in this issue
School
Revitalization in
North Denver, 5
years in - failures
and favorable
results
13
Social
Ills...
I N THE NEWS
FEATURI NG
6 Coping with
Financial Stress
9 Greenways
Return
3 Lowry Vista
15 Does Jack 'n
Grill liveup to the
hype?
17 What you've
wanted to know
about Mediation
Smiley Middle School
announced on March 19
that it will become a fully
accredited International
Baccalaureate (IB) Middle
Years Programme at a press
conference in the school's
library. Smiley will begin the
process to become an IB
Middle Years Programme in
the 2008-2009 school year,
which will bring changes
and new opportunities to
youth in Denver’s Park Hill
neighborhood.
In attendance where sev-
eral local dignitaries,
including City Council pres-
ident Michael Hancock,
DPS Board of Education's
Kevin Patterson, and
Nathaniel Howard, Smiley
Middle School principal.
The IB Middle Years
Program is designed for stu-
dents aged eleven to sixteen,
and focuses on preparing
students for the Diploma
Programme, that IB stu-
dents would engage in high
school. Widely recognized
Beth McCann took top line on the primary ballot for
State House District 8 on Saturday in what turned out to
be a marathon day of meetings for Denver Democrats.
"It's really a great time to be a Democrat in Colorado,"
said McCann. "It was such an exciting, energetic day,
and I'm very grateful to my supporters who were with
me the whole time -- their patience paid off in the end!
I know that with this kind of passion and commitment
in the party, we have a lot to look forward to in November
and beyond."
McCann narrowly edged out her competitors, with
all three candidates achieving the 30% standard needed
to make it on to the primary ballot.
"Timing was much more of a factor than we antici-
pated," commented McCann campaign director Kathryn
Poindexter. "We had to wait for a senate district to fin-
ish their business before the house district meeting could
start. At first the extra time was a good opportunity to
talk with undecided delegates, but after we passed the
90-minute mark, our whole strategy became about just
keeping our supporters in the room." Poindexter con-
cluded "I don't think anyone left here thinking
democracy is a glamorous process. But we did what we
came here to do, and that's what counts."
Final results were:
Total votes: 243
McCann: 84; 34.6%
Bergles: 80; 32.9%
Lowery: 78; 32.1%
Dick's Sporting Goods
Park, Kroenke Sports
Enterprises, and AEG Live
Rocky Mountain Region
today announced the first
annual Mile High Music
Festi val powered by
SanDisk.
The Mile High Music
Festival will be held on the
fields complex at Dick’s
Sporting Goods Park. Tom
Petty and the Heartbreakers
will headline on Saturday,
July 19 and the Dave
Matthews Band will top the
bill on Sunday, July 20.
Colorado has never
before seen a music festival
of this magnitude. The festi-
val footprint will host five
stages (some tented), food
from many of Denver’s top
restaurants, an artists’ vil-
lage, misting tents, and
more.
The Mile High Music
Festival will feature a tre-
mendous variety of musical
talent, ranging from estab-
lished touring powerhouses
to some of the hottest up-
and-coming performers,
including a number of bands
from Denver’s vibrant music
scene.
In addition to the head-
l i ner s , per f or mance
highlights will include John
Continued on Page 2
Smiley Middle School granted
International Baccalaureate
Status
4
McCann leads candidates for
August primary
Continued on Page 9
March-Apri l 2008 publ i shed monthl y Stapleton, Lowry, Park Hill, and North Aurora Issue 4 Vol 3
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3
Denver's
Biggest Music
Festival
planned for
Dick's
Sporting
Goods Park
The major task of the
trip was building a
small school building,
which was even more
remarkable in that it
was done by hand and
with rudimentary tools
of shovels,
wheelbarrows and
picks.
Can Restorative
Justice stop Billy
from becoming
Billy the Kid?
Students attend a presentation on Smiley's new IB status
Tower Ledger
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
2
March-Apri l 2008 publ i shed monthl y Stapleton, Lowry, Park Hill, and North Aurora Issue 4 Vol 3

ConTribuTing EdiTors
Devon Barclay, Angela Sasseville
Mark Mehringer, Helen Hand, Jeff LeClair,
Sophia Throop, Danielle Corriveau
PhoTograPhy
Lisa Digan, Sophia Throop
ad saLEs
sales@towerledger.com
phone 303.458.7541
media kit on-line at
www.towerledger.com/mediakit
arT dirECTor
Sven Hanson
PubLishEr
Emporia Publishing, LLC.
POB 12487
Denver, CO 80211
advErTising & EdiToriaL
inquiriEs:
www.towerledger.com
Tower Ledger is published monthly by Emporia
Publishing, and printed by Longmont-Times Call.
Copyright © 2007 by Emporia Publishing. All rights
reserved. Reproduction without permission is prohibit-
ed. Postmaster: Send address changes to Emporia
Publishing,POB 12487 Denver, CO 80212. This publi-
cation welcomes editorial submissions but assumes no
responsibility for the safekeeping or return of unsolicit-
sTaPLETon, Lowry, Park hiLL.
hiLLToP, haLE, Mayfair,
CrEsTMoor, MonTCLair, and
norTh aurora
Issue 4 • Volume 2 • March-April 2008
Internation Baccalaureate Comes to Smiley
Smiley gains World School Status, Middle Years Program
Tower Ledger
The financial contagion of the sub-
prime mortgage crash continues to work
its way through the nation’s economic
foundations like dry rot.
But to put the blame on mortgage
lenders, banks and the like is to mistake
swelling for the fracture. The U.S. econ-
omy is out of sorts at a very fundamental
level — and the result is that we see the
municipal bond (bonds issued by cities
and schools) market collapse at both
the level of the insurer and at the lend-
ing window itself. The entire auction
rate securities (ARS) market, an obscure
flavor of government bonds, including
some issued by the Denver International
Airport and the City of Aurora, has
interred itself for a lack of buyers.
Interest rates for cities and, by exten-
sion, their taxpayers, have skyrocketed.
The entire ARS market, as large as $342
billion, has literally evaporated. If you
hold an ARS bond, you literally can not
sell it today. Yet the mainstream media,
and public-at-large, have heard little of
this.
This trapped capital is yet one sign
of how bad the American economy is
right now. Those billions mean higher
credit card rates, student loan payments,
future mortgages and car loans. What
has traditionally been a very low risk
market, municipal bonds, is now a bad
joke. And job creating projects - roads,
schools, bridges, hospitals - are now at
risk.
One of the core reasons for the cred-
it calamity traces itself back to the
federal budget deficit and the twin hall-
marks of the Bush era - tax cuts, followed
by deficit spending and the $3 trillion
Iraq war. This huge debt, financed
largely by China in service of a massive
trade surplus with the U.S. - has knocked
flexibility out the American economy
The basic equation: buy cheap products
at Wal-Mart from the Chinese. The
Chinese, with their fixed-rate currency
system (part of the reason their goods
are cheap) then turn around and invest
those dollars in American debt. Because
the Chinese can’t reinject the full value
of their profits into their economy with-
out causing hyper-inflation, largely
because their fixed-rate currency can’t
adjust relative to the dollar, both nations
are trapped in this worsening spiral.
This in turn weakens the dollar
internationally, which causes energy
(and food) prices to go up, out of pro-
portion with fundamental costs.
American wages stagnate. In January,
American wages suffered a real dollar
decline. Savings and investment go
down, creating a negative feedback loop
which tightens credit.
At the same time, our overleveraged
capital market is rapidly unwinding.
The Bear Stearns bailout vaporized
some $18 billion in capital, looking back
over the past year.
The answer, which is uncertain at
best, is that we must get debt, both per-
sonal and federal, under control; reduce
our spending on energy; and re-invigo-
rate the core of the American economy
by boosting productivity through inno-
vation, and keeping jobs at home.
—The Tower Ledger
The Dry Rot Economy
This trapped capital is
yet one sign of how
bad the American
economy is right now.
Those billions mean
higher credit card
rates, student loan
payments, future
mortgages and car
loans. What has
traditionally been a
very low risk market,
municipal bonds, is
now a bad joke.
by many of the world's universities,
the IB Diploma Programme is nearby
available to Smiley students only at
George Washington high school.
"This [Middle Years] period,
encompassing early puberty and mid-
adolescence, is a particularly critical
phase of personal and intellectual
development and requires a pro-
gramme that helps students participate
actively and responsibly in a changing
and increasingly interrelated world.
Learning how to learn and how to
evaluate information critically is as
important as learning facts," says a
statement on the IB website. The
Middle Years Programme (MYP) is
one of three programmes offered by
the IB.
During the Middle Years program,
students study subjects from each of
eight subject groups through five areas
of interaction: approaches to learning,
community and service, homo faber,
environment, and health and social
education.
At a glance: approaches to learning
provides students with the tools to
enable them to take responsibility for
their own learning, thereby develop-
ing an awareness of how they learn
best, of thought processes and of
learning strategies; through commu-
nity service, students take an active
part in the communities in which they
live, thereby encouraging responsible
citizenship; in homo faber, students
explore in multiple ways the processes
and products of human creativity, thus
learning to appreciate and develop in
themselves the human capacity to
influence, transform, enjoy and
improve the quality of life; in environ-
mental education, students’ develop
an awareness of their interdependence
with the environment so that they
understand and accept their responsi-
bilities; and in health and social
education, students deal with physi-
cal, social and emotional health and
intelligence—key aspects of develop-
ment leading to complete and healthy
lives.
Only schools authorized by the IB
as IB World Schools can offer the
Middle Years Programme.
There are three phases to becom-
ing an IB World School, authorized to
offer the Middle Years Programme.
First, schools must undertake a feasi-
bility study and identify their available
resources. Second the school makes
an in-depth analysis of the philosophy
and curriculum, and identifies the
resources needed to deliver it. Finally,
the school goes through a trial imple-
mentation period. During this trial
period, the school puts in place all the
processes and resources needed to
deliver the programme, including the
training of teachers. The school must
then implement the full programme
for at least one year.
At the end of the trial period, a del-
egation appointed by the IB visits the
school and evaluates the school’s
capacity to deliver the programme. If
the outcome is positive, the school
becomes authorized to offer the pro-
gramme and attains the status of IB
World School. The school’s delivery of
the programme is evaluated by the IB
four years after authorization, and
then every five years. After a school
becomes authorized, the teachers are
encouraged to engage in an ongoing
process of professional development
by attending IB workshops and con-
ferences, participating in online
discussion and special events on the
IB’s website for teachers, and review-
ing relevant support materials
published by the IB online and in
print.
March-Apri l 2008 publ i shed monthl y Stapleton, Lowry, Park Hill, and North Aurora Issue 4 Vol 3
Continued from Page 1
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March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
3
It might surprise all of you, except those
following the issues closely, that many of
the same issues that surfaced regarding the
proposed Buckley Annex redevelopment
are now surfacing on the Lowry Vista (old
landfill) redevelopment project. Perhaps
like me, you too wonder why?
After listening to one of the recent
Lowry Vista presentations unveiling some
new plans for the project, I again, like the
issues surrounding Buckley Annex, found
myself confronting issues of high density,
increased traffic congestion, and environ-
mental concerns. I think Lowry United
Neighborhoods RNO, supported by sur-
rounding RNO’s at the edges of Lowry, just
asked questions on all those issues at the
Buckley Annex “public” meetings. Assured
by the Lowry Redevelopment Authority
(LRA) and Lowry Community Master
Association (LCMA) that they were listen-
ing, we can now be relatively sure nobody
was ever listening or ever heard us.
Lowry Vista is another redevelopment
project with similar issues, and in some
respects may represent greater concerns
than Buckley Annex. The redevelopment
of Lowry Vista is on the horizon and
nobody is listening. Imagine that. LRA
has lost focus in its rush to sunset.
Below is a brief comparison chart of the
two new redevelopment projects for your
consideration:
If you studied the chart, I surmise you
are thinking about some of the same ques-
tions I had about the projects. Let me list
a few for you:
How can 70-acres be so valuable at
Buckley Annex site and not be worth much
at Lowry Vista site?
