Prospectus

2014 - 2016

CONTACT US
Admissions Office
G/F APEC Communications Building
University of Asia and the Pacific
Pearl Drive, Ortigas Center
Pasig City, Philippines 1605
Telephone: (+632) 637-0912 to 26 loc. 310 or 321
Fax: (+632) 634-2809
admissions@uap.asia
www.uap.asia

Contact Us

USE OF THIS PROSPECTUS

Trunk Line

The contents of this Prospectus have been compiled and
organized to provide enrolled and prospective students
and others with an overview of the programs and policies
of the University of Asia and the Pacific. It presents in general the manner in which the University intends to proceed
regarding the matters covered, but the University reserves
the right to make changes without prior notice. This Prospectus is not intended to be and should not be regarded
as a contract between the University and any student or
other person.

Local numbers
Cashier

637-0912
631-2181; 338; 634-2832 (telefax)

Center for Research and Communication
Center for Social Responsibility

350
302; 360

Chaplain

227

College of Arts and Sciences

277; 278

Corporate Communications Office

301 (Publications);
342 (Marketing)

Don Emilio Ejercito Library

292

Don Eugenio Lopez, Sr. Library

291

Guidance Desk
Office of Alumni Affairs

365; 300
397; 635-3141 (direct fax)

Registrar’s Office

226; 322 (telefax)

Safety and Security Section

315

School of Communication

232

School of Economics

362; 637-8549 (telefax)

School of Education and Human Development 271; 220
School of Law and Governance

368; 323

School of Management

243; 244

School of Sciences and Engineering

316; 354

Mailing address
University of Asia and the Pacific
P.O. Box 13673, Ortigas Center Post Office
Pasig City 1605, Metro Manila, Philippines
Street address
University of Asia and the Pacific
Pearl Drive, Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1605
Metro Manila, Philippines
Web address
http://uap.asia

Contents
Prologue

2

About UA&P

3

Why Go to UA&P

7

The Student Life

9

Services and Facilities

15

The Academic Life

21

The Schools
College of Arts and Sciences

36

School of Communication

52

School of Economics

64

School of Education and Human Development

74

School of Law and Governance

90

School of Management

102

School of Sciences and Engineering

126

Frequently Asked Questions

144

How to Get to UA&P

148

Welcome!
This is the Undergraduate and Graduate Prospectus of the
University of Asia and the Pacific.
We are pleased to know that you are exploring the possibility
of studying in our University. We invite you to take your time
and go over this prospectus to familiarize yourself with what
UA&P believes, lives, and celebrates. In the following pages,
we have made it our cause to help you bring to consideration
the rare opportunity of spending the next four or five years of
your life in a university that fully develops everything that is
human in the individual.
Our University focuses on developing the whole person,
as well as combines breadth of learning and professional
specialization, in its educational programs. Our students go
through a strong liberal education program in their first two
or three years in the University. Thereafter, they begin to take
subjects in their chosen field of specialization. If they choose
a five-year program and meet all its academic requirements,
they may graduate with a master’s degree in five years.
As they take up these various areas of knowledge, the students are trained to look at ideas with a critical eye, an analytical mind, and ethical judgment, and to understand issues
from differing points of view. As the subjects are taught using a multidisciplinary approach, the students learn to make
connections across disciplines and see the big picture while
understanding the complexity of each part. The liberal arts
program also trains students to communicate ideas clearly,
precisely, and persuasively in speech and in writing.
The first three years’ offerings blend perfectly with the last
two years of professional skills training. The liberal arts add
grace and bearing to professional knowhow. The professional training continues using the multidisciplinary approach,
which requires students to relate their specialization to the
other sciences—a definite advantage in the professional
world.
With our brand of whole-person education amid the working
climate where adaptability is key, our graduates stand firm,
knowing that every facet of their being can be fully utilized to
catch up to the speed of life.
You can be one of these graduates. Blaze a trail with us.

2

University of Asia and the Pacific

About UA&P
Our name comes from the region that brought forth the dawn of a
new civilization and changed mankind forever. At 46 years, we are
young. Nevertheless, we write down our history with a burning
desire for excellence and integral human development.

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3

OUR HISTORY
The University of Asia and the Pacific is a
private, not-for-profit institution of higher
learning. We trace our beginnings to the
Center for Research and Communication
(CRC), which was established more than 40
years ago as a private think-tank conducting
research and offering graduate courses in
economics and management. We gradually
expanded our educational activities to other
fields and in 1995 were granted university
status by the Commission on Higher Education. Since then, we have become known as
the University of Asia and the Pacific.
Located in Ortigas Center, Pasig City, Metro
Manila, we have a population of 2,050 undergraduate and graduate students. There are
144 full-time faculty members, 125 part-time
faculty members, and 190 administrative
staff. To date, we have produced more than
7, 285 alumni, including those who graduated from the Center for Research and Communication.

OUR SCHOOLS
The University has long-term plans for a
multi-campus system offering various fields
of specialization and emphasizing professional competence founded on a strong liberal arts education. At present, we have one
college and six schools that offer academic
degrees:
College of Arts and Sciences (CAS)
School of Communication (SCM)
School of Economics (SEC)
School of Education and Human Development (SED)
School of Law and Governance (SLG)
School of Management (SMN)
School of Sciences and Engineering (SSE)

OUR BRAND OF EDUCATION
Founded on the liberal arts and humanities,
our academic programs push forward and
break boundaries while carrying on from the
traditions of learning. This distinctive approach to learning has made UA&P all that
it is today and in such a short time. Small,
young, and dynamic, the University has
already grown into its own as one of the top
schools in the country. Imagine where we
will be tomorrow.

4

University of Asia and the Pacific

OUR GRADUATES
Employers attest that UA&P graduates distinguish themselves in the workplace as much
by their work ethic and discipline as by their
ability to learn quickly, handle a wide range
of tasks, and communicate and interact well
with people inside and outside the organization. They come across as fresh, young
talents who combine breadth of learning,
professional skills and commitment, ethical
practice, and humanity.
At UA&P, meeting the need of employers for
knowledge workers is not our sole concern.
Our students are educated as professionals,
as citizens, and above all, as whole persons.

OUR HALLMARKS
In our institutional programs and activities, we
put due emphasis on the individual, the family, the community, and the world. Each unit
of the University thus strives to be a center of
excellence, particularly in three areas: values
formation, people development, and research
and communication. These are the hallmark
programs of UA&P as an educational institution.

Center for Social Responsibility (CSR), for
the people development hallmark

Center for Research and Communication
(CRC), for the research and communication hallmark

OUR MOTTO
The University seeks above all, unity of faith
and reason and unity of religion and life.
It reflects the commitment of everyone in
UA&P toward the pursuit of wisdom and
unity of life. This commitment is summed up
in one word: Unitas.

OUR UNIVERSITY CREDO
We believe

that education is a lifelong process, and
its focal point is and should always be
the individual person;

that the primary purpose of education
is the integral formation of the human
person, the fullest development of everything that is human in the individual;

that it is an essential part of the mission
of a school to help and complement the
family in the exercise of its educational
rights and duties;

that a university must be ever attentive and responsive to the real needs of
the community that sustains it, seek to
significantly contribute to human progress, and do everything it can to uplift the
moral, cultural, and material level of the
country and the region in which it operates; and

that a university fulfills its role best when
it forms individuals who are competent,
creative and enterprising, zealous for the
common good, and capable of making
free and morally upright choices, and
who can thus act as positive agents of
change in service of society.

• Values Education
We are committed to the inculcation of Christian human values and attitudes, and our
academic programs always include courses
in social and professional ethics.
• People Development
The University works with development
programs that help people to help themselves through values formation, general
and technical education, health and nutrition,
environmental quality, and cooperation.
• Research and Communication
As an academic community, we undertake
high-level interdisciplinary research for the
good of society and communicate the results
of such research through various media and
to varied audiences.
Three centers are mandated to promote
these hallmarks:

Center for Student Affairs (CSA), for the
values formation hallmark

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We, who form part of the University of Asia
and the Pacific, therefore, dedicate and commit ourselves to

the highest standards of professional excellence in our academic, scientific, and
cultural endeavors;

5

the inculcation of sound and time-tested
human and social values and attitudes
in people, beginning with those we work
and live with and reaching out especially
to those in most need of help in society;
the creation within the University of an
atmosphere of academic serenity conducive not only to disciplined and diligent
study, high-level research, and the responsible use of the freedom of scientific inquiry, but also to mutual respect,
openness, understanding, and friendship,
without discrimination of any kind; and
above all, the arduous but most spiritually rewarding pursuit of wisdom, the
synthesis of love of God and knowledge,
faith and reason, culture and life.

earn for the University a place among the
most prestigious academic institutions in
the Asia-Pacific region;

adopt advanced research and teaching
techniques so as to become a source of
innovative forms of learning, as well as
contribute to a better balance between
the cost and quality of research, communication, and education;

adapt its teaching programs, founded
upon basic research and the study of humanities, to the actual needs of a society
undergoing progressive change and of
a wide region promoting international
cooperation;

seek, while working closely with other
Philippine institutions, wider regional and
international recognition so that it can
be present in intellectual fora and policy
dialogues;

strengthen and broaden the avenues
of cooperation so that it can effectively
contribute to the spread of proper values
and people development and obtain from
various sectors of society the necessary
support to carry out its extensive work;

organize itself in a manner conducive to
internal efficiency and effective coordination, while keeping enough flexibility,
so as to enable all members of the University community to contribute freely
and responsibly to the fulfillment of their
common tasks; and

strive to attain, as a necessary condition
for its autonomous development, a level
of economic self-sufficiency that will
allow the University to firmly establish
itself as a center of academic excellence,
to initiate new projects, and to admit
well-qualified students from the underprivileged sectors of society.

OUR MISSION STATEMENT
The University of Asia and the Pacific (UA&P)
is an academic community where the pursuit
and spread of truth are undertaken according
to the highest intellectual and professional
standards. It shall always remain faithful to
these foundation aims:

to pursue, through world-class research,
an interdisciplinary synthesis of humanistic, professional, scientific, and technical
knowledge, inspired by a Christian view
of man and sense of life;
to promote, in an atmosphere of freedom, the integral development of all the
members of the University community
so that they may work with good will,
competence, and team spirit;

to form committed professionals and encourage them to serve with personal initiative and civic responsibility the community
in which they work, thereby helping build
just and harmonious social structures; and

to create and spread a culture that
strengthens the dignity of the human person and the unity of the family, and that
promotes understanding and cooperation
among persons of all races, beliefs, and
social conditions.

To achieve these aims, the University of Asia
and the Pacific shall

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seek to reach a level of excellence in its
research and teaching programs that will
University of Asia and the Pacific

Why Go to UA&P?
We have a burning desire for excellence.
Just like you, we are young, headstrong, and
passionate about our dreams. And we want
the best. We want to change the world. And
we want people with that same kind of fire raging in their eyes. To cherish it. To kindle it. To
set aflame the paths that others may follow. To
shed the light that others may take comfort in.
We are an effervescent glimmer in time about
to shine forth through the ages. And we want
YOU there, blazing that trail with us.

We aspire for the higher good.
Our programs seek to turn students not only
into good professionals, but also into good
citizens backed with a strong Catholic identity and spiritual formation. In this regard,
we rely on Opus Dei, a personal prelature of
the Catholic Church, to orient the students,
as well as the faculty and staff, to a life that
reflects Christian beliefs and values, and
ensures the doctrinal and moral soundness
of other aspects of formation imparted in the
University.

We foster the whole-person formation of
students.
In the Asia-Pacific region, UA&P is singular
in using a mentoring system in which oneon-one sessions between mentor and student aim to bring the integration of knowledge, skills, and values down to the personal
level. This mentoring program nourishes the
individual development and reinforces the
whole-person formation students receive
from the liberal education and the graduate
schools. It provides students with the opportunity to avail themselves of personal advising and assistance in different areas and at
various stages of their personal, professional, and social life in the University.

We believe that education is for everyone.
We have one of the most robust scholarship
programs in the country—one that allows us
to nurture young minds in an environment
that allows them to reach their fullest potential. UA&P’s scholars—both merit scholars
and financial aid recipients—come from the
most diverse backgrounds and have the most
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varied looks and personalities.
We call them “Stellar Scholars”—an allusion to the star on
our coat of arms that guides
the galleon to its port. They are
leaders and luminaries (though
apparently ordinary) who give
their peers examples on how to
strike a balance between fun and
study, make them compatible,
and excel in both.

We have excellent educational
resources.
The campus atmosphere that
UA&P provides for its students
exercises a decisive influence
that extends beyond lectures,
classes, or the laboratory. In our
commitment to give our students a quality education, we
rely on our excellent educational
resources. We also turn, in addition, to several non-academic
venues in which the development of values, character, creativity, and leadership skills
is given adequate attention.
These venues provide students
with their basic needs, as well
as ample opportunities for
outside-the-classroom development in the virtues associated
with the perfection of the human person through work and
relations with others.

We put emphasis where emphasis is due.
UA&P puts due emphasis on
the person, the family, the
nation, and the Asia-Pacific
region. We provide a powerful
combination of liberal education and professional specialization. We breed leaders who go
on to excel in their fields, reach
out to their communities, and
inspire others with their valuebased outlook and openness to
life. In UA&P, we always strive
to be responsive to the needs
of the community we belong
to and at large, whether these
needs be immediate or lasting.

8

University of Asia and the Pacific

The Student Life
Every student who has gone through a fruitful university experience knows that a student’s life extends beyond the academic
course of studies. Here in UA&P, we want you to take advantage of
the many opportunities to develop friendships, discover what you
are good at, strengthen your character, acquire the right personal
and social values, and hone your leadership skills. Many of these
you do not learn sitting down and taking notes.

