During the 1980s, the club was extremely
active with projects and fund raising. To raise
funds many gardening items, including our
highly desirable garden gloves, were sold
within the club. In 1980, the club sponsored
a lecture and workshop with Sheila Macqueen,
outstanding English gardener.
In December 1983, the Piedmont Environmental Council asked The GCV clubs in
Charlottesville to help found an ecology camp
for children. Mrs. Robert Blizzard (Gladys)
met with representatives of the other two clubs
and developed plans for ARC - Albemarle,
Charlottesville and Rivanna Clubs. Betsy
Dagleish, an environmental teacher and ex104

The Member Clubs


perienced camper, was secured as Director. A
location for the camp was provided by Mr. and
Mrs.James B. Murray (Bunny). The club participated by giving $100 toward operating expenses, sponsoring two scholarships, and sending volunteers to help during sessions.
The club sponsored The GCV Daffodil
Show in 1984. With giant painted daffodils
in the foreground, 1582 daffodils nodded and
85 artistic arrangements lent glorious color to
the site, the UVA Cage.
The club joined The GCV's other two
Charlottesville clubs in nominating Paul
Saunier who won The GCV Award For Meritorious Achievement in Conservation in 1985.
Paul was instrumental in getting the Ivy Creek
Natural Area started.
In the fall of 1986, the club explored a
new project, the University of Virginia Fraternities Landscape Renewal Project. Members met with the Dean of the School of Landscape Architecture who appointed students to
research the project. Five fraternities were
involved, and the members were enthusiastic
and cooperative. Preliminary plans were completed in May, 1987, and the club committee
met with the UVA Arboretum Committee.
The plans were approved and The Historic
Renovation Corporation became involved.
The club applied for The GCV Common
Wealth Award in 1988 and won second place.
The $2000 awarded to the club was matched
by the Historic Renovation Committee, and
the club voted to allocate $5000 toward the
next phase of the project.
In 1989 the club sponsored another lecture and workshop with Sheila Macqueen.
The club continued to give financial support of varying amounts to organizations sharing its goals.
During the 1980s, the club was fortunate
to have as its presidents, Mrs. Robert A.
Rutland (Peggy), Mrs. John Page Elliott
(Lois), Mrs. Edward W. Hook Gessie), Mrs.
Edmund H. Henderson (Achsah), and Mrs.
Robert S. Gilliam, Jr. (De).

paring for one of its most ambitious fund-raising endeavors,"An Entertaining Experience,"
with Keith Knost, a well-known interior designer from Shepherdstown, West Virginia.
The hard work paid off, and it was a beautiful
show.
The club's bylaws regarding membership
and meeting time were studied and amended.
In 1992, the club allocated $750 fora Speaker's
Fund with odd amounts at the end of the year
to go into a Flowers Shows Fund. After much
study, a new garden calendar was completed
by the committee in 1992. Members took at
least 5 at $5 each, placed copies in garden supply stores, and carried them to The GCV
meetings and to the Council of Garden Clubs.
The calendar is now in its second printing.
The club seemed addicted to rooftop gardens. It researched a new project, a rooftop
garden for the Martha Jefferson Hospital. In
1993, a committee planted flowers and bulbs
in the "Courtyard."
Mr. and Mrs. Lockwood Frizzell (Gale)
won an astonishing number of awards and ribbons at state and American Daffodil Society
shows.
The Charlottesville Garden Club was
pleased to have as its able leaders during the
1990s Mrs. P. Harris Leggett (Pattye), Mrs.].
A. Kessler, Jr. (Kate), and Mrs. John E.
Maddux Gane).

CHATHAM GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
The Chatham Garden Club was hostess
for The Garden Club ofVITginia Rose Show
held at the National Guard Armory in
Chatham in 1970 and 1971.
Gilman Court, a parcel ofland which was
originally deeded to the Chatham Garden
Club in 1936 "to be kept and maintained as a
park," has been lovingly tended through the
years by club members. A Norway spruce was
planted there in 1970 and decorated annually
with white lights during the holiday season.
Also a magnolia tree, a Bradford pear, and several dogwood trees have been planted in the

1990-1995

In the fall of 1991, the club started pre105

Follow the Green Arrow


and beautify Chatham. In cooperation with
other garden clubs, members worked to decorate the town by hanging wreaths and garlands
on public buildings. The club annually cosponsored a doorway decoration contest and
encouraged the placement of single white
candles in windows by citizens throughout the
community. Members continued to provide
the Pittsylvania County Chamber of Commerce with flower arrangements for its annual
banquet and flowers fat special occasions at
the three local private schools.
Chatham won many awards from the
Keep Virginia Beautiful Commission, including the award for "the most beautiful town in
Virginia" in 1982. Club members continued
to be very active on the Chatham Beautification Committee.
The first annual Christmas Tea was held
in 1986. Club members decorated the home
of the hostess with lovely wreaths and Christmas arrangements, and each invited a guest
from the community to share the Christmas
spirit at this occasion. This project also provided ideas for decorating members' own
homes.
In May 1986, the club sponsored the first
annual "Picnic-in-the-Park" which was held
in the Town Park. Enthusiasm for this project
has grown each year and is now eagerly anticipated by the community. Proceeds from
this event provided new entry markers for the
park, replaced geranium boxes on Main Street,
purchased hundreds of red geraniums, and
helped to beautify and maintain the Town
Park. Also, each year part of the proceeds was
given to the Pittsylvania Historical Society and
the Chatham Beautification Committee.
As a memorial to Mrs. Vernon Geyer,
(Mickey), who was the daffodil test chairman
for many years, the club planted a bed of daffodils from her test collection garden in the
Town Park. This greatly enhanced the garden in the park and honored the daffodil test
chairman who was also a charter member of
the Chatham Beautification Committee.
To further beautify the community, the
club planted nandina bushes, a crape myrtle,
azaleas, and boxwood in front of the Chatham
Rescue Squad.

park.
In May 1971, the club celebrated its 50th
birthday with a dinner at the Cedars Country
Club.
The formal presentation of the restored
first Clerk's Office of Pittsylvania to the Chairman of the Board of Supervisors was held June
9, 1971. James W Moody, Executive Director of the Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission, was the guest speaker. The Clerk's
Office was originally built in 17 67 at Callands,
eleven miles west of Chatham. The restoration, under the direction of Chatham Garden
Club members, was begun in 1966. The
$10,000 cost was collected through voluntary
contributions of money, labor, and materials
by interested citizens. To ensure the future
care and maintenance of this building, five
trustees were appointed, two of whom will always be members of the Chatham Garden
Club. A Highway Historical Marker was
placed at the Clerk's Office by the Virginia
Historic Landmarks Commission.
Chatham celebrated its Bicentennial in
March 197 6. In honor of this occasion, a club
member, Mrs. Langhorne Jones, (Gertrude),
designed "handkerchief gardens" which were
planted extensively throughout the community. She created four different formal garden designs, each using only ten square feet.
She said this was the "minimum space with
maximum effect." The gardens were four
shapes: round, square, hexagonal, and a variation of a square. Each design featured walkin paths and a center space for a decorative
garden figurine, bird bath or sundial. In
March 1976, club members made table arrangements for the Bicentennial Ball at the
National Guard Armory.
Presidents of the Chatham Garden Club
during this decade were Mrs. Whitehead
Motley, Mrs. Vernon T. Lankford, Mrs. Joseph Motley Whitehead, Mrs. James David
Jones (Nellie G.), and Mrs.John W Motley.
1980-1990
The Chatham Garden Club, being a small
club in a small community, worked closely with
other town organizations to fix up, clean up,
106

The Member Clubs

Club presidents during the 1980s were


Mrs. Thomas F. Motley III, Mrs. Claude S.
Whitehead, Jr., Mrs. Ben J. Davenport, Jr.,
Mrs. William E. Dickerson, Jr., and Mrs.
Henry C. Hurt, Jr.

grace the setting. These talented and loyal


men were made honorary members of the
club.
As conservation became a very timely
topic, the club joined this crusade. Using recycled leaves, the members bagged, hauled and
sold mulch by the bag or pick-up truck load.
Price: $1.00 per bag or $7 .00 for a truck load.
Oh, for the good ole' days!
Upkeep of Grove Street Cemetery (dating from 1833) had always been of great interest and concern to the club. In 1978, members voted to form a committee to hold an
annual Grove Street Cemetery "Spruce-up
Day." Each April, club members armed with
shears, rakes, clippers, and trash bags descended upon the ancient grounds and worked
enthusiastically until lunch time. One year
the committee decided that each participant
should bring a tidbit to enjoy following the
work day. Committee chairmen were concerned about having an adequate amount of
food. They need not to have worried! Food
came in such abundance that one member likened it to food falling like manna from heaven,
complete with pitchers ofBloody Marys. Following this Lucullan feast, the committee decided to appoint hostesses yearly to prepare a
light lunch for Spruce-up participants.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. James W. Jennings, Mrs. W. Hugh
Moomaw, Mrs. Dudley Overbey, Mrs. A.
Banks Turner, and Mrs. Charles C. Freed, Jr.

1990-1995
The Chatham Garden Club continued to
be a good friend to the community through
the members' hard work and dedication to
making Chatham a beautiful town in which
to live.
The "Picnic-in-the-Park" continued to
grow in popularity. In 1990, a committee of
club members was formed to study and recommend beautification projects which could
be undertaken with the proceeds from this
event. Landscaping at the Chatham Knitting
Mills on Main Street was chosen to be the first
project.
In 1993, the club voted to present an
award in the novice class at The Garden Club
of Virginia Lily Show for the next five years
in honor of Mrs. Girard V. Thompson (Mary
Helen), a member who had been a Flower
Shows judge and a patient and knowledgeable
instructor of flower arranging for the younger
members of the club for many years.
Mrs. Whitehead Motley (Dorothy) supervised the special planting of the gardens at
Chatham Hall for the school's centennial celebration in April 1994.
Mrs. Andrew W. Todd and Mrs.
Theodore E. Bruning served as presidents of
The Chatham Garden Club in the early 1990s.

1980-1990
The Danville Garden Club, holding fast
to its enthusiasm for beautification, began the
1980s with a new project, a plant sale. The
financial success of the sale was important.
The sale was held in a large warehouse because of the number of items to be sold: trees,
ferns, house plants, shrubbery, pots, and decorative items for house and yard.
Successful fund raising and careful preparations culminated in a lovely Annual Meeting of The Garden Club of Virginia in 1984.
A gala picnic, planned for the first evening to
be held outdoors at the Dan River Lodge, was
made festive by tablecloths of Dan River fab-

THE GARDEN CLUB OF DANVILLE


1970-1980
The decade of the 70s was one of accomplishment and cooperation for The Garden
Club of Danville. The club sponsored the
annual Daffodil Shows of The Garden Club
of Virginia in 1971 and 1972. Held in the
Stratford College Gymnasium, the Show had
as its theme "Designs for the 70s." Husbands
participated by building a full-sized gazebo to
107

Follow the Green Arrow


Lily Test Collection, Mrs. Francis H.
McGovern (Rebecca) prepared beds and lovingly planted her lilies. She waited in vain for
signs of growth. Finally, Mrs. McGovern discovered that something had enjoyed her lilies,
even if she and the garden club members had
not. Voles had eaten every bulb. Voles did
not devour the lilies of Mrs. Charlton B.
Strange, Jr. (Carol). Her talents and her lilies
commingled and won for Mrs. Strange and
The Garden Club of Danville the Presidents
of The Garden Club of Virginia Trophy for
the best Inter-club arrangement at The GCV
Annual Lily Show in 1992.
The club was saddened by the death ofits
beloved member, Mrs. James W. Perkinson
(Siggie) in 1993'. Mrs. Perkinson served as
The Garden Club of Virginia Rose Test Collections Chairman from 1978 to 1990. AtThe
GCV Annual Meeting May 10, 1990, Mrs.
Lilburn T. Talley (Nancy), The GCV President, read a letter praising Mrs. Perkinson for
her love of roses and for her work as Rose Test
Chairman.
And so, as the seasons progressed, the club
looked forward to Historic Garden Week and
a plant sale for The GCV Daffodil Show the
club will sponsor in 1996 and 1997. Will these
be picture-perfect shows, with no ill winds
blowing or???. Only the next history of The
GCV will tell.
Club presidents 1990-199 5 were Mrs.
Charlton B. Strange, Jr., Mrs. Gus W. Dyer,
Jr., and Mrs. William]. Erwin, Jr.

rics. Everyone was much surprised when a


strong wind came up sending tablecloths billowing in the air. No one dreamed that this
might be an ill wind until the next evening
when the formal banquet was held at the
Danville Golf Club. The tables were beautifully set; the arrangements were exquisite.
Only one thing seemed slightly awry. The
grand piano needed to be moved just inches.
Waiters came forth quickly to move the piano. Crash! Legs of the old piano splintered
and the piano went down on the floor. What
to do? The committee proved itself to be valiant. Undaunted, they called a local company
which, within the hour, delivered a substitute
piano, and an innovative member threw a
beautiful tablecloth over the collapsed one.
The catastrophe lent excitement to the
evening.
In 1985, there was also a catastrophe at
the Memorial Mansion, now the Danville
Museum of Fine Arts and History. Upkeep
of the Mansion grounds continued to be a
project of the club. During a period of heavy
rain, the lower floor of the mansion flooded,
and many of the plants had to be moved in
order for repairs to be made. The shrubbery
did not survive the move, and the club made
two major contributions to the grounds committee for replacements. The back entrance
of the museum was changed by the addition
of an elevator. A dogwood tree, shrubs, and
mulch made the entrance more attactive. This
project continued to be of major interest to
the club. In the words of a past chairman of
the Memorial Mansion grounds committee,
"it is a constant and never-ending project," as
members weed, water, plant, and donate plants
from their gardens.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Richard G. Barkhouser, Mrs. Gordon R.
Woody,Jr., Mrs. Calvin W. Fowler, Mrs. Kenneth R. Bell, and Mrs.John M. Stoneburner.

DOLLEY MADISON GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
The 1970s were busy years for Dolley
Madison Garden Club. Members worked toward excellence in horticulture, conservation,
and beautification. They performed duties
locally and were Chairmen of Committees in
The Garden Club of Virginia.
A Past President of The Garden Club of
Virginia (1964-1966), Mrs. Wyatt A. Williams
(Dottie) was a dedicated gardener. She received the Eleanor Truax Harris Challenge

1990-1995
Seasons change, time moves on, and the
1990s arrived. The Garden Club of Danville
remained devoted to the Grove Street Cemetery and Memorial Mansion projects. For a
108

The Member Clubs


Cup at The GCV Lily Show in 1970 and The
Sponsor's Cup at the Lily Show in 1972. Mrs.
Williams was appointed The GCV Chairman
of Finance in 1974-1976.
Mrs. Joseph M. Mercer (Virginia) was Chairman of The GCV JOURNAL from 19701972 and was awarded the Violet Niles Walker
Memorial Cup at The GCV Lily Show in
1977. Mrs. Wilfred T. Grenfell, Jr. (Nora)
served as The GCV Lily Test Collection
Chairman 1976-1980. Mrs.John S. Mcintyre
(Ann) was awarded the Yancie Donegan Casey
Memorial Award in 1979 for old garden roses.
Mrs. Williams' scholarly book Historic
Virginia Gardens was published by The Garden Club of Virginia in 1975. For this valuable source of garden information and for her
long and distinguished service to the DMGC
and The GCv, she was awarded the Massie
Medal in 197 6.
The club's local tour de force was helping
Project Pride of Orange with the planting of
trees, shrubs, window boxes, and planters on
Main Street. In 197 5 a gift from Mr. and Mrs.
Jacquelin E. Taylor (Helen Marie) for developing Taylor Park was given to the town with
the stipulation that Dolley Madison Garden
Club help with the planting and maintenance
of the park. Under the able direction of Mrs.
Williams and her committee, the Dolley
Madison Garden Club did an outstanding job,
and the project became an ongoing one for
the club.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Harrison P. Bresee, Mrs. Wilfred T.
Grenfell, Jr., Mrs. Atwell W Somerville, Mrs.
Alexander T. Stumpf, Mrs. Childress Hill, and
Mrs. Harry C. Mason.

guiding force of the camp. She also served as


Chairman of The GCV Conservation and
Beautification Committee 1986-1988. Mr.
Scott won The GCV Award for Meritorious
Achievement in Conservation in 1982 for his
educational programs on the consequences of
uranium mining in Virginia.
Members remained active in all three of
The Garden Club of Virginia Flower shows.
Mrs. Donald R. Ober (Vibeke) was named The
GCV Lily Test Collections Chairman in 19861988. Mrs. Robert F. Gillespie, Jr. (Catherine)
won the Louise Morris Goodwin Bowl at The
GCV Daffodil Shows in 1988 and 1989. The
beautification of the highways continued with
the planting of dogwood and helping with the
clean-up job in the town of Orange.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Theodore G. Scott, Jr., Mrs. Charles V.
Rich, Jr., Mrs. H. Pendleton Bresee, Jr., Mrs.
Robert F. Gillespie, Jr., and Mrs. John Y.
Faulconer.
1990-1995
The 1990s arrived with a never-ending
schedule. First and foremost was DMGC's
sponsoring of The GCV Lily Shows in 1993
and 1994. Plans were made, money was raised,
and many committee meetings were held. All
of it paid off with the 1993 Lily Show, "You're
Invited to a Wedding," staged at Woodberry
Forest School - former home of Mrs. Joseph
Walker, first Lily Test Collection Chairman
forThe GCV.
Mrs. Robert F. Gillespie, Jr. (Catherine)
was awarded the Louise Morris Goodwin
Bowl at The GCV Daffodil Show in 1990 and
was appointed The GCV Daffodil Test Collections Chairman in 1991-1994. Mrs. John
F. Jam es (Abigail) won the Jacqueline Byrd
Shank Memorial Trophy at The GCV Daffodil Show in 1991.
Thanks to the dedicated efforts of Mrs.
William G. Falcon (Trish), Dolley Madison
Garden Club began a monthly newsletter.
Included are items of interest, hints and helps
for gardening, and notification of regular club
meetings.
Time marches on and members of

1980-1990
During the 1980s the members ofDMGC
were encouraged to put their forces behind
conservation and recycling projects. A Natural History Day Camp was added to the club's
project list. The camp for boys and girls, ages
10-14, was well received by the area. Held at
Montpelier for the last several years, it won
for itself a place in the history of The GCV:
Mrs. Theodore G. Scott,Jr. (Carolyn) was the
109

Follow the Green Arrow


DMGC continue to contribute their many and
diverse talents for horticulture, conservation,
and beautification.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Gilbert K. Queitzsch and Mrs.
Donald R. Ober.

Three landscaping projects were completed during the 1970s. Carefully selected
specimens were placed at the Eastville Courthouse. In 1977 a flower garden was planted
at the Hermitage, a retirement home in
Onancock for the pleasure of the residents,
and a federally-funded landscape project at
South Accomack Elementary School was designed and supervised by members of the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore.
In 1979 Mrs. Guy L. Webster 0ane) donated $1,000 for the club to begin the Angel
Account, a special fund available only for designated club projects.
Presidents of the club during the 1970s
were Mrs. I. William Bagwell III, Mrs. John
E. Tankard, Mrs. Harry S. Holcomb III, Mrs.
Benjamin W. Mears, Jr., Mrs. N . Wescott
Jacob, and Mrs.John E. Tankard, Jr.

GARDEN CLUB OF .
THE EASTERN SHORE
1970-1980
Noteworthy events in the 1970s included
the special tribute paid to Mrs . Charles
Pennebaker (Kay) by The Garden Club of
Vrrginia. A Garden Club of the Eastern Shore
member and local artist, Mrs. Pennebaker
contributed her pen-and-ink sketches for use
in the official Historic Garden Week Guidebook from 1972 until 1992. The club was also
indeed proud of its dedicated and outstanding member, Mrs. Lucius J. Kellam, Jr. (Dot),
who served as President of The Garden Club
of Virginia from 1968-1970. Mrs. E. Polk
Kellam (Amine) received the deLacy Gray
Medal for Conservation in 1973 for spearheading the drive to remove abandoned vehicles from the Eastern Shore.
The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore
sponsored The GCV Board of Governors'
Meeting in 197 5. Mrs. Chester B. deGavre
(Tita) designed a logo to be used in the needlepoint rug at the Kent-Valentine House. Mrs.
Richard F. Hall, Jr. (Pete) completed the
needlework.
Interesting club trips during the 1970s
included two to the Kent-Valentine House,
one to Virginia Beach for Princess Anne Garden Club's Historic Garden Week Tour, and
one to Norfolk for the special display of
"Flowers in Art" at the Chrysler Museum.
Flower shows were held each year, alternating annually between intramural shows and
ones open to outside entries. A plant sale usually accompanied each show. The GCV Horticulture Awards of Merit were received by
Mrs. Henry]. Richardson (Fredonia), Mrs.
Harold L. Turner (Stevie), Mrs. Chester B.
deGavre, Miss Vena Walker, and Mrs. George
F. Parsons (Charlye).

1980-1990
Historic Garden Week in 1980 included
a walking tour of Accomac, and Garden Week
in 1982 was highlighted by a walking tour of
Eastville, both county seats amd sites of
charming historic houses and professional offices.
Mrs. Giles C. Upshur Ganie) won a Horticulture Award of Merit in 1980.
Kerr Place, home of the Eastern Shore
Historical Society, was chosen by The Garden Club of Virginia as its restoration project
in 1981. This 18th-century mansion and
grounds in Onancock attracted many visitors
over the course of the year, as well as during
Historic Garden Week.
In 1981 the Garden Club of the Eastern
Shore sponsored its own Nature Camp.
Called Camp Osprey, it was held for the next
three years at Brownsville, Eastern Shore
home of The Nature Conservancy. Camp
Osprey served as a prototype for nature camps
later established by other member clubs of
TheGCV.
The Garden Club of Virginia awarded
Honorary Memberships to Mrs. Charles D.
Pennebaker and to Mr. Robert H. Talley Jr.,
an honorary member of the Garden Club of
the Eastern Shore. Mr. Talley bequeathed his
110

The Member Clubs


outstanding collection of Catesby prints to
The GCV for display in the Kent-Valentine
House.
At the death of noted horticulturist and
founder of The Garden Club of the Eastern
Shore, Mrs. Littleton H. Mears (Nannie) in
October 1982, the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore presented an 1890 sterling silver
chop plate to The GCV as a memorial to Mrs.
Mears. The plate is used as a perpetual trophy at The GCV Daffodil Show and presented
for the best Inter-club arrangement.
At the request of the APVA, the club undertook the supervision of the restoration and
the maintenance of Mrs. Mears' garden at her
home, Holly Brook, near Eastville.
The club conducted a boxwood forum in
1982 which was open to the members of the
three other local garden clubs. Rose Day was
held at Gulf Stream Nursery, former home
and business of Mr. Robert H. Talley. Proceeds from this event were donated to the
Historical Society for maintenance of the
grounds at Kerr Place. In October 1982 Mrs.
Lucinda W Kellam was chairman of The
GCV Conservation Forum in Richmond.
Also during that year, the club planted 20
Constitution Oaks provided by the Forestry
Service, and a member donated $1,000 to plant
flowering pear trees along the Cherrystone
and Cheriton roadsides.
The club was honored to have one of its
distinguished members, Mrs. Benjamin W
Mears, Jr. (Katty), elected President of The
Garden Club of Virginia from 1984 to 1986.
In 1985, Keep America Beautiful awarded
Mrs. E. Polk Kellam the Mrs. Lyndon B.
Johnson Award for her sustained efforts at
"Beautification in America."
Mrs. David B. Tankard (Suzanne) spearheaded the project to apply for the 1985 Common Wealth Award to landscape the grounds
of the Eastern Shore Library. The club received a second place award of $500 and was
able to complete the $3,200 project with the
assistance of the Angel Account and individual
club members. In August 1985 the club conducted Project Wild, a conservation workshop
for Eastern Shore Science teachers. Mrs. E.
Polk Kellam, Jr. (Mary Anne) was chairman

of this project sponsored by the Commission


of Game and Inland Fisheries.
Mrs. George F. Parsons gave a miniature
silver cup for the best miniature daffodil grown
by a member of the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore. Eight silver goblets were bequeathed to the club by Mrs. Lawrence B.
Heffner (Mary Alice) to be used as artistic
awards for club members. Flower shows continued to be held annually alternating between
"in-house" and open to the public. Mrs. Richard W Young (Margaret) was chairman of
the committee to plan and supervise the planting of the Accomac Courthouse Green. Two
flower-arranging workshops were conducted
by Mrs. N. Wescott] acob and Mrs. Benjamin
W Mears,Jr. Bus trips were taken to the KentValentine House and to Historic Garden
Week in Virginia Beach. The club was delighted to have each presiding President of the
Garden Club of Virginia visit the Garden Club
of the Eastern Shore during this decade.
The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore
celebrated its 50th anniversary in June 1989.
This momentous year was highlighted by the
club's sponsoring The GCV Board of Governors' Meeting in October. At that time members were pleased to receive the 1989 Common WealthAwardof$5,000, which the club,
in turn, gave to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. This money, as well as an additional
$2,000 raised from individual members, was
designated to provide scholarships for Virginia
students to use Port Isobel, the CBF island
education center located just off the Eastern
Shore in the Chesapeake Bay near Tangier
Island.
Members serving as president of The
Garden Club of the Eastern Shore during the
1980s were Mrs. John E. Tankard Jr., Mrs.
Donald F. Fletcher, Jr., Mrs. George]. Savage, Jr., Mrs. Harry S. Holcomb III, Mrs.
James A. Stuart, Jr., and Mrs. N. Wescott
Jacob.
1990-1995
The club addressed changing of the times
by becoming more technologically current and
by joining hands with area clubs for special
111

Follow the Grem Arrow


projects. The club records were put on microfilm, and Historic Garden Week became a
one-day tour after its lengthly run as a twoday event.
In 1990 Mrs. Lucius]. Kellam, Jr. was
awarded the Massie Medal for a lifetime of
dedicated service to The Garden Club ofVirginia. Horticulture awards of Merit were
given to Mrs. N. Wescott Jacob, Mrs. C. W
Dickinson III (Margaret), and Mrs. David B.
Tankard.
The club maintained its historic connection with the Northampton Accomack Memorial Hospital by sponsoring annual scholarships (valued at $3,000) for the LPN Program at the Nursing School. In addition, the
club completed its $10,000 pledge to the
hospital's Capital Campaign. The club joined
with other local garden groups in a two-yearbulb-planting project for its Highway Beautification Project. A $5 ,000 donation was made
to the Campaign for the Kent-Valentine
House.
Mrs. N. Wescott Jacob and Mrs. Benjamin W Mears, Jr. supervised the replanting
of the area around the front gate at Kerr Place.
The club lent to Kerr Place two sterling trophies, two Minich bowls, and a sterling tea
service, presented to the club by Mrs. Guy L.
Webster's daughter, Mrs. T. W Monteith
(these items have an approximate appraised
value of $17,000). The club also undertook
replanting of the Hermitage Garden.
In 1992 and 1993 members attended and
participated in The GCV Rose Shows sponsored by The Princess Anne Garden Club.
Noted club rose horticulturists are Mrs. Frank
Lusk (Peach), Mrs. C. W Dickinson III, Mrs.
David B. Tankard, and Mrs.John E. Tankard,
Jr. Club daffodil horticulturists are Mrs.
George F. Parsons, Mrs. Donald F. Fletcher,
Jr., and Mrs. Samuel A. Nock (Evelyn).
A visit was made to the Kent-Valentine
House in 1994.
During the past 25 years the club continued to: participate in Historic Garden Week;
support NAM Hospital with gifts totaling over
$50,000 for specific projects; replenish crape
myrtles along Lankford Highway (Rt. 13);
sponsor participants in Nature Camp and be-

Mesdames I. William Bagwell III, Boxley T. Tankard, N Westcott Jacob, Frank M . McCraw, Jr.
and Collins Snyder with GCV Presidmt Mrs.
Hmley L. Guild.
gan a competition in area schools as a means
to broaden the pool oflocal students for Nature Camp; care for The Hermitage Garden
and Kerr Place; support The GCV Flower
Shows with award-winning arrangements and
horticulture; serve on numerous committes in
The GCV and as show judges; donate garden
books to the county library as memorials to
members who have died. For its 50th anniversary the club shifted emphasis from new
plantings to maintaining and restoring landscape projects undertaken at an earlier time.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. N. Wescott Jacob, Mrs. David B.
Tankard, and Mrs. Edward A. Ames III.

TIIE ELIZABETH RIVER


GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
Throughout its existence, The Elizabeth
River Garden Club has placed emphasis on
conservation, beautification, gardening, and
11 2

The Member Clubs


flower arranging. Members were required to
submit one arrangement for judging each year,
and the club sponsored flower shows, workshops, lectures, and horticulture symposiums.
In April 197 5, under the sponsorship of
and in conjunction with The Nansemond
River Garden Club, the club presented its first
Historic Garden Week Tour. It was a profitable and rousing success. The club historian
noted, "The N ansemond River Garden Club
taught us all we know about Garden Week
tour-giving, but they didn't teach us all they
know!"
The Elizabeth River Garden Club was
invited to join The Garden Club of Virginia
as its 45th member club in May 1975. This
union was achieved through the support and
advice of The Garden Club of Virginia clubs
in the area. The members jumped into The
Garden Club of Virginia activities with enthusiasm during the late 1970s. They attended
and entered Flower Shows, served on committees, and attended Judging Schools. The
club celebrated its 50th anniversary in 1977
and sponsored a Japanese flower arranging
lecture and demonstration. Christmas continued to be "rung in" every December by
decorating a member's house and having a
coffee for invited guests.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. J. A. Weatherford, Mrs. E. A. Barham,
Jr., Mrs. 0. P. Delcambre, Mrs. Clinton C.
Boyce, Mrs. Harry G. McCready, and Mrs.
E. A. Barham, Jr.

Director-at-Large of The Garden Club of


Virginia in 1983-1986 and First Vice President of The Garden Club of Virginia 19861988. Mrs. Richard S. Bray Gudy; Mrs.
Stephen S. Perry, Jr.) served as The GCV
Flower Shows Chairman in 1986-1988.
Along with the club's community involvement, it made some internal improvements.
Dismayed by the "rampant terror" among
members over flower arranging, the club
battled that terror on several fronts. A "buddy
system" of matching an experienced arranger
with a novice increased confidence. Since four
members were artistic judges of The GCV,
they led in teaching other members, and the
club used in-house judges each month instead
of judges from neighboring clubs. These innovations, coupled with workshops, raised
ability noticeably.
Members continued to work on Historic
Garden Week, and Olde Towne proved to be
a great drawing card.
For fun, the club honored husbands and
dates (only one per member) with a Valentine
Party each year. Homeowners opening for
Historic Garden Week were special guests.
Including the homeowners proved to be a real
public relations coup. It created a bond between club members and homeowners and
eased the uncertainty associated with opening for Garden Week. Club members were
inspired by a trip to the Philadelphia Flower
Show with a stopover in Wilmington, Delaware.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Roger A. Morris, Mrs. Ralph M. Stokes,
Mrs. Edward L. Oast,Jr., Mrs. Arthur Branan,
Jr., and Mrs. Judy B. Bray.

1980-1990
The Elizabeth River Garden Club hit the
1980s running! Plans were drawn and arguments marshalled to tum the 1846 Historic
Courthouse into a Fine Arts Center. With
that accomplished, the club's appeal to The
Garden Club of Virginia resulted in the designation in 1980 of the Courthouse grounds
as a restoration project.
The club sponsored The Garden Club.of
Virginia Daffodil Show in 1982. Members
won numerous ribbons including the Tri-color
Award. The club was indeed proud when Mrs.
Edward A. Barham, Jr. (Susan) was elected a

1990-1995
The nineties were busy times for the club
membership. Mrs. Bray served as a Directorat-Large (1990-1993) and Mrs. Barham as
Recording Secretary (1990-1992) ofThe Garden Club of Virginia. Time, energy, money,
laughs, and a few tears were expended toward
having the Annual Meeting of The Garden
Club of Virginia in 1993. The enthusiasm of
the club members, coupled with rave responses
113

Follow the Green Arrow


and Mrs. Kenneth M. Dennis (Evelyn) were
over 90 years old and participated in most activities of the club. Ah, continuity is a lovely
grace.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Robert W Knapp, Mrs. Claudius
F. Smith, Jr., and Mrs. Patricia B. Halstead.

from the guests, made the months of planning


and work totally worthwhile. The ladies of
the club were left with some grubby hands and
fingernails from sanding and staining the
wooden baskets given as mementoes of the
Meeting.
In 1991, an educational and fund-raising
project, Styles ofFlower Arranging-A Primer,
was well received not only among The GCV
clubs but also nationally.
Reaching into the community, the club
contributed $5 ,000 to the Portsmouth Museums in 1993 and sent a matching gift of $5 ,000
to the Kent-Valentine House. The club renovated its section of the city's Friendship Garden and continued active participation in
Flower Shows and other events of The Garden Club of Virginia.
The club found new ways to serve Portsmouth. The December Coffee was replaced
with a day of decorating the beautifully preserved 19th-century Hill House Museum for
Christmas. This home of the horticulturallyrenowned Hill sisters was left to the Portsmouth Historical Association.
As a result of hard work and to the relief
of the membership, the club was incorporated
in the state of Virginia in 1992 and granted
tax-exempt status in 1993.
Education, combined with fun, remained
high on the club's list of priorities. A bus trip
for lunch and a tour of the Kent-Valentine
House and an exciting field trip into the Dismal Swamp were highlights. When the
Children's Museum of Virginia opened in
Portsmouth in 1994, the club played an active
role in landscaping the entry mall of the museum.
Susan Barham was appointed The GCV
Massie Medal Award Chairman 1994-1996
andJudy Bray The GCVHorticulture Chairman 1994-1996.
As The Elizabeth River Garden Club approached it seventieth birthday, it remembered
that the thirty founding members met on the
first Tuesday of the month at Trinity Church.
Sixty members continued to meet on the first
Tuesday of the month at St. John's Church,
three or four blocks from Trinity. Two members of the club, Mrs. Fred A. Duke (Hope)

THE GARDEN CLUB OF FAIRFAX


1970-1980
Fairfax was "put on the map" after The
Garden Club of Virginia Rose Show in 1973.
It was held in the original George Mason
University gymnasium, and the members entertained the guests elegantly and elaborately
in their homes and at Gunston Hall Plantation.
Fairfax always had a number of outstanding and talented members. Mrs. D . H.
Patteson-Knight (Francis) was elected a Director-at-Large of The Garden Club of Virginia (1971-1974) and Chairman of The GCV
Flower Shows Committee (197 6-1978). Mrs.
H. John Elliott, Jr. (Edith) won the Eleanor
Truax Harris Challenge Cup at The GCV
Rose Show in 1972 . Mrs. Charles Pozer
(Katherine) who wrote a column, "Around the
Garden Gate" for The Washington Post, won
The Garden Club of Virginia Horticulture
Award of Merit in 1973. Mrs. William Scott
(Barbara) won The GCV Horticulture Award
of Merit in 1977. In 1978 Mrs. C.Meade Stull
(Ebie) was awarded the Edith Farr Elliott Perpetual Trophy. This was the first time the trophy had been awarded since it was given in
1973. Champagne was served by Mrs. Stull
in the trophy that evening.
For nine years Mrs. Patteson-Knight arranged flowers for the Washington Cathedral
and wrote a book titled Arranging Flowers For
The Sanctuary. She worked with children in
northeast Washington, where each child was
given a small plot of land to grow vegetables.
At the end of the summer the Mayor of Washington presented prizes to the children with
the best vegetables. The project was called
"Youth Gardens of Washington." In 1979,
114

The Member Clubs


Mrs. Patteson-Knight won the Massie Medal
for her exceptional knowledge of horticulture
and her readiness to teach and help others.
Historic Garden Week played a large part
in the lives of the members of The Garden
Club of Fairfax. They worked hard but enjoyed every minute of it. At one of the tours,
the following comment was overheard: "Do
you think the homeowners receive some of the
proceeds from the monies made on these
tours?" "Of course they do. You know that
they are not going to let all of these people
tramp through their homes for nothing." Not
true!
The members really "kicked up their
heels" when they celebrated the club's 50th
anniversary October 24, 197 6. It was a memorable evening with cocktails, old movies, books
and pictures oflife in Fairfax for the past 50
years. Two charter members, Mrs. Robert D.
Graham (Ruth) and Mrs. Craig Hunter (Elizabeth) were present for the festivities.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Theodore B. McCord, Mrs. H. Wise
Kelly, Jr., Mrs. William Roberts Scott, Mrs.
Paul Peter, Mrs. Frank Mayer Carter, and Mrs.
D. H. Patteson-Knight.

Whipple (Marty) was appointed Chairman of


The GCV Annual and Board of Governors'
Meetings Committee 1986-1988. In June
1988 the club felt privileged to recognize with
a silver salver 12 ladies who had been members for twenty-five years or more. Members
continued to broaden their area of talent and
encouraged a new generation of enthusiastic
women. One year The Garden Club of Fairfax
had more members than any other to attend
The GCV Judging School. Articles were written for The JOURNAL. Some interesting
titles included "Edible Flowers," "Ornamental Grasses," and "Flower Shows are Fun."
Members smiled at the last title but did take
all the jobs seriously. They tried to excel.
They tried to encourage.
Another worthwhile project completed at
the end of the decade was the renewing of the
Jermantown Cemetery in Fairfax City. Members of the Mount Calvary Baptist Church
made donations in memory of the ancestors
buried in the old cemetery. Along with seeding, trimming, planting, and repairing tombstones, Mrs. Jeffrey Hoyt (Linda) took her
daughter's Brownie troop to the cemetery to
plant daffodil bulbs.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. D. H. Patteson-Knight, Mrs. Alton E.
Parker, Mrs. George A. Whipple, Mrs. J.
David Holden, and Mrs. Mrs. Paul C.
Kincheloe, Jr.

1980-1990
Under the able guidance of Mrs .
Patteson-Knight, The Garden Club of Fairfax
sponsored The GCV Annual Meeting in 1980.
What an interesting time was had going to
the National Arboretum. One of the buses
got lost on the way! This made for much revelry and fun. Did we know our way around
our nation's capital?
The next year it was recommended by
Mrs.Paul Peter (Snip) that the Northern Virginia Training Center for the Mentally Retarded be the club's community project. The
club took on this endeavor with gusto and
proudly won the Common Wealth Award in
1984 for landscaping the center.
Mrs. Stull won the Edith Farr Elliott Perpetual Trophy in 1981, and Mrs. Scott won
the Jacqueline Byrd Shank Memorial Trophy
for the best miniature bloom in The GCV
Daffodil Show in 1984. Mrs. George A.

1990-1995
The Garden Club of Fairfax accepted
the challenge of The GCV Lily Shows for
1991 and 1992. Both shows, co-chaired by
Mrs. Whipple and Mrs. Stull, were most
successful, and both new and old members
were enlightened in the intricacies of
putting on a state show. Imagine the delight
when Mrs. Douglas S. Mackall Ill
(Bettijane), a novice lily grower, won "Best
Stem in Show" for her Copper King Lily.
The club was proud when Mrs. Whipple
was elected Treasurer of The Garden Club
ofVirginia 1990-1994.
A cottage garden was dedicated by members one rainy morning in September 1993 at
115

Follow the Green Arrow


FAUQUIER AND
LOUDOUN GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
Traveling was a happy highlight of the
1970s for the members of the Fauquier and
Loudoun Garden Club. The club visited the
Hunt Botanical Library at Carnegie-Mellon
University in Pittsburgh, the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, the White House, the State Department, Stratford, St. Augustine and Savannah, and the Brandywine Valley to see "The
Wyeths Paint the Wyeths" and picnic on the
Brandywine admidst the bluebells.
Horticulture was a major interest. The
Amaryllidaceae family was studied for twelve
long months, and the club learned it was not a
cross-eyed daisy as some first thought. Roses,
wildflowers and lilies were stressed also.
Three members presented a program on rooting. Thethemewas, "Growyourown: Dolt,
Show It, and Share It." Mrs. John T. Ramey
(Emily) won the Violet Niles Walker Memorial Cup at The GCV Lily Show in 1970, the
Eleanor Truax Harris Challenge Cup at The
GCV Lily shows in 1972 and 1974, and The
Sponsor's Cup in 197 5.
The club celebrated its 60th anniversary
at Confederate Hall, transported to
Middleburg from the 1907 Exposition in
Jamestown, and then the members moved on
to Hickory Hill, the home of Mrs. James P.
Mills (Alice). Members continued to win ribbons. Mrs.James L. Wiley (Molly) won Best
in Show at the Rose Show. Mrs. James H.
Herbert (Betty) won Best in Show at the Lily
Show and in 1976 won the Test Collection at
the Lily Show.
Club members held important positions
with The Garden Club of Virginia. Mrs. J.
H. Cunningham (Mary) was elected a Director-at-Large of The GCV (1969-1972) and
The GCV Flower Shows Chairman (19741976). Mrs. William Seipp (Misty) served as
Chairman of The GCV Horticulture Committee (1972-1974). Mrs. B. Powell Harrison
(Agnes) received the deLacy Gray Medal in
197 5 and was elected a Director-at-Large of

Mrs. C. Meade StuO and Mrs. George A. Whipple,


co-chairmen ofthe 1991 Lily Show.
George Mason University to Elizabeth Bradley Kincheloe Stull. Mrs. Stull and the club
were entertained at a coffee at the home of
President and Mrs.Johnson after the dedication. Members were saddened by the death
of Ebie Stull, an award-winning rosarian, in
January 1994.
Tradition was the Christmas Auction each
year. Can you believe members fought over
pecan pies, gingerbread cottages, boxwood
centerpieces, and swags? They made it all and
bid against each other. All for a good cause community projects. Club members loved
workshops. They became topiary experts and
skilled in interpretive, free form, and abstract
as well as Colonial and Flemish arrangements.
Why did they participate? Why were they
members? Perhaps they desired to learn new
approaches and techniques in the garden, in
arranging, or in conserving the natural resources for their children and grandchildren.
Can we not agree that a love of Virginia was a
part of it all?
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Paul C. Kincheloe,} r., Mrs. Herbert
L. Aman III, and Mrs. Morgan S. Whiteley,
Jr.
116

The Member Clubs


Mrs. William F. Rust, Jr. (Margaret) promoted Sky Meadow National Park. The club
participated by planting a tree at the entrance,
developing a daffodil bed, and advising Park
Rangers on landscaping. Mrs. Harry A.
deButts (Mary Moore) won the Robert S.
Pickens Memorial Trophy at The GCV Lily
Show in 1980.
At Alice's (Mrs. James P. Mills) instigation and with Betsy's (Mrs. Henry B. R.
Brown) assistance, a resolution was sent to the
Governor of Virginia requesting him to call
upon the Governor of Maryland and the
Mayor of Washington D.C. to join him in
plans for conservation of natural resources and
the orderly development of the Washington
Metropolitan Area. The Garden Club of Virginia adopted this resolution.
The Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club
sponsored The GCV Board of Governors'
Meeting in October 1985. Mrs. James L.
Wiley and Mrs. William H. West, Jr.
(Millicent) had members serving as chauffeurs
and taxied guests far and wide to dinner parties which were given in addition to the banquet. Mrs. West was appointed Chairman of
The GCV Annual and Board of Governors'
Meetings Committee (1988-1990). At The
GCV Lily Show in 1988, Mrs. James H.
Herbert (Betty) and Mrs. Donald W.
Patterson (Tish) won Best in Show and Mrs.
George A. Horkan, Jr. (Ann Mari) the Sweepstakes.
Historic Garden Week in 1989 brought
out the largest crowds in the history of the
club. One member was heard to repeat and
repeat, "We must be making buckets and
buckets of money," as indeed we did.
The decade ended with a gala SeventyFifth Anniversary celebration at a high noon
luncheon with many warm toasts at Oak Hill,
home of Mrs.Joseph Prendergast Oean). Mrs.
Tysowsky moved into her centennial decade,
still an inspiration and still sipping her nightly
bourbon. Now joined by Mrs. W Hunter
deButts (Mary Lee), they were toasted enthusiastically as the oldest and well-loved members.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Bertram C. Harrison, Mrs. William F.

The GCV (1977-1980).


