A packed basement

at North Presbyterian
Church and a swelter-
ing crowd, including
many of North Denver’s
movers and shakers
greeted Denver Public
Schools Superintendent
Michael Bennet on June
21. Bennet was there to
hear a series of demands
that centered around
the prospect of closing
North High School.
While Bennet refused
to rule out consider-
ation of closing North,
the matter seemed
wholly preemptive. No
credible source has
argued that North,
despite struggling achievement, a
high-rate of dropouts and declining
enrollment, is likely to face closure,
or even the massive re-design that
has shuttered temporarily Manual
High School.
The meeting, hosted by commu-
nity group, Padres Unidos (Parents
United), decried district support for
North’s reform plan and demanded
improvements ranging from more
Advanced Placement course offer-
ings to better efforts to prepare
students for college.
For his part, Bennet greeted the
Who is to define
a leader? It is often
said that a leader is a
person who you look
up to, someone who
can make a change
in the future, as well as your
everyday life. I now know what a
true leader is and am on my way
to becoming one.
As a young girl, I was always
told that going to college should be
a top priority in my life. However,
I never dreamed that I would be
given a chance to go to college.
Then something happened that
changed everything. In the fourth
grade I was asked if I would like to
join the Porter-Billups Leadership
Academy at Regis University. This
Academy requires a big commit-
Nor t h
Denv er
mailed to
14,117
Homes
NEWS
July 7, 2006
Potter Highlands • Jefferson Park • West Highland • Sunnyside • Sloan’s Lake • Berkeley
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Inside the
NORTH
DENVER NEWS
• Edgewater News page 11
• Ford’s hybrid SUV page 3
•Youth Farmer’s Market page 4
• Mommy Diaries page 24
• Open for Business page 30
• Tearing apart, the Mid-East
page 34
• Finding your own way
page 32
Regis program lifts
college hope
by Juanite Archuleta &
Kristen Blessman
V
o
lu
m
e

4
I
s
s
u
e

7
ment-three weeks every summer
until you go to college. As a child
that young who wants to give up
three weeks out of your summer
for something that was as far away
as college?
Now that I am a young woman,
I have learned that being given
the opportunity to come to such
a great and outstanding program
is one of the best things that has
happened to me. I have learned
so many things, showing me who
a leader actually is and choos-
ing right from wrong is only hard
if you make it hard. Mr. Lonnie
Porter, the head of the Academy
and Regis University’s basketball
coach is a true role model. He is
one of the most sincere men I have
ever known. Through him, I have
learned that everyone is a leader.
It is just a matter of whether or not
$
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• a voice for the new North Denver • (and Edgewater too! p.11)
Sidewalk bargains and pirates
– July looks to be a great month for
shopping along the 32nd Avenue
strip! On the 29th and 30th, 32nd
Avenue will host a Sidewalk Sale,
and on the 3rd Thursday, the line-
up of music, sales, and merriment
will take on a Caribbean theme as
pirates roam the neighborhood.
Come enjoy a cold beverage and
shop along the 32nd Avenue side-
walk. 32nd Avenue and Highland
Square are hosting a sidewalk sale
all weekend, Saturday, the 29th
from 10am to 6pm and Sunday, the
30th from 11am to 4pm. Everything
on the sidewalk will be marked
down from 40% - 75% off. By enter-
ing your name in a drawing, one
lucky shopper will win a $100 gift
certificate to one of the fantastic
shops in the neighborhood. So, stop
by your favorite boutique for a sip,
and save on clothing, books, baby
gifts, retro finds, chocolates, jewelry
Plunder 32nd
Ave for sidewalk
sales and pirates
see SKILLS on page 8
see PLAN on page 4
by Guerin Lee Green
North High undergoes summer
renovations.The 2003 school bond is funding
several rounds of repairs and improvements.
Community
rallies to
support
North High
by Devon Barclay
Gauntlet Down: The Northwest
Denver Literary Challenge
Can’t take the heat? Denverites
looking for a diversion from the
summertime blues have a new
writing contest to contemplate.
The first annual North West
Denver Literary Challenge offers a
tantalizing excuse to pick up pen
and paper or send your fingers a-
tap-tap-taping on your keyboard.
The theme of the contest -- “A
Denver Story” – hopes to draw out
compelling stories rooted in this
land, this city, this Denver. The
essay can be about a life lesson,
epiphany, or change-of-life, fork-
in-the-road moment. Perhaps it is
a story of greatest love or broken
heart, or a great love-turned-hor-
ror story. Any number of topics
can fill the bill: witty tales of first
homes or first borns, or growing
up or growing young.
If you have a great story smol-
dering inside you, this might be
theperfect opportunity to fire it
up. Stories should be nonfiction
and limited to 750-1000 words.
The writing contest is the brain-
child of Jay Solomon, owner of
Jay’s Patio Café and Eat Street
located inside the Children’s
see CONTEST on page 10
Downzoinig Town Hall Meeting: Preserving
Neighborhoods or Protecting Property Rights —
Conflict or Compromise
Common Grounds Coffeehouse
32nd & Lowell
Tuesday,
July 26th
6:30 pm
see PROSPECT on page 4
July 7, 2006
Page 2
NORTH DENVER NEWS
Ford’s pushing hybrids in
Denver
NORTH DENVER NEWS
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All material © 2006 North Denver News
The folks from the blue oval
stopped by this week to tout their
new hybrid SUV. Ford bigwigs
were in town to talk to Mayor
Hickenlooper and pitch the Ford
Escape Hybrid as a vehicle for taxi
fleets.
The Escape, like most current
hybrids, marries a conventional
engine to an electric motor that
is charged through regenerative
braking – in other words, while
slowing down,
braking effort
charges a bat-
tery.