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9

STUDENT MENTORING PROGRAM
An intrinsic part of the University’s liberal
education is the Student Mentoring
Program, through which UA&P’s
interdisciplinary offering of knowledge,
skills, and values is reinforced on a oneto-one personal level. This program is
one of the many signs of the University’s
commitment to the integral development of
its students.
The Student Mentoring Program provides
students with the opportunity to avail
themselves of personal advising and
assistance in different areas and at various
stages of student life. Mentoring enables
the student to reflect upon, assess, evaluate,
and integrate his or her learning skills
and experiences—under the guidance
of a mentor—in a way that benefits the
student’s acquisition and strengthening of
intellectual skills and moral criteria. The
mentoring program is aimed toward the
holistic formation of the student’s personal,
professional, and social life.
This system of personal formation
essentially revolves around the mentoring
sessions, which are regular, confidential
conversations between the student and his
or her mentor about student life. In principle,
the sessions occur for 30 minutes once or
twice a month. However, if circumstances
permit, the mentor can meet his or her
mentees as often as needed.
The mentoring program is gender specific:
female students are assigned female
mentors; male students, male mentors.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES
There is a diverse selection of activities,
development programs, and volunteer
projects in store for students who wish to
optimize their college experience.
Civics

Our graduates begin young as proactive
students who realize that citizenship is not
just a label or a title, but a way of living.
This perspective is reinforced by university
education that helps students understand
the notion and obligations of citizenship and
the principles behind political and social
participation. This means exposing students

10

to its actual exercise in the communities
where they find themselves.
The Civics Desk of UA&P’s Center for Student
Affairs (CSA) promotes awareness of sociopolitical issues and concerns, responsible
citizenship, and leadership empowerment.
Its annual CivAsia Conference Series serves
as a venue for reasoned conversation on
socio-political concerns. In this arena,
student leaders from all around the
Philippines and even neighboring countries
discuss the diverse angles of immediate
social issues. These conferences continue
to establish a network among University
student leaders and more importantly,
provide opportunities for the youth to
participate in the exercise of nation-building.
Civics Desk’s BIGGKAS (Basa, Isip, Gawa,
Galing, Katesismo, Arte, Sports) exposes
students and other members of the
university to social issues and solutions,
furthering their sense of active and
responsible citizenship. In 2010, students
involved in BIGGKAS introduced a “farm
in the city” concept of developing new
hydroponic farming technology to the
adopted community of the University, Brgy.
San Joaquin in Pasig City. The produce from
this urban garden could be used to start
a feeding program for the malnourished
children of the community and catalyze new
business ventures for the local women in
bottling new items for direct selling.
UA&P H.O.P.E.S. is a disaster relief operation
started by the Student Executive Board (now
University Student Government) during
Typhoon Ondoy (known as Ketsana) in 2009.
Until today, HOPES is reinstated whenever
needs arise, turning the University into a
major relief center.
Through its Unitas Leadership Education
Program (UN/LEAD/ED), the Civics Desk
contributes to the development of current
and emerging student leaders. Moreover,
it oversees the formation of the student
government and student organizations
(particularly the civic and professional orgs)
by providing assistance, support, and advice
necessary to the efficiency and organization
of these student groups.
The University Student Government (USG)
is the highest elective office of the student
University of Asia and the Pacific

body. It consists of students who ought
to serve the student body by promoting
the common good in the principle of
subsidiarity. The student-representative
body organizes and oversees official student
activities in promoting student involvement
and empowerment. Apart from representing
the student body’s interests before school
authorities, those in the USG must think
broadly, i.e., “to think University” and not
just to advocate a narrow perspective.
The recognized civics-oriented student
organizations in UA&P are AIESEC, Catalyst,
ER+GO, Fú, and Sabio.
AIESEC-UA&P is part of the world’s largest
youth-run organization. Focused on
providing a platform for youth leadership
development, AIESEC offers young people
the opportunity to be global citizens, to
change the world, and to get experience and
skills that matter today.
Catalyst is the UA&P students’ outreach,
advocacy, and leadership organization. It
aims to provide opportunities to participate
in meaningful service projects that uplift the
economic, moral, and intellectual status of
individuals, communities, and sectors of
Philippine society most in need.
ER+GO is an environmental organization
initiated by UA&P students. It aims to
educate and encourage the youth to
care for our environment, and to provide
opportunities for people to actively
participate and create solutions for the
benefit of the environment.
Fú is a Filipino-Chinese organization. It is
affiliated with the Alliance of Filipino-Chinese
Students (AFICS), an umbrella organization
that aspires to be the voice of the
contemporary Filipino-Chinese youth, and
gears itself toward socio-cultural awareness
and understanding.
Sabio is the official organization of UA&P
scholars. Its members aspire to live the
ideals of academic excellence, friendship,
and personal and social responsibility. Sabio,
in Spanish, means “wise” or “learned.” This
term describes what the University’s scholars
must be, that is, to be students who strive
to achieve academically and to become an
active part of the University by helping other
students and prospective scholars in their
human, cultural, and professional formation.
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11

Arts
A liberal arts institution with numerous stage productions,
concerts, workshops and art exhibits, UA&P is home
to young talents, award-winning artists, and respected
scholars that have come to represent the region
internationally.
The University’s arts and culture scene is made constantly
alive by the various theater and arts student organizations
led by the Center for Student Affairs’ Kultura Desk and
the academic departments of the College of Arts and
Sciences.
The Kultura Desk of CSA aims to be both a home for the
community’s creative talents as well as a coordinating
body for cultural and artistic events within the University.
Every year, with the cooperation of student volunteers,
it produces a varied arts season for the benefit of the
University community. Kultura also provides guidance to
student organizations that focus on the arts, and oversees
the activities of the UA&P Chorale, the University’s
resident choral ensemble.
Recognized arts-oriented student organizations in UA&P
are Dulaang Rock Opera Company (Dulaang ROC), I-SA
Dance Organization, ViARE, and Reverb.
Established in 1989, Dulaang Rock Opera Company
(originally named Rock Opera Company) is the pioneering
student theater organization of UA&P. It aims to promote
Filipino culture, language, and literature by staging the
works of established and emerging Filipino playwrights.
I-SA Dance Organization provides a home for dancers and
dance enthusiasts to create, showcase, and appreciate
dance, not just as a sport, but as an art.
Founded in 1993, ViARE continues its tradition of
propagating arts appreciation through theater. ViARE aims
to provide a suitable outlet for the members’ respective
talents within the parameters of the theater experience.
Reverb is an organization for all the musicians and music
enthusiasts of UA&P.
The departments under the College of Arts and Sciences
help promote culture and appreciation for the arts and the
written word through their activities and programs.
The Department of Arts invites known artists, musicians,
designers, and performers the world over to give talks
and workshops on their crafts. Besides partnering with
galleries, museums, individual artists, and groups, the
department also independently hosts film festivals,
exhibits, tours, and concerts. It also establishes the
foundation for a refined and critical appreciation of beauty.

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University of Asia and the Pacific

The Department of English, true to its role of nurturing an
understanding of the unity and diversity in the world, organizes
interdisciplinary activities featuring talks by personalities from the
fields of arts, business, social work, the sciences, and politics. It holds
the annual English Week in July.
The Buwan ng Wika (Month of Language) activities in August are
headed by the Department of Filipino, whose task is to nurture
students’ communication skills in the country’s native language.
Among the month’s activities are the Sabayang Pagbigkas (choral
recitation) competition between high schools all over the country,
Filipino parlor games, talks by prominent artists, and performances.
The Department of Literature, with its goal of enabling students
to enjoy the richness and diversity of written works, hosts
the Shakespeare Week in February, which celebrates the genius of
the Bard through poetry, monologue, and a theatrical performance.
Sports
UA&P’s Varsity Sports Program (VSP) is made up of teams composed
of student-athletes who represent UA&P in external events and
tournaments. The teams include men’s and women’s basketball,
men’s and women’s futsal, men’s and women’s volleyball, men’s and
women’s table tennis, Squadra (dance group), and the Firestarters
(cheerleading squad).
UA&P is a member of the Men’s and Women’s National Collegiate
Athletic Associations (MNCAA and WNCAA).
The UA&P Futsal Dragons is one of the first Philippine varsities to
promote and play futsal competitively.

STUDENT TRADITIONS
To blaze trails is to start new traditions, but long-standing traditions
are fuel to such fire, so to speak.
Though a young university, UA&P has beloved customs many of
which are held annually and eagerly awaited by students, staff, and
alumni alike.
Institutional events, such as the Incorporation, Equatorials, and
Graduation Rites, and liturgical activities like the Eucharistic
Processions, are also among the formal programs carried out for
UA&P’s student body.
Incorporation Rites
The first academic rite a UA&P freshman undergoes is the Incorporation
Rites. An annual tradition held on or close to the University Foundation
Day, August 15, this is a short ceremony in which the freshmen are
formally welcomed to the University. At this celebration, freshmen
receive an academic sash or beca, as it is called in Spain. It bears the
color white (representing the College of Arts and Sciences) and the
College seal. The celebration marks the students’ formal “incorporation”
or admission as freshmen into the University, signifying their
membership in the UA&P community. Students are asked to wear their
beca during very special occasions and institutional events.
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Equatorials
The Equatorial Rites are an official academic
function for students who have completed
their first two years at the University. The
underlying concept of the celebration is
derived from the tradition in some European
universities of officially recognizing those
students who have successfully completed
half of their course of studies. In Spain, this
academic act of recognition is called Paso del
Ecuador; this is translated as the “crossing of
the equator.” This tradition was first adopted
by CAS in 1990 and is the most significant
academic function after the first two years.
At this celebration, students receive a beca,
a traditional academic garb originating from
Europe, bearing the color of the respective
School that houses their chosen program
of study, and the University seal. The colors
of the schools are crimson for the School
of Communication, violet for the School
of Law and Governance, yellow for the
School of Sciences and Engineering, drab
for the School of Management, light blue
for the School of Education and Human
Development, and copper for the School of
Economics. Aside from the imposition of
the becas, special awards are also given to
students who have distinguished themselves
during their first two years in the University.
Graduation Rites
Around 300 students graduate from the
University annually, each with either a
bachelor’s or master’s degree. A salutation
by an exemplary student usually opens
the graduation ceremonies after a solemn
rendition of the Philippine National Anthem
by the Chorale and an Invocation by a
resident priest, normally the University
Chaplain. An individual of good repute and
well-entrenched in his or her field is invited
to deliver the Commencement Address. The
presentation of academic awards and the
much-awaited valediction follow the keynote
speech. After the conferral of degrees by
the University President, the Chorale sings
the Acclamation in Latin and the Alumni
Association incorporates a distinguished
member.

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University of Asia and the Pacific

Services and Facilities
There are elements in the university life that do not figure in lesson plans or co-curricular planning but play an important role
in the education of students as they go around the campus and
interrelate with people: the general university ambience, material
order, building and equipment maintenance, cordiality of teachers
and staff, and optimum security, among others. In UA&P, we make
it our responsibility to care for these details in order to create a
wholesome environment for teaching and learning.

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GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING
The Mentoring and Guidance Desks of the Center for Student Affairs is one link in the chain of
services directed toward the integral formation of UA&P students. As students grow into the
University, their concerns and expectations change when they encounter personal difficulties
in academics, environment, adjustment to college life, and interpersonal relationships. The
Guidance Desk helps students find healthy ways to address these issues through its comprehensive services and development programs.
The guidance counselors are available for personal or group counseling sessions. Because the
University knows that each individual is unique, each counseling session is conducted in a relaxed
and friendly atmosphere, with the utmost respect for confidentiality and privacy.
The Guidance Desk also offers other programs and seminars that explore and develop the
potential of the students.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
To help students finance their undergraduate education, the University of Asia and the Pacific
offers merit scholarships and financial assistance on the basis of the results of their entrance
exam, their high school academic performance, and financial status.
Merit Scholarships
Merit scholarships are highly competitive study grants that may cover up to 100% of tuition
fees. In addition, the top applicants of each batch may also be awarded a stipend, book allowance, and board and lodging allowance (for provincial applicants).
Who qualifies?

Grant

Valedictorians of select high schools

100% tuion fee grant

Applicants whose high school average is at
least 90% and are highly qualified based on
their College Entrance Exam Results

Grant depends on overall rank
and the scholarship slots available

The scholarship may continue up to the graduate level of the University’s five-year programs
or to the MA or MS program of a corresponding AB or BS program. To keep the scholarship,
the student must comply with the provision set forth in the Student Handbook.
Financial Assistance
The University also gives financial assistance to Filipino students who meet certain criteria. The
grant covers up to 100% of tuition fees. It is renewable every year and is premised on continued
financial need. It may continue up to the graduate level of any of the five-year programs.
To qualify for financial aid, an applicant must meet the following minimum conditions:
1. Financial need, as attested to by the family’s finances;
2. Academic competence: a high school average of at least 85%; and
3. Positive interview evaluation.
In addition, the student must comply with all other requirements set forth in the Financial Assistance Agreement.
If the student fails to fulfill any of the conditions, he or she forfeits any financial assistance
grant from the University. However, the student may apply for renewal up to a second time at
the beginning of the school year if either the need is re-established or the requirements are
met.

16

University of Asia and the Pacific

Student Assistantship
Financial assistance grantees must render
some hours of student assistantship in a unit
of the University to which they are assigned
for one school year. The number of hours to
be rendered depends on the percentage of
the grant awarded to the student.
Student assistantship work shall be administered by the Center for Student Affairs –
Student Services Desk in coordination with
the other units of the University (for 1st- to
3rd-year students), and by the respective
schools of the grantees (for 4th- and 5th-year
students). The relevant unit of the University shall give a report on each grantee’s
performance to the Scholarship Committee
at the end of each school year. The level of
financial assistance the student is given may
be modified on the basis of his or her performance as a student assistant.

CHAPLAINCY SERVICES
Part of a person’s integral formation is provided by formative activities that promote a
deeper understanding of religious doctrine
and growth in spiritual life. Students are
encouraged to take advantage of these opportunities for spiritual direction.
Appointments are made directly with the chaplains. The UA&P chaplains hold office in (a) the
Sancta Maria Stella Orientis Oratory located
at the Development Communications Building
(DCB) and (b) beside the chapel of the Administration and Library Building (ALB).
Eucharistic Celebrations and Confessions
Holy Mass is celebrated at the Stella Orientis Oratory at 7:45 a.m. and 12:05 p.m. on
weekdays, and at 12:05 p.m. on Saturdays.
On Fridays, the 12:05 p.m. Mass is celebrated
in Latin. A Eucharistic Vigil of the Blessed
Sacrament is also held every Friday after the
12:05 p.m. Mass. The Stella Orientis Oratory
is also open for confessions from 8:30 a.m.
to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays, and from 9:30 a.m.
to 7:30 p.m. on Saturdays. Students may also
visit the ALB Oratory anytime.
Liturgical Traditions
Students are also invited to participate in the
liturgical traditions that have become a part
of University life, such as the following:

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

17


Mass of the Holy Spirit (held on the first
day of classes of the first semester)
Eucharistic Procession (usually held on
the Thursday before the Feast of Christ the
King)
Simbang Gabi (nine days of dawn masses
celebrated from December 16 to 24 in
preparation for Christmas)
Foundation Day Masses (thanksgiving
masses celebrated on the foundation day
of each school in the University)
Baccalaureate Mass (thanksgiving mass
celebrated the day before University
Graduation)

http://facebook.com/uap.asia

UA&P publications

Student Handbook

Universitas

UA&P online content channels
http://issuu.com/cco.uap (online copies of UA&P publications)

Other Chaplaincy Services
The Chaplaincy also organizes special activities such as recollections, retreats, seminars,
and other liturgical services. The schedule of
official retreats for male and female students may be obtained from announcements
posted on the bulletin boards around the
campus. Initiatives that pertain to the liturgy
(e.g., adoration of the Blessed Sacrament,
processions, public recitation of the rosary,
and prayer meetings) are welcome. Nevertheless, for the sake of order and liturgical
appropriateness, one of the Chaplains should
be consulted before holding these activities.

