in this issue
Gypsie
Nation:
Every
Thursday
10
Ecology...
I N THE NEWS
FEATURI NG
6 Two is Better Than
One
14 Sun Safety for
Skiers
Devon M. Barclay
The development of a
l arge new Pl anned
Parenthood across from
Stapleton's old airport has
pro-life activists taking their
protests personal - and met-
ro-wide. The 50,000 sq. ft.
facility, once opened, will
offer a full suite of medical
services, including screen-
ings for breast and cervical
cancers, HPV vaccinations,
HIV/AIDS testing, hor-
mone t herapy and
mammogram referrals, and
birth control, along with
surgical and medical abor-
tion. It will also house
Planned Parenthood of the
Rocky Mountains adminis-
t rat i ve headquart ers,
currently housed downtown
at 9th and Broadway.
Abortion opponents,
however, have been picket-
ing the site in small numbers,
and are now looking to take
their protest action directly
to the company doing the
construction. Calling them-
By the tower leDger
Mark Udall says he expects this year’s Senate
race to be one of the top two in the country, as he
and Republican Bob Schaffer both pursue the
Senate seat being left open by Wayne Allard.
Neither man faces significant opposition within
their own parties.
A former director of Colorado’s Outward
Bound school, Udall has always seemed cut from a
different cloth than most politicians, more com-
fortable in Gore-Tex than worsted wool. A member
rev. laurene laFontaine
The task was fairly
daunting for anyone.
FDNC - Foundation for
Development of Needy
Communities, formed in
1996, to “improve the
social-economic status and
quality of life of under-
served people in Uganda,”
needed a school building
made especially for chil-
dren who were confronted
with the most profound
l i f e ci r cums t ances .
Montvi ew Boul evard
Presbyterian Church youth
pastor Sheri Fry wanted to
help, so she organized a
group of 14 high school
students and 6 adults to
make the long trip to
Mbale, Uganda for a work
trip.
Each member of the
Uganda trip had to raise
$3000 in order to make the
trip. Through a massive
garage sale, bake sales and
the support of many indi-
viduals, they were able to
go to Uganda for three
weeks. Their time there
was a time of listening and
l earni ng from the
Ugandans, walking from
village to village gaining a
deeper appreciation of the
needs, especially of those
Continued on Page 3
Reproductive health clinic
to bring controversy to
Stapleton
Continued on Page 6
4
Udall brings Senate tour to
Denver town hall meeting
Continued on Page 9
February 2008 Stapleton, Lowry, Park Hill, and North Aurora Issue 3 Vol 3
Tower Ledger
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3
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3
of the West’s only political royalty,
the Udall family, which has three
Montview
youth
making a
difference
half way
round world
The major task of the
trip was building a
small school building,
which was even more
remarkable in that it
was done by hand and
with rudimentary tools
of shovels,
wheelbarrows and
picks.
Save the Prairie
Dogs!
Clinic construction site ringed by barbed wire at 38th and Pontiac
Congressman Mark Udall is traveling
Colorado, meeting with voters in a quest for
ideas as much as votes and dollars.
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
2
I-70 is critical to our state’s economy as a
main conduit for business and tourism trans-
portation. It’s time for us to take immediate
action to relieve congestion on this vital
artery. If we don’t fix I-70 in the next several
years, our clogged economic artery will cause
Colorado businesses to suffer a stroke.
Waiting 10 years for added lanes and train
systems will be too late. Colorado is a pioneer
state, where people moving west used a spirit
of self-sufficiency to develop their own solu-
tions when faced with vexing problems. We
must now use this spirit to pilot an immedi-
ate solution to unclog I-70.
Testing an anti-traffic model along I-70
through a pilot program will yield significant
results for the tourism, trade, interstate com-
merce, trucking, and distribution industries,
among others. In this program, similar to
highly successful models in other states and
highways around the world, drivers would
receive a payment for using the highway
when it is not at peak demand and, in the
second phase of the program, pay a small fee
to use the highway when it is at peak demand.
This is not the only solution to fixing the I-70
debacle, but it will provide immediate pro-
tection for our economy while we plan
long-term solutions like bus lanes, mass tran-
sit and highway expansion.
Our economy is fueled by the free mar-
ket, supply and demand. This pilot program
would put those principles in place to help
alleviate the pinch on the economic vein run-
ning through the heart of our state.
At one point in time, parking spots in
downtown Denver were free because there
was an abundance of parking space with little
demand for it. Today, drivers expect to pay a
fee to park their cars where demand is high,
such as downtown during the day, and to pay
even more when that parking spot is at peak
demand, such as at a Rockies baseball game.
Could you imagine all parking being free
during a Rockies game?
During very specific times, highway space
along I-70 is as scarce of a resource as a
downtown parking space. Given this prob-
lem, it is time for us to ask people to slightly
change their driving habits, much in the same
way they do for parking, in order to allocate
scarce highway resources. When people put
a value on highway space, they will change
their habits in ways that will benefit our
state’s economy and reduce carbon emis-
sions. A five percent change in driving habits
can reduce congestion by 50 percent. The fee
necessary to change behavior could be mini-
mal enough to actually save drivers the extra
gas money they currently pay to sit in hours
of traffic during high-demand times.
An anti-traffic pilot program for incen-
tive-based driving could offer a solution to
what has become a critical problem. The
pilot would consist of three phases, carried
out over three years. Phase 1: apply a system
of incentives and fees to commercial truckers
so that they would not drive during high-de-
mand times, combined with incentives only
for other drivers to not commute during
those times. Phase 2: implement a system of
incentives and fees based on congestion for
all drivers. Phase 3: carry out a comprehen-
sive evaluation of the program. We would
require the program to be successful to be
renewed after 3 years.
Extra money collected through the pro-
gram could pay for other transportation and
incentive options, such as free buses, that
would boost tourism and stimulate local
business. More people traveling would bring
more money to Colorado’s mountain towns.
The pilot can be implemented without toll-
booths, using programs similar to those in
place in many cities and highways across the
U.S., in which a camera takes a photo of a
car’s license plate. The car does not have to
slow down or even pay at the time of use.
Voters have a unique role in shaping tax
and fiscal policy here in Colorado, which is
why I wanted to start this dialogue. Our
economy depends on I-70, and it’s clear that
with our fiscal challenges we cannot remedy
our troubled roads, highways and infrastruc-
tures with the same old thinking. It just won’t
work. We must implement a solution that
will improve access to Colorado’s natural
beauty, grow our state’s economy, and lessen
the environmental impact of congested high-
ways. We need to do it now. The key is to use
our Colorado spirit to pioneer new ways of
solving this vexing problem.

