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Redeemer Bible Church
Unreserved Accountability to Christ. Undeserved Acceptance from Christ.
The Christian Home, Lecture Fifteen: The Heart of Parenting Selected Scriptures Introduction Today we begin our discussion on the subject of Christian parenting. And although it could easily warrant a semester’s worth of lectures, we will take only about three weeks to address the main principles of godly child-rearing. In order to do this, it is critical that we begin with the children themselves. When God blesses us with offspring, what does he bless us with? I mean, what are we getting? I ask this question with you because I am convinced if we do not understand what kind of package the Lord has placed in our laps, we will never be able to apply those Scriptures which deal more or less directly with the “how-to’s,” if you will, of biblical parenting. So then, when we have babies, what does God give us? Well, the answer is simple. He gives us little, helpless sinners. Very well, then, we’re done for today. I’ll take your questions for the remainder of the class period. Not really. Although it sounds almost simplistic to say that our kids are sinners, the reality is that if we fail to come to grips with the condition in which our children are born, we will never understand how we are to parent them. This morning, then, what I’d like to do with you, is help you to understand the nature of your kids. Deep reflection on this area is indispensable for godly child-rearing; for our understanding of who they are will inform all that we do as their parents. I should tell you in advance that I am going to begin with assertions that I do not doubt you already know quite well. I mention this because I do not want you to stop listening simply because it may be familiar to you. Instead, listen carefully to what the Bible says about human nature and as you do, notice if you don’t begin to see how a deeper grasp of the subject would have major impact on your parenting. We Are Born Sinners Psalm 58:3 says, “The wicked are estranged from the womb; These who speak lies go astray from birth.” And in Ps 51:5, David says, “Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, And in sin my mother conceived me.” Turn with me in your Bibles to Rom 3:10-18:

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As it is written, "THERE IS NONE RIGHTEOUS, NOT EVEN ONE; 11 THERE IS NONE WHO UNDERSTANDS, THERE IS NONE WHO SEEKS FOR GOD; 12 ALL HAVE TURNED ASIDE, TOGETHER THEY HAVE BECOME USELESS; THERE IS NONE WHO DOES GOOD, THERE IS NOT EVEN ONE." 13 "THEIR THROAT IS AN OPEN GRAVE, WITH THEIR TONGUES THEY KEEP DECEIVING," "THE POISON OF ASPS IS UNDER THEIR LIPS"; 14 "WHOSE MOUTH IS FULL OF CURSING AND BITTERNESS"; 15 "THEIR FEET ARE SWIFT TO SHED BLOOD, 16 DESTRUCTION AND MISERY ARE IN THEIR PATHS, 17 AND THE PATH OF PEACE THEY HAVE NOT KNOWN." 18 "THERE IS NO FEAR OF GOD BEFORE THEIR EYES."

We enter this world as sinners upon our birth. That bundle of joy on your lap, that blessing from the Lord, is at one and the same time a bundle of wickedness and a potential source of ungodly grief. Our children, then, are not at all innocent. They are born into this world as tiny rebels against God. And their constant inclination is toward unrighteousness. Now some may object and say that children are indeed innocent. They may say that children are a blank slate and that therefore they are merely the products of their environment. Now I would not dispute that our kids are inexperienced with evil, that they are naïve to the ways of the world, that they are ignorant of many of the avenues of sin. But this does not mean that they are innocent. Our innocence or guilt is not simply a product of the things we do or say, but it is a product of our inheritance. We suffer from the effect of what is commonly called “original sin.” We Sin because We Are Sinners Turn ahead to Rom 5:12-19:
Therefore, just as through one man sin entered into the world, and death through sin, and so death spread to all men, because all sinned-- 13 for until the Law sin was in the world, but sin is not imputed when there is no law. 14 Nevertheless death reigned from Adam until Moses, even over those who had not sinned in the likeness of the offense of Adam, who is a type of Him who was to come. 15 But the free gift is not like the transgression. For if by the transgression of the one the many died, much more did the grace of God and the gift by the grace of the one Man, Jesus Christ, abound to the many. 16 The gift is not like that which came through the one who sinned; for on the one hand the judgment arose from one transgression resulting in condemnation, but on the other hand the free gift arose from many transgressions resulting in justification. 17 For if by the transgression of the one, death reigned through the one, much more those who receive the abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness will reign in life through the One, Jesus Christ. 18 So then as through one transgression there resulted condemnation to all men, even so through one act of righteousness there resulted justification of life to all men. 19 For as through the one man's disobedience the many were made sinners, even so through the obedience of the One the many will be made righteous.