If there are greater environmental prob-
lems at the Lowry Vista site that would
cause it to be less valuable, then what are
those problems? The threat could be sub-
stantial if the liability is near $49,999,990.
If Federal BRAC guidelines prevail for
base closures, then how were they followed
for one redevelopment project and not for
another?
Why should we allow developers to put
more money in their pockets for high-den-
sity redevelopment plans, causing traffic
congestion, noise and air pollution, and
environmental and health concerns that
lurk in these fast-track proposals? Why
are the residents left to suffer for develop-
er’s profits?
Now I am sure you can think of other
questions too. I have many more myself
but not enough time or space to express
them. Concerned Lowry and surrounding
residents deserve credible answers to these
questions, and more.
The broken promise for acres of open
spaces is disappointing to many residents.
The promises of walkways and bikeways
seem to be dwindling in favor of increased
traffic congestion. I wonder if developer
profits will get in the way and jeopardize
the quality of life many of us in the Lowry
community have come to appreciate.
Lowry residents, and those surround-
ing neighborhoods most affected by the
proposed redevelopments, are entitled to
economic analyses, feasibility studies, envi-
ronmental findings, and traffic studies data
for their own review. Otherwise, how will
we ever have opportunity to protect our
quality of living and get our city leaders to
help protect us – the taxpayers?
Dave Siefkas
Lowry Neighbors rally on Lowry Vista
March-Apri l 2008 publ i shed monthl y Stapleton, Lowry, Park Hill, and North Aurora Issue 4 Vol 3
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March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
4
Ed. Note: This story examines three
North Denver Schools that were “revi-
talization” projects after a 2003 mill
levy was pased by Denver voters. The
three schools were the closest group-
ing geographically of the schools that
underwent revitalization in its first
incarnation.
Five years after Denver voters gave
Denver Public Schools $2.3 million
yearly to revitalize failing schools, the
results in North Denver are decidedly
mixed. Three schools received revi-
talization funds in the first go round:
Brown and Remington Elementaries,
and Skinner Middle School. Remington
is closing next year, the most glaring
failure, and almost a total write-off of
taxpayer investment. Skinner Middle
has turned away from its revitalization
program, and represents the mixed bag
so often characteristic of school reform.
Brown, once the poorest performing
school in the area, now has one of the
best track records of improving stu-
dent performance in North Denver.
Brown has shown the most success
post-revitalization, with improving test
scores and strong parent support for
the school’s Intenational Baccalaureate
(IB) program. Brown was controver-
sial early, with every teacher at the
school initially fired. New leadership
transformed the school, and families
choiced into the school in substantial
numbers.
But alarm bells went off in the
Brown parent community last month
when funding for the expensive IB
program was at risk. Brown did not
receive a school improvement grant
for the 2008-2009 school year, and
funding for an IB coordinator and a
foreign language teacher, both part
of the requirements to stay in the six-
year long hunt for the IB certification,
couldn’t be found in Brown’s regular
budget. While Brown has been accept-
ed into the IB Primary Years accredita-
tion program, it has not yet completed
the course.
Suzanne Loughran, Brown’s prin-
cipal, says that Brown has received
a “long-term commitment from the
district” to fund IB, citing a letter of
support from Superintendent Michael
Bennet. But Loughran does not know
the source of the dollars. “I look for-
ward to getting a better understanding
of why we were not funded as a Beacon
school.” Brown’s funding needs for
International Baccalaureate are esti-
mated to be in excess of $130,000 each
year, including a $4,500 application fee
paid yearly to the IB umbrella orga-
nization. Whether the means or the
political will exist within DPS to main-
tain that funding for the long term
is an open question, given the con-
stantly shifting sands of school reform
funding. Brown has been successful in
attracting foundation grant dollars to
support professional development for
teachers, a key ingredient in improv-
ing student achievement and meeting
IB goals.
Councilman Rick Garcia said that
he was told by DPS Community lia-
sion Happy Haynes that money for
IB would be found and restored. The
foundation for success at Brown has
been preserved, at least for anoth-
er year. More importantly, DPS has
kept the faith with parents who have
choiced into Brown, as much as two-
thirds of Brown’s entering students,
using Loughran estimation.
“DPS has stated that they are going
to continue to fund the IB program
at Brown,” says Tony Curcio, a par-
ent at Brown. “We’re looking for a
commitment for Brown, Lake (middle
school) and a future Northwest Denver
Diploma (high school) program.”
The Brown funding issue points
out just how difficult funding reform
is. Change and programming require
funding, dollars that are just not con-
templated in DPS’ standard budget-
ing system. Those dollars also raise
questions of funding equity — schools
in line for revitalization money (now
called Beacon Schools) receive more
money per student than other schools.
Revitalization was supposed to be the
foundation for sustainable change, but
that has not been the reality.
The lessons at Brown, one of DPS’s
Beacon Schools, may be equally diffi-
cult to replicate. Involved parents and
prepared students are critical ingredi-
ents to school success. Parents most
engaged are most likely to choice into
schools showing success — a causal
conundrum that administrators and
think tanks don’t want to admit, at
least in public discussion of school
success.
At Skinner, after a contentious com-
munity process, the Integrated Arts
model was adopted, and funded at the
cost of hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars. But a change of principal meant
the model was partially abandoned,
leaving observers questioning DPS’s
commitment to community input in
school reform.
At Skinner today, vestiges of revi-
talization remain. The AVID program,
which both helps to organize students,
provides them with learning skills,
and structures the classroom environ-
ment, remains, trademark binders and
all. AVID is a fourth- through twelfth-
grade system to prepare students in
the academic middle for four-year col-
lege eligibility. And Integrated Arts
lives on, in the form of profession-
al development, and many Skinner
teachers have been trained in a Denver
University program that teaches them
to use the arts to enliven the classroom
and leverage learning.
Despite student achievement prob-
lems and declining enrollment, the
level of instruction in two classrooms
visited at Skinner is high. The school
has three Teach for America teachers
this year, benefiting from the national
program that seeks to put graduates
from America’s elite universities in
urban classrooms. That has added to
Skinner’s teaching corps, without a
budget drain. But the beat goes on, as
the declining enrollment means the
middle school will be cutting teachers
again next year.
DPS has inaugurated a new bud-
geting approach, which, within limits,
puts students at the core of the fund-
ing process. But the dollars are still too
fragmented, too restricted and ulti-
mately, too few, to make meaningful
changes in programming sustainable,
successful propositions. Programs,
particularly computer-assisted learn-
ing interventions, are too expensive to
be within the reach of many schools.
Further complicating the picture is
the high cost of personnel. DPS’ bud-
geting requires that each teacher cost
a school over $62,000- even though
teachers with full benefits often make
much less. So a school that is able
to find $35,000 in its budget to pay
for a reading specialist or a program
coordinator is still unavailable to hire
a full-time teacher for the role. Those
limits constrain innovation and stu-
dent achievement by placing bureau-
cratic rules ahead of student progress.
The DPS Budget Guidance Manual
for 2008 runs 55 pages, complete with
clip-art from 1989. Almost every page
contains restrictions on how schools
can spend dollars, and admonitions
that deviations have to be approved
at the highest level of DPS administra-
tion. The result is a central planning
document that may stifle finding new
solutions. The words “flexible” and
“innovate” are not to be found even
once in the document.
For taxpayers and parents, DPS’
mixed record of success suggests both
the difficulties and the potential for
transforming struggling schools. But
DPS still has yet to fully integrate the
reality of school choice into an institu-
tional perspective that gives students
the best chance at success.any.
—Tower Ledger
Revitalization after five years: failures, and
foundations for success
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$360,000
4412 Wyandot Street
$335,000
888 Logan St Unit 10G
$240,000
3539 Quitman Street
$315,000
3137 W 37th Avenue
$355,000
2757 W 46th Avenue
$370,000
2288 Elm Street
$735,000
It’s Your Money
Keep More
of it!

Full service real estate for a
*OFFER SUBJECT TO CONDITIONS, LIMITATIONS, EXCLUSIONS, MODIFICATIONS, AND/OR DISCONTINUATION WITH-
OUT NOTICE. ALL INFORMATION DEEMED RELIABLE BUT NOT GUARANTEED. PRICES AND AVAILABILITY ARE SUBJECT
TO CHANGE. PLEASE DISREGARD THIS IF YOUR HOME IS CURRENTLY LISTED WITH A DIFFERENT BROKER.
10925 W. 41st Avenue
$190,000
1422 Downing Street
$153,000
Colorado Free University
Moves classes to Lowry
THG
Tavern
Hospitality
Group
Beginning in May, Colorado Free
University will hold its CompuSkills
Computer Training classes at its
Lowry Campus. CFU has been busy
remodeling the old Firehouse in
Lowry to accommodate two new
computer labs for classes, as well as a
third lab that will be available for
rental by outside groups wanting to
do computer training.
In addition to holding computer
classes at the Lowry Campus, most of
CFU’s administrative offices will
move to Lowry. The Colfax and York
location, which has been home to
CFU for twenty-one years will con-
tinue to be used for classes and will
have some staff presence.
Moving day is scheduled for May
2. The first Compuskills Computer
class at Lowry will be Adobe
Photoshop Elements, on Tuesday
May 6.
While the school has no intention
of abandoning Colfax and plans to
continue to hold classes in its Central
Campus, President Helen Hand
hopes that the shift to Lowry will
allow the school to serve the commu-
nity better. The Lowry Campus has
accessible and ample parking and the
remodeling will make the space at
Lowry more conducive for classes. A
new kitchen has been added to the
Lowry Campus, as well, meaning that
a wide variety of cooking classes will
soon be available through Colorado
Free University.
Colorado Free University has
been Denver’s premier adult learning
center since 1987. Founded by John
Hand, the school was founded on
principles that emerged from the free
speech movement in the early 1970’s.
Teachers come from the community
with ideas, passion, and expertise and
offer their courses as independent
contractors. Students need not apply
or have any prerequisites to take part
in classes. Everything from foreign
languages to art, business, medita-
tion, and relationship and personal
growth opportunities are available at
the school. CFU offers about 400
courses at any given time.
N
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ic
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ic
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!
S
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www.ßradfordFealEstate.cou · 303.133.0211 · 2550 15th Street, üenver
Brokerage for buyers
and sellers since 1991
$274,900
Wonderful 1950's ranch on ureat block with excellent
location between hiuhlands su. and sloan lake, oak furs,
coved ceilinus, uodated kitchen, larue uaster bedroou,
larue backvard with oatio and uarden area, 2-car
uaraue with work bench, new furnace and h20.
Call Brad Lewis 720.971.1200
$274,900
Wonderful 1950's ranch on ureat block with excellent
location between hiuhlands su. and sloan lake, oak furs,
coved ceilinus, uodated kitchen, larue uaster bedroou,
larue backvard with oatio and uarden area, 2-car
uaraue with work bench, new furnace and h20.
Call Brad Lewis 720.971.1200
$274,900
Wonderful 1950's ranch on ureat block with excellent
location between hiuhlands su. and sloan lake, oak furs,
coved ceilinus, uodated kitchen, larue uaster bedroou,
larue backvard with oatio and uarden area, 2-car
uaraue with work bench, new furnace and h20.
Call Brad Lewis 720.971.1200
$274,900
Wonderful 1950's ranch on ureat block with excellent
location between hiuhlands su. and sloan lake, oak furs,
coved ceilinus, uodated kitchen, larue uaster bedroou,
larue backvard with oatio and uarden area, 2-car
uaraue with work bench, new furnace and h20.
Call Brad Lewis 720.971.1200
$274,900
Wonderful 1950's ranch on ureat block with excellent
location between hiuhlands su. and sloan lake, oak furs,
coved ceilinus, uodated kitchen, larue uaster bedroou,
larue backvard with oatio and uarden area, 2-car
uaraue with work bench, new furnace and h20.