ConTribuTing EdiTors
Devon Barclay, Angela Sasseville
Mark Mehringer, Helen Hand, Jeff LeClair,
Sophia Throop, Danielle Corriveau
PhoTograPhy
Lisa Digan, Sophia Throop
ad saLEs
sales@towerledger.com
phone 303.458.7541
media kit on-line at
www.towerledger.com/mediakit
arT dirECTor
Sven Hanson
PubLishEr
Emporia Publishing, LLC.
POB 12487
Denver, CO 80211
advErTising & EdiToriaL
inquiriEs:
www.towerledger.com
Tower Ledger is published monthly by Emporia
Publishing, and printed by Longmont-Times Call.
Copyright © 2007 by Emporia Publishing. All rights
reserved. Reproduction without permission is prohibit-
ed. Postmaster: Send address changes to Emporia
Publishing,POB 12487 Denver, CO 80212. This publi-
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sTaPLETon, Lowry, Park hiLL.
hiLLToP, haLE, Mayfair,
CrEsTMoor, MonTCLair, and
norTh aurora
Issue 3 • Volume 2 • February 2008
From t he Edi t or’ s Desk- Guest Opi ni on - Senat or Chri s Romer
Use Colorado Pioneer Spirit to Fix I-70 Gridlock
Tower Ledger
By DAVID KENDALL
So close, but so far away. At
first blush, that seems to be the
story of California’s efforts to
secure health care coverage for
all. The Democratically-
dominated State Assembly had
passed a groundbreaking reform
plan, and Republican Governor
Arnold Schwarzenegger was
ready to sign it into law. Then the
State Senate (also a majority-
Democratic body) balked at the
$14 billion price tag in the face of
a $14 billion deficit. The reform
effort died in a committee.
This Golden State setback
means that even though there has
been some serious progress
toward reform at the state level
(notably in Massachusetts), the
states can’t go it alone.
The federal government needs
to be an active partner in reform,
because it controls the purse
strings for health-care financing.
It needs to build upon the efforts
underway in the dozens of states
that have been inspired by the
Massachusetts example. Such
inspiration is laudable, but fed-
eral action is indispensable if we
as a nation are ever going to bring
about genuine reforms to our
outdated and inequitable health-
care system.
Some essential elements for
reform have emerged from the
state debates; each element will
require federal involvement.
Here they are:
An individual mandate. Health
coverage is a personal responsi-
bility that many people ignore.
One-third of all uninsured
Americans have incomes more
than $50,000. Two-thirds of the
nation’s uninsured children are
eligible for a public health-care
program, but are not enrolled.
The federal government should
require that everyone get cover-
age - or pay a penalty, such as the
loss of a tax deduction. The pen-
alty should be equal to the average
health-care costs that the public
now bears for each individual
patient who needs care but can’t
pay for it. The states should make
it easy for an individual to enroll
in either a public or private insur-
ance plan, as Massachusetts has
done through a network of state
agencies, employers and insur-
ance brokers.
Financial Assistance. There’s a
sizeable gap between the cost of
coverage and what workers can
afford to pay. Family premiums
cost more than $12,000 a year,
Lessons from the California health care reform effort
The federal
government needs to
be an active partner in
reform, because it
controls the purse
strings for health-care
financing. It needs to
build upon the efforts
underway in the
dozens of states that
have been inspired by
the Massachusetts
example.
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February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
3
selves the Collaborators Project, a
group of pro-life activists have branded
Weitz Company a "permanent collabo-
rator," and nicknamed the site
AuschWeitz.
They've been hosting a series of pro-
tests in residential neighborhoods
aimed at putting pressure on Weitz
Company employees to halt construc-
tion, and are planning further action on
other Weitz Company sites later in the
year.
So far, it appears the Weitz Company
is the only "collaborator" being target-
ed by the group.
A superbowl cookoff in front of one
Weitz Company executive's home
marked the first action by the group,
and "drew a crowd of 50 people at the
home of Gary Meggison, the Senior VP
of Weitz Company Rocky Mountain...
for failing to stop constructing America’s
largest abortion facility," according to a
statement posted on the group's web-
site.
The group plans to begin protest
activity at Cherry Creek North's
NorthCreek development - another
Weitz Company project - later in the
year, and plans to time this activity with
the opening of Hermes, an upscale
watch, jewelry and accessories bou-
tique.
For its part, the Weitz Company has
vowed not to stop or slow construction
at the Stapleton site.
"Anti-choice extremists continue to
escalate their intimidation campaign
against our company as a result of our
decision to honor our contract," says
Bill Hornaday, president of the Weitz
Company's Rocky Mountain Business
office. "Because they are unable to
achieve their goals through more legiti-
mate channels, they are resorting to
economic terrorism tactics designed to
intimidate and harass those only tan-
gentially (if at all) related to the issue."
"We do not abandon our clients
when the ‘going gets tough.’ The
Denver Planned Parenthood health
center project is proceeding on time
and on budget, and Weitz intends to
complete its construction services in
accordance with the requirements of its
contract...We believe it is legal to build
buildings for law abiding organiza-
tions."
"93% of what Planned Parenthood
does is preventative," explains Jodie
Berger, a spokeswoman for Planned
Parenthood. "Women will be using this
new facility for breast exams, pap
smears, STD screenings. These people
are trying to get in the way of - slow
down - healthcare that is available in
this state."
Continued from Page 1
Planned Parenthood piques
which is the annual income for a worker
with a minimum-wage job.
The federal government should provide
financial assistance based on a sliding scale.
In part, that means filling gaps in programs
for the poor like Medicaid. It’s shocking,
but true, that poor adults without children
do not automatically qualify for Medicaid.
States should continue to administer
Medicaid, but should not have to jump
through hoops to qualify for federal funds.
The federal government should provide tax
credits for moderate-income families, and
give states any unused tax credits to offset
the health-care costs of the remaining unin-
sured residents. The cost of the tax credit
would be offset by curbing the tax breaks
for health insurance for high-income execu-
tives - as both Sen. Hillary Clinton and the
conservative Heritage Foundation have
proposed. Because states do not have access
to such funding, they must resort to tax
increases or substantial mandates on
employers.
Choice and competition. Workers
shouldn’t be at risk of losing their coverage
simply because they change jobs. They
should be able to choose their own cover-
age regardless of where they work.
Toward this end, Massachusetts has cre-
ated a health-insurance connector, or
purchasing pool, which allows employers to
offer workers the same set of choices as
other employers. Individuals can join the
pool, as well - an important benefit for the
growing ranks of self-em-
ployed entrepreneurs.
The pool is modeled
upon the Federal Employee Health Benefits
program (FEHB), which serves members of
Congress and federal workers. The federal
government should require states to create
a purchasing pool or use a national version
of FEHB. Once these pools cover a sub-
stantial portion of the marketplace, they
will drive fierce competition among health-
insurance plans to improve quality and keep
costs down. The federal government and
the states need to do much more to wring
the waste out of health, but purchasing
pools are a good start.
This agenda, broadly speaking, has the
support of both of the leading Democratic
presidential candidates. The biggest differ-
ence among them is that Hillary Clinton
would apply the individual mandate to
everyone, while Barack Obama would apply
it only to families for coverage of children.
For their part, Republican candidates have
argued against strong federal leadership,
but they have acknowledged that the states
can’t do it alone.
The setback in California has created an
opportunity to debate a new health-reform
partnership between the federal govern-
ment and the states. If this comes to pass,
then California’s great effort will not have
been in vain.
More
at the
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February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
4
On February 8, 2008 I, Dave Siefkas,
President of LUN, and Kirsten Froyd,
LUN Board representative for the South
Neighborhood, met with Mayor
Hickenlooper to discuss the Buckley
Annex Development. Also present at the
meeting were representatives from sev-
eral other Registered Neighborhood
Organizations and Home Owner’s
Associations: Crestmoor(3), LRA/
LCMA/Task Force, Windsor Gardens,
Park Forest, and Lowry Neighbors.
The following are highlights of the
meeting; comments made by Mayor
Hickenlooper:
·The Mayor acknowledged the com-
munity’s concerns. He discussed his
desire for the best plan and acknowl-
edged that the immediate surrounding
communities are the ones with the best
perspective. The Mayor stated “…con-
sensus must be built for those most
immediately affected by the decisions.”
·The Mayor indicated the plan is far
from being completed and that undoubt-
edly there would be changes in the future.
The Mayor stated, “The GDP (General
Development Plan) is where the rubber
meets the road.”
·The Mayor firmly stated the City was
not going to do the GDP, and further-
more, the City didn’t have the money to
do it. Peter Parks, City Planning Director,
commented that he would rather see the
owner or developer of the land submit
the GDP. The City said they expected the
community to have input.
·The Mayor emphatically stated, “I
guarantee the Federal Government will
not trump the City.” The Mayor stated
neither the Air Force, nor anyone else for
that matter, would take precedence over
City zoning regulations. He said, “I can
promise you that.” He furthermore
assured everyone that no federal plan
could impose anything on City regula-
tions.
·The Mayor closed the meeting by
saying that everyone would be kept fully
informed of the process going forward,
and made sure his communications per-
son, Heather Barry, was aware of her
responsibility to keep all informed. He
thanked everyone for taking time out of
their busy day to attend the meeting.
During the meeting, I elaborated to
the Mayor, “LUN wants to cooperate and
collaborate going forward.” I further
stated, “LUN wants assurances that the
plan will have enforceability.” I com-
mented that bringing the GDP to the
forefront now was like putting the cart
before the horse, and asked, “Mr. Mayor,
can you, in conjunction with your legal
staff, tell us if a Developer Agreement
and/or a General Development Plan
takes precedence over a City zoning reg-
ulations?” The Mayor turned to the LRA
board members and asked them whether
they thought a Developer Agreement
would do that. They acknowledged it
could not.
I believe the meeting with the Mayor
was as productive as it could possibly be
for LUN. We have a commitment that we
will be informed in the future. We also
have a promise that the GDP will have to
be submitted by the developer. This
means the developer will have to approach
the community for approval before going
to the City for any change in zoning.
LUN will soon post to its web site ( www.
lowryunitedneighborhoods.org )a com-
plete description of the process for
submitting a General Development Plan.
As for the meeting itself, I feel it was
more productive than I expected it to be.
I am sure the LUN, and its membership,
will be discussing this more in the imme-
diate future.
Thank you,
Dave Siefkas, President
Lowry United Neighborhoods
Retrospectively, trying to understand
Big Oil on the subject of peak oil is about
as difficult as penetrating the comments of
central bankers, sometimes called Fedspeak
here in the U.S.
In 2004, the British Petroleum (BP)
exploration consultant Francis Harper told
London’s The Business newspaper that
world oil supply would be peaking earlier
than expected, and that “the world’s total
original usable oil resources — the amount
of oil before drilling began — at about 2.4
trillion barrels of oil. This is considerably
less than the 3 trillion assumed by bullish
commentators such as the US government’s
Geological Survey. This points to oil pro-
duction peaking between 2010 and 2020.”
When the world peaks isn’t the critical
thing. What’s more salient is when non-
Opec oil peaks, then you’ll have the control
of marginal production passed back to a
progressively smaller group of countries.”
He added that oil companies’ public
positions on the issue masked debate with-
in them. “There are people in BP who
happen to be economists and so happen to
think there’s no problem, and there are
people in BP who are geologists who are
saying it’s getting hard to find.”
Harper’s prediction is higher than the 2
trillion posited by doom-sayers like Colin
Campbell. Harper said: “I’m more conser-
vative than Exxon Mobil with regard to
future oil resources, but I’m not Colin
Campbell.”
In January (of 2008), BP told British
lawmakers than world oil demand would
peak, with supply following thereafter.
Reported by Reuters: “I believe there is
a realistic possibility that world oil produc-
tion will peak within the next generation as
a result of peaking demand,” BP Special
Economic Advisor Peter Davies told a
meeting at parliament organized by a group
of lawmakers looking into peak oil.
“I think we will run out of demand
before we run out of supply,” he said.
“There’s a distinct possibility that global
oil consumption could peak as a result of
climate policies.”
Instead, investment in oil production is
the issue. “An imminent peak in oil pro-
duction is not likely,” Davies said. “Valid
concerns remain over investment, especial-
ly in resource-rich regions.”
Davies was quoted as saying that 100
million barrels per day global production
was achievable, far above the current multi-
year plateau of 84-86 mpd.
We’re left as how to reconcile the two
positions of BP, the world’s third largest oil
company.
—Tower Ledger
Energy crisis - Demand? Supply?
Investment? Big Oil confuses
Lowry United Neighborhoods meets with Mayor
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September 2007 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
5
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members of Congress, from Colorado, New
Mexico and Arizona, and a former Secretary of
the Interior to its credit, Udall is more every-
man than political prince.
Udall, who is serving his fifth term in
Congress, brought his Idea Raiser tour, part
town hall meeting, part focus group, to Denver
last weekend. The tour, meant to put ideas on
the same playing field as campaign contribu-
tions and fundraisers, brought about two
hundred folks to Denver’s North High School.
The discussion touched on the Iraq war, the
economy and health care, and predictably, on
more impassioned cries to impeach Dick
Cheney or George Bush. For his part, Udall
said he was focused on the future and the prob-
lems facing Colorado families.
In an interview afterwards, Udall said as he
tours Colorado, people are looking for new
leadership, one “beyond party, beyond regional
(identity)” that would lead to change. “People
are hungry for a new kind of leadership.”
Speaking about the coming campaign and
the issues to define it, Udall said “the outlines
are clear- Iraq, the economy, immigration.”
Udall said that undocumented immigrants must
“travel the path to citizenship— pay a fine (for
being in the U.S. illegally), speak English, have
committed no crimes.” “We must address...
the health care system where families are one
illness away from bankruptcy.”
Udall, a westerner, said that Colorado issues
would play a key role in the Senate race: water,
transportation and creating more transit
options.
He also emphasized that Colorado’s position
for renewable energy and the jobs it could cre-
ate was strong, given our resources and the
presence of the National Renewable Energy lab
in Golden.
“Two interesting economics facts about
Colorado- we are number two (in the nation) in
aerospace, and we produce more beer than
anyone in the nation.”
Udall indicated that he would work hard to
keep Colorado’s standings in both categories.
Udall: Voters
hungry for change
continued from page 1
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Pity the next president of the
United States of America. This
person must find a way to unite
and lead millions of citizens with
vastly different goals and political
philosophies. Consider what peo-
ple will expect of the new Oval
Office occupant. We will want him
(or maybe her) to both win the war
and end the war, to simultaneously
raise taxes to fund vital govern-
ment programs and cut taxes to
stimulate the free market. We will
expect our new leader to champi-
on enlightened immigration reform
while still ensuring an adequate
supply of low-paid labor to per-
form those jobs Americans just
won’t do. He/she should have a
deep abiding faith but keep church
and state separate, defend mar-
riage and the family while being
inclusive and tolerant, of course be
pro-life and pro-choice, and for
heaven’s sakes, do something
about this crazy weather we’re
having.
Leading the free world is a
tough, thankless job, one that visi-
bly ages people. All you have to do
is compare photos of past presi-
dents when they assumed office
and when they stepped
down, from fresh-faced
and smiling to wizened
and gray. Even a single-
term president is put
through the meat grinder.
It is an enormous burden
for one person to bear.
So what should we do
about the situation? How
can we, as citizens, light-
en the load and ease the
crushing weight on the
shoulders of our com-
mander in chief? I suggest
we institute a practice
that has become increas-
ingly common in the
business world: job-shar-
ing. Let’s elect one person
from each major party
and let them trade off every thirty
days. One month Republican, next
month Democrat. Sure, we’d have
to tweak the Constitution a bit to
allow such a thing, but consider
the advantages. Both parties would
win the election, thus lessening
hard feelings between them (unit-
ing, not dividing). Each
co-president in turn would have
an opportunity to implement poli-
cies in accordance with his party’s
philosophy, and we in turn would
have two parties to blame for the
mess our country is in. People
could stop fretting about the direc-
tion our country is going, because
next month it will be going in a
different direction.
yes, we could have our cake
and eat it too. In July, Republicans
bomb our enemies. In August,
Democrats extend the olive
branch. In September, Republicans
cut the corporate tax burden. In
October, Democrats increase it. In
November, Republicans build a
wall along our southern border. In
December, Democrats tear it
down. We could get a cosmic-kar-
mic thing going here, a real
yin-and-yang, a swinging pendu-
lum. If nothing
else, it would cer-
tainly liven things up.
I can anticipate the objections
to my idea. A job-share presidency
would be a disaster, causing confu-
sion and gridlock. Our citizens
won’t know what to expect. Our
enemies won’t know what to
expect. The economy will grind to
a halt. The government will not be
able to function. Would that really
be such a bad idea? Or we might
find out something quite startling:
to the average American, it doesn’t
really matter who’s in power. The
stock market will continue to soar
and then plummet. People will still
buy and sell, marry and divorce,
get jobs and lose jobs, just go on
about their business, working and
taking care of their families, despite
or in spite of the government
power structure. Once we’ve dis-
covered it doesn’t matter who is
running the show, then maybe we
can dispense with political parties
(and political advertisements) alto-
gether and just pull a name out of
a hat and draft a regular person as
our leader.
—Teresa Keegan
Two is better than one
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February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
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Community
Stability Dreams
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How does your plan
for funding college
measure up?
While education costs have soared, tax
laws have opened up a range of tax-favored
funding opportunities. If you didn’t qualify
for these benefits in the past, now’s the
time to review your education plan. Speak
with a Financial Advisor and learn about:
• Expanded Education Savings Account
benefits
• Section 529 College Savings Plan
improvements
• How to pay back college loans with the
help of tax deductions
To learn more about education funding,
call Anthony Favela, Financial Advisor.
370 17th Street, Suite 2800
Denver, CO 80202
(303) 572-4038
www.fa.smithbarney.com/favela
anthony.favela@smithbarney.com
Citigroup, Inc., its affiliates, and its employees are not in the business of providing tax or legal advice. These materials and any tax-
related statements are not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used or relied upon, by any such taxpayer for the purpose of
avoiding tax penalties. Tax-related statements, if any, may have been written in connection with the “promotion or marketing” of the
transaction(s) or matters(s) addressed by these materials, to the extent allowed by applicable law. Any such taxpayer should seek
advice based on the taxpayer’s particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor.
© 2007 Citigroup Global Markets Inc. Member SIPC. Smith Barney is a division and service mark of Citigroup Global Markets Inc. and
its affiliates and is used and registered throughout the world. Citi and Citi with Arc Design are trademarks and service marks of
Citigroup Inc. and its affiliates, and are used and registered throughout the world. Working Wealth
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February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
8
Meeting at the Denver School of Science & Technology:
2000 Valentia Street, Denver, CO 80238
$tap|etoo0h0rch.com º 303.321.1014
º
Join us at SFC for this series:
$0oday, Narch 23 at 10:30am
*With Discovery Club for children of all ages.