Of the many things we could say concerning this text, what seems clear is that the reason we sin, the reason why we are inclined to disobedience from birth is that we are the
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children of Adam. Adam represented us in the garden, and when he fell, we fell. His disobedience and the guilt of that disobedience became ours by his representation and through our union with him as members of the human race. Death spread to all men, because all sinned. Infants die; and the reason they are subject to death the same as the rest of us is because in Adam we are guilty of sin, which always leads to death. The bottom line in all this is that you must remember that as parents, the Lord has placed in your care a person who is irresistibly inclined to evil. Granted, the evil to which your two year-old may be irresistibly inclined may not be as gross as the evil to which your 17 year-old may be irresistibly inclined, but this does not make such evil any the less evil in the sight of God. Sin is sin, no matter the form. Sin May Be Defined Only with Reference to God In this connection, we must be sure that we understand exactly what sin is. I have already spoken about our irresistible inclination toward evil, but I want to expand on that just a bit in order for us to grasp something more of the nature of sin. If I may borrow from my children’s catechism, “Sin is acting, thinking, or believing contrary to the will and character of God.” The Westminster Shorter Catechism, question fourteen, says, “Sin is any want of conformity unto, or transgression of, the Law of God.” Very basically, what my catechetical answer and the Westminster Shorter Catechism answer are saying is that sin can only be understood with reference to God. This is why in a list of sins, in a list of behaviors worthy of death, homosexuality is placed alongside gossip and God-hating alongside disobedience to parents.1 The Bible says that those who practice things such as disobedience to parents are worthy of death. And why? Because such behavior is a violation of the Law of God. Failing to love God is to fail to conform oneself to the standard of God’s word, and hating God is a transgression of the standard of God’s word. Disobedience to one’s parents, therefore, is no different. Our kids are sinners, they are rebellious against God. And although this rebellion can manifest itself in something as apparently harmless as a rolling of the eyes, or as apparently egregious as pre-marital sex, there is no such thing as a harmless sin. Harmlessness and sinfulness are mutually exclusive. Sin is vile before God and he will punish all evildoers. So then, when we bring home that warm, cuddly, soft, and yummy-smelling little peanut from the hospital, we need to remember that just under the little cap and the blue or pink blanket is a wicked rebel against the God of the universe. And it is this wicked rebel that the Lord has called parents to bring up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord (Eph 6:4). Somehow we are to raise sinners in the discipline and instruction of the Lord who they by nature hate. Our task is a great one indeed. How, then, are we to begin to engage in such a high and holy calling? How are we to move our children from the position of those who hate the Lord to the position of those
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See Rom 1:24-32.

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who love him? Well, let me say in advance that it is not you or I as parents who have the power to create clean hearts where there is only filth. God is sovereign in his grace. Only the Lord can save anyone. Nevertheless, he brings people to saving faith though the instrumentality of his servants. In the case of children born to Christian parents, the instruments of his design are those very parents. So it is our responsibility to see to it that we engage in this impossible-but-possible-with-God task with the utmost seriousness—and with the right perspective. Sin Is an Issue of the Heart So the Lord has called us to bring up sinners in the discipline and instruction of the Lord. Where do we begin? Well, we begin by understanding something else about the nature of sin. Not only is it important that we understand that our kids are born sinners and that sin is something that can only be understood with reference to the will and character of God, but of even greater moment for the parenting task is to understand that sin is an issue of the heart. Turn with me in your Bibles to Mark 7:14-23:
After He called the crowd to Him again, He began saying to them, "Listen to Me, all of you, and understand: 15 there is nothing outside the man which can defile him if it goes into him; but the things which proceed out of the man are what defile the man. 16 "If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear." 17 When he had left the crowd and entered the house, His disciples questioned Him about the parable. 18 And He said to them, "Are you so lacking in understanding also? Do you not understand that whatever goes into the man from outside cannot defile him, 19 because it does not go into his heart, but into his stomach, and is eliminated?" (Thus He declared all foods clean.) 20 And He was saying, "That which proceeds out of the man, that is what defiles the man. 21 "For from within, out of the heart of men, proceed the evil thoughts, fornications, thefts, murders, adulteries, 22 deeds of coveting and wickedness, as well as deceit, sensuality, envy, slander, pride and foolishness. 23 "All these evil things proceed from within and defile the man."