STUDENT COMMUNICATIONS
The proper and timely articulation of University policies, procedures, announcements, and
other news is crucial in making student life
more fruitful. The Corporate Communications
Office (CCO), the Center for Student Affairs
(CSA), and other units of the University provide regular communications to ensure that
students are informed, updated, or reminded
about existing, recently approved, or revised
policies and procedures, as well as other
relevant news. Effective communication is
achieved by the dissemination of information
via the following channels:

Bulletin boards (Study Hall A, CAS Ledge, etc.)

UA&P official email
Official announcements are sent through
the WebCampus (uap.asia) email accounts. Students are advised to check their
email regularly to avoid missing important
updates.

18

UA&P website
http://uap.asia

UA&P official social media accounts
http://twitter.com/uapasia

http://youtube.com/UAPchannel

Personal delivery (when necessary)

UA&P WebCampus
The UA&P WebCampus (http://webcampus.
uap.asia) is the University’s official online
communication and collaboration platform
powered by Google technologies. It integrates email, instant messaging, calendarsharing, group and document collaboration,
website creation, and other utilities for the
students, faculty, staff, and alumni of UA&P.
All incoming students automatically get a
WebCampus account by virtue of their enrollment in UA&P.
Other Online Services

Enlistment portal
http://enlistment.uap.asia

Class schedules and grades online
http://www.uap.asia/online-services/
grades-online/

Athena (public online library search engine)
http://unitas.uap.asia/athcgi/athweb.pl

MEDICAL SERVICES
First-aid Clinic
A registered nurse at the University’s first-aid
clinic attends to minor ailments or emergencies. A medical doctor is available for consultation on selected days. Serious cases are
taken to The Medical City Hospital located
along Ortigas Avenue.
Annual Physical, Medical, and Dental Examination
(APE)
The University, through the Student Services
Desk of the Center for Student Affairs, impleUniversity of Asia and the Pacific

ments the annual physical, medical, and dental examination as required by the Code on Sanitation of the
Philippines (PD No. 856).
All students enrolled under the four-year and five-year
programs are required to undergo and complete the
APE. Only the following students are exempted from
taking the APE:

Students who are enrolled in ABEP, SBEP, or other
graduate-only programs.

Students who have undergone an annual physical
exam between January 1 to May 31 of the same year,
provided that the said exam covered the six basic
areas of the standard APE (physical exam, chest x-ray,
urinalysis, fecalysis, CBC, and dental check-up). The
results must be submitted to and are subject to validation by the University’s resident physician.

Accident Insurance
Currently enrolled students are covered under an accident insurance policy. They may file an insurance claim
for accidents that result in bodily injuries, whether the
accident occurred inside or outside the campus. Claims
are processed on a reimbursement basis, and within
the limits of the policy coverage.

HOUSING REFERRALS
A database of appropriate housing facilities within the
vicinity of the University is available for students, especially those from the provinces and foreign countries.
All listed housing facilities are gender specific.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ASSISTANCE
The Student Services Desk of the Center for Student
Affairs can provide information on and facilitate the acquisition of Philippine student visas and special study
permits for international students.

PLACEMENT SERVICES
Placement services bridge the graduating students to
the workplace by referring possible employment opportunities, implementing corporate servicing projects,
holding career talks, and organizing the annual UA&P
Job Fair. Inquiries may be directed to the CSA – Student Services Desk located at the 4th landing of the
APEC Communications Building.
The UA&P Office of Alumni Affairs (OAA) also offers
placement services via its Alumni Employment Partners (AEPs) and the UA&P Job Board (http://jobs.uap.
asia).

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

19

LIBRARY SERVICES

DINING FACILITIES AND EATING AREAS

The University houses two libraries:

The dining concessionaires serve meals from
Monday to Saturday. The cafeteria and food
court are open from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
from Monday to Friday and from 7:00 a.m. to
2:00 p.m. on Saturdays.

Don Eugenio Lopez, Sr. Library (DELL)
CAS Building, Ground Floor
DELL contains the humanities collection,
books, and periodicals intended for the
use of undergraduate students.

Don Emilio Ejercito Library (DEEL)
Administration and Library Building
(ALB), 3rd Floor
DEEL houses the major portion of the
UA&P library collection, Multimedia
Section, Technical Services Division,
Acquisition Section, and the Office of
the University Librarian. The collections
in this library are primarily for graduate
students and faculty.

Online Library Services
Students may visit the UA&P Library’s website at http://library.uap.asia. They may also
access the following online databases:

Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC): Athena
Accessible online: http://unitas.uap.asia/
athcgi/athweb.pl

EBSCO Online Database
Accessible only within the UA&P Local
Area Network (LAN)

Gale Virtual Reference Library
Accessible only within the UA&P Local
Area Network (LAN)

STUDY HALLS
The two open areas at the ground floor of
the APEC Communications Building (ACB)
are designated as Study Halls A and B. Study
Hall A is reserved exclusively for study purposes. The only events that can be held there
are official university-wide activities such as
registration, orientation, and student-government elections. Study Hall B, while primarily a study area, can also be used for other
school activities during study periods (i.e.,
regular class hours). These activities include
orientations, registrations, job fairs, exhibits, and catered dining for official university
activities.

20

LOCKERS
Student lockers are available on a first-come,
first-served basis at various locations around
the campus.

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
The University Bookstore is located at the
DCB Ground Floor near the stairs of the Stella
Orientis Oratory.

PARKING FACILITIES
The Parking and Sports Building of the University houses three floors of parking facility
for varying vehicle sizes, while the fourth
floor serves as a hub for sports enthusiasts.

MULTI-PURPOSE COURT
The Multi-Purpose Court (MPC) is primarily
used for PE classes, varsity team training,
and tournaments organized by the Sports
Development Desk of the Center for Student
Affairs or other units of the University.
Because it is located in a residential area,
UA&P is also subject to the rules and regulations of the Ortigas Center Association, Inc.
(OCAI), which limit the types of activities that
can be held within the campus. Also, it is
imperative that the activities held at the MPC
do not disrupt regular Oratory activities, such
as the Holy Mass.

SECURITY
Security guards are assigned to various
parts of the campus: the ALB entrance, DCB
entrance, the driveway entrance/exit at Pearl
Drive, the driveway exit at St. Josemaría
Escrivá Drive, and the parking lot.

University of Asia and the Pacific

The Academic Life
A student’s course of study may either be (a) a four-year degree
program, which entitles him or her to earn an AB (Bachelor of
Arts) or a BS (Bachelor of Science) undergraduate degree at the
end of the course, or (b) a five-year master’s program, through
which he or she may earn an MA (Master of Arts) or an MS (Master of Science) degree at the end of five years.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

21

All programs of study begin with the core
curriculum of the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS). The liberal education of CAS
not only prepares the students for their
specific specialization, but also gives them
a well-rounded education that cultivates
genuine intellectual discipline—a prerequisite to acquiring any specialized knowledge.
The two-step educational process that the
University provides arises from the conviction that college students who immediately
pursue a specialization without the solid
grounding that a liberal education imparts
will be ill-prepared for the lifelong process of
learning, and that professional excellence today demands ever-increasing specialization
no longer adequately met by a bachelor’s
degree.
For the AB/BS program students, the CAS
curriculum is a preparation for immersion
in their major or specialized course after
their sophomore year. For MA/MS program
students, it is a preparation for their specific
specialization in the graduate level (fourth
and fifth year). At the end of three years, students under the five-year master’s programs
will have completed all the academic requirements for a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities
degree. If they meet all the academic requirements of the graduate program of their
choice, they can graduate with two degrees
(a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree)
at the end of five years.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Qualifications and Standards for Admission
Admission to AB/BS four-year programs
Students who qualify for admission to the
University are automatically admitted into
the AB or BS program of their choice as indicated in their application to the University.
If certain programs have additional requirements for admission (e.g., math grades/
scores for admission to B.S. in Applied Math,
B.S. in Industrial Engineering, and B.S. in
Information Technology; interview for B.S.
in Entrepreneurial Management applicants,
etc.), applicants must pass these additional
requirements as well. Also, depending on
their English scores in the admissions exam,
international students who graduated from
high schools where English was not the medium of instruction may be required to take
additional courses in English before they can
take a full load.

22

University of Asia and the Pacific

Admission to MA/MS five-year programs
Students admitted to the four-year AB or BS
programs but who are interested in getting
into any of the five-year graduate programs
may signify their application to the five-year
program in writing, not later than the second
semester of their sophomore year, subject to
the admissions requirements of the individual graduate programs.
Programs of Study
UA&P offers the following programs of study
(as of SY 2013-2014):
Bachelor’s degree programs (Four-year AB/BS
programs)
College of Arts and Sciences

Bachelor of Arts in Humanities

School of Communication

Bachelor of Arts in Integrated Marketing
Communications

Bachelor of Arts in Media and Entertainment Management

School of Economics

Bachelor of Arts in Economics

School of Education and Human Development

Bachelor of Science in Child Development and Education

Bachelor of Science in Human Capital
Development

School of Law and Governance

Bachelor of Arts in Political Economy

School of Management

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in Management

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in Management
with specialization in Business Analytics

Bachelor of Science in Entrepreneurial
Management

School of Sciences and Engineering

Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering (*a five-year BS program)

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

23

Master’s degree programs (Five-year MA/MS programs)
College of Arts and Sciences

Master of Arts in Humanities

School of Communication

Master of Arts in Communication Major
in Integrated Marketing Communications

School of Economics

Master of Science in Industrial Economics

School of Law and Governance

Master of Arts in Political Economy with
specialization in International Relations
and Development

School of Management

Master of Science in Management

Law program
School of Law and Governance

Juris Doctor

Other graduate programs
The University also has a number of academic programs (graduate-only programs)
that are designed for practitioners in the
areas of economics, education, and management, namely:
School of Economics

Master in Applied Business Economics

Master in Business Economics

School of Education and Human Development

Master of Arts in Education Major in
Child Development and Education

Master of Arts in Education Major in Educational Leadership

Master in Education Major in Child Development and Education

Master in Education Major in Educational
Leadership

School of Management

24

Master of Science in Management – Evening Program

University of Asia and the Pacific

REGISTRATION AND ENROLLMENT
Registration is a preliminary step to enrollment and consists of
enlisting the subjects the student is required to take under his or her
chosen program of study. The student’s registration in the University
implicitly signifies his or her willingness to abide by all the rules and
regulations of the University.
General Guidelines
1.

Notices and announcements. Registration announcements and notices are placed on the bulletin boards in various locations. Announcements are also posted on the UA&P Enlistment Portal
(http://enlistment.uap.asia). Specific registration procedures
change from time to time in view of a continuing development
program to streamline and improve procedures. Students are
advised to follow all instructions and observe all deadlines.

2.

Online enlistment. Students can enlist their subjects online. To avoid
overloading the system, there are schedules for online enlistment.
Students may visit the UA&P Enlistment Portal for announcements and instructions.

3.

Pre-enlistment. Beginning SY 2014-2015, all freshmen and sophomore, as well as all students under the Entrepreneurial Management program, are pre-enlisted by REG. During the online enlistment period, these students do the following: view their schedule/
pre-enlisted subjects online, print their Registration Certificate
(RC) and present it on campus for enrollment and payment. It is
only during on-campus enrollment that pre-enlisted students will
be allowed to add more subjects if they still lack units, or in some
cases, advance some subjects after getting clearance from the
proper academic adviser.

4.

Academic advising. Academic advising is part of the enrollment
procedure and is needed especially in the following cases: when
subjects to be added are advanced subjects, when subjects to be
dropped are pre-requisite subjects, when changing subjects that
have been enlisted online, and when dropping pre-enlisted subjects. For CAS subjects, advising is done by the CAS academic
adviser, while for specialization subjects, advising is done by the
academic adviser of the program.

5.

Enrollment. Students are considered officially enrolled only after
registration/enlistment and payment of tuition and other fees according to their chosen payment scheme.

6.

Modular subjects. If a student plans to take two modular subjects in
one semester, the first of which is a prerequisite of the other, he or
she must enlist in and pay for both subjects at the start of the semester; there is no mid-semester registration.
If a student fails the first module, he or she will automatically be
dropped from the second module, and the fees paid for the latter
will be credited to his or her account. If a student wants to enroll in a modular subject that starts during the second half of the
semester, he or she should enlist and pay for the said modular
subject at the start of the semester.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

25

7.

8.

Enrollment for a subject necessary to obtain credits. Only students who are officially enrolled
are allowed to attend classes and are given
credits if they pass the course. Students
whose names do not appear on the class
list are presumed not to have enrolled for
the class. They must consult the Registrar’s
Office if they enrolled in a subject but their
names do not appear on the class list issued to the professor.
Load adjustments. Any deviations from the
regular semestral academic load resulting from back subjects, missing prerequisites, overloading, underloading, crossenrollment, and audited subjects must
first be cleared with the Registrar before
registration.

Documents Submitted upon Enrollment
All documents pertaining to enrollment, including the high school report card (Form No.
138) and the high school transcript of record
(Form No. 137), shall become the property of
the University. They will not be returned to the
students. Neither is it possible to claim them if
a student wishes to transfer to another school.
Instead, the Registrar will provide the stu dent
with the necessary transfer credentials.
Confidentiality of Student’s Records and Personal
Information
All personal information about the students
(including class schedules) and all student
records are strictly confidential and will not be
divulged or released to unauthorized persons.