Colfax
Q
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23rd
Montview Blvd
S
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S H I P C H
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Because of
EASTER
A S P E C I A L M E S S A G E
Wisdom from a 35-year marriage
On vacation in the quaint,
water-side town of Mystic,
Connecticut, my husband and I
stopped in at a local pub one
night and made ourselves com-
fortable at the bar. Beside me sat
a gentleman who appeared to be
in his seventies. On a Friday
night at a bar, he was ordering
nothing but soda. Curious, we
struck up a conversation with
him.
Hugh was a warm and straight-
forward guy. As for the soda,
well, he wasn’t a drinker. “But
my wife of 35 years died a few
months ago. And sometimes it’s
just too quiet and lonely to be at
home now.”
Hugh recalled a long and
happy marriage with his lovely
wife, Fiona. The two of them had
a weekly ritual. Friday night was
always date night. Fiona would
go to the hairdresser every Friday
morning for a wash and a set.
Hugh would make a point to
leave work on time, no matter
how hard it was. The couple
would find someone to watch the
kids and then get all dolled up.
Every week led up to this trea-
sured event.
Despite his grief, Hugh’s eyes
sparkled when he spoke of her.
Eagerly, I asked him for his secret
to sustaining such a happy and
connected relationship for so
many years. “Well, every time
that I got frustrated or angry with
her, I would sit down and write
out a list of my complaints before
I said anything to her. Then I
would write out a second list of
everything that I loved and appre-
ciated about her… By the time I
finished that list, well, whatever I
was mad about seemed pretty
trivial in comparison. you can’t
let the bad make you lose sight of
the good.”
Researchers have now proven
what Hugh figured out a long
time ago: Long-term, intimate
relationships flourish when we
continue to “date” our partners.
Date night allows us to have
something special and fun with
one another that’s separate from
our co-parenting roles or the
responsibilities of sharing a home.
Scientists have also found that
when we focus on the positives,
we exercise and strengthen the
neural pathways in our brains
associated with the feeling of
happiness. In other words, the
more we practice being happy
and grateful about a relationship,
the easier it becomes to return to
that peaceful state.
Psychotherapist Angela
Sasseville, MA, NCC supports
adults and kids of all ages. She
specializes in helping couples and
families strengthen their relation-
ships. See FlourishCounseling.
com, call 303.875.0386 or stop by
her office at 44th Ave. and Lowell
Blvd. for more information.***
Angela Sasseville
Long-term, intimate
relationships flourish
when we continue to
“date” our partners.
Date night allows us
to have something
special and fun with
one another that’s
separate from our
co-parenting roles or
the responsibilities of
sharing a home.
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)Ǒ҅W˒'JȢMȠ
720-841-6887
sfield@kitchentuneup.com
kitchentuneup.com
720-841-6887
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The principal of Skinner Middle
School, Nicole Veltze, has been charged by
the Denver Police Department for failing
to report an allegation of child abuse.
Vel tze was handpi cked by
Superintendent Michael Bennet to replace
Pat Sandoval at the school. Skinnner par-
ents and the school’s Collaborative Steering
Committee, comprised of teachers and par-
ents, were not consulted in the Veltze
choice. Veltze subsequently scrapped most
of Skinner’s Revitalization plan, which had
been chosen by parents and the commu-
nity.
In 2004, her second year at Cole Middle
School, principal Veltze was the only prin-
cipal in Colorado and among just 15 in the
nation to receive the MetLife Foundation
Ambassadors in Education Award. The
award honors middle school, junior high
and high school principals who are making
an impact for the betterment of the entire
community. Veltze was widely hailed for
her role at Cole, but Cole was forcibly con-
verted to a charter by the State of Colorado,
after years of poor performance.
Veltze was also an Assistant Area
Superintendent, prior to her position at
Skinner. When Bennet scrapped the area-
superintendent form of administration,
Veltze ended up at Skinner.
Denver District Attorney’s office
spokeswoman Lynn Kimbrough boiled the
matter down thusly: It has been charged
that (Veltze) knew of an unlawful incident
of sexual contact and didn’t report it.
Colorado law requires that school person-
nel with a “reasonable cause to suspect”
child abuse, including child sexual abuse
have a duty to immediately report it.
Dana Easter, Chief Deputy District
Attorney in Jefferson County’s crimes
against children unit, emphasized that
school personnel are not trained to investi-
gate allegations of abuse. Reporting by
persons in a position of trust are among the
most important ways children are protect-
ed.
Easter could not recall a prosecution in
Jefferson County of a school official. Easter
said that school officials could report to
either Social Services or law enforcement,
but the key “was that abuse get reported.”
Easter said we expect schools to protect
our children, underscoring the urgency of
reporting abuse.
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
9
Principal charged with
failing to report abuse
by the Cherry Creekr News
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I N S P E C T I O N!!!
A sunny February day is the perfect
time to give your home’s exterior an
inspection. your view will not be
obstructed by leaves and flowers and
the relative “browness” of the sur-
rounding grass and vegetation acts as a
flat palette, allowing you to see more
clearly. The hour or so that you invest
in this activity could save you thou-
sands of dollars in future repair costs.
Before you begin, gather several
tools in a canvas bag: notebook, pen,
binoculars, camera, a key, and a rock
or small hammer. Begin at the front or
back of the house and work your way
around.
First, examine the roof (here’s where
the binoculars come in handy) and ask
yourself these questions:
Are there any missing, broken, or
Elizabeth Jeanne Wheeler
Denver Notions
warped shingles or tiles?
Does the asphalt shingle roof look
lumpy or bumpy? (This could be from
a shingles below the top
layer.) Are there lots of
mineral granules on the
roof?
Any pools of water?
Is the roof sagging?
How’s the flashing
around the chimney or steep-sloped
areas? Is it sagging or wobbly?
Then, take a look at the chimney
and ask:
Is the chimney leaning?
How are the bricks? Have any fall-
en out?
How’s the mortar?
Next, look at the gutters, parapet (if
you have) and cornice and note:
Are there any missing, loose, rotted
or debris-filled gutters?
What condition is the
paint on the cornice?
What condition is the
parapet? Has water dam-
aged it or is there a potential
for this to happen?
Now, bring your gaze down and take
a look at the walls, windows and doors.
Here are some questions to ask:
Is decorative woodwork firmly in
place and tightly caulked to prevent
water damage?
What shape is the paint in? Is it
peeling, curling, blistering or chalk-
ing?
Are there any loose, cracked or
missing clapboards or shingles?
Do I hear a hollow sound when I
knock on the brick with the rock?
(There could be a problem with the
sub-surface.)
When I take the key and run it
along the horizontal mortar between
the bricks, do white flakes fly? (It may
be time to have tuckpointing done.)
If the brick has been painted, is it
time to repaint to assure that the brick
is not damaged by water?
Is there any water damage on win-
dow sills and any horizontal brick,
stone or masonry areas?
How are the windows and doors?
Any broken glass?
Do they fit properly?
Is any of the wood rotted?
Finally, look at the bottom of the
house and ask yourself these questions:
Do any bushes, trees, or vines need
trimming?
Can water drain away from the
house?
Any signs of cracking in the foun-
dation walls?
You can reach Elizabeth at www.
historicgenie.com***
Thoughts &
tips from an
old house
lover
A sunny day in February is a good day to inspect you home. These houses are on 32nd
Avenue. Photo by Elizabeth Jeanne Wheeler.
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
10
Each February 2, Punxsatawney Phil comes up for a
few brief, camera-soaked moments to look for his shad-
ow. In an event that’s covered from coast to coast in the
national media, if the rodent sees his shadow, we’re stuck
with another six weeks of winter. Now, while we don’t
even have groundhogs in Colorado, we do have prairie
dogs - and our misplaced celebration is just another
example of how we’ve forgotten all about them.
To combat these perceived injustices, a group - the
prairie Dog Coalition - is working hard to secure a
more stable footing for our burrowing friends, and
pushing two ideas. The first, a legislative one, is rec-
ognition of a renamed “Prairie Dog Day” in our cities
and counties. And they’ve been making headway. This
year, the City of Denver joined Boulder in issuing a
proclamation celebrating Prairie Dog Day, and giving
our rodent residents the recognition they deserve.
The second idea is to give another look to our
yard-destroying, grazing-land inhabiting, “plague-
carrying” neighbors. Says Dr. Lauren McCain,
Co-Chair of the Coalition - which comprises some
30 member organizations - “we’re looking to raise
awareness on groundhog day, and get people the
information they need to know about prairie dogs.
Because of population, destruction of habitat, dis-
ease and predation, and policies allowing them to
be poisoned and exterminated, more than 90%
of the historical prairie dog population has been
destroyed.”
As a “keystone” species, the health of the
North American plains in many ways depends
upon the continued survival of these social crit-
ters. Living in complex networks of underground
tunnels that can become large enough to host
millions of prairie dogs, their churning of the soil
and the nitrogen-rich dung they deposit in it help
aerate, water, and fertilize our high-desert lands. When
these burrows become abandoned, they provide habitat
for numerous other species - including the endangered
black-footed ferret, and
the burrow-
ing owl.
And of
c our s e ,
p r a i r i e
dogs are deli-
cious - providing a
ready food source
for swift foxes,
c o y o t e s ,
weasels,
snakes, hawks and eagles. In all, some nine other plains
species literally depend on the prairie dogs for their
survival.
“They’re kind of the grocery store of the plains,” says
Co-Chair Lindsey Sterling Krank.
Until now, common practice has been to exterminate
whole colonies of prairie dogs either to make room
for new development, to secure more food for cattle
grazing, or to combat fears that these tunnelers would
spread the plague. “In fact,” says McCain, “science
shows that it costs more to kill the dogs, as they eat
weeds that are bad for cattle.” In terms of carrying
the plague, prairie dogs here too get unfair blame.
Because they are so susceptible to the disease, prai-
rie dogs usually die within 24 hours of infection,
and whole colonies can be wiped out in the blink of
an eye. “They really take one for the team during a
plague, and function as a warning, that plague is in
the area,” says Dr. McCain.
Currently, no local protections are offered to
prairie dogs - despite their vastly reduced numbers
and critical importance to the prairie ecosystem.
Under pressure from farmers, ranchers, develop-