The club's Bicentennial project was saving and maintaining the Crozet Bridge on old
Route 50 (an ongoing project).
The all-absorbing event of 1979 was The
GCV Lily Show at Foxcroft School. The
classes were staged in the school, and the exhibitors stayed in the dormitories.
Sadness struck when, in the midst of many
projects and full of future plans, Mrs. Thompson Woodland (Posey), the club's new president, died. Molly Wiley "picked up the
pieces," and the club continued its fine commitments. Another great loss to the club was
the death of Mrs. Charles Morgan (Ann), a
moving force and recent club president.
Two deaths and a flooded basement accounted for the loss of many of the club's
records.
During this decade, the club had four
members reach the age of ninety and remain
active members. Two had been club presidents, one was a prize-winning flower arranger, one was the club's authority on lilies.
In analyzing their qualities of strength and
enthusiasm it was established that Lucy Keith
touched her toes twenty-five times each morning, Emily Ramey ate raisin bran every day,
Connie Lyon drank milk every day, and
Catherine Tysowsky sipped bourbon every
night.
Members serving as club presidents during the 1970s were Mrs. Thompson Woodland, Mrs. James L. Wiley, Mrs. Lyon
Chatfield-Taylor, Mrs. Donald W Patterson,
and Mrs. Samuel T. Adam.
1980-1990
The Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club
ladies continued their work in horticulture.
The club adopted a local endangered species,
the trout lily. Mrs. W Hunter deButts (Mary
Lee) painted its picture from which postcards
were printed and sold. Mrs. Henley L. Guild
(Virginia) conducted a workshop on arrangements. Henry Mitchell was one of our speakers, and the club had a visit from Miss Jean
Printz, President of The Garden Club of Virginia.
117

Follow.the Green Arrow

Rush, Jr., Mrs. George Wertenbaker, Mrs.


George C . McGhee, and Mrs. George
Horkan.
1990-1995
The 1990s were off to a roaring start.
Visits to Brookside Garden in Wheaton,
Maryland, the wildflower walk at Mrs. Edwin
Zimmerman's unique beech woods above
Goose Creek, Mt. Cuba, and other private
gardens in Wilmington, Delaware, and private gardens in Charlottesville left the members breathless.
There were excellent speakers at every
meeting, including two open meetings.
Pamela Harper spoke on perennials for horticulture, and Elizabeth Haskell, the Virginia
Secretary for Natural Resources, spoke on
conservation at the other. The planning and
planting of the new Middleburg Library
grounds took place under the expert leadership of Mrs. James M. Rowley (Polly). The
project began with a 10-by-20-foot perennial
border of native plants that grew over five
years to encompass the entire grounds. An
informative book on plant material used and
their growth habits was on display inside the
library. Club members continued to maintain the garden that was dedicated to the
memory of Susan Clark Twining (Mrs.
Edmund S. Twining). The club was pleased
to have Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley (Nancy), Mrs.
Henley L. Guild (Virginia), and Mrs. W.
Tayloe Murphy, Jr. (Helen) as speakers and
visitors during their terms as Presidents ofThe
Garden Club of Virginia.
The pace did not slacken. The club initiated yearly symposiums as fund raisers. The
first, The Art of Entertaining, Colonial
Williamsburg to Modern Day, featured Mrs.
Libby Oliver from Colonial Williamsburg and
Renny Reynolds from New York City. The
second was on horticulture with Dr. ]. C.
Raulston of North Carolina State University
in Raleigh, Mrs. Elsa Bakalar, Director of
Continuing Education and owner of Hill Top
Gardens in Heath, Mass, and Mr. Alastair
Martin, a designer from England. Both symposiums were wildly successful, despite a major flood during the second one. However,
118

the workload made the club decide to do one


every other year.
On a cold January Sunday afternoon, in
conjunction with the Goose Creek Association and under the chairmanship of Mrs.
Charles Whitehouse Gan et), the club held a
well-received open meeting featuring the
topic, "Where Have all the Quail Gone?"
Throughout these busy years, the club
continued to win the Lily Test Collection
Class, thanks to Mrs. Donald W. Patterson
(fish) and Mrs. James H. Herbert (Betty).
Under a new member, Mrs.James M. Hackman (Donna), the club's horticulture exhibits
and entries reached new heights with neverending high commendations and ribbons.
Mrs. George A. Horkan, Jr. (Ann Mari) was
appointed Chairman of The GCVHorticulture Committee (1990-1992), and a Directorat-Large ofThe GCV (1993-1996). Millicent
West was selected The GCV Historian and
Custodian of Records (1990-1992).
Club members rallied to stop Disney's
plan to tum 300 acres into a historic theme
park and 3000 surrounding acres into golf
courses, homes, and commercial development
in the adjacent county of Prince William. The
adverse impact on Fauquier and Loudoun
would have been enormous.
In March 1995, a Horticulture Symposium was held as a fund raiser for club projects
and the Kent-Valentine House restoration.
Speakers were Dr. Allan Armitage, Dr. J. C.
Raulston, and Dan Robertson. Over 200
people attended and just under $6000 was
netted.
The year 1995 was a busy one for the
Goose Creek Bridge Committee. Because of
previous heavy winters much damage was occurring, and the club had to expend a good
portion of the Bridge Fund to shore it up and
seal the sides. At the Annual Meeting in May,
Mrs. J. H . Cunningham was awarded the
Massie Medal for her years of outstanding service to The Garden Club ofVirginia. It was a
well-deserved honor for her 90th year.
In June, our club celebrated its 80th birthday and 20th year of maintaining the Goose
Creek Historic Bridgeacross Route 50. It was
a delightful evening featuring speakers, blue

The Member Clubs


ful and one in particular extremely memorable.
After a long wet period, and in the midst of a
downpour, visiting tourists became mired in
tons of mud. County farmers saved the day.
One by one, with the use of tractors, the guests
were freed. The $1.50 block ticket certainly
gave them their money's worth.
The Bicentennial Celebration gave members an opportunity to show their talents. Not
only did they decorate for many occasions but
were said to be "the hit of the parade."
Diverse programs were enjoyed at the
meetings in the 70s. Buses were chartered to
go on Historic Garden Week tours within a
day's travel distance. An early bus trip to the
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts was a special
treat. Many club meetings were held while
attending Flower Shows. The May luncheon
is the final meeting each year. Reports, accolades, and the awarding of the activity cup
make this a festive occasion.
The members were happy to serve as
hostesses at the James River Plantations during Historic Garden Week. They became interested in hostessing also at Bacon's Castle
after the Director visited one of the club's
meetings.
Realizing that time was growing short in
preparing for The GCV Daffodil Show in
1983, the club made plans for a money-making Bar Be Que and Barn Dance. This required the enthusiasm of each member and
the brawn of the husbands. It was a huge success, and the club's coffers were enriched.
To promote a little more vigor within the
membership, the club was divided into two
groups - The Tigerlilies and The Wildflowers. Competition was fierce for the accumulation of activity points. The losing team furnished wine at the May luncheon.
Members rolled up their sleeves and prepared to face the 80s.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Emerson P. Jones, Mrs. J. Vaughan Beale,
Mrs. George W Conwell, Mrs. B. Barham
Dodson, and Mrs. C. F. Urquhart.

grass music, a picnic supper, and artistic competition of flower baskets for the tables. In
August, we received a gift from Senator John
Warner of the contiguous twelve acres ofland.
It will be used as a small wetland area providing public access to Goose Creek.
Club presidents in the early 1990s were
Mrs. James M. Rowley, Mrs. William N.
Wilbur, and Mrs. Richard K. Irish.
THE FRANKLIN GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
The seventies were exciting years for The
Franklin Garden Club. The GCV Board of
Governors' Meeting was held in Franklin for
the first time in 1971. It was at this Meeting
that the Board voted to purchase the KentValentine House. The club has enjoyed many
meetings there as well as various GCV committee meetings.
The Franklin Garden Club membership
is composed of Courtland, Franklin, and
Southampton County residents. The three
communities are connected by ten miles of
Route 58. This stretch of divided highway
has been the club's nemesis. Time and again,
this strip and entrances to the communities
have been planted with crape myrtle, dogwood, flowering pear, and bulbs. Because of
droughts and careless highway maintenance,
the survival rate has been poor. Consequently,
planting has been an ongoing chore. Plantings
at the library, schools, armory, and hospital
have fared considerably better.
Finding a few members were "gathering
a litte moss," the club decided it was time for
rejuvenation. After much consideration, the
club sponsored The Franklin Junior Garden
Club, a group that soon grew to fifteen energetic and enthusiastic young women. They
stimulated the community's interest in establishing a Farmers Market. In time this became a reality. Members assisted the senior
club in Historic Garden Week preparations
and became super "go-fers," as they learned
The GCV ropes.
Historic Garden Week was quite success-

1980-1990
1980 found the members planning an auc119

Follow the Green Arrow


and Flowers Show" at the Virginia Museum
of Fine Arts in Richmond. Garden books were
contributed to the library and many articles
to The GCV JOURNAL.
Pegboard trays were sold by the Ways and
Means Committee. A luncheon, with a
speaker, helped finance future obligations.
After visiting the outstanding "Tablescapes"
in Richmond, members who were convinced
"we could do that," did. What a success!
One member, Mrs. W. J. Parker (Anne),
was instrumental in presenting ecology classes
in the schools and day camp programs for the
students. On the lighter side, a favorite program was given by Mrs. B. A. Williams
(Corrine), slides chairman. During the year,
very informal pictures were taken at membership meetings - some were occasionally caught
doing some rather strange things! Fun!
There were many highlights in this decade. One was joining The Nansemond River
Club in opening homes in Smithfield for Historic Garden Week. It was the most successful tour either club had enjoyed. Members'
close association with the Suffolk ladies had
been rewarding.
In 1988 the club's beloved member, Mrs.
S. W. Rawls, Jr. (Ann Peace), received the
deLacy Gray Medal. A very intimate presentation ceremony with her three daughters
seemed most appropriate. In 1989 Mrs. C. F.
Urquhart received the Tri-Color Award in
The GCV Daffodil Show, and Mrs. A. W.
Brantley received the Tri-Color Award in The
GCV Rose Show.
The Franklin Garden Club has been fortunate to have had many ribbon winners since
19 55 when it was invited to join The Garden
Club of Virginia.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs.John D. Munford, Mrs. S. W. Rawls,Jr.,
Mrs. Leland E. Beale, Jr., Mrs. Harvey K.
Thompson, and Mrs. E. B. Gatten, Jr.

tion to ensure adequate financing for The


GCV Daffodil Show. It proved to be the most
successful money raiser in the club's history.
Each member was required to be responsible
for a specific number of articles. The attics of
Franklin were ransacked, and the armory was
filled to capacity. After a Bar Be Que Supper,
the bidding began. By evening's end, folks left
with a smile, and the club was assured of a successful 1983 Daffodil Show.
Upon the club's regaining its wits, it was
time to replant "Ole 58." And lo and behold,
the library requested further plantings. Meanwhile, the members were working with the
Southampton Historical Society on the restoration of the grounds and gardens of historic Rochelle House in Courtland. A Memorial and Beautification Fund was established to plant and maintain the gardens.
Feeling a little weary, many members
thought it was now time for "those Juniors"
to became "Seniors." So with much ado, the
young fledgings were welcomed into the fold.
They immediately received a blue ribbon at
the Daffodil Show in Charlottesville and were
ecstatic.
In this decade, there was a renewed interest in Nature Camp. Many youngsters were
f<;>und to be especially interested in this expenence.
Realizing the Capitol grounds lacked a
loblolly pine, the club's logo, the club planted
two. About the same time, the city of Franklin
was designated "Tree City U.S.A." The club
felt responsible for this award.
Wishing to make a greater contribution
to Historic Garden Week, members began
hostessing at Bacon's Castle for the entire week
while continuing to assist at the James River
Plantations.
Bus trips were still a feature of the agenda.
Joining eleven other clubs for the Chesapeake
Bay Symposium encouraged interest in this
area concern. Also of great interest was the
mounting enthusiasm for the Virginia Marine
Science Museum. The club made a pledge to
this undertaking. It was fulfilled in two years,
and meetings have been enjoyed there.
Since its beginning, the club has participated with much pleasure in the "Fine Arts

1990-1995
The 90s proved to be "Golden Years" for
The Franklin Garden Club. How excited were
the members to be preparing for The GCV
1991 Board of Governors' Meeting.
120

The Member Clubs


Programs on the environment, ecology, conservation, native plants, and
floral design continue to
be the club's interest.
Among the most interesting were: a presentation on
reconstruction plans of the
Norfolk Botanical Gardens, Franklin's Union
Camp new "de-inking"
plant (the only one of its
kind), and the Master Gardener program. The
members were enthusiastic, and many completed
Mrs. E.B. Gatten, Jr., Mrs. William C. Jones, Mrs. William L. Gilliam, this course as a result.
The club purchased
Jr. and Mrs. E.R.M. Coker at the presentation of the Rochelle House
ten videos on ecology and
Garden.
the environment. These
were presented to the schools and are currently
While the community is small, the enthuavailable to all civic organizations from our
siastic support and generous contributions
"new" Library. After twice planting the "old"
made the meeting most rewarding. Some of
the meeting's highlights were: Tour of Union
Library, the club, again, took on the monumental task of landscaping the new Franklin
Camp Corporation for the Board of DirecLibrary.
tors, "A Bar Be Que Hoe Down," tour of
Bacon's Castle, luncheon In Historic
In recent years the club has enjoyed holding a joint meeting with The Nansemond
Smithfield, entertainment by the Commonwealth Chorus, and an informative program
River Garden Club and The Elizabeth River
Garden Club to hear The Garden Club of
on environmental protection by Union Camp
Vrrginia Presidents.
Corporation. It is interesting that in 1971, in
Franklin, The Garden Club ofVirginia voted
Decorating the nursing home and the reto purchase the Kent-Valentine House.
tirement center continue to be on-going
Twenty years later (1991), in Franklin, at this
projects. In April 1995, The Franklin Garmeeting the members voted to begin plans for
den Club sponsored the Wildlife Center of
Vrrginia's visit to all schools in the city and
renovation of the Kent-Valentine House. Two
landmark decisions in our midst.
county. Children from preschool to seniors
In 1991 the restoration of the garden of
in high school were enthralled.
the Rochelle House in Courtland was comThe annual luncheon in May took on a
pleted. Mrs. William Gilliam (Anne), as a
"golden glow." The Franklin Garden Club
was fifty years old and celebrated with cake,
member of The GCV Restoration Committee, joined us for a formal Presentation Tea.
candles, and presents at a gala birthday party.
But more exciting was the introduction of sevPlanting at the Y.M.C.A. was completed, and
enteen young, eager and talented women from
members began looking for other beautificaour Auxiliary Club.
tion projects.
"We pass this way but once. Let us beauIn 1992, Franklin's Union Camp Corpotify the path as we go, that the world may see
ration was presented the prestigious Dugdale
Award. In 1993 the deLacy Gray Medal was
which way we went."
presented to Mrs. Charles F. Urquhart, Jr.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. E. R. M. Coker, Mrs. Franklin S.
(Dot). How proud the club was!
121

Follow the Green Arrow

GABRIELLA GARDEN CLUB

Mrs. Frank G. Turner, Mrs. Hosea E. Wilson, Jr., Mrs. James F. Ingram, Mrs. Landon
R. Wyatt, Jr., Mrs. Newton H. Ray, and Mrs.
Henry L. Roediger, Jr.

1970-1980

1980-1990

Gabriella Garden Club started the 1970s


with an official presentation to the Danville
Public Library of The Garden Club of
Virginia's fifty-year history Follow the Green
Arrow.
The members were concerned about the
outside of the library, a modern downtown
building. With a plan by Kenneth Higgins,
Richmond landscape architect, and $5,000
from the City Beautification Committee, the
club undertook the landscaping of the site.
Dues were raised to $20, and the club made a
variety of interesting donations - one being
$25 to Jamie Gosney for the cherry tree planting project which made him an Eagle Scout.
Mrs.James W. Ray, Jr. Oo)was appointed
The GCV Parliamentarian and Editor of the
Register (1970-1972) and elected Second Vice
President of The GCV (1972-1973). Mrs.
Hosea E. Wilson (Betty) was Chairman of The
GCV Annual and Board of Governors' Meetings Committee (1974-1976). Mrs. William
H. Parker, Jr. (Peyton) was elected a Director-at-Large of The GCV (1978-1981).
Members stayed busy with Historic Garden Week Tours, annual horse shows, tree
plantings, and sponsoring The GCV Board
of Governors' Meeting the year of the National Bicentennial. They also enjoyed excursions to Old Salem, Halifax, and to the KentValentine House for lunch.
In 1978 the club rejoiced when The GCV
Award for Meritorious Achievement in Conservation was given to Dan River, Inc. Members were proud when the horticulture display (a collection of rooted material which
could be found at Point of Honor) was assembled by Newton H. Ray, president of the
Men's Horticultural Society in Danville, and
husband of Martha Ray, president of the
Gabriella Garden Club, who carried the display to the meeting.
Club presidents during the 1970s were

Gabriella Garden Club's entry into the


1980s was highlighted when The GCV Horticulture Award went jointly to Mr. and Mrs.
Ray after they had simultaneously served with
distinction as presidents of the Men's Horticulture Society in Danville and the Gabriella
Garden Club. The club was proud when Mrs.
Parker was elected Second Vice President of
The GCV (1982-1984) and appointed Chairman of the Common Wealth Award Committee (1984-1986).
The club celebrated its 50th anniversary
in 1983. Mrs. Henry Roediger, Sr. (Ethel), a
charter member, was guest of honor at the
annual meeting, and all charter members were
honored with a $500 donation to the YWCA
pool-building fund. It was considered appropriate to raise the annual dues to $50. The
club became incorporated the very next year.
There were no changes necessary in the bylaws or constitution since they had never legally existed at all. Members had interesting
visits to the Duke Gardens in Durham,
Stoneleigh in Martinsville, the Philadelphia
Flower Show, and Fine Arts and Flowers at
the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond.
Mrs. Edward M. Williams Oudy) and Mrs.
B. Carrington Bidgood (Happy) made needlepoint pillows for the Kent-Valentine House,
and Mrs. James C. Spangler Oane), a
decoupage wastebasket. Mrs. Thomas W.
Leggett, Jr. (Betty) received the first copy of
The GCV's Members' Handbook as she was
the typist. GGC was awarded the Mrs.
Littleton H. Mears Trophy for Best Inter-Club
arrangement at The GCV Daffodil Show in
1987.
The Gabriella Garden Club sponsored
The GCV Daffodil Shows in 1988 and 1989.
At the 1984 Annual Meeting, octogenarian
Mrs. J. Nelson Benton (Margaret) made the
150 ultra-suede flower corsages for The GCV

Edmonds, and Mrs.Jam es P. Councill III.

122

The Member Clubs


the garden into existence.
Further community support for the roof
garden came through a huge yard sale and
subsequent annual poinsettia sales. The upkeep was guaranteed by 100 percent of the
membership divided into monthly teams. In
1994 this project was awarded The GCV
Common Wealth Award.
Teamwork became the key to broader
participation in The GCV's three annual
Flower Shows. A talented arranger no longer
had to be solely responsible for an Inter-Club
arrangement from start to finish.
The first five-day Nature Camp for 25
local children became a delightful reality.
There continued to be interest and support
for long-time projects including Historic Garden Week, the recycling project, the Council
of Garden Clubs agenda, and sending campers to Nature Camp at Vesuvius.
The hospital roof garden focused the
club's attention on therapeutic horticulture.
It was natural to present a 1993 community
workshop on the use of horticulture therapy
to improve life quality for individuals with disabilities. The $500 realized from registration
fees was divided between the Virginia Gardener Horticulture Project at VPI and the
Southern Virginia Mental Health Institute
(where these funds would be seed money) for
a horticulture therapy program.
Lois Mengel was appointed The GCV
Chairman of Admissions (1992-1994) and The
GCV Chairman of the Restoration Committee (1994-1996).
What a special pleasure was found in
Gabriella's 1995 roster: seven third-generation
members of The Garden Club of Virginia.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Harry W. Pritchett, Jr., Mrs. Thomas H. Faucett, and Miss Mary Jo Davis.

Mrs. Paul W. Mengel and Mrs. Glenn B. Updike


at the 1988 Daffodil Show.
ladies attending the luncheon given by GGC
at the home of Mrs. Frank G. Turner (Marcia).
Mrs. Paul W. Mengel (Lois) was elected a Director-at-Large of The Garden Club of Virginia (1989-1992).
The club remained committed to Historic
Garden Week tours, the library landscape, the
Council of Garden Clubs, the Gabriella's
award-winning glass recycling project (which
raised money for community trees) and
dreamed of a five-day Nature Camp for local
first and second graders.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Henry L. Roediger, Jr., Mrs. William E.
Michaels, Mrs. Paul W. Mengel, Mrs. George
W. Davis, Jr., Mrs.]. Martin Scott, Jr., and
Mrs. HarryW. Pritchett,Jr.
1990-1995
The Gabriella Garden Club selected a
September Sunday afternoon in 1990 to finally open the hospital roof garden for patients, visitors, and staff and celebrate with a
"christening party" in honor of the 100-yearold hospital auxiliary (the Ladies Benevolent
Society) whose gift of $15,000 had nurtured

THE GARDEN STUDY CLUB


1970-1980
The members of The Garden Study Club
accomplished much in the decade 1970-1980.
They did all the well-ordered things that a
123

Follow the Green Arrow


1980-1990

garden club ought to do and the special things


that added interest and meaning to the club's
existence.
Participating in Historic Garden Week
tours each year was successful. Also successful were the Sheila Macqueen lecture and
demonstration in 1972.
Civic beautification projects were: creating a mini-park in the downtown business
district; financing the planting in the North
Court of Memorial Hospital; planting
liriope in the re-designed landscaping of the
Henry County courthouse; contributing to
the establishment of a memorial mini-park
in a residential area, and contributing to the
landscaping of the Chamber of Commerce
Civic Clubs' signs. These projects were financed with proceeds from Estate Auction
Sales in May 1970 and a bridge luncheon in
1971. Several young people were sent to
Nature Camp, and the club gave books to
the Public Library.
Mrs. John W. Clark (Sally) served as
Chairman of The Garden Club of Virginia
Horticulture Committee (1970-1972).
In 1977, the Garden Study Club and
The Martinsville Garden Club jointly presented the Edith Hardison Walker Perpetual Award to The Garden Club of Virginia, to be presented annually at The GCV
Daffodil Show. The Garden Study Club
was proud of Mrs. F. Paul Turner, Jr,'s
(Katherine) many achievements in The
GCV Daffodil Shows. She won the Member Clubs' Cup for the Best Bloom in The
GCV Show in Warsaw in 1975; the Presidents of Member Clubs' Cup in Roanoke in
1977; the first Edith Hardison Walker Perpetual Award in Roanoke in 1978; the
Eleanor Truax Harris Challenge Cup in
1980.
The club's greatest achievement was entertaining The GCV Board of Governors in
1978. It was a beautiful meeting, lots of fun,
and hard work.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. J. Vance Bonds, Mrs. Paul A. Roy, Mrs.
Eldon Holsinger, Mrs. Edwin G. Penn, Jr.,
Mrs. John Kirk Adams, and Mrs. Donald R.
Holsinger.

The Garden Study Club continued to


share Historic Garden Week tours, flower
shows, and yearly joint meetings with The
Martinsville Garden Club.
Club members held positions in The Garden Club of Virginia. Mrs. Edward H. Ould
(Betty Barr) was Chairman of The GCV Slides
Committee (1980-1982) and Recording Secretary (1982-1984). She was awarded both the
Louise Morris Goodwin Bowl and the
Jennette H. Rustin Trophy atThe GCVDaffodil Show in 1983.
Just for the fun of it, the members took a
bus trip to Prestwould in 1981 where they had
a picnic lunch on the grounds. A happy experience! The club celebrated its 40th Anniversary with a festive luncheon at Stoneleigh,
home of former Governor and Mrs. Thomas
B. Stanley. At that time there were twelve
active charter members of the original group
of founders in 1946.
To spur interest in arranging flowers, the
membership was divided into two teams.
Records were kept, and a summer picnic was
sponsored by the losing team, "The Dandelions." The winning team members were "The
Roses."
Mrs. Charles P. Smith III (Betsy) was appointed Chairman of The GCV Annual and
Board of Governors' Meetings Committee
1982-1984.
At The Garden Club of Virginia Annual
Meeting in May 1987, Mrs. Clark, one of the
charter members, was honored when she was
presented the deLacy Gray Medal for Conservation.
In 1987, the club chose the landscaping
of the Virginia Museum of Natural History
as an on-going project. To help finance its
work at the museum, the club applied for The
GCV Common Wealth Award in 1988 and
was given a second place award. Two
"Tablescapes" exhibits were held to raise funds
for the project.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Charles P. Smith III, Mrs. George E.
Morris, Jr., Mrs. Gorman T. White, Mrs.
Wilbur S. Doyle, and Mrs. Albert G. Byrum.
124

The Member Clubs


1990-1995

event of the decade was a public auction held


in order to provide money to build a beautiful
garden with walks, fountains, and many plants
at a local nursing home.
The club sold anything and everything:
items gleaned from attics, closets, and cellars,
all tax-deductible. A delicious supper, champagne, and beer were served. The evening
was a financial and social success. The annual
daffodil show, a large, beautiful, and great production for such a small club, continued to be
held. The well-known show drew competition and visitors from all over the state.
The members were busy trying to beautify the environment. Participation in a vigorous drive helped to rid Gloucester of more
than 2,000 abandoned junk cars. Daffodil
bulbs were made available to Indian women
to beautify the approach to the Mattaponi
Reservation. The club joined the Rotary Club
and the Chamber of Commerce in a highway
beautification project that resulted in the
planting of 300 trees, plus 70 crape myrtles
and 1,700 daffodil bulbs.
A plant sale was held each year in October to send two children to Nature Camp.
And, of course, there was always Historic Garden Week. Homes and gardens in Gloucester
and Mathews counties were opened for two
days each year.
Presidents of The Garden Club of
Gloucester during the 1970s were Mrs. William H. Tunner, Mrs. Thomas Roy Jones, Mrs.
H. Blair Farinholt, Mrs. Samuel A. Martin,
Mrs.John L. Finney, and Mrs. Ben B. Pickett.

In March 1990, the club amended its constitution and bylaws to incorporate the auxiliary into active membership.
The landscaping of the Virginia Museum
ofNatural History was planned by a landscape
architect, and the planting was completed in
1991. The club also contributed to the landscaping of the Adult Day Care Center. Another project was bringing arrangements in
non-returnable containers to be distributed at
the nursing homes and the Adult Day Care
Center.
The club celebrated its 45th Anniversary
with a beautifully appointed tea in May 1991.
The six active charter members and the sustaining charter members were honored.
The club had wonderful programs at its
meetings. Members took a field trip to Andre
Viette Nursery near Waynesboro in May 1991
and to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in
Richmond for the "Fine Arts and Flowers"
exhibit in October 1993.
The Garden Study Club sponsored The
GCV Board of Governors' Meeting in October 1994. The Ways and Means Committee
planned various things to finance the meeting. One was a beautiful Christmas tour of
homes, with a candlelight tea, and a sale of
greens and Christmas decorations in December 1990. In 1991, 1992, and 1993, the committee conducted successful raffles. The first
prize was decoration of a home for Christmas
by members of the club. Second prize was a
door wreath, and third prize was a kissing ball
or dining room table arrangement.
The club planted annuals in barrels in
uptown Martinsville in May 1995.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Nelson Frank Smith, Mrs. Carter
B. Smith, and Mrs. G. Ronald Pigg.

1980-1990
The club started the decade with a garden party to honor the people who had opened
their homes and gardens for Historic Garden
Week during the past ten years. Members also
participated in the Bicentennial celebration.
During the 1980s, the club continued its
fall plant sale, its Christmas decorations at
Sanders Nursing Home, the annual Daffodil
Show, and participation in Historic Garden
Week.
Members voted to support the preservation of Rosewell and sent money realized from

THE GARDEN CLUB


OF GLOUCESTER
1970-1980
The Garden Club of Gloucester's biggest
125

Follow the Green Arrow

the plant sale. The club joined a joint community effort to establish a permanent recycling station in Gloucester and to support and
participate in an ecology trail at Gloucester
High School.
The Garden Club of Gloucester became
a corporation and was granted tax-exempt status. Planting was done at the library, the nursing home, on the hill at Long Bridge Ordinary, and in the middle of Route 14.
The club was nominated for the Common
Wealth Award and was honored to be one of
the finalists.
In 1982, the daffodil show was dedicated
to John Tradescant. Mrs. James Bland Martin, (Teen), the only American Trustee of the
Tradescant Trust, was hostess to the Worshipful Company of Gardeners of London. The
Company had a tree-planting ceremony at the
historic Courthouse Circle in memory of the
Tradescants. Mrs. Martin entertained the visiting members in her home and introduced
them at the official opening of the daffodil
show.

coming, but in a rural community with no


charming inn, where would they stay, where
would they meet, where would a banquet be
held? After investigating several possibilities,
it was decided that the Duke of York Motel in
Yorktown would be the headquarters.
The first evening everyone gathered at
Purton for supper. The meeting the next
morning was held in the Old Courthouse in
Gloucester and lunch followed in five members' homes. Arrangements were made to have
the meeting the next day at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science at Gloucester Point to
be followed by an outdoor lunch. A highlight
of the evening at the banquet at the Yorktown
Victory Center was the Fife and Drum Corps
piping the members into the building for cocktails and later upstairs for dinner.
Members have continued to plant and
grow, to arrange, to write, and to enjoy being
a part of The Garden Club of Virginia.
Club presidents during the years 19801989 were Mrs. David L. Peebles, Mrs. Hugh
C. Dischinger, Mrs. William Ingles, Mrs. H .
C . K. Spotswood, and Mrs. Carroll W .
Bartlett.
1990-1995
The 1990s brought an end to some of the
club's long-standing traditions.
The club was informed by The
Gloucester Health Department that it would
be unable to sell the homemade soup, fried
chicken, and sandwiches during the plant sale.
Since this cut back on profits, another way was
needed to raise the money to send children to
Nature Camp. Members picked up on the
Christmas house tour idea that was used in
the 1980s. Another change was to open only
one day for Historic Garden Week instead of
the usual two days. When the County Fire
Marshall decreed that no fresh greens could
be used as Christmas decorations at the nursing home, the members reluctantly switched
to plastic.
The daffodil show remains an unchanging tradition with an admirable number of
blooms and arrangements more beautiful each
year.

Mrs. Edward H. Ould III and Mrs. William


Ingles, October 1988.

In 1988, The GCG entertained the Board


of Governors ofThe Garden Club of Virginia.
In anticipation, the active membership ofThe
GCG was increased from 35 to 40. The club
was delighted that the Board of Governors was
126

The Member Clubs


Mrs. William B. Kemp, Jr., Mrs. Edward
H. Ould III, Mrs. S. Lyons Robinson, and Mrs.
Henry Lane Wilson served as club presidents
during the early 1990s.

a matter of minutes. Streets were flooded, rescue vehicles and tow trucks were everywhere,
and the police were demanding evacuation of
the area. Our tour was a total loss.
Through it all, our indomitable chairman,
Mrs. G. Royden Goodson, Jr. (Patty), did not
lose her head or her cheerful spirit. She even
drove all over the Peninsula delivering chicken
salad to help the women who had been cooking for days, and we were left with 300 unsold
lunches. That was an affair to remember, but
"C'est la vie!"
Mrs. Willits H. Bowditch (Marian) wrote
this poem after the disastrous storm.

HAMPTON ROADS GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
In the Hampton Roads Garden Club, the
highlights of the decade centered around two
fund-raising projects, a memorable Historic
Garden Week experience, and planning for
The Garden Club of Virginia Annual Meeting in 1981. The club began the sale of poinsettias each December to support the garden
it had established at the Peninsula Council of
Garden Club Headquarters. To help with
expenses for the The GCV Annual Meeting,
Cooking Schools with Annemarie were sponsored for two successive years. It was great
fun, lots of work, and financially rewarding.
From Annemarie we learned two little "bywords" to cover any cooking mishaps or extravagances, and which we laughingly carried
over into other areas of our lives! For criticism of a mishap we say, "That's the way I like
it!" For the extravagance, the reply is "I'm
WORTH it!"
Mrs. R. Vollie Richardson (Barbara) was
appointed The Garden Club of Virginia
Chairman of the Slides Committee (19761978).
Historic Garden Week 1978 was heralded
as "A Day By the Bay," with attractive beach
houses on the tour, lunch planned by the
Woman's Club, and the City of Hampton all
"fixed up" and enthusiastic about reviving the
area and showing it off. The day before the
tour was beautiful and balmy. The Bay glistened in the sunlight, and the flower arrangers
were excited over the nautical and beach
themes - a switch from the 18th century, to say
the least. During the night, a northeaster blew
up! It was the very worst nightmare scenario
imaginable. The tide rose so quickly and so
high in the morning that one of the members,
who had gone to Buckroe early to check her
arrangement, lost her car. It was inundated in

An Ode to Garden Week on the Peninsula


"A Day By the Bay"
T'was the day before tour, and down all
the beach
All creatures were hustling, the deadline
to reach.
The flowers were gathered, from near and
from far;
The houses were sparkling, the doors all
ajar.
Each member to her post, the arrangements to fix;
The signs are all up, chicken - ready to
mlX.

The hostesses are briefed, instructed,


'bout dress;
No smoking, no eating, don't make any
mess.
Later - tired and weary, all tucked in their
beds
While visions of 'mechanics' danced in
their heads.
When what to their listening ear, should
resound
But hurricane winds, and waves on the
pound.
Up from their beds, they sprang like a
127

Follow the Green Arrow


flash;
Away to Buckroe, they drove in a dash.

lst Street inundated, by 2 feet of water;


Evacuation of people, to some new quar-

The spray, how it spattered, each newly


washed pane;
The wind steady howling, driving the rain.

ter.
There was wringing of hand, and an occasional tear;
No money for Garden Week, at all this
year.

The waves when they crested, rose high


and in tandem,
Then crashed to the earth, with reckless
abandon.

The flowers have wilted, the chicken is


froze;
The home owners busy, cleaning house
with a hose.

To the top of the steps, over the top of


the street,
The tide it did rise, meeting ocean with
creek.

There is a sequel, to this tale of woe;


Just don't ask me to exhibit, ever no mo'.

Now Ranny and Nancy, were watching it


all,

Club presidents during the 1970s were


Mrs.John Q. Hatten, Mrs. Herbert V. Kelly,
Mrs. H. Cornelius Shawen, Mrs. R. Vollie
Richardson, Mrs. David N. Montague, and
Mrs. Russell Buxton.

And Patty was bug-eyed, climbing the


wall.
The cars got all stuck, in the fast-forming
mud;
The water roared over, way up past the
hub.

1980-1990
In 1981, the Hampton Roads Garden
Club had the privilege of sponsoring the Annual Meeting of The Garden Club ofVrrginia.
As the Peninsula Arts Association grew
and established itself in a building on the
Mariner's Museum property, the Hampton
Roads Garden Club began to consider moving its community garden to the grounds of
the Art Center. On April 6, 1982, the move
had been completed. To commemorate the
club's 50th anniversary, the garden was dedicated to its illustrious member, Mrs. Edward
L. Alexander (Margaret). The garden gave
pleasure to many visitors as a restful place to
pause and to enjoy the garden statuary and
plants under the towering oaks that shade the
area. The deck was used for picnics and even
a wedding. The club continued to work
closely with the Peninsula Arts Center to further its goal of civic beautification.
From the early 1980s, the club concentrated quite heavily on matters of conservation. Mrs. Edgar B. Wertheimer Jr. (Alice)
served as conservation chairman. She raised

Jean was a-crying, on her dear mother's


breast;
The Woman's Club ladies, sat in stunned
rest.
The chicken was cooked, the eggs on to
boil;
What to do with 300 lunches, in this turmoil.
And I in my wagon, loaded up with exhibit,
Rode down to the beach, just to get with
it.
I had my wool cap, pulled close o'er my
ears
And what I beheld, I'll remember for
years.
Sirens were screeching, rescue squads-in
action,
Wrecking trucks pulling, couldn't get any
traction.
128

The Member Clubs


be filled with new challenges as well as rewarding possibilities. Knowing that the club was
becoming part of such a productive and impressive group as The Garden Club of Virginia, members decided to meet the challenge
head on. The first step was a name change to
the Harborfront Garden Club.
The primary focus of the club in recent
years has been the raising of funds to encourage horticulture through community landscaping projects. Existing work in progress
for the Junior Club included the rather formidable task of landscaping the courtyard at
the D'Art Center in downtown Norfolk. It
has since been successfully completed and continues to be maintained by the club. This effort, begun in 1991, was funded by revenues
from the annual Christmas Poinsettia Sale and
Spring Flower Sale. The revenues also supplemented the Brownie Scout efforts to establish
a Yellow Fever Park. In the next year the Club
responded to a request by the Virginia Zoological Society to establish a Butterfly Garden at the Virginia Zoo in Norfolk. The garden is maintained by the Zoo and has been
one of its most successful attractions.
Club president, Mrs. Townsend Brown,
Jr. (Candy), attended the club's first Board of
Governors' Meeting of The Garden Club of
Virginia in October, 1992. The GCV President, Mrs. W Tayloe Murphy,] r. (Helen) and
all other Board Members present extended the
warmest of welcomes. Candy returned with
an energetic report, complete with accolades
for everyone with whom she had come in contact. Her 'word' for the meeting was 'overwhelming,' in terms of energy, enthusiasm,
organization, and results emanating from this
group of women. Candy issued a challenge
to the members of the Harborfront Garden
Club to rise to the expectations of The GCV
The HGC responded right away with a
$20,000 four-year pledge toward renovations
of the Norfolk Botanical Garden, the greatest
commitment in the club's history. In addition,
funds were allotted for the planting of trees at
Harbor Park, the city's new baseball stadium,
and for the annual planting and maintenance
of the D' Art Center courtyard.
New opportunities in conjunction with

members' "consciousness level" and prodded


and encouraged them to call and write to our
legislative representatives on every subject involving air, water, earth, wetlands, "the Bay",
etc. Mrs. Wertheimer was awarded the deLacy
Gray Medal in 1985 for her remarkable service in the dissemination of knowledge of environmental problems to her club and to her
community.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. George S. Grier III, Mrs. E. RalphJames,
Mrs. William 0. Harris, Jr., Mrs. John A.
Horgan, and Mrs. Ernest P. Buxton.
1990-1995
In 1991, 1992, and 1993, under Patty
Goodson's chairmanship, the members volunteered in the "Kiddie Litter" Program in the
public schools.
The club sponsored trips to the Philadelphia Flower Show, including stops at
Longwood Gardens, Winterthur, and the
Philadelphia Museum.
Fund-raising projects, Historic Garden
Week, decorating the chapel at Kecoughtan
Veteran's Hospital at Christmas, and conservation efforts in the community involved every member. The Hampton Roads Garden
Club had an enthusiastic, creative group of
members to uphold the reputation of those
who came before us.
The HRGC is looking forward to sponsoring The GCV Rose Show in 1996 and
1997.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Rene D. Koun, Mrs. James L.
Eason, and Mrs.John B. Morgan II.

HARBORFRONT GARDEN CLUB


1990-1995
Founded in 1953 by The Garden Club of
Norfolk for daughters and daughters-in-law
of members, the Junior Garden Club of Norfolk was issued an invitation to join The Garden Club of Virginia in May 1992. All members anticipated that the upcoming year would
129

Follow the Greerz Arrow


The Garden Club ofVirginia included entries
into the three GCVFlower Shows, participation in The GCVJudging School, attendance
at The GCV Conservation Forum, and representation at The GCV Board of Governors'
and Annual Meetings. Mrs. Charles E. Snyder
(Lee) thrilled us all when she won the Blue
Ribbon and Best in Show Award at The GCV
Rose Show in 1993. The club continued its
good efforts when it won the Blue Ribbon and
Tri-Blue for the Inter-Club at the Rose Show
in 1994 with an arrangement done by Mrs.
Claude M. Bain (Elizabeth) and Mrs. William E. Ingram (Robin).
Much of the club's recent efforts have
been directed toward restructuring the organization to accommodate the added responsibility of membership in The GCV. In particular, the club's participation in Historic
Garden Week grew from a minor assistant role
to one of full partnership with The Garden
Club of Norfolk. Club presidents during this
reorganization have been Mrs. Townsend
Brown, Jr., Mrs. Charles E. Land and Mrs.
Frank W. Gwathmey.
Now, as members of Harborfront Garden Club have soared into the 1990s with so
many challenges and new affiliations, members anticipate a course charted with new
friends, opportunities, successes, and stability. The club will be put to the test officially
in the year 2000 as sponsors of The GCV
Annual Meeting. Members look forward to
providing warm hospitality and a friendly, festive atmosphere for their first opportunity to
entertain The GCV.

care of the grounds. This project was maintained until the house became the property of
the city.
Mrs. Edwin B. Vaden (Bunny) served as
Chairman of The Garden Club of Virginia's
Finance Committee from 1970 until 1972, as
The GCV Corresponding Secretary from
1972 to 1974, and as a Director-at-Large from
1975 to 1978.
Civic beautification was the main thrust
of the club's labors over the years. Funds were
raised from club projects to plant a garden at
the Virginia Baptist Hospital, to give a stone
bird bath to Nature Camp at Vesuvius, to make
a donation to the Keep Lynchburg Beautiful
Commission for the landscaping of the Robert D. Morrison Interchange at Rivermont
Bridge, and to landscape the traffic island at
the intersection of Langhorne Road and Memorial Avenue. Plant sales made it possible
to contribute to the Kent-Valentine House.
Miss Emmy Lou Thomson worked the
needlepoint square, designed by Anne
Buchanan Percy, for the rug in the Kent-Valentine House representing the member clubs
in The Garden Club of Virginia.
The Garden Club of Virginia voted in
1977 to restore the gardens of Point of Honor,
the 1816 Federal mansion considered the finest example of its type in the city. The first
phase of this restoration was completed in May
1978 when HGC was hostess for the 58th
Annual Meeting of The Garden Club of Virginia. Mrs. Lea Booth (Mary Morris) was
elected a Director-at-Large of The GCV
(1979-1982).
Presidents of the Hillside Garden Club
during the 1970s were Mrs. C. Lynch Christian, Mrs. Gordon P. Howell, Mrs. William
McK. Massie, Mrs. Lea Booth, and Mrs. Edward C. Suhling.

HILLSIDE GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
The highlight in 1970 for Hillside Garden Club was the beginning of the greenhouse
at the Dabney-Scott-Adams House on Cabell
Street. In 1972 a herb garden was added with
23 varieties of herbs planted in a rectangular
space between the kitchen and servant quarters. The club voted in 1973 to continue the
maintenance of the greenhouse and to add the

1980-1990
During the 1980s, the Hillside Garden
Club accomplished some of its most important endeavors. The Lynchburg Garden Club
and HGC assumed the responsibility of helping the city maintain the grounds at Point of
Honor. Later that year, the club began a gar130

The Member Clubs


den, attractive to birds and visible to patients
in the Health Center, at Westminster-Canterbury. The club, with other community organizations, restored the garden at the home
of Anne Spencer, internationally known
Harlem Renaissance poet and the only Virginian whose poems are included in the first
edition of The Norton Anthology ofModern and
British Poetry. Besides hours of planning and
toiling at this Virginia Historic Landmark,
HGC contributed over $8,000 to the $20,000
cost of the renovation. The club received the
Common Wealth Award for the completion
of the garden in 1985.
Other highlights in this decade included
Mrs. Robert L. Galloway (Liz) winning The
GCVHoricultureAwardofMeritin 1985. In
1987, the club established its Endowment
Fund, and in 1989, Mrs. Kenneth S. White
(Jane) received the Massie Medal" ....as a planner, creator, restorer, and preserver of gardens." The club's involvement in Operation
Plant-A-Tree and Westminster-Canterbury
were important projects. Each year a student
was selected for the Frances Dirom Scholarship to Nature Camp.
The club sponsored The GCV Rose
Shows in 1987 and 1988. Peter Hatch, curator of the gardens at Monticello, was the guest
speaker. A wine and cheese party was given
for the exhibitors, and a cocktail party for the
judges was held at the home of Mrs. George
B. Craddock (Mary Spencer).
Hillside Garden Club was awarded the
Mrs. Littleton H. Mears Trophy for the best
Inter-Club arrangement at The GCV Annual
Daffodil Show in 1988 and 1989.
Mrs. RobertH. Bowden,Jr.,Mrs. George
M. Lupton, Jr., Mrs. Frank D. Rock, Mrs.
Charles H. Sackett, and Mrs. William M.
Roberts, Jr. served as club presidents during
the 1980s.

upkeep of the garden.