FEES AND PAYMENTS
Modes of Payment
Payments may be made in cash, or by credit
card, telegraphic transfer, demand draft, or
personal check.
It is presumed that personal check payments
are backed with sufficient funds. If a check
bounces, it must be replaced immediately
with cash. Also, future check payments will
no longer be accepted.
The University has no existing ties with any
of the pre-need companies; thus, the University does not accept payment through educational plans.
Payment Schemes
Students have the option to choose from
three payment schemes:

26

Full payment


Two-installment scheme (with installment charge)
Three-installment scheme (with installment charge)

If the payment scheme chosen is installment and the check payment bounces, the
full amount becomes immediately due and
demandable and must be paid in cash. Also,
future check payments will no longer be
accepted. If a student fails to pay on the due
dates, any unpaid balance shall become immediately due and demandable. Full installment fees will also be charged. A 1% service
fee will be charged for every month of delay.
Reimbursements
If a student has paid the pertinent tuition and
other fees in full or for any period longer
than one month but voluntarily and in writing withdraws from the University, transfers
to another university, goes on Leave of Absence (LOA), or drops a subject he or she is
enrolled in within two weeks after the beginning of classes, he or she shall be entitled to
a refund of tuition and/or other fees based
on the following schedule, in accordance
with the Commission on Higher Education’s
(CHED) Manual of Regulations for Private
Higher Education 2008 (Art. XX, Sec. 100):
For regular semesters
Within the first week of classes
Within the second week
After the second week

75% refund
50% refund
no refund

For the summer term
On the first and
second day of classes
On the third day of classes
After the third day of classes

75% refund
20% refund
no refund

This schedule will be followed whether or
not the student attended classes. Refunds
will be processed only after the student has
obtained the necessary clearance.
Refunds due to overpayment, or overpayment
resulting from a change in the student’s academic load, are credited toward subsequent
enrollments. However, refunds may be reimbursed upon submission of a letter from the
student’s parent/s or guardian.
Arrears
If a student has unsettled accounts or arrears
from the previous semester, he or she may
enroll for the following semester only after
these accounts or arrears have been settled.
University of Asia and the Pacific

ACADEMIC POLICIES
Academic Load
The school year is divided into two regular
terms: the first and second semesters. The
summer term is normally intended for remedial
work and some required specialization subjects.
A regular semester is 18 weeks long, including
final exams week. One unit of credit for a lecture course is equivalent to one hour of class
or recitation each week. One unit of credit for a
laboratory course is equivalent to two or three
hours of laboratory work per week.
Regular load
When a student registers in the University, it
is understood that he or she is enrolling for
the regular load of the entire semester according to the normal schedule stipulated in
the chosen program of study. Generally, the
approved program of study for the four-year
AB/BS programs consists of a normal load of
18 units of academic subjects per semester,
while for the five-year MA/MS programs, the
regular load consists of 21 units of academic
subjects per semester.
Minimum and maximum load
The minimum load of academic subjects
per semester for students is 15 units, while
the maximum load is 26 units (except for
programs whose curricula as mandated by
CHED require more than the allowable maximum load). For the summer term, the maximum load is nine units.
Underload
Students may be allowed, for sufficient and
valid reasons, to enroll in fewer units than
the normal load during regular semesters,
but in no case lower than the minimum load
of 15 academic units.
Overload
Students are ordinarily not allowed to go
beyond the number of units stipulated per semester in the chosen program of study. However, seniors or graduating students may be
permitted to overload in their last year in order
to graduate with their class. Such overload
requests are decided on a case-to-case basis.
Prerequisite subjects
Some subjects are regarded as prerequisites
for higher-level subjects. If the student has not
successfully completed a prerequisite subject,
he or she shall not be allowed to enroll for the
corresponding subject(s) at the next level.
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Advancing of subjects
Students may be allowed to take subjects ahead of the normal schedule if they
have successfully passed the prerequisite
subject(s), as long as they comply with the
rules on overloading, and subject to the
availability of slots.
Changing streams/Shifting courses
Changing streams shall be defined as transferring from the four-year AB/BS program to
the five-year MA/MS program or vice-versa,
within the same field of specialization.
Shifting courses shall be defined as transferring from one program to another with a different field of specialization, whether it is being
offered by the same school or a different one.
Procedures for changing streams and shifting
courses are presented in the Student Handbook.
Academic and Non-Academic Subjects
Academic subjects
Academic subjects are governed by the policies enumerated in the academic code. In
particular, they are governed by the university policy on retention of students. Grades
in the academic subjects are included in
the computation of the general weighted
average (GWA) and the weighted average
(WA) for retention. All the core curriculum
subjects are considered academic except
for Physical Education (PE), Introduction to
People Development (IPD), National Service
Training Program (NSTP), and Asia-Pacific
Language subjects.
Non-academic subjects
Physical Education (PE) subjects, though considered non-academic, are included in the
computation of the GWA in compliance with
the policy of the Commission on Higher
Education (CHED). However, PE subjects are
not included in the computation of the WA to
determine retention in the University.
Introduction to People Development (IPD) is a
three-unit non-academic course that exposes
students to issues in corporate social responsibility (CSR), such as corruption, genetically
modified organisms, child labor, and environmental sustainability, among others. The
course introduces students to various corporate initiatives in mitigating issues through
a highly interactive session in the classroom
that entails analyses of case studies. Students
are then deployed to leading CSR organizations to document CSR-related issues using

27

analytical tools taught in the classroom and to analyze their approaches to resolving these issues.
The National Service Training Program (NSTP) is a program mandated by law
for tertiary-level students. It aims to enhance civic consciousness and
defense preparedness in the youth by developing in them the ethics of
service and patriotism while they undergo training in any of the following three program components:

Reserve Officers Training Course (ROTC) is a program designed to
provide military training to tertiary-level students in order to motivate, train, organize, and mobilize them for defense preparedness.

Literacy Training Service (LTS) is a program designed to train students to become teachers of literacy and numerical skills to
schoolchildren, out-of-school youth, and other segments of society in need of their services.

Civic Welfare Training Service (CWTS) refers to programs or activities
that contribute to the general welfare and the betterment of life for
the members of the community or the enhancement of its facilities, especially those devoted to improving health, education,
environment, entrepreneurship, safety, recreation, and morals of
the citizenry. It is also aimed at articulating basic concepts of social
responsibility, civic consciousness, and community development,
and applying these development concepts in community-based
fieldwork.

The University offers the Literacy Training Service (LTS) and the
Civic Welfare Training Service (CWTS) only. Students who choose
the ROTC component will have to cross-enroll at other colleges and
universities that offer it. The student has to follow the proper procedures for cross-enrollment. He or she must have prior authorization
from the Registrar’s Office to cross-enroll; otherwise, he or she will
not be given any credits for the ROTC component.
Non-Filipino students are exempted from the completion of NSTP.
Students seeking exemption on the basis of citizenship have to
submit documents proving their foreign citizenship and an updated
Alien Certificate of Registration to the Registrar’s Office.
IPD and NSTP are handled by the Center for Social Responsibility
(CSR), a social extension center within the University that maximizes
the synergy of the faculty, students, and partner institutions in uplifting
the social and economic conditions of marginalized groups in society.
Asia-Pacific Language Studies
As a requirement for graduation from any of the five-year MA/MS
programs, students will be asked to pass a language proficiency test in
an Asia-Pacific language. An Asia-Pacific language shall mean any language officially recognized and spoken in any of the APEC countries,
with the exception of English and Philippine languages. The unit offers
classes in those languages for which there is a sufficient number of
interested students to make the course economically viable. For now,
these languages may include Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, and French.
The competency preparation program is placed under the supervision
of the Asia-Pacific Language Unit.

28

University of Asia and the Pacific

Asia-Pacific Language courses are considered non-academic subjects, and thus do not
fall under the scope of the retention policy,
nor are they included in the computation of
the GWA or the WA.
Attendance
In principle, students must be present in all of
their classes. However, should circumstances
prevent it, they are required at the very least
to be present for at least 80 percent of the
subject’s total class hours during the semester;
otherwise, they automatically fail the subject.
Absences
• Due to cutting classes
These absences do not entitle students to
make up for missed requirements. This
is premised on the fact that when they
freely decide to forego or cut a class, they
consciously take the risk of missing out on
work that might be given in their absence.

Due to sickness
These absences are due to a serious
sickness needing medical attention. A
serious sickness must be diagnosed by a
doctor; hence, an official medical certificate is needed, and not just a simple
excuse letter from the student’s parents
or guardian, when the student reports
back to class.
Due to official business
These are absences incurred because of
one’s participation in UA&P institutional
events and activities that normally appear in the official calendar of activities.

Absences due to sickness and official business shall be deducted from the student’s
balance of allowable absences, but entitle
him or her to make up for work missed on
the day(s) of absence (this includes papers,
quizzes, and exams). Incurring these types of
absences will not increase the student’s total
number of allowable absences: that number
will remain constant regardless of the type of
absence incurred.
Policies regarding late submission of requirements due to either of these two types of
absences (sickness or official business) are
left to the discretion of the teacher.
Absences will be assessed more stringently
when these occur during midterm and final
examinations.

Tardiness
The teacher has the discretion on whether or
not to allow a late student to enter the class.
The academic department and/or teacher
concerned may decide equivalencies between
tardiness and absence (e.g., three instances of
tardiness as equivalent to one absence). If the
student is more than 10 minutes late for class,
he or she may be considered absent.
Whenever a teacher is not present at the
beginning of a class, students are obliged to
wait for at least 15 minutes before leaving (for
one-hour and 1.5-hour classes). For two-hour
or three-hour classes, students are obliged to
wait at least 30 minutes before leaving.
Evaluation Tools and Examinations
The evaluation of a student is reached by
a reasoned judgment made by the subject
teacher on the student’s performance. Competence or grasp of knowledge or skills, or
the lack thereof, is the sole basis for their
marks. Effort and interest are not measures
of academic performance (though they ordinarily occasion good performance).
Examinations
Exams are given throughout the semester.
Final examinations are held during the last
week of the term. Although greater weight
is ordinarily given to the final examination mark, the percentage of this mark with
respect to the final grade varies among the
different academic departments.
Exemptions
Exemption from the final examinations is the
prerogative of the teacher. The department
and/or the teacher can, therefore, decide to
grant or not to grant exemptions. Exemptions are allowed only for the final examinations, and only for students with a standing
of 1.00 to 1.50 in the subject.
Grading System
Marks and mode equivalents
Number
Mode

Description

Letter
Mode/Abbreviation

1.00

Excellent

A

Superior

B+

Very Good

B

1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

29

2.25
2.50

Good

C+

3.00

Competent

C

3.50

Failed

F

3.50

Failure Due to
Absences

FDA

2.75

Other marks and abbreviations
Pass (for some non-academic subjects)
Fail (for some non-academic subjects)
Incomplete
Withdrawal with Permission
Audited
Credited

P
F
INC
WP
AUD
CRD

Percentage equivalents for a particular grade may vary from department to department, or may not be relevant at all because of the
subject matter.
The transcript of records contains marks in the number mode only
and, whenever applicable, the abbreviations P/F (a pass/fail for some
non-academic subjects), INC (incomplete), WP (withdrawal with
permission), AUD (audited), and CRD (credited) as indicated in the
grading system.
Passing and failing marks
For students enrolled under the AB/BS stream, the minimum passing
mark is 3.00, while the failing mark is 3.50.
For students enrolled under the MA/MS stream (five-year programs),
the minimum passing mark for first-, second-, and third-year subjects
is 3.00, and the failing mark is 3.50. For fourth- and fifth-year subjects
(graduate-level subjects), the minimum passing mark is 2.50, and the
failing mark is 3.00.
For prerequisite subjects, a passing mark implies that the student is
ready for the next subject level. A failing mark implies failure to reach
the required competence level in the subject. If a subject is a required
subject (not an elective) for the student’s chosen program of study,
the student who fails it has to re-take and pass it. Students who fail
an elective subject may either take it again and pass it or choose another elective subject to complete the required number of units.
If the student has exceeded the allowable number of absences for a
class he or she is officially enrolled in, the student shall be given a
failing mark due to academic deficiency caused by his or her absences. This Failure Due to Absences (FDA) shall be reflected in the transcript of records as a failing mark (3.50 for undergraduate subjects
and 3.00 for graduate-level subjects).
An Incomplete (INC) means that the student’s class standing is passing
but he or she, for justifiable reasons, has failed to submit an important
requirement. The student is given one semester to complete the lacking requirement for undergraduate subjects and one year for graduatelevel subjects (fourth and fifth year of the five-year programs).

30

University of Asia and the Pacific

For undergraduate subjects (core curriculum
subjects under CAS and AB/BS program
subjects): failure to submit the lacking requirement within one semester automatically converts an Incomplete (INC) mark into
a failing grade.

month before the start of regular classes,
and
2. The application is accompanied by the
transcript(s) of records from the previous
school(s), as well as the pertinent course
descriptions and syllabi.

For graduate-level subjects (fourth- and fifthyear subjects under the five-year programs):
failure to submit the lacking requirement
within one year automatically converts an
Incomplete (INC) grade into a failing mark.

The processing of the request (including
administration and evaluation of a validating
examination, whenever applicable) must be
completed at least a week before the regular
semester enrollment to enable the student
to determine what subjects to enroll in.
Requests for accreditation after the specified
period are not allowed.