In prac-
tice, with the
Escape, the
process is
hardly notice-
able. The
Escape has
got more than
sufficient pick-
up – it merged
onto I-70 in
mo d e r a t e l y
heavy traf-
fic with plen-
ty of alacrity – and it’s smooth.
The transmission is not sharp,
and engine revs seem somewhat
decoupled from road speed, but if
you aren’t used to a sharp sports
car with a manual transmission,
you may never notice.
You also won’t notice the extra
weight of the battery and electric
motor in handling. The Escape,
while no road-going scalpel, han-
dles well enough, and the suspen-
sion belies its price point.
On the whole, we were happy
the folks from Detroit dropped by
to say hi. The Escape, especially
with the tax credits for hybrid
vehicles, would make a great mid-
size SUV for Colorado drivers,
particularly those spending a lot
of time in the city. Like its regen-
erative hybrid cohorts, the Escape
gets better mileage in stop and go
city driving than in highway cruis-
ing. If you avoid getting on the gas
in stop and go traffic, you can use
close to no gas
at all!
The Ford
folks says that
the extended
warranty on the
battery takes
almost all the
worry out of
embracing this
leading edge
transportation
t e c hno l o g y .
Ford deserves
kudos for tak-
ing a greener
road among
American auto
makers.
More facts: The Escape Hybrid is
expected to be the world’s cleanest,
most fuel-efficient SUV, able to travel
between 35 and 40 miles — more than
a 75 percent improvement over the
conventional Escape — in stop-and-
go city driving. The Escape Hybrid
will provide a 50% metro-highway
combined fuel economy improvement
over a conventional Escape. On the
highway, Escape Hybrid gets 30 mpg
and its 2.3-liter, four-cylinder engine
and electric traction motor can team
up to produce acceleration perfor-
mance similar to the V-6 Escape.
Can an emphasis on energy
conservation have a major eco-
nomic impact and bring more
jobs to the region? The Metro
Denver Economic Development
Corporation argues affirmatively,
in a new report that area busi-
nesses can create more jobs and
increase their bottom lines with
just such an approach.
The Metro Denver Economic
Development Corporation (Metro
Denver EDC) has completed a
report that suggests investments
and low-cost efforts that Metro
Denver businesses can make to
conserve energy and boost their
bottom lines. Prepared for Metro
Denver EDC by the Colorado Energy
Science Center, “Energy Efficiency:
Bottom Line Opportunities for
Metro Denver Companies” offers
concrete evidence of cost-saving
efficiency upgrades and return-on-
investment.
The Metro Denver EDC, along
with the Economist magazine,
hosted a recent forum on the grow-
ing cost and tight supply of energy.
The panel discussion, “Can the
World End Its Addiction to Oil?,”
included Vijay Vaitheeswaran,
Economist energy correspon-
dent, NREL Director Dan Arvizu,
Western Gas president Peter
Dea, and Aspen Skiing’s Auden
Schendler. Though the discussion
seemed to underplay the climate
threat, potential scarcity of oil and
the geopolitical security risks that
mark many conversations about
energy, the coming changes in the
way Americans get and consume
energy were broadly accepted.
“Instead of imposing regula-
tory solutions to our energy chal-
lenges, this report shows solid,
market-based evidence that Metro
Denver businesses can save money
and add predictability by invest-
ing in energy-efficient upgrades,”
said Tom Clark, Executive Vice
President of Metro Denver EDC.
“This study is a crucial aspect of
our ongoing strategy to market
Metro Denver as the ‘Balanced
Energy Capital of the West.’”
The Metro Denver EDC seeks to
position Denver within a triad of
energy — home to a large natural
gas production region, locus of
renewable and alternative energy
development, and a place where a
region-wide focus on conservation
can improve the economy.
The report focuses mainly on
the commercial business sector,
which is where Metro Denver EDC
found that its analysis and even-
tual results could have the great-
est impact on the overall area
economy. The report argues that
evidence shows how office and
retail-based businesses can invest
in energy-saving strategies for
tangible payback. For example,
replacing lighting fixtures with
high-efficiency ballasts and bulbs
can drop costs 20 to 45 per-
cent, according to the analysis.
The report also outlines federal
tax credits and rebates from Xcel
Energy that businesses and build-
ing owners can use to their advan-
tage. Finally, the analysis also
suggests a voluntary efficiency ini-
tiative that aims to drive demand
for efficient buildings and energy
savings in the future.
“This analysis supports the idea
that conservation, fossil fuels and
renewable energy resources rep-
resent each leg of a ‘three legged
stool’ of energy components, and
each element is equally important,”
said Peter Dea, Chair of the Metro
Denver EDC’s Energy Committee
and Western Gas Resources presi-
dent & CEO. “Applying the pieces
of this initiative is more than a
smart investment; it’s a sustain-
able and responsible choice that
can help Metro Denver’s economy
grow and profit.”
One case study outlined
upgrades at Denver Place’s North
and South Towers, where a $1.35
million energy retrofit was imple-
mented in 1996. Upgrades includ-
ed gas-fired boilers, switching to
electronic – rather than magnetic
– fluorescent bulbs, adjusting cool-
ing systems, and more. Currently,
the building saves $300,000 annu-
ally on energy costs, representing
a 20 percent return on investment
and enabling energy savings to
help pay for the investment in
about three years.