Call Brad Lewis 720.971.1200
2938 Osceola St. 2938 Osceola St. 2938 Osceola St. 2938 Osceola St. 2938 Osceola St.
1300 Pennsylvania St. #208 1735 Boulder Street 4575 Tennyson Street 2916 W. 24th Ave 3329 Grove Street
3332 Eliot Street
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$272,000-$422,500
14 new row homes across from Berkeley Park; features: 7
level design with private rooftop deck, 40’ sky-lit atrium, slab
granite, stainless steel appliances, and unfinished basement
with bath rough-in. www.watchthiscorner.com
Presented by Rachel Grace Hultin 303-667-0609
$268,500
Charming bungaloww/ modern renovations, customkitchen w/ Slab
Granite &Maple Cabinets, exposed brick, updated systems, Double
French Doors lead to deck &landscaped yard, nicest house for the
price. Hot area in the Highlands!
Presented by Jordana Lebowitz 303-921-0332
$475,000
Stunning city views from master bedrm! New sprocket tower
townhome filled w/light! Attached garage! Amazing location,
steps from restaurants,shops, parks! 2nd bdrm loft/study -
great unit, hurry! One-of-a-kind, will go fast at this price!
Presented by Kristen Moore 303-726-7597
$278,000
Rare true loft in 1924 Penn Garage building barrel vaulted ceilings,
exposed brick open stair case to loft bedroom, quiet corner unit,
secured building and deeded garage sp wa &dr in unit. Concrete
kit counters, unique shelving w/ library ladder, cool pl!
Presented by Brad Lewis 720-971-1200
$359,900
Fully restored &remodeled Denver Square half duplex, just blocks
fromfine shops, cafes &nightlife. Newer systems, gourmet kitchen
with customcabinetry, slab granite, stainless steel appliances, original
character &details throughout, mantel &tiled hearth, built-in &trim.
Presented by Brad Lewis 720-971-1200
$380,000
Recently updated home with separate lower level rental unit, over-
sized 2 car garage with work shop. Main kitchen with slab granite,
newer windows, wood floors, high ceilings, and two sets of appli-
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Presented by Brad Lewis 720-971-1200
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www.BradfordRealEstate.com • 303.433.0211 • 2550 15th Street, Denver
Last week I joined friends for a
birthday celebration, with a special
treat for the birthday girl: dinner
at a fancy restaurant. We decided
to step out of our normal sports
bar comfort zone, go gourmet and
blow our tax refunds at a rich peo-
ple’s restaurant, an elegant five-star
establishment where we would sip
wine and feast on sublime epicu-
rean delights. She’s worth it. We’re
worth it. So we chose a trendy, tony,
upscale spot in LoDo and made res-
ervations.
We met in front of the restau-
rant at the designated time, taking
note of the profusion of limousines
dropping off well-dressed diners.
We stashed our bus passes deep in
our purses, stepped into the grand
foyer and made our way to the coat
check. A group of women ahead of
us, talking and laughing, casually
checked their mink coats. We sheep-
ishly handed our ski jackets to the
young woman behind the counter,
who took them without comment
and hung them in the broom closet.
Maybe, said the birthday girl, we
are getting in over our heads.
The maitre d’ led us to our table.
We were dazzled by the elegant
Parisian decor, the lovely silk uphol-
stered armchairs and heavy gold
tapestries at the windows. The place
was packed with darkly tanned
beautiful people sporting diamond
necklaces and Rolex watches, look-
ing like they’d jetted in from winter
homes in Antigua and would be
jetting out after dinner to moun-
tainside mansions in Aspen. We sat
down at our table, pale and bling-
less, trying to be inconspicuous. We
have definitely, said the birthday
girl, gotten in over our heads.
Then a handsome young waiter,
silver serving tray in hand, appeared
at our table and presented each of
us with a phone book-sized wine
list. We decided on champagne to
mark the festive occasion and finally
chose a bottle of bubbly with a price
equal to my weekly salary. Then we
turned our attention to the menu.
And a very impressive menu it was,
page after page of gourmet dishes
not merely cooked but seared, but-
ter poached and glazed, accompa-
nied by purees, brulees and gelees.
We decided to try an appetizer.
Not finding hot wings, poppers or
mozzarella sticks on the menu, we
asked our waiter for
his recommendation.
The Jumbo Maine Sea
Scallops, he replied, are excellent
this evening. We placed our order,
sat back and sipped champagne,
savoring the ambiance, anticipating
the sure-to-be palate-pleasing first
course.
The waiter soon reappeared with
our selection and placed it in the
center of the table. The plate was
beautifully garnished with vegeta-
bles cut in flower shapes, delicate
slivers of fruit and colorful swirly
sauces. But where was the food?
The birthday girl tentatively pushed
her fork around the plate, finally
uncovering four tiny morsels, one
for each of us. No, no, we said. This
can’t be right. Did we mistakenly
order Scallops Anorexia? We sum-
moned our waiter, who assured us
that this was indeed the dish we had
chosen (with lobster emulsion).
Surprised and disappointed, we
looked around the restaurant, close-
ly scrutinizing the dining choices
of our fellow patrons, and noticed
that they, too, appeared to have very
little actual food on their plates. Was
it just us, or was anyone else upset
with such microscopic portions at
astronomic prices? It appeared not.
Everywhere we looked, tanned
beautiful rich people chatted and
laughed, raised their forks to their
lips and nibbled invisible food, just
like little girls pretending to have a
tea party.
None of us wanted to cause a
scene and spoil our friend’s birth-
day celebration, so we decided to
forge bravely onward and order
dinner. Our waiter approached the
table and asked if we had any ques-
tions about the menu. Yes, I said.
What comes with the ranch ante-
lope? The waiter replied haughtily
that this was an a la carte menu
(French for “empty your wallet”).
Side dishes had to be ordered sepa-
rately. Chastened, I meekly ordered
a nine-dollar baked potato (with
black truffle). My friends placed
their orders, and the waiter van-
ished into the kitchen.
The main courses soon arrived,
once again on plates beautifully gar-
nished. Once again, we hunted for
our food like miners panning for
gold, but in the end, it was hardly
The Emperor has no food
Painting
Interior
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Residential
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Standards
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Extras
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Over a Decade of Quality Craftsmanship
303.322.ISLE (4753)
Call for your free estimate
Licensed & insured www.emeraldislepainting.com First-rate references from happy clients
Marcella’s Cleaning & Concierge Services
Exceptionally reliable, references available
Please call: office 720-498-0217 cell 303-618-5321
“I’ve been in business over nine years. Thoroughly enjoy
cleaning homes weekly, biweekly, monthly and seasonally
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TowerLedger.com
continued on page 13
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
7
75O5 L. 35th Ave, 8O238 * 3O3.316.3339
35th and Ouebec - |n Ouebec 5quare
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AFFORDABLE LIVING AT LOWRY
$140,000’s - 150,000’s
$1000 - $1200 per month
$1000 down
Colorado Community Land Trust can help!
**income and occupancy restrictions apply.
Located at the intersection of Lowry Boulevard and Alton Way.
For more information contact 303.355.5044 and visit our website at www.coloradoCLT.org
Community
Stability Dreams
Pass/Fail
How does your plan
for funding college
measure up?
While education costs have soared, tax
laws have opened up a range of tax-favored
funding opportunities. If you didn’t qualify
for these benefits in the past, now’s the
time to review your education plan. Speak
with a Financial Advisor and learn about:
• Expanded Education Savings Account
benefits
• Section 529 College Savings Plan
improvements
• How to pay back college loans with the
help of tax deductions
To learn more about education funding,
call Anthony Favela, Financial Advisor.
370 17th Street, Suite 2800
Denver, CO 80202
(303) 572-4038
www.fa.smithbarney.com/favela
anthony.favela@smithbarney.com
Citigroup, Inc., its affiliates, and its employees are not in the business of providing tax or legal advice. These materials and any tax-
related statements are not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used or relied upon, by any such taxpayer for the purpose of
avoiding tax penalties. Tax-related statements, if any, may have been written in connection with the “promotion or marketing” of the
transaction(s) or matters(s) addressed by these materials, to the extent allowed by applicable law. Any such taxpayer should seek
advice based on the taxpayer’s particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor.
© 2007 Citigroup Global Markets Inc. Member SIPC. Smith Barney is a division and service mark of Citigroup Global Markets Inc. and
its affiliates and is used and registered throughout the world. Citi and Citi with Arc Design are trademarks and service marks of
Citigroup Inc. and its affiliates, and are used and registered throughout the world. Working Wealth
SM
is a service mark of Citigroup
Global Markets Inc.
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
8
Meeting at the Denver School of Science & Technology:
2000 Valentia Street, Denver, CO 80238
$tap|etoo0h0rch.com º 303.321.1014
º
Join us at SFC for this series:
$0odays d0r|og Apr||, 10:30am
*With Discovery Club for children of all ages.

Colfax
Q
u
e
b
e
c
V
a
le
n
t
ia
23rd
Montview Blvd
S
T
A
PLET
O
N
F
E
L
L
O
W
S H I P C H
U
R
C
H
NEW MESSAGE SERIES AT SFC
BEGINNING APRIL 6
NEW MESSAGE SERIES AT SFC
BEGINNING APRIL 6
Coping with financial stress
By now we’ve all heard numer-
ous reports about the economy.
We know that there are many
people facing significant financial
difficulties. From my conversa-
tions with others, it seems that
personal financial stress and con-
cern about the national economy
are prevalent worries. Here are
a few ideas to help you and your
loved ones cope if you’re faced
with financial uncertainty:
1) Identify the emotions you’re
having regarding money. Is it
worry and anxiety? Sadness?
Hopelessness or depression?
Incompetence? Once you’ve
identified the emotions do a little
detective work in your own life
and look for situations that trigger
or increase those unpleasant emo-
tions. Often gaining insight into
our own emotional triggers helps
these emotions to feel less over-
whelming and allows us to begin
to predict them. For example, if
cash flow is a problem for you,
you may start noticing that you
feel anxious or panicky when you
have to sit down and pay a stack
of bills. Once you recognize
this trigger you can begin to look
for ways to better cope with that
situation, such as soothing your
anxiety with your favorite relax-
ing activity following a stressful
bill paying session.
2) Notice any emotion-
al responses you’re having to
media coverage of the economy.
Wellness expert and author Dr.
Andrew Weil writes that it’s com-
mon for people to feeling stressed
out after watching or reading the
news. Consider putting yourself
on a “media diet” and intentional-
ly consume less media coverage of
the economy. Then note whether
or not your diet has helped you
decrease your stress.
3) Try to “externalize” the
problem. We spend so much
time around our family members
that we often take the brunt of our
stress out on them. If our part-
ner has different spending habits
than we do, it’s easy to fall into
the trap of blaming them for our
financial stress. Instead of turn-
ing on one another, try to adopt a
team attitude within your home.
Blame something outside of the
family (like the slow economy)
for your stress. Enlist the help of
everyone in the home to come up
with ideas for saving money and
create a team approach to getting
through this tough time.
4) Live in the moment. Often
the things that we ruminate on
and fear the most lie in the future
and may not ever come to pass.
For example, if you’ve lost your
job it’s understandable that you
would worry about losing your
house or not being able to pay
your rent down the road if you
don’t find new employment. But
focusing on that fear will send
anyone’s anxiety level through the
roof. Give yourself a break from
your stress and worry by return-
ing your focus to today and make
a mental list of all of the things
that you do have in the present.
5) Enlist professional support
when you need it. If money mat-
ters are damaging your relation-
ship with your partner or causing
you to get down on yourself,
counseling can help you learn
healthier ways of coping with
your situation. Many psycho-
therapists, like me, offer a sliding-
scale fee to meet people where
they are at financially. If you need
help creating a concrete plan to
address the source of your finan-
cial stress, contact a professional
financial planner, financial coach
or a reputable debt consolidation
agency.
Psychotherapist Angela
Sasseville, MA, NCC supports
adults and kids of all ages. She
specializes in helping couples and
families strengthen their relation-
ships. See FlourishCounseling.
com, call 303.875.0386 or stop by
her office at 44th Ave. and Lowell
Blvd. for more information.***
Angela Sasseville
Identify the emotions
you’re having
regarding money. Is it
worry and anxiety?
Sadness?
Hopelessness or
depression?
Incompetence? Once
you’ve identified the
emotions do a little
detective work in your
own life and look for
situations that trigger
or increase those
unpleasant emotions.