A Withdrawal with Permission (WP) means
that the student has made the decision not to
continue taking a subject and has filed within
the time specified in the academic calendar
the approved required forms with the Registrar’s Office.
The student may, with the permission of the
teacher, and subsequently of the Vice Dean
for Academic Affairs (for CAS subjects) or
the Program Director (for specialization subjects), withdraw from any subject he or she
is enrolled in, provided that the withdrawal
is made within the period indicated in the
university calendar and that such withdrawal
does not result in an academic load lower
than 15 units.
Until the request is officially granted, the
student must continue to attend classes in
the subject from which he or she wishes to
withdraw. Otherwise, the student may be
given a failing mark due to absences.
Requests for permitted withdrawals are
entertained only from students who have not
exceeded the number of absences allowed
by the University in the pertinent subjects.
Audited (AUD) means that the student has
enrolled for a class with the understanding
that he or she will not be given any academic
credits.
Credited (CRD) means that the subject taken
by the student at another educational institution is accredited by the University, and the
student will, therefore, be given academic
credits for the subject.
Transfer students can request for the accreditation of the subjects they have taken in their
previous school(s). Accreditation requests
will be entertained only if
1. The applicant submits his or her request
to the Registrar’s Office not later than a
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Release of Grades
The students’ grades are completely confidential. They are released only through a
personal transaction between the student
and the teacher or the Registrar. Ordinarily,
grades may not be obtained by proxy. Whenever grades may be viewed electronically
by the students, the University adopts strict
security measures to maintain confidentiality so that only the student concerned can
view his or her grades. Students should also
take precautionary measures to protect this
confidentiality. The University is not liable
for any breach in confidentiality caused by
the students’ negligence or consent.
Grades may now be viewed online via the
UA&P website and on-campus kiosks.
A copy of the summary of final grades is sent
by mail to the student’s parents or guardians.
The Registrar’s Office may opt to withhold
the final grades if the student has not completely settled his or her accounts or in case
certain credentials required for enrollment
have not been submitted.
Academic Recognition
Students who excel in their academics are
given due recognition. The Registrar’s Office
releases the following lists a month after the
end of each semester:
Dean’s List
The Dean’s List recognizes students who
have shown excellent academic performance
in a particular semester based on their
Weighted Average (WA) for that semester.
To be on the Dean’s List, the student must
have:
• A Weighted Average (WA) of 1.50 or better for that particular semester;
• A regular academic load for the semester;

31

No failing mark during his or her entire
stay in the University; and
• No incomplete mark for the current semester.
Note: Grades from the previous Summer
Term are included when computing for the
First Semester Dean’s List.

President’s List
The President’s List recognizes students who
have shown excellent academic performance
throughout their stay in the University based
on their General Weighted Average (GWA).
To be on the President’s List, the student
must have:
• A General Weighted Average (GWA) of
1.50 or better at the end of the semester;
• A regular academic load;
• No failing mark during his or her entire
stay in the University; and
• No incomplete mark for the current semester.
Note: Students become eligible for inclusion
in the President’s List after they have completed two semesters in the University.
If a student consistently earns a place on
these lists, he or she is on the path to graduating with Academic Honors.
General Weighted Average
The General Weighted Average (GWA) is
computed on the basis of the grades (1.00,
1.25, 1.50, 1.75, 2.00, 2.25, 2.50, 2.75, 3.00,
and 3.50) given for all subjects completed at
and/or credited by the University, including
PE, but excluding IPD, NSTP, and Asia-Pacific
Language subjects.
PE, though not an academic subject, is
included in the GWA computation, in accordance with the Commission on Higher
Education (CHED) policy.
Aside from being an indicator of the student’s academic performance, the GWA is
used to determine the student’s eligibility for
academic recognition (President’s List) and
graduation honors. The Weighted Average
(WA) for the semester is also a criterion for
academic recognition (Dean’s List).
The GWA is computed differently from the
WA used to determine retention in the University.

32

University of Asia and the Pacific

Separation from the University
Leave of absence
A Leave of Absence (LOA) is granted if a student wishes to separate from the University
temporarily for non-academic or non-disciplinary reasons. If the student is granted an
LOA, he or she may continue his or her education in UA&P at a later date, provided the
student observes the Maximum Residency
Rule. LOA periods are included when computing a student’s residency at the University.
The duration of the LOA is limited to one year,
but may be extended on a case-to-case basis.
Students who are on Leave of Absence cannot be issued an Official Transcript of Record
or transfer credentials, as they are still considered students of the University. For this
reason, they are not supposed to apply for
admission to another university while they
are on Leave of Absence. Students who wish
to transfer to another university must first
voluntarily withdraw from the University.
Voluntary withdrawal
If a student is voluntarily withdrawing or separating from the University, for academic or
other reasons, the student must inform the
Registrar’s Office, in writing and with the signature of his or her parent/s or guardian, of
his or her intention to voluntarily withdraw
from the University. Subsequent procedures
for voluntary withdrawal are detailed in the
Student Handbook.
Transfer credentials
Transfer credentials are issued only to those
who are voluntarily withdrawing from the
University. Transfer credentials may be
withheld due to suspension, expulsion, or
non-settlement of property and financial obligations. These documents will be released
when the student’s obligations are settled or
the penalty of suspension is lifted.
Temporary transcript of record
A temporary transcript of record, which lists
all the grades for subjects the student has
completed in the University, may be issued
upon the student’s request in writing should
he or she decide to transfer to another university. The temporary transcript of record is
issued only for the purpose of evaluation by
another university.
Official transcript of record
An Official Transcript of Record is issued only to
1. Students who have graduated from the
University and
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

2. Students who have transferred to and have
been accepted by another university.
For students who have transferred to another
university, the Official Transcript of Record is
issued directly to the university to which the
student is transferring and upon the written
request of the said university. It cannot be
personally given to the student unless authorized by the requesting university.
Retention Policy
The retention policy is an academic standard
that determines the competence of a student
to meet the more rigorous demands of the
higher levels of the University program.
AB/BS four-year programs
To be retained in the University, students under the AB/BS four-year programs must meet
the following standards:
• Attain a weighted average (WA) of 2.75 in
their freshman and sophomore years
• Pass at least 70% of the total number of
academic units coursed in the junior year
(including summer term)
• Pass all the required subjects for graduation in the senior year
• Limit residency to six years
Note: Students under the B.S. Industrial Engineering program, which has a five-year curriculum as mandated by CHED, must meet
the following standards:
• Attain a WA of 2.75 in their freshman,
sophomore, and junior years
• Pass at least 70% of the total number of
academic units coursed in the fourth year
(including summer term)
• Pass all the required subjects for graduation in the fifth year
• Limit residency to seven years
MA/MS five-year programs
To be retained in the University, students
under the MA/MS five-year programs must
meet the required minimum standards:
• Attain the following WA:
- 2.75 in their first year (for entry into
second year)
- 2.50 in their second year (for entry into
third year)
- 2.25 in their third year (for entry into
fourth year)
- 2.00 in their fourth year (for entry into
fifth year)
• Pass all the required subjects for graduation in the fifth year
• Limit residency to seven years

33

Complete all CAS subjects by the summer term of their third year

Additional retention standards may be required by the student’s specific program of
study, especially for admission to the fifth
year of the five-year programs.
Weighted Average (WA)
The weighted average used to determine
retention in the University is computed on
the basis of the grades given for all academic
subjects (excluding PE, IPD, NSTP, and AsiaPacific Language subjects) completed at and/
or credited by the University within a given
school year.
Included in the WA computation are the following subjects:
a. All academic subjects (that is, excuding
PE, IPD, NSTP, and Asia-Pacific Language
subjects, which are non-academic subjects)
b. Previously failed subjects (remedial subjects) re-taken during the first or second
semester (Remedial subjects re-taken
during summer are not included in the
computation.)
c. Required subjects (non-remedial subjects) taken for the first time during the
summer will be included in the computation of the WA for the succeeding year.
Note: A passing grade for a subject that the
student has previously failed within the year
(or during the previous summer) does not
replace his or her previous failing mark. Both
marks are included in the computation of the
WA.

must make sure that he or she completes all
the CAS subjects by the summer term of the
junior year.
Maximum Residency Rule
Students are allowed to course their curricula for the maximum number of years
depending on the normal duration of their
program.
Normal program duration
CAS curriculum
AB/BS programs
MA/MS programs
Maximum residency
CAS curriculum
AB/BS programs
MA/MS programs

3 years
4 years
5 years
5 years
6 years (inclusive of
CAS)
7 years (inclusive of
CAS)

Students cannot earn a degree if they exceed the maximum residency period without
completing their program of study. A diploma, therefore, cannot be issued to them.
The y may, however, request for a certificate
indicating the subjects they completed in the
University.
Graduation
The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the student’s satisfactory
completion of the academic and other requirements of his or her program. Only those
who have satisfactorily complied with all the
academic and other requirements shall be
eligible for honors and privileges accruing to
a full graduate of the University.

No CAS Back Subject Policy
Students under the MA/MS five-year programs who have back subjects (subjects in
the CAS curriculum not taken for whatever
reason, or CAS subjects failed and not yet
re-taken or passed) shall not be allowed to
enroll in the graduate level (fourth year of
the five-year programs).

Academic honors
Academic honors are given to students who
have completed their respective programs of
study with the following GWAs:

The Manual of Regulations for Private Higher Education (MORPHE), Art. II, Section 8
requires a Bachelor’s degree as a minimum
qualification for entry to the graduate level.
The fourth year of the five-year programs is
equivalent to the first year of the graduate
level. For this reason, students under the
five-year programs have to complete all the
CAS subjects that are required for their bachelor’s degree (Bachelor of Arts in Humanities). To avoid being delayed, the student

No student who has received a failing mark
in any subject credited by the University may
graduate with honors.

34

Summa cum laude
Magna cum laude
Cum laude

GWA of 1.00 - 1.10
GWA of 1.11 - 1.30
GWA of 1.31 - 1.50

Diploma
Students who graduate from any of the fiveyear MA/MS programs have earned two degrees, and hence shall receive two diplomas
upon graduation: one for their bachelor’s
degree (Bachelor of Arts in Humanities) and
one for their master’s degree.
University of Asia and the Pacific

The Schools

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

35

College of Arts
and Sciences
The College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) is the
main gateway to the University.
CAS’s three-year Liberal Arts program gives
students a solid foundation in the humanities. It enables students to determine their
strengths and interests by equipping them
with enhanced learning skills. After completion of the undergraduate program, students
move on to their field of specialization.
Education in CAS has the following features:
• A liberal education curriculum that integrates learning skills with knowledge of
the basic principles of major disciplines.
• A tutorial system with one-on-one sessions between mentor and student to
help bring general theory down to a personal level and integrate intellectual skills
and knowledge with values.
• A co-curricular program with activities
that foster professionalism and a spirit
of solidarity with those in greatest need
in society, and contribute to the integration of skills, knowledge, and values with
action.
The following departments compose the College of Arts and Sciences:
• Department of Arts
• Department of Asia Pacific Studies
• Department of English
• Department of Filipino
• Department of History
• Department of Literature
• Department of Philosophy
• Department of Physical Education
• Department of Religion
CAS confers the following degrees:
• Bachelor of Arts in Humanities
• Master of Arts in Humanities

36

University of Asia and the Pacific

LIBERAL ARTS PROGRAM
The Liberal Arts courses give students a
solid foundation in the humanities. It enables them to determine their strengths and
interests by equipping them with enhanced
learning skills. After completing the undergraduate program, students move on to
their field of specialization.
The academic load of the Liberal Arts curriculum consists of 128 academic units for
science majors and 126 for non-science
majors, and 29 non-academic units. The latter
is comprised of 8 units of Physical Education
courses, 6 units of the National Service Training Program, 3 units of Introduction to People
Development, and 12 Foreign Language units.
The Liberal Arts program is composed of
the following clusters:
• Theology
• Fundamentals of the Person
• Christian Civilization
• Literature
• Arts
• Language
• Mathematics
• Sciences
• Philippine Society
• Asia Pacific Studies
• Fundamentals of Society

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Theology - 9 units
The Creed (TH 101)
This is a philosophical and theological study
of the basic creedal truths of the Catholic religion following the outline of the Catechism
of the Catholic Church.
The Seven Sacraments (TH 102)
The first half of the course is a theological and
practical study of how each sacrament is carried out, with the goal of helping the students
understand the great value of the sacramental
rite. The second part is devoted to the study
of conjugal love, marriage, and family from a
personal viewpoint following the valuable insights of John Paul II’s Theology of the Body.
Moral Theology (TH 103)
In this course, the linkages of the creedal
truths and the sacramental economy to
Christian living are studied. Specific norms
of Christian living (Ten Commandments) are
studied in detail in order to learn how to grow
in personal communion with the Blessed Trinity.
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Fundamentals of the Person - 9 units
Introduction to Philosophical Anthropology Part 1
(PH 100)
This is a highly abstract course that studies the
human person from a philosophical perspective: what he is, who he is, what it means to
have a body, psyche, intelligence, will, affectivity, and biography. It explores the meaning of
self-realization, self-transcendence, and selfexpression. The course aims to educate a person’s way of looking at one’s self and others.
Introduction to Philosophical Anthropology Part 2
(PH 102)
This course focuses on the fundamental nature
and processes of human thought and knowledge vis-à-vis some practical issues on learning how to think. The course explores man’s
use of reason and its relation to culture and
leisure, humanization, refinement, and expression of the human spirit in light of who and
what it means to be a human person.
Philosophy of the Family (PH 101)
This course studies the nature, properties,
and ends of the family based on the correct
understanding of human dignity and what a
person is. This is a preparatory course, both
theoretical and practical, on marriage and
family life. The emphasis is on the internal
dynamism of the family both as an inter-personal relationship and an institution.
Ethics (PH 103)
Providing a general understanding of how to
assess and evaluate one’s acting with respect to
oneself and to others, this course aims to enable
the students to critically think about ethical issues
and ultimately align reasoning and personal acting with his/her authentic humanity. In this light,
the students are assumed to have mastered the
content of moral theology.
Christian Civilization - 6 units/3 units
A Survey of Christian Civilization (CIV 111)
This course is divided into three main parts: the
first centuries of Christianity, the history of Christendom during the Middle Ages, and the Christian Civilization and the Modern World. A major
emphasis of this course is how the Christian faith
and the Church’s organization interacted with
and affected the political, economic, social, and
cultural contexts through time.
Formation of Christian Civilization (CIV 121)
The course discusses the foundation of Christianity during the apogee of the Roman Empire,
the life of the early Christians, the context of the

37

development of Christian teaching, the contributions of monasticism, the conversion of the
Barbarians, and the evolving interrelationship
of the Church with the temporal sphere and its
multidimensional consequences.
Christian Civilization and the Modern World (CIV 122)
This course studies the action and imprint
of Christianity in modernity, particularly on
Western civilization and those societies and
cultures it came in contact with and influenced. A combination of a chronological
framework and thematic approach is used.
Literature - 12 units for 5-year programs
Classical Literature (Iliad and Aeneid) (LIT 101)
This course introduces students to the study
of literary pieces that are considered timeless. It aims for students to develop a critical understanding of classical literary works
through active reading, methodical analysis,
and rational discussion of the text.
Renaissance Literature (Shakespeare) (LIT 102)
This course encourages students to analyze
the literature not just as a work of fiction but
also as a product of a particular time and
culture. Class discussions explore man’s
struggle between truth and falsehood, good
and evil, reason and passion, thought and
action, as he encounters a diversity of characters and situations in the world.
Medieval Literature (Dante) (LIT 103)
This course provides students with a forum
for the continued development of their core
skills of listening, speaking, reading, and
writing, as well as the enhancement of their
creative and critical thinking skills through
comprehension, inferences, and evaluation
of Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy.
Modern Literature* (LIT 104)
Designed as a synthesis course, LIT 104 provides students with a forum for the continued development of their core skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing through
the comprehension, analysis, synthesis,
interpretation, evaluation, and appreciation
of modern literary texts.
*not offered in four-year programs

Arts - 9 units
Fine Arts (ART 101)
This course provides students with the education of the sense of sight. It trains them to
see (i.e., to look intelligently at the visual arts:
painting, sculpture, architecture, photography,

38

digital art, and installation art). The course develops in the students the skills to perceive and
respond to works of art critically through the
analysis of form, subject, and content.
Film (ART 102A)
This course introduces students to the language of film (i.e., its narrative and stylistic
elements) as a means of communicating
human struggles, ideas, emotions, and situations. It guides them in judging the quality
of the use of various elements to express
meanings, achieve certain effects, and elicit
certain responses through the critical analysis of various films, broadening their sensitivity to beauty.
Music (ART 102B)
The course introduces students to the medium of music as a form of artistic expression.
It enables them to develop informed value
judgments on the quality of music through
an understanding of the elements of music
guided by selected reading in aesthetics, history, criticism, and production.
Theater (ART 104)
The course introduces students to the elements of theater arts as found in Western,
Eastern, and Philippine theater traditions. It
aims to make students understand theater as
a form of aesthetic expression using history
as a framework, and develop the skills necessary to watch theater productions through
analysis of form.
Language - 18 units
Communication Arts 1 (ENG 101)
This course aims to strengthen and refine the
students’ macro-skills of listening, speaking,
reading, and writing as well as their critical
and creative thinking skills. It also emphasizes audience analysis, organization skills, and
delivery techniques as students deliver effective oral interpretations before an audience.
Communication Arts 2 (ENG 102)
This course aims to strengthen and refine the
students’ macro-skills of listening, speaking,
reading, and writing as well as their critical
and creative thinking skills. Through the writing of informative, reflective, and persuasive
essays, students develop their ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and effectively.
They also have an opportunity to practice
their speaking skills in a formal debate.