In addition to some of the more
capital-intensive upgrades, the
report outlines ways any busi-
ness can reduce energy costs with
little or no investment: turning
off office lights and equipment at
see REPORT on page 9
Songs • Chants • Dance • Instruments
milehighmusictogether@comcast.net • 720.366.8655
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North Denver News Staff:
Guerin Lee Green, Publisher and Editor
Laura Douglas, Managing Editor
Devon Barclay, Associate Publisher
Eliza Gibbons, Copy Editor
Naomi Hartman, Executive Assistant
Cyndeth Allison, Fran Schroeder, Betsy Martinson,
Dixie Darr, Rebecca Simmons, June Hicks, Corinne Hunt, Beth
LaVigne, Eliza Gibbons, Beverly Newton, Tanya Carwyn, Rachel
Pollack, Kathryn Delaney, Renee Fajardo, Devon Barclay, Laurene
Lafontaine, Cynthia Badger, Melanie Beaton, Maureen Schmidt,
Theresa Southerland, Adam DeGraff, Elizabeth Wheeler, Rossy Kay
... plus our other writers and contributors
from all over North Denver
Energy efficiency can help
Denver's bottom line
July 7, 2006
Page 3
NORTH DENVER NEWS
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“From Perry Street to Julian,
everyone will have stuff out on the
sidewalk for sale,” says Kristi Howard
of Starlet. “And the merchants will
be handing out drinks for the shop-
pers - lemonade, ice tea, mimosas
- whatever they decide.”
3rd Thursday will take on a pirate
theme, as scurvy dogs roam the strip
and music, sales, and drawings flavor
the Avenue. Japa Dapta will be play-
ing live music at Studio Bead, and
there are nautical rumors of music
at the Perfect Petal, too. Babareeba!
will be selling head scarves for the
pirate in every woman, and a trunk
show at Studio Bead by designer
Robin Johnson will headline a Black
Pearl drawing.
Studio Bead and Starlet will be
sponsoring complimentary Pedicab
rides along 32nd Avenue for 3rd
Thursday!!! Mile High Pedicab will
give shoppers a lift up and down the
avenue from Studio Bead to Starlet
- just a tip - for a lift!!
“It’s sort of a celebration of the
movie,” explains Joy Barrett, owner
of Studio Bead. “So we’re doing all
things piratey. Have a seat and tap
your feet to Japa Dapta out on the
patio, or enjoy a shiver me timbers
sort of evening along 32nd Avenue.
We’re hoping to have a scurvy dog
trolling the street – it should be
fun.”
Get out on your peg legs, round
up your matees, and enjoy some
good times and great bargains on
32nd Avenue.***
July 7, 2006
Page 4
NORTH DENVER NEWS
continued from page ONE
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Summer shopping and fun
along 32nd Ave
enthusiasm for North warmly while
generally not making commitments
beyond those already in place. “I’ve
never had a discussion about clos-
ing North,” said Bennet. North is in
a vice created by declining enroll-
ment; each student leaving North
or choosing another school takes
with her about $6,000 in sup-
port. Fewer dollars equates to fewer
classes, fewer teachers.
Hatton Littman, of North West
Parents for Excellent Schools,
pointed out that “one in seven
children born in Denver” live in
the North High enrollment area,
thus generating more than enough
children to keep North thriving.
Yet substantial numbers of stu-
dents in North Denver end up at
other schools, both public and pri-
vate, and take those resources- and
involved parents— with them. More
painfully, no one seems to know
just how many students are not a
North, where they have gone, and
why.
Bennet did comment upon the
lack of success in high school
reform, quoting former President
Bill Clinton, who has remarked
that we know what works, but have
failed “to scale” solutions to make
improvements district-wide, much
less nationally.
Bennet has sowed the seeds of
school closure in recent months.
After completing the school dis-
trict’s strategic plan, Bennet has
concluded that the fixed costs of
operating so many schools with
small and declining enrollments
represent a structural fiscal disas-
ter with which DPS cannot cope
indefinitely.
But for some in the crowd, the
show of support, and strong words
from North students and recent
graduates, were heartening and
Prospect of North closure
decried
continued from page ONE
Youth Farmer’s Market.
Organized by Don Diehl, the
farmer’s market has cooking dem-
onstrations as well as free booth
space for those looking to sell
their own arts and crafts. For
more information contact Denver
Urban Gardens, or Diehl at
720.855.8985.
Fairview Elementary in the Sun
Valley neighborhood has a tremen-
dous program with a community
garden and a weekly farmer’s mar-
ket.
Sundays, from 1 to 4 p.m.
throughout the summer, you can
get some lovingly grown produce
at 12th and Decatur at Fairview
Youth Farmer’s Market at
Fairview
During the past week three of our
neighborhood’s cats have succumbed
to antifreeze poisoning. These cats
lived on Newton Street between 44th
and 45th Avenue. We do not know
where the cats ingested the antifreeze,
nor if it was an intentional poisoning.
More information: Antifreeze con-
tains ethylene glycol, an incredibly
toxic substance when metabolized by
cats, dogs, and even young children;
the toxin breaks down kidney func-
tion and sends the victims into acute
renal failure. Unfortunately, animals
and kids are attracted to antifreeze
because it tastes sweet, and ethylene
glycol is found in other substances
(though not in as high of concentration
as in antifreeze) such as brake fluid, air
conditioning coolant, and even Windex.
Dogs only need to ingest about one
tablespoon and cats only as much as
a teaspoon of antifreeze for the toxic
and fatal reaction to occur. An antidote
exists for dogs if you’re able to get them
to the vet in time; unfortunately, cats
metabolize the toxin so quickly that
antidotes are futile.
Signs of poisoning:
• Excessive drinking and urinating
• Lethargy
• Vomiting
• Drunken or staggered walk
• Raspy breath
Sara & Nick Watterson
Andrea & Steve Denis
Berkeley neighbors: Antifreeze
poisoning alert!
July 7, 2006
Page 5
NORTH DENVER NEWS
July 29 Saturday 10-6


July 30 Sunday 11-4
Enjoy a cold beverage and shop along
32nd Avenue for savings up to 75% off!