Hillside Garden Club won the Elizabeth
Gwathmey Jeffress Trophy for the best InterClub arrangement at The GCV Annual Rose
Show in 1991.
In the spring of 1992, it was proposed that
the club undertake the landscaping of Carey
House, a temporary home for abused mothers and their children. A landscape design was
created by a club member and in several
months $4,000 was raised in addition to gifts
of shrubs, trees, flowers, bulbs, and labor by
members and community well-wishers. One
of the most heartwarming contributions came
from husbands of many of the younger members. They worked throughout the summer
to build playground equipment, fences, and a
garbage-area screen. The entire planting was
accomplished in one all-day work session in
the fall of 1992. Thirty-five members, their
families and friends, accomplished this miracle
on a budget of $3,000. The estimated value
of the finished project was $15,000.
The club played an important part in a
civic project to renew and repair the Old City
Cemetery. Because of the enormous destruction from the storm of]une 4, 1993, the club
voted to work with the civic group formed by
the Southern Memorial Association and to
appropriate $3,000 during the next year toward the replanting of 100 trees. The association came up with the idea of replanting
the Confederate section of the cemetery with
native 19th century plants. The suggestion
was to turn the approximately 25 acres into
an arboretum of 19th century trees and shrubs.
A club member, Mrs.John H. Mullin III (Susan), offered to donate whatever trees were on
the Arboretum wish list that she grew on her
Ridgeway Farms, Inc. nursery. This generous gift included 28 out of the list of 100 trees.
HGC undertook many cooperative ventures with the Lynchburg Garden Club in the
1990s. Besides having yearly joint meetings,
the clubs took bus trips together to the Lewis
Ginter Botanical Garden, Vrrginia House, and
Agecroft. The two clubs co-sponsored Historic Garden Week in Lynchburg and worked
together to decorate Point of Honor for
Christmas and for Historic Garden Week.

1990-1995
HGC members maintained an active interest in the Anne Spencer Garden until 1993.
After ten years of dedicated service to the Anne
Spencer Board, the club decided to relinquish
the responsibility of overseeing the care and
131

Follow the Green Arrow


Remember, we wore long dresses then! The
DixielandJazz Band brought us saints marching in and kept every toe tapping. In the
thank-you notes that followed, delegate after
delegate reported that she had removed the
handles from the gorgeous hand-quilted tote
bags in order to convert them to sofa pillows.
In the end we were poorer in resources but
richer in bonds of friendship and appreciation
of the work of The Garden Club of Virginia.
Under the direction of Mrs. Harrison
Mann (Betty), the members conducted a very
successful Anti-Litter Poster Contest in all the
elementary schools in Alexandria. The posters were highly imaginative and colorfully executed. Each participating school was awarded
a dogwood tree for its grounds along with instructions on its nurture. HCGC was so
pleased for The Garden Club of VITginia to
have such a gracious house for its headquarters that it contributed to the Kent-Valentine
House.
Mrs. Latham and Mrs. Mann were both
elected to serve as Directors-at-Large, Mrs.
Latham for 1970-1973 and Mrs. Mann for
1972-1975.
The years 1973-1975 under Mrs. Thomas Anglin (Neosha) showed an expanding
horticultural expertise. The club kicked off a
plan for the Athenaeum Garden by offering a
$1,250 prize for a sculpture to be installed in
the garden. The sculpture, "Olympic Champion" by Carl Mose, was unveiled at a festive
springtime cocktail party for members, husbands, friends, and staff of the Northern Vll'ginia Fine Arts Association.
Under the guidance of Mrs. Charles M.
Noone (Nancy) 1975-1977, the club's Bicentennial Project, the Athenaeum Garden, was
completed with the installation of a handsome
wrought-iron gate so that passers-by could
glimpse the results of the club's efforts. Meade
Palmer, landscape architect, was engaged for
advice on the restoration of the plantings at
Lee's boyhood home, the club's next project.
A very talented new member, Mrs. Henley L.
Guild (Virginia), joined the club. In these
years began the saga of the needlepoint square
for the rug at the Kent-Valentine House. The
logo of the Bridge over Hunting Creek, ~x-

The clubs were pleased to have The GCV


Presidents, Mrs. Henley L. Guild (Virginia)
(1990-1992) and Mrs. W Tayloe Murphy, Jr.
(Helen) (1992-1994), as guest speakers at joint
meetings in the 1990s.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Theodore J. Craddock, Mrs. C. Tad
Holt, and Mrs. McMillan Kendall.

THE HUNTING CREEK


GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
In 1970 Mrs. Douglas G. Lindsey (Sara
Ann) wrote in her president's report of the
enormous pride she felt in being a member of
The Garden Club of Virginia.
Serving as club president from 1971 to
1973, Mrs. Merrill Beede (Kay) observed that
taking ebullient young provisionals into the
club had not resulted in a threatened stampede of older members to the sustaining ranks.
The opposite happened, and the new young
members invigorated the entire club. The
generation gap had been closed.
Almost all thoughts and energies were
directed toward planning, down to the smallest detail, the Annual Meeting of The Garden Club ofVirginia sponsored by The Hunting Creek Garden Club in May 1972. Mrs.
Harry Harris (Lee) and Mrs. Sydney Buford
III (Lucy) gave beautiful cocktail parties in
their homes. Mrs. Robert E. Latham (Ella)
entertained The GCV Directors at a dinner.
The walk into that dinner was along a pathway lined with a hundred candle-lit paper lanterns - the paper bags laboriously filled with
sand by Mr. Latham. Yes, husbands were
pressed into service. The meeting featured a
fascinating tour of the Woodrow Wilson
House in Washington and later that night a
feast in 18th-century splendor at Gadsby Tavern, complete with HCGC hostesses in colonial costumes borrowed from the Alexandria
Little Theater. The next night there was an
incredible cloudburst just as the ladies in their
best silks and satins were boarding buses for
the banquet at the Anny-Navy Country Club.
132

The Member Clubs


quisitely worked by Mrs. Latham, was entrusted to the U. S. Mail to deliver to Richmond and never ever seen again. A second
square was frantically prepared in order to
meet the deadline and hand-earned to Richmond and put in place in the gorgeous rug.
In 1977 when Mrs. S. Cooper Dawson,
Jr. (Franny) took office, the Richmond shuttle
ran with frequency. Mrs. Guild was appointed
Chairman of The GCV Flower Shows Committee; Mrs. Mann was The GCV Parliamentarian and Editor of the Register (197 6-1978)
and Chairman of the Massie Medal Committee (1978-1980).
When Mrs. A. Slater Lamond (Jack), the
only charter member still on the active list,
assumed her duties as club president, she
rounded out the decade of the seventies as
head of a smoothly running club that fulfilled
its obligations to The GCV with grace and
flair. The Historic Garden Week tours attracted thousands of visitors. The annual
Christmas Workshop refilled the club's coffers and enabled it to take on major civic beautification efforts.
The club presidents during this decade
were Mrs. Douglas G. Lindsey, Mrs. Merrill
Beede, Mrs. Thomas Angling, Mrs. Charles
M. Noone, Mrs. S. Cooper Dawson, Jr., and
Mrs. A. Slater Lamond.

ronmentalists.
The historic home of Mr. and Mrs. Beede
was made even more historic when they sponsored a gala 40th Birthday Party for Hunting
Creek Garden Club.
Mrs.John D. Schmidtlein (Ann) assumed
the presidency of the club 1983-1985. Under
the guidance of The GCV, members became
even more cognizant of the threats to the environment. They worked for billboard legislation, fought for Sen. Marye's Bottle Bill, did
battle with the gypsy moth, and supported the
clean-up of the Chesapeake Bay - heavy duty
stuff. The club was tremendously gratified by
the success of its project at Goodwin House
Retirement Home which enabled the elderly
residents there to grow and show their own
daffodils at the club's annual daffodil show.
The show, held since 1951, was now co-sponsored by The Garden Club of Alexandria.
Mrs.Joel Crenshaw (Pat) was The GCV Daffodil Test Chairman (1982-1991) and received
The GCV Horticulture Award of Merit. Mrs.
Lindsay was GCV Lily Test Chairman (19801984).
Mrs. Peter T. Straub (Wendy) served as
club president when HCGC sponsored The
GCV Lily Show in 1985 and 1986. Both were
smashing successes under the capable guidance of Mrs. Guild and Mrs. Jam es D. C.
Gouldin (Jane).
Mrs. E. Edmonds Gray (Ellen), who
served as club president from 1987 to 1989,
remarked that "Hunting Creek has plenty of
talent to spread around." Mrs. Guild was
elected First Vice President of The Garden
Club of Virginia 1988-1990 and Mrs. Mann,
mainstay of The HCGC since the early 1940s,
was the recipient of the Massie Medal in 1988
for "heart and mind and talents ... in service
to The Garden Club of Virginia." Mrs.
Clayton Tasker (Elizabeth) received The GCV
Horticulture Award of Merit.
As the decade drew to a close, Mrs.James
P. Cox, Jr. (Helen) was elected club president
(1989-1991).
Club presidents were Mrs. A. Slater
Lamond, Mrs. Henley L. Guild, Mrs. John
D. Schmidtlein, Mrs. Peter Straub, Mrs. Elias
Edmonds Gray, and Mrs.James P. Cox, Jr.

1980-1990
Mrs. Lamond passed the gavel in 1981
into the deft hands of Mrs. Guild, who was
elected a Director-at-Large of The GCV
(1980-1983).
The landscaping project at the Bellefonte
Gardens Home for Mentally Handicapped
Adults was a finalist for the Common Wealth
Award. Though HCGC did not win, the club
redoubled its efforts at fund raising at its
Christmas Greens Workshop and was able to
complete the project. Mrs. Julian T. Burke,
Jr. (Betty) educated members monthly on the
gypsy moth. We scraped off egg masses,
wrapped burlap around trees, set out traps, and
agonized over the increasing threat to trees.
Many happy campers were sent off to Nature
Camp to become a new generation of envi133

Follow the Green Arrow

1990-1995

blue skies. John Trott, naturalist, was an outstanding speaker with his slides of wildlife in
Virginia. The tour of historic homes and gardens with a stop at the Apothecary Shop Museum, HCGC's current project, was well received. The "tented" banquet in the garden
of the Carlyle House, The GCV restoration,
saw ladies piped into dinner by a handsomely
kilted Scotsman.
Somewhat wearily, members held the
Annual Christmas Greens Workshop just two
months after The GCV Board of Governors'
Meeting.
Club presidents were Mrs.Jam es P. Cox,
Jr., Mrs. Timothy L. Bryan, and Mrs. Arthur
Sibold,Jr.

In 1990 HCGC found its warm, capable,


friendly, and highly accomplished Mrs. Guild
installed as President of The Garden Club of
Virginia. Mrs. Sophie Clagett received The
GCV Horticulture Award of Merit the same
year.
Mrs. Lindsay and Mrs. Arthur Sibold,Jr.
(Libby), intrepid members of HCGC, ventured off to Col. Reeves's Adult Nature Camp.
To the amazement and whole-hearted admiration of the club, they reported that they not
only endured but also enjoyed the rigorous
experience.
Mrs. Timothy L. Bryan (Penny) was
elected club president for 1991-1993 and
wisely strengthened our "infra-structure."
The bylaws were refined and dues raised. The
increased challenges of working members and
graying members were smoothly met and resolved. The highlight was the marvelous 50th
Birthday Party of The Hunting Creek Garden Club at the home of Mrs. Latham. A
wonderful turnout of former and out-of-town
members reminisced on the founding and
former days of the club. Members were regaled with tales of hats and white gloves, elegant tea tables, and afternoon meetings "back
then." The club rejoiced to have Mrs. Guild
back after her highly successful term as President of The GCV, and of course she blended
right in like the pro she is.
Planning for The GCV Board of Governors' Meeting in 1993 went into high gear
under the chairmanship of Mrs. Cox and Mrs.
Gray. Mrs. Sibold was Chairman of The GCV
Conservation Forum in Richmond on "Conservation in Virginia - From the Mountains
to the Sea."
Mrs. Lindsey and Mrs. Sibold went off to
a post-grad course at Nature Camp taking
their husbands with them this time.
Mrs. Sibold became club president in
1993 and welcomed The GCV Board of Governors to the meeting in Alexandria in October. All the detailed planning paid off. With
butterfly gardens as the horticulture exhibits
and frog tote bags to hold the papers, the
meeting assembled under October's bright

THE HUNTINGTON GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
The presidents who "bookended" the decade of the 1970s were half-weeping with
laughter. Old friends, they had become members of The Huntington Garden Club in the
mid-1960s and had been asked to review the
club's history during and between their terms
of office.
"Do you remember.... ?" asked '78-'80 for
perhaps the fifth time. "Oh yes," responded
her friend, wiping her eyes, "but we can't actually tell any of that." In the end, though,
they decided that the story of the difficulties
overcome was worth reporting and might not
even be unique.
By 1970 The Huntington Garden Club
was resting on its laurels.
("What do you mean 'resting on its laurels?"' asked '71-'73. "'Dying on the vine'
would be more like it.")
By now the members, still enthusiastic
about their project, were tiring, and certainly
not getting any younger. While Patrick Henry
Hospital greatly appreciated its glorious landscaping, it was unable to provide maintenance,
and the club's volunteer group, "The Weeders," was running out of steam. The annual
Wreath Sale proceeds were used to contract
with a landscape nursery to clean up beds and
134

The Member Clubs


maintain the grounds.
The club's valedictory contribution to
Patrick Henry Hospital was the design and installation of what was originally termed a
"Prayer Garden" but was finally named the
"Garden of Meditation" in the interest of political correctness. This walled garden included asphalt wheelchair paths for the patients and residents and also appropriate
benches.
Mrs. Christopher Phillips
(Deborah), who was chairman of the endeavor,
viewed the terms "appropriate" and "unobtainable" as synonymous for several years.
The benches were finally acquired, and in
1979 the garden was completed, thus bringing to a close 35 years of Huntington's involvement with Patrick Henry Hospital.
During this decade, many members expressed the need and desire for flower arranging workshops, which were given annually,
with emphasis on the time period immediately
preceding Historic Garden Week.
Interest in conservation increased as we
became more aware of the planet's diminishing resources. One meeting program each
year was devoted to environmental concerns,
and the presentation of an "environmental
minute," a brief report on some aspect of conservation, was included as a regular agenda
item for each meeting.
The honor of sponsoring the Annual
Meeting of The GCV was ours in 1990, and
planning and fund raising for that auspicious
event consumed a fair amount of energy. Since
we were already committed to an annual fund
raiser, the Wreath Sale, we decided to assess
each member $20 a year from 1986-1990 and
were then smart enough to appoint a banker's
wife, Mrs. Carl Burgdorf (Katharine), as chairman of the arrangements.
This money, combined with proceeds
from the Wreath Sale (which were building
up nicely as we awaited delivery of the aforementioned benches) gave us a nest egg. When
we
learned that the Virginia Living Museum had
recently completed an ambitious long-term
landscaping plan for its 30 acres but did not
have the resources to fund it, Huntington was
ready.

replace shrubs and trees. From time to time


an older building was razed, and plantings
were provided for its replacement, but all of
this was handled by a few of the older members: hardly a whole club hands-on experience.
While newer members respected the club's
past accomplishments and enjoyed the
monthly gloves-and-hat social luncheon meetings, it was apparent that a fresh wind was
needed.
Fresh winds are generated by fresh young
people, and the members' own daughters and
their friends belonged to the Auxiliary. The
solution, of course, was to enlarge the constitutional membership and assimilate the Auxiliary, thereby bringing in the next generation
and a voting majority willing to make changes.
The nineteen-seventies was a decade of
reassessment and growth for The Huntington Garden Club. The club was strengthened
by the process and enabled to go forth to new
accomplishments in ensuing decades. A debt
will always to owed to the club presidents during the 70s, whose patience and guidance set
us on course to becoming a vital and productive garden club: Mrs. Raymond M. Brown
(Evelyn), Mrs. Wendell Hussey (Woody), Mrs.
M. Quincy Holt (Mary Sherwood), Mrs.
Albert 0. Goodale, Jr. (Iona), Mrs.]. Gayle
Sanford (Elizabeth), Mrs. George B. Colonna,
Jr. (Cynthia), and Mrs. Thomas R. Watkins
(Jean).
1980-1990
The 1980s were a period of pride and accomplishment for The Huntington Garden
Club. Just ask any one of the hard-working
presidents of that decade: Mrs. Nelson
Durden (Molly), Ms. Benson Bowen, Mrs.
George S. Hankins, Jr. (Ann), Mrs. Charles
Zimmerman, Jr. (Elizabeth), or Mrs. Byrd
Saville (Judy)!
Plans were developed for completing the
landscaping of Patrick Henry Convalescent
Hospital, a task greatly simplified by its acquisition by a major non-profit hospital corporation which not only converted it into a
modern nursing home and geriatric care facility but also could afford to landscape and
135

Follow the Green Arrow


In 1989, we entered into a five-year commitment to the Museum (no more open-ended
projects for us) ane promised volunteer help
and a minimum of$15,000 over that time. In
its turn, the Museum agreed to make the Butterfly Garden a memorial, dedicated to
Huntington's charter members and members
emeritae, and installed a bronze plaque commemorating those ladies.
By the end of the decade and with additional help from other civic-minded groups,
an irrigation system had been installed at the
Virginia Living Museum, and the Wildflower
Garden, the Butterfly Memorial Garden, and
Outdoor Aviary were in place. It was apparent that the Huntington Garden Club would
enter the '90s with enthusiasm and a real sense
of who we were.

began in early 1991, and the exhibit was almost instantly filled with a myriad of wildlife:
birds, squirrels, butterflies, even bats, and
thousands of two-legged critters as well. On
Earth Day 1993, club president, Mrs. Donald
N. Patten (Marty), joined Virginia Secretary
of Education, James W. Dyke, and the VLM
Projects Chairman, Mrs. Holt, in pouring ceremonial seed into the squirrel feeder to mark
the exhibit's official opening. Thanks to The
GCV Common Wealth Award, old and young
Virginians are learning that, even though
widespread habitat destruction continues to
pose a threat to wildlife, people can help by
preserving nature in their own backyards.
The club's commitment to the Virginia
Living Museum came to an end in 1994.
During the five year period $25,000, a Common Wealth Award, and hundreds of volunteer hours were donated to the Museum.
No laurel-resting for The Huntington
Garden Club, however. In 1993 members
were looking beyond the VLM and were
pleased to be able to provide assistance with
two "one-time" community projects. One was
to provide basic no-maintenance landscaping
at a shelter for battered women. The second
was to help with the restoration of "Little
England" Chapel. This small church, used a
century ago by Hampton University (then
Institute) students who rowed across the creek
to attend services, had fallen into serious disrepair. The club's contribution for landscaping matched a grant requirement and so did
double duty.
The club's new exciting project, that is,
the type which involves planning and (volunteer) planting as well as money, was finished
in 199 5. Club president, Ms.Janie Hargette,
oversaw completion of the Virginiana Garden
at the newest City of Newport News Library.
This fine new library contains the city's
priceless Virginiana Collection of books and
other written materials, part of which was
donated many years ago by the mother of one
of the club's former presidents. The walled
garden will be the library's entrance and will
be planted with specimens which have Virginia
in the species names: Magnolia virginiana, Itea
virginica, Rosa virginiana, Veronicastrum

1990-1995
The Huntington Garden Club sponsored
The Garden Club of Virginia Annual Meeting in May 1990. Mrs. Burgdorf arranged the
Meeting, which won raves from its participants
and returned $2 ,000 to the club's civic projects
account.
Mrs. Kendall] ones (Nancy) became president of the club in 1990 and so presided over
the beginning of what would be a significant
period in the life of The Huntington Garden
Club.
Plantings continued at the Virginia Living Museum, which became the largest botanical display of native plants in Virginia. The
Memorial Butterfly Garden was made a special project account to ensure tax-deductibility of contributions, and a permanent "Bookof-Commemoration" to record the names of
all persons honored was begun. The Museum
had 200,000 visitors a year, including 85,000
school children in its elementary education
program.
The staff had long wanted to establish a
Backyard Wildlife Habitat to provide a "howto" feature for its horticultural exhibits. The
club's funds could not be stretched to provide
this exciting facility, but in 1991 the Backyard
Wildlife Habitat was the proud recipient of
the Common Wealth Award. Construction
136

The Member Clubs


and long hours of dedication to wreaths and
trees from almost every member, the results
of this combined effort were used for planting and landscaping throughout Richmond.
In the last ten years, the club labored from
Church Hill (St. John's Church and the East
View Overlook) to Grace House, The Caskie
House, Museum of the Confederacy, and
Monumental Church.
During this decade club members made
outstanding contributions to The Garden
Club of Virginia. Mrs. Hall was Chairman of
Historic Garden Week in 1971 when a recordbreaking $100,000 was realized for the first
time for Garden Week. Mrs. Hall served as a
Director-at-Large (1971-1974), Second Vice
President (1974-1976), and Chairman of the
Kent-Valentine House (1978-1980). Mrs.
Robert J. Keller III (Sarah) was elected The
GCV Recording Secretary (1978-1980). Mrs.
James 0. Burke (Alice) was appointed Chairman of the Finance Committee (197 6-1978)
and Mrs. Hunter H. McGuire, Jr. (Alice),
Chairman of Historic Garden Week (19771979).
Members serving as club presidents during the 1970s were Mrs. William T Reed, Jr.,
Mrs. Richard A. Michaux, Mrs. Spotswood B.
Hall, Jr., Mrs. Zayde Rennolds Dotts, and Mrs.
Calvin Satterfield III.

virginicurn, and many more. (It cannot be limited to these species as we must include our
state tree, Camus florida).
In 1995 The Huntington Garden Club,
alive and vigorous, continued and expanded
its long record of not only personal gardening and flower arranging but also community
beautification and education as well.
Club presidents were Mrs. Kendall C.
Jones (Nancy), Mrs. Donald N. Patten
(Marty), and Ms.Janie C. Hargette.
THE JAMES RIVER GARDEN CLUB

1970-1980
Early in the 1970s, The James River Garden Club minutes noted that "more members
dig their own gardens now than ever before."
Conservation has always been a prime
interest of The James River Garden Club.
Mrs. William T Reed,Jr. (Mary Ross) received
the deLacy Gray Medal in 1972 for her many
achievements in the field of conservation.
Mrs. Robert Miller Jeffress (Elizabeth) was
awarded the Massie Medal in 1973 for restoration work at the University of Virginia.
In the spring of 197 5, the provisional
members staged a meeting and workshop featuring Mrs. Philip M. Minor's (Lucy Payne)
talk on flower arranging, a topiary demonstration, and lunch at Wmdsor in Richmond. The
day was such a success that The Garden Club
ofVirginia labeled it "a memorable experience
that set the standard for all garden clubs and
their meetings."
Members participated in flower shows
with gratifying results. A case in point: the
report stating a "most unexpected blue ribbon for the on-the-spot arrangement at the
GCA Zone VII Meeting was won by Mrs.
Spotswood B. Hall, Jr. (Katie) and Mrs. E.
Massie Valentine,Jr. (Ella Gordon), with flowers consigned to the trash basket, retrieved,
and arranged by talented and apparently desperate members."
Restoration and beautification projects
were financed by the traditional Christmas
Green Sale. Requiring hard work, ingenuity,

1980-1990
In 1981, The Jam es River Garden Club
made a radical change in money-raising techniques. It abandoned the long-standing and
reliable Christmas Green Sale and published
"A Taste ofVirginia." This 32-page cookbook,
featuring 18 color photographs of famous Virginia Houses with accompanying recipes, was
conceived, edited and expedited by Mrs.
FitzGerald Bemiss (Margaret) and Miss Mary
Tennant Bryan (Polly; Mrs. Chiswell D. L.
Perkins, Jr.). Hours of cooking and tasting,
miles of driving and selling by a dedicated
committee, and months of careful money
management by Mrs. Andrew H. Christian
(Ginna) produced net profits of $4 7,000 in the
first two printings. The principal was invested,
and the interest used for projects and conser137

Follow the Green Arrow


vation. For these achievements members were
grateful, tired, and solvent.
The Jam es River Garden Club and the
Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton
worked together to stage The GCV Rose
Show in 1981and1982.
Restoration and beautification have long
been top priorities for The JRGC. Starting
with iris in the grass plots on Monument Avenue in 1915, the club financed the landscaping, labeling, and renovating of a wide variety
oflocations. In 1982 a committee was formed
to review and report on the status of each
project. As a result, projects were updated and
renewed to the tune of several thousand dollars. This became an on-going challenge.
Labeling every tree at Maymont was such
an undertaking that Mrs. B. Armistead Burke
(Beulah) was awarded the deLacy Gray Medal
in 1982.
The club's activities were expanded to include Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden (with
the other three Richmond clubs in The GCV),
The Children's Hospital, Richmond Renaissance ($3,000 for benches along Canal Walk),
the Science Museum, and Maymont's Fountain Court (with the Tuckahoe Garden Club
of Westhampton), to name a few.
Concern with conservation resulted in a
$2,000 contribution to the Nature Conservancy Heritage Program. An unprecedented
club meeting was held at the North Anna
Nuclear Plant.
The club continued to send two children
to Nature Camp and supported the Bottle Bill,
the saving of Virginia wetlands, and the programs of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
Members continued to be active in horticulture and flower shows. TheJRGC motherdaughter combination, Mrs. Minor and her
daughters, Mrs. William T. Reed III (Helen
Scott) and Mrs. S. Townsend Harrison (Sarah), was widely recognized as outstanding
flower show judges and horticulturists.
Again a family matter, a unique award was
given to a sister-in-law team, Mrs. Henry L.
Valentine II (Peggy) and Mrs. E. Massie Valentine, Jr., when they received the coveted
Jeffress Bowl. Mrs. S. Townsend Harrison
won the Louise Morris Goodwin Bowl at The

Mrs. Philip M. Minor at a GCV Lily Show.


GCV Daffodil Show in 1984.
The JRGC sponsored The GCV 69th
Annual Meeting in 1989. This undertaking,
engineered by Mrs. E. Reed Carter (Elisabeth)
and Mrs. John K. Burke (Archer) involved
just about every member of the club - twice.
The carefully planned schedule of complexities of such a meeting ran along like clockwork. Locations ranged from lunches at Lewis
Ginter Botanical Garden to dinner at Brandon with the Honorable Robert W Daniel and
Mrs. Daniel (Linda) to tea at the Executive
Mansion. A tour and box lunch in the garden
at Redesdale, home of Mrs. Charles L. Reed,
Jr. (Ann), was given by The Boxwood and the
Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton.
Garden tours, talks, and bus rides all culminated in several gala dinners at members'
homes and a spectacular banquet at The
Jefferson Hotel that drew letters of praise from
far and wide.
Members continued to hold positions
with The Garden Club of Virginia. Mrs.
McGuire was Corresponding Secretary (19801982) and a Director-at-Large (1984-1987).
Mrs. Hall served as Chairman of the KentValentine House Committee (1981-1984), the
138

The Member Clubs


Historian and Custodian of Records (19841986), and Chairman of the GCV Admissions
Committee (1986-1988). Mrs. Keller was
Chairman of Historic Garden Week (19851987).
Mrs. Robert A. Bristow, Mrs. Robert
Carter, Mrs. Daniel D. Talley III, Mrs. V.
Richardson Anderson, and Mrs. FitzGerald
Bemiss served as club presidents during the
1980s.

ardship, has served as a catalyst for environmental action in Virginia and, indeed, across
the nation.
In a joint effort with the Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, and The Jam es River Garden
Club, a permanent composting demonstration
site was established near the Children's Garden at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
A generous member gave the club membership copies of "Fifty Simple Things You
Can Do to Save the Earth." Points from this
booklet were discussed at subsequent meetmgs.
The JRGC joined the other three clubs
in The GCV in Richmond in a joint two-year
pledge, which was matched by the Henry
Flagler Foundation, for an annual perennial
symposium at the Lewis Ginter Botanical
Garden. Club members assisted at the
Maymont Flower and Garden Show.
Mrs.Jonathan Bryan III (Elise) won The
GCV Horticulture Award of Merit in 1990,
and Mrs. Alexander Hamilton IV (Betsy) won
the award in 1991.
The club continued to work with the
Richmond Department of Recreation and
Parks to improve city parks and protect open
spaces. Two bus trips with city officials as
guides have shown what a challenge this
project was. Monroe Park, on the list since
the early 1950s, remained the club's main
beautification in the 1990s. Members worked
with the city and with VCU to upgrade this
special park. Mrs. J. Mark Wittkofski (Sally),
a landscape architect, drew up a detailed plan
to guide the efforts.
In keeping with the custom of updating
projects, the club allotted $2,000 for the revitalization of the dogwood trees at the Carillon which it planted 55 years ago.
The members took a James River Rafting Trip twice, accompanied by a guide to
point out the sights and save skins. A wonderfully rewarding meeting was held at
Riverfront Plaza. The program was a tour of
Richmond's downtown and neighborhood areas with speakers from Central Richmond
Association and Richmond Riverfront Development. Members have broadened their ho-

1990-1995
On March 15, 1990, The Jam es River
Garden Club reached the age of 75 years. The
birthday was celebrated with a gala cocktail
buffet at the home of longtime hostess Mrs.
James W Rawles (Gina). It was catered and
paid for by generous and gifted members.
High spirits were inspired by guests arriving
in a startling assortment of hats and outfits
from the attics of mothers and grandmothers.
A skit was presented with historical anecdotes
from two world wars pointing out the changes
in gardening methods and projects: do-ityourself composting and weeding, victory gardening, and beautifying 15 filling stations (in
1932).
Outstanding in the club's conservation
efforts was the program initiated by Mrs. H.
Hudnall Ware III (Betty Byrne). Her career
in Richmond recycling started in 1990 when,
at her request, the club gave a matching grant
to the city of Richmond to start a pilot program of recycling in two neighborhoods. The
program was so successful that by 1992 curbside recycling expanded to 56,000 homes in
the city. Again, energized by Mrs. Ware, The
JRGC financed the publication of 3,000 copies of a Business Recycling Guide distributed
throughout the city. For her contribution,
Mrs. Ware was asked to serve on the GCA
National and Legislative Affairs Committee
and in 1991 received the Virginia Governor's
Award for Conservation. She was the only
individual cited; the others were corporations.
Mrs. Robert Carter (Bessie), the selfstyled "trash queen,'' received The GCV
deLacy Gray Medal in 1991 as a tireless visionary who, with endless energy and stew139

Follow the Green Arrow


Sponsor's Cup and Mrs. Jam es F. Birchfield
Gane) won both The GCV Blanche Rohrer
Davis Cup and Blue Ridge Garden Club Cup
in The Garden Club of Virginia Lily Show.
Mrs. Peal was awarded The Garden Club of
Virginia Horticulture Award of Merit in 1970.
On a state-wide level, three members distinguished themselves in 197 5. Mrs.
Birchfield won The GCV Massie Medal for
"her outstanding accomplishments in the field
of horticulture, particularly in the growing of
lilies and daffodils, and for her energetic work
and generous sharing of knowledge with other
gardeners." Mrs. B. Powell Harrison (Agnes)
won the deLacy Gray Memorial Medal for
"her dedicated and effective work to protect
the natural resources of the Commonwealth,
and for her years of service in the promotion
of recycling and reuse, of environmental education and oflegislation to preserve the beauty
of the land." Col. Robert S. Pickens, an honorary member of LGC, won The GCV Horticulture Award of Merit in 197 5. Mrs. Peal
won The GCV Horticulture Award of Merit
again in 1978.
Mrs. Harrison served as Director-atLarge of The Garden Club of Virginia from
1977 to 1980, and Mrs. James S. Dietz
(Rosalie) was The GCV Historian and Custodian of Records from 1978 to 1980.
In the 1970s, the club saw its proceeds
from Historic Garden Week grow from
$4,855in1973to$7,760in1979. The highlight of these tours was the Sunday evening
candlelight tour of Oak Hill, historic home of
club member Mrs.Joseph Prendergast Gean).
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Charles F. Holden, Mrs. Douglas
Phillips, Mrs. W. Hugh Peal, Mrs. Bertram
C. Harrison, Mrs.Jam es W. Dietz, and Mrs.
Edward W. Goshorn.

rizons and enjoyed knowing members of all


ages by a variety of trips to destinations as varied as Charleston, S. C., Poplar Forest, the
Chelsea Flower Show in London, and the
Philadelphia Flower Show.
In response to members' requests, half
The JRGC meetings are scheduled in the
morning and half in the afternoon. Most are
in historic places such as St. John's Church.
Other special localities have been Virginia
Union University and Westminster-Canterbury.
Probably one of the club's most successful accomplishments has been the continuing
appeal of its cookbook, "Taste ofVirginia." It
has been reprinted with a few updates. Thanks
to the diligence of the committee members,
sales ring up amazing totals. Long may it be a
best seller.
TheJames River Garden Club presidents
in the 1990s were Mrs. Alfred P. Scott, Mrs.
Alexander M. Fisher, Jr., and Mrs. Frederick
S. Fisher.

LEESBURG GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
In the 1970s, Leesburg Garden Club continued its annual plant sale, a fifty-year tradition. Through the years funds from this sale
were used to landscape the Loudoun Memorial Hospital, Leesburg Volunteer Fire Department, and Loudoun County Courthouse.
In support of Leesburg's Bicentennial activities, the club combined a house tour with the
plant sale.
Another annual tradition was the Christmas greens workshop in the spacious basement
of Woodburn, home of Mr. and Mrs. W. Hugh
Peal (Margaret). The wreaths and swags were
made to decorate the Courthouse and adjoining office buildings.
Daffodil bulbs, donated by club members,
were awarded to local homeowners who were
outstanding in beautifying their yards. Members participated in all The Garden Club of
Virginia Flower Shows. In 1970, Mrs. Douglas Phillips (Elizabeth) won The GCV

1980-1990
Leesburg Garden Club sponsored The
Garden Club of Virginia's 38th Annual Lily
Show held at the Simpson Middle School in
June, 1980. It was gratifying to see the results
of months of effort. Mrs. Robert S. Pickens
(Vinton) won The Garden Club of Virginia
140

The Member Clubs

Sweepstakes Award for the show. She also


presented a new award, The Garden Club of
Virginia Col. Robert S. Pickens Memorial
Cup, in memory of her late husband.
At The Garden Club of Virginia Annual
Meeting in May, Miss Nancy Rogers received
The GCV Horiculture Award of Merit for her
collection of Virginia wildflower slides with
accompanying lectures. The Garden Club of
Virginia President, Miss Jean Printz, was a
guest of the club for two days in June 1981.
Everyone enjoyed getting to know this special person during her visit.
The club nominated The Xerox Corporation for The GCV Award for Meritorious
Achievement in Conservation. Xerox received
this award in 1982 at the 23rd Annual Conservation Forum in Charlottesville.
In 1982, the club received the Common
Wealth Award for its project, the landscaping
at The Douglas Community Center and Park.
Also, in 1982, Mrs. William J. McDonald
(Dorothy) was appointed to a two-year term
as Director of Public Relations of The GCV.
In 1983, Mrs. Peal was awarded The GCV
Massie Medal for "furthering the aims, ideals
and programs ofThe Garden Club ofVrrginia
while at the same time making a significant
contribution to the local comm1lnity."
Throughout the 1980s, club members
were involved not only in garden club activities but also in civic and state-wide activities.
The club continued to monitor the county sign
and zoning ordinances. This resulted in an
unusual experience in 1986. When Lyndon
LaRouch, extremist political leader, moved to
Leesburg, one of his organizations filed for a
variance before the Board of Zoning Appeals.
Along with other concerned citizens, the club
gathered to protest this request. Mr. La Rouch
was so enraged that in response to a television
interviewer's question he said about the club,
"You've got these clacking busybodies in this
Soviet jellyfish front sitting here in
Leesburg ..... making nuisances of themselves."
Well, we' cl been called many things, but never
communists!
In September 1987, a teak Lutyens-style
bench was presented by the club to the
Oatlands Plantation in appreciation of its res-

toration of the Oatlands garden. This was just


in time for the October visit of Mrs.Jam es C.
Godwin (Ellen), President of The Garden
Club of Virginia.
Mrs. Patrick Acheson 0udy) was appointed Slides Committee Chairman for The
Garden Club of Virginia (1988-1990).
Club presidents in the 1980s were Mrs.
William J. McDonald, Mrs. Benjamin H.
McElhinney, Mrs. Winslow Williams, Mrs.
Patrick Acheson, and Mrs.Jam es F. Tyler.
1990-1995
Leesburg Garden Club was pleased to win
the Inter-Club Silver Bowl for the fifth consecutive year at the Upperville Flower Show
in April 1990.
October 1990 saw years of planning come
to fruition when the club sponsored the 77th
Meeting of the Board of Governors, a demanding but rewarding job. All the rights to
a bench logo, created for this meeting by a
club member, were given to Oatlands for its
use.
In April 1991, $250.00 was donated to
plant a tree on the newly created Memorial
Parkway (Route 7 East) in honor of Mrs.
Pickens, in her nineties and still a productive
club member. Mrs. K. B. Kingsley (Kassie)
was the recipient of The GCV Horticulture
Award of Merit in May 1991. That same
month The Garden Club ofVrrginia proposed
to restore a sixty-foot section of the unique,
historic garden wall at Oatlands.
While a member of The GCV Conservation Committee (1991-1994), Mrs. William
H. Brown Q"ean) represented The Garden
Club of Virginia on the steering committee
of the Virginia Environmental Network. Mrs.
James F. Tyler (Lynn) became The GCV
Flowers Show Chairman for 1992-1994.
The club was saddened in November
1993 by the death of Mrs. Pickens. In the late
1930s, she had pioneered the crusade against
roadside billboards. In 1940 she petitioned
the Board of Supervisors to explore the creation of zoning as a tool to protect the appearance of Loudoun County's roadsides.
Mrs. Pickens was named chairman of the
141

Follow the Green Arrow


county's first Planning Commission. Loudoun
County gained national recognition in 1924
when it became the first agricultural county
in the country to adopt a zoning ordinance.
Only a few months before her death, the club
had awarded her, for the second time, the Rust
Bowl for service. LGC will do its best to continue her good work - no easy task in rapidlygrowing Loudoun County.
In addition to the usual greens workshop,
the club held a Christmas raffle for the first
time in December 1993. Prizes included room
decorations, arrangements, and wreaths. It
was a great success, thus ending the year on a
positive note!
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Stephen Conger, Mrs. Claude C.
Arthur, and Mrs. John H. Cook III.

GCV Historian and Custodian of Records


(1972-1974). The Little Garden Club ofWmchester sponsored the Board of Governors'
Meeting of The Garden Club of Virginia in
October 1972.
Locally, the club expanded its involvement
in the preservation and conservation of beauty
in and around this small historic town. Members sponsored Historic Garden Week with
Winchester-Clarke Garden Club, supported
landscaping at the Preservation of Historic
Winchester's new headquarters, decorated
rooms at historic Abram's Delight for Christmas tours, and maintained flower beds there
during the summer. The club donated money
to the Handley Library for the purchase of a
new linden tree and to the National Trust for
Historic Preservation for use at Belle Grove
Plantation. Contributions were made to the
local recycling program. In 1974 the club
contributed $1,000 to a landscaping project
at the new Daniel Morgan Middle School. In
1978 it began to assist the Winchester Parks
and Recreation Department in the development of an eleven-park area by providing advice and funds for a landscaping project at the
Frederick Douglass Park. Children received
scholarships to Nature Camp each year.
In March 197 5, The Little Garden Club
of Winchester had its 40th anniversary as a
garden club and its 20th anniversary as a member of The Garden Club of Virginia.
During the 1970s, another club president,
Mrs. Stewart Bell, Jr. (Rosalie), was Second
Vice President of The GCV (1976-1978) and
represented the club well in the fields of conservation and restoration. In 1976, Mrs. Bell
was appointed by Governor Godwin to serve
on an eleven-member committee on "outdoor
advertising in sight of public highways." For
many years a leading advocate for highway
beautification, Mrs. Bell devoted countless
hours to the preservation of Virginia's natural
landscape and to the promotion of education
in all areas of conservation and beautification.
Members serving as club presidents during the 1970s were Mrs. W. H. Lawrence, Jr.,
Mrs. Virgil R. Strader, Jr., Mrs. W.W. Baker,
Mrs. J. Victor Arthur, Jr., Mrs. Ferman W.
Perry, and Mrs. Harry R. Kern, Jr.

THE LITTLE GARDEN CLUB


OF WINCHESTER
1970-1980
What had begun in 1934 as a little club of
16 members with little gardens had gone
through 40 years of progress and change. The
members were pleased with what the club was
doing in the 1970s, although it was no longer
so little.
The members of The Little Garden Club
of Winchester continued to have a variety of
interests and talents and to work together to
accomplish objectives as a garden club. In
1970 members began working with the Winchester Council of Garden Clubs to help sponsor a local flower show each fall.
The death in 1971 of Mrs. Edward Barr
(Virginia Boyd), a charter member who had
been president twice and who had worked tirelessly in her efforts in every facet of the club,
was a great loss. The Virginia Boyd Barr
Award was established in her memory and presented annually, when merited, to a member
who had given outstanding service on behalf
of The Little Garden Club. It was first
awarded in 1973 to Mrs. J. Sloan Kuykendall
(Emily), a past president who participated in
activities throughout the state. She served as
142

The Member Clubs


1980-1990

bership also continued to change: workshops


were held where experienced arrangers taught
the less experienced. The club continued to
raise money for its projects at the annual
Christmas Auction.
The club sponsored The Garden Club of
Virginia Lily Shows in 1987 and 1988 under
the able leadership of Mrs.James Berry (Betty)
and Mrs. William Mote (Susie).
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Harry R. Kern, Jr., Mrs.James L. Berry,
Mrs. William M. Mote, Mrs. Charles L.
Burns, Jr., Mrs. Sarah]. MacLellan, and Mrs.
Phillip S. Griffin.

The highlight at the beginning of the


1980s for The Little Garden Club of Winchester was Mrs. Bell's receiving the deLacy
Gray Medal at the Annual Meeting of The
Garden Club of Virginia. She was recognized
for her total and tireless dedication to the cause
of highway beautification. Every member of
the club had been affected by her enthusiasm
and dedication in opposing highway billboards
and in the effort to have Route 7 from Wmchester to Alexandria designated the Harry
Flood Byrd Highway.
In 1982 the members were saddened by
the deaths of Rosalie Bell and Emily
Kuykendall. Both had given immeasurable
service to The Little Garden Club of Winchester and The Garden Club of Virginia.
In the early 1980s the local civic project
with the Winchester Parks and Recreation
Department was continued. Twenty-two trees
were planted at the Frederick Douglass Park.
Trees were also planted at the local high school
and at the Northwestern Workshop. Annuals
at Family Land in the City Park and bulbs at
Westminster-Canterbury were also planted.
In the late 1980s, the club's efforts and
resources were directed to two other local civic
projects. The first was a landscaping project
in the backyards of two low-income non-profit
housing corporations. The second was a much
larger landscaping project on the grounds of
Stonewall Jackson's Headquarters, a Registered Virginia and National Historic Landmark in Winchester. It is visited annually by
thousands of people and was much in need of
landscaping improvements. In 1989, The
Little Garden Club made this project an ongoing and sole civic beautification project and
divided the work into stages. Mrs. Nikolas
Parthemos (Martha), chairman of the committee, spearheaded the planning, planting, and
weeding work. Her enthusiasm, along with
her wish list, generated help from other club
members and others in the community who
donated labor and materials.
Other things were happening in The
Little Club of Winchester. The bylaws were
updated and categories changed. The mem-

1990-1995
The Little Garden Club of Wmchester
turned 60 in the 1990s. The membership included one active charter member and four
honorary charter members. Two presidents
were daughters of past presidents. Many of
the traditions and objectives which began with
the club in 1934 continued as the members
attempted to accommodate the changing
times.
The membership remained diverse. They
were of different ages, had different talents and
interests, and had different amounts of time
to give. Some had full-time jobs, and some
were retired.
Members continued many activities, instituted new ones, and eliminated some. The
Little Garden Club of Winchester and the
Winchester-Clarke Garden continued to cosponsor the tours during Historic Garden
Week. The club also co-sponsored an annual
flower-arranging demonstration and annual
flower show with the Winchester Council of
Garden Clubs. The members continued to
assist in decorating the historic Abram's Delight, Belle Grove Plantation, and Long
Branch at Christmas. The Annual Christmas
Auction continued to raise money to send two
children to Nature Camp and to finance the
club's ongoing civic project at Stonewall
Jackson's Headquarters.
New endeavors in 1990 included a
monthly newsletter so members could be better informed. Individual members continued
143

Follow the Green Arrow


to make a difference in the club and in the
community. Mrs. Philip Glaize (Dolly) was
responsible for preserving and planting many
trees in Winchester and was instrumental in
th~ e.stablishment of the local City Tree Comnuss10n.
Perhaps the most exciting new endeavor
was the Little Nature Camp, sponsored by
The Little Garden Club of Winchester and
begun by Mrs. Philip Glaize,Jr. (Mary Bruce)
in the summer of 1993. She learned about
one-week day camps at The GCV Conservation Forum and obtained guidelines on the
mechanics of running it from the Piedmont
Environmental Council. The number of children attending was limited to twenty, and two
scholarships were offered. Its purpose is: "to
help bond children with nature, arming them
with knowledge and leaving them with an understanding and love for the environment."
The Little Nature Camp, the club's newest
project, helps to define one of the primary objectives of The Little Garden Club of Winchester in the 1990s.
Club presidents in the early 1990s were
Mrs. Philip S. Griffin, Mrs. Dennis W: Wise,
and Mrs. Philip J. O'Donnell.