4Dэ .̨D̙Ȣ͝MȺǑOȠ
)Ǒ҅W˒'JȢMȠ
720-841-6887
sfield@kitchentuneup.com
kitchentuneup.com
720-841-6887
Garden News: March 22,
2008
Hello Gardeners!
Apologies for taking so long
to give you an update on the
Greenway Garden (aka West
Stapleton, by the dog park.)
There has been a lot going on that
I need to tell you about--and as
we round the equinox it will final-
ly be time for us to get some dirt
under our fingernails.
2008 Gardening Season,
Volunteer Workdays, and Art!
While there are still some
issues to be worked out, we are
on track to be able to garden this
season. As you may remember,
the site has been chosen as a loca-
tion for a significant piece of
public art. The artist is currently
being selected, and the general
plan for the art should be avail-
able in May. Until we know what
the public art will be--a fence,
sculpture, benches, ???.--there is
a little uncertainty about what
needs to be done to prepare to
garden, but we will still move for-
ward with those elements of the
garden that we know we will need
regardless of what the art will be.
The public art will be ready to be
installed in 2009.
Denver Urban Gardens staff
will be leading two work days in
April to get the garden ready for
gardening this year. They will be:
Saturday, April 12, 9:00 AM--
the vision for the day is to run sod
cutters over the whole site, and
have volunteers rolling and haul-
ing the sod to a staging area for
removal. Many more volunteers
are needed, and will be joined by
a group from JP Morgan.
Saturday, April 26, 9:00 AM--
the vision for this day will be to
load, move, rack out, till and
tamp the crusher fine and the
topsoil. V3 Companies of
Colorado has offered to help us
that day.
Please come if you can, and
bring anyone who wants to help.
To the degree you are able, please
bri ng your own tool s.
Wheelbarrows are especially
needed.
Even if you are not interested
in rolling sod or tamping gravel,
coffee, bagels and other comfort
items will make the work even
more fun.
Garden Meeting--Wednesday,
April 23, 5:30, 23rd and Spruce
This is when we will select
plots--if you can't attend but want
a plot, please let me know.
Many of you have recently
contacted me to ask if you will
have a spot in the garden this year.
We have over 60 people who have
expressed an interest in garden-
ing and only 35-40 plots (still a bit
uncertain until the public art is
known). What I have told people
is that I have been "date stamp-
ing" the time that I learned from
you that you would like to gar-
den. This has been a bit confusing,
but the list below is based on my
records and I believe it is accu-
rate. However, if you have reason
to believe that I may not be using
your first contact with me, let me
know and I'll do some research.
This means that the list may move
a bit, and I'll appreciate every-
one's understanding. Also, many
people have indicated that you
would be willing to share a plot.
If that is the case, let me know.
Let's have a garden meeting
on April 23 at 5:30. We have some
things to work out about how we
will govern ourselves, our vision
for the garden, fees, etc. It will
also be a nice opportunity to
check-in on the progress of the
garden after the first work day.
Fundraising
The cost of this garden is
about $25,000-30,000, not includ-
ing the art. Stapleton United
Neighbors has started the ball
rolling by generously contribut-
ing $1,000. We have requested
funding from Forest City (through
Diane Deeter), Stapleton
Foundation (through Brian
Weber) and Master Community
Association (Keven Burnett). We
have not heard yet from any of
these three organizations, but are
hopeful that we will soon.
While it is not a requirement
for gardeners to contribute to
construction, it would be much
appreciated for those who are
able. There is currently an offer
to match the first $500 of grants
from gardeners--so if you can
contribute now, you will double
your donation. Also, if anybody
has any additional ideas on fund-
i ng s our ces - - bus i nes s es ,
individuals, grandparents, etc.
please let them know. Does your
employer match charitable dona-
tions? Donations are all
tax-deductible and will be made
to Denver Urban Gardens, a
501.c.3.
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
9
Greenway Garden programs bloom once again
Combining Ouality, Compassion and Care
· PPLL |n-Home Assessment
· Caregivers are Trained, 8onded & |nsured,
8ackground Checked/Pinger Printed
· Live-|n & Hourly Care
· Lrrands & Shopping/Transportation
· Meal Planning & Preparation
· Medication Peminders
· Hospital Sitters
· 8athing & Personal Care Assistance
· Light Housekeeping
· Lmployment Opportunities for
Pull/Part Time Caregivers 303-756-9322
www. synergyhomecare. com
"The Most Trusted Name |n Home Care"
After two convincing wins in exhibi-
tion matches over Boise State University
on March 6th and March 8th that extend-
ed their record to 12-5 overall (9-5 in
varsity matches), the #7 ranked NAIA
men's volleyball team in the country,
Johnson & Wales University (Denver,
CO) hosted #5 ranked Lindenwood
University (St. Louis, MO) for their final
two conference matches of the regular
season. Both teams came into the week-
end tied for 2nd place in the MAMVIC-
West Conference.
In the weekend opener on March
14th, which was played at the Colorado
Convention Center during the
Colorado Crossroads
Tournament, several
hundred fans were
treated to a tense
match. Johnson &
Wales overcame a slow
start to Game 1 to
win the opening game
30-27. Lindenwood's
block (statistically
ranked #1 in the NAIA)
led them to wins in Games 2 and 3,
30-26 and 30-28. JWU fought back to
win game 4 31-29, before falling 13-15
in the 5th and deciding game. With just
3 points separating the teams over the
span of 5 games, this was unquestionably
Johnson & Wales' most closely contested
match of the season. On the night, JWU
was led by a match high 26 kills from
junior outside hitter Curtis Oliver (Santa
Barbara, CA) who did so while hitting
.340. Senior setters Chance and Cody
Dunston (Aurora, CO) each contrib-
uted 31 assists. Defensively, the Wildcats
were led by senior middle blocker Ty
Schraufnagel's (Parker, CO) 6 blocks
and by junior libero Hapaki Kaululaau's
(Laie, HI) match high 23 digs. For his
#7 Ranked Johnson & Wales comes up just short
against #5 Lindenwood
efforts this past weekend, Kaululaau
was named the NAIA co-libero of the
week. This is the 2nd time this season
that Kaululaau has won this award.
The rematch between these two
teams took place the following day
on March 15th, at Johnson & Wales'
Senior Day, which was the final home
match for seniors Chance Dunston,
Cody Dunston, Nathan LaHanes, and Ty
Schraufnagel. The Wildcats again took
Game 1, this time by a score of 33-31,
but Lindenwood bounced back to take
the next 3 games, winning the match 3-1
(31-33, 30-20, 30-27, 30-27), behind the
stellar offensive play of
senior Prince Wilson who
put down 22 kills while
hitting .500. Johnson &
Wales was led on the day
by setter/opposite Cody
Dunston who put down
13 kills, hit .476, dished
out 29 assists, and dug 8
balls. Schraufnagel also
put up another solid night at the net
by collecting 12 kills, hitting at a .364
clip and amassing 3 blocks. Defensively,
junior libero Brad Larsen (Costa Mesa,
CA) came up big with a match high 12
digs.
With the losses, Johnson & Wales
falls to 12-7 overall (9-7 in varsity match-
es) and will finish in 3rd place in the
MAMVIC-West Conference. JWU and
Lindenwood will face off again in three
weeks in the first round of the confer-
ence tournament, as Lindenwood has
now secured 2nd place in the conference
standings. Next up for JWU is a trip to
Lake Wales, FL where they will take part
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March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
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Many people think about replacing old windows
as a solution to high energy bills and to help reduce
their carbon footprint. Old, single-glazed windows
often feel drafty and cold to the touch, so they seem
like the place to start.
In terms of energy payback, however, windows
rarely provide the “biggest bang for the buck”.
Other reasons to replace windows might sway the
decision though. Not having to struggle with sticky
windows, prop up windows with a stick, change
storm windows and screens, or paint window
frames are often at the top of the list of the “added
benefits” of new windows. Old windows are also
the biggest source of lead poisoning in Denver, so
families with young children
might factor that into their
decision. On the opposing
side, historic wood windows,
when properly maintained
and refurbished, add a lot of
charm to the home, can last
100 years or more, and can
be lead-safe. It takes energy
to make new windows, so fix-
ing up old windows may be a
better solution for reducing
your carbon footprint.
Insulating Value of
Windows
New windows offer more
insulating benefits than old
windows. Most new windows
are made of two panes of
glass, separated by a small
air space. The R-Value of a
good new window can be
anywhere from R-2 to R-4.
Old, single-glazed windows
are just R-1 but with a good
storm window they are closer
to R-2. To make things con-
fusing, windows are usually
rated with U-factor, rather
than R-value. U-factor is just the inverse of R-value.
So R-2 is equal to U-1/2. The lowest U-factor win-
dow gives you the highest R-value.
Many new windows come with an option of
a “low-e” coating. This increases the R-value of
the window. It is relatively inexpensive and worth
the cost in terms of energy payback. If you invest
in new windows, invest in the additional cost of a
low-e coating (usually only about $15-$25 per win-
dow). Many windows also come with the option of
argon gas fill. Instead of air in the gap between the
two panes, there is argon gas. This also increases
the R-value of the window. There is some contro-
versy over whether argon gas filled at sea level will
still be in the window when it gets to Denver (the
gas expands as the window is taken to a higher alti-
tude and may leak out). If the windows are manu-
factured in Denver or Cheyenne, go for the argon.
If they are manufactured at a lower elevation, it
may not be worth any added cost.
Solar Heat Gain
Windows are also important because they let
solar energy into our homes. Even a home that
isn’t designed specifically for solar heating, gets a
portion of its heat from the sun. This can be bad
in summer if you get so much solar heat that you
have to use an air conditioner, but good in winter
as solar gains offset the need for heating. You want
to pick the right window to maximize solar heating
in winter, but not cause overheating in summer.
The low-e coating described above can help fine-
tune this choice. Products that are “low solar gain”
low-e (using names like “super low-e”, “low-e2”)
are the type that cut out a lot of solar heat gain.
They are great for large expanses of west-facing
glass that can overheat a house in summer. For
typical homes in older Denver neighborhoods, I
recommend a “high solar gain” low-e that doesn’t
cut out so much of the solar energy. This will pro-
vide a good balance of letting the sun warm up the
house but providing the extra insulation quality of
new, low-e windows.
The Energy Payback
If you replace your old
single-glazed windows with
new double-glazed, vinyl-
or wood-framed windows
with a high solar heat gain
low-e coating you might
save on the order of $150
per year on your heating bill
and $15 per year on your
cooling bill (if you have air
conditioning). If your win-
dows already have storm
windows, the savings will
be less. Replacing the win-
dows might cost you around
$8000, so it would take 48
years to recapture the money
you spent through the ener-
gy savings. There are many
other ways to reduce energy
use in your home that pay
back quicker and reduce
more greenhouse gases per
dollar invested.
Recommendations
1. If your old windows
are in decent shape, think about restoring them and
adding storm windows before replacing them. Be
careful of lead-based paint if the restoration hap-
pens on-site. If you have young children, make sure
the lead paint is stripped off of the friction surfaces
of the window.
2. If your old windows are beyond repair and
you’re tired of painting, propping, and struggling
with them, select the right window:
• Double-glazed with wood or vinyl frames.
• High solar heat gain low-e coating, except for
large west-facing expanses which should have low
solar gain low-e.
• Ask to see the NFRC rating of the window.
This is a third-party rating system that shows the
official U-value and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient
(SHGC) for the window. It’s a sign of quality and
the seriousness with which the company takes
energy issues. Look for U-factor less than 0.35 and
a SHGC greater than 0.5.
If young children live in or frequent your house,
make sure your contractor is trained in lead-safe
work practices, especially if your home was built
before 1940.
Wendy Hawthorne is the Executive Director of
Groundwork Denver. Visit their website at www.
GroundworkDenver.org***
Traveling on a whim breaks the mold Replacing windows and your
carbon footprint
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
11
during Avs and Nuggets games
5001 E Colfax
Denver Music Festival, cont
Photo by NortherN AurorA busiNess
AssociAtioN
Mayer, The Black Crowes, O.A.R.,
Michael Franti & Spearhead, Rodrigo
y Gabriela, Steve Winwood, Spoon,
Flogging Molly, Colbie Caillat,
OneRepublic, The Roots, plus local
favorites Flobots, Rose Hill Drive,
Meese, Born In The Flood, Railbenders
and The Photo Atlas. A complete list
of currently confirmed acts is included
below, with additional artists still to be
announced.