Enter to win a $100 gift certificate
Sidewalk sale shops from Perry to Julian on 32nd Ave.
in Denver Highlands. (not the ranch)
at any participating merchant!
While the Ford House on 32nd Avenue has escaped demolition, this century
old home next to Highlands Cafe, fell to the wrecking ball last week. Many
neighbors are expressing concern about scrapeoffs in North Denver.
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Page 6
NORTH DENVER NEWS
Renee Fajardo
North Denver Notions
and blood vessels. What is under-
neath the surface of our epidermis
is fascinating.
Skinless cadav-
ers sound gruesome,
but Van Hagens in
his infinite sensitiv-
ity to the balance
between life and death has taken
a pragmatic approach. This is not
a high school biology class with a
skeleton hanging in the
corner. Figure Skaters
dip and bend, Soccer Man
kicks a ball, and Yoga Girl
poses with adept flexibil-
ity. Museum patrons get
a first-hand look into the
complex and miraculous
workings of the human
body. Even the simple act
of forming a fist or smil-
ing requires thousands
of interactive impulses
sent from the brain to
the nerve centers to the
muscles attached to the
bones. What we take for
granted is in actuality a
feat of engineering bril-
liance.
“These once were liv-
ing breathing beings that
have donated their bod-
ies so others may learn”
points out Von Hagens.
“It is an honor for my
foundation to have these
individuals who were will-
ing to contribute to this science. I
do this to honor life, to show how
precious and complex the human
body is. The first and foremost goal
of this exhibition is to bring aware-
If you have not made your way
over to the Denver Museum of
Nature and Science
for Dr. Gunther Von
Hagens’ Body Worlds
2: The Anatomical
Exhibition of Real
Human Bodies, now
is the time. The blockbuster world
acclaimed exhibition will be leaving
the Mile High City on July 23rd.
This is truly a
once-i n-a-l i f e-
time exhibit that
must be seen,
felt and experi-
enced.
Von Hagens,
the genius phy-
sician from
G e r m a n y
responsible for
Body Worlds
2, developed
a process 25
years ago called
Plastination by
which the nat-
ural fluids in the
body are replaced
with reactive
fluid plastic.
The result is an
orderly, dry and
perfectly pre-
served human
body. Remember
your grandma
telling you beau-
ty was only skin deep? She was
right, most of the two hundred
specimens on display are without
skin, thus exposing the muscles,
tendons, bones, organs and nerves
Still time to
experience Body
Worlds 2
ness to the public about the very
nature how complex our bodies
are. I want to create an under-
standing about healthful living,
awareness and consciences.”
If you need to loose a few extra
pounds and quit smoking, take
a look at the cross section of an
obese man who died from heart
disease or the cancer-filled lung
of a smoker. Want proof that life is
awe inspiring? Visit the display of
the mother who died when she was
five months pregnant. Many have
proclaimed this show controver-
sial but it is also one of the most
enlightening displays of humanity
you will ever see.
While the spark that illuminated
the lives of the donors who are part
of the exhibit has long since passed
from this world, their legacy to
those of us living is tremendous.
Von Hagens, who one day will also
be a plastinate said, “The human
body is much too valuable to be
just mourned. We can continue to
learn and teach long after we are
gone.”
For more information on the exhi-
bition visit www.DMNS.org or call
303-322-7009.***
HIGHLANDS
WINETASTING
SUNDAY,
SEPTEMBER 10
Why is shopping for a car so unpleasant and
complicated? You would think that dealers
actually believe that people like being
pounced upon by waiting salesmen before
you even get out of the car, and the “let me go
talk to my manager” games.
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who have never worked in a car dealership
with one simple concept: make buying a car a
simple and pleasant experience.
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No archaic sales practices.
No games.
No “managers”.
No handling fees or document fees.
No excuses.
a great deal for a great cause
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Whether you select from our inventory or allow us
the best car at the best price without the typical
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• Improve posture
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July 7, 2006
NORTH DENVER NEWS
Page 7
No r t h
De n v e r
NEWS
North Denver’s Bigger, Better Paper
To Advertise: 303.458.7541
Gallop Coffee has been one of
my favorite places since it opened
a year and a half ago. Friendly,
tasteful and low-key, the summer
changes have made it even more of
a go-to place for me.
Co-owners David
Grafke and Glen Baker
are quick to point out
the huge support they’ve
had from the neighbor-
hood, noting that their success
has been due to the nearby locals
who make Gallop a regular coffee
drive-by on their way to work in the
morning, and a bustling lunch stop
at midday. “The neighborhood has
embraced us and been supportive
of us,” David said. Gallop has even
become something of a destination
spot, as drifters from as far away
as Highlands Ranch have made it
north to this cool spot.
And it’s no wonder. Gallop is
not just attentive to its customers’
needs, but intuitive about what
they might like; thus the gradual
expansion from coffee shop fare to
creative lunch menu, to a small-
plate dinner-and-cocktails menu.
With the summer months in
mind, last year Dave and Glen
advertised for a kitchen god or
goddess (no kidding, that was the
ad), and got her in spades in the
form of Nancy Kaskel. Let me per-
sonally vouch for some of Nancy’s
creations: one bite of her pineapple
cake and another of her delectable
chocolate-hazelnut-coconut tartlet,
and not only am I sold on Nancy’s
skill as a pastry chef, but now
walking into Gallop has the poten-
tial to be perpetually dangerous to
my already-shoddy will power.
Nancy is far beyond just a great
cook. She has lifelong experience in
kitchens and knowledge of owning
and running restaurants handed
down from two generations of women
in her family. Nancy attended the
Culinary School of the Rockies in
Boulder, plus she completed two
apprenticeships in France. Her goal
is to keep the menu interesting
and delicious, and indeed the offer-
ings change four times a year or
so. Plus, about twelve
months ago, Nancy took
Gallop’s fledgling cater-
ing business and turned
it into a popular option
for Denver companies,
small weddings, baby showers and
the like.