River and The Spotswood Garden Clubs to


speak on conservation legislation. Mrs.James
W: Wiltshire, Jr. (Grace) visited seven of The
Garden Club of Virginia clubs and presented
"Birds of Virginia Gardens," illustrated with
her slides.
In 1973, The Lynchburg Garden Club
rejoiced in the celebration of its 50th anniversary as a member of The Garden Club of Virginia. The most exciting, challenging, and
rewarding event of the anniversary year was
entertaining the 53rd Annual Meeting of The
Garden Club of Virginia. The club's anniversary gift to the Kent-Valentine House was a
pair of handsome candelabra in honor of beloved member Mrs. Powell Glass (Anne), a
Past President of The Garden Club of Virginia.
In honor of the Bicentennial, donations
of $1,000 were made to Point of Honor, to
the Lynchburg Historical Foundation, and to
the landscaping of the Robert D. Morrison
Garden at the Main Street approach to the
new Rivermont Bridge. Plans and plants
were given to the Lynchburg Training
School and Hospital for a patio garden for
wheelchair patients. To reduce the amount
of driving during the fuel shortage, the Bicentennial Historic Garden Week concentrated on old city homes in close proximity.
The club was thrilled to learn that the 197 6
Lynchburg Garden Day raised over onethird of the total receipts in the HGW District. Club members were indeed proud of
the returns on this traditional joint venture
with Hillside Garden Club.
Lynchburg landmark Point of Honor
was selected by The Garden Club of Virginia
as its restoration project for 1978 and was the
recipient of some of these garden day proceeds.
A provisional group of enthusiastic novice gardeners was organized in 197 4 and in
1978 held the state meeting of provisionals
from six clubs.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. H. D. Forsyth, Mrs.]. Edward Shank,
Mrs. James W. Wiltshire, Jr., Mrs. Karl F.
Hehl, Mrs. Robert G. Taylor, Jr., and Mrs.
Lewis B. Goode, Jr.

THE LYNCHBURG GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
Advocacy for the beautiful, beloved Peaks
of Otter began the decade for The Lynchburg
Garden Club when Appalachian Power Company proposed to run a high-voltage line
through Bedford County across the foreground of the Peaks. Mrs. J. Edward Shank
CJ acqueline) helped to found The Central Virginia Environment League, Inc., which promoted and effected legislation regarding the
State Corporation Commission. This landmark law put the first ribbon of restraint on
the sec by requiring that landowners be
heard when utility companies wished to seize
their land by the power of eminent domain.
This was the beginning of much needed legislation to protect Virginia's countryside.
Mrs. Shank traveled to The Nansemond
144

The Member Clubs


1980-1990

The club's many civic projects included a


window at the Aviary (the garden center for
the Lynchburg Council of Garden Clubs),
continued decoration of Point of Honor for
Christmas Open House and Garden Day,
sponsorship of a camper to Nature Camp, and
maintenance of the gardens at the MillerClaytor House and Point of Honor. New
projects included sponsorship of Westvaco for
The GCV Award for Meritorious Achievement in Conservation, co-sponsorship of an
inner-city park in White Rock Hill, and the
planting of Constitution Oaks at historic sites
around Lynchburg. The Lynchburg Bicentennial Project in 1986 was the landscaping
of the 501 North Gateway to the city and the
co-sponsorship of the garden at Nichols Tavern near historic Garland Hill. Funds to accomplish these projects were raised in creative
and enjoyable ways. Wildflower pictures taken
by Mrs. H. Bruce Thomson, Jr. were sold as
postcards. A plant sale and a perennial ordering service provided valuable income and introduced members to Andre Viette.
The Lynchburg Garden Club became
incorporated and established an endowment
fund that grew to over $24,000 and was used
to help finance representation at The GCV
Flower Shows, Meetings, and Judging
Schools. A trip to the Philadelphia Flower
Show was a treat to all and a boost to the coffers.
The Lynchburg Garden Club was proud
when its members, Mrs. Karl F. Hehl (Bea),
Mrs. Robert C. Wood III (Mina), and Mrs.
James A. Piggott (Toni) received The GCV
Horticulture Awards of Merit, and Mrs.Jesse
C. Crumbley III (Laura) won the Tri-color
Award at The GCV Rose Show in 1988.
Proceeds from Historic Garden Week,
co-sponsored by The Lynchburg Garden
Club and Hillside Garden Club, increased
from $8,400 in 1981 to $16,000 in 1989.
"Daffodil Lady," Mrs. Hehl, and
orientalist and landscape designer, Mrs.
Leggett, were members of The GCV Speakers' Bureau. It was indeed an honor to have
Mrs. Leggett a Director-at-Large from 1982
to 1985, Corresponding Secretary from 1986
to 1988, and Second Vice President from 1988

The "greening of Lynchburg" was the


main focus of activity of The Garden Club of
Lynchburg in the 1980s. Operation Plant-ATree (OPAT) turned trash into cash by recycling newspaper, aluminum, and glass at four
collection sites across town. Thus, valuable
landfill space was saved, and the city was reforested by the sale of the recycled items. Organized and ably led by Mrs. H. Gordon
Leggett, Jr. (Pat), Mrs. Frank G. Davidson,
Jr. (Cissy), Mrs.John H. Mandot (Hazel), and
Mrs. Powell M. Glass, Jr. Goan), club members worked at the sites on a monthly basis, at
first alone, and later with the aid of many community groups. Enthusiastic citizen involvement occurred city-wide as a result of comprehensive promotion in all media as well as
in educational anti-litter, recycling, and conservation programs in schools.
From its inception until it was taken over
by the Lynchburg Beautification Commission,
OPAT saved 13 million pounds of recycled
items from the landfill and earned more than
$100,000 which was donated to the city to
plant well over 3000 trees. Peripheral benefits included the establishment of a city forestry advisory board, appointment of a city
horticulturist, completion of the master street
tree plan, observance of Arbor Day, and designation of Lynchburg as a Tree City, USA,
one of five in the state.
The most cherished awards were those
from The Garden Club of Virginia. OPAT
was named a three-time finalist in The GCV
Common Wealth Awards in 1981, 1982, and
198 7. Mrs. Davidson was proud to be a
speaker about OPAT at the Conservation Forum in Charlottesville in 1987 and to answer
requests for advice from other member clubs
of The GCV and administrators of other cit1es.
Early in the 1980s, the club was saddened
by the deaths of Mrs. Glass and Miss
Katherine Ann Mundy. A silver tray was given
to the Kent-Valentine House in memory of
Miss Mundy, and a donation was made to the
Presidents of The Garden Club of Virginia
Fund in memory of Mrs. Glass.
145

Follow the Green Arrow

GCV President Mrs. Henley L. Guild with Mrs. George A . Hurt, Mrs. Parham R. Fox, and Mrs.
Clunet H. Pettyjohn, Jr., October 1990.

successful and the longest sustained recycling


program in the state of Virginia. In addition,
it is the most successful volunteer urban reforestation program and has made a tremendous contribution to the quality of life in
Lynchburg."
Very creative and talented flower arrangers came home with ribbons of all colors in
Inter-Club competition. Very able and dedicated members represented the club on The
GCV Board of Directors. Mrs. Leggett served
as First Vice President (1992-1994) and was
elected President in 1994. Mrs. Wood was
elected Second Vice President for a two-year
term (1990-1992) and Parliamentarian and
Editor of the Register (1992-1994).
The Lynchburg Garden Club invited The
Garden Club of Virginia to Lynchburg for
The GCV Annual Meeting in 1992. S. Allen
Chambers,Jr., architectural historian, Barbara
Hill, President of Sweet Briar College, and
Linda Lorimer, President of Randolph-Macon Woman's College, were featured speakers. Dinners were held at Pharsalia, home of
Mrs. George E. Flippen, Jr. (Perkins) and at
Boonsboro Country Club. The GCV Board
luncheon was held at Shan Shui, home of Mrs.
Leggett, and the luncheons the next day were

to 1990 of The Garden Club of Virginia, and


to have Mrs. Wood serve as The GCV Corresponding Secretary from 1988 to 1990.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. L. B. Goode, Jr., Mrs. H. G. Leggett,
Jr., Mrs. R. C. Wood ill, Mrs. A. S. Kemper
III, Mrs. Eric]. Sorenson, and Mrs. F. B.
Teague, Jr.
1990-1995
The Lynchburg Garden Club received
The GCV Massie Medal in 1947 for its beautiful creation and permanent maintenance of
the garden at the Miller-Claytor House for
educational benefit to the community. Now
the club found the garden had outgrown its
bounds. Mrs. George A. Hurt (Cinda), president, identified "spontaneity" with approving
the project, when she said at the May 1990
meeting, "Spontaneity, when it comes along,
grab it with gusto!" A plant sale fund raiser
was approved and by late September had raised
$1500 to finance the restoration of the garden.
In September 1990, John P. Stevens,
Lynchburg Public Services Administrator,
wrote, "Operation Plant-A-Tree is the most
146

The Member Clubs

in six homes on Oakwood Place.


The club received The Keep America
Beautiful National Recycling Award for its
Plant-A-Tree project which had just been
turned over to the Lynchburg Beautification
Commission. A silver cup is displayed at the
City Hall. The club co-sponsored with the
Lynchburg Rotary Club a courtyard garden
at the Good Samaritan Inn, a lodge for homeless men undergoing substance abuse rehabilitation and actively in search of employment.
Some of the club's learned and talented members presented a series of three lectures and
workshops for the novice gardener.
Plans are underway for the establishment
of a mini-garden in an inner-city neighborhood near Point of Honor. The club sponsored the luncheon meeting and public forum
with Ed McMahon, Director of American
Greenways Program, in Lynchburg. Mr.
McMahon contended that "conservation and
economic development can coexist and are
necessary to one another. Progress does not
have to be ugly or destroy the unique character of a city."
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. F. B. Teague, Jr., Mrs. George A.
Hurt, Mr. C. H. Pettyjohn, Jr., and Mrs. Peter 0. Ward, Jr.

Garden Week.
Always interested in city beautification,
the club landscaped the entrance to the new
hospital, contributed to the landscaping of the
Henry County Courthouse, and planted
Bradford pear trees and white pines at the
entrance to a new residential area.
When the Kent-Valentine House became
The Garden Club of Virginia Headquarters,
one of our members donated a 200-year-old
dining room table. The logo square for the
needlepoint rug was done by Mrs. Bob P.
White (Charlene) from a daffodil drawing by
the late Buck Carter. Proceeds from a lecture
by Mrs. Ed Boehm on "Boehm Birds" were
contributed to the Kent-Valentine Endowment Fund of The GCV:
In 1979, the club began what was to become its most ambitious project: the landscaping of the grounds and parking lot of the Blue
Ridge Regional Library. This project was accomplished by a plant sale, memorial gifts
from individuals and organizations, and plants
from members' gardens. We were pleased to
have the members of our Auxiliary unite with
us to make one club.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. James B. Montgomery, Mrs. Francis B.
Teague, Mrs. E. A. Sale, Mrs. Kathryn Clark
Bassett, Mrs. Bate C. Toms, Jr., Mrs. A. E.
Wilson, and Mrs.James B. Montgomery.

TIIE MARTINSVILLE GARDEN CLUB

1980-1990
1970-1980
The Martinsville Garden Club had waited
62 years to have one of its members as President of The Garden Club of Virginia, so we
were very proud when Mrs. James B. Montgomery, First Vice President (1980-1982), was
elected The GCV President in May 1982.
We continued our participation in city
beautification by planting dogwood trees at
an elementary school and Constitution Oaks
at the local high school, contributing to
plantings in the gardens at Stoneleigh, and
landscaping an area around a "Welcome to
Virginia" sign at the North Carolina Border.
Our library project became even more
challenging in 1984 when the building was
enlarged. The committee members saved

The Martinsville Garden Club started this


decade by entertaining The Garden Club of
Virginia Board of Governors in October. We
were proud to number among our members
Mrs. Bate C. Toms,Jr. (Margie), Director-atLarge (1969-1972) and Recording Secretary
(1974-1976), and Mrs. James B. Montgomery (Dot), Corresponding Secretary (19761978) and Second Vice President (1978-1980)
of The Garden Club of Virginia.
Whenever possible, homes and gardens
were opened for Historic Garden Week, and
if not, the club sponsored lectures by such
notables as English flower arranger Sheila
Macqueen, with proceeds going to Historic
147

Follow the Green Arrow


proceeds going to this project.
The club was again honored by one of its
members when Mrs. J. Robert Walker was
awarded the Massie Medal in May 1990 for a
lifetime of outstanding accomplishments in
gardening, horticulture, and flower exhibiting.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. J. William} ones III, Mrs. David C.
Jones, and Mrs. William L. Pannill.

plants, boxwood, and trees from the bulldozer


as construction began. One of the trees saved
was a magnificent Soulangeana magnolia,
which inspired the architect to design a large
semi-circular window to make the tree the
focal point of the building. In addition to the
original plantings, a new perennial garden was
added. The club continued to plant, fertilize,
weed, water, and pray over our garden and
plantings.
By 1984, a club member, Mrs. J. Robert
Walker (Edith), had distinguished herself by
having won the Harris Cup eight times, The
Beirne Bowl three times, the Bloomer Award
four times, and the Goodwin Bowl twice.
The club sponsored the annual Daffodil
Show ofThe Garden Club ofVrrginia in 19861987 at Patrick Henry Community College.
A member designed and made lovely aprons,
painted with daffodils, for all workers to wear.
The club had several workshops for arranging and sponsored a flower show for club
members. Whenever a candidate could be
found, the club sponsored a child to Nature
Camp, as had been done for years.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. John J. Austin, Mrs. William F. Stone,
Jr., Mrs. Charles C. Bassett, Mrs. Peter L.
Perry, Mrs. Franz W. Smith, and Mrs. Dwight
W. Pemberton.

MILL MOUNTAIN GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980

If Mill Mountain Garden Club needed


one word for its decade (1970-1980), it might
be "gangbusters."
Inspired by Bob Lynn's gift of 400 dogwood trees, the club embarked on a moneyraising flower arranging demonstration by
Sheila Macqueen. She showed that one need
not limit oneself to flowers but could also add
some type of tree branches and a few weeds.
Next came the choice of a plot for the
club's Mill Mountain Wildflower Garden, a
long-range plan culminating in its dedication
in 1979. Interveningyearswerenotuneventful. Backbreaking weed-ins and dig-ins, newspapers, autumn leaves, grass clippings, and
perseverance were the name of the game.
Meanwhile, the club undertook more
money-raising projects: "A Night on the
Mountain" and "A Phantom Ball" were followed by awards that made members stand
taller: horticulture achievement, The GCA
Medal (Amy Angell Collier Montague) to Mr.
and Mrs. Benjamin Parrott, and an all-time
excitement with the GCA Founders Fund
Award. To greet the delegates with loud cheers
on their proud return from The GCAMeeting, a dozen or so club members, clad in jeans
and sweat shirts, wielding rakes, hoes, shovels
and trowels, arrived at the Roanoke Airport.
A brief disruption for the Roanoke Airport, a
memorable evening for MMGC.
Mrs. N. W. Bullington, Jr. (Mary Wise)
served as The Garden Club of Virginia Chairman of the Admissions Committee (1970-

1990-1995
The Martinsville Garden Club was
pleased to have its ongoing project of landscaping the grounds at the Blue Ridge Regional Library chosen as a finalist for the Common Wealth Award.
In continuing its support oflocal beautification of Martinsville, the club donated to
the landscaping of the Adult Day Care Center, the garden at the local SPCA, and the
grounds at Walker Fine Arts Center at Patrick
Henry Community College.
A committee from the local Chamber of
Commerce formed a group, known as Gateway Streetscape Foundation, Inc., to beautify
certain areas of our city and county. In support of this project, the club sponsored a "kickoff" fund raiser, a Western Barbeque, with the
148

The Member Clubs

1972) and a Director-at-Large (1973-1976).


Mrs. E. Griffith Dodson, Jr. (Molly) was The
GCV Chairman of Admissions (197 6-1978).
No chance for boredom. Next, members
were hostesses for The GCV Board of Governors' Meeting in 1974andlaterfound themselves challenged by The GCV two-year
(1977-1978) Daffodil Show. In spare moments
two squares were completed for the Kent-Valentine needlepoint rug.
Continuing in this busy decade was the
club's constant effort toward conservation and
recycling. Urged to bring aluminum cans and
newspapers to the waiting pick-up truck,
members were encouraged to "drink more,
read less."
Finally, The Mill Mountain Garden Club
celebrated its "Fifty Bloomin' Years" (19271977) with a beautiful cocktail buffet. Club

president, Mrs. Peyton B. Winfree,Jr. (Betty),


summed up the club's history in verse, presenting each past president with a "gold" pendant which read "For Valor."
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Beirne Carter, Mrs. B. Purnell Eggleston,
Mrs. E. Griffith Dodson, Jr., and Mrs. Peyton
B. Winfree,Jr.
1980-1990
Nothing could have made the members
more proud than having their Betty Byrne
Chaney(Mrs.JohnM. Chaney; Mrs. Hudnall
Ware III) receive The GCV deLacy Gray
Medal in 1983 for being a leader dedicated to
the causes of beautification and conservation.
Then The MMGC received The GCV Com149

Follow the Grero Arrow


mon Wealth Award in 1988 for its Mill Mountain Wildflower Garden. Fame spread far and
wide; visitors came from The Garden Club of
Dallas, the College of William and Mary
Board, and many school groups. If you were
"with it," you planned your wedding in the
Wildflower Garden.
The club continued its Beginners' Course
for young homeowners.
Historic Garden Week, a yearly project
in conjunction with Roanoke Valley Garden
Club, had two of the houses which were open
appear in The New York Times piece on Historic Garden Week in Virginia.
More and more members were gathering
up their courage to enter The GCV Flower
Shows and brought home rave reviews of the
Shows, a few ribbons, and even one Tri-Color
Best-in-Show, with high hopes for more in the
1990s.
MMGC is a wide-awake, gung-ho, group
of energetic women, proud to be a part of The
Garden Club of Virginia.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Frank A. Boxley, Mrs.John M. Chaney
(Mrs. H. Hudnall Ware III), Mrs. William G.
Sandy, Mrs.John]. Butler, and Mrs. Stanley
Breakell.

Garden have gone to the Smithsonian Institution, and slides of the Phillips Garden are
scheduled to go.
Finding that the Roanoke Country Club
continued the use of styrofoam cups, the club
invited it to stop-and it did!
Lastly, in the interest of water conservation the following jingle surfaces:
"Th' agenda for today is water:
Not what we do, but what we oughta.
Turn off water, while you're brushing,
Then economize on flushing.
See that you take speedy showers,
Save the water for your flowers.
We have the best deal in the nation
And have for many a generation.
Can you think of anything
More magic than our Crystal Spring?
For more years than we can count
Not one soul knows the amount;
It's gurgled up just like a fountain
Beneath our own beloved Mill Mountain."
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. E. Collins Brown, Mrs. Clifton A.
Woodrum III, and Mrs. W Ware Smith, Jr.

1990-1995
The decade of the 1990s has been a time
to crow about flower shows. First off, the club
began an annual "in club Daffodil Show" with
a cup for "Best in Show" to be rotated.
Spurred along by this, four members produced
different Tri-Color winners in The GCV
Daffodil Show for arrangement and one for
horticulture! Mrs. Thomas B. Mason (Emily
Ann) won the Jacqueline Byrd Memorial Trophy for the best miniature bloom in The GCV
Daffodil Show in 1990. Mrs. Frank T Ellett
(Lucy) served as Chairman of The GCV Conservation and Beautification Committee
(1990-1992).
Led by Bill Hundley of the Science Museum, nature walks to Falls Ridge, Roaring
Run, and Bottom Gorge have been informative and fun.
Slides of The Mill Mountain Wildflower

THE NANSEMOND
RIVER GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
In the 1970s, TheNansemondRiverGarden Club began landscaping Suffolk's parking
lots as a memorial to its members. The club
worked with city officials to help preserve invaluable old trees and sponsored a poster contest on pollution throughout the city schools.
One member donated 800 bulbs for the 1st
graders at John Randolph School to plant on
the school grounds.
The Nansemond River Garden Club also
began its long involvement with Riddick's
Folly and joined the community effort to re150

The Member Clubs

store the ante-bellum mansion as a cultural


center.
One of the club's smart moves was sponsoring The Elizabeth River Garden Club for
membership in The Garden Club ofVirginia.
The clubs have enjoyed joint projects and have
worked together on three Historic Garden
Week tours.
When The GCVacquired the Kent-Valentine House, The NRGC made its first contribution and designed a club logo which Mrs.
E. Everett Bagnell (Nita) used for the needlepoint square for the rug.
In 1971, the club suffered a setback during the Historic Garden Week tour. King,
favorite driver for three of the members who
no longer drove, got a little rattled while delivering them to their assignment at the home
of Mrs. Myra Pittman Dodd. Instead of dropping them off in the driveway, he drove them
right through Mrs. Dodd's garage door. That
year the profits went toward the restoration
of the Dodds' garage.
The club bounced right back the next year
with the opening of Bacon's Castle. For the
first time in history, the ghost of Bacon's Castle
went public. There were more than 5,000 visitors! Several sighted the ghost in the attic as
did the hostess. This was the club's all-time
money maker, $7,000. Naturally, the club
opened it again the next year. Only loyalty to
The GCV kept those assigned to the basement
(spell that dungeon) at their posts. They
nearly froze, but their blood ran colder when,
soon after, it was discovered that the beams
supporting the first floor were totally riddled
by termites. Only habit held up the floor.
When not flirting with disaster, the members had lots of fun. The club invited 160 area
garden club members to lunch. Everyone remembers Mrs. Thomas J. O'Connor (Alice)
greeting guests at the door wearing a Mr. Peanut costume.
In 1978, The Nansemond River Garden
Club was 50 years old. "Down Memory Lane"
was the theme that year. The golden anniversary celebration included a reception honoring NRGC past presidents, wonderful skits,
and a lecture-demonstration by Libby Hodges
Oliver, supervisor of the Flower Section for

Colonial Williamsburg. Later, Mrs. Oliver


became a valuable member of The NRGC.
At a Norfolk Garden Club Show at the
Chrysler Museum, the club's then newest
member, Mrs. Eley R. Duke. Jr. (Lydia) won
Best-in-Show. Mrs. R. Curtis Saunders, Jr.
(Martha Godwin) won the Tri-Color for her
arrangement at The GCV Daffodil Show in
1970. A super ten years.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. M. Anderson Maxey, Mrs. Jam es C.
Godwin, Mrs. William M. Birdsong, Mrs.
James L. McLemore, Jr., Mrs. Marshall
Andrews, and Mrs. Thomas J. O'Connor.
1980-1990
The Nansemond River Garden Club
jumped into the 1980s by sponsoring The
GCV Daffodil Show in 1981 . The theme was
"Reflections on the Nansemond River." The
center of Nansemond-Suffolk Academy's
cafetorium was transformed into a marsh scene
surrounded by daffodils, a breathtaking sight.
After all the planning and perspiration, Mrs.
James L. McLemore Gane) received the TriColor for her arrangement.
The club accomplished a lot in the 80s.
It was one of the first of The GCV clubs to
start its own ecology camp. This was instigated by Mrs.James C. Godwin (Ellen) and is
still one of the club's most successful projects.
The club planned the landscaping of the Tidewater Occupational Center. The community
service project of entertaining the patients at
Hillcrest Retirement Home every month was
one of the best.
NRGC was a good friend of the Suffolk
Historical Society, always helping during the
Christmas Candlelight Tour. Support of
Riddick's Folly continued with a strong commitment of time, talent, and money to improve
the landscaping.
Back to Bacon's Castle, NRGC entertained one hundred dignitaries and guests at a
luncheon there when the restored gardens
were presented by The GCV to the APVA in
1989. This was an especially proud moment
for The NRGC because "Our Judith" (Mrs.
F. Whitney Godwin) was one of the driving
151

Follow the Green Arrow

tiful as The Nansemond River Garden Club's


plantings were put in place.
Getting back to the very basics of flower
arranging, the club decided to make its own
containers. The members spent an uproarious afternoon up to the elbows in clay while
"throwing pots." There was great anticipation as creations were sent off to be fired. Mrs.
Dixon M. Rollins (Carleen), club president
then, announced that she had at last achieved
a "first," being quite sure that she was the first
woman to preside over a garden club meeting
wearing an apron.
And now, the club's small army and many
generals are poised and ready for action as The
GCV Rose Show approaches. In The Garden
Club of Virginia, there is never a dull moment.
Club presidents during 1990-1995 were
Mrs. Burwell R. Winslow, Mrs. Dixon M.
Rollins, and Mrs. David]. Frohman.
The Nansnnond River Garden Club's two Mrs.
Godwins: Mrs. F. Whitney Godwin and Mrs.
James C. Godwin.

THE GARDEN CLUB OF NORFOLK

forces in this splendid accomplishment. She


was among the first to see the opportunity to
obtain Bacon's Castle, and she put much effort into that goal. Everyone has a favorite
''Judith Story." This, perhaps, is the important one.
The club contributed two Presidents to
The Garden Club ofVirginia:Judith Godwin
in 1956-1958, and Ellen Godwin in 19861988. During the Bicentennial, the unforgettable Judith was Suffolk's Martha Washington. Ellen, the latest "top blossom," was probably the only woman to have made a
Treasurer's report funny. We knew then she
was destined for greatness.
A history of NRGC's first 55 years was
compiled by Mrs. Paul Everett Oudy Taylor).
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. John P. Harlow, Jr., Mrs. Austin T.
Darden, Jr., Mrs. Cecil B. Birdsong, Mrs.
Lawrence N. Smith, Mrs. Burwell R. Wmslow,
and Mrs.John C. Harrell.

1970-1980
At the suggestion of the Norfolk Bicentennial Commission, a Garden Club of Norfolk member, Mrs. Thomas H. Willcox, Jr.
(Betty) designed a scarf incorporating a garden club and Bicentennial theme. The design, a flag of flowers executed in red, blue,
and white on green, was produced by Frankie
Welch. Profits exceeded $2,000 and supported
a project of foundation planning for the Arts
and Letters Building at Old Dominion University.
An herb and perennial garden, edged with
brick, was begun at the historic Willoughby
Baylor House. The club gave ten scholarships
to the Tidewater Rehabilitation Institute for
a therapeutic playground. Mrs. Mayor F.
Fogler (Ann) received the deLacy Gray Award
in 1974 for her conservation efforts. She was
described as a "dirt grubbing gardener." The
club began its year in 197 6 with a luncheon in
honor of Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr. (Hunter),
newly installed President ofThe Garden Club
of Virginia.
Mrs.John E. Clarkson (Kirk) spearheaded

1990-1995
Riddick's Folly became ever more beau152

The Member Clubs


the passionate fight to save Norfolk from the
oil refinery and was the first president of
CARE (Citizens Against Refinery Effects).
For her successful six year battle, she received
the deLacy Gray Award in 1979 for "service
in dissemination of knowledge of the natural
resources of our river and urging wise development of these resources."
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. James D. Finley II, Mrs. Wendall L.
Winn, Mrs. Wendall L. Winn, pro tern, Mrs.
William B. Copeland, Mrs. Paul S. Huber,Jr.,
and Mrs. Levi Old, Jr.

This project was a finalist for The GCV Common Wealth Award.
The first annual Tidewater Horticultural
Symposium was co-sponsored with the Virginia Beach Garden Club in 1989. The focus
of this day was to educate the public on gardening in our unique climate.
Seven club members opened their gardens
for the benefit of a scholarship fund for the
Norfolk Botanical Gardens. This event is
called "Gardeners in Their Gardens" and is
held annually on Mothers' Day.
Members serving as club presidents during the 1980s were Mrs. Nathan H. Bundy,
Jr., Mrs. Willcox Ruffin, Jr., Mrs. Frank Nash
Bilisoly III, Mrs. Jerome E. Adamson, and
Mrs.John Twohy Iv.

1980-1990
During this period, the club was active in
multiple projects. Landscaping was completed
on a small children's garden at Children's
Hospital of The King's Daughters. Some of
the funds were raised by a gourmet dinner for
12, catered by club members. The club gave
$5,000 to the Bird and Wildlife preserve at
Weyanoke Sanctuary, a unique inner city oasis for the protection of living things. The
club restored the Hermitage Museum garden,
and members have maintained it. This project
was a GCV Common Wealth Award runnerup. The Chrysler Museum memorial garden
was restored by The GCN. Members were
asked to "green the garden," and there were
direct contributions of $10,000.
The GCV Rose Show was held at the
Norfolk Botanical Gardens in 1984.
In 1986, The Garden Club of Virginia
received the Garden Club of America Medal
for Historic Preservation which is awarded for
outstanding work in the field of preservation
and restoration of historic gardens or buildings of national importance. The Garden
Club of Norfolk proposed The GCV for this
award, and it was seconded by The Virginia
Beach Garden Club.
In 1988, the club undertook the project
of the greening of Olde Huntersville, an inner city neighborhood. This moderate- income section of the city had deteriorated since
it was built in the twenties. Through the efforts of a few club members, four vacant lots
were fenced and planted with donated plants.

1990-1995
The annual Christmas Greenery Sale was
an excellent moneymaker for the club. Since
1990, each member has been responsible for
one balsam or boxwood wreath. Bows, boxwood trees, roping, table arrangements made
by members, and fresh cut greens from members' gardens were sold with a profit of approximately $5,000. Many orders are placed
before the sale, and the remaining items are
offered to the public.
In 1992, a gala cocktail party was given
by the club in a member's home for members
and husbands as a fall kickoff. Charging
$25.00 a couple and donating the food, the
club cleared $1,400 and had a good time doing it.
Seven of our senior members were honored by the club president to commemorate
the 75th anniversary of The Garden Club of
Norfolk in 1992. Reaching a milestone of this
magnitude brings a time of reflection. One
founder, Elizabeth Grandy, had said at the
25th anniversary, "The advantage a corporate
body enjoys over a biological one, is that of
not deteriorating with age, for it is evident
vigor, vitality, and enjoyment of life seem as
firmly entrenched in the club as ever they
were." This certainly speaks for The GCN.
An open conservation meeting was sponsored by the club in 1993. Mr. Edward
153

Follow the Green Arrow


With her guidance and the help of Mrs.]. H.
Cunningham (Mary), The Rappahannock
Valley Garden Club, and The Garden Club
of Gloucester, the club's first GCV Flower
Show was successful. These shows were held
at the Rappahannock Community College in
Warsaw, the county seat of Richmond County.
The club put on an Historic Garden Week
tour for The GCV before it became an official member, which was a very helpful experience. The people in the Northern Neck, in
turn, have been thrilled with the restoration
of gardens at Stratford Hall and Historic
Christ Church. The club began to spread its
wings in horticulture. Lily, Daffodil, and Rose
Test Gardens were established. Mrs. Wat T.
Griffith (Nancy), Mrs.John Garland Pollard,
Jr. (Peggy), and Mrs. James N. Carter (Pat)
were awarded Horticulture Awards of Merit.
Mrs. Pollard designed a club seal, and Mrs.
Griffith executed a needlepoint square to be
added to the famous rug at the Kent-Valentine House. Mrs. Smith served as GCV Chairman of Admissions (1972-1974) and Director
of Public Relations (1974-1976).
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Benjamin B. Morris, Mrs. T. Dabney
Wellford, Mrs. Dixon L. Foster, Mrs. John
Garland Pollard, Jr., and Mrs. E. A.
deBordenave.

McMahon, Director of the American


Greenway Program at the Conservation Fund,
spoke on "Saving Virginia's Sense of Place."
A guote from the 40th anniversary was a
poem composed by Betty Dabney.
"Forty years in sun and shower
We've sowed the seed and watered
the shoot,
Pruned the boughs to enhance the
flowers,
Rejoiced in foliage, blossom and fruit;
And now we pause, as artists should,
Look at our work and find it good!"
And so it is today with The Garden Club
of Norfolk, resting a moment and then looking forward to new challenges.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs.James A. Bacon, Mrs. Carter B. S.
Furr, and Mrs. Corydon M. Baylor, Jr.

THE GARDEN CLUB OF


THE NORTHERN NECK
1970-1980

In 1970, The Garden Club of the Northern Neck became the youngest member of
The Garden Club of Virginia, the 44th club
to be asked to join. It was a challenge for 40
ladies from four counties encompassing 75
miles of the Northern Neck. The club had
been established four years previously under
the able leadership of our first president, Mrs.
H. Marston Smith (Kitty; Mrs. Katherine
McL. Smith), and the second, Mrs. Albert P.
Zuger (Bertie).
The club was assisted and encouraged by
The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club, its
sponsor. Mrs. Lucius ] . Kellam (Dot), The
GCVPresident, and Mrs. RobertL. Hopkins,
Jr. (Lula), Admissions Chairman, gave the club
the needed assurance for success.
As a member club of The GCV, the club
immediately started planning for the 197 5 and
197 6 Daffodil Shows. Mrs. Robert Wheat III
(Margaret), a recognized GCV Daffodil expert, became an associate member of the club.

1980-1990
During this decade the club planted wildflowers on nature trails at Stratford Hall and
George Washington's Birthplace and sponsored a child to Nature Camp each year. The
club decided to give Beautification Awards to
local businesses and citizens every two years
in each county. The club sponsored Project
Wild with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Local teachers were treated
to a stimulating day of studying conservation
with the hope that their enlightened attitude
would be carried into the classroom.
The club compiled a slide history of the
Northern Neck entitled "The Secret and the
Promise." Its initial showing was to The GCV
at the Tides Inn in Irvington, when the club
sponsored the Annual Meeting in 1983. To
154

The Member Clubs

raise money for this Meeting, Mrs.John Garland Pollard, Jr. and Mrs. Albert C. Pollard
(Mary Louisa) published The Northern Neck
Entertains, a hostess book, which had a brief
history of the Northern Neck and featured
houses opened for Historic Garden Week.
The GCNN and others still reminisce about
that Annual Meeting where the after-dinner
entertainer enjoyed far-too-much libation to
perform. The next morning Mrs. James
Carter filled in with a song and dance program about The GCNN because our speaker
had to cancel at the last minute.
In 1986, the club's Inter-Club artistic arrangement won the Tri-Blue. The practice
of appointing teams to do Inter-Club arrangements was initiated, and many clubs have followed this idea with success. During this period the club was awarded a cash prize as a
runner-up for a Common Wealth Award
project of landscaping around the Chinn
House on the campus of the Rappahannock
Community College in Warsaw.
Historic Garden Week in Irvington in
1989 was the largest in the club's history. An
informal orientation of new members was begun with the aid of a handbook compiled by
Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. (Helen) which
explained club traditions and practices.
During the 1980s Mrs. Murphy was The
GCV's Historian and Custodian of Records
(1982-1984), Parliamentarian and Editor of
the Register (1984-1986), Second Vice
Presicent (1986-1988), and Recording Secretary (1988-1990).
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr., Mrs. Richard A.
Farmar, Jr., Mrs. Lloyd T. Griffith, Mrs.
Herbert W. Carden, and Mrs. James R.
Hundley.

GCV President Mrs. Henley L. Guild and Mrs.


David Lay at the 1991 Rose Show.

awarded Queen of the Show in 1992. The


club again won the Tri-Blue for our Inter-Club
arrangement at The GCV Daffodil Show in
Roanoke. For the second time the club was
runner-up in the Common Wealth Award
competition with the nomination of a White
Garden planted at Rappahannock
Westminster-Canterbury. The prize money
was spent on a butterfly garden there.
In 1992, the club was awarded the Massie
Medal at The GCV Annual Meeting in
Lynchburg. Mrs. Hopkins presented the
award to Mrs. Jackson Simmons (Frances),
club president, Mrs. Benjamin Ogle Tayloe
(Frances), vice president, and Mrs. W. Tayloe
Murphy, Jr., The GCV First Vice President.
At the end of the meeting, Mrs. Murphy was
installed as the new President of The Garden
Club of Virginia. Mrs. Hundley was awarded
a Horticulture Award of Merit.

1990-1995
This decade began with The GCV Rose
Show 1991-1992. Co-chairmen, Mrs. Lloyd
T. Griffith (Mary Chester) and Mrs. Herbert
W. Carden (Betty), did a superb job of directing the show at Rappahannock WestminsterCanterbury. A prize horticulture specimen of
Mrs. James R. Hundley (Charlotte) was
155

Follow the Green Arrow


Three beautiful exhibits at the Fine Arts
and Flowers Show at the Virginia Museum of
Fine Arts in 1993 were created by Mrs. Douglas E. Winters (Suzi), Mrs. Thomas C.
Slaughter III (Marguerite), and Mrs. Phillip
Arnest (Scottie). That same year, Mrs. William H. Edwards Gean Marie) led the club in
preparing the Christmas decorations for
Stratford Hall Plantation. The club also
started its monthly newsletter entitled "Hot
Garden Flashes" with announcements, plant
news, and club recipes.
In 1994, with the advice and leadership
of Mrs. Murphy, the club agreed to sponsor a
new club called The Garden Club of the
Middle Peninsula which includes members
from Essex, King and Queen, King William
and Middlesex counties. The spring Historic
Garden Week Tour in Sharps surpassed our
past record. The club won the award for the
best Rose Test Collection in both 1993 and
1994.
During these 25 years all the members
have joined together to make the club both
fun and productive while developing friendships. Members have kept their ~enses of humor, goals ofleadership, and adherence to the
ideals of The Garden Club of Virginia. The
club looks forward to a continuation of this
spirit.
Club presidents in the early 1990s were
Mrs. C. Jackson Simmons, Mrs. Benjamin
Ogle Tayloe, and Mrs. David Lay.

ervation and purchasing of Petersburg landmarks which were in danger of being destroyed. The club also assisted in the planting of trees on the median strips of new highways within the city.
Mrs. Robert W. Harwell (Doris) designed
a seal for the club which has been used on the
cover of the club's yearbooks. She also used
this design to make the needlepoint square for
the rug at the Kent-Valentine House.
In May 197 5, the club celebrated its 50th
anniversary. Mrs. John C. Anderson Gulia),
historian, read a paper on club activities, accounts of which were gleaned from interesting old scrapbooks. All enjoyed reminiscing
and found it a delightful and nostalgic event.
However, the members had no time to
rest on their laurels. In 1977, we sponsored
The GCV Board of Governors' Meeting, and
there was plenty of planning and work to be
done by all. This occasion was a great honor
for the club, and the meeting days were a
happy pleasure for all the members.
The decade ended with the joyous news
that Centre Hill Mansion had been chosen as
one of the two sites to be landscaped by The
Garden Club of Virginia. This fine Federal
mansion, built about 1820, is an important
landmark whose beauty was enhanced by the
new landscaping.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. R. Bolling Cameron, Mrs. Robert
Zeugner, Mrs. Lewis M. Walker, Jr., Mrs.
Eugene R. Marable, Jr., and Mrs. Philip R.
Roper, Jr.

THE PETERSBURG GARDEN CLUB


1980-1990
1970-1980
The Petersburg Garden Club began this
decade on the same exciting note on which it
ended the last. April 10, 1980, marked the
presentation of the landscape setting at Centre Hill Mansion. The members as a club,
and as residents of the city, were most grateful to The GCV for this restoration project.
A rotation system of all members was set up
to help maintain the planting and keep litter
picked up. The club was proud that the
grounds were kept in beautiful condition.
Recycling became a popular theme in the

The Petersburg Garden Club maintained


its keen interest in horticulture as was evident
by the large number of test collections of roses,
lilies, and daffodils purchased by members.
Numerous ribbons were won in many shows.
Following the renovation of the courthouse and the building of the new complex,
the city took over the landscaping and maintenance of this area. The club's project there
ended, and a donation was made to the Historic Petersburg Foundation to help with pres156

The Member Clubs


1980s. The Petersburg Garden Club was one
of the first groups in the city to promote this
cause. The conservation chairman, Mrs.
Thomes P. Kidd,Jr. Gudy) exhorted the members month after month to "reduce, re-use,
and recycle." Her porch was used as a depository for the recyclable items until the city
established a collection station. Those bins
were welcomed with open arms. Concern for
the environment was further displayed by the
club's joining the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
A donation is sent every other year to honor
the outgoing president.
Two new events during this decade gave
members the opportunity to show off their
flower arranging skills. First was the Battersea
Ball, a marvelous event held each September
to raise money for the restoration of the fine
18th-century house, Battersea. Each year
some members helped with decorations, and
a monetary contribution was made from the
club.
The Fine Arts and Flowers Show at the
Virginia Museum provided a great opportunity for the many talented ladies to show off
their interpretive skills. The club provided
hostesses as well as arrangements for this exciting show in Richmond.
The club continued two traditions enjoyed by the members. Every other fall the
Petersburg, Ashland, and Brunswick Garden
clubs meet at the Kent-Valentine House. Each
time we were fortunate to have as our speaker
the President of The Garden Club ofVirginia.
Her presence and the warm friendship shared
by these clubs make this a special time for all.
Each year when winter's bleak weather has
members feeling rather blue, we come to our
January meeting with bright plants to be taken
to patients in the local hospital. The cheery
blooms, coupled with a sense of doing for others, sends everyone off with a smile.
The treasured Lee Park Herbarium volumes were refurbished and repaired where
needed, and the collection was on loan at Richard Bland Library.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Lewis M . Walker III, Mrs. John D.
Haire, Jr., Mrs. Victor Parks III, Mrs. John
W Lynn, and Mrs. Oliver A. Pollard, Jr.

1990- 1995
The Petersburg Garden Club began this
decade by celebrating its 65 th anniversary with
a lovely Christmas tea held in the home of Mrs.
W Roy Smith (Virginia Lee). Many honorary members attended as well as some of the
local press who followed with an article about
the Petersburg Garden Club and a photograph
of some of our "more senior" members.
Mrs. Walter E. Morgan III (Dahne) has
been chairman of the Springtime fund raising
event for the past three years. "Splashes of
Spring" has been a huge success and is looked
forward to by both club members and friends
who have attended. The program which began with a speaker of state-wide renown was
followed by a fashion show with some of the
lovely members serving as models. Luncheon
concluded the event with all eagerly anticipating next year's "Splashes."
In 1991, the Herbarium Committee was
formed to look into the restoration and preservation of this treasure belonging to the club.
The collection originated in 1935 with club
member Mrs. Donald Claiborne Holden supervising the gathering of specimen plants
from the Lee Park area by WP.A. workers.
Bessie Niemeyer Marshall was then commissioned by The Petersburg Garden Club toillustrate the collection. The eleven volumes
included more than 200 specimens and corresponding watercolors. In 1948, the Petersburg Garden Club was awarded The GCV
Massie Medal for the creation and preservation of the Lee Park Herbarium. Mrs. R. F.
Burke Steele, Jr. (Betty) has worked tirelessly
as chairman of this committee to bring the
project to its present status. As the club anticipates its 70th anniversary, it is offering a
limited edition of 500 portfolio sets containing four watercolor prints of wildflowers from
the collection. It is hoped that with the proceeds from sales of these prints, steps to better preserve the collection can be taken. The
committee also hopes to promote the educational value of this collection with video and
slide lectures.
The club considers itself an important
part of this historical city and stands ready to
157

Follow the Green Arrow


assist wherever it can in Petersburg's efforts
to preserve its past and promote its future.
With this in thought and in mind, the club
has continued its support of the Battersea Ball
with an annual donation as well as assistance
with decorations. At Christmas, members
participate in decorating Centre Hill Mansion
for the holiday. The club has provided hostesses for the Petersburg Symphony Designer
House both years this event has taken place.
The 1994 Petersburg tour for Historic
Garden Week was a first. The club sponsored
a two-day tour. The second day featured Sears
Roebuck homes in the Hopewell area. These
houses have received national attention recently, and The Petersburg Garden Club was
pleased to be able to help bring these homes
to public attention through Historic Garden
Week.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. R. F. Burke Steele, Jr., Mrs. Gordon D. Shackelford, and Mrs. Thomas P.
Kidd, Jr.