The reason why things on the outside cannot defile a man is because things, such as food, cannot go into his heart. Food does not go into the man’s heart. Instead, it goes (v 19 says) into his stomach, and is eliminated. Now the original does not have the phrase and is eliminated; the original reads like this: “it goes into his stomach and into the toilet (latrine).” What a vivid description! Far from ending up in the heart; food ends up in the john (isn’t Jesus great!). The real latrine, then, the real toilet, the real place of uncleanness is the heart. Read vv 20-22: And He was saying, “That which proceeds out of the man, that is what defiles the man. For from within, out of the heart of men, proceed the evil thoughts, fornications, thefts, murders, adulteries, deeds of coveting and wickedness, as well as deceit, sensuality, envy, slander, pride and foolishness.” As with vv 18b-19a, Jesus repeats part of the parable and gets to the explanation: That which proceeds out of the man, that is what defiles the man. Jesus emphasizes that it is not what is on the outside that defiles a man with the repeated word that in the second

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phrase of v 20: that is what defiles the man. Not that external stuff, but that, the internal stuff—that is what makes a person unclean. Here is what he means. Look again at v 21: For from within, out of the heart of men, proceed the evil thoughts. All our evil machinations and our plans for evil that we have devised come from inside ourselves, not from outside. Calvin puts it this way: “[S]ince outward things are by nature pure, the use of them is free and pure, and uncleanness is not contracted from the good creatures of God. It is therefore a general statement, that pollution does not come from without into a man, but that the fountain is concealed within him.”2 Jesus is saying that only people can be unclean, not things. But it is not their physicality that renders them unclean; it is what goes on in their hearts that defiles them. This is what James means when he says in his letter that “each one is tempted when he is carried away and enticed by his own lust” (Jas 1:14). He places the source of temptation squarely on our shoulders. Now this should not be taken to mean that Satan plays no role in the temptation of the brethren. The Bible is clear enough on this point. But what it does mean is that even though Satan may be involved in the temptation, he does not “make us do it.” For James is saying that the reason we give in to temptation is because we want to. We are not tempted by God; we are tempted by our own evil hearts. As one commentator has said, “[E]ven the suggestions of the devil do not occasion danger, before they are made ‘our own.’”3 Satan would not tempt us with something that we would find unappealing. He would not tempt you to adultery with a man or woman you find completely resistible. He would not tempt you to gluttony with food you abhor. He uses the desires that are present in us to bring about our downfall. The reason why the thirty pieces of silver were appealing to Judas is because he was a lover of money. If deep down he had been somehow indifferent toward money, or better, loved the Lord more than money, the temptation would have had no power. For the power of temptation is found in each one of our hearts. James, you see, is simply reflecting the teaching of his brother, Jesus. So sin is not a substance; it cannot be confined to a physical thing. It cannot even be reduced to isolated acts of disobedience. Sin is a compulsive network of beliefs and behaviors that stem from a heart that is alienated from God. The enemy is within—the enemy is us. In William Golding’s book, Lord of the Flies, a plane full of British schoolboys crashes on a deserted island. While they are there, free from external authority and control, they degenerate into savages. Most of the time they are on the island, they are petrified by a “beastie thing” that they believe is haunting them, all the while unaware that the beast they are looking for is in their hearts. Simon, the Christ-figure of the novel, is the only one who

2 3

John Calvin, Harmony of the Gospels, Vol 2 (AGES Library), 188, italics added. J A Bengel, Gnomon of the New Testament, Vol. 5 (reprint; Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1860), 7.