In addition to the fabulous food,
Gallop now has a full bar with high-
end spirits and an excellent wine
list. Meanwhile, creativity behind
the counter keeps things lively in
the form of new drinks, such as the
guava mojito that was forced on
me during one particularly hedo-
nistic visit. (Just kidding. There
was no forcing involved.) And I
saw the creation of probably the
greatest Bloody Mary in Denver
– nay, perhaps in all of Colorado
– but I had to drive home and had
already had that mojito… It is spicy
and large enough for a family of
four, and comes with a PBR (Pabst
Blue Ribbon) chaser. Saturday and
Sunday brunch cocktails are two
for one, by the way.
Finally, Gallop will be doing
some small-scale wine tastings
starting this summer and differ-
ently-themed happy hours every
afternoon. Look for dates posted
at the shop, or call up to find out
about the next one.
Do try brunch on the weekends,
and especially try the patio on one
of these fleeting, superbly beautiful
summer nights we are so privileged
to have in Colorado.
Gallop Café is located at 32nd
and Zuni. In the summer, Gallop
opens at 6:30 a.m. during the week
and 7:00 a.m. on the weekends;
Sunday and Monday open until 5:00
p.m., Tuesday through Saturday
open until 7:30 p.m.***
Eliza Gibbons
North Denver Notions
Fresh on tap
at Gallop...
freeze, and do so through charac-
teristic shaking, humans often are
not able to complete this cycle. It is
in the inability to thaw out from the
freeze that causes emotions such as
fear, terror, and rage to get stuck
in the body. Post Traumatic Stress
Syndrome is an extreme of this situ-
ation.
The key to releasing the fro-
zen fear lies in allowing the body
and nervous system to complete
what it instinctually needs to do:
feel empowered to either escape or
defend itself.
There are various therapies
available today that facilitate this
completion. These include EMDR,
Somatic Experiencing, Sensorimotor
Psychotherapy (formerly Hakomi
Somatics), and Emotional Freedom
Technique, to name a few. Through
developing and strengthening the
bodily “felt sense” of resources that
may have been missing at the time
of the threatening event, such as a
feeling of being able to defend one-
self, run away or say no to someone
bigger or older, and through weaving
these resources into the memory of
the stressful event, reworking it at
the bodily “felt sense” level, the body
can have a different experience of
the event, and can successfully dis-
charge the fear that may have been
held for years.
Through this discharge, there is
more freedom, peace, and potential
for achieving lasting happiness.
For more information you may call
Linda Baird, M.A., Certified Hakomi
Therapist, 303 507-6310. ***
Resolving trauma to
achieve lasting happiness
As a seeker on a spiritual path,
and a psychotherapist specializing
in trauma resolution, I am often
asked questions such as, “Why
should I do psychotherapy? My
(teacher, minister, guru) says that
I just need to focus on the teach-
ings” or “I am doing all of the ‘right’
things. Why am I not getting better?
Why am I not happier?”
My answer is that we cannot
attain freedom and lasting peace,
and we cannot manifest our heart’s
desires, as long as we are uncon-
sciously being run by fear. And
fear, like all emotions, is held in the
tissues and cells of the body, which
is why we often cannot simply “talk
it through.”
Scientific research over the last
fifteen years has shown that infor-
mation coming into the human
brain via the five senses reaches a
“choice point” in an almond-shaped
organ in the limbic brain called the
amygdala, which is a “gatekeeper”
for incoming sensory information.
If the amygdala determines that
the information is non-threaten-
ing, it is sent to the thinking brain,
the neocortex, for processing. But
if the information is determined to
be threatening, the amygdala sends
the information to the body via the
hypothalamus, through the release
of neuropeptides that signal the
body to prepare for fight or flight.
When a human is unable to fight
or flee, the third alternative is to
freeze. While other mammals have
an innate ability to “thaw” after a
by Linda Baird, M.A.
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PROUDLY FEATURING BUMBLE & BUMBLE
HAIR CARE PRODUCTS
OPEN TUESDAY - THURSDAY 9-7 • FRIDAY 9-6 • SATURDAY 9-4
COMPLIMENTARY HAIRCUT
WITH PURCHASE OF
HIGHLIGHT OR HAIR COLOR
The Marigold Tour
Featuring the following Denver
flowerbeds, along with several other
points of interest: Washington Park,
Harvey Park, Ruby Hill, Harvard
Gulch State House, Eisenhower,
Bible Park, Garland Park
August 5, 2006 9 a.m. - Noon
The Rose Tour
Featuring the following Denver
flowerbeds, along with several other
points of interest: Alamo Placita
Park, Cheesman Park, Cranmer
Park, Central Park Stapleton,
Montbello Civic Center, Village
Place, Bluff Lake
August 12, 2006 9 a.m. - Noon
The Geranium Tour
Featuring the following Denver
flowerbeds, along with several other
points of interest: Sloan’s Lake,
Inspiration Point, Berkeley Park,
Viking Park, Centennial Gardens,
Confluence Park, Shoemaker Plaza,
Commons Park
October 21, 2006 8 a.m. -
Noon
Denver Parks and Recreation
invites you to join our first annu-
al ‘Buds-to-Blooms’ garden tour
series! Journey through the life-
cycle of Denver parks gardens
beginning with a lecture at the
greenhouse, followed by several
guided tours of our most famous
flowerbeds, and ending with
‘Putting the Beds to Bed’ volunteer
event. You will acquire useful gar-
dening tips and discover the secret
of those unusual gardening terms
like dead-heading and dibbling.