Other projects included Hope Haven, a


local orphanage. Working with the children,
members planted a 26-tree orchard, furnished
seeds for the children to plant a vegetable garden, and landscaped the houses. Members
were invited to meet there at harvest time and
were rewarded by the children with jars of
canned vegetables from their garden.
In other civic projects, funds were donated
for 100 native plants for Red Wmg, a city park.
Club members attended Richmond meetings
in support of scenic rivers and returnable containers and in opposition to billboards and
additions to the Capitol. Members worked
with CARE (Citizens Against Refinery Effects) to prevent the construction of a refinery on the Elizabeth River. Working with the
Princess Anne County Historical Society, the
club contributed to the restoration and landscaping of Upper Wolfsnare, an 18th-century
house owned by the Society.
For the club's major fund raiser, the Annual Wreath Sale, boxwood was collected at
Bacon's Castle, and in later years, at Berkeley
Plantation. Treks through snow, sleet, and rain
were rewarded by tailgate parties.
In 1978, Dr. Spencer Wise of the Nature
Conservancy, who graciously contributed so
much time and good advice to the club, received The GCV Award for Meritorious
Achievement in Conservation for timely and
constructive action in the conservation of our
natural resources. He later became an honorary member of The Princess Anne Garden
Club.
In 1978, Historic Garden Week was cancelled for the first and only time as a result of
a northeaster in the Sandbridge area. The
following year, the club returned for a successful two-day tour to compensate for the
previous year's washout.
In the 1970s, Mrs. William R. Miller, Jr.
(Katie) served as Chairman of the Conservation and Beautification Committee (19741976).
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. M. Bagley Walker, Jr., Mrs. William R.
Miller, Mrs. Russell B. Davis, Mrs. Charles
U. Walkley, Mrs. Herbert G. Robinson, and
Mrs.John Carroll Fears, Jr.

THE PRINCESS ANNE


GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
In the early 1970s The Princess Anne
Garden Club's efforts to have Seashore State
Park reopened and not sold for development
had been successful. However, it had another
hurdle: the Navy wanted to build 600 housing units at Fort Story, adjacent to the Park.
That, too, was prevented by the club's efforts
and with the help of The Garden Club of Virginia.
The club's next focus was the Lynnhaven
House. Members researched and planted an
appropriate orchard and herb garden, published a booklet on herbs for use and sale at
the house, and served as docents. The help of
the Men's Garden Club of Norfolk was sought
in planting a myrtle hedge along the property
line, and wildflowers were planted along the
entrance path. Each year the Lynnhaven
House has been included in the club's Historic Garden Week Tour.
158

The Member Clubs

Members sponsored two flower-arranging symposia. The first one featured the English designer, Sheila Macqueen, and the second, Peggy Conway of Montgomery, Alabama.
For better education and enlightenment
of the membership, meetings were held in such
places as The Norfolk Botanical Garden, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in
Gloucester, The Marine Science Museum,
Rainbow Nursery in Pungo, and the Back Bay
Wildlife Refuge as well as in members' homes.
Members serving in positions in The
Garden Club of Virginia included Mrs. Russell
Davis, Chairman of the Horticulture Committee (1980-1982).
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. John Carroll Fears, Jr., Mrs. Robert K.
Molloy, Mrs. Julian H. Lipscomb, Mrs. John
A. Carlston, Mrs. Robert G. Jones, and Mrs.
Littleton W Parks.

Mrs. Powell Harrison and Mrs. William R.


Miller, Jr. on an EYES trip to Loudoun County.

1990-1995
In 1990, the club undertook a new project,
the deWitt Cottage owned by the City ofVirginia Beach and now designated as a Virginia
Historic Landmark. It had been the home of
a member, Miss Julia deWitt, and her sisters.
Remembering her lovely "garden by the sea,"
members wanted to be actively involved in the
development of the garden. The club received
the Common Wealth Award for this project
in 1993.
Historic Garden Week in 1990 was celebrated in conjunction with the city's
tricentennial celebration at the old Princess
Anne County Courthouse. For the last few
years, a flower arranging demonstration has
been included on the club's Historic Garden
Week tour and has been well received. The
PAGC also resumed its popular boat tour.
To offset the rental expense of the Virginia Beach Center for the Arts for the Rose
Show, members furnished arrangements for
the Center's special events.

1980-1990
Aware that young people were the future
decision makers, the club undertook a new
project, EYES (Educating Youth for Environmental Service). This project was created
and developed by Mrs. Miller with helpful suggestions and encouragement from The GCV
members, particularly, Mrs. Powell Harrison
(Leesburg Garden Club) and Mrs. Stuart Bell
(The Little Garden Club of Winchester). In
1981, Mrs. Miller received the deLacy Gray
Medal for her leadership in the promotion of
environmental education. Selected eighth and
ninth grade students were introduced to representatives of organizations involved with
environmental issues. The PAGC was given
the Common Wealth Award for this project
in 1981.
For several years an ecology camp in Seashore State Park was a joint effort of Princess
Anne and The Virginia Beach Garden Club.
The club furnished the funds for the publication of the Volunteers' Handbook and
Educational Films for the Marine Science
Museum.

We dig in the dirt til our back and


knees hurt,
fix flowers and open up houses.
159

Follow the Green Arrow


And we'll never pause, to help a good

opened Germanna Community College.


With the cooperation of the college's biology
professor, Dr. Robert A. Hodge, the club
planned a nature garden with a living laboratory trail at Hugh Mercer Elementary School.
On a tract of land nearby, a living classroom
was developed, which made available to children, kindergarten through 3rd grade, a spot
to study and enjoy nature. Mrs. Robert L.
Frackelton (Decca) was The GCV Chairman
of the Horticulture Committee (1978-1980).
Members, along with the Council of Garden Clubs, planted flower boxes to help rejuvenate and revive interest in the older section
of the city.
Providing miniature Christmas trees to
each patient at Mary Washington Hospital
during the holiday season continued as an annual project. The trees were appropriately
sized for a bedside table and cleverly decorated with non-edible ornaments thereby
bringing Christmas joy to those forced to
spend the holiday in the hospital. With the
local Council of Garden Clubs, members participated in decorating the city's historic attractions with gala Christmas decorations.
During the Bicentennial year, The RVGC
invited The Garden Club of Virginia to have
its Annual Meeting at the Sheraton in May,
197 6. Guests and members have not forgotten the straw bags with the needlepoint in red,
white, and blue. Also for the Bicentennial,
the club encouraged city officials to plant
Bradford pear trees downtown.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Josiah P. Rowe III, Mrs. Jere M. H.
Willis, Jr., Mrs.John L. Smoot, Mrs. Grellet
C. Simpson, and Mrs. F. Byrd Holloway.

cause,
sometimes with the help of our
spouses.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Littleton W. Parks, Mrs. Robert}.
Parr, Mrs. John M. B. Baillio, and Mrs.
Murden Michelson.
THE RAPPAHANNOCK VALLEY
GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club
began the decade by sponsoring The Garden
Club of Virginia Daffodil Show in 1970. The
beautiful show was held at Mary Washington
College.
Mrs. A. T. Embrey, Jr. (Martha) served as
The Garden Club ofVirginia Corresponding
Secretary (1970-1972) and Chairman of The
GCVJOURNAL Committee (1972-1974).
Years of planning and work were rewarded
when, in 1972, the club was awarded the
Massie Medal for designing and replanting the
garden at the Rising Sun Tavern, an historic
attraction owned by The Association for the
Preservation of Virginia Antiquities.
There is no doubt that Virginia looks like
paradise during Historic Garden Week. Efforts of The Rappahannock Valley Garden
Club, not just during Garden Week, but also
all year long, have been aimed at beautifying
its section of Virginia by participating in
projects that result in preservation, restoration, and beautification. Toward this end,
members planted trees on the grounds of the
Juvenile Detention Home and continued
planting dogwood trees along Washington
Avenue. In an effort to keep the Avenue beautiful, the club provided two benches and landscaping at the Monument for Religious Freedom.
The club sponsored a local flower show
as well as an art show, using the proceeds to
beautify Alum Springs Park and to plant a large
red dogwood tree on the campus of the newly

1980-1990

In conjunction with a riverfront development project and with the city's approval,
members undertook the tremendous job of
renovating and landscaping the grounds of the
Rappahannock Valley Regional Library. This
was a $55,000 project that entailed, among
other things, digging up asphalt parking lots,
placing all wiring underground, installing an
irrigation system and a fountain, and oversee160

The Member Clubs


ing the landscape planting. Committee members wrote many letters to city authorities,
solicited donations from city merchants, and
saw the fruition of much hard work.
The GCV's 49th and 50th Annual Rose
Shows were sponsored by The RVGC and
held at the Sheraton. Members were rewarded
for their hard work when they glimpsed the
beautiful artistic arrangements and horticulture specimens.
Thanks to the efforts of a lawyer husband,
The RVGC became incorporated. The silhouette of a girl with a watering can was
adopted as the official seal. The design had
been used on the cover of the club's yearbooks
in 1924 and 1974 and as The RVGC's design
on The GCV needlepoint rug.
Another project was the rejuvenation of
the garden at the Rising Sun Tavern. This
was accomplished by replacing and heightening the grape arbor, replacing the cedar rail
fence, and adding the picket fence along the
back line of the property.
During all this time, other members were
busy making flower arrangements for biannual
dinner meetings (black-tie affairs) of
Kenmore's Board of Regents, for the Fine Arts
and Flowers Show at the Virginia Museum in
Richmond, and for the three annual Flower
Shows of The GCV. The RVGC received the
first Elizabeth Gwathmey Jeffress Trophy for
the Best Inter-Club arrangement at The GCV
annual Rose Show in 1983.
Mrs. Jere M. H. Willis, Jr. (Barbara)
served as Director-at-Large of The GCV
(1985-1988) and The GCV Historian and
Custodian of Records (1988-1990). Mrs.
Josiah Pollard Rowe III (Anne) was appointed
The GCV Director of Public Relations (19881990).
Continuing the club's conviction that trees
help to beautify, The RVGC participated in
Arbor Day observances. To honor the Mayor,
a tree was planted in front of his new house.
The club continued to plant dogwood trees
on Washington Avenue in front of Kenmore,
donated a pin oak to the National Park Service to be planted in the Fredericksburg National Cemetery, and received a certificate for
helping the Virginia Department of Forestry

in planting "Constitution Oaks" at the Mary


Washington Monument and at Mary Washington College. Finally, still thinking beautification, members wrote letters to city officials opposing the sale of billboard space
around entrances to the city. Thus ended a
very busy decade!
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Douglas E. Quarles, Jr., Mrs. A. Thomas Embrey, Jr., Mrs. David F. King, Mrs.
Lawrence R. Motor, and Mrs. H. McPherson
Janney, Jr.
1990-1995
It is hard to describe the delight felt in
The RVGC on hearing that it was runner-up
for the Common Wealth Award! All that
"blood, sweat and tears" spent at the
Rappahannock Regional Library came to rewarding fruition, and the whole city could
enjoy its new look. Members also felt pride
in the fact that Mrs. George L. Beals (Anne)
and her husband were among three national
winners of an award given by the National
Endowment for soil and water conservation.
Two club members served on a committee to beautify Hurkamp Park, and members
wrote letters to the Virginia Department of
Transportation urging plantings of wild flowers on Interstate 95.
Mrs. Rowe was a Director-at-Large of
The GCV (1991-1994), Mrs. Douglas E.
Quarles, Jr. (Kitty), Chairman of The GCV
Slides Committee (1990-1992), and Mrs.
David F. King (Bev), Director of Public Relations (1990-1992), Chairman of the Common
Wealth Award Committee (1992-1994) and
Director-at-Large (1995-1998). Mrs. H.
Harrison Braxton, Jr. (Gail) was Chairman of
The GCV Common Wealth Award Committee (1994-1996).
Mrs. Jere M. H. Willis, Jr. (Barbara) received The GCVHorticultureAward of Merit
in 1994.
Mrs. Robert R. Harry (Ann) served as
chairman of the local Council of Garden
Clubs. Other members continued to cooperate with the Council in the selection of scholarship recipients to Nature Camp and sup161

Follow the Green Arrow


Rivanna Garden Club shared Historic
Garden Week responsibilities with the
Albemarle Garden Club and The
Charlottesville Garden Club for the entire
week. A special University Day included the
President's House, Pavilions, Bayly Museum,
and selected students' rooms on the Lawn
decorated in floral finery.
The club continued to send memorials to
the Kent-Valentine Endowment Fund, fought
litter battles, remembered the elderly at
Christmas, helped to landscape the Martha
Jefferson Hospital, established and took care
of an Ash Lawn Garden, gave numerous herb
books to the UV& Alderman Library as a
Susan Metcalf Musselman Memorial, and
planted trees along the new Route 250 West
By-Pass.
The GCV's 35th and 36th Annual Lily
Shows were sponsored by the RGC with great
success in 1977 and 1978.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Myron E . Tremain, Mrs. Elmer F.
Wieboldt, Jr., Mrs. Carl McFarland, Mrs.
David V. Strider, and Mrs. Charles M.
Davison, Jr.

ported it financially.
Members have continued to furnish decorated miniature Christmas trees to Mary
Washington Hospital patients during the holidays. They also participated in "Arts in
Bloom,'' a show which generated much local
interest in seeing flower arrangements interpreting Gari Melcher's paintings in the
Belmont Gallery. The club continues its
policy of keeping informed on state and government issues and of members writing letters of support or protest when they deem it
to be helpful.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs . Donald J. Kendall, Mrs. H.
Harrison Braxton, Jr., and Mrs .]. Martin Bass.
RIVANNA GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
In a tax conscious decade, Rivanna Garden Club was proud when the Internal Revenue Service granted the club charitable status. The club celebrated its 50th anniversary
with a Sentimental] ourney in 1972 and sent a
gift to the Kent-Valentine House.
Club members serving with distinction on
The GCV Committees during this decade
were Miss Jean Printz, Director of Public Relations (1970-1972), Parliamentarian and Editor of the Register (1972-1974), The GCV
Treasurer (1974-1978), and First Vice President (1978-1980). Mrs. Charles K. Woltz
(Dawn) was The GCV Flowers Show Chairman (1973-1974), Horticulture Chairman
(1976-1978), and a Director-at-Large (19781981 ). Miss Elisabeth Aiken Nolting won the
deLacy Gray Medal in 197 6 for her dedicated
and effective work in preserving historic
Green Springs Valley from 20th-century encroachment.
After over 14 years as Rivanna 's Rose Test
chairmen, the marvelous team, Captain and
Mrs. Edgar M. Williams (Margaret), stepped
down and were honored with a "Williams
Day." They continued to participate, exhibit,
and win. In 1972 and 1973, they received the
President of Member Clubs Cup.

1980-1990
For Rivanna Garden Club 1980 was a special year. Jean Printz was elected President of
The Garden Club of Virginia (1980-1982),
and the club sponsored The GCV Annual
Meeting in 1985. Never too busy to assume
responsibility, Jean served later as Finance
Chairman of The GCV from 1984-1986 and
Chairman of the Nominating Committee
from 1986 to 1988. The club was indeed
proud when Dawn Woltz received the Massie
Medal in 1987 "for her gift of beauty and her
joy in the giving." Betty Strider served as
District II Chairman of Historic Garden Week
from 1983-1989.
The club helped to landscape a new Red
Cross Building, operated Rivanna's booth at
Barracks Road Bazaar and had plant sales to
finance gifts to the Nature Conservancy,
Blandy Farm, ARC (Albemarle, Rivanna,
Charlottesville) Camp, Ivy Creek, Chesapeake
Bay Foundation, Attention Homes, High Rise
162

The Member Clubs


for Elderly, and Comyn Hall. It also sent
campers to Nature Camp, worked with the
Albemarle and The Charlottesville Garden
clubs to man and finance an ARC Natural
History Day Camp, pooled resources of
$4,500 for a Wildlife Center van (named
ARC), and developed an environmental issues
brochure. The clubs' joint Historic Garden
Week opened for fewer days, though it netted
more than $30,000. Members delivered hospital flowers on a regular basis, tested a novice gardening class, instituted a "Plant-ATree" project for the downtown mall, added
subtantially to the "in house" library collection, and planted a small rose and herb garden at City Hall, in memory of Captain and
Mrs. Edgar M. Williams.
The club was awarded $500 twice (as runner-up for The Garden Club of Virginia Common Wealth Award) to replace trees destroyed
by a 1983 tornado at Miller School. In 1987,
the club was the recipient of the Common
Wealth Award. With the $5 ,000 award, along
with help from the club treasury and dedicated
members, more than 40 trees were planted at
the school.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Stanley P. Wilcox, Mrs. Richard L.
Nunley, Mrs. William S. Edwards, Mrs. Bruce
W. Nelson, and Mrs. Ernest H. Em.

community and The Garden Club of Virginia." As the club's perpetual finance chairman, she encouraged contributions to the
Kilham Garden (which the members had
planted at St. Anne's School in 1967) and to
the landscaping of the Ronald McDonald
House.
Life with Rivanna is never idle!
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Martin Ochs, Mrs.James B. Wood,
and Mrs. A Ward Sims.
ROANOKE VALLEY GARDEN CLUB

1970-1980
During the 1970s, Roanoke Valley Garden Club began to feel the impact made by
one member, Mrs. Edmund T. Morris. Ruth
had arrived in Roanoke from Pennsylvania in
the late 60s. She was enthusiastic, talented,
and well-trained in the art of flower arranging. By 1970, she had established training
workshops for our members and led a large
coterie of participants to each of The GCV
Flower Shows. Nor did any flower show in
the Roanoke area escape her attention and
winning ways! After her untimely death in
1973, a core of those who had "sat at her feet"
continued to carry her banner forward. Without missing a beat, the workshops marched
on with monthly in-club shows. The arrangers walked off with 14 Tri-colors, out of the
30 GCV Flower Shows held during the decade. In 1978, the Flower Shows Chairman,
Mrs. Douglas H. Patteson-Knight (Francis)
paid a visit to Roanoke. At a party given in
her honor, refreshments were served in the
thirty-seven cups which had been won at The
GCV shows. Between workshops and Flower
Show road trips, the club sponsored The GCV
Rose Show in 197 6.
The GCV's "top blossom," Mrs.John D.
Varner (Betsy), was sorely missed at many of
the meetings for a couple of years while she
served her outstanding term as President of
The Garden Club of Virginia. It was appropriate in 197 5 for the area's Historic Garden
Week to be held in neighboring Botetourt

1990-1995
Having come a long way since its formation on November 16, 1922, the club started
the 1990s with a full complement of accomplished gentlewomen, 50 active, 20 associate,
and a few gentlemen among the honorary
members. The club assisted the Albemarle
Garden Club at The GCV Annual Meeting
in 1994 and remained committed to the challenges of Historic Garden Week each year and
to the task of sponsoring The GCV 1995 and
1996 Lily Shows. The club won the Past
Presidents of The Garden Club of Virginia
Trophy at The GCV Annual Lily Show in
1993.
Accolades were given once more to Jean
Printz, the 1991 winner of the Massie Medal
for "loving and distinguished service to the
163

Follow the Green Arrow


Marigolds, ageratum, geraniums, scarlet sage,
and chrysanthemums extended the bloom
throughout the summer and fall. Keeping
these large designs pristine and productive
required the hands, knees, and backs of almost
all club members. These efforts were rewarded by this project's becoming a finalist for
the Common Wealth Award. The club had
just received the $500 check to build paths
throughout the garden when the Flood of '85
struck! The museum building was half submerged in river water; the boxwood circles,
totally. Machines in the park, including steam
engines, were washed askew or down the river.
Only a few tips of scarlet sage could be spotted bounding in the muddy waters. Subsequently, remaining exhibits were moved out
of the flood plain to a warehouse which required none of the proposed paths.
The Common Wealth Award was returned. And, then, happy days! The Committee sent the check back to be used in establishing gardens in planters at the museum's
new site. Again, members moved boxwood
salvaged from the flood and thereby proved
the durability of the plants and of the club's
members.
For the first time, the two Roanoke clubs
produced Historic Garden Week in another
city, Blacksburg, 50 miles away. All went well,
but the coming and going was incessant and
taxing on the clubs' membership.
Roanoke Valley held The GCV's Annual
Meeting at the Hotel Roanoke, just before its
doors were closed for what was feared, at the
time, forever. Mrs.James C. Lester, the club's
leading flower arranger, won the coveted
Massie Medal for sharing her time and expertise with GCV clubs all over the Commonwealth. She opened her garage and grounds
for the club's annual series of flower-arranging workshops. Graduates of this program
received diplomas from THE DRIVEWAY
SCHOOL OF DESIGN. They also received
eight more Tri-colors and 26 more silver cups
from The GCV Flower Shows.
Members serving as club presidents during the 1980s were Mrs.Jam es C. Lester, Mrs.
Joseph P. Lawson, Mrs. Barton W. Morris,Jr.,
Mrs. Hugh]. Hagan, Jr., and Mrs.Joseph W.

County. Fincastle Presbyterian Church in the


county seat had been a GCV restoration
project in the 1940s. This year work was underway at the church as part of refurbishing
various restorations for the Bicentennial Year.
Old projects, such as maintaining the
Hester Freeman Memorial Garden, sending
a child to Nature Camp, and fixing plates for
the local Veterans Hospital were continued
with monies raised by Holiday House Bazaar
in conjunction with the Roanoke Council of
Garden Clubs, and by our in-club Plant and
Pantry sale. The Course For Young Gardeners was begun with all proceeds going to the
Kent-Valentine House Endowment Fund.
As the decade ended, three new projects
were undertaken: long-range planning for the
Memorial Garden, beautifying an unsightly
dirt bank near the city tennis courts, and landscaping the grounds around the Roanoke
Transportation Museum.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. J. Albert Ellett,
Mrs. Henry B. Quekemeyer, Mrs. H. Leland
Lawson III, Mrs. W.W. S. Butler III, and Mrs.
Hugh Fletcher, Jr.
1980-1990
When the Roanoke Museum of Fine Arts
moved from an old suburban home to its new
quarters downtown, the old home was sold and
the club had to move its beloved, long-tended
Memorial Garden to a new site. Moving
benches and urns was a straightforward action,
but moving 163 boxwood was a somewhat
daunting proposition. As the new plot at
Fairacres, the home of the Roanoke Council
of Garden Clubs, could not accommodate all
the boxwood, some were given to a local
church, some were sold to club members, and
50 were transplanted to the entrance of the
Roanoke Transportation Museum. Landscaping the garden at this museum was the RVGC's
newest project, and 200 small boxwood were
planted in four circles, repeating the pattern
of the wheels of the #6ll steam engine parked
behind the garden. Red tulips, 600 of them,
were also planted: 150 in the center of each
wheel. The spring results were spectacular!
164

The Member Clubs


Hazlegrove.

won for the Tri-color. Not bad for a twentythree-year participation in The GCV Flower
Shows! But, nothing comes easy! As only
home-grown plant material is used in The
GCV Flower Shows, horticulture members
have supplied at least 30,000 stems, and flower
arrangers have traversed atleast 23,000 miles
to bring home this glory.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Ward W. Stevens,]r., Mrs. Talfourd
H. Kemper, Mrs. Edwin R. Feinour, and Mrs.
W. Lee Wilhelm III.

1990-1995
Over the years, the Roanoke Valley Garden Club's affiliation with the Roanoke Council of Garden Clubs, composed of 25 garden
clubs and plant societies, strengthened. Working with other clubs became a large part of
the RVGC's activities. Slides of The GCV
restorations were shown at the Virginia Federation of Garden Clubs' Bicentennial Flower
Show, held in Roanoke.
The GCV clubs and the Federated clubs
merged their efforts to produce the Art in
Bloom flower show, held annually at the
Roanoke Museum of Fine Arts and similar in
concept to the Fine Arts and Flowers Show at
the Vlrginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. Early on, the RVGC had advocated
with financial support the Council's purchase
of Fairacres, the handsome Tudor home of a
former member of the RVGC. This home
and grounds takes up almost a whole city block
in the South Roanoke area. Since its purchase
in 1965, it has been continually enhanced, both
inside and outside. The RVGC has gradually
begun to have most of its meetings there. Its
major fund raiser, Holiday House, has become
a city-wide event, with the two largest garden
clubs (The GCV ones) being active and enthusiastic participants. RVGC members have
served on its board with Mrs. Varner, who was
its chairman in 1991-1993. Hopes are high
that zoning restrictions can be countered to
allow the Center to be rented for social occasions, much like the Kent-Valentine House.
As the Roanoke Transportation Museum
is now the Transportation Museum of Virginia, projected plans entail enlargement of
its quarters, requiring the relocation and expansion of RVGC's plantings there. Since the
club has become very adept at moving whole
gardens, these news items have been received
somewhat nonchalantly by the membership.
Should the occasion demand, and it
might, that we have to move two more gardens, we could now have a large celebratory
function, serving refreshments in almost 100
of The GCV silver cups, 26 of which were

THE SPOTSWOOD GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980

In the 1970s The Spotswood Garden


Club could very well have added a new honorary member to its roster, Mother Nature! She
showed up in full regalia for all of our state
functions. First she blew through the 1971
Lily Show as Hurricane Camille, scattering
stigmas and stamens at will. Next she flooded
the city in 1972 forcing the cancellation of
both horticultural and artistic Lily Show entries. Then, satisfied that she had made a lasting impressiori, she retired until October 10,
1979, The Garden Club of Vlrginia Board of
Governors' Meeting. At that time she dumped
10 inches of snow on the Valley's brilliant fall
foliage and stranded The GCV Officers and
club presidents at the Sheraton Hotel while
club members wheeled around the city carting
food and flowers to our guests.
The club continued its aggressive program of city beautification funded by the proceeds of its Arbor Day Tree sales. In addition
to planting trees in the median strips of
Harrisonburg's streets, the club landscaped the
new Police Headquarters and parking lots,
purchased Myers Yews to fill 3 5 redwood
planters placed in the downtown area, and
planted the hospital boxes and patio.
Then, in 1973, as an expression of its
gratitude for the excellent support of past club
projects, the club held a flower show to which
the community was invited.
Miss Martha Sieg completed the club's
165

Follow the Green Arrow


square for The GCV rug in 197 6. In 1977
Mrs. Gordon Brown (Georgia) received the
deLacy Gray Medal for "outstanding efforts
in furthering the knowledge of our natural
resources, and encouraging their wise use."
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Charles 0. Strickler, Mrs.James R. Sipe,
Mrs. Robert W. Preston, Mrs. Kimberly
Brabson, and Mrs. 0. Walton Wine, Jr.

Harrisonburg, a civic organization which was


initiated by individual club members. Aimed
at city beautification, this group planted hundreds of bulbs, trees, and shrubs both downtown and along entry corridors into the city.
It also sponsored horticulture lectures for the
general public.
In 1991, Mrs. Carlson F. Booth (Barbara)
received The GCV Horticulture Award of
Merit.
In 1992 and 1993, the club sponsored The
GCV Daffodil Show, and this time Mother
Nature could not have been lovelier. She came
with a warm smile and in 1992 blessed the first
American Daffodil Society sanctioned show
of The Garden Club of Virginia. The
Spotswood Garden Club won the Best InterClub Arrangement Award at the Daffodil
Show in 1992.
Mrs. John R. Eagle (Sandra) was appointed The GCV Flower Shows Chairman
(1994-1996).
Mrs. Dan C. Stickley Oulie) received The
GCV Horticulture Award of Merit in 1994.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Jam es H. Wheatley, Mrs. Walter
M. Zirkle, Jr., and Mrs. A. Wesley Graves VI.

1980-1990
The club expanded its focus in this decade by adding the restoration project of the
Daniel Harrison House in Dayton. An historic preservation site which served as a sheltering fort during the French and Indian War,
the house was restored to the 1850s. When it
was renovated, the club hired Mr. William D.
Rieley, an historic landscape architect, to plan
the nineteenth-century plantings. As a result,
early variety apple trees, coral berry ground
cover, an herb garden and appropriate shrubs
and perennials were planted and maintained
by the club. In addition, a picket fence and
pilgrim's benches were donated.
The club, continuing its civic beautification, planted maples, pin oaks, and birch
throughout the city as well as trees and shrubs
in front of the library. At the hospital, the
club continued to decorate at Christmas time
and to plant window boxes in the spring.
Mrs. Robert W Preston (Mitzie) was
elected a Director-at-Large of The GCV
(1980-1983). The SGC won the Elizabeth
Gwathmey Jeffress Trophy in 1984 for Best
Inter-Club arrangement in The GCV Rose
Show. Mrs. J. David Diller (Genie) began
serving as The GCV Chairman of the Lily
Test Collections in 1988. Mrs. Walter M.
Zirkle, Jr. (Widgee) was District II Chairman
for Historic Garden Week.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Dan C. Stickley, Jr., Mrs. J. David Diller,
Mrs.John R. Eagle, Mrs. Daniel G. Witmer,
and Mrs. Lyle W Sweet.

THREE CHOPT GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
In 1971, the Three Chopt Garden Club
members began having "attic" sales at the
Tuckahoe Masonic Temple to raise money to
pay for the landscaping and planting of four
community gardens. The first was for a "sidewalk garden" along two blocks of Grove Avenue. Round cement urns were put in place
in front of the stores. The ladies were busy
planting flowers in the urns when the police
arrived and told them to move the urns because they were on city property. The city
did not want to be sued when people tripped
over the lovely urns, a likely event since there
was a popular late-night tavern at one corner.
The planters were repositioned nearer the
stores and were planted with red geraniums
and white petunias. All shop owners were

1990-1995
The club joined forces with Greener
166

The Member Clubs


given green watering cans and a pink broom
to keep their plants watered and their area tidy.
A few years later, brick planters were built to
replace the cement ones. They added greatly
to the beauty of Westhampton Village.
Three years later, the club donated money
to design a garden behind the main building
of the Richmond Public Library in downtown
Richmond. The money helped to provide a
fountain, benches, and plants. This garden
attracted people of all ages who wished to read
a book, eat lunch, or enjoy a quiet rest.
For its Bicentennial project, the club gave
many large boxwood which were planted along
the walkway leading to the front door of St.
John's Episcopal Church in Church Hill. In
addition, members helped with the restoration of the grounds at nearby St. Patrick's
School.
A highlight of 1976 was the placement of
the needlepoint rug at the Kent-Valentine
House. Mrs. Richmond Gray (Mary) was a
co-originator of the idea and supervised the
making of each square by the 45 member
clubs. The squares were sewn together, and
the rug became a beautiful pictorial depiction
of Virginia. It is perhaps the greatest treasure
in the house.
By 1978, the club's backyard sale had produced a net of $10,000 in eight years. Upon
hearing this good news, the members decided
it was a perfect time to end this exhausting
and less-and-less remunerative project and to
move on to something else.
The club had as its able club presidents
during this decade Mrs. Richmond Gray, Mrs.
Robert Brydon ill, Mrs. W Holt Souder, Mrs.
Waller H. Horsley, Mrs. H. Waldo Foster, Jr.,
and Mrs.Jam es Asa Shield.

Volunteer Award from the Boys Club of


America. This project was taken over by the
Extension Service a few years later.
This and other projects were financed by
the club's new fund-raiser, a spring plant sale.
Perennials were sold at a two-day event open
to the public. The sale was repeated successfully for several years. Other sources of money
included an ongoing cocktail napkin sale organized by Mrs. P. B. Eggleston ill Gudy).
The napkins were designed by Mrs. E. Otto
N. Williams,Jr. (Vann).
Mrs. William Brooke Power (Leslie) won
the Tri-Blue Inter-Club arrangement award
at The GCV Daffodil Show in 1985.
Mrs. Horace H. Harrison (Sally) was
Chairman of Historic Garden Week in 1980
and 1981, and Mrs. Arthur S. Brinkley, Jr.
Gody), in 1988 and 1989. Mrs. Power was
appointed Flower Shows Chairman for 1988
and 1989.
The Annual Meeting of The Garden Club
ofVirginia was held in Richmond in 1987.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. James Asa Shield, Jr., Mrs. Arthur S
Brinkley, Jr., Mrs. William T. Tucker, Mrs.
William Brooke Power, Mrs.John P.Josephs,
and Mrs. Leonor F. Loree III.
1990-1995
The club seemed to start a new fund-raising project every decade. The newest was
"Deck the Halls." Raffle tickets were sold in
the community, and the winner had her house
decorated for Christmas. This of course was
a great hit and very successful. The club raised
~5 ,000 for the "new" Grove Avenue landscapmg.
Three Chopt Garden Club was an enthusiastic supporter of the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. Money was given by the club to
the Flagler Foundation Matching Grant.
"Deck the Halls" money was also donated
to landscape two new houses built in Richmond for AIDS patients. Club members, with
the help of husbands and children, bought,
planted and mulched over 40 trees and shrubs.
This was definitely a hands-on weekend.

1980-1990
Under the leadership of the project chairman, Mrs. James Asa Shield, Jr. (Sandy), the
club members started the "Garden on the
Tracts" at the Science Museum of Virginia in
1981. Twenty-five members of the Boys Club
of Richmond learned to plant and tend an urban garden with the help of club members.
As a result, Mrs. Shield won the Distinguished
167

Follow the Grero Arrow


Mrs. Towers won the coveted Harris Cup at
the Rose Show for the second time. Miss
Jane Saunders won a Horticulture Award of
Merit (1975). Mrs. Thomas W Murrell, Jr.
CJane) served as President ofThe Garden Club
of Virginia from 1978-1980.
Seven presidents gave able and inspired
leadership during these 10 years. They were
Mmes. H. Merrill Pasco (Canny), Parke F.
Smith (Alice), William M. Hill ((Ruth), John
W Riely (Jean Roy), Williams E. Pembleton
(Ella; Benjamin A. Bosher),John D. Blackwell
(Doris), and Christopher R. Tompkins (Mary
Leavell).

Mrs. Brinkley was elected a GCV Director-at-Large (1991-1994).


Through the years, the club has undertaken many projects for the improvement of
the city and state. It is proud of its accomplishments during its 55-year history.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Leonor F. Loree III, Mrs. William
V. Daniel, and Mrs. John H. Wick III.

TUCKAHOE GARDEN CLUB


OF WESTHAMPTON
1970-1980

1980-1990
The Tuckahoe Garden Club of
Westhampton had three major undertakings
in the 1970s: the restoration of the garden at
the John Marshall House, the creation of a
reading garden and miniature park behind the
Richmond Public Library, and the restoration
of the Fountain Court at Maymont Park.
When the ladies of the Tuckahoe Garden
Club were not busy participating in the above,
they were conducting an annual flower arranging course to raise money and to educate members as well as many non-members in the art
of arranging. The members who conducted
these workshops did extremely well in imparting their wisdom and spawning a generation
who today are busy peddling their services at
weddings and gala events. Also, during this
time, the Provisional Program was enhanced
by the addition of many eager new members.
Another annual event started in the 1970s
and still going is the Annual Christmas Auction and Workshop. Over the years, this auction has provided a continuing source of income as well as Christmas cheer!
Obviously, these projects did not keep the
Tuckahoe Garden Club ladies, an indefatigable group, busy enough; therefore, in 1973,
a gardening guide was compiled and edited
by Mrs. St. Julian Oppenhimer (Emma) and
Mrs. Thomas R. Towers (Betty). In 1974, the
Tuckahoe Garden Club held the Board of
Governors' Meeting.
Several members deserve special recognition for their achievements during the 70s.

The 1980s arrived, as the years tend to


do, and the Tuckahoe Garden Club embarked
on several major fund raising events. A new,
bigger, and better Gardening Guide was created. It was compiled by Mrs. Oppenhimer,
Mrs. Towers, and Mrs. Joseph Stettinius
(Carolyn). It is still being marketed today and
contains invaluable information pertaining to
all aspects of gardening.
In 1982, the club sponsored a demonstration and workshop by the well-known English
gardener, Sheila Macqueen, at the Science
Museum. It was a huge success. The other
major fund raiser in this decade was a talk by
Martha Stewart, author, gardener, and expert
on entertaining. A small note should be inserted here in these annals. Martha Stewart
got on the WRONG plane leaving New York
and was late arriving for her talk. Mrs.
Leighton Huske III (Anne Rawles), club president, recovered her equanimity after many
anxious minutes!
The Tuckahoe Garden Club also contributed to the restoration of the gardens at The
Museum and White House of The Confederacy, the Children's Hospital Memorial Garden, and the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
Members helped with the landscaping at the
Science Museum ofVirginia, sponsored a child
at Nature Camp, and participated in the
Maymont Garden Market by selling plants.
When the Maymont Garden Market was enlarged and became the Maymont Flower and
168

The Member Clubs


den Club also allocated money to the Science
Museum's proposed educational park.
A major fund raising event in the fall of
1994 was the demonstration and workshop
by Sheila Macqueen, renowned English gardener. Some of the money raised from this
event went toward the club's pledge for the
new addition to the Kent-Valentine House.
Mrs. Oppenhimer was Chairman of Historic Garden Week (1992-1993). She was one
of The Garden Club of Virginia's representatives on the floor of the Capitol when the Legislature adopted a resolution honoring the
60th anniversary of Historic Garden Week.
During the 90s, the club continued to
have the Christmas Auction and to sell the
Gardening Guide. It also participated in the
Maymont Flower Show, the Virginia
Museum's Fine Arts and Flowers Show, Historic Garden Week, and in any endeavors
which furthered the goals of The Garden Club
of Virginia and the Tuckahoe Garden Club of
Westhampton.
With five years left until 2000, the Tuckahoe Garden Club will certainly continue the
precedent set in this century and promote it
into the next century. Members will be wherever a tree needs to be planted, an endangered
species saved, a garden restored, or the public
informed on an environmental issue.
The presidents of the club who have
steered the course for the 90s were the Mesdames Charles H . Frischkorn Jr. (Charlotte),
W Thomas Cunningham,Jr. (Ruth), and Mrs.
John Peyton McGuire Boyd (Hylah).