ers and some government officals, the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service has so far refused to take any
action to preserve the critters - and, as a result,
though you still see prairie dogs all the time, much
of the remaining population is now “function-
ally extinct,” says Dr. McCain. “And that means
they’re still there, but not in large enough numbers
or in the correct environment to contribute to the
ecosystem.”
For more information about the plight of the
prairie dog, and for ways to get involved, check out
prairiedogcoalition.org.
—Devon Barclay
Traveling on a whim breaks the mold End Groundhog Day! Save the Prairie Dogs!!
HOLY WEEK AND EASTER DAY
AT SAINT JOHN’S EPISCOPAL CATHEDRAL
Welcoming and Inclusive of All
HOLY WEEK
PALM SUNDAY
March 16, 2008
Liturgy of the Palms
7:30 am Cathedral ~ 8 am Saint Martin’s Chapel
Liturgy of the Palms and Procession *
9 & 11:15 am, Cathedral
6 p.m. the Wilderness
HOLY MONDAY
March 17, 2008
7 pm Holy Eucharist
HOLY TUESDAY
March 18, 2008
7 pm Holy Eucharist, Cathedral
* Indicates services with the Saint John’s Choir
HOLY WEDNESDAY
March 19, 2008
7 a.m. The Holy Eucharist, St. Martin’s Chapel
A Service of Tenebrae *
7 pm Cathedral
MAUNDY THURSDAY
March 20, 2008
7 pm The Solemn Liturgy of the Lord’s Supper,
Cathedral
9 p.m. All night Prayer Vigil � Saint Martin’s
Chapel
GOOD FRIDAY
March 21, 2008
The Solemn Liturgy of Good Friday
Noon & 7 pm ~ Cathedral
THE GREAT VIGIL OF EASTER
Saturday, March 22, 2008
7 pm ~ Cathedral
EASTER DAY
March 23, 2008
Four Services
7:30 am Cathedral ~ 8 am Saint Martin’s Chapel
Festal Eucharist ~ 9 & 11:15 am Cathedral *
10:30 am Easter Egg Hunt
6 p.m. the Wilderness
SUNDAY WORSHIP SCHEDULE
The Holy Eucharist
7:30, 9, and 11:15 am ~ Cathedral
8 am ~ Saint Martin’s Chapel
6 pm the Wilderness
WEEKDAY SERVICES ~ Saint Martin’s Chapel
Monday – Friday
Morning Prayer ~ 8:30 am
Evening Prayer ~ 5 pm
The Holy Eucharist ~ 5:30 pm
Wednesday Morning ~ 7 am
The Holy Eucharist
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February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
11
Park Hill church youth in Africa
Photo by NortherN AurorA busiNess
AssociAtioN
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children who were labeled “special
needs” children. Here stateside,
when we hear the term special
needs, we think about learning dis-
abilities, developmental delays or
physical challenges. For the chil-
dren of Uganda, special needs often
means born with missing limbs,
severe developmental delays or
untreated injuries.
The major task of the trip was
building a small school building,
which was even more remarkable in
that it was done by hand and with
rudimentary tools like shovels,
wheelbarrows and picks. The ini-
tial task for the group was to dig,
with their shovels, trenches for the
foundation, followed by hand mix-
ing cement and pouring it for the
building’s foundation. During two
and half weeks of work, they had
built the walls of the school with
over 15,000 handmade bricks.
The most impressive aspect of
this build was the sense of partner-
ship with FDNC and the Uganda
people. Often Americans go abroad
on work trips with a mentality of
helping those in need by doing it for
them. The Ugandan countryside is
littered with such projects. What is
hopeful about this project is its deep
commitment to building relation-
ships and sharing much needed
resources so that the people of
Uganda experience a profound
sense of empowerment.
In Mbale, Uganda, a handful of
high school students and adults
made an incredible difference in the
lives of children, men and women.
The message of hope was expressed
through their daily physical labor
but more importantly, their willing-
ness to listen, learn and develop
life-giving relationships. To see the
pictures of the school being built
and to read the participants’ own
words, go to boardingpasses.org.
Plans are already in the works for
future work trips.
Continued from Page 1
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
12
×ȢlǣӰ Ǒ«Ƞ ×Ȫ«ȪӮ
ӭ̢:̛ Ν«Ⱥ έ ΝӅ·
ӬȢ͝͝«ɺ Ѿæ.͕æ.ɚ·
·ͽlΝ·æțΥ· ·ͩl,
~l.Ǒ:Ǒҿ.Ν͸
·Ȫͩ:Ȫ··
-v-«zz;·..
Ǒ«Ȫa·ѵ̢̢҅ӂ..΍ͨ
«vvz ×. .v:̛ ~.Ⱥ
·- ȒlΕ.͕· .ǚґӂ έ .̙Ȫ҅.aǑ͸)
Denver City Council President Michael
B. Hancock issued the following statement
from Tokyo regarding the death of Rachel
B. Noel
"Denver, indeed the entire State, has
lost a true warrior. Ms. Rachel Noel earned
her wings by demonstrating true courage
and will as she stood for equality in educa-
tion for ALL Denver children.
Today there are thousands of adults liv-
ing throughout the world who call a person
of different race, color, creed, or religion a
friend because of the act of courage by Ms.
Noel in 1968. Those of us who are prod-
ucts of Denver Public Schools from the
late 60s to the mid 90s went to school with
kids from all walks of life and from every
part of the City. We were wealthy, middle
class, working poor, White, Black,
Hispanic, Asian, and American Indian—
children of all stripes; but that did not
matter!
Because of Ms. Noel, all that mattered
was that we were Angels, Thunderbolts,
Rebels, and Spartans; or simply students
who did their very best. The torch still
burns; so long Warrior."
Hancock farewells Noel
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
13
Bill Moses has a college degree
and 30 years professional experi-
ence but he can’t make a living.
After being laid off
from a job as a Sales
and Mar ket i ng
Director for an ad
agency, Bill finally
found a job in retail
making $10 per hour.
He recently lost that
job as well because of
the slow economy.
As an older adult
with no kids, Bill can
barely survive on a
$10/hour job, which is
about $20,000/year,
but only because he
saved enough in the
past to pay off his
home. There are many other peo-
ple in Bill’s position, however, who
have an even harder time, especial-
ly when they have to raise a family
as well.
About one out of four Denver
households make less income than
the minimum thought necessary to
provide for their basic needs.
Another large percentage of work-
ers are underemployed, working in
jobs like Bill’s retail job that pay
less than they should be making or
working two jobs just to make ends
meet.
The ability of Denver residents
to make a decent living is the sub-
ject of a new task force being
created by the Mayor and City
Council. The Economic Prosperity
Task Force, which begins its work
in early March, will look for ways
to advance the economic prosperi-
ty of all Denver residents, from
people like Bill Moses who can’t
find a good job to the homeless,
who have a hard time holding any
job, to those who have jobs but
would like something better.
The Economic Prosperity Task
Force is being convened by
Denver’s Economic Development
Director, Andre Pettigrew and
myself and will meet for approxi-
mately one year. The committee is
made up of just over 30 people
representing government, non-
profits, business, labor and
academia. A former official from
Denver Public Schools, Andre
Pettigrew has long shared my inter-
est in creating better economic
opportunities for young people as
well as adults. We are hoping that
the Task Force will generate cre-
ative ways of improving
opportunities for all Denver resi-
dents.
According to the Colorado
Fiscal Policy Institute, a single par-
ent in Denver with
two young children
needs to earn at least
$45,000/year to cover
the costs of housing,
food, child care and
other basic needs.
The problem is that
half the workers in
Denver make less
than this amount.
Someone earning
mi ni mum wage
would actually have
to work three jobs at
once to reach this
self-sufficiency stan-
dard.
Many Denver workers, about
one in eight, make even less than
federal poverty levels. This level,
which hasn’t been adjusted for
many years, is only $17,000 per
year. With typical housing costing
at least $1,000/month, this amount
doesn’t even cover the basics.
While there are many efforts aimed
at making housing more afford-
able, the emphasis of the Prosperity
Task Force will be on how to help
people make enough money to
afford housing.
The Task Force will discuss a
wide range of issues related to our
economic well-being, including
education, housing, self-sufficiency,
job training, entrepreneurialism
and sustainable development.
Many of the recommendations
from the Task Force will focus on
these areas. Examples might be
efforts to improve the connection
between education and jobs, ways
to make it easier to start a new
business and methods for improv-
ing financial literacy and credit so
that people can afford to buy a
house.
I am hoping that, through this
task force, we can identify ways in
which city agencies, community
organizations and the business
community can work together to
expand economic opportunities
for Denver residents and, by doing
so, strengthen our local economy.
doug Linkhart is a denver City
Councilman at-Large, represent-
ing the entire city on City
Council.***
The wages of being a good
neighbor
by Councilman Doug Linkhart
“The more you read, the more
things you will know. The more that
you learn, the more places you'll go.”
- Dr. Seuss, "I Can Read With My
Eyes Shut!"
(Family Features) Theodor “Dr.
Seuss” Geisel knew what he was talk-
ing about. Reading is the key to
unlocking untold worlds for your
child, from scholastic and profession-
al success to personal enrichment.
The challenge is figuring out ways to
create a thirst for reading that will
serve your children throughout their
lives. At a time when some 30 million
U.S. adults function at the "below
basic" level of literacy skill, according
to ProLiteracy Worldwide, the impor-
tance of concentrating on reading at
an early age cannot be over empha-
sized.
“The family that reads together
has the right idea,” said Steve Mogck,
executive vice president and brand
leader for Country Inns & Suites By
Carlson (and father of three). “We
hear from our guests – families, edu-
cators and business travelers – that
reading is a vital part of their every-
day life which is why we developed
the Read It & Return Lending Library
for our hotels.” Enticing kids to read
at a young age is the first step to cre-
ating a lifelong reader. Here are 10
ways to help make this happen:
Lead by example. If your child
sees you reading, he or she will get
the idea that reading is fun. Make it a
point to talk about books at the din-
ner table – maybe even start a family
book club.
Leverage every reading opportu-
nity. The next time you plan a road
trip, look for hotels that provide
books for guests to enjoy
and offer specials that
enable you to broaden
your family book collec-
tion. For example, if you
plan to stay two or more
consecutive nights at a
Country Inns & Suites,
ask for the “Get a Gift
Card” promotion, effec-
tive Oct. 15, 2007 -March
15, 2008, and you will
receive a $15 Borders gift
card.
Encourage family
reading time. Even if it’s
just once a week, consis-
tency counts.
Get to know your
library. The community
library is at the heart of a
good reading program.
When traveling, introduce your child
to the Read It & Return Lending
Library at more than 400 Country
Inns & Suites hotels around the coun-
try. your child can take out a book,
and return it the next time you stay.
Steer your child to television pro-
gramming that promotes reading.
One good example is the Emmy
award-winning PBS children’s series,
“Reading Rainbow,” a show designed
to encourage a love of books among
children ages 4-8.
Read On! 10 Ways to
Encourage Your Kids to Read
Live Longer - Become an Optimist!
It’s a proven medical fact that Optimists live
longer... Come visit us at the Mile Hi Optimist
Club and find out how...
Programs are held Thursdays at noon at the Denver Country