For more information, con-
tack Denver Parks + Recreation at
720.913.0739 or visit www.den-
vergov.org/parks+recreation. Or
email them at brenda.marquez@ci.
denver.co.us.
Guided Flowerbed Tours
Learn valuable planting and
growth techniques, flowerbed care,
and appreciation for all varieties
of flowers featured in our parks.
Transportation will be provided for
all guided flowerbed tours.
July 29, 2006 9 a.m. - Noon
Buds-to-Blossoms garden tour
July 7, 2006
Page 8
NORTH DENVER NEWS
• Berkeley News • Berkeley News
a non-sports institute estab-
lished in 1996 by Lonnie Porter,
Regis University’s men’s basket-
ball coach, and now partnered by
Chauncey Billups of the Detroit
Pistons, helps students become
leaders among their peers, see
education as a path to success,
graduate from high school and
attend college. About 90 percent of
the Academy students will be the
first members of their families to
attend college.
For three-weeks this summer,
the Porter-Billups Academy wel-
comes 130 students. Ranging in
grades from fourth through their
junior year in high school, these
students aren’t normally termed
overachievers.
Students are accepted into the
Academy based on their at-risk
status, with academic potential.
The goal of the Academy is to enroll
kids while they are in elemen-
tary school and put them on the
path to higher education. In the
Academy, students master skills
that aren’t taught in a traditional
classroom such as critical think-
ing, teamwork, conflict-resolution
and money management.
Support continues throughout
the school year to ensure that
Academy students’ grades and
behavior records are good. During
high school, they take college prep
courses, sit for achievement tests
such as the ACT, and apply to col-
leges.***
you choose to show your leader-
ship qualities or put them to their
full potential.
Coming to the Porter-Billups
Leadership Academy, has given
me a great outlook of my future.
Just knowing that there are actu-
ally people who believe in me and
want to see me succeed in my
future is one of the best feelings
you can have.
I would recommend this pro-
gram to everyone, even if you do
not know what you want for your
future or don’t think you can go
to college.
Juanita Archuleta is a junior
at the Career Education Center,
a DPS middle college in North
Denver. She has been attending
the Porter-Billups Academy for 6
years.
EXTRAORDINARY YOUTH
START SUMMER BREAK
Typical elementary or high
school students spend their
summer break hanging out with
friends, watching television or
going to the mall. The thought of
spending their days at a college
campus refining skills in leader-
ship would send most kids run-
ning in the other direction.
However, a select group of stu-
dents is giving up not just one
summer, but seven consecutive
summers, in hopes of changing
their lives forever.
The Porter-Billups Academy,
Skills, hopes for college nourished
continued from page one
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La Muraglia’s
Day Spa & Body Shop
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God is still speaking,
Berkeley Community United Church of Christ
3701 W. 50th Avenue 303-433-5881
services every Sunday at 10am
Walk with us in the Rally for Life!
July 22 at Skinner Middle School - 5PM to 7AM


C
a
n
c
e
r

d
o
e
s
n
’t sleep
..
.
S
o

n
e
i
t
h
e
r

w
ill w
e
!
God is still speaking,
Berkeley Community United Church of Christ
3701 W. 50th Avenue 303-433-5881
services every Sunday at 10am
Paint-a-Home Project in the Neighborhood!
Bring brushes and scrapers • August 12, 8:30AM - 3:00PM
NW Denver Chili Cookoff Winners
The results are in from the First Annual NW
Denver Chili Cookoff. There were 21 entrants
representing 7 neighborhood associations, Fire
Station #20, Councilwoman Judy Montero,
Councilman Garcia’s Office, and the Highland
Senior Rec Center.
Chili Cookoff Results
Best Veggie - Rita Berberian, West Highland
Neighborhood Association
Best Green Chili - Co-Winners
John Quintana, Sunnyside United Neighbors,
Inc., and Marc Lefkovic, Sunnyside United
Neighbors, Inc.
Best Red Chili - Jane Parker Ambrose, Sloans
Neighborhood Association
Best Con Carne - Pat and Ray Defa, West 29th
Ave. Neighborhood Association
Best Fire Station Chili - Fire Station #20
Best Celebrity Chili - Councilman Garcia’s
Office, Beverly Ryken
Best Salsa - Councilwoman Judy Montero
specialty drinks
sandwiches & pastries
fresh brewed coffee
catering available
Mon - Fri 6 am - 6 pm
Sat - Sun 7 am - 6 pm
4995 Lowell Blvd • 303-475-1170
Coffee on the Lowell
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- no other discounts apply
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come on in and try our delicious sandwiches and summer fresh salads
July 7, 2006
NORTH DENVER NEWS Page 9
As the commer-
cial trade developed,
the special tools used
were invented by
Nathaniel Jarvis Wyeth. He was a
friend of Frederick Tudor, who has
been called the “The Ice King” and
is considered the father
of the ice industry. These
two New Englanders were
truly innovators.
Tudor was the first
to realize that ice could
be shipped to countries
where heat was almost
unbearable. His first shipments
were more educational for him than
profitable. He experimented until
he had figured out the best insula-
tion to keep the ice from melting
during long ocean voyages.
One of the most dramatic sto-
ries is of a shipment of 100 tons of
crystal-clear ice from New England,
transported across 15,000 miles
of mostly warm seas to Calcutta,
India, on the brig Tuscany. Upon
her arrival , 80 tons of the original
amount was still solid.
When she docked on September
10,1833, the news that the New
England ice they’d been told to
expect was coming that day, the
families of the British Colony sent
their servants to greet her and buy
ice for their dinner tables.
Ice was so important in New
England’s economy that even the
poet, Thoreau praised it. “Why
is it,” he wrote, “that a bucket of
water soon becomes putrid, but fro-
zen remains sweet forever?”