Garden Show, the club again participated by


selling its highly coveted Gardening Guide.
In 1983, with Mrs. Rufus G. Roberts, Jr.
Oeanne), as chairman, the Tuckahoe Garden
Club sponsored the Rose Show for the second successive year. In the 1980s, the provisional category was discontinued, and the
provisionals were incorporated into the active
membership. However, the membership category was divided into under- and over-40 age
groups in order to help keep our club young.
Many of our members won special awards
and ribbons in both artistic and horticultural
divisions at the annual Rose, Daffodil, and Lily
Shows. Mrs. Delman H. Eure (Dabney) won
the prestigious Harris Cup which had not been
awarded in five years. In 1984, the Massie
Medal was awarded posthumously to Mrs.
Thomas W Murrell, Jr. Oane), and, in 1985,
the Massie Medal was again awarded to a club
member, Mrs.John Robert Massie, Jr. (Charlotte).
Mrs. Parke F. Smith was Chairman of
Historic Garden Week in 1984-1985. Mrs.
Herbert W Jackson III (Betsy; Mrs. Jack M.
Parrish, Jr.) was The GCV Treasurer for two
terms (1986-1988, 1988-1990).
Mesdames Joseph Stettinius (Carolyn),
Hudnall Ware III (Pam), Claude R. Davenport,Jr. (Mary Meade), Delman Hodges Eure
(Dabney), and Leighton Huske III (Anne
Rawles) served as club presidents during this
decade.
1990-1995
The Tuckahoe Garden Club has been
planning for the future. One of its main focuses has been conservation. The club is in
step with the times. Mrs. John Peyton
McGuire Boyd (Hylah) spearheaded this effort. She had served as chairman of the Conservation Forum and has been instrumental
in getting the compost exhibit at the Lewis
Ginter Botanical Garden off the ground. This
project was a finalist for the Common Wealth
Award. Another project has been restoring
the gardens at Richmond Hill, a nondenominational retreat open to the public for meditation and conferences. The Tuckahoe Gar-

THE VIRGINIA BEACH


GARDEN CLUB

1970-1980
In 1970 the HANDS award was given to
The Virginia Beach Garden Club for its successful Anti-Litter Campaign spearheaded by
Jane Tucker (Mrs. Lawrence Tucker). The
members purchased and decorated 41 trash
cans which were placed in the shopping section of the resort area. The club also persuaded 13 6 children to clean the street and
169

Follow the Green Arrow


Tilbrook [Mrs. Gilmore Lee Tilbrook]), was
completed in 1972. In 1975 landscaping and
planting around the Bicentennial Commission
Building was completed.
In 197 5 Alice Walter (Mrs. Maurice
Walter), a member and noted conservationist, almost single-handedly led a move to save
the Old Coast Guard St.ation on 24th Street
from demolition. It was part of a chain of sea
rescue stations extending down the coast of
Virginia and North Carolina at the turn of the
century and was one of two still remaining.
The project succeeded after four years of dedicated work by Alice.
The Virginia Beach Garden Club had
become a member club of The Garden Club
ofVrrginia in 1953, and in 1977 the club sponsored the Annual Meeting of The GCV. In
1978 the club initiated a regional conservation meeting in the area.
Mrs. Mayor F. Fogler (Anne) served as
Chairman of The Garden Club of Virginia
Conservation and Beautification Committee
(1970-1972) and as Chairman of the Admissions Committee (1974-1976). Mrs. W.
Wright Harrison (fanet) was a Director-atLarge of The GCV (1974-1977).
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. George G. Phillips (Thelma), Mrs.
Harold Page Smith (Dee), Mrs. Richard F.
Welton III (Betty), Mrs. John T. Goode III
(f uliet), and Mrs. Hugh S. Meredith (Gwen).

beach and provided a huge, white paper-mache


rabbit, "Harvey the Good Habit Rabbit," who
rode on the float that led the parade. The
determination to clean up and beautify the
beach community became a driving force in
the 70s, because litter was such a constant
problem.
An exciting new project was proposed by
Dale Henderson (Mrs. Thom W. Henderson,
Jr.) and Florence Turner (Mrs. F. Kimberly
Tucker) in 1971. Upper Wolfsnare, built in
1759 by Thomas Walke, was deeded to the
Princess Anne Historical Society, and restoration was underway. The landscaping around
this 18th-century house was accepted as a continuing project of The Virginia Beach Garden Club, and 565 trees and 17 5 shrubs were
planted. Rudy Favretti provided plans for an
authentic vegetable and herb garden of that
period. In 1974 the house and grounds were
placed on the National Register of Historic
Places.
In 1971 the ecologists in the club, led by
Anne Beasley Fogler (Mrs. Mayor Farthing
Fogler), were successful in saving the two largest sand dunes on the East Coast, located in
Seashore St.ate Park, from being used for the
construction of a public school. The maritime oaks were saved also. As a result, Anne
received The Garden Club of Virginia deLacy
Gray Medal for Conservation in 1974.
Members were actively engaged in civic
projects pertaining to the preservation of Seashore State Park, thereby safeguarding the
wildlife in the area north of Virginia Beach.
They also acted to prevent billboards on the
Norfolk-Virginia Beach Expressway and other
highways entering the city.
Landscaping was the next venture, and
planting trees for shade and beauty became a
must. A rose garden and trees were planted
at the Virginia Beach Hospit.al. A fragrant garden was planted for the blind at Red Wing
Park by The Junior Virginia Beach Garden
Club which The Virginia Beach Garden Club
had organized in 19 51. The plantings featured
the members' favorite shrub, crape myrtle.
The planting of the crape myrtles for the
Virginia Beautification Commission (which
was founded by Jane Tucker and Charlotte

1980-1990
In the early 80s The Virginia Beach Garden Club saved the 1732 Francis Land House
and 35 acres from development by persuading the City Council to purchase it. It is now
on the National Register of Historic Places
and listed as a Virginia Historic Landmark.
The Virginia Beach Historical Maritime
Museum, now called the Life-Saving Museum
of Virginia, opened its doors on 24th Street
in 1981. It was the first museum in the city
and was also placed on the National Register
and listed as a Virginia Historic Landmark.
Because Alice Walter had led the fight for its
preservation, she had received in 1980 the
Garden Club of America's Award for Historic
170

The Member Clubs


Preservation.
In 1982 Jean Marie Randolph (Mrs.
Alfred M. Randolph) and Ganelle Smith (Mrs.
Lawrence Smith) started the Annual Pansy
Sale. In 1983 Charlotte Dashiell (Mrs. Edward L. Dashiell) coordinated the first year
of the Coastal Ecology Camp in Sea Shore
State Park and False Cape for students in the
4th and 5th grades. The club continued to
send two students to Nature Camp which is
located near Vesuvius in the Shenandoah Valley.
In 1984 The Vrrginia Beach Garden Club
presented the city with a flag pole and base
plantings when the Virginia Beach Garden
Park was dedicated on Baltic Avenue. Annalee
Thatcher (Mrs. Joseph 0. M. Thatcher)
turned out the first copy of"Ground Cover,"
the monthly news sheet which everyone looks
forward to receiving. A deep well and automatic sprinkler system were installed at Upper Wolfsnare, and live oak trees and crape
myrtles were planted in accordance with Rudy
Favretti's plans. Jane Tucker was presented
the Mayor's Outstanding Citizen Award, the
highest award for sustained involvement in
conservation and beautification.
Concern for the ailing Chesapeake Bay
led to an additional symposium with The
Elizabeth River Garden Club of Portsmouth.
Charlotte Dashiell and the Conservation
Committee invited 11 other garden clubs.
The Committee implemented an eastern region proposal for the preservation of the
Chesapeake Bay which was adopted by The
Garden Club of America and The Garden
Club of Virginia. Eventually 44 garden clubs
in six states joined together in the campaign
to Save the Bay which was due largely to the
hard work and determination of Charlotte
Dashiell. She compiled a synopsis ofBay legislation and was responsible for the quick passage in Congress of numerous pieces of legislation including two key provisions of the 1985
Farm Bill. In 1986 Charlotte was awarded the
Garden Club of America's very prestigious
Conservation Award.
In the mid-eighties Lee Moomaw (Mrs.
W. Hugh Moomaw), Anne Gilliam (Mrs.
William L. Gilliam, Jr.), and Douglass

The Marsh Walk and Flower Garden at the Virginia Marine Science Museum.
Patterson (Mrs. Hugh L. Patterson) told the
club they would try to raise $50,000 to fund
the Marsh Walk at The Virginia Marine Science Museum. The Virginia Beach Garden
Club and The Junior Virginia Beach Garden
Club, which had helped over the years with
Historic Garden Week and other projects,
each contributed $12,500. At the suggestion
of Charlotte Dashiell, the club applied for and
was awarded a $25,000 matching grant from
The Virginia Environmental Endowment.
Handsome permanent legends were installed
along the Marsh Walk labeling flora and fauna
found nearby.
In 1987 the flower show committee
headed by Nancy Thornton (Mrs. Daniel M.
Thornton,Jr.) staged a flower show, "Enchantment of the Bay," which was open to the public and won the prestigious Garden Club of
America Small Flower Show Award. A Wildflower Symposium at the Virginia Marine Science Museum was opened in 1988 by Mrs.
171

Follow the Green Arrow

were largely responsible, and Lee received


The Garden Club of Virginia Horticulture
Award of Merit as a result of her work on this
endeavor.
The Virginia Beach Garden Club sponsored the Annual Meeting of The GCV in
1991with143 members attending. A flower
show, "Autumn at the Chrysler," sponsored
by the club, The Garden Club of Norfolk, and
the Chrysler Museum Flower Guild, took
place in September 1991.
In 1993, the club gave $6,500.00 for the
signage on the deck overlooking its Native
Plant Garden. In 1994, The Virginia Beach
Garden Club gave $10,000.00 toward a
$25,000.00 commitment to fund half of"Discover Owl's Creek Deck and Educational
Area" at the Virginia Marine Science Museum.
The Virginia Environmental Endowment
gave the VMSM another $25,000.00 to complete the club's project, thanks to the efforts
of Lee Moomaw. Since 1986 the club has been
responsible for $75,000.00 being awarded to
the Virginia Marine Science Museum in
grants, and the members have raised another
$50,000.00 (including a $10,000 club pledge
soon to be paid) fora total ofover $125,000.00!
In 1994, The Virginia Beach Garden Club
Conservation Chairman Betsy Agelasto (Mrs.
Peter A. Agelasto III) and The Garden Club
of Virginia Conservation Committee member,
JudyTerjen (Mrs. Henry A. Terjen,Jr.), organized and presented a Bayscapes Workshop
which introduced environmentally sound
landscape practices to Tidewater. Working
with Billy Mills of the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, the Department of Planning for
the City of Virginia Beach, and the Hampton
Roads Planning District Commission, the club
sponsored a morning of speakers and an afternoon of field trips, including a boat trip and
lunch on Linkhorn Bay.
In late fall 199 5, the Club planted a live
oak tree at the Virginia Marine Science Museum in the Coastal Woodland Retreat area
to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of The Garden Club of Virginia.
There have been seven annual Tidewater
Horticultural Symposia sponsored by The
Virginia Beach Garden Club and The Gar-

Charles Robb, wife of the U. S. Senator, and


Mrs. James Godwin, Past President of The
Garden Club ofVirginia. In 1989, plans were
made for a Native Plant Garden near the
Marsh Walk. The garden was planted and is
maintained by club members. Also, in 1989,
the club proposed The Virginia Beach City
Council for The Garden Club of Virginia's
Dugdale Award for Meritorious Achievement
in the Field of Conservation, and the Council
received it. The club also contributed to the
landscaping of the new Virginia Beach Center for the Arts, and with the Garden Club of
Norfolk, it sponsored the first Tidewater
Horticultural Symposium for the public which
was well attended and given rave reviews.
Adele McMahon (Mrs . Bernard G .
McMahon)'s beautiful paintings of all The
Garden Club of Virginia Restorations to date
were given to the Kent-Valentine House.
During the 1980s many positions were
held by club members in The Garden Club of
Virginia. Douglass Patterson was The GCV
Chairman of Annual and Board of Governors'
Meetings (1980-1982) and Corresponding
Secretary (1982-1984); Charlotte Dashiell was
Chairman of the Conservation Committee
(1982-1984); Anne Gilliam, Chairman of the
Restoration Committee (1982-1984), First
Vice President (1984-1986), Chairman of the
Common Wealth Award Committee (19861988), and Chairman of the Massie Medal
Committee (1988-1990); Evie Holt (Mrs.
Saxon W. Holt), Lily Test Chairman (19841986).
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Bernard G. McMahon (Adele), Mrs. K.
K. Wallace (Pat), Mrs. P. Porcher Gregg
(Connie), Mrs. E. Carruthers Bruce (BettyJo),
and Mrs. Corydon M. Baylor, Jr. (Sandra).
1990-1995
In the Fall of 1990 The Virginia Beach
Garden Club won The Garden Club of
Virginia's coveted Common Wealth Award for
the "Wildflowers by the Sea" Native Plant
Garden at the Virginia Marine Science Museum .
Lee Moomaw and Margaret
Whitehurst (Mrs. W. Lee Whitehurst, Jr.)
172

The Member Clubs


den Club of Norfolk to educate the public.
Since 1970, over $200,000 had been raised
by Historic Garden Week. Articles were published in The Garden Club ofVrrginiaJOURNAL by members, and the club continued its
membership in the Council of Garden Clubs
which The Virginia Beach Garden Club organized in 1940.
The Pansy Sale which was begun in 1982
evolved into the Fall Flower Festival and became the club's one and only fund raiser. From
a few hundred dollars profit in the early years
the net profit in 1995 exceeded $13,000.
The next 2 5 years can bring only more
challenges and accomplishments to the 61 active, 21 associate, and 10 honorary members.
In The Garden Club of Virginia, Betty
Jo Bruce (Mrs. E. Carruthers Bruce) served
as Chairman of the Slides Committee (19941996).
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. William C. Overman (Anne), Mrs.
Fred Bingham Gentry, Jr. (Susan), and Mrs.
C. Stribling Snodgrass, Jr. (Eleanor).

paid the expenses for a worthy student from


the local high school to attend Nature Camp.
For the second successive year, The Garden Club of Virginia Lily Show was sponsored
by The Garden Club of Warren County in
June, 1970.
Mrs. Claude B. Harris (Gladys) was
awarded the deLacy Gray
Memorial Medal in 1971 for outstanding
achievement in conservation. Mrs. Richard
R. Almy (Fran) received the Presidents of
Member Clubs Cup in 197 5. In the same year,
Mrs. Percy Rogers (Mortie) was awarded the
Eleanor Truax Harris Cup and, in 1976, was
the recipient of the Presidents of Member
Clubs Cup. Mrs. Robert H. Payne (Peggy)
received The GCV Horticulture Award of
Merit in 1976, and, in 1979, Mrs. Almy was
also a recipient of this honor. The Lily Test
Chairman Silver Cup was presented to Mrs.
Almy in 1978 and to Mrs. Hugh McCormick
(Virginia) in 1979.
The annual local Historic Garden Week
tours were the club's major contribution to
restoration and preservation. It contributed
also to the Kent-Valentine House Endowment
Fund.
One of the club's most successful fund
raising projects was the annual Round Robin
Bridge Tournament.
The 50th anniversary celebration of The
Garden Club of Warren County began on
June 14, 1979, at the club's regular monthly
meeting with a few frills appropriate to a halfcentury existence. Members indulged in nostalgia as the birthday cake was cut, and pride
was felt as some references were made to the
evidence of the club's efforts during the 50
years in conservation, beautification, restoration, and preservation both locally and
through participation in annual Historic Garden Week tours.
Mrs. E.J. Kerfoot (Gail), through extensive research, wrote a series of articles delineating the club's history from its beginning in
June 1929 to its 50th birthday. These articles
appeared (one each week for six weeks) in the
local newspaper, The Warren Sentinel. The
theme for the club's annual flower show in
October 1979 was "Fifty Years, One at a time,"

TIIE GARDEN CLUB


OF WARREN COUNTY
1970-1980
During this decade, The Garden Club of
Warren County continued to emphasize beautification, conservation, restoration, preservation, and horticulture.
Trees were planted on the grounds of
Warren Memorial Hospital and at Warren
County Intermediate School. The club also
planted memorial trees in the Samuels Library
Garden and at the Front Royal Botanical Garden. Members continued to maintain three
test gardens.
The club followed an architect's drawing
for developing a city park, known as Bowman
Park. The plantings included many trees
(mostly dogwood), some flowering shrubs,
annuals, perennials, and thousands of bulbs of
many varieties.
For eight years of this decade, the club
173

Follow the Green Arrow


which evoked many unusual and timely artistic creations. Artistic classes were: "We Organized" (an arrangement for a dining room
table circa 1929), "We Grew and Grew" (a
design of fresh-cut plant material using values of green), "We Worked and Worked" (an
arrangement of autumn flowers suitable for
the hallway of a restored home), "We Saved
and Saved" (an arrangement of dried flowers,
pods, foliage, seed heads, and stems), and "Also
We Played and Played" (a free-standing design from the floor with minimum height of
48 inches and no restrictions).
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Milton A.Joyce, Mrs. E. J. Kerfoot, Mrs.
Robert E. L. Miller, Jr., Mrs. Isaac M. Zigler,
Mrs. Douglas T. Smith, and Mrs. C. Courtney
Carbaugh.

In 1984, the club entered the Front RoyalWarren County Anti-Litter Awards Contest
and received an award of $125.00 for work
done at Bowman Park.
Club members were active in support of
the Warren Heritage Society, whose work was
the restoration of the Belle Boyd Cottage and
the maintenance of Ivy Lodge. Plans were
shared for the development of the landscaping of both, and Mrs. Zigler presented 150
boxwood as a memorial to her husband.
The more exciting highlights of 1986 included the award of the deLacy Gray Medal
for conservation to a well-deserving Mrs.
James W Denton (Molly), the presentation
of The Garden Club of Virginia restoration
of Belle Grove in Middletown, and the special honor of the club's receiving the Common Wealth Award at The GCV Board of
Governors' Meeting. This award funded the
landscaping of Belle Boyd Cottage on Chester
Street in Front Royal.
In March 1986, the club sponsored a wonderful trip to the Philadelphia Flower Show,
and in April 1987 members had a marvelous
tour of Historic Oatlands in Leesburg.
The club seemed to be always planting
trees! These are planted in memory of deceased members and for the Downtown Redevelopment Project and any other worthy
cause. White oak seedlings, donated by the
Virginia Department of Forestry to celebrate
the 200th anniversary of the Constitution of
the United States, were planted at various public locations and historic homes. The Warren
County plantings were under the direction of
The Garden Club of Warren County.
In the fall of 1988, members toured the
18th-century home, Glen Burnie, and its extensive gardens. Luncheon was served in the
Palladian Tea House.
Mrs. William C. Trenary III (Melba)
served as The Garden Club of Virginia Historian and Custodian of Records (1986-1988)
and was a Director-at-Large (1989-1991).
For Christmas 1988, The Garden Club
of Warren County decorated the parlour at
Belle Grove, a property of the National Trust
for Historic Preservation which was built in
the late 18th century. Belle Grove is always

1980-1990
The highlight of The Garden Club of
Warren County in the early 1980s was entertaining The Garden Club of Virginia Board
of Governors' Meeting in Front Royal in October 1981. Getting acquainted with the ladies of The GCV was a joy to each member,
and seeing The Club in action was most interesting and enlightening. Members wined
and dined their guests at a welcoming cocktail buffet at the Quality Inn and concluded
with a banquet at the Shenandoah Valley
Country Club. Mrs. Isaac M. Zigler (Pearl)
propagated African violets as a gift to each
member of the Board of Governors.
The club continued its efforts in maintaining Front Royal's Bowman Park which has,
among other plantings, 1248 assorted bulbs.
A large cash donation was made toward landscaping at the new Samuels Public Library,
and, in addition to this donation, the club
planted trees on the library grounds as memorials to former members.
At the 63rd Annual Meeting of The Garden Club of Virginia, Mrs. Zigler received the
Horticulture Award of Merit for the year
1982-1983. Mrs. Courtney Carbaugh (Virginia) was selected to serve as Chairman of
The GCV Massie Medal Committee for the
years 1982-1984.
174

The Member Clubs


Mrs. Percy L. Rogers (Mortie) was presented a silver cup for 50 years of active service (1941-1991). She is now an honorary
member. Mrs. I. Otis Kibler (Emily) was also
the recipient of a silver cup for 50 years of
active service (1935-1985). She was an honorary member until her death in 1991. The
award was presented to her daughter, Mrs. S.
Francis McFall, at the May meeting in 1991.
Community projects by The Garden
Club of Warren County included a contribution to the landscaping of the Senior Center in
Front Royal. The club was also responsible for
landscaping and planting the front lawn of the
sheriff's department in Front Royal.
The club continued to take an active part
in the Adopt-A-Highway Program and was the
recipient of the second place award from the
Anti-Litter Council for its effort in the campaign against litter.
Another civic project was the planting of
wildflowers at local schools and sponsoring
wildlife programs. Members continued to
monitor the gardens at Belle Boyd Cottage.
The club was instrumental in developing
the Beautification of Front Royal Committee
and worked in cooperation with this organization to help with the improvement and beautification of community property. The present
goal is to facilitate the implementation of the
Route 340/522 corridor landscape plan developed by the University of Virginia. This treeplanting project would maximize the beauty
of Front Royal and not only improve air and
water quality but also reduce noise and temperatures in this area. The Beautification
Committee, chaired by Mrs.John C. LaBarca
(Louise), submitted a proposal to The Garden Club of Virginia that this project be considered for the Common Wealth Award.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Earl K. McCall, Mrs.John A. Wilson, and Mrs. Norman H. Upchurch.

beautifully decorated for candlelight tours in


December.
For her good work in the field of horticulture, Mrs. Ira B. Richards (Ellen) was presented a Horticulture Award of Merit from
The Garden Club of Virginia in 1989.
The 60th Anniversary of The Garden
Club of Warren County was celebrated in
1989. The club was honored to sponsor The
GCV 4 7th annual Lily Show. The title of the
show was "Dances of the Decades 1929-1989."
The club was delighted to receive a white ribbon for its Inter-Club entry with the theme
"The Anniversary Waltz." The 1989 Lily
Show will be long remembered for the spectacular fireworks which nature provided. A
thunderstorm developed which caused light
bulbs to explode in the Randolph-Macon
Academy Gymnasium shortly before the presentation of awards. No one was injured, but
all hoped the remaining lights would come on
again. Eventually they did. One exhibitor
found that her car windows had imploded.
The four garden clubs of Warren County,
including The Garden Club of Warren
County, worked together to landscape the
Front Royal-Warren County Senior Center.
Mrs. Robert R. Long (Anne) represented The
Garden Club of Warren County.
The club continued to take care of Bowman Park with the help of the town maintenance crew. Members weeded and planted
bulbs and trees, of course!
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. C. Courtney Carbaugh for two terms,
Mrs. Ben R. Lacy ill, Mrs. William C. Trenary
III, Mrs. Hugh D. McCormick, and Mrs.
William A. Hall.
1990-1995
The Garden Club of Warren County continued to be a dynamic, productive group. In
1990, the club sponsored The Garden Club
of Virginia's 48th annual Lily Show for the
second consecutive year. Held at RandolphMacon Academy, the show's title was "Yard
Goods." The club was awarded a red ribbon
for its entry in the Inter-Club Class, "Brocade."

THE WARRENTON GARDEN CLUB


1970-1980
This was the decade of beautification in
175

Follow the Green Arrow

celebration of the nation's Bicentennial of


1976. Mrs. Russell Arundel (Marjorie)
planned and planted the highway approaches
to Warrenton. Members worked on the club's
contribution of a square, "Spirit of '76," for
the rug at the Kent-Valentine House. Funds
for these projects were raised by selling a postcard featuring an endangered Partridge Berry
drawn by Hildy van Roijen. Hospital Hill was
beautified with daylilies and the Court House
Square with three six-foot concrete curbside
planters. Two of these were mowed down by
errant drivers.
The club sent local teachers to Audubon
Camp and gave 600 daffodil bulbs to be
planted by local schools. Members picked up
roadside litter, an effort which made Mrs. J.
H. Tyler Wilson (Bambe) richer when she
found $1 O! Mrs. Wilson was The GCV Chairman of the Annual and Board of Governors'
Meetings (1970-1972). The deLacy Gray
Memorial Medal was presented to Mrs. S.
Prentice Porter (Hope) in 1978 for her leadership in advocating the billboard ordinance
and the anti-litter campaigns in an effort to
"Keep Fauquier Beautiful."
The club was charmed by an anecdote
concerning Mrs. Cornelius Jadwin's (Peg)
grandfather, Major Robert Peabody Barry,
who bought the farm, Dunnottar, near
Warrenton in 1876. The giant tea rose was
planted there some years later. Mrs. J adwin
wrote, "When another house had to be built
after 1899 the bush was moved to the new
garden, where the Barrys sat in fine weather.
It was here that my mother scolded me for
picking a bloom by its head, but my grandfather replied that there was no better use for a
rose than to be loved by a small child. Five
generations have lived on the farm, and we
still cherish the same bush."
The club protested in vain the removal of
ancient trees gracing town sidewalks. The
town merchants, having seen what improvement the flower boxes and barrels made on
Main Street when overflowing with petunias,
geraniums, and periwinkle planted by the club,
decided to plant their own.
To help preserve the beauty and nature
of the Rappahannock River, members opposed

the Salem Dam project.


The last surviving founding member of
The GCV, Mrs. Samuel Appleton (Mary), died
in 1973. In her memory, the Mary P. A.
Appleton Award "To stimulate knowledge of,
and continuing interest in, horticulture," was
established. How pleased she would be with
the projects undertaken to win her award!
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. W. Langhorne Bond, Mrs. W.J. Catlett,
Jr., Mrs. Robert D. van Roijen, Mrs. Melville
Church III, and Mrs. Henry F. Dunbar.
1980-1990
Perhaps because rural Fauquier County
is increasingly threatened by the sprawl of
metropolitan Washington, the soul of The
Warrenton Garden Club lies in environmental stewardship. The club is extremely proud
of its members whose work had been recognized outside Warrenton's boundaries. Mrs.
S. Prentice Porter (Hope) continued to educate and influence Fauquier citizens, as well
as the local and state government, about the
dangers of irresponsible land development.
Mrs. Russell Arundel's (Marjorie) creative vision in furthering conservation of the world's
dwindling wild bulbs and other resources
earned her national recognition. The
Warrenton Garden Club basked in the reflected glory of these two crusaders. The
Warrenton Garden Club sponsored The GCV
39th Annual Lily Show in 1981.
Viewing education as the cornerstone for
a viable future, The Warrenton Garden Club's
pet project since 1984 had been its annual twoweek day camp, partially supported by the
Piedmont Environmental Council. Virginia
H. Farrar ran this adventure at her farm, and
members assisted her in helping children (ages
8-12) discover, observe, appreciate, and enjoy
the area's natural history. It should be added
that heat, rain, bugs, and slime did not deter
these kids! The club also contributed to various scholarships and programs specializing in
environmental studies and donated a large
portion of the gardening books found in the
Fauquier Library.
Members continued to carry on the club's
176

The Member Clubs

tradition of planting trees and landscaping


various spots within the community, and the
ladies tended to many flower boxes throughout the old town. In addition, seed money
was spread to beautify Crocket Park, Haiti
Park, Main Street, the Route 29 by-pass, the
Warrenton Center, and the surroundings of
the Fauquier Hospital.
Funds for these endeavors came, in large
part, as a gift from heaven. Following the
death in 1985 of long-time member Miss
Lucie Duer, the club was allowed to remove
from her estate approximately 1000
"Kingsville" boxwood, which she had rooted.
The plants were further propagated and sold
by the membership.
Each year, The Warrenton Garden Club
invited the public to a meeting featuring an
expert in the field of conservation. Speakers
came from the Piedmont Environmental
Council, The Virginia Wildlife Center, the
Chesapeake Bay Foundation, and the World
Wildlife Fund, among others. The range of
topics discussed by these representatives indicated how Warrenton's environmental concern has grown from its local roots up through
a global canopy.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Henry F. Dunbar, Mrs. John Eric
Decher, Mrs. J. Brooks Semple, Mrs. Barry
W. Starke, Mrs. Charles H. Seilheimer,Jr., and
Mrs. J. H. Tyler Wilson.

environmental education, the club continued


to provide financial support to various local
and national programs specializing in ecological studies. Warrenton's Natural History Day
Camp thrived, and some of its alumni returned to fill counselor posts. The club sponsored open forums on land use, water, and the
invasion of alien plants. Warrenton's sense of
environmental responsibility was sharpened by
the zeal of Mrs. Arundel, who was awarded
the deLacy Gray Medal in 1992 for her demonstration oflove for the natural environment
and responsibility for its preservation.
The GCV Board of Governors' Meeting,
held in Warrenton in 1992, produced a profitable dividend. Mrs. Charles H. Seilheimer
(Mary Lou), the organizer of the event, persuaded Mrs. Barry W. Starke's (Laurie) husband (F.A.S.L.A.) to design the signature bag
with Warrenton landmarks. After The GCV
ladies returned home, Warrenton was able to
use the popular canvas totes as a sale item.
Mrs. Seilheimer served as Chairman of The
GCV Horticulture Committee (1992-1994)
and The GCV Corresponding Secretary
(1994-1996).
While still keeping an eye on its origins,
The Warrenton Garden Club managed to
adapt its style as the 2 lst century approached. It continued to hold most meetings in members' homes, exchange plants
regularly, and have highway beautification as
an ongoing project. In 1928, Warrenton's
club president (Mrs. George C. Lawrence)
declared the club outrageously casual. How
would she feel about the bag lunches that are
replacing high teas as the standard meeting
fare today? What would she think about
propagating and selling plants from the gardens of club members to help finance
projects? Would she be prepared to don a
blaze orange vest and work pants to wield
shovels and rakes to improve the entrances
to the historic old town? The Warrenton
Garden Club is confident that she would approve of the evolution.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. J. H. Tyler Wilson, Mrs. Edward
C. A. Wachtmeister, Mrs. Arthur H. Nash, and
Mrs. Maximilian A. Tufts, Jr.

1990-1995
Seventy years later, The Warrenton Garden Club was unable to rest on its laurels as a
founding member club. It remained one of
the smallest clubs in The GCV at a time when
the community was expanding rapidly. Along
with this growth, the club faced exponentially
enlarged challenges at a time when almost
50% of the active membership held jobs outside the home.
Mrs. James S. Lee (Alison) was awarded
the Sponsor's Cup at The GCV Lily Show in
1990.
The preservation of our natural resources
and rural countryside was a major concern of
The Warrenton Garden Club. To further
177

Follow the Green Arrow

1980-1990

THE WILLIAMSBURG
GARDEN CLUB

Sally Stetson, Editor of The Garden


Club of Virginia JOURNAL for two decades, was awarded the Massie Medal for distinguished achievement in 1981. After the
celebrations and flowery praise from The
Garden Club of Virginia, she said, "I feel like
I've been to my own funeral. I've never been
hugged and kissed so much in my life."
The club continued its interest in local
beautification and conservation. In 1982,
Mrs. Arthur D. Strong (Mary), the club's
wildflower expert, was instrumental in establishing a wildlife sanctuary on the campus of
the College of William and Mary. Proceeds
from sales of her book of poetry, THE ENGLISH WAY, were divided between purchases of benches and plants for the sanctuary and a donation to the Kent-Valentine
House.
In 1985 Nancy Gotwald Harris and her
Project Search Committee brought to the
club's attention an unsightly area behind the
College of William and Mary's Phi Beta
Kappa Memorial Hall and directly opposite
the new Muscarelle Museum entrance.
Weeds, debris, and a row of storage room
windows spoiled the view from the Dodge
Room where meetings and parties were often
held. Thus began the long-term efforts that
finally created a charming courtyard. With
club funding and cooperation with the
College's Buildings and Grounds Manager,
Roy Williams, the committee helped plan
and plant small trees, gumpo azaleas, ground
covers, Kingsville boxwood, and planters for
seasonal flowers. Evergreen clematis planted
on a trellis along the wall softened the row of
windows, and brick pavers filled the open
space. The far end begged for a suitable
piece of sculpture, which the committee
found in the Williamsburg studio of Patricia
Winter, who generously offered "The
Maenad" on permanent loan to the College.
The major fund raiser in this decade was
an annual plant and bulb sale that grew bigger by the year with the addition of a boutique section with dried wreaths, garden
tools, and containers.

1970-1980
"That the Future May Learn from the
Past" was a fitting theme for The Garden
Club of Virginia Annual Rose Shows sponsored by The Williamsburg Garden Club in
1977 and 1978.
The club celebrated its 50th anniversary
in 1979. Three charter members, Mrs.
Ashton Dovell (Martha), Mrs. Archie Ryland
(Mary), and Mrs. J oho M. Stetson (Sally)
were honored guests at a champagne luncheon.
During the past ten years, The
Williamsburg Garden Club became increasingly active in local garden club projects. It
contributed 105 books on gardening and related subjects to the Williamsburg Regional
Library. The landscaping of one of the entrances to the city of Williamsburg was undertaken. The Garden Club Study Group's
optional meetings were well attended each
month. Lectures and work sessions were
held on horticulture, flower arranging,
herbs, edible wild plants, and point scoring.
During Historic Garden Week, garden
walking tours through the Historic Area with
club members as guides were very popular
and helped to increase ticket sales.
The headquarters of The Garden Club
of Virginia JOURNAL, with Mrs. Stetson as
its Editor and Mrs. Robert T. Vermillion
(Marguerite) as the Associate Editor, was in
Williamsburg.
Mrs. Thomas E. Thorne (Lelia) was
Chairman of the Restoration Committee of
The GCV (1970-1972). The sudden deaths
of Mrs. Thorne in 1972 and a few years later
of Dr. Thorne were a great loss. Their loyalty and many contributions to the club and
to The Garden Club of Virginia will always
be remembered.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Arthur D. Strong, Mrs. T. Robert Vermillion, Mrs. Gardiner T. Brooks, Jr., Mrs.
Arthur L. Smith, and Mrs. Thomas W.
Wood.
178

The Member Clubs


The Annual Meeting of The Garden
Club of Virginia came to Williamsburg in
1988. This event brought all the club's members together as never before with endless
preparations led by Mrs. Thomas W. Wood
(Gillie) and Mrs. Joseph N. Rountree (Sue).
Remember the gazebo centerpieces which
required months and months of work in Sue's
basement!
In 1989, most of the members took the
club's first overnight, long-distance field trip
to Winterthur and Longwood Gardens in
Wilmington, Delaware. It was a trip made
memorable by an afternoon tea at the home
of former member, Mrs. Thomas Graves
(Zoe), whose husband, Tom, was Director at
Winterthur.
The highlight of that year was The
Williamburg Garden Club's 60th Anniversary Party in the Dodge Room, overlooking
its project, the newly landscaped courtyard.
Husbands were invited and in the display of
memorabilia was Sally Stetson's Massie
Medal. Sally, the club's only remaining charter member, entertained the group with stories of early years when the club was formed
by mostly college faculty wives. They all
wore hats and gloves.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Harry G. Hager, Mrs. Joseph N.
Rountree, Mrs. Glen Shivel, Mrs. Baxter I.
Bell, Jr., and Mrs. Andrew W. Abbitt.

Sternbergia Lutea, for the Kent-Valentine


House rug.
The club was still very much alive with
many mentors who teach and share in all aspects of its purpose. Learning to arrange has
been heavily stressed in recent years as five
accredited judges, Elaine Abbott, Mrs.
Baskerville Bridgforth, Jr. (Kitty), Mrs. Richard K . Delaune Oewel Lynn), Nancy
Gotwald Harris, and Mrs. William L. Roberts, Jr. (Gale), guide the inexperienced
through informative sessions of the club's
unique Study Group and critique arrangements regularly brought to meetings. Every
member is expected to participate, and real
improvement is seen in this area. More help
for Historic Garden Week and Flower
Shows! The Williamsburg Garden Club was
awarded the Mrs. Littleton H . Mears Trophy
for the Best Inter-Club Arrangement in The
GCV Annual Daffodil Show in 1991.
The club's most recent fund raiser, a
yearly Christmas Wreath Sale, was started in
1990 and quickly became a success. The
handsome wreaths were ordered from the
same source used by Colonial Williamsburg.
Each member is expected to sell or buy at
least six wreaths.
In 1993, further interest in the campus of
The College of William and Mary College
resulted in the club providing the seed
money for replacing 20 18th-century species
trees in the courtyard of the Wren Building
in celebration of the college's Tercentenary.
Grateful thanks were expressed by
pleased Avalon Directors after The
Williamsburg Garden Club designed and installed landscaping at their shelter for battered women and children, an uplifting experience for all.
The approaching mid-90s finds a
younger face on the active body of The
Williamsburg Garden Club as older members go on to associate membership. This
new energy was just what's needed to meet
the challenges of the next decade and beyond.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Anthony J. Taylor, Mrs.Joseph R.
Pinotti, and Mrs. Thomas M . Jamison.

1990-1995

In the first years of the 90s, The


Williamsburg Garden Club lost some of its
most beloved and colorful members. Sally
Pattee Stetson, the last charter member and
Editor of The Garden Club of Virginia
JOURNAL for over twenty-five years, died
in 1991. Mrs. Hibbert D. Corey (Peg), treasurer of the JOURNAL for many years and a
former sailing companion of Lelia Thorne,
died in 1992. Mrs. Victor Iturralde (Mary
Selby), who could be depended on to know
all the Latin names for plants and was a renowned needlework designer, died in 1993.
She designed and executed the needlepoint
square featuring the club's flower,
179

Follow the Green Arrow


tributed to the local historical societies for
maintenance of boxwood gardens at Abrams
Delight, Wmchester's oldest home, and at the
grounds at the Burwell-Morgan Mill. It contributed to selected conservation organizations
and sent one or more children to Nature
Camp each year. Some peaks, some valleys
and some levels in between.
There were outstanding peaks for the
club, however. One member, Mrs. E.M.
Whiting (Helen), was honored by the American Boxwood Society with a boxwood cultivar named for her - the Helen Whiting boxwood. Mrs. George W. Burton (Sarah) became a certified GCV artistic judge, and Mrs.
Richard C. Plater, Jr. (Pam) received The
GCV Horticulture Award of Merit for her
expertise in boxwood and roses.
Club presidents during the 1970s were
Mrs. Daniel Dougherty, Mrs. Flournoy L.
Largent, Jr., Mrs. George G. Snarr, Jr., Mrs.
Richard C. Plater, Jr., Mrs. W. David
McWhorter, Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley, and Mrs.
Maurice J. Duffey.

WINCHESTER-CLARKE
GARDEN CLUB
1970-1980
The decade of the 1970s was a time of
peaks and valleys. A busy membership celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Wmchester-Clarke Garden Club in 1974 and continued the activities of those rewarding years.
These activities included educating the public and club members through lectures, flower
shows, and seminars, and contributing time
and money to civic projects and conservation
efforts.
In 1971, The Garden Club of Virginia
selected the Burwell-Morgan Mill in
Millwood for landscaping with Historic Garden Week funds. Following the completion
of the project, the club decided to use the Mill
for The GCV Annual Rose Show in 1974.
This was surely a wonderful place to exhibit!
A beautiful setting for the show, it, however,
was hot and had no air conditioning. Mrs.
David Simpson Gudy; Mrs.John F. Anderson)
and Mrs. C. Ridgely White (Eleanor), cochairmen of the show, and their committees
were relieved when, fortunately for the roses,
the old stone building turned into a refrigerator at night. A potential valley became a peak.
Some things fall between the peaks and
the valleys. The younger members proposed,
and followed through with, the formation of
a Junior Garden Club comprised of the next
generation. They learned about horticulture,
flower arranging, and conservation. But as
young girls go, the junior members grew older
and their interests turned to boys, proms, and
the myriad activities of teenagers. With no
daughters of suitable age, the junior club was
disbanded after several years.
Educating the public was a priority. First
was a lecture by Sheila Macqueen, and then
four seminars were presented by speakers on
landscaping, perennials, annuals, and their care
and maintenance. In the intervening years a
small flower show was held by the WCGC,
and participation in all The GCV Flower
Shows brought joy and knowledge to many
through the beauty of flowers . The club con-

1980-1990
The club started the decade of the 1980s
by planting a boxwood garden at Handley Library in memory of Helen Whiting, a project
enhanced by generous donations of boxwood
from Pam Plater and Blandy Farm and of
mulches, fertilizers, and her gardener's help
from Eleanor White.
The 1980s found the club with a split personality. Some members were coping with the
inevitable pull of gravity as arches and energy
headed southward. The board realized that
the club needed to increase its active membership to meet its many responsibilities. The
members wanted to maintain the closeness of
a small club; yet, it needed the energies of a
larger group. The decision was made to expand. The infusion of young, eager new members began.
Their eagerness prompted the club to
venture outside its own backyards with a trip
to Winterthur, Longwood Gardens, and other
points of interest in the Brandywine Valley.
Husbands were included on this and another
180

The Member Clubs


memorable trip to the Diplomatic Reception
Rooms of the State Department.
Participating husbands will never forget
a canoe trip on the Shenandoah. Working
with state and local organizations and practicing what they preached in their own homes,
club members had taken up the crusade for
water conservation. To emphasize the local
resources, 13 canoes, filled with agile members and some husbands and children, took to
the river under the watchful eyes of two experienced white-water guides.
The red flag of conservation and the selection of Belle Grove Plantation in
Middletown as The GCV's restoration project
rekindled enthusiasm. The club continued its
commitment to education by staging two small
flower shows and conducting a flower-arranging workshop at a local nursing home. It continued to support other conservation organizations and to send a child to Nature Camp.
The club also held The GCV Board of Governors' Meeting in 1982.
Civic beautification became a focal point
for the club. WCGC constructed a dry wall
and landscaped the visitor's pavilion at Blandy
Farm, the State Arboretum in Clarke County.
The committee worked feverishly to complete
the job in time for 1987 Historic Garden
Week. The complex was to be open, and tea
was to be served there. First, a late killing
frost wiped out the tender plants. Then came
rains, and the rest of the underplantings were
drowned. Dedication Day arrived with pouring rain. Members remained calm, and six
months later a serene and inviting entrance
welcomed guests.
In 1988 Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley (Nancy)
was installed as President of The Garden Club
of Virginia at the Annual Meeting in
Williamsburg. For two years the club burst
with pride in celebration of its first member
serving in that prestigious position.
For a number of years the club auctioned
inhouse articles members had made for Christmas gifts and decorations with wonderful results and a hilarious good time for all. But in
1989, the aforementioned young members had
gotten up a real head of steam, and the auction went public. Members toiled for months,

making hundreds of items to be sold at the


famous Middleburg Christmas Shop. The
project was highly successful in raising money
for future projects. Exhausted members
crawled home to families waiting for orderly
homes. Kitchens were cleared enough to function, rec rooms were swept clean of everything
from pine needles to sequins, and fingers
burned by hot glue guns began to heal! Members were prepared for the next decade.
Club presidents during the 1980s were
Mrs. Charles H. Schutte, Jr., Mrs. Gerald A.
Gildersleeve, Mrs. George W. Burton, and
Mrs. George R. Moore.
1990-1995
The tremendous effort of 1989 caused a
bit of burn-out in the field of creative endeavors and the club turned its energies toward
important civic matters.
The Winchester-Frederick County Historical Society presented the club with a Certificate of Honor in appreciation for its service in preservation and conservation. In cooperation with the Winchester Chamber of
Commerce and the County of Clarke, members helped to start the pilot program for a
recycling project that had gratifying results.
Mrs. M. Gray Farland (Mary) and Mrs.
T. Haliburton McCoy (Becky) submitted a
plan for the planting and beautification of a
highway intersection on Route 7 in Clarke
County. This project, funded by contributions
from local citizens, was met with such enthusiasm by the county that the club was asked to
share its horticulture talents in carrying out
the plan.
Another civic project, the landscaping,
planting, and educational program for Shalom et Benedictus, got off to a roaring start in
1991. This project at the facility for young
substance abusers was chosen for $1,000 runner-up award from The GCV Common
Wealth Fund. The next year, 1992, the members were most gratified to be the winner of
the Common Wealth Award. This project was
started with a simple planting in the cement
planter in front of the building. It developed
into an entire landscape design that was imple181

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mented in phases by club members and their
families working side by side with the student
residents. Members gained from working with
these students, one of whom took such an interest that he was able to find employment
with a landscaping business after graduating.
For Sarah Burton, 1993 was a banner year!
As usual, she came back with enough silver
and ribbons from daffodil shows to stock a
shop. Among them was the Katherine
Leadbeater Bloomer Perpetual Award from
The GCV Daffodil Show. Sarah generously
shared her love and knowledge of daffodils
with club members, local daffodil enthusiasts,
and other garden clubs throughout the state.
Winchester-Clarke Garden Club added
two more artistic judges to the ranks, Mrs.
Theodore Foster (Jane) and Mrs. William
Brandt (Elaine).
Who will ever forget the Winter of 19931994? Snow, ice, and cancelled meetings.
Using that time to good advantage, our resourceful 1994 Rose Show chairman, Mrs.
McCoy, and her able committee manned the
telephone and had everything planned by the
time Spring finally arrived. The Rose Show
theme "Alice in Wonderland" with its creative
schedule was well received. The club's most
successful Historic Garden Week ever was an
added bonus for 1994.
As 1995 rolled around, the \VinchesterClarke Garden Club was as busy as ever with
flower shows, the geranium and spring plant
sales to benefit the Nature Camp camper, conservation, horticulture, the eternal fight to rid
the highways of billboards, civic programs, etc.
"Through the Looking Glass" was chosen for the theme of the 199 5 GCV Rose
Show. The capable guidance of Mrs. William
Brandt (Elaine) would produce another
memorable show.
Club presidents during the early 1990s
were Mrs. Harry K. Benham III, Mrs. George
L. Sheppard,Jr., Mrs. Theodore Foster II, and
Mrs. Robert T. Mitchell, Jr.

182

APPENDIXES

I. OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 1970-1995


II. COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 1970-1995

183
188

III. LIST OF MEMBER CLUBS

195

IY. LIST OF HOSTESS CLUBS

198

v.