University of Asia and the Pacific

Research Writing (ENG 103)
This course is designed to hone the students’
critical and creative thinking skills as well as
their language and research skills. Students
identify research topics and investigate them
thoroughly in order to produce research
papers.
Komunikasyon sa Akademikong Filipino (FIL 101) - 3
units
Ang kursong ito ay isang metalinggwistik na
pag-aaral sa gamit ng akademikong Filipino
sa iba’t ibang sitwasyon at larangan. Sa
paraang interdisiplinaryo at interaktibo, inaasahang mauunawaan at malilinang sa mga
estudyante ang mga kailangang kaalaman at
kasanayang komunikatibo: pakikinig, pagsasalita, pagbasa, pagsulat.
Pagbasa at Pagsulat Tungo sa Pananaliksik (FIL 102)
- 3 units
Ang kursong ito ay pagpapalawak ng mga
kaalaman at kasanayan sa kritikal na pagbasa at lohikal na pagsulat tungo sa pagsasagawa ng sariling pananaliksik. Ituturo din
sa asignaturang ito ang mga kasalukuyang
teorya at praktika sa pagsasagawa ng akademiko at iskolarling pananaliksik para sa
pagsulat ng iba’t ibang papel o komposisyon
na kakikitaan ng seryoso at mataas na antas
ng pag-iisip at pagtatala ng mga nakuhang
impormasyon at kaalaman.
Masining na Pagpapahayag: Retorikang Filipino (FIL
103)
Sumasaklaw ang asignaturang ito sa mga
batayang prinsipyo ng Retorika tungo sa masining at mabisang paraan ng pagpapahayag
kaugnay ng apat na batayang uri ng diskurso:
paglalarawan, pagsasalaysay, paglalahad,
at pangangatwiran na may tuon sa estilo at
wastong paggamit ng wikang Filipino sa mga
gawaing pasalita at pasulat sa klase.
Filipino for Foreign Students 1 (FFS 1) (katumbas ng
FIL 101)
Tinatawag itong “Conversational Filipino,”
na nakatuon sa pag-aaral at gamit ng wikang
Filipino sa iba’t ibang sitwasyong pangwika.
Itinuturo sa mga estudyante ang wasto at
angkop na paggamit ng Filipino sa pagkuha
ng kinakailangang impormasyon, pakikipagusap sa mga kaklase, pag-unawa sa mga direksyon at patalastas, at pagtanggap ng mga
tuntunin o patakaran, pasalita man o pasulat.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Filipino for Foreign Students 2 (FFS 2) (katumbas ng
FIL 102)
Tinatawag itong “Intermediate Filipino,” na
nagbibigay-diin sa pag-aaral sa mga tuntuning pambalarila ng wikang Filipino, sa pagsulat ng maiikli at simpleng pangungusap,
at sa pagbasa ng mga simpleng tekstong
nasusulat sa wikang ito.
Filipino for Foreign Students 3 (FFS 3) (katumbas ng
FIL 103)
Tinatawag itong “Advance Filipino,” na
nakapokus sa patuloy na pagpapahusay sa
mga kaalaman at kasanayang natanggap na
ng mga estudyante sa naunang dalawang
kurso. Bukod diyan, bibigyan sila ng pagkakataong bumasa ng mga piniling teksto
mula sa Panitikang Filipino na angkop sa
kanilang kakayahan o antas ng pagkatuto. Sa
ganitong paraan, inaasahan na lubos nilang
mauunawaan ang mga katangian ng isang
Pilipino at ng lipunang ginagalawan nila.
Mathematics - 6 units for Non-IEP and Non-IT Major,
and 8 units for IEP and IT majors
General Mathematics I (MATH 1)
The course focuses on enhancing logical
thinking through mathematical or symbolic
logic, precision in numerical expression
through the algebra of numbers presented
as an axiomatic system, and problem solving through proper translation of words or
sentences into mathematical symbols and
algebraic solutions.
General Mathematics II (MATH 2)
The course focuses on enhancing logical
thinking, precision in numerical expressions,
and problem solving through Euclidean and
Non-Euclidean geometries, calculus, probability, and statistics.
Sciences - 9 units
Biology 1 (SC 101)
This course discusses the cell, tissues, bioenergetics, life processes, genetics, body
systems, and the latest findings on scientific
issues related to this discipline in a logical
and comprehensive way. Likewise, laboratory activities are included to enhance and
facilitate the teaching-learning process in
this course.
Environmental Science (SC 102)
This course includes the review of the basic
concepts about the environment, traditional
sciences, relevant issues (in politics, business, and laws), values, and global concerns.

39

It also encourages the students to do critical
thinking and inculcates in them the sincere
concern of all the forms of living and nonliving components of ecosystems.
Physics (SC 103)
The course presents the material universe in
terms of the physical concepts, principles, laws,
equations, and theories that physicists have discovered and formulated to describe and predict
the properties, behavior, and motion of matter
and energy through space and time.
Chemistry (SC 104)
The course presents the material universe in
terms of the chemical theories that scientists
have discovered and formulated in order
to describe and predict the properties and
behavior of different types of matter and the
changes they undergo.
Philippine Society - 12 units
Philippine History (PS 101)
The course is a critical analysis of the development of the Filipino nation. Its political,
social, economic, cultural, intellectual, as
well as religious foundations are studied in
an integrative manner to cast light on the
historical bases of contemporary Philippine
realities. The course takes on a more global
perspective by placing events and/or developments in their appropriate regional and
international contexts.
Philippine Society and Culture (PS 102)
This course introduces students to the notion
of civic engagement through a re-appreciation of its socio-cultural identity brought
about by the people’s history. It capitalizes
on the reality that Filipinos are a historically
developed group of people. Thus, it is important for students to understand how geography, ethnicity, values, social institutions, and
external forces interact and shape, over time,
the Filipino way of life.
Philippine Politics and Governance (PS 103)
This course responds to the Filipinos’ need to
understand politics and how to make it work.
It retraces the historical beginnings, structural
dimensions, organizational functions, socialcultural influences, and dynamics that set
Philippine politics and governance apart from
other systems.
The Life and Works of Rizal (PS 104)
A sequel to Philippine History, the course
provides students with a deeper understand-

40

ing and appreciation of Jose Rizal’s intellectual
development, the role he played in the emergence of Filipino nationalism, and his concept
of a civic community. The course provides an
opportunity for students to explore the intersection of history and biography.
Asia Pacific Studies – 18 units for 5-year programs
North American Studies (APS 101)
The course focuses on the interplay of social,
political, cultural, and economic dimensions
of the United States of America within the
international system particularly in the AsiaPacific region. It covers important facets of
American civilization, which include fundamental view of American government,
economy, ideology, society, and culture.
China Studies (APS 102A)
The course gives undergraduate students a
background on one of the biggest and most
powerful countries in the world today. The
teaching of China Studies is interdisciplinary
in nature. Geography, philosophy, religion,
archeology, arts, culture, literature, politics,
history, economics, and international relations are utilized in teaching the course.
Japan Studies (APS 102B)
The course is intended to give undergraduate students an overview of the first industrialized country in Asia. It looks primarily into
the historical roots of the nation, surveying
and highlighting the major events and key
figures that shaped Japan into what it is
today. The course also aims to examine Japan’s integral role in the world today.
Southeast Asian Studies (APS 103)
This is an introductory course on the process
of nation-building and regional cooperation
among the states comprising the modern and
contemporary Southeast Asian region. It aims
to make the students comprehend the continuing evolution of Southeast Asian nations and
how the region serves as a vital partner in the
economic and political growth of the AsiaPacific region.
Australian Studies (APS 104)
The course introduces to undergraduate
students the social, political, cultural, and
economic dimensions of Australia and the
interplay of these dimensions within the nation
and within the Asia-Pacific region. This threeunit course traces the origins of Australia as a
culture, nation, and society and highlights the
important facets of Australian civilization.
University of Asia and the Pacific

Latin American Studies/Mexico (APS 105)
The course is designed to provide students
with an overview of Latin America through
Mexico as the point of convergence and at
the same time a springboard to themes and
debates apparent and emergent in the historical, social, political, cultural, and economic
dimensions.
Fundamentals of Society – 6 units
Basic Economics (FOS 101)
This course is an introduction to the field of
economics. The first part is macroeconomics,
which introduces students to the workings
of the economy. The second part takes up
microeconomics, which tackles the resource
allocation problem from the point of view of
the firm and markets.
Political Thought (FOS 102)
This course is designed to provide students
with a deeper understanding and appreciation of the philosophical underpinnings of
democracy, not only as a form of rule but
also as a system of political ethics. It introduces students to a range of ideas that form
the corpus of what is more widely known as
liberal democracy.

FACULTY
Department of Arts
Laya Boquiren-Gonzales
Ph.D. Philippine Studies (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. Art Studies
University of the Philippines Diliman

Ma. Concepcion Lagos
Ph.D. Philippine Studies (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. Political Economy
University of Asia and the Pacific
Philip Michael Paje
Ph.D. Philippine Studies (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. Philippine Studies
University of the Philippines Diliman
Elizabeth Urgel
Ph.D. Philippine Studies
University of the Philippines Diliman

Department of English
Ma. Socorro Claudio
M.A. Education
University of Asia and the Pacific
Robert Cortes
M.A. Education Leadership
Columbia University, USA
Linette De Guzman
M.A. Teaching English Language
De La Salle University
Tara Donozo
Ph.D. Educational Management
De La Salle University
Alfonso Augusto Hiquiana
Ph.D. English Studies: Language
University of the Philippines Diliman

Mairene Leynes
M.A. Liberal Arts Major in Art History
Universidad de Navarra, Spain

Felicidad Mallari
M.A. Language Education
University of the Philippines Diliman

Veronica Ramirez
Ph.D. Educational Administration
University of the Philippines Diliman

Victor Primo
M.A. Education Major in
Educational Administration
Jose Rizal University

Arthur Joseph Vito Cruz
M.A. Education Major in Liberal Education
University of Asia and the Pacific

Department of Asia Pacific Studies

Judy Tanael
Ph.D. Education Major in Educational
Psychology
University of the Philippines Diliman

Maria Christina Victoria Angela Cayton
M.A. Humanities
University of Asia and the Pacific

Arwin Vibar
Ph.D. Linguistics
University of the Philippines Diliman

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

41

Department of Filipino
Moreal Camba
Ph.D. Philippine Studies (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. Philippine Studies
University of the Philippines Diliman
Vivencio Talegon Jr.
Ph.D. in Language Planning (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. Filipino Language
University of the Philippines Diliman
Antonio Torralba
Ph.D. Pedagogy
Universidad de Navarra, Spain

Department of History
Marya Svetlana Camacho
Ph.D. History
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Clement Camposano
Ph.D. Philippine Studies
University of the Philippines Diliman

Juan Mesquida
Ph.D. History
University of Santo Tomas
Mary Josefti Nito
Ph.D. History (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. Humanities with Specialization in History
University of Asia and the Pacific

Department of Literature
Joachim Emilio Antonio
Ph.D. Creative Writing
University of the Philippines Diliman
Maria Jesusa Carina Aunario
Ph.D. Education Major in Educational
Psychology (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. Education-Reading
University of the Philippines Diliman
Raul Calsado
M.A. Teaching Literature
Philippine Normal University

Grace Liza Concepcion
Ph.D. in Philippine Studies (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. History
Universidad de Navarra, Spain

Theresa Ma. Inez Cortes
Ph.D. English Language and Literature
(coursework)
Ateneo de Manila University
M.A. Humanities
University of Asia and the Pacific

Paul Dumol
Ph.D. Medieval Studies
University of Toronto, Canada

Ma. Lourdes Gonzalez
Ph.D. Comparative Literature
University of the Philippines Diliman

Ma. Victoria Ferreria
M.A. History
Ateneo de Manila University

Jose Marcelino Nicdao
Ph.D. Comparative Literature
University of the Philippines Diliman

Arnel Joven
Ph.D. History
University of the Philippines Diliman

Leon J. Arthur Peckson
M.A. Humanities
University of Asia and the Pacific

Sophia Marco
Ph.D. History (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. History
University of the Philippines Diliman

Philip Samuel Peckson
Ph.D. English Language and Literature
(coursework)
Ateneo de Manila University
M.A. Humanities
University of Asia and the Pacific

Danielle Young Calantuan-Mejos
M.A. Humanities
University of Asia and the Pacific