He described a commercial har-
vest as a crew who came to “unroof
the house of fishes.”And when he
learned that ice had successfully
been unloaded in Calcutta, he com-
mented, “That it appears that the
sweltering inhabitants...of Madras
and Bombay and Calcutta, drink at
my well.”
There now, don’t you feel a lot
cooler?***
Who may have made the first ice
cream not really a fact. Much of
the wonderful stuff’s history is pure
conjecture. One thing we know
for sure; there’d be no ice cream if
there was no ICE. Discussing ice
may make us feel cool, so let’s talk
about it.
The last few genera-
tions know only mechan-
ically made ice when it’s
used in connection with
food, whether as cubes
from their own refriger-
ators or the block ice
manufactured for cooling in larg-
er spaces. It has probably never
occurred to them that ice was once
considered an agricultural product,
collected from lakes, ponds, and
even rivers and stored in special
“ice houses” for use in the sum-
mer. The world was less polluted
then, so no one gave that aspect a
thought. The ice was there; “Let’s
use it.”
In the beginning, ice harvest-
ing was a community project, with
neighboring farmers cooperating to
cut the ice on the lakes. In the 19th
century harvesting ice, especially in
New England, became big business.
One account called it “the first
important agricultural product of
the year” because it was harvested
in January and February.
It was no easy task. First the
snow had to be scraped from the
surface, a task that might need to
be repeated several times during
the winter as storms deposited new
snow.
A wooden snowplow was pulled
across the ice by a team of horses
until it was clear. Then the ice was
marked in a checkerboard pattern
of lines about 3 inches deep and
a fixed number of inches apart.
Special ice plows deepened the
grooves to make it easier to saw the
blocks apart. Care had to be taken
not to cut so deep as to cause the
ice to break under the weight of
horses and plow.
Corinne Hunt
North Denver Notions
July is
National
ice cream
month
Indulge Italian Style.
PIZZERIA • DELI • TRATTORIA
AND GELATO!
DINE IN & TAKE OUT
11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday - Saturday
4401 Tennyson Street Denver
303.561.0234 Fax 303.480.5514
See our menu online at www.parisi-denver.com
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night; reducing after-hours heat-
ing and cooling use; pre-cooling or
pre-heating building at night dur-
ing off-peak, low-cost times; using
fresh air to warm or cool buildings,
if possible; installing utility man-
agement software; and reviewing
monthly energy bills to manage
peak demand and use details.
Tax credits, outlined in the
Energy Policy Act of 2005, further
help businesses recoup invest-
ments in energy-efficient buildings
or retrofits. Deductions of up to
$1.80 per square foot are available
for certain energy-saving upgrades,
according to the report.
The report recommends that
Metro Denver implement an initia-
tive to promote the consideration
of energy efficiency as companies
renovate an existing building or
construct a new facility. Setting
efficiency goals and providing
resources for businesses to access
how-to guides, information and tax-
credit details are also suggested.
Several metro area companies have
expressed interest in the voluntary
program.***
Report sees dollars in build-
ing refits, planning
continued from page 2
Urban OutSitters
A Pet Nanny Service
• Dog Walking • Vet & Groomer Taxi Service
• Care for Dogs, Cats, Birds & Fish
• Bonded & Insured
303.271.1705 www.urbanoutsitters.net
Sonia Avery
July 7, 2006
Page 10
NORTH DENVER NEWS
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Ask about our Blooming Beaderz Creative Parties!
Full Retail
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5223 W. 25th Avenue
303-216-0536
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FRIDAYS 10-8 FOR OPEN BEADING!
Where the beads bloom!
Last month, the North Denver News expanded its
distribution to the City of Edgewater, and this is the
second in a series of articles on the City, its events,
and its development. For more information, or to
be included in the Edgewater News, call 303-458-7541.
Museum). Solomon wanted to cre-
ate a project that would blend
the writing community with local
businesses, much like First Friday
is a collaboration between artists
and neighborhood merchants. He
also hopes to shine a spotlight on
aspiring writers (both novice and
seasoned) and the elusive craft
that they practice. “While many
people enjoy dashing off an enter-
taining email, only a few wannabe
writers ever get published. So this
is kind of a fun ‘call to action ’ to
the closet writers amongst us.
Solomon, an avid promoter of
the Upper 15th Street District,
also wanted to offer incentives for
the writing contest, not just a ‘pat
on the back’. Hence, by offering
almost $2000 in prizes and gift
certificates to North Denver mer-
chants, Solomon has provided a
stirring motivation to set pen to
paper.
To help pay for the prizes (and
promote the contest), Solomon
applied for (and received) gen-
erous funding from the Denver
Foundation’s Strengthening
Neighborhoods grant program.
Local merchants who agreed to
offer gift certificates as prizes
include Mona Lucero Fashions,
Lola’s, Real Baby, Jay’s Patio Café/
Eat Street, Dragonfly Apparel, West
Side Books, Duo Restaurant, Red
Door Swingin’, Zen Bath, Mondo
Vino, BROWS, and other mer-
chants are still signing up.
To judge the submissions,
Solomon enlisted the renown
Lighthouse Writers Workshop,
an independent creative writing
school based in Denver. To provide
further incentive for contestants,
the North Denver News has agreed
to publish the winning essay.
Submissions can be emailed
to jayspatiocafe@comcast.net
or delivered to Jay’s Patio Café,
2563 15th St, Denver, CO, 80211,
Attn: NW Denver Lit Challenge.
The deadline is August 21, 2006.
Submissions will be judged by the
faculty of the Lighthouse Writers
Workshop. The winning stories will
be published in the North Denver
News. Length: 750-1000 words.