Club, 1700 E. 1st Ave. For more information, contact Terry
Barnett at terrybarnett917@comcast.net
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
14
By BETSI BRIMER
The combination of higher altitude
and ultraviolet (UV) rays reflected by the
snow puts skiers and snowboarders at an
increased risk of sun damage and ulti-
mately, skin cancer. More than 90 percent
of all skin cancers are caused by sun
exposure.
"It's easy to associate winter with
frostbite and windburn, but most people
are unaware that UV rays can be even
more damaging on the slopes than on the
beach," said Perry Robins, MD, President
of The Skin Cancer Foundation. "With
the coldest months ahead of us, it's more
important now than ever to make people
aware of the proper precautions to take
while on the slopes.”
Higher altitude means increased lev-
els of harmful UV exposure compared to
sea level areas. UV exposure increases
8-10 percent with every 1,000 feet above
sea level. At an altitude of 9-10,000 feet,
UV may be 45-50 percent more intense
than at sea level. In addition, snow
reflects about 80 percent of the UV light
from the sun, meaning that you are often
hit by the same rays twice. This only con-
tributes to the problem, further increasing
the risk for skin cancer.
Both snow and strong wind can wear
away sunscreen and reduce its effective-
ness, so you have to take extra precautions.
To protect your skin
from the bitter cold,
heavy winds and winter
sun, follow these impor-
tant sun protection tips:
* Use a broad-spec-
trum sunscreen with an
SPF of 15 or higher
whenever you spend
time outdoors. Apply 30
minutes before hitting
the slopes. Be aware that
the sun's reflection off
the snow is strong even
on cloudy days.
* Apply sunscreen
liberally and evenly to all
exposed skin - most ski-
ers and snowboarders
do not use enough sun-
screen and therefore do not get the
maximum protection.
* Use a more moisturizing sunscreen.
Winter conditions can be particularly
harsh on the skin.
* Be sure to cover often-missed spots:
lips, ears, around eyes, neck, underside
of chin, scalp and hands.
* Always wear a lip balm with an SPF
15 or higher - lips are even more sensitive
than most parts of the skin.
* Cover up with clothing, including a
broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking
sunglasses.
* Reapply at least every two hours,
and more often after sweating or expo-
sure to wind and snow.
* Carry a travel-sized sunscreen and
lip balm with you on the slopes. Reapply
on the chairlift, especially after a long,
snow-blown run.
Cover Up
* Wear items like ski masks, which
will cover most of the skin, leaving very
little exposed to the wind and sun.
* UV-blocking sunglasses or goggles
that offer 100% UV protection and have
wraparound or large frames protect your
eyelids and the sensitive skin around your
eyes, common sites for skin cancer and
sun-induced aging. The sun's rays and
glare can impair your vision, so it's
important to wear sunglasses or gog-
gles to clearly see the terrain. Plus, it
will increase your enjoyment and per-
formance while skiing.
Be mindful of time spent in the
sun, regardless of the season.
* Keep track of the time you spend
in full sunlight. If possible, ski early in
the morning and later on in the day,
before 10AM and after 4PM. This
helps avoid long lines and decreases
the amount of time spent outdoors in
the most intense hours of sunlight.
* If you are on the slopes for most
of the day, take a few breaks indoors to
reapply sunscreen.
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Essential Sun Safety Information for Skiers
Higher altitude means
increased levels of harmful
UV exposure compared to
sea level areas. UV
exposure increases 8-10
percent with every 1,000
feet above sea level. At an
altitude of 9-10,000 feet,
UV may be 45-50 percent
more intense than at sea
level. In addition, snow
reflects about 80 percent
of the UV light from the
sun, meaning that you are
often hit by the same rays
twice.
Our neighborhood has
fared well in a time
of foreclosures and
declining property
values, but many people
still  nd themselves
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February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
15
Last year I was invited to
join some friends at the Spicy
Basil Thai Restaurant, 1
Broadway in Denver. At that
time someone else in that
group insisted that I must try
her favorite place, Thai Basil,
540 E. Alameda. It’s taken
me a full year, but at last
I can present to you, the
Battle of the Basils!
Despite the similarity
in names, these Thai bis-
tros are very different in
appearance and in menu
offerings. But as it turns
out different really can’t
be defined as better, it’s
simply a matter of taste
and mood, and what you
would like in a dining experi-
ence.
The defining difference is
atmosphere. Thai Basil
embraces the theme of its
menu with Asian accessories
and design elements. The
ambiance creates a mood and
invites people to linger and
relax. Spicy Basil, on the
other hand, has sterilized the
environment so that it has
very little reflection on the
ethnic food it serves. The
pleasant but undefined space
allows us to focus on the food
and presentation much more
so than the camaraderie of
the evening.
Spicy Basil is located
across from the Mayan
Theater in a high-traffic area.
There is a great likelihood
that the diners choosing this
location are on a tight sched-
ule, wanting quick service
and delicious food without
the fear of long waits, slow
servers, and casual timing.
They want to eat their food
and move on. To foster this,
Spicy Basil lines Formica
tables in a compact, linear
fashion to maximize diner
capacity – albeit at the
expense of diner privacy –
and maintain easier services
to clean and accommodate
new diners. Although the
chairs are comfortable, they
aren’t cozy. I would not
choose this location to kick
back and relax. I choose this
location when my movie tick-
ets have a show that starts in
an hour and I want to be sure
I am there on time.
This is not to say that the
décor of Spicy Basil is
unpleasant. It serves a very
specific purpose in a modern
and colorful way. you will
realize a secondary benefit
when your food arrives. It is
so beautifully presented, the
plates so colorful, that your
meals are set like little jewels
before you. It is absolutely
lovely.
Thai Basil, on the other
hand, is very comfortable
and inviting. It is more
appropriate for people who
want to relax and enjoy their
food and conversation at a
leisurely pace. Although
equally small, Thai Basil does
not cram its tables together,
and there is a greater sense of
intimacy as diners are given
their own personal space.
Thai Basil was put togeth-
er with intent. They create a
theme of warmth and luxury
with rich, dark woods, heav-
ily upholstered chairs and
Asian-themed art and acces-
sories. It is darker, quieter,
and easier to have a private
conversation while you enjoy
a relaxed meal with no sense
of hurry. you aren’t looking
at the people lining up wait-
ing for seats, as often happens
at Spicy Basil, so you have no
guilt in taking a few extra
moments to linger over your
tea.
If we compare the food at
the two locations, I may have
a split verdict. The Toasted
Potstickers ($4.95) at Thai
Basil are among the best I’ve
ever enjoyed, and the Chicken
Coconut Soup ($3.25) was
fantastic. Not only were both
of these starters absolutely
wonderful, the presentation
of the soup was lovely, in its
own mini tureen. My only
complaint is
that the serving size of the
soup was too small. I could
easily make this a meal in
itself if the portion were tri-
pled.
My Summer Rolls ($3.95)
at Spicy Basil, however, were
fine but uninspired.
Thus, the first round
goes to Thai Basil.
When we look at
the entrées, however, I
think that my vote will
swing to Spicy Basil.
Its menu is really inter-
esting with many more
options. It delves more
deeply into traditional
foods and, as men-
tioned earlier, it has
extremely lovely plating.
Whether you are trying the
Thai BBQ Chicken in Peanut
Sauce ($8.50) or any one of
their brilliant Curries ($8.50),
both your eyes and your
tongue will be duly impressed.
My personal favorite (today)
is the Whiskey Beef ($8.95).
Thai Basil has a very tradi-
tional, although smaller
menu. Service is more relaxed
so it is more encouraging to
order that extra course. you
will find, however, that the
entrée portions are extremely
generous (unlike their soup!)
so you should anticipate tak-
ing home leftovers. On the
night of our visit I tried one
of the few items designated
as non-spicy, the Royal
Chicken ($8.95). Although
pleasant, it was not necessar-
i l y memorabl e. My
companion had a huge por-
tion of Pad Thai ($7.95)
which was very good but
again, not entirely unique.
The bottom line, in the
Battle of the Basils, is that it
is very important to choose
your location based on the
overall dining experience
you desire on that specific
evening. If you want excel-
lent food fast, with reasonable
prices and quick service,
Spicy Basil is the place for
you. If you want to settle in
to comfortable surroundings
and lazily chat with friends
and loved ones, Thai Basil
has a place all set.***
Dining Detective: Battle
of the Basils
Thai Basil
540 E. Alameda
303.715.1188
Spicy Basil
1 Broadway, Unit B-100
333.871.8828
www.spicybasilcom
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
16
By JASON ALDERMAN
The days when most folks
joined a company right out
of school and remained until
retirement are long gone.
Today, people intentionally
change jobs numerous times
during their lifetimes.
Unfortunately, such changes
aren't always voluntary, as
anyone who's been laid off
knows.
If you've recently been
laid off or fear one is around
the corner, here are a few
ways to cope with what lies
ahead:
Rein in expenses. It may
take months to find another
job, which could wipe out
your savings. If you don't
already have one, create a
budget and stick to it like
glue. Know exactly how
much money you have and
track all expenses. Postpone
major purchases (car, vaca-
tion, new clothes) and trim
smaller expenses: Avoid res-
taurants and cook at home;
cancel cable TV; wear a
sweater and turn down the
thermostat - there are hun-
dreds of ways to save
money.
Have a rainy-day fund
you could live off for at least
three months.
Curtail retirement sav-
ings. If you're still employed
but fear the worst, this may
be the one and only time it
makes sense to temporarily
halt your 401(k) plan contri-
butions. you may need that
money to survive the next
few months and early 401(k)
withdrawals come with steep
penalties. Besides, you may
be able to make a lump-sum
contribution later if it was a
false alarm. Consult a finan-
cial professional about your
particular situation and if
you don't know one, www.
plannersearch.org is a good
place to start your search.
Ask about severance ben-
efits. If you're laid off, find
out what benefits are avail-
able. Many employers offer
severance pay or help with
COBRA health insurance
premiums; however, they
have no legal obligation to
do so. Many companies also
provide outplacement coun-
seling, which may include
professional assistance with
resume writing, interview
skills and job searches, or
even office equipment
usage.
If your company doesn't
offer outplacement, visit
www.careeronestop.org, a
U.S. Department of Labor-
sponsored website featuring
career resources and con-
nections to local career
centers that provide employ-
ment and t rai ni ng
opportunities.
AARP also has a compre-
hensive guide to surviving
job loss, including discus-
s i ons a bout a ge
discrimination and employ-