200

LIST OF RESTORATIONS

VI. ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS AND WINNERS

204

VII. FLOWER SHOWS: CLUBS SPONSORING

212

VIII. FLOWER SHOWS: CHALLENGE CUPS and WINNERS

214

IX. BOOKS

221

183

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HONORARY MEMBERS OF
THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA

* Mrs. Irving L. Matthews, Richmond, Virginia


* Mr. Harold]. Neale, Richmond, Virginia
The Honorable FitzGerald Bemiss, Richmond, Virginia
* Mr. Ralph E.Griswold, Williamsburg, Virginia
The Honorable Lewis F. Powell, Jr., Washington, D. C.
Mr. August Dietz III, Richmond, Virginia
* Mr. Robert H. Talley, Jr., Belle Haven, Virginia
Mr. William G. Pannill, Martinsville Virginia
Mr. Rudy J. Favretti, Storrs, Connecticut
* Mrs. Charles D. Pennebaker, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania
Mr.Joseph C. Carter, Jr., Richmond, Virginia
Mr. Ronald]. Chiabotta, Kensington, Maryland
Mr.John G. Zehmer, Richmond, Virginia
* Deceased

184

Appendix I

APPENDIX I
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS

1970-1995

HONORARY PRESIDENTS

FIRST VICE PRESIDENTS

1922-32 Mrs. Malvern C. Patterson, James


River
1934-52 Mrs. William R. Massie, Albemarle
1963-75 Mrs. HerbertMcKelden Smith,
Augusta
1987- Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr.,
Boxwood

1970-72 Mrs. Leon S. Dure, Albemarle


1972-74 Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr.,
Tuckahoe
1974-76 Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr., Norfolk
1976-78 Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr.,
Tuckahoe
1978-80 Miss Jean Printz, Rivanna
1980-82 Mrs.James B. Montgomery,
Martinsville
1982-84 Mrs. Frederic W. Scott, Albemarle
1984-86 Mrs. William L. Gilliam, Jr.,
Virginia Baach
1986-88 Mrs. Edward A. Barham, Jr.,
Elizabeth River
1988-90 Mrs. Henley L. Guild, Hunting
Creek
1990-92 Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr.,
Northern Neck
1992-94 Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.,
Lynchburg
1994-96 Mrs. Charles H. Schutte, Jr.,
Winchester-Clarke

PRESIDENTS
1970-72 Mrs. George H. Flowers,Jr.,
Boxwood
1972-74 Mrs. George M. Cochran, Augusta
1974-76 Mrs.John D. Varner, Roanoke
Valley
197 6-78 Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr., Norfolk
1978-80 Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr.,
Tuckahoe
1980-82 Miss Jean Printz, Rivanna
1982-84 Mrs. James B. Montgomery,
Martinsville
1984-86 Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.,
Eastern Shore
1986-88 Mrs.James C. Godwin,
N ansemond River
1988-90 Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley,
Winchester-Clarke
1990-92 Mrs. Henley L. Guild,
Hunting Creek
1992-94 Mrs. W. TayloeMurphy,Jr.,
Northern Neck
1994-96 Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.,
Lynchburg

SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS


1970-72
1972-73
1973-74
1974-76

Mrs. George M. Cochran, Augusta


Mrs.James W. Ray, Jr., Gabriella
Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr., Norfolk
Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall,Jr.,
James River
1976-78 Mrs. Stewart Bell, Jr.,
Little Garden Club
1978-80 Mrs.Jam es B. Montgomery,

185

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1992-94 Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.,
Ashland
1994-96 Mrs. Laurent Boetsch, Blue Ridge

Martinsville
1980-82 Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.,
Eastern Shore
1982-84 Mrs. William H. Parker, Jr.,
Gabriella
1984-86 Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.,
Ashland
1986-88 Mrs. W. TayloeMurphy,Jr.,
Northern Neck
1988-90 Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.,
Lynchburg
1990-92 Mrs. Robert C. Wood III,
Lynchburg
1992-94 Mrs. Charles H. Schutte, Jr.,
Winchester-Clarke
1994-96 Mrs. Robert Carter, James River

CORRESPONDING SECRETARIES
1970-72 Mrs. A. T. Embrey, Jr.
Rappahannock Valley
1972-74 Mrs. Edwin B. Vaden, Hillside
1974-76 Mrs. D. H. Patteson-Knight,
Fairfax
1976-78 Mrs.James B. Montgomery,
Martinsville
1978-80 Mrs. William W. Old III, Blue
Ridge
1980-82 Mrs. Hunter H. McGuire, Jr.,
James River
1982-84 Mrs. Hugh L. Patterson, Norfolk
1984-86 Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley,
Wmchester-Clarke
1986-88 Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.,
Lynchburg
1988-90 Mrs. Robert C. Wood III,
Lynchburg
1990-92 Mrs. Charles H. Schutte, Jr.,
Winchester-Clarke
1992-94 Mrs. FrankT. Ellett, Mill Mountain
1994-96 Mrs. Charles Seilheimer, Jr.,
Warrenton

TREASURERS
1970-74 Mrs.John D. Varner,
Roanoke Valley
1974-78 Miss Jean Printz, Rivanna
1978-82 Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.,
Ashland
1982-86 Mrs.James C. Godwin,
Nansemond River
1986-90 Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson III,
Tuckahoe
.
1990-94 Mrs. George A. Whipple, Fairfax
1994Mrs. Austin T. Darden, Jr.,
Nansemond River

DIRECTORS-AT-LARGE

RECORDING SECRETARIES

1968-71 Mrs. William T. Reed,Jr.,


James River
1968-71 Mrs. Melvin Wallinger, Ashland
1969-72 Mrs.]. H. Cunningham, Fauquier
and Loudoun
1969-72 Mrs. Bate C. Toms, Jr.,
Martinsville
1970-73 Mrs. Robert E. Latham, Alexandria
1970-73 Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr., Norfolk
1971-74 Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall, Jr.,
James River
1971-74 Mrs. D. H. Patteson-Knight, Fairfax
1972-75 Mrs. C. Harrison Mann, Jr.,
Hunting Creek
1972-75 Mrs. Sol W. Rawls, Jr., Franklin
1973-76 Mrs. Stewart Bell, Jr., Little
Garden Club
1973-76 Mrs. N . W. Bullington,Jr.,

1970-72 Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr.,


Tuckahoe
1972-74 Mrs. W.J. Perry, Augusta
1974-76 Mrs. Bate C.Toms,Jr., Martinsville
1976-78 Mrs. Sol W Rawls, Jr., Franklin
1978-80 Mrs. Robert W. Keller,] ames River
1980-82 Mrs. William W. Old III, Blue Ridge
1982-84 Mrs. Edward H. Ould, Garden
Study
1984-86 Mrs. Willcox Ruffin, Jr., Norfolk
1986-88 Mrs. Austin T. Darden, Jr.,
Nansemond River
1988-90 Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr.,
Northern Neck
1990-92 Mrs. Edward A. Barham, Jr.,
Elizabeth River
186

Appendix I
1988-91 Mrs. Austin T. Darden, Jr.,
Nansemond River
1989-92 Mrs. Paul W Mengel, Gabriella
1989-92 Mrs. William C. Trenary III,
Warren County
1990-93 Mrs. Robert Carter, Jam es River
1990-93 Mrs. Richard S. Bray, Elizabeth
River
1991-94 Mrs. Arthur S. Brinkley,Jr.,
Three Chopt
1991-94 Mrs.Josiah Pollard Rowe III,
Rappahannock Valley
1992-95 Mrs. P. William Moore, Jr.,
Augusta
1992-95 Mrs. T. Austin Sydnor, Jr.,
Albemarle
1993-96 Mrs. William L. Roberts, Jr.,
Williamsburg
1993-96 Mrs. George A. Horkan, Jr.,
Fauquier and Loudoun
1994Mrs. Frank T. Ellett, Mill Mountain
1994Mrs. Hill Carter, Jr., Ashland
1995Mrs. David F. King,
Rappahannock Valley
1995Mrs. Arthur Pleasant Sibold,Jr.,
Hunting Creek

Mill Mountain
1974-77 Mrs. W Wright Harrison,
Virginia Beach
1974-77 Mrs. RobertL. Hopkins,Jr.,
Ashland
1975-78 Mrs. Frederic W Scott, Albemarle
1975-78 Mrs. Edwin B. Vaden, Hillside
1976-79 Mrs.John S. Battle,Jr., Boxwood
1976-79 Mrs. Benjamin W Mears, Jr.,
Eastern Shore
1977 -80 Mrs.Jam es C. Godwin,
Nansemond River
1977-80 Mrs. B. Powell Harrison, Leesburg,
Fauquier and Loudoun
1978-81 Mrs. William H. Parker, Jr.,
Gabriella
1978-81 Mrs. Charles K. Woltz, Rivanna
1979-82 Mrs. Lea Booth, Hillside
1979-82 Mrs. McCluer Gilliam, Blue Ridge
1980-83 Mrs. Henley L. Guild, Hunting
Creek
1980-83 Mrs. Robert W Preston,
Spotswood
1981-84 Mrs. Russell S. Crenshaw,Jr.,
Alexandria
1981-84 Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley,
Winchester-Clarke
1982-85 Mrs. GeorgeM. Brooke,Jr.,
Blue Ridge
1982-85 Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.,
Lynchburg
1983-86 Mrs. James B. Murray, Albemarle
1983-86 Mrs. Edward A. Barham, Jr.,
Elizabeth River
1984-87 Mrs. Edward H. Ould, Garden
Study
1984-87 Mrs. Hunter H. McGuire, Jr.,
James River
1985-88 Mrs. Charles C. Freed,Jr.,
Danville
1985-88 Mrs.JereM. H . Willis,Jr.,
Rappahannock Valley
1986-89 Mrs. Willcox Ruffin, Jr., Norfolk
1986-89 Mrs. Merritt W Foster, Jr.,
Boxwood
1987-90 Mrs. Hugh]. Hagan, Jr., Roanoke
Valley
1987-90 Mrs. Thomas H. Tullidge, Augusta
1988-91 Mrs.James T. Butler, Jr.,
Brunswick
187

Follow the Green Arrow

APPENDIX II
COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN

1970-1995

1976-78 Mrs. Richard F. Welton, Virginia


Beach
1978-80 Mrs. Eugene R. Marable,Jr.,
Petersburg
1980-82 Mrs. Hugh L. Patterson, Virginia
Beach
1982-84 Mrs. Charles P. Smith III, Garden
Study
1984-86 Mrs. Austin T. Darden, Jr.,
Nansemond River
1986-88 Mrs. George A. Whipple, Fairfax
1988-90 Mrs. William H. West, Jr.,
Fauquier and Loudoun
1990-92 Mrs.James A. Stuart, Jr., Eastern
Shore
1992-94 Mrs. Leland E. Beale, Jr., Franklin
1994-96 Mrs. Alexander M. Fisher, Jr.,
James River

ADMISSIONS
1970-72 Mrs. N. W. Bullington, Jr., Mill
Mountain
1972-74 Mrs. H. Marston Smith, Northern
Neck
1974-76 Mrs. Mayor F. Fogler, Virginia
Beach
1976-78 Mrs. E. Griffith Dodson, Jr., Mill
Mountain
1978-80 Mrs. Stewart Bell, Jr., Little
Garden Club
1980-82 Mrs.James T. Butler, Jr.,
Brunswick
1982-84 Mrs. Thomas F. Motley III,
Chatham
1984-86 Mrs. Colin]. S. Thomas,Jr.,
Augusta
1986-88 Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall, Jr., James
River
1988-90 Mrs. William Ingles, Gloucester
1990-92 Mrs.Joseph W. Hazlegrove,
Roanoke Valley
1992-94 Mrs. Paul W. Mengel, Gabriella
1994-96 Mrs. Farris P. Hotchkiss, Blue
Ridge Garden Club

COMMON WEALTH AWARD


1980-82 Mrs. Frederic W. Scott, Albemarle
1982-84 Mrs. Charles B. Miller, Boxwood
1984-86 Mrs. William H. Parker, Jr.,
Gabriella
1986-88 Mrs. William L. Gilliam, Jr.,
Virginia Beach
1988-90 Mrs. Edward A. Barham, Jr.,
Elizabeth River
1990-92 Mrs. William L. Roberts, Jr.,
Williamsburg
1992-94 Mrs. David F. King,
Rappahannock Valley
1994-96 Mrs. H. Harrison Braxton, Jr.,
Rappahannock Valley

ANNUAL and BOARD OF


GOVERNORS' MEETINGS
1970-72 Mrs.]. H. Tyler Wilson,
Warrenton
1972-74 Mrs. Daniel 0. Worthington,
Charlottesville
197 4-76 Mrs. Hosea E. Wilson, Gabriella
188

Appendix II
CONSERVATION and
BEAUTIFICATION

FLOWER SHOWS
1970-72 Mrs. T. B. Apgar, Warren County
1972-73 Mrs. David G. Simpson,
Winchester-Clarke
1973-74 Mrs. Charles K Waltz, Rivanna
Miss Virginia Bowen,
Charlottesville
1974-76 Mrs.J. H. Cunningham, Fauquier
and Loudoun
1976-78 Mrs. D. H. Patteson-Knight,
Fairfax
1978-80 Mrs. Henley L. Guild, Hunting
Creek
1980-82 Mrs. St.Julian Oppenhimer,
Tuckahoe
1982-84 Mrs. Joseph P. Lawson, Roanoke
Valley
1984-86 Mrs. Merritt W Foster, Jr.,
Boxwood
1986-88 Mrs. Richard S. Bray, Elizabeth
River
1988-90 Mrs. William Brooke Power,
Three Chopt
1990-92 Mrs. Hugh]. Hagan, Jr., Roanoke
Valley
1992-94 Mrs.James F. Tyler, Leesburg
1994-96 Mrs.John R. Eagle, Spotswood

1970-72 Mrs. Mayor F. Fogler, Virginia


Beach
1972-74 Mrs.James B. Montgomery,
Martinsville
1974-76 Mrs. William R. Miller, Jr.,
Princess Anne
1976-78 Mrs. Richard G. Miller, Jr.,
Albemarle
1978-80 Mrs. Charles B. Miller, Boxwood
1980-82 Mrs.James C. Godwin,
Nansemond River
1982-84 Mrs. Edward L. Dashiell, Virginia
Beach
1984-86 Mrs. John E. Clarkson, Norfolk
1986-88 Mrs. Theodore G. Scott, Jr.,
Dolley Madison
1988-90 Mrs. Robert Carter, James River
1990-92 Mrs. Frank T. Ellett,
Mill Mountain
1992-94 Mrs.James B. Murray, Albemarle
1994-96 Mrs. Clarke T. Cooper, Jr., Little
Garden Club
FINANCE
1970-72 Mrs. Edwin B. Vaden, Hillside
1972-74 Mrs. McCluer Gilliam, Blue Ridge
1974-76 Mrs. Wyatt A. Williams, Dolley
Madison
1976-78 Mrs.James 0. Burke, James River
1978-80 Mrs.John D. Varner, Roanoke
Valley
1980-82 Mrs. Thomas H. Tullidge,
Augusta
1982-84 Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.,
Ashland
1984-86 Miss Jean Printz, Rivanna
1986-88 Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.,
Ashland
1988-90 Mrs. John D. Varner, Roanoke
Valley
1990-92 Mrs.Jam es C. Godwin,
Nansemond River
1992-94 Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley,
Winchester-Clarke
1994-96 Mrs. George A. Whipple, Fairfax

HISTORIAN and CUSTODIAN


OF RECORDS
1970-72 Mrs. Munford R. Yates, Petersburg
1972-74 Mrs.]. Sloan Kuykendall,
Winchester-Clarke
1974-76 Mrs. H. Blair F arinholt, Gloucester
1976-78 Mrs. R. Bolling Camerons
Petersburg
1978-80 Mrs.James S. Dietz, Leesburg
1980-82 Mrs. Eugene R. Marable,
Petersburg
1982-84 Mrs. W Tayloe Murphy, Jr.,
Northern Neck
1984-86 Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall, Jr., Jam es
River
1986-88 Mrs. William C. Trenary III,
Warren County
1988-90 Mrs.JereM. H. Willis,Jr.,
Rappahannock Valley
1990-92 Mrs. William H. West, Jr.,
189

Follow the Green Arrow


1993-95 Mrs. Robert A. Bristow,James
River
VC: Mrs.James C. Hamilton,
ThreeChopt
1995-97 Mrs.James C. Hamilton, Three
Chopt
VC: Mrs. Bowlman T. Bowles, Jr.,
Boxwood

F auquisr and Loudoun


1992-94 Mrs. Carroll W. Bartlett,
Gloucester
1994-96 Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.,
Ashland
HISTORIC GARDEN WEEK
1969-71 Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall,Jr.,James
River
VC: Mrs. Alexander W. Neal, Jr.,
Three Chopt
1971-73 Mrs. Alexander W. Neal, Jr.,
Three Chopt
VC: Mrs.John S. Battle, Jr.,
Boxwood
1973-75 Mrs.John S. Battle,Jr., Boxwood
VC: Mrs. Lawrence Lewis, Jr.,
Tuckahoe
1975-77 Mrs. LawrenceLewis,Jr., Tuckahoe
VC: Mrs.Hunter H. McGuire, Jr.,
James River
1977-79 Mrs. Hunter H. McGuire, ] r.,
James River
VC: Mrs. Horace H. Harrison,
Three Chopt
1979-81 Mrs. Horace H. Harrison, Three
Cho pt
VC: Mrs. Charles L. Reed, Jr.,
Boxwood
1981-83 Mrs. Charles L. Reed, Jr., Boxwood
VC: Mrs. Parke E. Smith, Tuckahoe
1983-85 Mrs. Parke E. Smith, Tuckahoe
VC: Mrs. Robert]. Keller, James
River
1985-87 Mrs. Robert]. Keller, James River
VC: Mrs. Arthur S. Brinkley, Jr.,
Three Chopt
1987-89 Mrs. Arthur S. Brinkley,Jr., Three
Chopt
VC: Mrs. Merritt W. Foster, Jr.,
Boxwood
1989-91 Mrs. Merritt W. Foster, Jr.,
Boxwood
VC: Mrs. St. Julian Oppenhimer,
Tuckahoe
1991-93 Mrs. St.Julian Oppenhimer,
Tuckahoe
VC: Mrs. Robert A. Bristow,James
River

1965-92 Mrs.]. Robert Massie, Jr., Editor


of Guidebook and Director of
Publicity
1992Mrs. Edwin P. Munson Editor of
Guidebook and Executive
Director of Historic Garden
Week
1971-86 Mrs. Richard B. Williams,
Executive Secretary
1988Mrs. William H. Flowers,
Secretary (in 1993 designation
changed to Administrator)
HORTICULTURE
1970-72 Mrs.]. W. Clarke, Garden Study
1972-74 Mrs. William Seipp, Fauquier and
Loudoun
197 4-76 Mrs. Robert W. Massie ill,
Lynchburg
1976-78 Mrs. Charles K. Waltz, Rivanna
1978-80 Mrs. Robert L. Frackelton,
Rappahannock Valley
1980-82 Mrs. Russell B. Davis, Princess
Anne
1982-84 Mrs. Tull Gearreald, Norfolk
1984-86 Mrs. Robert C. Wood ill,
Lynchburg
1986-88 Mrs.Jack C. Fuson, Gloucester
1988-90 Mrs. William L. Roberts, Jr.,
Williamsburg
1990-92 Mrs. George A. Horkan,Jr.,
Fauquier and Loudoun
1992-94 Mrs. Charles H . Seilheimer, Jr.,
Warrenton
1994-96 Mrs. Judy Boyce Bray, Elizabeth
River (Mrs. Stephen S. Perry, Jr.
name change)
190

Appendix II
Valley
1994-95 Mrs. Edward A. Barham, Jr.,
Elizabeth River
1995-96 Mrs. Charles C. Freed, Jr.,
Danville

KENT-VALENTINE HOUSE
1972-74 Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr.,
Boxwood
1974-76 Mrs. DeWittF. Helm,Jr., Boxwood
1976-78 Mrs.James C. Wheat, Jr., Tuckahoe
1978-80 Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall, Jr.,
James River
1980-81 Mrs. Williams E. Pembleton,
Tuckahoe
1981-82 Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall, Jr., James
River
1982-84 Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall, Jr., James
River
1984-86 Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr.,
Boxwood
1986-88 Mrs. W. G. Maser, Boxwood
1988-90 Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall, Jr., James
River
1990-92 Mrs. Richard H. Catlett, Jr.,
Boxwood
1992-94 Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr.,
Boxwood
1994-96 Mrs. Charles H. Frischkorn,
Tuckahoe

NOMINATIONS
1970-72 Mrs. James Bland Martin,
Gloucester
1972-74 Mrs. Benjamin F. Parrott, Mill
Mountain
1974-76 Mrs. Lucius]. Kellam, Eastern
Shore
1976-78 Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr.,
Boxwood
1978-80 Mrs. George M. Cochran, Augusta
1980-82 Mrs.John D. Varner, Jr., Roanoke
Valley
1982-84 Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr., Norfolk
1984-86 Mrs. Frederic W. Scott, Albemarle
1986-88 Miss Jean Printz, Rivanna
1988-90 Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.,
Eastern Shore
1990-92 Mrs. Wyatt A. Williams, Dolley
Madison
1992-94 Mrs. James C. Godwin,
Nansemond River
1994-96 Mrs. Henley L. Guild, Hunting
Creek

MASSIE MEDAL AWARD


1970-72 Mrs . ]. Gordon Lindsay,
Charlottesville
1972-74 Mrs. Webster S. Rhoads,Jr.,
Gloucester
1974-76 Mrs. Francis P. Brawley, Albemarle
1976-78 Mrs. Spotswood B. Hall,Jr.,James
River
1978-80 Mrs. C. Harrisbn Mann, Jr.,
Hunting Creek
1980-82 Mrs. Ben B. Pickett, Gloucester
1982-84 Mrs. C. C. Carbaugh, Warren
County
1984-86 Mrs. Wyatt A. Williams, Dolley
Madison
1986-88 Mrs.James B. Montgomery,
Martinsville
1988-90 Mrs. William L. Gilliam, Jr.,
Virginia Beach
1990-92 Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.,
Ashland
1992-94 Mrs. Hugh]. Hagan, Jr., Roanoke

PARLIAMENTARIAN and EDITOR


OF THE REGISTER
1970-72
1972-74
1974-76
1976-78
1978-80
1980-82
1982-84
1984-86
1986-88
1988-90
1990-92
191

Mrs.James W. Ray, Jr., Gabriella


Miss Jean Printz, Rivanna
Mrs. McCluer Gilliam, Blue Ridge
Mrs. C. Harrison Mann, Jr.,
Hunting Creek
Mrs. Thomas H. Tullidge, Augusta
Mrs. Charles C. Freed, Jr., Danville
Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.,
Eastern Shore
Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr.,
Northern Neck
Mrs. Henley L. Guild, Hunting
Creek
Mrs. Charles H. Schutte, Jr.,
Winchester-Clarke
Mrs. Willcox Ruffin, Jr., Norfolk

Follow the Green Arrow


1992-94 Mrs. Robert C. Wood III,
Lynchburg
1994-96 Mrs. Leland E. Beale, Jr., Franklin

EDITOR
1961-88 Mrs.John M. Stetson,
Williamsburg

PUBLIC RELATIONS, DIRECTOR OF

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

1970-72 Miss Jean Printz, Rivanna


1972-74 Mrs. RobertL. Hopkins,Jr.,
Ashland
1974-76 Mrs. H. Marston Smith, Northern
Neck
1976-78 Mrs. William W. Old III, Blue
Ridge
1978-80 Mrs. Charles C. Freed,Jr.,
Danville
1980-82 Mrs.JackM. Gwaltney,Jr.,
Charlottesville
1982-84 Mrs. William J . McDonald,
Leesburg
1984-86 Mrs. David L. Peebles, Gloucester
1986-88 Mrs. Leland E. Beale, Jr., Franklin
1988-90 Mrs. Josiah Pollard Rowe III,
Rappahannock Valley
1990-92 Mrs. David F. King,
Rappahannock Valley
1992-94 Mrs. Hill Carter, Jr., Ashland
1994-96 Mrs. Rudolph Bumgardner III,
Augusta

1973-88 Mrs. T. Robert Vermillion,


Williamsburg
PUBLICATIONS, CHAIRMEN
1988-90 Mrs. Charles C. Freed, Jr.,
Danville
1990-92 Mrs. Hunter H. McGuire, Jr.,
James River
1992-94 Mrs. Austin T. Darden. Jr.,
Nansemond River
1994-96 Mrs. Robert C. Wood III,
Lynchburg
EDITORIAL BOARD, CHAIRMEN
1988-90 Mrs. William W. Old III, Blue
Ridge
1990-92 Mrs. Austin T. Darden, Jr.,
Nansemond River
1992-94 Mrs. William W. Old III, Blue
Ridge
1994-96 Mrs.James F.Johnson, Roanoke
Valley

PUBLICATIONS
THE GARDEN CLUB
OF VIRGINIA JOURNAL

EDITORS of THE GARDEN CLUB OF


VIRGINIAJOURNAL and UPDATE

CHAIRMEN

1988-90 Mrs. Lewis F. J ally, Spotswood


1990- Mrs. Royston Jester rv; Hillside
(1994 - Name Change: Mrs. C.
Patterson Jester)

1970-72 Mrs.Joseph M. Mercer, Dolley


Madison
1972-74 Mrs. A. T. Embrey, Jr.,
Rappahannock Valley
1974-76 Mrs. William H. Sipe, Huntington
197 6-78 Mrs. McKelden Smith, Augusta
1978-80 Mrs. Dixon Foster, Northern
Neck
1980-82 Mrs. E. Barham Dodson, Franklin
1982-84 Mrs. Robert T. Scott, Boxwood
1984-86 Mrs. Thomas W. Wood,
Williamsburg
1986-88 Mrs. William W. Old III,
Blue Ridge

RESTORATION
1970-72 Mrs. Thomas E. Thorne,
Williamsburg
1972-74 Mrs. Lucius]. Kellam, Eastern
Shore
1974-76 Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr.,
Tuckahoe
197 6-78 Mrs. George M. Cochran, Augusta
192

Appendix II
1978-80 Mrs. George H. Flowers,Jr.,
Boxwood
1980-82 Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr., Norfolk
1982-84 Mrs. William L. Gilliam, Jr.,
Virginia Beach
1984-86 Mrs. Henley L. Guild, Hunting
Creek
1986-88 Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley,
Wmchester-Clarke
1988-90 Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.,
Ashland
1990-92 Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.,
Lynchburg
1992-94 Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.,
Eastern Shore
1994-96 Mrs. Paul W. Mengel, Gabriella

1994-

Dolley Madison
Mrs. W. John Matheson,
Gloucester

LILY
1966-72 Mrs. Arthur A. Dugdale, Ashland
1972-76 Mrs. Hunt Nenon, Chatham
1976-80 Mrs. Wilfred T. Grenfell, Jr.,
Dolley Madison
1980-84 Mrs. Douglas G. Lindsay, Hunting
Creek
1984-86 Mrs. Saxon W. Holt,Jr., Virginia
Beach
1986-88 Mrs. Donald R. Ober, Dolley
Madison
1988Mrs. David Diller, Spotswood

SLIDES
ROSE
1970-72 Mrs. William H. King, Three
Chopt
1972-74 Mrs. Richmond Gray, Three
Chopt
1974-76 Mrs. Ivor Massey, Boxwood
1976-78 Mrs. R. Vollie Richardson,
Hampton Roads
1978-80 Miss Jane Saunders, Tuckahoe
1980-82 Mrs. Edward H. Ould, Garden
Study
1982-84 Mrs.James T. Butler, Jr.,
Brunswick
1984-86 Mrs.John D. Haire, Jr., Petersburg
1986-88 Mrs. J. Brooks Semple, Warrenton
1988-90 Mrs. Patrick Acheson, Leesburg
1990-92 Mrs. Douglas E. Quarles, Jr.,
Rappahannock Valley
1992-94 Mrs. Laurent Boetsch, Blue Ridge
1994-96 Mrs. E. Carruthers Bruce, Virginia
Beach

1964-74 Mrs. Thomas R. Nelson, Augusta


1974-78 Mrs. Russell S. Crenshaw, Jr.,
Alexandria
1978-90 Mrs. James W. Perkinson, Danville
1990-96 Mrs.John P.Josephs, Three Chopt
CHAIRMEN OF SPECIAL
COMMITTEES
KENT-VALENTINE HOUSE LONG
RANGE PLANNING
1992-

Co-Chairmen - Mrs. George M.


Cochran, Augusta
Mrs. Richard H. Catlett, Jr.,
Boxwood
INVESTMENT

1990-92 Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson III,


Tuckahoe {name change to}
1992-94 Mrs.JackMcP. Parrish,Jr.,
Tuckahoe
1994-96 Mrs. R. Walter Jones III,
Tuckahoe

TEST COLLECTIONS
DAFFODIL
1968-74 Mrs. Reginald F. C. Vance,
Gloucester
1974-82 Mrs. Karl F. Hehl, Lynchburg
1982-91 Mrs.Joel Crenshaw, Hunting
Creek
1991-94 Mrs. Robert F. Gillespie, Jr.,

SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Seventy-fifth Anniversary Gala - Chairmen
1994-95 Mrs. Hunter H . McGuire, Jr.,
193

Follow the Green Arrow


James River
Mrs. William T. Tucker, Three
Cho pt
Mrs. Herbert A. Claiborne, Jr.,
James River
CAMPAIGN for the
KENT-VALENTINE HOUSE
1995-

Co-Chairmen - Mrs. Charles H.


Seilheimer, Jr., Warrenton
Mrs. P. William Moore,Jr., Augusta

194

Appendix Ill

APPENDIX III
LIST OF MEMBER CLUBS

Admitted GCV:

Club:

Organized:

ALEXANDRIA
The Garden Club of Alexandria
The Hunting Creek Garden Club

10/1/1925
3/5/1942

4/23/1930
5/12/1954

ASHLAND
The Ashland Garden Club

10112/1922

5/19/1948

CHARLOTTESVILLE
Albemarle Garden Club
The Charlottesville Garden Club
Rivanna Garden Club

10/16/1913
3/17/1949
11/16/1922

511511957
5/30/1924

CHATHAM
Chatham Garden Club

7/1921

5/12/1922

DANVILLE
The Garden Club of Danville
Gabriella Garden Club

6/20/1918
4/15/1933

1920
5/1111938

EASTERN SHORE
Garden Club of the Eastern Shore

5/12/1939

5/12/1942

FAIRFAX
The Garden Club of Fairfax

6/1926

6/13/1935

FRANKLIN
The Franklin Garden Club

9/1945

5/17/1955

FREDERICKSBURG
The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club

10/28/1924

FRONT ROYAL
The Garden Club of Warren County

6119/1929
195

1920

5/3/1933
5/20/1941

Follow the Green Arrow


GLOUCESTER
The Garden Club of Gloucester

6/1928

HARRISONBURG
The Spotswood Garden Club

7118/1924

6/12/1929

LAWRENCEVILLE
The Brunswick Garden Club

3/12/1924

5/18/1926

LEESBURG
Leesburg Garden Club

12/9/1915

5/18/1926

LEXINGTON
The Blue Ridge Garden Club

10/111925

4/23/1930

LYNCHBURG
Hillside Garden Club
The Lynchburg Garden Club

7/1935
3/29/1922

5/29/1953
5/23/1923

MARTINSVILLE
The Garden Study Club
The Martinsville Garden Club

9/1946
4/1923

5/15/1958
5/30/1924

MIDDLEBURG AREA
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club

11/23/1915

NEWPORT NEWS-HAMPTON
Hampton Roads Garden Club
The HuntingtoD Garden Club

4/1932
4/1935

5/12/1937
5/17/1956

NORFOLK
Harborfront Garden Club
The Garden Club of Norfolk

1953
2/24/1915

5/20/1992
1920

NORTHERN NECK
The Garden Club of the Northern Neck

1lt15/1966

5/14/1969

ORANGE
Dolley Madison Garden Club

11/1919

1920

PETERSBURG
The Petersburg Garden Club

5/5/1925

5/19/1932

PORTSMOUTH
The Elizabeth River Garden Club

417/1927

5/14/1975

RICHMOND
The Boxwood Garden Club
The James River Garden Club
Three Chopt Garden Club

1/1937
3/1/1915
2/7/1939

5/15/1952
1920
5/15/1952

196

5/9/1945

1920

Appendix III
Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton
ROANOKE
The Mill Mountain Garden Club
Roanoke Valley Garden Club
STAUNTON
The Augusta Garden Club

6/28/1928

5/10/1934

6/29/1927
4/1925

5/27/1936
6/12/1929

1919

1920

SUFFOLK
The Nansemond River Garden Club

10/26/1928

5/27/1936

VIRGINIA BEACH
The Princess Anne Garden Club
The Virginia Beach Garden Club

2/6/1932
3/10/1937

5/11/1938
5/29/1953

WARRENTON
The Warrenton Garden Club

5/17/1911

1920

WILLIAMSBURG
The Williamsburg Garden Club

3/21/29

6/11/1931

WINCHESTER
The Little Garden Club of Winchester
Winchester-Clarke Garden Club

7/1934
517/1924

5/12/1954
5/26/1927

The following fo:ur clubs were members but later resigned:


Name:
Warrenton Flower Club
Scottsville
West Park View, Portsmouth
Warm Springs Valley, Hot Springs

Admitted:
1922
1925
1925
1925

197

Resigned:
1927
1938
1938
1956

Follow the Green Arrow

APPENDIX IV

LIST OF HOSTESS CLUBS

1970-1995

The James River Garden Club ................................................................... May 19, 20, 21,
The Martinsville Garden Club ............................................................ October 13, 14, 15,
The Charlottesville Garden Club .............................................................. May 11, 12, 13,
The Franklin Garden Club .................................................................. October 26, 27, 28,
The Hunting Creek Garden Club ............................................................. May 16, 17, 18,
The Little Garden Club of Winchester ............................................... October 10, 11, 12,
The Lynchburg Garden Club .................................................................... May 15, 16, 17,
Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton .............................................. October 9, 10, 11,
Albemarle Garden Club ............................................................................. May 21, 22, 23,
The Mill Mountain Garden Club ............................................................. October 8, 9,10,
The Garden Club of Alexandria ................................................................ May 13, 14, 15,
Garden Club of the Eastern Shore ...................................................... October 14, 15, 16,
The Rapahannock Valley Garden Club ..................................................... May 11, 12, 13,
Gabriella Garden Club ......................................................................... October 12, 13, 14,
The Virginia Beach Garden Club .............................................................. May 17, 18, 19,
The Petersburg Garden Club .............................................................. October 11, 12, 13,
Hillside Garden Club ................................................................................. May 16, 17, 18,
The Garden Study Club ....................................................................... October 10, 11, 12,
The Boxwood Garden Club ....................................................................... May 15, 16, 17,
The Spotswood Garden Club ................................................................ October 9, 10, 11,
The Garden Club of Fairfax ...................................................................... May 20, 21, 22,
The Blue Ridge Garden Club .............................................................. October 14, 15, 16,
Hampton Roads Garden Club ................................................................... May 19, 20, 21,
The Garden Club of Warren County .................................................. October 13, 14, 15,
The Princess Anne Garden Club ............................. ,................................. May 18, 19, 20,
The Augusta Garden Club ...................................................................... ctober 19, 20, 21,
The Garden Club of the Northern Neck .................................................. May 17, 18, 19,
Winchester-Clarke Garden Club ......................................................... October 11, 12, 13,
The Garden Club of Danville .................................................................... May 15, 16, 17,
The Ashland Garden Club ................................................................... October 16, 17, 18.
Rivanna Garden Club ................................................................................. May 21, 22, 23,
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club .................................................. October 15, 16, 17,
Three Chopt Garden Club ........................................................................ May 13, 14, 15,
The Nansemond River Garden Club .................................................. October 14, 15, 16,
Roanoke Valley Garden Club ..................................................................... May 19, 20, 21,
198

1970
1970
1971
1971
1972
1972
1973
1973
1974
1974
1975
1975
1976
1976
1977
1977
1978
1978
1979
1979
1980
1980
1981
1981
1982
1982
1983
1983
1984
1984
1985
1985
1986
1986
1987

Appendix IV
The Brunswick Garden Club ............................................................... October 13, 14,1 5, 1987
The Williamsburg Garden Club ................................................................ May 10, 11, 12, 1988
The Garden Club of Gloucester .......................................................... October 11, 12, 13, 1988
The Jam es River Garden Club ..................................................................... May 9, 10, 11, 1989
Garden Club of the Eastern Shore ...................................................... October 24, 25, 26, 1989
The Huntington Garden Club ................. ......................................... ............. May 8, 9, 10, 1990
Leesburg Garden Club ......................................................................... October 17, 18, 19, 1990
The Virginia Beach Garden Club .............................................................. May 14, 15, 16, 1991
The Franklin Garden Club ...................................................................... October 8, 9, 10, 1991
The Lynchburg Garden Club .................................................................... May 19, 20, 21, 1992
The Warrenton Garden Club ...................................... ........ ................ October 13, 14, 15, 1992
The Elizabeth River Garden Club ............................................................. May 11, 12, 13 , 1993
The Hunting Creek Garden Club ....................................................... October 12, 13, 14, 1993
Albemarle Garden Club ............................................................................. May 10, 11 , 12, 1994
The Garden Study Club ......................................................................... October 11,12,13 , 1994
The Garden Club of Norfolk ....................................................................... May 9, 10, 11, 1995
Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton ............................................ October 10, 11, 12, 1995

199

Fol/aw the Green Arrow

APPENDIXV
LIST OF GCV RESTORATIONS

Chairmen: Mrs. Fairfax Harrison and


Mrs. Thomas R. Boggs
Renovation, 1954-1958
Landscape Architect: Mr. Alden S.
Hopkins
Chairmen: Mrs. A. E. Kendrew and
Mrs. Herbert McK. Smith

The outstanding work and achievement


of The Garden Club of Virginia has been the
restoration of historic gardens within the
State. This accomplishment has been made
possible through the net proceeds of Historic
Garden Week. Beginning in 1929 the last week
in April has been observed as Historic Garden Week in Virginia when, under the auspices of The Garden Club of Virginia, the
great majority of the historic homes and gardens of the State and a limited number of
modem gardens have been open to the public
on payment of a fee. Over $5 ,000,000 has been
raised from Historic Garden Week and used
to provide proper settings for many of
Virginia's historic landmarks.

3) WOODROW WILSON BIRTHPLACE, Staunton, Garden, 1932-1934


Landscape Architect: Mr. Charles F.
Gillette
Chairman: Mrs. Thomas R. Boggs
Brick paths laid, 1960
Landscape Architect: Mr. Charles F.
Gillette
Chairman: Mrs. C. James Andrews
Terraces, 1968
Landscape Architect: Mr. Ralph E.
Griswold
Chairman: Mrs. James Bland Martin
Forecourt and gardens connecting the
Museum with the Emily Smith Reception
Center, 1990
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J. Favretti
Chairmen: Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.
and Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.

1) KENMORE, Fredericksburg, Garden and


grounds, 1929
Betty Washington's Flower Garden, 1941
Landscape Architect: Mr. Charles F.
Gillette
Chairman: Mrs. Thomas W. Wheelwright
Fredericksburg-Wilderness Walk. Tree
Planting Plan, Walk and Terrace
Adjustments, Demonstration
Kitchen Garden, 1992-1996
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J. F avretti
Chairman: Mrs. Paul W. Mengel

4) LEE CHAPEL, Washington and Lee


University, Lexington.
Planting, 193 3
Landscape Architect: Mr. Charles F.
Gillette
Chairman: Mrs. Thomas R. Boggs
Brick Terrace, 1977

2) STRATFORD HALL, Westmoreland


County, Garden 1930-1932
Landscape Architects: Mr. Arthur
Shurcliff and Mr. Morley Williams
200

Appendix V

5) ROLFE-WARREN HOUSE, Smith Fort


Plantation, Surry County. Grounds, 1936
Landscape Architect: Mr. Arthur Shurcliff
Chairman: Mrs. Thomas R. Boggs

13) WEST LAWN, University of Virginia,


Charlottesville.
Five gardens, 1947-1953.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Alden S.
Hopkins
Chairmen: Mrs. D. C. Sands, Mrs. C.
James Andrews
Mrs. Herbert McK. Smith

6) WILTON, Richmond. Grounds,1936


Landscape Architect: Mr. Arthur Shurcliff
Chairman: Mrs. Thomas R. Boggs
Additional planting, 1959
Pair of iron gates, 1961
Landscape Architect: Mr. Alden S.
Hopkins

14) GUNSTON HALL, Fairfax County.


Gardens and grounds, 1947-1954.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Alden S.
Hopkins
Chairmen: Mrs. D. C. Sands, Mrs. C.
Jam es Andrews, Mrs. Herbert McK.
Smith, Mrs. Frank]. Gilliam

7) BRUTON PARISH CHURCH,


Williamsburg. Churchyard, 193 7.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Arthur Shurcliff
Chairman: Mrs. Thomas R. Boggs

15) WOODLAWN PLANTATION, Fairfax


County, Gardens and grounds, 1953-1960.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Alden S.
Hopkins
Chairmen: Mrs. Frank]. Gilliam, Mrs. A.
E. Kendrew, Mrs. Herbert McK. Smith
Orchard paths laid, 1967.
Chairman: Mrs.Jam es Bland Martin
Kitchen garden, 1974.
Chairman: Mrs. Lucius J. Kellam
Visitors Reception Center, 1977.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Meade Palmer
Chairman: Mrs. George Moffett Cochran

Landscape Architects: Griswold, Winters


and Swain
Chairman: Mrs. George Moffett Cochran

8) MARY WASHINGTON MONUMENT, Fredericksburg.


Planting, 193 7.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Alden S.
Hopkins
Chairman: Mrs. Thomas R. Boggs
9) MONTICELLO, Charlottesville. Garden, 1939.
Architect: Mr. Fiske Kimball
Planting plans: Mr. Garland W.Wood,Jr.
Chairman: Mrs. Fairfax Harrison

16) ADAM THOROUGHGOOD HOUSE,


Princess Anne County.
Garden, 1958-1960.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Alden S.
Hopkins
Chairman: Mrs. C. James Andrews

10) CHRIST CHURCH, Middlesex County.


Churchyard 1940.
Chairman: Mrs. Fairfax Harrison
11) FINCASTLE PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH, Botetourt County.
Churchyard, 1942 and 1960.
Chairmen: Mrs. Fairfax Harrison and
Mrs. Frank]. Gilliam

17) EAST LAWN, University of Virginia,


Charlottesville.
Five gardens, 1960-1965.
Landscape Architects: Mr. Alden S.
Hopkins, Mr. Donald H. Parker, Mr.
Ralph E. Griswold
Chairmen: Mrs. Frank J. Gilliam, Mrs.
Thomas E. Thorne, Mrs. Burdette S.
Wright

12) BARTER THEATRE, Abingdon.


Planting 1947-1950.
Chairmen: Mrs. D. C. Sands and
Mrs. C. James Andrews
201

Follow the Green Arrow


Landscape Architect: Mr. Meade Palmer
Chairman: Mrs. George Moffett Cochran

18) ST. JOHN'S MEWS, Richmond, 19641967.


Landscape Architect: Mr. Ralph E.
Griswold
Chairman: Mrs. Burdette S. Wright

26) CENTRE HILL MANSION, Petersburg. Immediate grounds and approach


landscaped, 1980.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy]. Favretti
Chairman: Mrs. George H. Flowers, Jr.

l 9)HISTORIC CHRIST CHURCH,


Lancaster County.
Churchyard, 1966-1968.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Ralph E.
Griswold
Chairman: Mrs. James Bland Martin

27)PRESTWOULD PLANTATION,
Clarksville. Gardens delineated, grounds
restored and summerhouse furnished.
1980-1981. Landscape Architect: Mr.
Rudy]. Favretti Chairmen: Mrs. George
H. Flowers, Jr., Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr.

20) MARY WASHINGTON HOUSE,


Fredericksburg. Garden 1968-1969.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Ralph E.
Griswold
Chairman: Mrs. Wyatt Aiken Williams

28) HISTORIC PORTSMOUTH COURTHOUSE, Portsmouth. Courthouse yard,


1979-1982.
Landscape Architect: Mr.] .P.C. Hanbury
Consulting Landscape Architect: Mr.
Rudy]. Favretti Chairmen: Mrs. George
H. Flowers,] r., Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr.

21) SCOTCHTOWN, Hanover County.


Landscape Setting, 1968-1971.
Landscape Architects: Griswold, Winters
& Swain
Chairmen: Mrs. Wyatt Aiken Williams
and Mrs. Thomas E. Thorne

29) KERR PLACE, Onancock. Grounds and


Gardens, 1982.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J. F avretti
Chairman: Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr.

22) BURWELL-MORGAN MILL, Clarke


County.
Landscape setting. 1971-1973.
Landscape Architects: Griswold, Winters
& Swain
Chairmen: Mrs. Thomas E. Thorne, Mrs.
Lucius]. Kellam

30) SMITHFIELD PLANTATION,


Blacksburg. Fences, walks and colonial
kitchen garden, 1982-1984.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J. Favretti
Chairmen: Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr., Mrs.
William L. Gilliam,] r.

23) KENT-VALENTINE HOUSE, Richmond. Grounds,1972-1973.


Landscape Architects: Griswold, Winters
& Swain
Chairman: Mrs. Lucius J. Kellam

3 l)BELLE GROVE PLANTATION,


Middletown. Landscape Interpretation,
1983-1986
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy]. Favretti
Chairmen: Mrs. William L. Gilliam, Jr.,
Mrs. Henley L. Guild

24) NORTH FORECOURT OF THE ROTUNDA, University of Virginia.


Charlottesville, 1977.
Landscape Architects: Mr.]. Patrick Graham rv, Ms. Nancy Tagahaski, and the
University Planning Office
Chairman: Mrs. George Moffett Cochran

32) BACON'S CASTLE, Surry. Site Archaeology, Restored Garden and Forcing Wall,
1984-1989.
Landscape Architect Mr. Rudy J. Favretti
Chairmen: Mrs. Henley L. Guild, Mrs.
Lilburn T. Talley, Mrs. Robert L.
Hopkins, Jr.

2 5) POINT OF HONOR, Lynchburg.


Landscape restored, 1978.
202

Appendix V
Special gifts:

33) VIRGINIA UNION UNIVERSITY,


Richmond.
Tree plantings, 1989, 1991
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J. Favretti
Chairmen: Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.,
Mrs. H . Gordon Leggett, Jr.

1940 - HAMMOND-HARWOOD HOUSE,


Annapolis, Contribution.
1941 - BRITISH MOBILE KITCHEN.
1941 - Rehabilitation work at PLYMOUTH,
ENGLAND.
1950 - ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, Richmond,
Churchyard.
(Through Massie-Christian fund)
1974- Publication of book,
197 6 HISTORIC VIRGINIA GARDENS, by
Dorothy Hunt Williams in collaboration with Ralph E. Griswold. Second
printing-198 5.

34) GRACE ARENTS GARDEN-LEWIS


GINTER BOTANICAL GARDEN,
Richmond. Restored formal garden with
arbors, seated trellises and garden house,
1990.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J. Favretti
Chairmen: Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr.,

Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.


35) CARLYLE HOUSE, Alexandria. Front
landscape, interpretive signs, indoor interpretive exhibit, 1991.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J. F avretti
Chairmen: Mrs. Lilburn T. Talley, Mrs.
Robert L. Hopkins, Jr., Mrs. H. Gordon
Leggett, Jr.

Refurbishing of previous restorations


for the 197 6 Bicentennial.
1989 - Contribution to the City of Charleston, South Carolina, for the replacement of trees following the devastation
of HURRICANE HUGO.
1993- Publication of book, GARDENS &
LANDSCAPES of VIRGINIA, Photography by Richard Cheek. Text by Rudy
]. Favretti.

36) MONTPELIER Orange. Restoration of


terraced wall gardens and repainting of
brick wall, 1992.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J. F avretti
Chairman: Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.
37) ROBERT E. LEE HOUSE, Lexington.
A public garden for Washington and Lee
University. 1992 .
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J . F avretti
Chairmen: Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.,
Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.
38) BELMONT, Falmouth. Grounds at the
home of the artist, Gari Melchers, 1992
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J. F avretti
Chairmen: Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.,
Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.
39) OATLANDS, Leesburg. Restored Historic Wall, 1991-1992.
Landscape Architect: Mr. Rudy J . F avretti
Chairman: Mrs. H. Gordon Leggett, Jr.

203

Follow the Green Arrow

APPENDIX VI
ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS and WINNERS

ing the Rising Sun Tavern Garden.