Nonfiction only.***
Contest with words? Writing
on North Denver
continued from page 1
• Edgewater News •
Edgewater Days
are coming!
With a carnival, rides,
food, vendors, and
the musical stylings
of Wendy Woo and
Hazel Miller, who can
ask for more? And
all just minutes from
the Highlands in the
heart of Edgewater!
Come down and enjoy
the fun.
August 11, 12
and 13.
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CONCERTS IN THE
PARK
Edgewater
Calendar of Events
SUNDAYS
6:30-8:00 PM
MEMORIAL PARK
25TH & CHASE
July 9 Holly Holverson
(jazz)
July 16 Rumble Seat
(big band)
July 23 Pangaea
(percussion)
July 30 Martin Pickett
(country)
August 6 Colo Celts
(scottish
• Edgewater News • Edgewater News •
Page 11
July 7, 2006 NORTH DENVER NEWS
before
AFTER!
WESCO DOG GROOMING
5225 W. 25th Avenue
(1/2 Block West of Sheridan)
We Look Forward to Grooming
Your Best Friend!
call for appointment
303-455-3445
Tues-Fri 10-4
Sat 10:30-6
Featuring
Custom Gift Baskets
Home Accessories
Vintage — Fashion
Gold & Silver Jewelry
Porcelain Teapots
Cups & Saucers
Gift Cards and Much
Much More
A Girl and Her Ribbon
5217 25th Ave in Edgewater
303-462-1158
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Some more of this,
some more of that!
Another choice for the
plus size woman
Consigning Career, Casual, Funky
5218 W. 25th Avenue
303-237-1152
Tuesday-Friday
Noon-6:00PM
Saturday
10:00AM-5:00PM
Sundays by chance
Return this card for 20% off your purchase
The bright yellow walls, check-
ered floor, and swinging screen
door at Re...Markable! belie the
evolving businesses growing with-
in. Stepping inside, tables set with
antique furniture show off not just
the colorful history of the cof-
feehouse, but of the surrounding
town too – and, on a quiet morn-
ing, you’re likely to find a local or
two step into the room, dressed
for a day at the office, an after-
noon peddling wares, or, dressed
in paint-colored trousers, an after-
noon in the baking sun fixing one
of Edgewater’s old houses.
It’s a classic small town coffee
shop, though inside, the murmur-
ing of big things to come can be
heard through the sounds of the
espresso machine and the move-
ment of old wooden chairs.
At Re...Markable!, just past the
archway that leads into Edgewater
along 25th Avenue, you can find
a morning cup of
coffee, a chat about
what’s new in the
neighborhood, a new
home, or a chair or
table to furnish the
home you have now.
And you’ll find all the
local flair you can
handle.
Elaine Lucero, the
shop’s owner, moved
her realty office into
the back of the build-
ing after Some More
of This...Some More
of That! moved into
her space next door.
Already a flourishing
consignment and antique busi-
ness, Re...Markable! soon became
the home of Urban Advantage
Realty as well, as well as a hub for
the nascent Edgewater Merchants
Association. With a steady stream
of locals coming by to check in on
what’s new in the neighborhood,
and no other coffee shop on the
strip, the final expansion seemed
obvious – and, with some modifica-
tions of an old pastry stand and the
installation of a coffee machine, the
building became a coffeehouse too.
“With the way the real estate
market is now, you have to be
diversified,” laughs Lucero. “Any
good little neighborhood like this
has to have a good networking
place.”
Sitting down to a cup of cof-
fee in an old antique chair, you
can browse through the pages of
a magazine old or new, see some
familiar faces, and – if you happen
to like the chair you’re sitting in
– take it home with you. If you’re
just discovering the neighborhood,
Elaine can give you the scoop on
who’s moving in, what’s moving
out, and where the town is going.
She can probably even help you
find a place in town, and introduce
R
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.
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Enjoy a cup of coffee on an
old wooden chair...
...and if you like the chair,
take it home!
*
*
Lattés, coffee, pastries, furniture and antiques!
5224 West 25th Avenue in Edgewater
Half a block east of Sheridan Boulevard

303-918-6511
Lattés!
Buy one,
Get one half price!
you to the neighbors – they’ll be by
any minute.
As they come by, big plans are
tossed about – a 25th Avenue street
fair to coincide with Edgewater
Days and introduce new custom-
ers to the neighborhood; a farmer’s
market; streetscape improvement;
perhaps even a local government
race or two. Along with Edgewater
Days, a fair and community garage
sale on 25th Avenue promises ven-
dors, a garage sale, and more – and
there’s room to be included, at rea-
sonable rates. Just swing by Re...
Markable! and ask.
And, like any small town coffee
shop, there’s also plenty of gossip
to be heard. It’s an emerging hub in
an established community, and, as
one of the first businesses you meet
in Edgewater, a perfect match for its
position at the front of town. Swing
by, pull up a chair, and check on
the news at Re...Markable!.
The “Cheers” of coffeehouses— Re...Markable
by Devon Barclay
Ke||µ Purce|| MT. 303-931-8896
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Exµ: 9/1/06
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July 7, 2006
NORTH DENVER NEWS Page 12
keep it
simple
shop locally!
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Simple Foods Market
3rd Year Anniversary
Celebration!
$5.00 donation is welcome with all proceeds going
to the Colorado AIDS Project and Angel Heart.
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HOURS & CONTACT:
Monday - Saturday: 7am-8pm
Sunday: 10am-5pm
303.561.4740 t
303.561.4743 f
simplefoodsmarket.com
Save $5
N
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Bring in this ad for $5
off any $50 purchase
during July & August.
Saturday, August 5th from 5-9pm.
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JUST BLOCKS AWAY FROM Sloanʼs Lake AND The Highlands
at 3901 Tennyson
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