ee rights (www.aarp.org/
money/careers/jobloss).
Apply for unemployment
benefits. If you become
unemployed and meet cer-
tain eligibility requirements,
you may qualify for unem-
ployment insurance while
looking for a new job. Go to
www.servicelocator.org/
OWSLinks.asp for details.
Polish your resume. you
may be competing against
hundreds of other job appli-
cants, so make sure your
resume stands out from the
crowd. It should accurately
reflect your accomplish-
ments and show potential
employers you have the
experience and qualifica-
tions they seek. Use concise,
strong language and an orga-
nized appearance. It's a
good idea to update your
resume regularly, especially
after a promotion or changed
job responsibilities.
Alert your network. Let
family and friends know
you're looking; they may
know about opportunities
or spread the word on your
behalf. Seek out networking
events sponsored by the
Chamber of Commerce,
local colleges, trade associa-
tions or other business and
social organizations - even
volunteer work.
Track job-search expens-
es. If you itemize income tax
deductions, many job-
search-related expenses are
deducti bl e, i ncl udi ng
resumes, business cards,
phone calls, unreimbursed
job interview trips and
career counseling.
Being laid off can be very
stressful, but if you're pre-
pared with a good game
plan, you can minimize the
time you are out of work -
and the pain that goes with
it.
For more resources, go
on-line at the
towerledger.com
If a layoff looms, be prepared
Space Invaders opens at Museo de
las Américas in February
Get it off your
to-do list.
Make your
own will at
TowerLedger.com/will
Today!
Visit our website at: www.stelizabethsdenver.org
On the Clayton Early Learning Campus: 3605 Martin Luther King Blvd.
An Episcopal, Coeducational, Independent Day School
Serving a Diverse Denver.
• Academics, Music and Visual Arts.
• Diverse faiths, races, and cultures.
• Small class size.
• Two teachers per class.
• Extended Day Program.
• At maturity, grades K-8.
• Financial Aid available.
303-322-4209
Welcoming Kindergarten
& First Grade Applications
For 2008-2009
Active Minds March Events
Government & The Media
Over 35 years after Watergate, join Active Minds as we
explore the often stormy relationship between the govern-
ment and the media. We will look at the role of the media as
a watchdog in society as well as how journalistic standards
have changed over the years with regard to what should
and should not be exposed to the public.
Date: Monday, March 3, 2008
Time: 7:00-8:00 pm
Location: Denver School of Science & Technology, 2000
Valentia St., Denver, CO 80238
Cost: Free • RSVP: Stapleton Foundation: 303-468-3223
The C.I.A.
Join Active Minds as we examine the history and current
challenges facing the Central Intelligence Agency. We will
discuss the origins of the C.I.A. after World War II and how
the C.I.A. functioned during the Cold War. We will end by
looking at how our needs for intelligence have changed in
recent years and how this impacts the role of the C.I.A.
Date: Tuesday, March 11, 2008
Time: 12:30-1:30 pm
Location: Tattered Cover, 2526 E Colfax (2 blocks east of
York) • Cost: Free
North Korea
Join Active Minds for a discussion of the history of North
Korea and the development of the North Korean nuclear
program. We will cover the successes and shortcomings of
diplomatic efforts between North Korea, the United States
and other countries. North Korea’s place in the world rela-
tive to global issues such as international trade and human
rights issues will also be addressed.
Date: Monday, March 17, 2008
Time: 7:00-8:00 pm
Location: Denver School of Science & Technology, 2000
Valentia St., Denver, CO 80238 • Cost: Free
RSVP: Stapleton Foundation: 303-468-3223
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
17
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Space Invaders opens at Museo de
las Américas in February
Recent air test results
i n s i d e De n v e r
International Airport’s
four smoking establish-
ments all exceed EPA
maximum safe exposure
levels by significant
amounts creating a haz-
ardous environment for
patrons, employees and
passengers.
All four smoking res-
taurants and bars in DIA
were tested for indoor air
quality: the two Aviator’s
Smoking Lounges, Mesa
Verde and the Smokin’
Bear. Air samples were
taken continuously during
a 30-minute period in each
establishment using a TSI
SidePak AM 510 Personal
Aerosol Monitor. Test
results were provided by
the Roswell Park Cancer
Institute in New york.
The most extreme
results came from the
Aviator’s Smoking Lounge
in Concourse B, which
recorded 10 times the
EPA’s maximum safe
exposure level for outdoor
air and exceeded the air
quality measurements dur-
ing the worst day of the
2002 Hayman fire. On
that day, Denver was cov-
ered with a thick blanket
of smoke and haze, and
the state health depart-
ment issued warnings for
people to stay inside.
“Breathing the air in
these establishments is a
serious health hazard,”
said RJ Ours of the
American Cancer Society.
“We urge DIA officials
and Denver’s elected offi-
cials to take a hard look at
what is going on out
there."
Although airport offi-
cials have insisted that the
ventilation systems in the
smoking establishments
suffice, ventilation experts
at the American Society of
Heating Refrigerating and
A i r - C o n d i t i o n i n g
Engineers (ASHRAE),
which sets the industry
standard for ventilation,
disagree.
According to ASHRAE
President Terry Townsend,
"The only way to effec-
tively eliminate health risk
associated with indoor
exposure is to ban smok-
ing activity."
Secondhand smoke
exposure causes 53,000
deaths each year in the
U.S. The EPA has found
that fine particulate air
pollutants can penetrate
deeply into the lungs and
have serious health effects,
including increased respi-
ratory symptoms and
disease, decreased lung
function, and alterations
in lung tissue and struc-
ture.
Most major interna-
tional airports are already
100% smoke free indoors
which include airports in
Boston, Chicago, Dallas,
Houston, Las Vegas, Los
Angeles, Miami, Newark,
New york, Phoenix, San
Francisco and Seattle.
Air Tests Reveal Alarming Health
Hazard at DIA
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Sarery, Libraries in 2008
Sarery, Libraries in 2008
As Denver vorers mailed
back rheir ballors rhis monrh,
rhey added $1.4 billion in
debr and inreresr ro rhe ciry`s
ledgers.
Lur absenr rrom rhe
debare over rhe bond issues
was a rull accounring or
Denver`s exisring debr load.
The ciry recenrly released irs
so-called Òcrober book, rhe
compilarion or revenue and
spending rhar makes up rhe
ciry budger. Òn page 59` or
rhe massive documenr begins
a lengrhy recirarion or rhe
ciry`s long-rerm debr.
According ro rhe docu-
menr, rarings agencies rhar
examine Denver`s abiliry ro
repay debrs like bonds
scored rhe ciry`s debr burden
as 'moderare.` However, rhe
ciry srares ¨rhe moderare rar-
ing is mainly a resulr or
paying ror rhe ciry`s indebr-
edness rrom rhe ner revenues
or enrerprise runds.¨ In
orher words, Denver keeps a
subsranrial porrion or debr
orr irs books by accounring
rrearmenrs rhar push rhe
debr or cerrain ¨enrerpris-
es,¨ like Denver Healrh, inro
new caregories.
Denver`s currenr debr
load in Ceneral Òbligarion
load in Ceneral Òbligarion
load in Ceneral Òbligarion
bonds was $726 ror every
bonds was $726 ror every
man, woman and child in
man, woman and child in
rhe ciry, nearly $4`0 million.
rhe ciry, nearly $4`0 million.
The ciry has an addirional
The ciry has an addirional
$174 million in vorer aurho
$174 million in vorer aurho
rized bonds rhar have yer ro
rized bonds rhar have yer ro
be issued, mosrly in debr yer
be issued, mosrly in debr yer
ro be incurred ror rhe Jusrice
ro be incurred ror rhe Jusrice
Cenrer. Ar some poinr in rhe
Cenrer. Ar some poinr in rhe
near rurure, Denver`s
near rurure, Denver`s
Ceneral Òbligarion debr will
Ceneral Òbligarion debr will
reach nearly $600 million, or
reach nearly $600 million, or
$1,0`0 ror each residenr.
$1,0`0 ror each residenr.
Ceneral Òbligarion debr is
Ceneral Òbligarion debr is
backed by rhe rull ¨rairh and
backed by rhe rull ¨rairh and
credir¨ or rhe residenrs or
credir¨ or rhe residenrs or
Denver, shorrhand ror say
Denver, shorrhand ror say
ing rhar raxes, specirically
ing rhar raxes, specirically
properry rax rares, can and
properry rax rares, can and
would be raised ro meer
would be raised ro meer
rhese debrs, wirhour vorer
rhese debrs, wirhour vorer
approval, ir currenr raxes
approval, ir currenr raxes
May you die berore your
May you die berore your
children. Unril I see you again.
children. Unril I see you again.
May Cod be wirh you.
These rhree salurarions -
These rhree salurarions -
whar people use ror 'goodbye'
whar people use ror 'goodbye'
in Iarsi, Irench, and a deriva
in Iarsi, Irench, and a deriva
rion rrom Òld Lnglish
rion rrom Òld Lnglish
('goodbye' comes rrom rhis
('goodbye' comes rrom rhis
phrase) - represenr rhree dis
phrase) - represenr rhree dis
rincrly dirrerenr culrures, and
rincrly dirrerenr culrures, and
rhree disrincrly dirrerenr cul
rhree disrincrly dirrerenr cul
rural ourlooks. And in a world
rural ourlooks. And in a world
where rhe combined challenges
where rhe combined challenges
The Eenaissance ar Xenia Village Aparrmenrs involved
rhe acguisirion and rehabilirarion or rour aparrmenr buildings
on rhe 1400 block or Xenia Srreer in Lasr Denver. The
Colorado Coalirion ror rhe Homeless (CCH) had managed
rhree or rhe buildings since 1999. However, rhe rourrh build-
ing was poorly operared by absenree ownership, and was a
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November 2007
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November 2007
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Sarery, Libraries in 2008
load in Ceneral Òbligarion
load in Ceneral Òbligarion
bonds was $726 ror every
bonds was $726 ror every
man, woman and child in
man, woman and child in
rhe ciry, nearly $4`0 million.
rhe ciry, nearly $4`0 million.
The ciry has an addirional
The ciry has an addirional
$174 million in vorer aurho
$174 million in vorer aurho
rized bonds rhar have yer ro
rized bonds rhar have yer ro
be issued, mosrly in debr yer
be issued, mosrly in debr yer
ro be incurred ror rhe Jusrice
ro be incurred ror rhe Jusrice
Cenrer. Ar some poinr in rhe
Cenrer. Ar some poinr in rhe
near rurure, Denver`s
near rurure, Denver`s
Ceneral Òbligarion debr will
Ceneral Òbligarion debr will
reach nearly $600 million, or
reach nearly $600 million, or
$1,0`0 ror each residenr.
$1,0`0 ror each residenr.
Ceneral Òbligarion debr is
Ceneral Òbligarion debr is
backed by rhe rull ¨rairh and
backed by rhe rull ¨rairh and
credir¨ or rhe residenrs or
credir¨ or rhe residenrs or
Denver, shorrhand ror say
Denver, shorrhand ror say
ing rhar raxes, specirically
ing rhar raxes, specirically
properry rax rares, can and
properry rax rares, can and
would be raised ro meer
would be raised ro meer
rhese debrs, wirhour vorer
rhese debrs, wirhour vorer
approval, ir currenr raxes
approval, ir currenr raxes
May you die berore your
May you die berore your
children. Unril I see you again.
children. Unril I see you again.
These rhree salurarions -
These rhree salurarions -
whar people use ror 'goodbye'
whar people use ror 'goodbye'
in Iarsi, Irench, and a deriva
in Iarsi, Irench, and a deriva
rion rrom Òld Lnglish
('goodbye' comes rrom rhis
phrase) - represenr rhree dis
rincrly dirrerenr culrures, and
rhree disrincrly dirrerenr cul
rural ourlooks. And in a world
where rhe combined challenges
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November 2007