42

Michelle Monique Tomacruz
M.A. Language and Literature
Ateneo de Manila University

University of Asia and the Pacific

Department of Philosophy
Ma. Andrelita Cenzon
Ph.D. Philosophy, University of Santo Tomas
Ph.D. Theology, Pontifical University of the
Holy Cross, Italy
Ph.D. Education, Universidad de Navarra,
Rome branch
Ferdinand De Los Reyes
M.A. Philosophy
University of the Philippines Diliman
Guillermo Dionisio
Ph.D. Philosophy (coursework)
University of Santo Tomas
M.A. Philosophy
University of Santo Tomas
Lani Mae Junio
Ph.D. Philosophy
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Ma. Asuncion Magsino
Ph.D. Philosophy
University of the Philippines Diliman
Jose Maria Mariano
Ph.D. Philosophy
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Dean Edward Mejos
Ph.D. Philosophy (coursework)
University of Santo Tomas
M.A. Philosophy
University of Santo Tomas
Corazon Toralba
Ph.D. Philosophy
University of Santo Tomas

Department of Physical Education
Brixtonn John Busto
M.S. Human Movement Science (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
Bachelor of Physical Education
University of the Philippines Diliman

Alberto Jose Magpily
M.S. Human Movement Science
University of the Philippines Diliman
Anamaria Laudet Mangubat
M.S. Human Movement Science
University of the Philippines Diliman
Jamael Pangandaman
M.S. Human Movement Science (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
Bachelor in Sports Science
University of the Philippines Diliman
Stella Marie Urbiztondo
Ph.D. Education in Research and Evaluation
(candidate)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.S. Physical Education
University of the Philippines Diliman
Joshua Ben Villareal
M.S. Human Movement Science (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
Bachelor of Physical Education
University of the Philippines Diliman

Department of Religion
Antonio Eliezer Bermejo Jr.
Ph.D. Sacred Liturgy
Pontifical Athenaeum of St. Anselm, Italy
Roberto Latorre
Ph.D. Sacred Theology
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Teodorico Santiago
Ph.D. Philosophy
Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, Italy
Caesar Santos
Ph.D. Theology
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Edgar Soria
Ph.D. Canon Law
Universidad de Navarra, Spain

Christian Dominguez
M.S. Physical Education
University of the Philippines Diliman
Ma. Del Carmen Elvira Galvez
M.S. Human Movement Science
University of the Philippines Diliman

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

43

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
HUMANITIES
The Bachelor of Arts in Humanities is designed to provide A.B. students with a broad
grasp of the humanistic disciplines. After
taking the liberal arts curriculum common
with that of the M.A. students during the
first three years, they will be introduced to a
more in-depth study of the four fields of the
Humanities in their senior year. The courses
offered aim at developing intellectual awareness through the use of interdisciplinary
approaches.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Because of its intense interdisciplinary approach, the Humanities program opens a
wide range of professions that graduates can
go into and excel in. They can be any of the
following:
• Educator
• Literary/Art critic
• Theater/Film associate
• News/Features writer
• Fictionist
• Historian
• Researcher
• Curator
• Lawyer

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Entry into the AB Humanities program is open
to students who comply with the University’s
admission requirements. They should pass the
UA&P Entrance Exam and complete all documents needed for admission.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer

Total

23 units
23 units
20 units
20 units
24 units
21 units
21 units
18 units
3 units
173 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
For 3rd Year (Undergraduate Level)
Grade
Point
Description
100-99
1.00
Excellent
98-96
1.25
Superior
95-93
1.50
Very Good

44

University of Asia and the Pacific

92-90
89-87
86-84
83-81
80-78
77-75
74-below
For 4th Year
Grade
100-99
98-96
95-93
92-90
89-87
86-84
83-81
80-below

1.75
2.00
2.25
2.50
2.75
3.00
3.50

Point
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.25
2.50
2.75

Good
Satisfactory
Sufficient
Fair
Competent
Pass
Fail

Description
Excellent
Superior
Very Good
Good
Satisfactory
Sufficient
Pass
Fail

COURSES OFFERED
Third Year - First Semester
HIS 201
Introduction to Historical Research
LIT 201
Introduction to Literary Genres
Third Year - Second Semester
ART 201 Introduction to Art Theory
HUM 299 Research Methods
Fourth Year - First Semester
ART 202 Visual Arts
HIS 202
Historiography
HUM 201 Foundations of the Humanities
LAT 101 Latin Module 1
LIT 202
Western Literature
XXX
Humanities Elective #1
Fourth Year - Second Semester
ART 209 Film Theory
HIS 207
Philippine Historiography
HUM 206 Work and Society
HUM 207 History of Ideas
LAT 102 Latin Module 2
LIT 203
Asian Literature
Fourth Year – Summer
HUM 400 Summer Internship Electives
HIS 204
Philippine Women Before the 20th
Century
HIS 208
Spanish Colonial Institutions in
the Philippines
HUM 202 Pedagogy
LIT 205
Emergent Literature
LIT 206
Philippine Narratives

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Introduction to Historical Research (HIS 201)
This course serves as an introductory path
for students seeking an in-depth immerProspectus 2014 - 2016

sion into the research methodologies, philosophies, perspectives, approaches, and
issues encountered in the academic study
of history. It utilizes Philippine history as an
area of discourse and inquiry for exercising
the principles and problematiques in the current scholarship.
Foundations of the Humanities (HUM 201)
The course covers the transmission of ideas
from Classical Greece and Rome to the Postmodern Age. It is multidisciplinary in nature,
with contributions from the four disciplines
of art, literature, philosophy, and history.
Work and Society for Hum (HUM 206)
This course is a philosophical study of work
in the light of its anthropological, sociological, and ethical dimensions. It seeks to
highlight the relevance of work as a human
activity, contributing thus to the development of the worker, co-workers, culture, and
society.
History of Ideas (HUM 207)
The course introduces the students to a
framework for understanding some of the
major philosophical trends in the West from
the pre-Socratic era to the 20th century. Emphasis is given to the historical significance
and genesis of ideas as well as the continuity and discontinuity in the history of development of the thought.
Research Methods (HUM 299)
The course explores various research techniques needed by the students for designing, analyzing, and implementing research
projects in the study of the Humanities.
Summer Internship (HUM 400)
The course requires 60 hours of internship
work at recognized partner institutions.
Latin Module (LAT 101 and LAT 102)
This course is an attempt to familiarize students with the most basic elements of the
Latin language and its history and expose
them to a sampling of its rich literature, from
classical times to the present.
Art Major Subjects
Introduction to Art Theory (ART 201)
This course focuses on the four disciplines
of art: aesthetics, art history, art criticism,
and art production. It allows students to
read selected texts on these disciplines and
converse intelligently. Analyses of particular

45

artworks give focus to a more theoretical and
objective discussion of well-made art, the
concept of beauty, and the creative process.
Visual Arts (ART 202)
This course is a study of the characteristics of
visual art forms, using the process of reading visual images. Painting, sculpture, print
media, and contemporary art expressions are
examined through class discussions, lectures,
conversations with artists, multi-media presentations, and museum visits.
Film Theory and Criticism (ART 209)
This course introduces students to major
theories that have institutionalized the study
of film in academe within the discipline of
Film Studies.
History Major Subjects
Historiography (HIS 202)
This course adopts the historical approach
to provide an overview of the development
of historiography. Attention is given to the
nature and functions of historiography and,
in turn, to their philosophical underpinnings.

Asian Literature (LIT 203)
The course introduces the students to
representative literary production from
countries of Asia and the Pacific, including
Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand,
Vietnam, and New Zealand, written in or
translated to English.
Electives
Philippine Women Before the 20th Century (HIS 204)
This course on the history of women in the
Philippines prior to the 20th century consists
mainly of a critical analysis of major primary
sources for the period covered as well as
contemporary historiography on the subject.
Spanish Colonial Institutions in the Philippines (HIS
208)
This course delves into the history of colonial
Philippines during the Spanish regime and
looks into how the country’s political, social,
economic, and religious traditions began and
flourished. It allows the students to analyze
and critique these institutions that had been
established.

Philippine Women Before the 20th Century (HIS 204 )
This course on the history of women in the
Philippines prior to the 20th century consists
mainly of a critical analysis of major primary
sources for the period covered as well as
contemporary historiography on the subject.

Pedagogy (HUM 202)
This course introduces the art of teaching
and management of learning. It teaches
pedagogy as a craft, an art, as well as a science, as it is governed by certain principles
of instruction and learning based on natural
stages of educational development.

Philippine Historiography (HIS 207 )
This course is a survey of historical writing
about the Philippines from the first available writings until the present-day scholarly
works. It includes works written by foreigners and Filipinos.

Emergent Literature (LIT 205)
The course explores non-canonical literary
texts of the western hemisphere, mirroring
their milieu and their impact on their respective societies.

Literature Major Subjects
Introduction to Literary Genres (LIT 201)
This course mainly focuses on the different
literary genres: poetry, drama, short story,
and the novel, particularly how each came
about, developed, and who popularized
them.
Western Literature (LIT 202)
The course traces the development of Western literature from the Classics produced by
Greece and Rome up to the present trends
in the modern period as well as the latest
developments in these contemporaneous
times.

46

Philippine Narratives (LIT 206)
The course exposes students to a selection
of literary pieces written in the English language, as produced by local Filipino writers.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements of the
program of study by the student.
Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements of
the graduate program and clear all academic
deficiencies.

University of Asia and the Pacific

MASTER OF ARTS IN
HUMANITIES
The Humanities program of the University
of Asia and the Pacific (UA&P) is a holistic
program that aims to build on the students’
passion for history, philosophy, literature,
and the arts. This field of study focuses on
man—his motivations, his capabilities, his
limitations, and those that are universal in
him throughout human history.
The Master of Arts in Humanities students
share a common liberal arts curriculum with
the A.B. students during their first three
years in UA&P. On their third year, they will
begin to take specialized subjects in the
Humanities. Also, in their fifth year, they are
expected to write a thesis based on their chosen field of specialization, either History or
Literature. Upon graduation, they are expected to be familiar with concepts specific to
their chosen field of study on top of having a
good grasp of the different theories belonging to the disciplines of the Humanities.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Because of its intense interdisciplinary approach, the Humanities program opens a
wide range of professions that graduates can
go into and excel in. They can be any of the
following:
• Educator
• Literary/Art critic
• Theater/Film associate
• News/Features writer
• Fictionist
• Historian
• Researcher
• Curator
• Lawyer

QUALIFICATIONS TO 5TH YEAR
A CAS student interested in taking the fifth
year of the M.A. Humanities program has to
abide by the following qualifications:
1. The student needs to have a General
Weighted Average (GWA) of 2.0 or higher
for all subjects taken in the Humanities
program.
2. The student should have passing marks
in all of the Humanities subjects. A failing
mark automatically disqualifies a student
from being accepted into the fifth year.
3. The student should submit a letter of
intent to the Program indicating possible research topics or at least probable
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

47

areas of research. The letter should be
submitted to the Humanities program by
February 1 of the second semester of the
student’s senior year.
4. The student is expected to take a psychological examination (to be administered
by the CSA – Guidance Desk) also within
February of the second semester of the
student’s senior year.
The student’s application will be reviewed by
a panel composed of the Program Director,
Humanities faculty members, and the Humanities Coordinator.
The student will be notified of the decision
of the panel before the end of April, summer
term of the student’s senior year.
Graduates of Other Universities
Those who have completed their bachelor’s
degree at other universities should submit
the following:
1. A copy of his or her transcript of records
(with no failing marks in any of the major
subjects)
2. A letter of intent addressed to the Program Director.
The student should attend the scheduled interview with the panel of senior Humanities
faculty members.
It is only upon completing this process that
the applicant will be accepted into the fifthyear master’s program.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year

Fifth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

26 units
26 units
26 units
26 units
30 units
27 units
18 units
21 units
3 units
9 units
6 units
218 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
For 3rd Year (Undergraduate Level)
Grade
Point
Description
100-99
1.00
Excellent
98-96
1.25
Superior
95-93
1.50
Very Good
92-90
1.75
Good

48

89-87
86-84
83-81
80-78
77-75
74-below

2.00
2.25
2.50
2.75
3.00
3.50

Satisfactory
Sufficient
Fair
Competent
Pass
Fail

For 4th and 5th Year (M.A. Level)
Grade
Point
Description
100-99
1.00
Excellent
98-96
1.25
Superior
95-93
1.50
Very Good
92-90
1.75
Good
89-87
2.00
Satisfactory
86-84
2.25
Sufficient
83-81
2.50
Pass
80-below
2.75
Fail

COURSES OFFERED
Third Year - First Semester
HIS 201
Introduction to Historical Research
LIT 201
Introduction to Literary Genres
Third Year - Second Semester
ART 201 Introduction to Art Theory
HUM 299 Research Methods
Fourth Year - First Semester
ART 202 Visual Arts
HIS 202
Historiography
HUM 201 Foundations of the Humanities
LAT 101 Latin Module 1
LIT 202
Western Literature
XXX
Humanities Elective #1
Fourth Year - Second Semester
ART 209 Film Theory
HIS 207
Philippine Historiography
HUM 206 Work and Society
HUM 207 History of Ideas
LAT 102 Latin Module 2
LIT 203
Asian Literature
XXX
Humanities Elective #2
Fourth Year – Summer
HUM 400 Summer Internship
Fifth Year - First Semester
HUM 203* Sources of Rizal’s Thought
HUM 301 Thesis Writing 1
LIT 204** Literary Theory and Criticism
XXX
Humanities Elective #3
Fifth Year - Second Semester
HUM 205 Philosophy of Art
HUM 302 Thesis Writing 2

University of Asia and the Pacific

Electives
HIS 204* Philippine Women Before the 20th
Century
HIS 208* Spanish Colonial Institutions in
the Philippines
HUM 202 Pedagogy
LIT 205** Emergent Literature
LIT 206** Philippine Narratives
* For those specializing in History
** For those specializing in Literature

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ate student with the guidance needed to
embark on the initial research for the writing
of a thesis paper. It defines and explains the
methodology as well as the ultimate purpose
of graduate research within the fields of
literature and history.
Research Methods (HUM 299)
The course explores various research techniques needed by the students for designing, analyzing, and implementing research
projects in the study of the Humanities.

Introduction to Historical Research (HIS 201)
This course serves as an introductory path
for students seeking an in-depth immersion into the research methodologies, philosophies, perspectives, approaches, and
issues encountered in the academic study
of history. It utilizes Philippine history as an
area of discourse and inquiry for exercising
the principles and problematiques in the current scholarship.