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comes to understand the truth. His revelation is depicted by a conversation with the impaled head of a pig mounted on a spear that has been shoved into the earth:
“‘Fancy thinking the Beast was something you could hunt and kill!’ said the head. For a moment or two the forest and all the other dimly appreciated places echoed with the parody of laughter. ‘You knew, didn’t you? I’m part of you? Close, close, close! I’m the reason why it’s no go? Why things are what they are?’”4

So all these evil things, says Jesus in v 23, proceed from within and defile the man. Sin is an affair of the heart. Sexual immorality is an affair of the heart. Thefts are affairs of the heart. Murders are affairs of the heart. Adulteries are affairs of the heart. Coveting is an affair of the heart. Wickedness is an affair of the heart. Manipulation or deceit is an affair of the heart. Sensuality is an affair of the heart. Envy is an affair of the heart. Slander is an affair of the heart. Pride is an affair of the heart. Foolishness is an affair of the heart. All these evil things are affairs of the heart. What a black heart we have! Charles Spurgeon, reflecting on these vices says, “These are the bees: what must the hive be!”5 So sin is an issue of the heart. That means that all our kids’ behaviors are merely symptomatic of a greater malady. We need to remember this. It is all too easy for us parents to become inordinately focused on behavior, on getting our kids to behave a certain way. If we do this, we betray that we do not really understand the nature of sin. If we do not get to the heart issues that give birth to those sins, then although we may be able to force our children (especially when they’re young) to conform to some external standard of behavior, all we have done is cut off one of an almost literally limitless number of outlets for the heart attitude that gave birth to that particular behavior. In addition, too many parents think that sin is a communicable disease; something that their kids pick up at school from their friends. I remember having a conversation with a young woman who told me that at the beginning of the school year, her mother would always threaten to remove her from public school because her mother never saw attitudes over the summer like she saw after the kids returned from their first week of classes. What this mother failed to recognize was that although the other kids at school may have been more outwardly rebellious than her kids, all that the other kids were really doing was fanning into flame attitudes in her own children that had been lying dormant all summer long. We cannot, then, make our children’s behavior the ultimate issue; we must address our children at the level of their hearts. We need to remember that Prov 4:23 is true: “Watch over your heart with all diligence, For from it flow the springs of life.” We need to remember that the mouth speaks out of that which fills the heart (Matt 12:34). Understanding that all our behavior flows from the heart ought to inform all our goals and methods of parenting. If it does not, we will inevitably fall short of the biblical

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William Golding, Lord of the Flies (New York: Perigee Books, 1954), 143. C H Spurgeon, Commentary on Matthew (AGES Software), 245.

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ideal. Let me give you a couple examples of attempts by parents to deal with sinful habit patterns. Here is a very common one. Let’s say that your little boy loves his toys—I mean loves them. And you know that he clearly loves them too much because he is willing to sin to have them. He is willing to hit his brother and sister if they take one of his toys, even one with which he is not immediately occupied. When you go shopping at Target and pass the toy department, your refusal to visit the area is met with whining, complaining, or perhaps an all out tantrum. When you have told him playtime was over because it was time to eat, he has whined or complained, or even punched or kicked or otherwise flailed. This, of course, should give us all pause. When we see our kids loving their things like this, we are legitimately concerned. Regrettably, many parents would remedy this problem simply by removing the toys. Well, by now, I hope you are beginning to see that this does nothing more than to redirect his love of things to other things! You have not at all addressed his heart. His problem is not that he has these toys, or even that he likes them a lot. His problem is that his heart is desperately sick; his problem is that his heart is a latrine. His behavior is flowing from that cesspool of wickedness. Parents who understand this will employ different methods than simply clamping down on the boy’s behavior by removing his toys. They will help him to identify the heart attitudes that have given birth to his ungodly behaviors. And they will provide him with the wisdom and guidance, the discipline and instruction he needs in order to put to death such attitudes. Another example of parents failing to look to the heart of their child’s behavior comes from a discussion I once had with the father of a teenage girl. She was about sixteen and worked at a local retail food shop. He told me that he noticed that whenever his daughter worked with a particular young woman—she was around twenty—whenever his daughter worked with this twenty year-old, his daughter came home and copped an attitude with him and with his wife. I asked him what he decided to do in response. He told me that he told his daughter that if she ever came home with that attitude again that he would force her to quit her job. And that was the end of that. Again, do you see how this does not at all address the heart of the daughter? Keep in mind that this sixteen year-old was a professing Christian. Well, for my part, I suggested to him that instead, he should sit down with his daughter when the dust had settled and engage her something like this:
“Hey sweetheart, can we talk for a minute.” “Sure, Dad.”