Doors will open at 10:30 a.m. each
day, with performances commencing
at noon and ending at 11:00 p.m.
“With its abundant natural beauty,
the Denver metropolitan area has
always been a special place for out-
door summer concerts,” says Chuck
Morris, President-CEO of AEG Live’s
Rocky Mountain Region. “The addi-
tion of the fields complex at Dick’s
Sporting Goods Park has allowed us
to realize our long-held dream of stag-
ing a world-class music festival in the
Denver Metropolitan area.”
The Mile High Music Festival marks
the first outdoor festival ever held at
Dick’s Sporting Goods Park, the home
of the Colorado Rapids Soccer Club.
The site is the largest professional sta-
dium & field complex in the world,
and features 24 fully-lit immaculate
grass soccer fields with remarkable
vistas of the Denver skyline and Rocky
Mountain Front Range, including a
panoramic view from Long’s Peak to
Pikes Peak.
Concertgoers will have a wide
range of cuisines to choose from, with
many of Denver’s most popular res-
taurants participating in the event. An
artists’ village – including an extensive
exhibit of local arts and crafts – will be
another highlight of the festival.
Tickets for the Mile High Music
Festival powered by SanDisk will go
on sale on the Rapids’ 2008 Opening
Day, Saturday, March 29th, at 10:00
a.m. MST online at www.TicketHorse.
com, by phone at 866-461-6556, at the
Dick’s Sporting Goods Park Box
Office, and at the ticket kiosks located
in all Denver area Dick’s Sporting
Goods stores.
Ticket prices are $150.00 (plus ser-
vice charges) for a 2-Day Pass. A
limited number of Single Day Tickets
will be available for $85.00 (plus ser-
vice charges) while supplies last.
2-Day VIP Packages are also available
for $495 (plus service charges).
Continued from Page 1
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March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
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×ȢlǣӰ Ǒ«Ƞ ×Ȫ«ȪӮ
ӭ̢:̛ Ν«Ⱥ έ ΝӅ·
ӬȢ͝͝«ɺ Ѿæ.͕æ.ɚ·
·ͽlΝ·æțΥ· ·ͩl,
~l.Ǒ:Ǒҿ.Ν͸
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·- ȒlΕ.͕· .ǚґӂ έ .̙Ȫ҅.aǑ͸)
Simple foods reign...
worth the effort. Blame it on our
plebeian mac-‘n-cheese palates, but
the strange spices and odd ingre-
dients in these dishes were quite
off-putting to our taste buds. One
friend complained that her wasabi
gelee had a distinct underlayment
of mouthwash, the birthday girl
thought she detected a hint of Ben-
Gay in the sauce bernaise, and my
ranch antelope tasted like it had
been braised with black licorice.
We all gave a big thumbs-down to
the saffron corn froth.
When the bill arrived, we raided
our retirement funds and settled up
with the waiter. We retrieved our
jackets from the broom closet and
took our leave of this trendy, tony,
upscale, overrated restaurant and
headed to our favorite sports bar
for heaping helpings of hot wings
and nachos (hold the fig sauce).
As we hungrily devoured these old
favorite, familiar comfort foods,
we decided to start our very own
new diet: The Ten-Day Gourmet
Restaurant Miracle Weight Loss
Plan.
—Teresa Keegan
continued from page 7
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March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
13
I watched one day as the city’s
juvenile court tried kids who had been
issued summons for various incidents.
One kid was there for a
fistfight after school.
Another was there for
jostling in a hallway.
Most were there for
problems that occurred
months earlier and
received either a $100
fine or a couple days of
community service.
This kind of behavior
used to result in a kid
being sent to a school’s
dean or a note to parents.
Suddenly it seems like
we’re using the police
and courts for what
should be handled
among school administrators and par-
ents.
The same can be said for incidents
perceived as involving sexual contact.
In February, such reports related to
kids under ten years old skyrocketed
by 76%, amounting to 251 incidents
in only one month. Some of these
reports involving nothing more than a
couple of kids kissing or accidentally
touching a private area while playing
tag. These activities are inappropriate
but are by no means criminal.
The number of reports from
schools regarding supposedly-sexual
contact will hopefully decline after
the city and school administration
help clarify what should be reported.
But the question remains about how
schools should handle these and other
sorts of inappropriate behavior.
Our first priority must be to keep
our children safe. Any activity that
involves harm, bullying or harassment
of another child should be treated
seriously. Teachers should be report-
ing these incidents and administrators
should be forwarding these reports to
the appropriate authorities when seri-
ous enough. Most of all, parents need
to be notified and
involved.
For incidents that
are not serious, the best
strategy is one being
implemented incre-
mentally throughout
Denver Public Schools,
called restorative jus-
tice. This strategy
i nvol ves bri ngi ng
together the kids
involved in a particular
incident, along with
their parents, identify-
ing the reason for the
incident and resolving
differences so the prob-
lem does not reoccur.
Restorative justice has shown posi-
tive results in schools where it has
been implemented. During the 2nd
year of implementation at Montebello
High School there was approximately
a 50% reduction in the number of
tickets and arrests. Between the first
semester of last year and the first
semester of this year, North High
School saw a 25.6% reduction in
arrests.
Not only does restorative justice
cause a direct reduction in calls to the
police and Human Services; it also
leaves victims feeling better
(“restored”) and reduces the chance
of incidents reoccurring by resolving
problems rather than simply punish-
ing someone. Studies have shown that
traditional criminal punishments
often lead juveniles to additional
crime as an adult. None of us can
afford that result.
How to stop Billy from
becoming 'Billy the Kid'?
by Councilman Doug Linkhart
Since the beginning of the year, the
Denver Preschool Program (DPP),
which increases access to quality early
childhood education programs for all
City and County of Denver children in
their last year of preschool before kin-
dergarten, already has received more
than 1,100 applications from families
seeking to enroll their children in a pre-
school program offered by eligible
providers. This is the largest number of
family applications obtained in a six-
week period of time since the program’s
launch in fall 2007. Additionally during
this time period, DPP has added more
than 145 classrooms to its growing list
of available preschool programs.
DPP provides parents with a tuition
credit to use at any licensed preschool
participating in DPP’s quality improve-
ment system, based on their family
income, household size and quality rat-
ing of the provider. Participation in the
DPP program is open to all provider
types: for-profit, non-profit, public and
private providers.
“We’re spreading the word about
DPP so every family in Denver with
children in their last year of preschool
before kindergarten knows they can
receive a tuition credit for their child’s
education,” said James Mejía, chief
executive officer for DPP. “The accel-
eration in enrollment is a true testament
to parents’ understanding of the impor-
tance of preschool education, as well as
its increased affordability in our com-
munity, which DPP makes possible.”
Local Denver parents and recent
DPP enrollees Eric and Kim Pruitt
stated, “For many years we thought
preschool was simply a luxury we
wouldn’t be able to afford. But now,
with help from the Denver Preschool
Program, we’re sending our first-born
to one of the city’s best programs. With
full tuition credits covering the full cost
of preschool, we can ensure that our
daughter is ready for a lifetime of learn-
ing.”
More than 40 years of research
shows that early childhood education
provides significant educational and
social benefits for children, families
and communities. Almost 80 percent
of brain development occurs before the
age of five. Therefore, having children
attend a preschool education program
is crucial to their development and
ability to grasp basic and fundamental
skills early in order to be prepared to
learn when they enter kindergarten. In
Colorado, kindergarten teachers report
that one-third of children come to
school unprepared to learn, a trend
DPP would like to halt through increas-
ing access to affordable, quality
preschool programs for every child in
Denver.
The Denver Preschool Program is
the result of a ballot initiative approved
by Denver residents in November
2006. For additional information on
the program or to learn how to get
involved, visit www.denverpreschool-
program.org.
Denver Preschool Program
enrollment soars
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March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
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F i r s t
B a p t i s t
Church of
Denver is the
oldest Baptist
congregation
in both the city and the state. Organized
before statehood, during the Civil War on
May 2, 1864, it held services in several
locations prior to its present home at 1373
Grant.
The present building was constructed
in 1934 through 1936. Our “architectur-
ally significant” building has been
recognized as a Denver Historic
Landmark. It was constructed in the
“Christopher Wren” style, found mostly
on the East Coast and in England. The
solid granite columns at the front of the
building are so large, they were turned on
a lathe in the middle of 14th Avenue dur-
Fran Schroeder and Corinne Hunt
Denver Icons
ing construction of
t he bui l di ng.
Elegant granite and
marble stonework in the narthex of the
building near the front columns are note-
worthy.
When it is sometimes referred to
as “the Mother church of the Rockies.” It
is well named for during the 1880-1890s
period it was responsible for the estab-
lishment of ten new churches and eight
missions in Denver during the short but
significant leadership
of Dr. Robert Cameron
The First Baptist
Organ
The traditional pipe
organ is a collection of
tuned pipes, which are
sounded by admitting
air to them from a wind-
chest. The centuries of
development of the pipe
organ have yielded a
rich variation in types of
pipes as well as mecha-
nisms for sounding
them. The collection of
pipes of a given type is
called a rank, and the
organist’s control knob
for a rank is called a
“stop”.
“Pulling the stop”
means opening the valve
to let air into that rank
of pipes (when the cor-
responding key on the
keyboard is pressed).
Some of the largest
organs have more than a hundred ranks.
A visit to First Baptist will be treat for
your ears, as you listen to the largest pure
pipe organ between Chicago and Salt
Lake City, a 126 rank Aeolian-Skinner
organ with 8,000 pipes. The average
church organ is between 20-30 ranks.
The one in the Mormon Tabernacle has
214 ranks. ***
First
Baptist
Church of
Denver
Can Jack N Grill live up to the
hype that they, themselves, show-
case? Step into their dining room
at 25th and Federal Blvd. and the
first thing you notice is an entire
wall filled with plaques and awards.
Then you notice that these awards
extend onto the windows and other
surfaces. There are stickers herald-
ing their popularity in internet polls,
certificates of honor for offering the
best value menu, the best burgers
and the best green chile. Articles
from local newspapers and maga-
zines offer kudos and praise for a
job well done. It’s a very impres-
sive display that would have many
first-time patrons patting themselves
on their backs for selecting such a
prime dining location. But from
the eyes of a reviewer it becomes
a challenge. They are essentially
promising me that I am going to
not only like their food; I am going
to love their food.
With the gauntlet
thrown down, I
accept that chal-
lenge!
The first hur-
dle I must over-
come is the menu.
Holy guacamole
Batman! This
thing is huge! In
addition to four or five lunch spe-
cials, there are probably close to 100
options for entrees grouped into tra-
ditional categories: tacos, burritos,
house specials, sopaipillas, enchila-
das, burgers, etc. There are over a
dozen versions of gorditas alone. It
is truly overwhelming. I finally suc-
cumbed to asking the waiter for his
recommendation, which was also
choke-full of options. “The Jaxx
Burger,” he said, “or the Frito Pie,
the Chile Relleno Burrito, or the
Gorditas are good. The cheese
enchilada platter, also.” Oh great.
I was right back where I started!
Needing a moment to regroup, I
ordered an appetizer-sized “Corn-
in-a-cup” ($3) and asked him to give
us a moment to think about it.
The Corn-in-a-cup was pretty
interesting. Kernels are mixed with
butter, lemon, hot sauce, chile pow-
der, salt, and topped with grated
parmesan cheese. The first bite was
arresting and I had to think about
whether or not I wanted to con-
tinue. But after swirling things with
my spoon to mix more thoroughly
I have to admit that this was really
good in an addictive sort of way. It
was decisively more enjoyable than
the home-made tortilla chips which,
I hazard to guess, were probably
fried in oil that wasn’t quite hot
enough, making them heavy and
greasy rather than light and crispy.