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Stapletonʼs Tower
Ledger is Hiring!
Weʼre looking for commission
salespeople to help us keep
up with rapid expansion.
Work your own hours!
Earn 25-30% Commission
on new advertising
sales!
On the job training provided.
Call 303-458-7541 for more
information and details.
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
18
Layered Taco
Salad with
Avocado-Lime
Dressing
2 fully ripened
Mexican avocados,
halved, pitted and
peeled,
divided
1/4 cup fresh cilantro leaves
1/4 cup vegetable oil
Lime juice, as directed
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups shredded romaine or iceberg
lettuce
1/4 cup thinly sliced red onion
1 cup chopped cooked chicken
(optional)
1 can (15 to 16 ounces) refried
beans
3/4 cup chopped tomatoes
1 cup shredded Cheddar or
Monterey Jack cheese
To prepare the dressing: Chop one avocado;
place in the bowl of a food processor with
cilantro, oil, 1-1/2 tablespoons lime juice,
sugar, salt and 2 tablespoons water; process
until smooth. Transfer to a zip pered plastic
bag, seal and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Coarsely chop remaining avocado; toss with
2 teaspoons lime juice; set aside. In a 9-inch
glass pie plate, layer lettuce, onion, chicken,
beans, reserved avocado, tomatoes, and
cheese in that order. Cover tightly with plastic
wrap, pressing directly onto salad. Refrigerate
until ready to serve. To serve: Spoon dressing
onto salad, spreading evenly. Serve with
tortilla chips if desired.
Yield: 4 to 6 main dish portions or 10 to
12 appetizer portions
Spicy Roasted Corn, Avocado
and Chicken Salad
2 tablespoons lime juice
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 ears fresh supersweet corn,
husk and silk removed
2 cups diced cooked chicken
(about 10 ounces)
1 cup halved grape or cherry
tomatoes
1/4 cup sliced radishes
2 fully ripened Mexican
avocados, halved, pitted
and peeled
Spicy Salad Dressing, recipe
follows
4 cups mixed salad greens in
bite-sized pieces
Preheat broiler to high. In a small cup,
combine lime juice, chili powder and salt.
Brush corn ears with the seasoning mix-
ture; place on a broiler pan. Broil 6 inches
from heat source until lightly browned; turn
and continue broiling until barely cooked, a
total of 7 to 10 min utes. Cool. Meanwhile,
in a bowl, combine, chicken, tomatoes and
radishes. Cut each avocado into slices then
cut slices in half cross wise; add to chicken
mixture. Add 1/4 cup Spicy Salad Dressing;
toss gently. Cut two or three 1/4-inch slices
from each corn ear; set aside. Cut remain ing
corn kernels from the cobs, by holding the ear
upright in a shallow bowl so the kernels don’t
scatter. Divide salad greens among 4 dinner
plates. Top with the chicken mixture then corn
kernels. Garnish with reserved corn rounds.
Serve with addi tional dressing, if desired.
Yield: 4 portions
Spicy Salad Dressing: To 1/2 cup of your
favorite vinaigrette dressing, add
1 teaspoon chili powder, and 1/8 tea spoon
each ground cumin and ground
red pepper (cayenne).
Per Serving: 402 calories, 26 g protein, 31 g
carbohydrate, 22 g fat, 462 mg sodium
Avocado and Corn
Confetti Cups
1 ear fresh supersweet corn, husk
and silk removed
1 cup chopped tomatoes
1/4 cupfnelychoppedonion
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano, crushed
1/2 teaspoonfnelychoppedgarlic
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 fully ripened Mexican avocado,
halved, pitted, peeled and
chopped
3/4 cup crumbled feta cheese
(about 4 ounces)
Large iceberg or leaf lettuce
leaves
Cut kernels from ear of corn by holding the ear upright in a shallow dish to prevent the
kernels from scattering. In a medium bowl, combine corn kernels, tomatoes, onion, olive
oil, vinegar, oregano, garlic, salt and pepper. Gently stir in avocado and feta. Cover and
refrigerate until ready to serve. To serve: On 4 salad plates arrange lettuce to form cups;
spoon salad into in each cup. Garnish with avocado slices, if desired.
Yield: 4 portions
Per Serving: 214 calories, 6 g protein, 13 g carbohydrate, 16 g fat, 616 mg sodium
FAMIly FeATuReS
I
mpress your family and dinner guests with vibrant and delectable salads
that are quick and easy to prepare. using a creative combi nation of pre pared
ingre dients like bagged greens or cooked chicken and
some fresh favor-rich ingredients, you will
earn raves and recipe requests!
Avocados and corn are two delicious whole some ingre dients that are actually
plentiful at this time of year. The avocado’s rich favor
and creamy texture comple ment the crunchy char acter of supersweet corn,
making them a dynamic duo that can trans form your everyday salad.
The avocados on store shelves now likely come from Mexico. It’s the
same Hass variety you are used to, only grown in ideal conditions in central
Mexico, the avocado capital of the world. The rich volcanic soil, moun tain
rain and abundant sunshine, combined with frst-class production and safety
standards, allow Mexican growers to harvest high-quality fruit year round.
Before cutting them, make sure avocados are ripe. Their buttery-smooth
favor and texture are at their prime when the pebbly skin is dark and the
fruit yields to gentle pressure. If they are green and not quite ripe when
you buy them, hold avocados at room temperature for a couple of days.
Once ripe, refrig erate until ready to use.
Right now is a great time for sweet corn on the cob, thanks to
supersweet varieties grown in Florida. Because they do not lose their
sugar as quickly as traditional summer corn, you are rewarded with a
delicious sweet taste in every bite. The extra sugar also keeps them fresh
longer, (stored in the refrig erator), and the corn cooks quicker as well, on
the grill or in the microwave. For the unmistaka ble juicy crunch you only
get from fresh corn, cut ker nels from the cob just before use in recipes. The
kernels are equally tasty when eaten raw.
F
resh fruits and vegetables don’t need nutritional
labels to tell you how packed they are with the
right combination of nutrients for healthy goodness
— naturally. Besides outstanding fresh favor, both
Mexican avocados and super sweet corn pack an
impres sive nutritional punch.
Avocados are nutrient-dense with 20 vitamins
and minerals. They also boast heart-healthy unsatu-
rated fats as recommended by The American Heart
Association. And they’re great for diabetics as they
are fber-rich and do not contain carbs.
Supersweet corn with its complex carbohydrates
pro vides energy and is also a good source of
Vitamin C and folic acid, lacking in the diets of
most Americans. One medium ear of corn only has
80 calories and no saturated fat.
Both avocados and corn contain lutein, an anti oxi-
dant that has been shown to help maintain healthy
eyesight as we age. Supersweet corn also contains
zeaxanthin, another important anti oxidant, which
may lessen the risk of developing age-related macular
degeneration and cataracts.
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
19
Denver International School
(DIS) will host an Open House
on Saturday, March 1st, 2008
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. for fami-
lies interested in immersion
bilingual international educa-
tion.
In the growing global econo-
my, the command of a second
language is becoming more and
more important. Americans flu-
ent in other languages enhance
our economic competitiveness
abroad, improve global commu-
nication and help maintain our
political and security interests.
“Bilingual education, and
more commonly, multilingual
education, is an intrinsic, almost
essential part of life skills for the
21st century,” said Adam Sexton,
Executive Director at Denver
International School. “One of
the fundamental purposes of
education is to prepare students
for life in the workplace – a work-
International School Open House
place that is now global.”
DIS is located in the former
Machebeuf High School build-
ing in Park Hill at 1958 Elm
Street. Teachers, staff and cur-
rent DIS families will be available
to answer questions and provide
tours of the facilities. Snacks and
children’s activities also will be
available.
Denver International School
is an independent school that
fulfills the highest educational
standards of the United States,
China, France, Spain and other
countries by offering early
immersion bilingual internation-
al education, accredited by
participating governments, in
order to prepare its students to
thrive in a diverse and competi-
tive global society. For more
information, call 303.756.0381
or visit www.dischool.org.
The Cleaning Queen and her team
of professionals serve the entire
Denver Metro Area.
• C Q professionally cleans private homes
and businesses
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trained
• C Q is 100% guaranteed, or your money back
Weekly • Bi-Weekly • Monthly
Move-ins or Move-outs
Call us for your free estimate!