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“Well, I wanted to tell you that I noticed that whenever you work with Mary, you come home and you become very disrespectful toward your mom and me. Do you realize that you are doing this?” “Yeah, I guess so.” “Well, this leads me to believe that there must be some rebellion in your heart, otherwise being with Mary wouldn’t affect you in this way at all. Is there something the matter? Are you angry with us? Is there anything on your mind?” “No, nothing’s the matter…it’s just that sometimes I feel jealous that Mary lives on her own and drives and has all these privileges, and I have to live here with you and mom and my sisters. It kinda bums me out. I guess I’ve been taking it out on you and Mom.” “Yeah, I understand. I remember wanting to be on my own when I was your age, too. And I remember being pretty impatient about it, too. Well, why don’t we pray about this together? Let’s pray that you would trust God with your circumstances, that he loves you and knows best by allowing you to be sixteen and not yet twenty.” “Thanks, Dad.” “I love you, sweetheart.” “I love you, too.”

You see, if this father would have understood the implications of behavior flowing from the heart, he would have more likely been able to unearth that his daughter’s disrespectful behavior was actually the result of envy toward her co-worker. She was not adopting her co-worker’s disrespect for her own parents. Simply to clamp down on the situation without getting to the heart of the matter would have left this young woman in the throes of envy, with no guidance or prayer from her parents. It would not have addressed the heart. It should be becoming clearer to you that this kind of parenting, parenting that addresses the heart, is much more complicated and requires much more wisdom than that which merely seeks to curtail certain undesirable behaviors in your children. It is fairly easy to get kids to behave the way we like, through biblical means or otherwise, but if all we accomplish is their conformity to some maintainable standard, all we have accomplished is cleaning the outside of the cup, while on the inside they are still full of dead men’s bones and all corruption. We need to keep in mind that the Bible has a label for people who conform to external standards while their hearts are far from God. Such people are called hypocrites. And if there’s one thing that is clear from God’s word, it is that hypocrisy is wicked. Earlier in Mark 7, Jesus rebukes the Pharisees for falling into this trap: “And He said to them, ‘Rightly did Isaiah prophesy of you hypocrites, as it is written: “This people honors me with their lips, but their heart is far away from me. But in vain do they worship me, teaching as doctrines the precepts of men”’” (Mark 7:6-7). Our job as parents is to cultivate the hearts of our children such that they can learn more and more to recognize the why of their behavior—the heart attitudes that give birth to them. If our interest lies solely in behavior, and especially if we succeed at bringing them into conformity with the rules of the house, we have failed to point them to the gospel; for

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the gospel is a message for people who recognize just how impossible it is to change their own hearts. When Jesus comes to us with power through the gospel, he removes stony hearts and replaces them with fleshy ones. If we communicate to our children that all there is to Christianity is the keeping of certain standards, of behaving by certain norms, then we will have totally undermined the gospel. Christianity is for people whose hearts are deceitful above all else and desperately sick. Christianity is for people with hearts of stone. It is for the spiritually dead. And it is a miracle that each of us needs to experience. If we are not faithful to show them the extent of their depravity, if we blunt the sinfulness of sin by reducing righteousness to mere externals, the result will be that we will have failed to bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord. Sin Is Idolatry of the Heart One final point on the nature of sin is absolutely crucial for our parenting. Turn with me in your Bibles to Rom 1:18-23:
For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men who suppress the truth in unrighteousness, 19 because that which is known about God is evident within them; for God made it evident to them. 20 For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes, His eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly seen, being understood through what has been made, so that they are without excuse. 21 For even though they knew God, they did not honor Him as God or give thanks, but they became futile in their speculations, and their foolish heart was darkened. 22 Professing to be wise, they became fools, 23 and exchanged the glory of the incorruptible God for an image in the form of corruptible man and of birds and four-footed animals and crawling creatures.