We eventually decided to try two
of the staff recommendations, the
Chile Rellano Burrito ($9) and the
Gordita sampler ($10) The Burrito,
smothered “Christmas” style with _
red chile and _ green chile, was gen-
erously filled with roasted peppers,
cheese and beans. The red chile
was mild and sweet, the green fla-
vorful and just hot enough to make
my head sweat a little (yum). The
Gordidta sampler platter asks you
to select from over a dozen possible
options. While all were good, the
best … and I mean BEST was the
vegetarian “calabsitas.” I enjoyed
this so much I would probably go
back and ask for a full order of
those, alone. Sweet seasonal veggies
are diced, sautéed, and stuffed in a
very fluffy flour shell. Both red and
green chile sauces are offered for
dipping. Again with the “yummy.”
Glancing back up at all of the
plaques and awards, I was once
again reminded that there is some-
thing special about this restaurant
that makes their customers return
again and again, nominate them for
awards, and push Jack N Grill to
a higher reputation. Yes, the food
is good, but the
menu is far more
extensive than
it needs to be.
So many of the
dishes are similar
it seems silly to
honor each with
its own listing. It
also makes it real-
ly hard for many
people to make up their minds.
What is it, then, than truly makes
this restaurant seem like home to so
many of the regular clientele? My
guess is the sense of “family” that
envelops every aspect of the opera-
tion. Jack N Grill is a family owned
and operated business. The Martinez
family history, beginning with their
move to Denver from Albuquerque,
is printed on the menu so that you
can read and get to know about
each of them before they come to
take your order or clear your plates.
Pictures of siblings and grandchil-
dren are embedded throughout the
menu and many dishes are named
after most of them.
Still the question remains: Does
Jack N Grill live up to the hype of
the wall-o-awards? I guess the jury
is still out. I really enjoyed my meal,
but I can’t really say any part of it
was “the best.” There is also the
issue of the huge menu. Clearly we
hadn’t sampled enough to get the
full experience. I know for a fact
that I would like to try one of their
burgers, which all featured roasted
chili peppers, and because this was
a lunch and not a dinner I wasn’t
able to sample an adult beverage
from the bar (a vital part of any truly
Mexican dining experience!).
And so I will leave you with this:
Was Jack N Grill the “best”? I
can’t say. But I do know that I left
the establishment feeling very full
and satisfied, yet wishing I would
have more. And isn’t that one of
the golden rules in entertainment?
Always leave your audience wanting
more. And oh, I do.***
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
15
Dining Detective
Does Jack and Grill
live up to the hype?
Jack N Grill
2524 Federal Blvd
303.964.9544
Leaving a 401(k) with a previous employer could mean
leaving it alone with no one to watch over it.
At Edward Jones, we can explain options for your 401(k) and
help you select the one that’s best for you. If you’d like to roll
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303-377-7557
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2373 Central Park Blvd Ste 104
Denver, CO 80238
303-320-7752
Beginning May 7, from 6-8 p.m.,
the JFS Counseling Center of Jewish
Family Service (JFS) will present
its marriage workshop for couples
interested in creating and maintain-
ing a Jewish home. Participants in
the seven-week workshop, The
Aleph Bet of Marriage: Journeying
Toward Commitment, will meet
on Wednesdays at Jewish Family
Service, 3201 S. Tamarac Dr. in the
Rafael Spiritual Healing Center. The
workshop is sponsored by Jewish
Family Service and Rocky Mountain
Rabbinical Council. The cost is $250
per couple.
“Couples can expect to meet other
couples going through a similar expe-
rience and gain insights into the skills
they will need for a successful and
mutually rewarding marriage,” says
Arleen Gershen, LCSW, workshop
coordinator. “The workshop will help
couples improve communication
skills, learn how to resolve conflicts,
explore families of origin including
their differences and similarities, and
create a marriage that is a true part-
nership.”
For information or to enroll: Arleen
Gershen, LCSW, (303) 597-7777, ext.
806 or agershen@jewishfamilyservice.
org.
Jewish Family Service of Colorado
has launched its new homecare
group, JFS at Home, building on its
135-year tradition of excellence in pro-
viding specialized care throughout
metro Denver. JFS at Home will pro-
vide compassionate support and com-
prehensive services to help seniors
and those with chronic illnesses live
safe, healthy, independent lives in
their own homes.
“Jewish Family Service has estab-
lished a high standard for quality
homecare for seniors, the disabled,
and the chronically ill,” says Debbie
Zimmerman, JFS COO. “We will
strive to further enhance this excep-
tional standard of care through JFS at
Home.”
Carla Weeks, RN, MSN, FNP, a
professional with strong expertise in
the nursing and homecare fields, is
director of the new homecare group.
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
16
Marriage
Workshop 5/7
A Letter from the
Performing Arts
Home Care
Agency
versus
Private Duty
Space Invaders opens at Museo de
las Américas in February
Visit our website at: www.stelizabethsdenver.org
On the Clayton Early Learning Campus: 3605 Martin Luther King Blvd.
An Episcopal, Coeducational, Independent Day School
Serving a Diverse Denver.
• Academics, Music and Visual Arts.
• Diverse faiths, races, and cultures.
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• At maturity, grades K-8.
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303-322-4209
Welcoming Kindergarten
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For 2008-2009
As the owner of Synergy HomeCare
in the heart of Denver, I am travel-
ing around Denver and the metro area
talking and with current clients, care-
givers, and potential new clients. I am
frequently asked why it is better to hire
a Home Care Agency, when it would be
less expensive to hire a friend or a private
individual to help a parent or loved one.
Keep in mind that the majority of
older adults want to remain in their own
home, with their own belongings, their
own surroundings, and their own rou-
tines. Currently, one of the utmost long-
term needs of our elderly and those with
chronic or acute illnesses is for in-home
care services.
Home Care Aides can provide a
variety of services, such as assistance
with activities of daily living (ADLs)
which include bathing, dressing, groom-
ing, feeding, assistance with transfers,
and ambulation. Additionally, they may
assist with instrumental activities of daily
living (IADLs), such as meal prepara-
tion, shopping, making appointments,
transportation, and laundry. Also, com-
panionship is a key component with all
home care. There would be nothing
worse than having someone you don’t
like spending the day with you and in
your home.
Unfortunately, many families hire pri-
vate individuals or friends rather than a
home care agency. While at first blush
this appears advantageous, this may
cause unexpected problems and liabili-
ties for the family down the road.
When the family hires privately, the
family then becomes an employer and is
required by state and federal law to pay
Social Security, payroll taxes and unem-
ployment, as well as provide worker’s
compensation insurance. Additionally,
I have met several individuals working
Continued on Page 18
This last weekend of February,
the audience at Boettcher Concert
Hall was delighted to see
internationally famed guitarist
Sharon Isbin make her Colorado
Symphony debut. Performance
was of two concerti by Vivaldi
and Rodrigo respectively, much to
the admiration of the public, in an
unforgettable spectacle.
It sounds original. Since the
guitar does not produce the same
sound volume as a piano or violin,
is meant primarily for recitals,
amplification of the instrument is
necessary when performing with
orchestras. Pianists, violinists and
cellists still are the most frequent
soloists with symphony orchestras,
but classical guitarists are making
increasing impact. I came to realize
that no artist has done more to
promote that transformation than
Sharon Isbin.
I arrived early for a pre-concert
talk. Ushers directed attendees to
the orchestral seats and, for some
viewers like me, this could be one
opportunity to see the stage from
that particular angle! Our host
introduced the concerti, together
with a brief on the accomplishments
of the composers. He announced
by way of conclusion that we
audience were on for a show,
advising us to sit back and enjoy. I
waited anxiously.
Enjoy we did. For several years,
I have been a regular visitor of
the arts complex but the above
concert was exceptional. The artist
honors her guitar by elevating it
to the rank of instruments worthy
of performance with symphony
orchestras. She hugs her guitar,
and I mean hug, while adding
ornaments to the melodies and
rhythms she plays.
The tunes kept flowing smoothly
while an already fired-up audience
held its breath. Personally, I
would have preferred the tunes
should continue an eternity. The
two concerti came to en end, the
audience was on its feet, and round
after round of applause filled the
auditorium, until the artist decided
for an encore, a tune from Granada,
Andalucía. The orchestra simply
watched.
An extended break and the
second half of the concert seemed
less satisfying though rich in
percussion and string notes.
Debussy compositions were on the
menu, but they seemed to wane
in comparison with the preceding
soloist performance. I headed
out the concert hall as streams
of attendees scurried alongside.
Yet my head was resounding
with the tunes I have just heard.
The only time I have experienced
such a classical music delight was
at a performance of Symphony
No. 9 in C by Franz Schubert,
almost a quarter of a century ago.
Disorientation may well occur after
grandiose concerts, or at least so I
find.
Master performances are not
destined to fall into oblivion,
and this particular one will be
memorable for a long time to
come. As it happens, Ms. Isbin
will perform yet one more time
this year in Colorado at the Aspen
Music Festival on August 3. I would
strongly recommend that those of
us, who appreciate classical music,
could afford a trip that far, and of
course the price of a ticket, should
seriously consider attending. I can
almost guarantee excellent value
and an experience of a lifetime.
This is one for the ages.
—Robert Sand
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Sarery, Libraries in 2008
Sarery, Libraries in 2008
As Denver vorers mailed
back rheir ballors rhis monrh,
rhey added $1.4 billion in
debr and inreresr ro rhe ciry`s
ledgers.
Lur absenr rrom rhe
debare over rhe bond issues
was a rull accounring or
Denver`s exisring debr load.
The ciry recenrly released irs
so-called Òcrober book, rhe
compilarion or revenue and
spending rhar makes up rhe
ciry budger. Òn page 59` or
rhe massive documenr begins
a lengrhy recirarion or rhe
ciry`s long-rerm debr.
According ro rhe docu-
menr, rarings agencies rhar
examine Denver`s abiliry ro
repay debrs like bonds
scored rhe ciry`s debr burden
as 'moderare.` However, rhe
ciry srares ¨rhe moderare rar-
ing is mainly a resulr or
paying ror rhe ciry`s indebr-
edness rrom rhe ner revenues
or enrerprise runds.¨ In
orher words, Denver keeps a
subsranrial porrion or debr
orr irs books by accounring
rrearmenrs rhar push rhe
debr or cerrain ¨enrerpris-
es,¨ like Denver Healrh, inro
new caregories.
Denver`s currenr debr
load in Ceneral Òbligarion
load in Ceneral Òbligarion
load in Ceneral Òbligarion
bonds was $726 ror every
bonds was $726 ror every
man, woman and child in
man, woman and child in
rhe ciry, nearly $4`0 million.
rhe ciry, nearly $4`0 million.
The ciry has an addirional
The ciry has an addirional
$174 million in vorer aurho
$174 million in vorer aurho
rized bonds rhar have yer ro
rized bonds rhar have yer ro
be issued, mosrly in debr yer
be issued, mosrly in debr yer
ro be incurred ror rhe Jusrice
ro be incurred ror rhe Jusrice
Cenrer. Ar some poinr in rhe
Cenrer. Ar some poinr in rhe
near rurure, Denver`s
near rurure, Denver`s
Ceneral Òbligarion debr will
Ceneral Òbligarion debr will
reach nearly $600 million, or
reach nearly $600 million, or
$1,0`0 ror each residenr.
$1,0`0 ror each residenr.
Ceneral Òbligarion debr is
Ceneral Òbligarion debr is
backed by rhe rull ¨rairh and
backed by rhe rull ¨rairh and
credir¨ or rhe residenrs or
credir¨ or rhe residenrs or
Denver, shorrhand ror say
Denver, shorrhand ror say
ing rhar raxes, specirically
ing rhar raxes, specirically
properry rax rares, can and
properry rax rares, can and
would be raised ro meer
would be raised ro meer
rhese debrs, wirhour vorer
rhese debrs, wirhour vorer
approval, ir currenr raxes
approval, ir currenr raxes
May you die berore your
May you die berore your
children. Unril I see you again.
children. Unril I see you again.
May Cod be wirh you.