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February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
20
Featured Home…






380 Dahlia Street
$2,295,000
Classical Italian Architecture!
This new Italian inspired masterpiece will enchant you with its elegant de-
tails. The gourmet kitchen opens to the great room and backyard inspires
casual entertaining. The generous master retreat beckons you to the sitting
room and sumptuous bathroom. Finished basement with wet bar: 5 Bed,
7 Bath, 6,270 Fin Sq Ft



THE NAME THAT SELLS DENVER
Luke Gordon, Broker
303.331.4573 Direct
303.320.1556 Office
luke@denvercityhomes.com
RE/MAX Cherry Creek, Inc.

3050 S Garfield St
Slavens K-8!
New traditional custom
w/high end finishes!
Large yd, gourmet
kitchen butler & walk-in
pantry! Mn flr study w/
beam ceilings & wain-
scoting! Master w/sitting
area! 4 Bed, 4 Bath,
4,505 sq. ft.
$1,100,00
636 S Ogden St
Prime Wash Park R2 Site!
Prime R2 site to build 2
townhomes w/full walk-
out lower lvl + mtn
views! 2 Blks to Park!
Includes plans, soil test-
ing, pin survey, and as-
bestos report! Ready to
build! 6,350 sq. ft. lot
$549,000

2910 S Adams St
COMING SOON!
Amazing renovated
ranch! Slavens Elemen-
tary! Solid granite count-
ers, stainless appliances!
Generous backward &
patio! Great basement
and design colors! New
master suite!
4 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,722
sq. ft.
$535,000

851 S Emerson St
UNDER CONTRACT!
3 Blocks from Wash
Park! Excellent Wash
Park site to build 2 town-
homes or investment
property ($700/mo rent
each)! Includes plans,
soil testing, pin survey!
Ready to build!
1,481 sq. ft., 6,340 Lot
sq. ft.
$459,000
818 S Franklin St
SOLD!
Magic of Wash Park! State
of the art renovation! Awe-
some vaulted master w/his
& her closets! Gourmet
kitchen! Butler’s pantry w/
wine bar! Media/rec room!
Oversized lot! 3-Car Garage!
4 Bed, 5 Baths, 4,290 Fin.
Sq. Ft.
$1,450,000
THE GORDON TEAM
www.denvercityhomes.com
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
21
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Double Points
Tuesdays in February.
$3,000 in Cash drawings
+ Jeep giveaway
4pm - 8pm, Friday, February 29
(Invitations to the Winner Wonderland
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Only thirty minutes from Denver,
take I-70 exit 243 at Hidden Valley
to get to Fortune Valley.
Reservations:
1-800-924-6646 or 303-327-2200.
www.FortuneValleyCasino.com
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February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
22
Numbness/Tingling?
If you suffer from these or other warning signs call
immediately to prevent possible advancing
complications
Pain Resulting from Injury
Neck Disc Injury
Nerves Down
the Arm
Chronic Pain, Numbness,
and Weakness Radiate from
The Neck Down to the Hand
Vertebra
Neck Disc
Spinal Cord
Nerve Root
Side Cut-Away View
C5-C6 Disc
Herniation
with Nerve
Root
Compression
Figure 1
26-481091
(
303
)
678-7170
LDenver, CO—Do you
suffer from Numbness and
Tingling down the arms or
legs? Most numbness/tingling
sufferers have no idea what to
do when they experience these
symptoms.
Although there are
many causes of numbness/
tingling one of the main reasons
is to the joints,
ligaments, and discs in the neck
or low back. Damage may have
occurred as a result of an injury
or could have developed slowly
over time.
In addition to pain,
damaged spinal joints and
discs (cushion between the
bones) will place pressure on
the nerves that go down the
arms, hand, fingers, and even
the upper back. This ‘pressure’
is the cause of numbness/tin-
gling. See Figure 1. When left
untreated, pain and weakness in
the muscles may be the even-
tual result.
Generally, most of you
resort to medication use. When the problem is in the neck or lower back, using
over-the counter, and even prescribed drugs to fix the cause of the problem is not
the answer for many. And if medication fails, surgery might be considered the only
other alternative.
Dr. Alison Milbauer, DC wants to let you know that there is another way.
To discover the “best kept secret” that has given thousands of people relief
without the use of drugs or surgery call to receive a complimentary Numbness and
Tingling analysis and consultation. Take Back Your Life.
303-832-3668
Insurance Accepted
Advertise in the Cherry Creek News and
the Tower Ledger for just $89/month
303-458-7541
Monroe Pointe reshapes
Cherry Creek living
It’s hard not to notice the major redevel-
opment of the Cherry Creek shopping and
residential district. But among the fancy new
New-york-City-style
condominiums, posh
boutiques and private
gyms, one Cherry Creek
development has quiet-
ly emerged: Monroe
Pointe. Monroe Pointe
is the first development
project of Bruce and
Stuart Rifkin, sons of
the equally quiet and
pr i vat e Monr oe
“Monty” Rifkin, one of
Denver’s notable cable
pioneers.
Construction on
the 69-unit Monroe
Pointe was completed
at the end of January,
and residents have already begun to move in.
In contrast to the numerous high-end devel-
opments now springing up across Cherry
Creek and remaining dormant, Monroe
Pointe sold all but one of its multi-million
dollar units before the building was even half
complete. The secret to the development's
success?
"Do your homework up front," says
Bruce Rifkin, who looked at several different
plans for the site before moving forward
with the current design. "People wanted
something that was more like individual
homes within a building, not a cookie-cutter,
square development."
"With the location, and size, we wouldn't
want to be doing 270 units," explains Rifkin.
"People wanted bigger units, and to be able
to adapt. We kept the building skinny, with
wider units, more light, and more glass - the
idea was to let in as much light as possible, so
that when you step inside, it's not like step-
ping into an apartment - it's more like looking
at a painting of the amazing views."
According to the Rifkins, Monroe Pointe
is a place for people who want to live the
Cherry Creek lifestyle quietly. Within walk-
ing distance to favorite restaurants and
shopping, the Pointe offers a private address
slightly removed from the retail center’s hus-
tle and bustle. As such, it's been a natural
draw for young professionals, as well as emp-
ty-nesters. "But the surprise has been the
Aspen and Vail buyers," says Rifkin, describ-
ing a clientele who live in the mountains, but
are looking for well-located, low-mainte-
nance, high end city residences for weekend
trips and periods of higher business volume.
"We had no idea that that buyer was even
out there."
Even though the more-expensive resi-
dences are all but sold out, people looking
for the quieter Cherry Creek lifestyle still
have
options. Monroe Pointe residences start
in the mid-300s and offer a variety of floor
plans.
Monroe Pointe is at the corner of Monroe
Street and Cherry Creek Drive North, where
the old turquoise and white Cherry Creek
Medical Building
used to sit. Construction on the project
began more than two years ago.
For more information about the Monroe
Pointe condominiums, visit www.monroe-
pointe.com or call the sales office at
303.333.5280.
Bruce Rifkin of Monroe Pointe
Service LLC
Could you use a personal
assistant because of your job,
age or physical limitations?
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Time for You
• Transportation
• Entertainment Assistance
• Shopping
• Errands
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• Basic Household Jobs & more
Patrick Eustrom
303-263-6603
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February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
23
STAPLETON
2678 Florence: Beautiful 3Bed-
room, 3 Bathroom House with
almost 1750 SQ FT of Living
Space •Unique open floor plan
with 2 car attached garage
•Spacious Front Porch opens
up to landscaped courtyard •
$1595

2332 Alton: Rarely found on the
rental market – this amazing 5
Bedroom 4 Bathroom house has
over 2700 s.f. of Living Space on
the main level and a 1400 s.f.
finished basement •Unique
Open Floor Plan is loaded with
upgrades including hardwood
floors on most of main level
•Gourmet Kitchen with
Upgraded Cabinets and stainless
appliances •Formal Dining
Room •Gorgeous Master Suite
with spacious walk in his/her
closet, 5 piece bath, and private
balcony. •2 car alley loaded
garage •Private fenced in land-
scaped back yard – Large for
Stapleton!! •Great Outdoor
Living with Front Porch, large
Fenced “private” landscaped
backyard $2,495

3475 Florence: Beautiful brand
newer, 3 Bedroom, 3 Bathroom
House with almost 1600 SQ FT
of Living Space •Unique open
floor plan with 2 car attached
garage •His/Her closets in mas-
ter bedroom •Spacious Front
Porch opens up to landscaped
courtyard •Blocks from Central
Park $1650

2636 Emporia Newer
Wonderland Garden Court
Single Family Home •Popular
Ashton Floor Plan: Almost 1500
SQ FT of living space with 3
Bedrooms & 2 ½ baths •Master
Suite includes large Master and
5 piece Master Bathroom with
Ceramic Tile •Spacious Kitchen
with Upgraded Maple Cabinets,
Pantry, Hardwood Floors and
an Island that flows into a Large
Dining Area •9’ Ceilings
throughout Main Level with
Gas Burning Fireplace •Large,
Unfinished Basement, Great for
Storage •2 Car Garage with
Auto Opener Located on the 1st
Level $1850

9994 MLKJ: Newer
Wonderland Artesian Plaza
Home with 2 Bedrooms and 1.5
baths •Almost 1150 SF with
Open Floor Plan & hardwood
on main level. •Master Suite
with Large Master Bedroom &
Bathroom with a walk-in closet
•Spacious kitchen with attached
dining area that flows into large
living area •Beautiful large pri-
vate fenced in patio •Stainless
appliances, washer/dryer and
“cool” window coverings
included •Rate includes HOA,
trash, and water •1 Car Garage
with Automatic Garage Door
Opener Located on the 1st
Level $1350

1162 Rosemary: Recently
Remodeled 3 Bedroom Home
with large fenced in back yard
•Section 8 accepted •All appli-
ances included, including
washer and dryer. $1195
TJC Management Services. Phone 303-324-6988. www.tjcmanagement.com
SERVICES
Nails by Terri
Do you like to get your nails done but
hate going to a salon? I am a licensed
manicurist and have been doing nails
out of my home for 15 yrs. I am cur-
rently looking for some new clients. I am
located in the Lowery/Montclair neigh-
boorhood in Central Denver and
specialize in manicures, pedicures, gel
nails ( a great alternative to acrylics) and
handpainted nail art. I also do mini
manicures and nail art for kids. $5.00 off
your first visit. Call Terri today @ 303-
947-1121 to set up an appointment.
ACCOUNTING!
WORLD PEACE!
Fortunately, I can help with the more
difficult of the two. Free consultation
for small business/nonprofits. Certified
QuickBooks Pro Advisor. General
Accounting/Bookkeeping Set up/
Tr a i n i n g / Tr o u b l e s h o o t i n g /
Maintenance of QuickBooks, Payroll,
Taxes, New business setup and ques-
tions. Dori Hennecken, CPA, MBA
303.841.9304
FOR SALE
Kenwood Home Theatre Surround
Sound System - includes five speakers,
receiver, 200 disc CD Changer, remote,
and double cassette deck. Excellent
working condition. $650 for everything.
Call 720-771-3197






HOME FOR RENT
A Gardener’s Dream
Charming 2 bedroom home nestled
in the pines in Park Hill. This unique
home features an open floor plan, sunny
study, cozy family room, large eat-in
kitchen, fireplace, hardwood and tile
floors, 1 bath , private patio, lawn
service , all appliances, off street park-
ing, fenced back yard + more ! Dogs
nego. One year lease. N/S , $ 1285,
303-332-5897
Classified Classified
Basement Finishing
Best Builders, Inc. Where you deserve
the best! Licensed and Insured with
30 yrs. Experience. 303-564-0500
FRESH COAT PAINTERS
One room or the Whole House! Interior/
Exterior, Work guaranteed.Insured, Bonded,
Excellent references! VISA/ MC/AMEX
Call 303-321-2903 for FREE Estimate
guiTarLEssons
ALL LEVELS and Ages, 35 yrs.
Experience. Downtown /Metro area,
parking. Denver Guitar Guy, call Jim
@ (303) 669-2877 or Jim@denvergui-
targuy .com
11-30-07
Experience the lightness of being...
GET ORGANIZED!
303-232-2935
February 2008 Tower Ledger www.towerledger.com
24
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