The most basic point of this remarkable passage is this: we are not neutral. To be born in sin is to be born idolaters. We are worshipping creatures. We either worship the true and living God or we worship idols. We exchange the glory of the incorruptible God for an image in the form of corruptible man and of birds and four-footed animals and crawling creatures. And our idolatry does not need to manifest itself in such wooden or metallic ways. For idolatry is the product of hearts that though they know the true and living God, the God of Scripture, they choose instead to ignore what God has made plain in creation and in themselves. This is why Ezekiel talks about idolatry of the heart. Turn with me to Ezek 14:1-8.
Then some elders of Israel came to me and sat down before me. 2 And the word of the LORD came to me, saying, 3 "Son of man, these men have set up their idols in their hearts and have put right before their faces the stumbling block of their iniquity. Should I be consulted by them at all? 4 "Therefore speak to them and tell them, 'Thus says the Lord GOD, "Any man of the house of Israel who sets up his idols in his heart, puts right before his face the stumbling block of his iniquity, and then comes to the prophet, I the LORD will be brought to give him an answer in the matter in view of the multitude of his idols, 5 in order to lay hold of the hearts of the

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house of Israel who are estranged from Me through all their idols."' 6 "Therefore say to the house of Israel, 'Thus says the Lord GOD, "Repent and turn away from your idols and turn your faces away from all your abominations. 7 "For anyone of the house of Israel or of the immigrants who stay in Israel who separates himself from Me, sets up his idols in his heart, puts right before his face the stumbling block of his iniquity, and then comes to the prophet to inquire of Me for himself, I the LORD will be brought to answer him in My own person. 8 "I will set My face against that man and make him a sign and a proverb, and I will cut him off from among My people. So you will know that I am the LORD.

I have said this from this pulpit before, but it is worth repeating: before any idol is ever and idol from the hearth, it is ever and always first an idol of the heart. We need to remember this when we engage in the task of bringing up our children in the discipline and instruction of the Lord. Our kids are worshippers; they are either worshipping God or they are worshipping idols. This is what it means for us to be sinners. We never lose the sense of God placed in us by the one who made us, but instead of paying homage to the one to whom it is rightly due, we pay it to gods of our own creation; we pay it to the gods of our heart. So when Junior loves his toys more than his siblings, his parents, and his God, his sinful behaviors need to be seen as an offering placed on the altar of materialism, or pleasure, or comfort. This being the case, the removal of the external manifestation of his idolatry (his hoarded toys), the removal of whatever he loves more than God will not help him to love God more. It will not bring him up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord. He will just cut down a tree, so to speak, and craft a new idol. He needs to see how his behavior is a form of idol-worship and he needs to be directed back to the true and living God. When your teenage daughter is disrespectful to you, her behavior needs to be seen as an offering placed on the altar of envy, or discontent, or self-centeredness. If all we do is get her to stop being disrespectful to us, we have made no real progress at directing her away from her idolatry and toward the worship of the King of kings. Our job, then, is to show our kids that their false worship is vile before the Lord and more than that, it is utterly vain. It can never bring the satisfaction that they are looking for. The Shorter Catechism rightly says that the chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy him forever. Everything that God has done has been for the manifestation of his own glory (I won’t take the time to survey the myriad texts that make this abundantly clear). This includes his creation of us. This is why 1 Cor 10:31 says, “Whether, then, you eat or drink or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.” Here is why we are on the planet—to enjoy and honor the God who placed us here. To live at all outside the reason for which we were created is to live out of synch, out of step with reality. Our kids need to see that God is so great, so majestic, and so worthy of our devotion, that offerings on any other altar to any other god are positively and utterly foolish. They are foolish because the can never satisfy, and they are foolish because they bring the wrath of God: they are vain and they are vile.

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Of course, this means that we as parents need to believe that God is our great reward. We need to believe what the psalmists have said—that a day in his courts is better than a thousand outside, that he is greater joy than when their grain and new wine abound, that in his right hand are pleasures forever more, that our souls can be satisfied with God as with the choicest of foods. We cannot ask our kids to taste of that which we have never imbibed. We need to drink deeply at the fountain who is the Risen Lord. And we need to see our children as idolaters whose idolatry leads them only to misery and the pain of hell forever. So we begin with this simple but profound statement: our kids are sinners. They are guilty before God, they have hearts that are alienated from God, and they worship false gods. May God give us the grace and the wisdom to employ the methods that will direct our kids away from their sin and toward the savior of sinners.

Redeemer Bible Church 16205 Highway 7 Minnetonka, MN 55345 Office: 952.935.2425 Fax: 952.938.8299 info@redeemerbiblechurch.com www.redeemerbiblechurch.com www.solidfood.net

The Christian Home, Lecture 15: The Heart of Parenting

© 2004 by R W Glenn

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