These rhree salurarions -
These rhree salurarions -
whar people use ror 'goodbye'
whar people use ror 'goodbye'
in Iarsi, Irench, and a deriva
in Iarsi, Irench, and a deriva
rion rrom Òld Lnglish
rion rrom Òld Lnglish
('goodbye' comes rrom rhis
('goodbye' comes rrom rhis
phrase) - represenr rhree dis
phrase) - represenr rhree dis
rincrly dirrerenr culrures, and
rincrly dirrerenr culrures, and
rhree disrincrly dirrerenr cul
rhree disrincrly dirrerenr cul
rural ourlooks. And in a world
rural ourlooks. And in a world
where rhe combined challenges
where rhe combined challenges
The Eenaissance ar Xenia Village Aparrmenrs involved
rhe acguisirion and rehabilirarion or rour aparrmenr buildings
on rhe 1400 block or Xenia Srreer in Lasr Denver. The
Colorado Coalirion ror rhe Homeless (CCH) had managed
rhree or rhe buildings since 1999. However, rhe rourrh build-
ing was poorly operared by absenree ownership, and was a
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Sarery, Libraries in 2008
load in Ceneral Òbligarion
load in Ceneral Òbligarion
bonds was $726 ror every
bonds was $726 ror every
man, woman and child in
man, woman and child in
rhe ciry, nearly $4`0 million.
rhe ciry, nearly $4`0 million.
The ciry has an addirional
The ciry has an addirional
$174 million in vorer aurho
$174 million in vorer aurho
rized bonds rhar have yer ro
rized bonds rhar have yer ro
be issued, mosrly in debr yer
be issued, mosrly in debr yer
ro be incurred ror rhe Jusrice
ro be incurred ror rhe Jusrice
Cenrer. Ar some poinr in rhe
Cenrer. Ar some poinr in rhe
near rurure, Denver`s
near rurure, Denver`s
Ceneral Òbligarion debr will
Ceneral Òbligarion debr will
reach nearly $600 million, or
reach nearly $600 million, or
$1,0`0 ror each residenr.
$1,0`0 ror each residenr.
Ceneral Òbligarion debr is
Ceneral Òbligarion debr is
backed by rhe rull ¨rairh and
backed by rhe rull ¨rairh and
credir¨ or rhe residenrs or
credir¨ or rhe residenrs or
Denver, shorrhand ror say
Denver, shorrhand ror say
ing rhar raxes, specirically
ing rhar raxes, specirically
properry rax rares, can and
properry rax rares, can and
would be raised ro meer
would be raised ro meer
rhese debrs, wirhour vorer
rhese debrs, wirhour vorer
approval, ir currenr raxes
approval, ir currenr raxes
May you die berore your
May you die berore your
children. Unril I see you again.
children. Unril I see you again.
These rhree salurarions -
These rhree salurarions -
whar people use ror 'goodbye'
whar people use ror 'goodbye'
in Iarsi, Irench, and a deriva
in Iarsi, Irench, and a deriva
rion rrom Òld Lnglish
('goodbye' comes rrom rhis
phrase) - represenr rhree dis
rincrly dirrerenr culrures, and
rhree disrincrly dirrerenr cul
rural ourlooks. And in a world
where rhe combined challenges
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November 2007

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Stapletonʼs Tower
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March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
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Space Invaders opens at Museo de
las Américas in February
Mediation Explained
Just about everyone has heard
about mediation in divorce or for
other disputes. However, when
really confronted with the possi-
bility of using this method, people
are not really certain how it works.
Once the mediation process and
goals are explained, people find
they are much more comfortable
about trying it to resolve differ-
ences.
What exactly is mediation?
Mediation is a method whereby a
neutral and unbiased individual
works with disputing parties to
reach an agreement-- hopefully
one that is a win-win situation.
Initially the mediator talks to each
party to discover the areas in con-
tention. If the parties are willing to
work together to resolve the prob-
lems, then the mediator arranges
for one or more series of meet-
ings.
What happens in mediation?
Often, a mediator will start the
initial meeting with explaining the
process of mediation and what
parties can expect. The mediator
may then begin to develop a list of
disputed areas with the parties
and the parties work through the
issues in a systematic way. Most of
the meetings occur with both par-
ties in the same room; however,
some mediation sessions occur
with parties in separate rooms and
the mediator moves between the
parties to discuss issues, propos-
Continued on Page 19
Giant Warehouse Sale
Rain or Shine
April 11 & 12 9-3
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Liquidating Overstock--new & used!
Baskets & Containers, Raffia, Shred, Water, Beverages, Display
Pieces, Racking, Tools, Office Furniture, Forklifts, Food & MORE!
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
In-home care: risks and rewards of care approaches

Monthly
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in the home care industry who represent themselves as
“independent contractors,” allegedly relieving the family
of these tax obligations. In all of the individuals I have met,
they do not meet the criteria of an independent contractor.
It is the family’s responsibility to be sure that the aide truly
meets the definition of an independent contractor and is
paying their own taxes. If the aide does not meet the legal
criteria as an independent contractor and they have not
met their tax obligations, the responsibility once again
falls to the family as the caregiver’s employer. This can be
a very nasty obligation, as it may involve interest on back
taxes, civil fines, and even criminal penalties are possible.
If the family still desires to hire privately, they should
receive advice from a labor law attorney and accountant to
insure appropriate hiring practices and taxation.
Unfortunately, the home care industry is rife with
work-related injuries. The family, now considered the
employer, is liable for any work-related injury that occurs
while on the job. Keep in mind this may include the cost of
all medical expenses and possibly any disability payments
should they be applicable.
Additionally, should there be an injury to the person
being cared for or any other person on the premises, the
family retains any liability that comes from the injury.
Basically this means that if the caregiver were to cause an
injury or a loss to any other family member, the family, as
the employer, would carry the full burden of the responsi-
bility for all costs and compensation.
As much as I hate to talk about this, there is a poten-
tial for physical or emotional abuse as well as financial
exploitation. Keep in mind when services are performed
on behalf of a frail, cognitively impaired and often func-
tionally limited person, there is always one individual who
could see this as a potential opportunity to take advantage.
This abuse is especially easy when the caregiver and client
are somewhat isolated with little to no supervision. Please
know that most families don’t fail to provide supervision
because of no interest or neglect, but it may be difficult
due to geographic distance, work schedules or the close
bond (emotionally) that the caregiver and client may have
established. Keep in mind as well that families may not
have the wherewithal to perform criminal background
checks, the I-9s, or check work and personal references.
Sadly, there are times when the families are so apprecia-
tive of the caregiver’s care that they are vulnerable as
well to the manipulation and exploitation of a caregiver.
Unfortunately, as the owner of Synergy HomeCare, I have
spoken to many clients and non-clients who have been
victimized by private individuals.
While most caregivers do care, giving out of the sin-
cere desire to be of service to someone, there are others
who see this as an opportunity to take advantage of the
client and gain financially. Some of these caregivers are
family members, or friends of a friend, who have had a
run of bad luck or just need a little break. Some move
from community to community, they are able to ingrati-
ate themselves into the community by offering to lend a
hand with yard or housework, etc. By talking with them,
the person becomes an expert for caring for people with
the exact same illnesses and soon is caring for your family
member.
Before you can even think fully about the situation,
this caregiver has moved in. They are assisting in pay-
ing bills, shopping, getting their names on all the bank
accounts, arranging for home or auto repair, as well as
fixing up the home. While some of this sounds wonderful,
think about the phone being left off the hook for “quiet”
time, for the caregiver not allowing for company because
the client is “resting” or feeling “ill,” or family heirlooms
being “misplaced”.
I recently read a book by Sue Grafton entitled “T for
Trespass.” The book, basically, was about a person repre-
senting themselves as a quality, private caregiver. Without
giving the book away, let’s just say the book was scary. I
would suggest if you are going to hire a private caregiver,
read the book first.
Should the family not be able to fulfill all of the above
responsibilities, it would be in the client’s best interest for
an Agency to be hired - although this decision needs to
take into consideration the type of assistance required, the
financial and tax implications, as well as the supervision
necessary.
As the owner of Synergy HomeCare, I have the respon-
sibility to supervise all of my employees. I make visits to
all of my clients, both when the caregivers are there as
well as when they are not present. This gives me feedback
on each of the caregivers involved, helps me understand
the changing needs of the clients, and allows me to offer
suggestions regarding procedures, care, and additional
resources if necessary.
The caregivers often work in very challenging envi-
ronments as well as family dynamics. Therefore, my
supervision is often key for the caregiver and family. My
supervision assists in clarifying the roles of the caregiver,
and clarifies the expectations of the family and client as
well as the caregiver. Keep in mind that there are often
different cultural and faith traditions, eating preferences,
and expectations about personal schedules the supervi-
sion may clarify.
My supervision and support may assist the caregiver
and family in explaining the disease process and behav-
ioral changes. There are occasions when personality
issues arise due to the cognitive changes of the client. My
supervision may lend guidance and support to all parties
involved. Supervision is a key component in making a
challenging situation work.
Synergy HomeCare also has immense responsibility in
hiring, training, background checks, financial and legal
obligations. Communication with the family, caregiver,
and client are absolutely necessary. If the communica-
tion is not available, the care provided won’t be optimal.
While the Agency may provide daily hands-on care, family
involvement is crucial in assuring proper care and a rela-
tionship that is mutually supportive.
Betsi Brimer, RN
Synergy HomeCare
Continued from Page 16
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
19
school.org.
Numbness/Tingling?
If you suffer from these or other warning signs call
immediately to prevent possible advancing
complications
Pain Resulting from Injury
Neck Disc Injury
Nerves Down
the Arm
Chronic Pain, Numbness,
and Weakness Radiate from
The Neck Down to the Hand
Vertebra
Neck Disc
Spinal Cord
Nerve Root
Side Cut-Away View
C5-C6 Disc
Herniation
with Nerve
Root
Compression
Figure 1
26-481091
(
303
)
678-7170
LDenver, CO—Do you
suffer from Numbness and
Tingling down the arms or
legs? Most numbness/tingling
sufferers have no idea what to
do when they experience these
symptoms.
Although there are
many causes of numbness/
tingling one of the main reasons
is to the joints,
ligaments, and discs in the neck
or low back. Damage may have
occurred as a result of an injury
or could have developed slowly
over time.
In addition to pain,
damaged spinal joints and
discs (cushion between the
bones) will place pressure on
the nerves that go down the
arms, hand, fingers, and even
the upper back. This ‘pressure’
is the cause of numbness/tin-
gling. See Figure 1. When left
untreated, pain and weakness in
the muscles may be the even-
tual result.
Generally, most of you
resort to medication use. When the problem is in the neck or lower back, using
over-the counter, and even prescribed drugs to fix the cause of the problem is not
the answer for many. And if medication fails, surgery might be considered the only
other alternative.
Dr. Alison Milbauer, DC wants to let you know that there is another way.
To discover the “best kept secret” that has given thousands of people relief
without the use of drugs or surgery call to receive a complimentary Numbness and
Tingling analysis and consultation. Take Back Your Life.
303-832-3668
Dr. Alison Milbauer
Insurance Accepted
“SEVERE LOW BACK PAIN?”
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and the experience could be LIFE CHANGING.
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IONGMONT SPINE CENTER 303-678-7170
“SEVERE LOW BACK PAIN?”
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might be the answer. The Consultation and Exam is FREE
and the experience could be LIFE CHANGING.
Don`t wait another day in pain. You could be only a phone
call away Irom fnally ending the suIIering. BeIore you
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IONGMONT SPINE CENTER 303-678-7170
Continued from Page 17
als, and potential solutions.
How does the mediator get us
to agree? The mediator may use
different techniques depending
upon the parties and their issues.
One goal is to get one of the par-
ties to actually listen to what the
other is saying without immedi-
ately jumping in to defend their
position. Another goal is to
acknowledge the concerns beneath
the issue being voiced at the time.
In this way the real issues can be
resolved. A mediator may also
“caucus” or have separate meet-
ings with each person to better
understand if there is an underly-
ing issue, to suggest a better
approach, to allow venting a very
strong emotion, or just to take a
time out.
Once we reach agreement,
what happens next? If the parties
reach an agreement, the mediator
will usually write up the agreement
for review. Parties are encouraged
to obtain legal counsel and review
of the agreement prior to signing.