1973-Mrs. Robert Miller Jeffress of Richmond for her abiding appreciation of our heritage from the past, for her vision, her gentle
persuasion, her generosity and her many contributions to the University of Virginia and to
our Commonwealth.
1974---Mrs. George H. Flowers,Jr., for her
dedicated service and leadership in the community and in The Garden Club of Virginia
and for her vision and work as the guiding
spirit of the Kent-Valentine House.
197 5-Mrs.James F. Birchfield for her outstanding accomplishment in the field of horticulture, particularly in the growing of lilies
and daffodils, and for her energetic work and
generous sharing of knowledge with other
gardeners.
1976-Mrs. Wyatt Aiken Williams "for her
long and distinguished service and for the
unselfish use of her time and talents in publishing Historic Virginia Gardens, the history
and blueprints of all gardens restored by The
Garden Club of Virginia, 1929-1973."
1977-The Blue Ridge Garden Club of
Lexington for their creation and maintenance
of the Bertha Whitney Townes Memorial
Courtyard Garden at the Stonewall Jackson
Hospital, Lexington.
1978-Mrs. Arthur A. Dugdale of Ashland
for outstanding achievement in horticulture
and stimulation of knowledge and love of gardening among others.
1979-Mrs. Douglas H. Patteson-Knight
of Fairfax for her exceptional knowledge of

FOR ALL PREVIOUS WINNERS OF


AWARDS, SEE THE APPENDIXES: FOL-

LOW THE GREENARROWTHE HISTORY


OF THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
1920-1970.
MASSIE MEDAL: (First awarded in 1929)
The Distinguished Achievement Medal, a
memorial to Mrs. William R. Massie, Honorary President of The Garden Club of Virginia,
may be awarded, when merited, to a member
of a Member Club of The Garden Club of
Virginia, (including Honorary Members) or
to a Member Club of The Garden Club of
Virginia.
The recipient, in the judgment of the Committee, must have done outstanding work in
gardening, served The Garden Club of Virginia with unusual dedication and distinction,
improved the quality of life or have been effective in the protection, restoration, or preservation of the natural beauties of our Commonwealth.
The Medal has been awarded to:
1970-Mrs. James Bland Martin of
Gloucester "for her leadership, devotion and
dedication" and in recognition of her services
in writing Follow The Green Arrow, The His-

tory ofThe Garden Club of Virginia, 1920-1970.


1971-Mrs. Howard B. Bloomer, Jr., of
Lorton in recognition of her international
achievements in the growing and exhibiting
of daffodils.
1972-The Rappahannock Valley Garden
Club of Fredericksburg for creating and plant204

Appendix VI
horticulture and her readiness to teach and
help others.
1980-Mrs. George Moffett Cochran of
Staunton for her outstanding dedication, leadership and concern for The Garden Club of
Virginia and the Commonwealth of Virginia.
1981-Mrs. John M. Stetson of
Williamsburg, Editor of The Garden Club of
Virginia J oumal, for distinguished service to
The Garden Club of Virginia "by her devotion, constancy, knowledge and wit."
1982-Mrs. F. Whitney Godwin of Suffolk for her many years of dedicated service
to The Garden Club of Virginia in the fields
of Restoration and Conservation.
1983-Mrs. W. Hugh Peal of Leesburg for
furthering the aims, ideals and programs of
The Garden Club of Virginia while at the same
time making a significant contribution to the
local community.
1984--- Mrs. Thomas W. Murrell, Jr., of
Richmond in recognition of her integrity,
dedication and leadership to The Garden Club
of Virginia and the community.
1985-Mrs.J. RobertMassie,Jr., of Richmond ... "the success of Garden Week is due
in large part to her editorial expertise, instinctive good taste and persistent hard work."
1986-Mrs. Jam es 0. Lester of Roanoke
for freely sharing her interest in the fields of
arranging and growing flowers.
1987-Mrs. Charles K. Waltz of
Charlottesville for her gift of beauty and her
joy in the giving.
1988-Mrs. C. Harrison Mann, Jr., of Alexandria for "heart and mind and talents ... .in
service to The Garden Club of Virginia."
1989-Mrs. Kenneth S. White of
Lynchburg " .. as a planner, creator, restorer
and preserver of gardens."
1990-Mrs. J. Robert Walker of
Martinsville for a lifetime of outstanding accomplishments in gardening, horticulture and
flower exhibiting.
1990-Mrs. Lucius J. Kellam of the Eastern Shore for a lifetime of dedicated service
to The Garden Club of Virginia.
1991-Miss Jean Printz of Charlottesville
For her "loving and distinguished service to
the community and The Garden Club ofVir-

ginia."
1992-The Garden Club of the Northern
Neck, "an outstanding member club of The
Garden Club of Virginia."
1993-Mrs. Robert L. Hopkins, Jr., of
Ashland for "unparalleled dedication to the
objects of The Garden Club ofVirginia."
1994---Mrs. Toy D. Savage, Jr. for "wise
decisions made with sparkling vitality."
1995-Mary Ramey Cunningham of
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club who
"with clear vision and dedication to teaching
exemplifies the ideals of The Garden Club of
Virginia."
1996-Elizabeth Perkins Varner of
Roanoke Valley Garden Club "for her continuing involvement which is of inestimable
value to The Garden Club of Virginia."

DeLACY GRAY MEDAL:


The Conservation Medal, a memorial to
Mrs. Leslie H. (deLacy) Gray, given by the
Dolley Madison Garden Club of Orange, may
be awarded to an individual member or individual club of Th~ Garden Club of Virginia.
The recipient must, in the judgment of the
committee, have rendered outstanding service
in the dissemination of knowledge of the natural resources of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the conservation and wise development of such resources. This medal was first
awarded in 1965.
This Medal has been awarded to:
1970-Boxwood Garden Club in the name
of Mrs.George H. Flowers, Jr. and Mrs. William A. Johns for their outstanding effort in
promoting interest and educating citizens in
the conservation and beautification of the
James River in the Metropolitan Richmond
area.
1971-Mrs. Claude B. Harris of the Garden Club of Warren County for her outstanding efforts in the field of highway beautification, her activities in Virginia water pollution
control and in recognition of the national
awards she has received including a presidential commendation for community service.
1972-Mrs. William T. Reed, Jr. of the
James River Garden Club for her many
achievements in the field of conservation, in205

Follow the Green Arrow


James River Garden Club for her outstanding effort in conserving and developing the
natural resources of Maymont Park in Richmond.
1983-Mrs. John M. Chaney of the Mill
Mountain Garden Club as a leader dedicated
to the causes of conservation and beautification.
1984-Elizabeth Pinkerton Scott of the
Albemarle Garden Club for her vision and
leadership in conservation and beautification.
1985-Mrs. Edgar B. Wertheimer, Jr. of
theHampton Roads Garden Club for her remarkable service in the dissemination of
knowledge of environmental problems to her
club and to her community.
1986-Mrs. James W Denton of Front
Royal, author and photographer of ""Wildflowers of the Potomac Appalachians-a
Hilker's Guide".
1987-Mrs. John W Clark of The Garden Study Club for her lifelong dedication to
the beautification of Martinsville.
1988-Mrs. S. W: Rawls, Jr. a dedicated
conservationist who, during her lifetime,
opened her home to young people for the
study of conservation and horticulture.
1989-Mrs. James C. Godwin of The
Nansemond River Garden Club for inspired
leadership in conservation, accomplished with
humor, intelligence and vision.
1990-The Lynchburg Garden Club for
the miracle wrought by Operation Plant-ATree. Nominated by Hillside Garden Club.
1991-Mrs. Robert Carter, a tireless visionary who, with endless energy and stewardship, has served as a catalyst for environmental action in Virginia and indeed, across
the nation.
1992-Mrs. Russell Arundel of
Warrenton-a conservation leader who demonstrates a love for the natural environment
and a responsibility for its preservation.
1993-Mrs. C. F. Urquhart, Jr. of the
Franklin Garden Club for her many achievements in education, conservation, and horticulture, and for her generosity in sharing her
knowledge with others.
1994-No Award.
199 5-Bunny Murray (Mrs. Jam es B.

eluding service on local, state and national


boards which advance conservation and for
making her home, Sabot Hill Farm, a showplace of good conservation practices.
1973-Mrs. E. Polk Kellam of The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore for placing service to humanity ahead of personal recognition in her untiring efforts and many outstanding accomplishments in the field of conservation.
1974-Mrs. Mayor Farthing Fogler ofThe
Garden Club of Norfolk and The Virginia
Beach Garden Club for years of devotion to
the conservation of Virginia's beauty and natural resources and for special dedication to the
preservation of the coastal areas.
197 5-Mrs. B. Powell Harrison for her
dedicated and effective work to protect the
natural resources of the Commonwealth, and
for her years of service in the promotion of
recycling and reuse, of environmental education and of legialation to preserve the beauty
of the land.
197 6--Miss Elisabeth Aiken Nolting of the
Rivanna Garden Club for her dedicated and
effective work in preserving historic Green
Springs Valley from twentieth century encroachment.
1977-Mrs. Georgia Shrum Brown for her
outstanding efforts in furthering the knowledge of our natural resources, and encouraging their wise use.
1978-Mrs. Hope Wallach Porter for her
continuing actions against opposing forces in
the struggle to preserve and maintain the quality oflife enjoyed in Fauquier County.
1979-Mrs.John E. Clarkson ofThe Garden Club of Norfolk for her extraordinary efforts as a dedicated and effective speaker for
the cause of conservation and for the protection of Virginia's coastal resources.
1980-Mrs. Stewart Bell, Jr., of The Little
Garden Club of Winchester for her total and
tireless dedication to the cause of highway
beautification.
1981-Mrs. William R. Miller, Jr., of The
Princess Anne Garden Club for her leadership in the promotion of environmental education.
1982-Beulah Rennolds Burke of The
206

Appendix VI
Murray) of the Albemarle Garden Club for
her devotion to the cause of conservation with
enthusiasm, intelligence and skill.

seum.
1992-Winchester-Clarke Garden Club
for "Shalom et Benedictus Not Only Good
Gardening" project.
.
1993-The Princess Anne Garden Club
for the restoration of the grounds, including
design, plant acquisition and fund raising to
create an old fashioned seaside garden at the
deWitt cottage.
1994- Gabriella Garden Club for a second-floor roof garden at Danville Memorial
Hospital.
1995-Hillside Garden Club for joining
the renovation effort to save the Old
Lynchburg City Cemetery.

COMMON WEALTH AWARD:


The Common Wealth Award was established at the Annual Meeting, May 1979, to
provide an annual grant or grants, when merited, and to promote projects in the areas of
conservation, beautification, horticulture,
preservation and education. These projects
may be sponsored by a committee or a member club of The Garden Club of Virginia.
The Award has been made to:
1980-The Blue Ridge Garden Club of
Lexington for landscaping the entrance to the
C. & 0. Walking Trail.
1981-The Princess Anne Garden Club of
Virginia Beach for "Educating Youth for Environmental Service."
1982-Leesburg Garden Club for landscaping at Douglass Community Center and
Park, a park for all ages.
1983-The Conservation and Beautification Committee of The Garden Club of Virginia for Welcome to Virginia planting areas.
1984-The Garden Club of Fairfax for
landscaping at Northern Virginia Center for
Mentally Retarded.
1985-Hillside Garden Club for completion of Anne Spencer Garden in Lynchburg.
1986- The Garden Club of Warren
County, Front Royal, for the Belle Boyd Cottage Gardens Project.
1987-Rivanna Garden Club of
Charlottesville for the Miller School Arboretum.
1988-Mill Mountain Garden Club of
Roanoke for the Mill Mountain Wildflower
Garden.
1989-The Garden Club of the Eastern
Shore for Scholarships to Port Isobel.
1990-The Virginia Beach Garden Club
for Wildflowers By the Sea, an educational
project at the Virginia Marine Science Museum.
1991-Huntington Garden Club of
Hampton-Newport News for its Backyard
Habitat project at the Virginia Living Mu-

COMMON WEALTH
AWARD RUNNERS-UP:
1984-The Rivanna Garden Club of
Charlottesville for trees at the Miller School;
The Garden Club of Norfolk for restoration
of boxwood at the Hermitage Foundation; and
The Garden Club of Gloucester for preservation and clearing at Rosewell.
1985-The Garden Club of the Eastern
Shore for landscaping the Eastern Shore Public Library; The Charlottesville Garden Club
for the Courtyard Garden at The University
of Virginia Hospital; The Rivanna Garden
Club For the Miller School Arboretum;
Roanoke Valley Garden Club for the garden
at the Roanoke Transportation Museum.
1987-The Lynchburg Garden Club for
Operation: Plant-A-Tree.
1988-The Charlottesville Garden Club
for Landscaping the University of Virginia
Fraternities; and The Garden Study Club of
Martinsville for Landscaping the Virginia
Museum of Natural History.
1991-The Winchester-Clarke Garden
Club for landscaping and beautification at
Shalom-et-Benedictus Treatment Center; and
The Garden Club of the Northern Neck for
gardens at Rappahannock Westminster-Canterbury Retirement Community.
1992-The Rappahannock Valley Garden
Club of Fredericksburg for landscaping the
Central Rappahannock Regional Library.
207

Follow the Green Arrow


THE HORTICULTURE
AWARDS OF MERIT

1974Mrs. W. Bedford Moore III, Albemarle


Mrs. William J. Perry, Augusta
Mrs. Hunter McClung, Blue Ridge
Mrs.John T. Ramey, Fauquier and
Loudoun
Mrs. Robert W. Massie III, Lynchburg
Judge and Mrs. M. Dirk A. Kuyk,
Mill Mountain
Mrs. Albert Gibbs, Princess Anne
Mrs. Edmund P. Goodwin, Roanoke Valley
Mrs. T. Coleman Andrews, Jr., Tuckahoe
Mrs. Arthur D. Strong, Williamsburg
1975 Mrs.James B. Murray, Jr., Albemarle
Mrs. T. Austin Sydnor, Albemarle
Mrs. Howard T. Holden, Augusta
Mrs. Whitehead Motley, Chatham
Mrs. Thomas Roy Jones, Gloucester
Col. Robert S. Pickens, Leesburg
Mrs.John 0. Simpson, Jr., Lynchburg
Mrs.Jesse W. Beams, Rivanna
1976 Mrs. Albert R. Gillespie, Augusta
Mrs. Richard Croxton, Danville
Mrs. Atwell W. Somerville,
Dolley Madison
Mrs. Paul W. Mengel, Gabriella
Mrs. James T. DeAlba, Huntington
Mrs. Wesley B. Jones, Princess Anne
Mrs. Robert H. Payne, Warren County
Mrs. Baxter I. Bell, Williamsburg
1977 Mrs. Lawrence G. Fehrenbaker, Danville
Mrs. Chester B. deGavre, Eastern Shore
Mrs. William Roberts Scott, Fairfax
Mrs. Elijah Baker III, Hampton Roads
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Howell, Hillisde
Mrs. Robert W. Massie III, Lynchburg
Mrs.James N. Carter, Northern Neck
Mrs. Hill Beverly Wellford, Rappahannock
Valley
1978 Mrs. Harry T. Marshall, Jr., Albemarle
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Wright, Ashland
Miss Margaret Davis, Blue Ridge
Mrs. Charles C. Broaddus, Jr., Chatham
Mrs. W. Hugh Peal, Leesburg
Mrs. 0. Blackwell Brown
Mrs. Thomas B. Scott, Jr., Tuckahoe

These awards, established in 1960, may be


presented by the Horticulture Committee for
outstanding achievements in horticulture.
Recipients are selected from entries submitted by member clubs. The awards have been
given to:
1970 Mrs. Francis H. McGovern, Danville
Mrs. Henry J. Richardson, Eastern Shore
Mrs.John W. Clarke, Garden Study
Mrs. Elias Richards, Jr., Hillside
Mrs. Hamilton Baskerville, James River
Mrs. W. Hugh Peal, Leesburg
Mrs. Alexander Hamilton, Jr., Petersburg
Mrs. Landon Hillard, Virginia Beach
1971 Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Dugdale, Ashland
Mrs. Wyatt A. Williams, Dolley Madison
Mrs. Harold L. Turner, Eastern Shore
Mrs. Philip Minor, James River
Ms.Jane Q. Saunders, Tuckahoe
1972 Mrs. W. Dimmack Buxton, Albemarle
Mrs. Frederick Reaves, Boxwood
Mrs. William S. Peebles, Brunswick
Mrs. Francis B. Hastings, Dolley Madison
Mrs. Tazewell M. Carrington III, James
River
Mrs. Levin]. Houston III, Rappahannock
Valley
Miss Jean Printz, Rivanna
Mrs. Edmund T. Morris, Jr.,
Roanoke Valley
Mrs. William J. Catlett, Warrenton
1973 Mrs. Franklin M. Hanger, Augusta
Mrs. Charles Pozer, Fairfax
Mrs. Raymond Brown, Gloucester
Mrs. J. Barnett Hodges, Hillside
Mrs. Paul E. Sackett, Hillside
Mrs. Thomas Newman, Huntington
Mrs. B. Armistead Burke, James River
Mrs. Herbert A. Davies, Mill Mountain
Mrs. Barron F. Black, Norfolk
Miss Elisabeth A. Nolting, Rivanna
208

Appendix VI
Mrs. Victor Iterralde, Williamsburg
Mrs. Richard C. Plater, Wmchester-Clarke
1979 Mrs. William P. Pence, Alexandria
Mrs. Robert E. Anderson ill, Boxwood
Mrs. Charlton B. Strange, Jr., Danville
Mrs. Leonard W. Dick, Jr., Dolley
Madison
Mrs. George Francis Parsons,
Eastern Shore
Mrs. E. H. Ould, Garden Study
Mrs. David Stifel, Gloucester
Mrs. William L. Gilliam, Jr.,
Virginia Beach
Mrs. Richard R. Almy, Warren County
Mrs. Hibbert 0. Corey, Williamsburg
1980 Col. Thomas B. Gentry, Blue Ridge
Mrs. Giles C. Upshire,Jr., Eastern Shore
Mr. and Mrs. Newton H. Ray, Gabriella
Mrs. Henry M. Sackett ill, Hillside
Mrs. Henley L. Guild, Hunting Creek
Mrs. E. Massie Valentine, James River
Mrs. Henry Lee Valentine, James River
Mrs. Russell B. Davis, Princess Anne
Mrs. Alfred R. Armstrong, Williamsburg
Mrs. George W. Burton, WinchesterClarke
1981 Mrs.John M. Maury, Alexandria
Mrs. Theodore G. Scott, Jr.,
Dolley Madison
Mrs. Karl R. Hehl, Lynchburg
Mrs. W. Pollard Acree, Petersburg
Mrs. St.Julian Oppenhimer,Jr., Tuckahoe
1982 Mrs.John Y. Kerr, Alexandria
Mrs. Henry C. Martin, Dolley Madison
Mrs. Tull N. Gearreald, Norfolk
Mrs. Wat Tyler Griffith, Northern Neck
Mrs. William Rotch, Rivanna
Mrs. Charles 0. Strickler, Spotswood
Mrs.Jam es Asa Shield, Jr., Three Chopt
1983 Mrs. Oscar A. Thorup, Jr., Charlottesville
Mrs. Charles B. Crews, Chatham
Mrs.John Garland Pollard,Jr., Northern
Neck
Mrs. Isaac Zigler, Warren County
1984 -

Mrs. Nathan H. Bundy, Norfolk


Mrs. William Edwards, Rivanna
1985 Flavienne Gaubert Crenshaw, Alexandria
Mrs. Wilfred T. Grenfell, Jr.,
Dolley Madison
Elizabeth Christian Galloway, Hillside
Patricia Mann Crenshaw, Hunting Creek
1986 Leslie Smith Ariail, Alexandria
Mrs. Lockwood Frizzell, Charlottesville
Katherine Lewis Pickett, Gloucester
Joan Taylor, Norfolk
Joan Ray Hayes, Princess Anne
1987 Mrs.James M . Rowley,
Fauquier and Loudoun
Sarah Townsend Harrison, Jam es River
Mina Walker Wood, Lynchburg
Virginia Numez Harlow, Nansemond
River
Marian Rose Abbitt, Williamsburg
1988 Mrs. Allen A. Atwood, Alexandria
Mrs. Clayton B. Tasker, Hunting Creek
Elizabeth Cocke Winfree, Mill Mountain
1989 Doris Haines Dixon, Augusta
Georgia Bahnsen Fuson, Gloucester
Ellen Margaret Richards, Warren County
1990 Mrs. Robert F. Gillespie, Jr.,
Dolley Madison
Mrs. Leroy Glover, Gloucester
Sophie Knox Clagett, Hunting Creek
Toni Weber Piggott, Lynchburg
Martha Irby Kitchen, Rivanna
Lee Bowman Moomaw, Virginia Beach
1991 Kate ScottJacobs, Eastern Shore
Elizabeth Veeneman Hamilton, James
River
Katherine B. Kingsley, Leesburg
Emily Ann Mason, Mill Mountain
Barbara Sanders Booth, Spotswood
Mrs. Arthur L. Smith, Williamsburg
1992 Mary Glen Boyd Taylor, Boxwood
Elizabeth Wilson Whitehead, Chatham
Mrs. Ronald]. Woodaman, Fairfax
209

Follow the Green Arrow


for outstanding accomplishment in conservation to an industry, organization or individual
not a member of The Garden Club of Virginia.
The Award has been given to:
1974--The Union Camp Corporation for
its gift of fifty thousand acres in the Dismal
Swamp through the Nature Conservancy to
the U. S. Department of the Interior for operation as a wildlife refuge.
197 5-Mrs. Hiram B. Ely for her leadership in the fight to preserve the Green Springs
Historic District.
1976-1977-No Award.
1978-Dr. E. Spencer Wise of Christopher
Newport College for his unselfish service to
the Commonwealth of Virginia and for timely
and constructive action in the conservation of
our natural resources.
1978-Danville Group, Dan River, Inc. for
improvement of the environment and conservation of resources. Programs included management planning, allocation of funds, extensive engineering and implementation.
1979-The Reynolds Metals Company for
conservation of natural resources and energy
through its aluminum recycling program and
for beautification and preservation of the
Kanawha Canal Locks.
1980-No Award.
1981-Virginia Department of Highways
for highway beautification.
1982-Xerox Training Center in Loudoun
County for unselfish service to the Commonwealth of Virginia and for timely and constructive action in beautification and environmental preservation.
1982-Mr. Theodore G. Scott, Jr. of Orange County for his educational programs on
the consequences of uranium mining in Virginia.
1983-Mr. Bartow H. Bridges, Jr. of Virginia Beach for his unselfish contribution in
conservation, beautification and environmental preservation.
1983-Federated Garden Clubs of Virginia, Inc., for their unselfish contribution to
environmental education of young people in
the establishment and continuation of Nature
Camp at Vesuvius, Va.

Joanne McClellan Bartlett, Gloucester


Perkins Morton Flippin, Lynchburg
Elizabeth Baugh Towers,Tuckahoe
Mr. and Mrs.John McCullough Hodgson,
Virginia Beach
Charlotte Delano Hundley, Northern
Neck
1993 Bettina Balding Blackford, Albemarle
Margaret Parsons Dickinson, Eastern
Shore
Ann Mari Horkan, Fauquier and Loudoun
Sharon Williams Scott, Gabriella
Lulie Murchison Eggleston,
Mill Mountain
Anne Rixey Ruffin, Norfolk
Jeannie Weatherford Drescher,
Princess Anne
Annabel Callister Josephs, Three Chopt
Gale Abbott Roberts, Williamsburg
1994 Georgia S. Vance, Alexandria
Suzanne van Kesteren Tankard, Eastern
Shore
Joy Peebles Massie, James River
Barbara Pratt Willis, Rappahannock
Valley
Frances Radish Boninti, Rivanna
Elizabeth Brown Watts, Roanoke Valley
Julia Carpenter Stickley, Spotswood
Judith Burch Geddy, Warren County
1995 Beverly Wood Hereford, Albemarle
Elizabeth Thompson Herbert,
Fauquier and Loudoun
Elizabeth Rawles Cronly, Jam es River
Gina M. Rawles, James River
Marika A. Rawles, James River
Elizabeth Hock Boxley, Mill Mountain
Ora Nell Paige, Rivanna
Joan Seltzer Semple, Warrenton
Fannie Richardson Williams,
Williamsburg
THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
AWARD FOR MERITORIOUS
ACHIEVEMENT IN CONSERVATION:
This award is presented at the Conservation Forum and may be given, when merited,
210

Appendix VI
1984--Miss Gisela Grimm for her work
in planning and creating the Wildflower Preserve in the Weyanoke Sanctuary in Norfolk.
1984--Mrs. Lyndon Baines Johnson for
her lifetime of beautification projects and the
establishment of the National Wildflower
Research Center.
1985-Mr. Paul E. Saunier, Jr. of
Charlottesville for his untiring efforts in bringing into being the Ivy Creek Natural Area and
the Ivy Creek Foundation.
1986-Mr. Linton Beasley for his aide in
the recycling program to raise money for the
'Plant-A-Tree" project of the city of
Lynchburg.
1986-Piedmont Environmental Council
for leading in the education of the public and
the opposition to uranium mining in Virginia.
1987-The Carden family, owners of
Potomac Supply Lumber Company, for their
extraordinary efforts to protect the environment of the Potomac River, an example for
the lumber industry.
1987-Gordon W. Shelton, Fredericksburg City Councilman and environmental watchdog of the Rappahannock River.
1988-Mr. Bruce Brenner, President of
Cycle Systems of Roanoke, Virginia for his
pioneering work in the recycling efforts in the
Roanoke Valley.
1988-City Council of Virginia Beach for
the Council's support of community efforts to
save ocean front land for the 24th Street park.
1989-DUE TO THE GENEROSITY
OF THE ASHLAND GARDEN CLUB,
THIS AWARD GIVEN AS A TRIBUTE
TO ELIZABETH CABELL DUGDALE IS
NOW NAMED IN HER HONOR. ..........
1989-Mr. Ernest Dickerman, Buffalo
Gap, Virginia, for his contribution as "the
Father of the Virginia Wilderness."
1990-Mr. Jam es V. Morgan of Gloucester
County for a lifetime of contribution to conservation.
1990-Reynolds Metals Company of Richmond as a pioneer in recycling efforts.
1991-Ms. Judith Kator of Williamsburg
for establishing the first city recycling program
in the state.
1991-Advance Auto Parts of Roanoke as

a leader in the critical area of recycling.


1992-Union Camp Corporation of
Franklin for its new chlorine-free pulp bleaching system built into its fine Paper Division
plants in Franklin and Eastover, South Carolina.
1992-Newport News Shipbuilding and
Drydock Company for its systematic and comprehensive landscaping project, begun more
than ten years ago, to transform the ugly duckling of its industrial site and environs into a
lovely, flourishing swan.
1993-Brenda Scanelli, Brownie Troop
#328, Norfolk, for planting a memorial garden on the site of an 1858 mass grave of Yellow Fever victims.
1993-Edwin E. Rodgers, retired State
Forestry official, for promoting conservation
and for the creation of Smokey the Bear.
1993-Friends of the Rappahannock for
preserving, protecting and for disseminating
information about the State Scenic River.
1994-- No award.
1995- Winkler Botanical Preserve, Alexandria, Virginia, a forty-three-acre tract of
land in Alexandria, which is dedicated to the
study and conservation of the flowers, trees
and plants of the Potomac Valley Region.
Mrs. Lynn Davis, who has worked to protect the viewsheds of the Blue Ridge Parkway
and, as a founding member of the Valley Beautiful Foundation, worked to make the Roanoke
Valley an even more beautiful place.
Mr. T. Ashby Watts III, for his efforts in
transforming the Lynchburg Expressway from
a wasteland into a beautiful green corridor.

211

Follow the Green Arrow

APPENDIX VII

FLOWER SHOWS: SPONSORING CLUBS

DAFFODIL SHOWS:
36th. 1970 Fredericksburg, Rappahannock
Valley
37th. 1971 Danville, Danville
38th. 1972 Danville, Danville
39th. 1973 Gloucester, Gloucester
40th. 1974 Gloucester, Gloucester
4lth. 1975 Warsaw, Northern Neck
42th. 1976 Warsaw, Northern Nack
4 3th. 1977 Roanoke, Mill Mountain
44th. 1978 Roanoke, Mill Mountain
45th. 1979 Lynchburg, Lynchburg
46th. 1980 Lynchburg, Lynchburg
47th. 1981 Suffolk, Nansemond River
48th. 1982 Portsmouth, Elizabeth River
49th. 1983 Franklin, Franklin
50th. 1984 Charlottesville, Charlottesville
51 th. 1985 Charlottesville, Albemarle
52th. 1986 Martinsville, Martinsville
53th. 1987 Martinsville, Martinsville
54th. 1988 Danville, Gabriella
55th. 1989 Danville, Gabriella
56th. 1990 Roanoke, Mill Mountain
57th. 1991 Roanoke, Mill Mountain
58th. 1992 Harrisonburg, Spotswood
59th. 1993 Harrisonburg, Spotswood
60th. 1994 Ashland, Ashland
61 th. 1995 Ashland, Ashland

33th.
34th.
35th.
36th.
37th.
38th.
39th.
40th.
41 th.
42th.
43th.
44th.
45th.
46th.
47th.
48th.
49th.
50th.
51 th.
52th.
53th.
54th.

1975
1976
1977
1978
1979

Ashland, Ashland
Ashland, Ashland
Charlottesville, Rivanna
Charlottesville, Rivanna
Middleburg, Leesburg, Fauquier
and Loudoun
1980 Leesburg, Leesburg, Fauquier
and Loudoun
1981 Warrenton, Warrenton
1982 Orange, Dolley Madison
1983 Chatham, Chatham
1984 Chatham, ~hatham
1985 Alexandria, Hunting Creek
1986 Alexandria, Hunting Creek
1987 Winchester, Little Garden Club
1988 Winchester, Little Garden Club
1989 Front Royal, Garden Club of
Warren County
1990 Front Royal, Garden Club of
Warren County
1991 Fairfax, Garden Club of Fairfax
1992 Fairfax, Garden Club of Fairfax
1993 Orange, Dolley Madison
1994 Orange, Dolley Madison
1995 Charlottesville, Rivanna
1996 Charlottesville, Rivanna

ROSE SHOWS:
34th. 1970 Chatham, Chatham
35th. 1971 Richmond, Boxwood
36th. 1972 Richmond, Three Chopt
37th. 1973 Fairfax, Garden Club of Fairfax
38th. 1974 Millwood, Winchester-Clarke
39th. 197 5 Lawrenceville, Brunswick
40th. 197 6 Roanoke, Roanoke Valley

LILY SHOWS:
28th. 1970 Front Royal, Warren County
29th. 1971 Harrisonburg, Spotswood
30th. 1972 Harrisonburg, Spotswood
31th. 1973 Lexington, Blue Ridge
32th. 1974 Lexington, Blue Ridge
212

Appendix VII
41 th.
42th.
43th.
44th.
45th.

1977
1978
1979
1980
1981

46th. 1982
47th. 1983
48th. 1984
49th. 1985
50th. 1986

Williamsburg, Williamsburg
Williamsburg, Williamsburg
Alexandria, Alexandria
Alexandria, Alexandria
Richmond, James River and
Tuckahoe of Westhampton
Richmond, James River and
Tuckahoe of Westhampton
Petersburg, Petersburg
Norfolk, Norfolk
Fredericksburg, Rappahannock
Valley
Fredricksburg, Rappahannock
Valley

51 th.
52th.
53th.
54th.
55th.
56th.
57th.
58th.
59th.
60th.

213

1987
1988
1989
1990

Lynchburg, Hillside
Lynchburg, Hillside
Richmond, Boxwood
Northern Neck, Garden Club
of Northern Neck
1991 Northern Neck, Garden Club
of Northern Neck
1992 Virginia Beach, Princess Anne
Garden Club
1993 Virginia Beach, Princess Anne
Garden Club
1994 Winchester, Winchester-Clarke
1995 Winchester, Winchester-Clarke
1996 Hampton, Hampton Roads

Follow the Green Arrow

APPENDIX VIII
FLOWER SHOW AWARDS and WINNERS

THE ELEANOR TRUAX HARRIS


CHALLENGE CUPS:
The Eleanor Truax Harris Challenge
Cups were established in 193 7 as a personal
memorial to Mrs. Floyd Harris, and stand as
an expression of the great love of The Garden Club of Virginia for the personality of
Mrs. Harris, and as a tribute to her leadership
in horticultural enterprises.
One of three cups of old Georgian design
is awarded annually, if merited, for the best
horticultural achievement made by a member
of The Garden Club of Virginia at each of the
three annual shows-the Daffodil Show, the
Rose Show, and the Lily Show. The winner
holds the cup for a year.
These cups were first awarded in 193 8:

1986 No award
1987 No award
1988 Mrs. Kit Pannill, Martinsville and
Garden Study Club
1989 Mrs.]. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1990 Mrs. William Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
1991 Mrs. Lockwood Frizzell,
Charlottesville
1992 No award
1993 No award
1994 No award
1995 Mrs. K. B. Kingsley, Leesburg

LILY:
1970 Mrs. Wyatt Aiken Williams, Dolley
Madison
1971 No award
1972 Mrs. John T. Ramey, Fauquier and
Loudoun
1973 Mrs. Percy Rogers, Warren County
1974 Mrs.John T. Ramey, Fauquier and
Loudoun
197 5 Mrs. Percy L. Rogers, Warren County
1976,1977
No award
1978 Mrs. W.W. Sproul, Augusta
1979,1980
No award
1981 Mrs. W. W. Sproul, Augusta
1982,1983
No award
No award
1984,1985
No award
1986,1987
1988,1989
No award
No award
1990,1991
No award
1992,1993
No award
1994

DAFFODIL:
No award
1970,1971
1972 Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1973 Mrs. Robert Wheat III, Northern
Neck
1974 Mrs. Raymond W. Lewis, Gloucester
197 5 Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1976 No award
1977 Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1978 No award
1979 Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1980 Mrs. F. Paul Turner, Martinsville
1981 No award
1982 No award
1983 No award
1984 Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1985 No award
214

Appendix VIII
1995 No award

1995 No award

ROSE:
1970 Mrs. Thomas R. Towers, Tuckahoe
1971 No award
1972 Mrs.John Elliott, Jr., Fairfax
1973,1976
No award
1977 Mrs. D. B. Tankard, Eastern Shore
1978 Mrs. Charles Broadus, Jr., Chatham
1979 Mrs. Charles Broadus, Jr., Chatham
1980 No award
1981 Mrs. FrankM. Lusk, Eastern Shore
1982,1983
No award
1984 Mrs. David B. Tankard, Eastern Shore
1985,1987
No award
1988 Mrs. 0. H. Eure, Tuckahoe
1989 Mrs. Frank M. Lusk, Eastern Shore
1990,1992
No award
1993 Mrs. David B. Tankard, Eastern Shore
1994, 1995
No award

THE KATHERINE LEADBEATER


BLOOMER PERPETUAL AWARD
This award was given by Mrs. Karl F. Hehl
and Mrs. 0. H. Patteson-Knight in recognition of the many contributions made by Mrs.
Bloomer to further the interest in daffodils by
members of The Garden Club of Virginia.
This award was first given in 1977:
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988

THE MARY McDERMOTT BEIRNE


CHALLENGE BOWL:
The Mary McDermott Beirns Challenge
Bowl to be given annually at the Daffodil Show
of The Garden Club ofVirginia and to be held
for one year. This award was given in 1966 by
The Ashland Garden Club to honor Miss
Bierne, a pioneer in hybridizing and cultivating daffodils in Virginia. This award was first
given in 1968.

1989
1990
1991
1992
1993

1969,1972
No award
1973 Mrs. E. Ashton Sale, Martinsville
1974 Mrs. E. Ashton Sale, Martinsville
197 5 Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1976 No award
1977 Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1978 Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1979 Mrs. Daniel K. Critz, Martinsville
1980 Mrs. Daniel K. Critz, Martinsville
No award
1981,1988
1989 Mrs. Kit Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
1990 No award
1991 Mrs. William Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
1992 No award
1993 Mrs. W. John Matheson, Gloucester
1994 No award

1994
1995

Mr. William Pannill, Martinsville


Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
No award
Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
Mrs. Daniel K. Critz, Martinsville
Mrs. Isaac M. Zigler, Warren County
No award
Mrs. Raymond W Lewis, Gloucester
Mrs. Raymond W Lewis, Gloucester
Mrs. Kit Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
Mrs. Kit Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
Mrs. Kit Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
Mrs. Kit Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
Mrs. Katherine Kingsley, Leesburg
Mrs. George W Burton, WinchesterClarke
Mrs. W. John Matheson, Gloucester
Mrs. Lockwood Frizzell,
Charlottesville

THE EDITH HARRISON WALKER


PERPETUAL AWARD
This award was presented by the
Martinsville Garden Club and The Garden
Study Club in 1977 with appreciation for Mrs.
Walker's outstanding work as Daffodil Test
Chairman of The Garden Club of Virginia
1951-1962.
This award was first given in 1978:
1978 Mrs. F. Paul Turner, Martinsville
1979 No award
1980 Mrs. Robert G. Taylor,] r., Lynchburg
215

Follow the Green Arrow


1981 No award
1982 Mrs. Robert G. Taylor, Jr., Lynchburg
1983 No award

This award was given in loving memory


of Helen Louise Broyhill by her daughter,
Mrs. Sandra Broyhill Aman. It is to be awarded
annually at the Daffodil Show to a Garden
Club of Virginia member for the Best Collection of three of a kind.
It was first presented in 1980:

1984 Mrs. R. W. Massie ill, Lynchburg


No award
1985,1986
1987 No award
1988 Mrs. Robert F. Gillespie, Jr., Dolley
Madison
1989 Mrs. Whitehead Motley, Chatham
1990,1991
No award
1992 No award
1993 Mrs. Lockwood Frizzell,
Charlottesville
1994 Mrs. W. John Matheson, Gloucester
1995 Mrs. Raymond Brown, Gloucester

1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990

THE JACQUELINE BYRD SHANK


MEMORIAL TROPHY
This award was given by Mr. J. Edward
Shank of "Lochwood Hall," Bedford County,
Virginia, in memory of his wife, Jacqueline
Byrd Shank, past president of The Lynchburg
Garden Club. It is awarded to a Garden Club
of Virginia member for the best miniature
bloom in the Daffodil Show.
The award was first given in 1979:

1991
1992
1993
1994
1995

1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995

Mrs.]. Walled Harrison,James River


Mrs. George F. Parsons, Eastern Shore
Mrs. Raymond W. Lewis, Gloucester
Mrs. William R. Scott, Fairfax
Mrs. Laurens H . Rhinelander,
Albemarle
Mrs. William R. Scott, Fairfax
Mrs. Chesterman Constantine,
Princess Anne
Mr. William R. Pannill, Martinsville
Mrs. Raymond W. Lewis, Gloucester
Mrs. Cecil Brown, Gloucester
Mrs. Cecil Brown, Gloucester
Mrs. Thomas Mason, Mill Mountain
Mrs.John F.James, Dolley Madison
Mrs. Gene W. Beale, Franklin
Mrs. Frances Boninti, Rivanna
Mrs. W. John Matheson, Gloucester
Evelyn Nock, Quinby, Virginia

Mrs. Howard B. Bloomer, Alexandria


Mrs. Raymond W. Lewis, Gloucester
Mrs. Raymond W. Lewis, Gloucester
Mrs.]. A. Bear, Jr., Albemarle
Mrs. Frank C. Wyche, Petersburg
Mrs. Daniel M. Thomton,Jr., Virginia
Beach
Mr. William G. Pannill, Martinsville
Mrs. Raymond W. Lewis, Gloucester
Mr. William G. Pannill, Martinsville
Mr. William G. Pannill, Martinsville
Mrs. William Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
Mrs. William Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
Mrs. Isaac M. Zigler, Warren County
Mrs. W.JohnMattheson, Gloucester
Mrs. William Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
Mr. William G. Pannill, Martinsville
(Honorary Member GCV)

THE LOUISE MORRIS


GOODWIN BOWL
This bowl is given in memory of Louise
Morris Goodwin of the Roanoke Valley Garden Club in recognition of her lifelong ability
to create and share beauty. It is to be awarded
annually at the Daffodil Show to a Garden
Club of Virginia member for 5 varieties of
American Bred daffodils-one stem each.
It was first awarded in 1982:
1982 Mrs.]. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1983 Mrs. E. H. Ould, Garden Study Club,
Martinsville
1984 Mrs. Sarah Townsend Harrison,
James River
198 5 Mrs. George W. Burton, WinchesterClarke
1986 Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville
1987 Mrs. Raymond W. Lewis, Gloucester

THE HELEN LOUISE


BROYHILL TROPHY
216

Appendix VIII
1988 Mrs. Robert F. Gillespie, Jr.,
Dolley Madison
1989 Mrs. Robert F. Gillespie, Jr.,
Dolley Madison
1990 Mrs. Robert F. Gillespie, Jr.,
Dolley Madison
1991 Mrs. William Pannill, Martinsville
and Jam es River
1992 Mrs. W. John Matheson, Gloucester
1993 Mrs. W. John Matheson, Gloucastir
1994 Mrs. W. John Matheson, Gloucester
1995 Mrs. George Burton, WinchesterClarke

Daffodil Show.
The Trophy has been awarded to:
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994

Roanoke Valley Garden Club


Tuckahoe Garden Club
Three Chopt Garden Club
Dolley Madison Garden Club
Gabriella Garden Club
Hillside Garden Club
Hillside Garden Club
Garden Club of the Northern Neck
The Williamsburg Garden Club
The Spotswood Garden Club
The Ashland Garden Club
The Little Garden Club of
Winchester
1995 The Garden Club of Gloucester

THE JENNETTE H. RUSTIN TROPHY


This award was given by Mrs. Howard B.
Bloomer, Jr., in recognition of the many contributions made by Miss Rustin as Daffodil
Test Chairman for The Garden Club of Virginia 1941-1946. It is awarded for a Daffodil
parent and child-two cultivars, one being the
parent (seed and pollen) of the other. May be
won only one time by an exhibitor.
Awarded for the first time in 1982:

LILY SHOW AWARDS:


THE VIOLET NILES
WALKER MEMORIAL CUP
This cup was given by the Dolley Madison Garden Club for horticultural achievement: the lily chairman of Dolley Madison
Garden Club shall be the perpetual custodian
of the Violet Niles Walker Memorial Cup.
This shall include the administration of funds
and purchasing of lily bulbs to be awarded as
a prize annually to the winner of this cup at
the Lily Show of The Garden Club of Virginia.
This cup was first awarded in 1948:

1982 Mrs. J. Robert Walker, Martinsville


1983 Mrs. E. H. Ould, Garden Study Club,
Martinsville
1984 Mrs. Lockwood Frizzell,
Charlottesville
1985 Mrs. Staige Blackford, Albemarle
1986 Mrs. Isaac Zigler, Warren County
1987 Mrs. Raymond W. Lewis, Gloucester
1988 Mrs. Robert F. Gillespie, Dolley
Madison
1989,1990
No award
1991 Mrs. William Pannill, Martinsville and
James River
1992 No award
1993 Mrs. W. John Matheson, Gloucester
1994 Mrs. Raymond S. Brown, Gloucestsr
1995 No award

1970 Mrs. John T. Ramey, Fauquier and


Loudoun
1971,1972
No award
1973 Mrs. Arthur A. Dugdale, Ashland
1974 No award
197 5 Mrs. Arthur A. Dugdale, Ashland
1976 No award
1977 Mrs.Joseph Mercer, Dolley Madison
1978 No award
1979 Mrs. Atwell W. Somerville,
Dolley Madison
1980,1992
No award
1993 No award
1994 No award
1995 No award

THE MRS. LITTLETON


H.MEARSTROPHY
This award was given by the Garden Club of
the Eastern Shore in memory of Mrs. Littleton
H. Mears, founder. It is awarded to a member
club of The Garden Club of Virginia for the
best Inter-Club arrangement at the annual
217

Follow the Green Arrow


THE SPONSOR'S CUP

of Warren County
1986 No award
1987 Mrs. Richard R. Almy, Garden Club
of Warren County
1988,1991
No award
1992 Mrs. Wesley Graves VI,
Spotswood
1993 Mrs. George Harnsberger, Spotswood
1994 No award
1995 Noaward

OnJune 18, 1953, this cup, a gift of Miss


Jeanette M. Francis, was presented as a perpetual Lily Show trophy to The Garden Club
of Virginia by The Garden Club of Alexandria. It is to be given by the club sponsoring
the annual Garden Club ofVirginia Lily Show
and is to be offered in a horticultural class,
designated by the sponsoring club, as an award
to the blue ribbon winner in the designated
class.
This award was first made in 1954:

THE BLUE RIDGE


GARDEN CLUB CUP
This cup was given by an anonymous donor in the name of The Blue Ridge Garden
Club as a perpetual trophy to be awarded annually at the Lily Show. It was presented in
1962 and was won for the first time in 1970.
The award has been made to:

1970 Mrs. Douglas Phillips, Leesburg


1971 No award
1972 Mrs. Wyatt Aiken Williams,
Dolley Madison
1973,1974
No award
1975 Mrs.John T. Ramey, Fauquier and
Loudoun
1976,1978
No award
1979 Mrs. Robert S. Pickens, Leesburg
1980,1988
No award
1989 Mrs. Ronald]. Woodamon, Fairfax
1990 Mrs. James S. Lee, Warrenton
1991 Mrs. George A. Horkan, Fauquier and
Loudoun
1992 Mrs. Gilbert K. Queitzsch,
Dolley Madison
1993 Mrs. Gilbert K. Queitzsch,
Dolley Madison
1994 Mrs. Gilbert K. Queitzsch,