Why should I try mediation?
For mediation to really work, both
parties must be willing to try to
settle their differences. The major
goal of mediation is to generate
creative and workable solutions
that make the “pie” bigger, rather
than just dividing the pie.
Agreements that people reach
themselves are more satisfactory
and more often adhered to than a
judgment that is dictated to the
parties by a third party. In addi-
tion, parties can retain a working
relationship, which is especially
important when future contact
will be necessary, such as with
minor children. And finally, medi-
ation is generally less expensive,
and potentially less emotionally
wearing than litigation.
Wendy Spencer Teaches “Moving
on: Money, Methods, and Modern
Marriage Dissolution” at Colorado
Free University. CFU also offers “
Become a Mediator: Comprehensive
Training” taught by attorney
Jo-Marie Lisa for those wanting to
learn to be a mediator.
The mediation process -
questions answered
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
20
DENVER’S CHOICE FOR REAL ESTATE
LUKE GORDON
The Luke Gordon Team RE/MAX Cherry Creek, Inc.
Direct: 303.331.4548 Office: 303-320-1556
luke@denvercityhomes.com www.denvercityhomes.com
380 Dahlia Street
$2,199,000
Classic Inspired Architecture
This new Italian inspired masterpiece will enchant you with its elegant details. The gourmet kitchen opens to the great room and
the back yard inspires casual entertaining. The generous master retreat beckons you to the sitting room and sumptuous bathroom.
Finished basement with wet bar. 5 beds, 7 baths, 6,410 finished sq. ft.
Featured Home...
2250 Albion Street
$879, 000
One of a kind Park Hill Charmer. Updated.
Studio with covered patio. Four bedrooms
could be six. Custom stain glass throughout.
Granite counters. Two master suites. Ample
closet space. Media room could be sixth bed-
room. Garage has studio that could be 3rd tan-
dem. Appraised at $940,000 in February, 2008.
4 beds, 4 baths, 3,181 Sq. Ft. + Fully Fin. Base-
ment
2910 S. Adams Street
Amazing renovated ranch. Solid
granite counters, stainless appliances,
vaulted ceilings in living room & din-
ing room. Generous backyard & patio.
Great basement and design colors.
New master suite. Slavens Elementary
School. Move-in ready! 4 beds, 3 baths
2,832 Fin. Sq. Ft.
424 Milwaukee Street
$1,345,000
New custom contemporary inspired 2
story in the heart of Cherry Creek. Solid
cherry doors and cabinets. Family room
with stone fireplace. Gourmet kitchen
with oversized island, architect, stainless
appliances. Rec/media room and built-
in bar in newly finished basement.
4 beds, 4 baths
311 Monroe Street
Prime Cherry Creek block. Quiet and
close to everything. Great open floor
plan. Beautifully decorated. Country
style kitchen opens to generous family
room. Master with fireplace, his &hers
closets & deck with a view. Second
floor office. Three fireplaces. Sharp!
4 beds, 4 baths, 3,732 fin. sq. ft.
$569, 500
636 Ogden Street
Prime Wash Park location ! R2 site
to build 2 townhomes or a single
family home with full walkout lower
level and mountain view. 2 blocks to
park. Ready to build.
6,350 Lot Sq. Ft.
$514,900
960 Jackson
Craftsman bungalow with convenient
Congress Park location. Walk to shops
on 12th Avenue & cherry Creek. New
paint & carpet inside. Move-in condi-
tion. Neutral colors. Xeriscaped front
yard. Flagstone patio in back yard.
2 beds, 1 bath, 972 sq. ft. + bsmt.
$299,000
COMING SOON
$535,000
COMING SOON
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
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March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
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Advertise in the Cherry Creek News and
the Tower Ledger for just $89/month
303-458-7541
Independent Police Monitor
reports
Office of the Independent Monitor
The Office of the Independent Monitor
(OIM) publicly released its 2007 Annual
Report on Monday, March 17, 2008. The
report details investigations of 2007 offi-
cer-involved shootings and in-custody
deaths, complaint investigations and find-
ings, the status of OIM goals, and issues
and concerns identified by the Independent
Monitor over the past year.
The mission of the OIM is to provide
fair and objective oversight of public safety
and ensure transparency and accountabil-
ity. The OIM is responsible for (1)
monitoring and participating in investiga-
tions of sworn police and sheriff personnel;
(2) making recommendations to the
Manager of Safety, Chief of Police and
Undersheriff/Director of Corrections
regarding case findings and discipline; and
(3) making broader policy recommenda-
tions.
“This report demonstrates the City of
Denver’s commitment to providing trans-
parency and accountability to the public
regarding the Police and Sheriff
Departments’ efforts to police themselves
and hold their employees accountable for
their conduct,” said Independent Monitor
Richard Rosenthal. The Independent
Monitor added: “Whatever criticism I may
have lodged regarding the Department of
Safety in this report must be tempered by
the fact that the Police and Sheriff
Departments have, overall, done an excel-
lent job in policing themselves and holding
themselves accountable during the course
of the year.”
Officer-Involved Shootings and
In-Custody Deaths
There were seven on-duty officer-in-
volved shootings, two DPD in-custody
deaths, and one officer-involved traffic
collision that resulted in the death of a
civilian. Five officer-involved shootings
were found to involve no policy violations.
One shooting resulted in the imposition of
discipline for failing to call out the shoot-
ing, another shooting is still pending
administrative review by the Manager of
Safety. One in-custody death was found to
be “in-policy,” the second in-custody death
is still pending administrative review. The
officer-involved traffic collision resulted in
a misdemeanor criminal filing by the
District Attorney against the involved offi-
cer.
There were eight in-custody deaths in
the County Jail during 2007. Four were by
suicide and four were as the result of pre-
existing medical conditions. Six of the
in-custody deaths did not involve any poli-
cy violations; one in-custody death
investigation is still pending, another
incustody death case is pending possible
imposition of discipline.
In the last five years, the number of
officer-involved shootings has ranged from
three to ten annually. The average number
of shootings over the past five years has
been seven per year.
There was only one officer-involved
shooting fatality in 2007.
Issues and Concerns Identified by the
Independent Monitor in this Year’s
Report:
1. The Police Department has had dif-
ficulties in imposing timely discipline in
serious cases due to delays in scheduling of
Disciplinary Review Boards and Chief’s
Hearings.
2. Overall timeliness of officer-involved
shooting administrative reviews has drasti-
cally improved. However, the Chief of
Police and the Manager of Safety have
taken more than six months to review an
officer-involved shooting where the
Monitor expressed concerns with the offi-
cer’s tactics. Despite the fact that the
incident was nearly one year ago, the
Manager of Safety has not made a finding.
3. The DPD has allowed officers who
have lied during the course of internal
investigations to continue to work in
assignments which require the officers to
testify in court on a regular basis.
4. The Police and Sheriff Departments
do not, as a matter of practice, terminate
employees who have repeatedly lied dur-
ing the internal affairs investigation and
disciplinary processes.
5. The Sheriff Department does not
put officers on administrative leave, even
after the Undersherrif/Director of
Corrections has concluded that an officer
should be terminated or when a recom-
mendation for termination is probable.
6. The Colorado Fraternal Order of
Police Legal Defense Fund provides its
Denver sheriff deputy members (who have
been suspended without pay for miscon-
duct) an option to be reimbursed for lost
pay in lieu of proffering an appeal, thereby
undermining the Department’s ability to
impose discipline.
The Community-Police Mediation
Program:
Fifty-nine mediations were conducted
during 2007, a 44% increase from 2006,
making Denver the second largest commu-
nity-police mediation program in the
country. Complainant and officer
satisfaction with the mediation process
and outcome increased significantly
between 2006 and 2007 and even more sig-
nificantly when compared to the
traditional internal affairs complaint han-
dling process.
The OIM’s Annual Report, and its
executive summary, can be accessed online
at www.denvergov.org/oim.
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
23
STAPLETON
2678 Florence: Beautiful 3Bed-
room, 3 Bathroom House with
almost 1750 SQ FT of Living
Space •Unique open floor plan
with 2 car attached garage
•Spacious Front Porch opens
up to landscaped courtyard •
$1595

2332 Alton: Rarely found on the
rental market – this amazing 5
Bedroom 4 Bathroom house has
over 2700 s.f. of Living Space on
the main level and a 1400 s.f.
finished basement •Unique
Open Floor Plan is loaded with
upgrades including hardwood
floors on most of main level
•Gourmet Kitchen with
Upgraded Cabinets and stainless
appliances •Formal Dining
Room •Gorgeous Master Suite
with spacious walk in his/her
closet, 5 piece bath, and private
balcony. •2 car alley loaded
garage •Private fenced in land-
scaped back yard – Large for
Stapleton!! •Great Outdoor
Living with Front Porch, large
Fenced “private” landscaped
backyard $2,495

3475 Florence: Beautiful brand
newer, 3 Bedroom, 3 Bathroom
House with almost 1600 SQ FT
of Living Space •Unique open
floor plan with 2 car attached
garage •His/Her closets in mas-
ter bedroom •Spacious Front
Porch opens up to landscaped
courtyard •Blocks from Central
Park $1650

2636 Emporia Newer
Wonderland Garden Court
Single Family Home •Popular
Ashton Floor Plan: Almost 1500
SQ FT of living space with 3
Bedrooms & 2 ½ baths •Master
Suite includes large Master and
5 piece Master Bathroom with
Ceramic Tile •Spacious Kitchen
with Upgraded Maple Cabinets,
Pantry, Hardwood Floors and
an Island that flows into a Large
Dining Area •9’ Ceilings
throughout Main Level with
Gas Burning Fireplace •Large,
Unfinished Basement, Great for
Storage •2 Car Garage with
Auto Opener Located on the 1st
Level $1850

9994 MLKJ: Newer
Wonderland Artesian Plaza
Home with 2 Bedrooms and 1.5
baths •Almost 1150 SF with
Open Floor Plan & hardwood
on main level. •Master Suite
with Large Master Bedroom &
Bathroom with a walk-in closet
•Spacious kitchen with attached
dining area that flows into large
living area •Beautiful large pri-
vate fenced in patio •Stainless
appliances, washer/dryer and
“cool” window coverings
included •Rate includes HOA,
trash, and water •1 Car Garage
with Automatic Garage Door
Opener Located on the 1st
Level $1350

1162 Rosemary: Recently
Remodeled 3 Bedroom Home
with large fenced in back yard
•Section 8 accepted •All appli-
ances included, including
washer and dryer. $1195
TJC Management Services. Phone 303-324-6988. www.tjcmanagement.com
SERVICES
Nails by Terri
Do you like to get your nails done but
hate going to a salon? I am a licensed
manicurist and have been doing nails
out of my home for 15 yrs. I am cur-
rently looking for some new clients. I am
located in the Lowery/Montclair neigh-
boorhood in Central Denver and
specialize in manicures, pedicures, gel
nails ( a great alternative to acrylics) and
handpainted nail art. I also do mini
manicures and nail art for kids. $5.00 off
your first visit. Call Terri today @ 303-
947-1121 to set up an appointment.
ACCOUNTING!
WORLD PEACE!
Fortunately, I can help with the more
difficult of the two. Free consultation
for small business/nonprofits. Certified
QuickBooks Pro Advisor. General
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Taxes, New business setup and ques-
tions. Dori Hennecken, CPA, MBA
303.841.9304
FOR SALE
Kenwood Home Theatre Surround
Sound System - includes five speakers,
receiver, 200 disc CD Changer, remote,
and double cassette deck. Excellent
working condition. $650 for everything.
Call 720-771-3197

HOME FOR RENT
A Gardener’s Dream
Charming 2 bedroom home nestled
in the pines in Park Hill. This unique
home features an open floor plan, sunny
study, cozy family room, large eat-in
kitchen, fireplace, hardwood and tile
floors, 1 bath , private patio, lawn
service , all appliances, off street park-
ing, fenced back yard + more ! Dogs
nego. One year lease. N/S , $ 1285,
303-332-5897
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Classified Classified
11-30-07
March-April 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
24
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