Summer Internship (HUM 400)
The course requires 60 hours of internship
work at recognized partner institutions.

Foundations of the Humanities (HUM 201)
The course covers the transmission of ideas
from Classical Greece and Rome to the Postmodern Age. It is multidisciplinary in nature,
with contributions from the four disciplines
of art, literature, philosophy, and history.

Art Major Subjects
Introduction to Art Theory (ART 201)
This course focuses on the four disciplines
of art: aesthetics, art history, art criticism,
and art production. It allows students to
read selected texts on these disciplines and
converse intelligently. Analyses of particular
artworks give focus to a more theoretical and
objective discussion of well-made art, the
concept of beauty, and the creative process.

Philosophy of Art (HUM 205)
The course analyzes each of the seven fine
arts (architecture, sculpture, painting, music,
dance, poetry, and drama) plus film, using
the concepts of matter and form.
Work and Society for Hum (HUM 206)
This course is a philosophical study of work
in the light of its anthropological, sociological,
and ethical dimensions. It seeks to highlight
the relevance of work as a human activity,
contributing thus to the development of the
worker, co-workers, culture, and society.
History of Ideas (HUM 207)
The course introduces the students to a
framework for understanding some of the
major philosophical trends in the West from
the pre-Socratic era to the 20th century. Emphasis is given to the historical significance
and genesis of ideas as well as the continuity
and discontinuity in the history of development of the thought.
Thesis Writing I and II (HUM 301 and HUM 302)
These courses provide the qualified graduProspectus 2014 - 2016

Latin Module (LAT 101 and LAT 102)
This course is an attempt to familiarize students with the most basic elements of the
Latin language and its history and expose
them to a sampling of its rich literature, from
classical times to the present.

Visual Arts (ART 202)
This course is a study of the characteristics
of visual art forms, using the process of reading visual images. Painting, sculpture, print
media, and contemporary art expressions
are examined through class discussions, lectures, conversations with artists, multi-media
presentation, and museum visits.
Film Theory and Criticism (ART 209)
This course introduces students to major
theories that have institutionalized the study
of film in academe within the discipline of
Film Studies.
History Major Subjects
Historiography (HIS 202)
This course adopts the historical approach
to provide an overview of the development
of historiography. Attention is given to the
nature and functions of historiography and,
in turn, to their philosophical underpinnings.

49

Sources of Rizal’s Thought (HUM 203)
The course examines the philosophical
influences, literary works and trends, historiographical studies, and related scholarly
pursuits that shaped Rizal’s thought, as his
life and writings evince.
Philippine Historiography (HIS 207)
This course is a survey of historical writing
about the Philippines from the first available writings until the present-day scholarly
works. It includes works written by foreigners and Filipinos.
Literature Major Subjects
Introduction to Literary Genres (LIT 201)
This course mainly focuses on the different
literary genres: poetry, drama, short story,
and the novel, particularly how each came
about, developed, and the many authors
who popularized them.
Western Literature (LIT 202)
The course traces the development of Western literature from the Classics produced by
Greece and Rome up to the present trends in
the modern period as well as the latest developments in these contemporaneous times.
Asian Literature (LIT 203)
The course introduces the students to representative literary production from countries
of Asia and the Pacific, including Indonesia,
Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam,
and New Zealand, written in or translated to
English.
Literary Theory and Criticism (LIT 204)
The course introduces students to the origin
of literary theories, their development, and
major exponents as well as the basic tenets
of literary criticism.
Electives
Philippine Women Before the 20th Century (HIS 204)
This course on the history of women in the
Philippines prior to the 20th century consists
mainly of a critical analysis of major primary
sources for the period covered as well as contemporary historiography on the subject.
Spanish Colonial Institutions in the Philippines (HIS
208)
This course delves into the history of colonial
Philippines during the Spanish regime and
looks into how the country’s political, social,
economic, and religious traditions began and
flourished. It allows the students to analyze

50

and critique these institutions that had been
established.
Pedagogy (HUM 202)
This course introduces the art of teaching
and management of learning. It teaches
pedagogy as a craft, an art, as well as a science, as it is governed by certain principles
of instruction and learning based on natural
stages of educational development.
Emergent Literature (LIT 205)
The course explores non-canonical literary
texts of the western hemisphere, mirroring
their milieu and their impact on their respective societies.
Philippine Narratives (LIT 206)
The course exposes students to a selection
of literary pieces written in the English language, as produced by local Filipino writers.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements of the
program of study by the student.
Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements of
the graduate program and clear all academic
deficiencies.

FACULTY
Ma. Cristina Borra
M.A. Liberal Studies
New York University, USA
Ma. Victoria Angela Cayton
M.A. Humanities
University of Asia and the Pacific
Robert Cortes
M.A. Education Leadership
Columbia University, USA
Paul Dumol
Ph.D. Medieval Studies
University of Toronto, Canada
Nanette Dungo
Ph.D. Sociology
University of the Philippines
Laya Boquiren-Gonzales
M.A. Art History
University of the Philippines
University of Asia and the Pacific

Ma. Lourdes Gonzalez
Ph.D. Philippine Studies
University of the Philippines
Ernesto Grio
Ph.D. Education Major in Social Studies
University of the Philippines
Arnel Joven
Ph.D. History
University of the Philippines
Lani Mae Junio
Ph.D. Philosophy
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Leodivico Lacsamana
Ph.D. Philippine Studies
University of the Philippines
Ma. Asuncion Magsino
Ph.D. Philosophy
University of the Philippines
Sophia Marco
M.A. History
University of the Philippines
Jose Maria Arsenio Mariano
Ph.D. Philosophy
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Danielle Young Calantuan-Mejos
M.A. Humanities
University of Asia and the Pacific
Juan Mesquida
Ph.D. History
University of Santo Tomas
Jose Marcelino Nicdao
Ph.D. Comparative Literature
University of the Philippines
Enrique Portugal
M.A. Philosophy
University of the Philippines
Veronica Ramirez
Ph.D. Educational Administration
University of the Philippines
Arthur Joseph Vito Cruz
M.A. Education Major in Liberal Education
University of Asia and the Pacific

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

51

School of
Communication
The School of Communication (SCM) offers
the pioneering program in integrated marketing communications (IMC) in the Philippines
and is a leader in IMC education in Asia.
Formerly the Institute of Communication,
the School draws strength from its multidisciplinary IMC program and its faculty
composed of industry executives and distinguished academicians.
Aside from its ties with the International Advertising Association (IAA), the School has
linkages with the American Marketing Association (AMA), Asian Media Information and
Communication Centre (AMIC), the American
Academy of Advertising (AAA), and the Association for Education in Journalism and
Mass Communication (AEJMC).
SCM confers the following degrees:
• Bachelor of Arts in Integrated Marketing
Communications
• Master of Arts in Communication Major
in Integrated Marketing Communications
• Bachelor of Arts in Media and Entertainment Management

52

University of Asia and the Pacific

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
INTEGRATED
MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
The UA&P School of Communication is
among the first in Asia that offers a Bachelor
of Arts in Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) and a Master of Arts in Communication Major in Integrated Marketing
Communications (IMC).
The IMC program is a response to changes
in the marketplace and in the fields of media
and communication. Effective communication today entails the integrated mix of many
marketing communication disciplines such
as advertising, public relations, brand activation, and digital media marketing. Students
discover the intricacies and nuances of each
discipline. Furthermore, they learn the effective way of putting them together to create
value for brands and businesses.
IMC prepares forward-thinking professionals
for a career in management, as they imbibe
a holistic and strategic approach to business
and brand communications planning that is
audience-focused, data- and results-driven,
channels-centered, and research-based.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The intensive, rigorous, and demanding
program of study ensures that graduates are
highly competitive and highly valued in the
marketing communications industry.
Many are employed by leading local and
global corporations in the following fields:
• Marketing or brand management
• Strategic and account planning
• Market research
• Sales management
• Account management
• Creative copy writing and art direction
• Corporate communications
• Public relations
• Media planning and management

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Entry into the AB IMC program is open to
students who comply with the University’s
admission requirements. They should pass
the UA&P Entrance Exam and complete all
documents needed for admission.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year

Third Year
Fourth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

23 units
23 units
20 units
20 units
6 units
24 units
21 units
25 units
23 units
185 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
For 4th year subjects
98 – 100
1.0
95 – 97
1.25
92 – 94
1.5
89 – 91
1.75
85 – 88
2.0
78 – 84
2.25
70 – 77
2.5 (passing mark)
69 and below
3.0 (failing mark)
For 3rd year subjects
98 – 100
1.0
95 – 97
1.25
92 – 94
1.5
89 – 91
1.75
85 – 88
2.0
80 – 84
2.25
74 – 79
2.5
67 – 73
2.75
60 – 66
3.0 (passing mark)
59 and below
3.5 (failing mark)

COURSES OFFERED
Second Year – Summer
COM 20 Understanding Media and its
Content
COM 21 Business Communication
Third Year – First Semester
COM 314 Communication Research Methods
IMC 30
Brand Communication
Management
Third Year – Second Semester
COM 312 Communication Theory
IMC 32
Advertising Management
Fourth Year – First Semester
COM 42 Communication Ethics and Law
IMC 31
Human Insight
IMC 33
Marketing Communications
Research
IMC 40
IMC Principles and Practice
IMC 41
Creative Strategy and Concept

53

IMC 43
IMC 45

Development
Brand Activation
IMC Business Process

Fourth Year – Second Semester
COM 43 Career Management
IMC 46
IMC Cases and Application
IMC 47
Media Decisions
IMC 48
Digital Marketing
IMC 49
Financial and Managerial
Accounting
IMC 55
Sales and Channel Management
XXX
IMC Elective
XXX
IMC Elective
Electives
IMC 50
IMC 51
IMC 52
IMC 53
IMC 54
IMC 56
IMC 57
IMC 58

Entrepreneurial Marketing
Global Marketing
Copywriting and Art Direction
Direct Marketing/CRM
Public Relations Principles and
Practice
Shoppers Marketing
Service Marketing
Business-to-Business Marketing

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Understanding Media and its Content (COM 20)
The course aims to help students become
critical and discerning consumers of media
and develop a more sophisticated appreciation of the role of media in shaping world
events and popular culture by looking closely
into the interrelated subtopics of media history, media industries, media technologies,
media content, and media impact or effects.
Business Communication (COM 21)
The course covers the fundamentals in business writing and the standards, structures,
and styles of the written word as applied to
the workplace. It also provides knowledge
and insight into the nature and scope of business presentations, speech communication,
and presentation skills.
Communication Theory (COM 312)
This course examines the critical role, function, and impact of communication on life,
history, and culture. Specific emphasis is
given to teaching students how to read,
understand, and analyze information and
messages in everyday media and the life of
the times.
Communication Research Methods (COM 314)
This course is designed to enable students
to have a firm grasp of the primary meth-

54

odological approaches to communication
research.
Major Subjects
Brand Communication Management (IMC 30)
This course aims to provide basic understanding of the brand management discipline with special focus on the communication process and strategies as critical pillars
in building and managing successful brands.
Human Insight (IMC 31)
This course aims to enable students to understand consumers, how they behave, and
how marketers and advertisers can effectively communicate with them. Students are
exposed to different case studies illustrating
how these have led to successful communications across traditional and digital space.
Advertising Management (IMC 32)
The course introduces students to the field
of advertising and promotions, from operations, processes, and products of advertising agencies. It also gives students an
understanding of the major marketing communication disciplines: direct marketing,
interactive media, sales promotion, public
relation, and personal selling.
Marketing Communications Research (IMC 33)
This course introduces the principles and
methods used in the systematic search
for and analysis of information relevant to
marketing decision making. The students
gain (actual) exposure to the entire research
process, grasp its business application, and
learn proper and insightful analysis leading
to actionable recommendations.
IMC Principles and Practice (IMC 40)
The course engages the students in the
concept and process of integrated marketing communications by learning its various
principles and their application to actual
cases.
Creative Strategy and Concept Development (IMC
41)
This course takes students from the crafting
of powerful creative briefs to the creation
of breakthrough and effective campaign
ideas. It enables students to learn how to
focus (the essence of strategic thinking) and
to explore the unexpected (the essence of
creative thinking). They also learn how to
use both to affect consumer behavior.

University of Asia and the Pacific

Communication Ethics and Law (COM 42)
The course covers the study of the basic laws
affecting communication, their limitations,
and their corresponding jurisprudence. It
includes the study of the freedom of expression and privacy in the Internet and cyberspace and its applicable jurisprudence in the
Philippines and, if any, in the United States
and the European Union.
Brand Activation (IMC 43)
The course is a theoretical and practical exposition of activation or experiential marketing and other non-advertising disciplines.
IMC Business Process (IMC 45)
The course focuses on functional integration of marketing with various organizational
units. It also involves analysis of the organization’s core competence.
IMC Cases and Application (IMC 46)
The course involves exposure to and analysis of local and global integrated marketing communications programs conducted
through the case study method.
Media Decisions (IMC47)
This course is designed to give the upcoming
marketing and advertising professional the
necessary media know-how to navigate the
evolving world of marketing communications.
Digital Marketing (IMC 48)
This course is designed to introduce students
to the rapidly evolving world of Internet
marketing for them to understand how developments in digital marketing are affecting
businesses and consumers.
Financial and Managerial Accounting (IMC 49)
The course aims to enable students to utilize
finance as an important decision-making tool
in all facets of their work challenges.
Sales and Channel Management (IMC 55)
This course deals with creative salesmanship
as a key driver of business success. Case
analysis and classroom workshops are used
to enhance student learning and appreciation
of selling techniques.
Electives
Entrepreneurial Marketing (IMC 50)
This course explains the strategic constraints
and issues faced by entrepreneurs and
enables students to answer the question
“What does it take to be a successful entrepreneur?”
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Global Marketing (IMC 51)
The course seeks to introduce students to the
trends that are pushing manufacturing and
marketing companies to market their brands
beyond their home countries and take advantage of the opportunities in today’s world.
Copywriting and Art Direction (IMC 52)
The course introduces students to the craft
of selling through words and pictures.
Direct Marketing/CRM (IMC 53)
The course deals with the identification of a
company’s most valuable customers and the
building of long-term relationships with them.
Public Relations Principles and Practice (IMC 54)
The course identifies the role of public
relations (PR) in the integrated marketing
communications mix and the roles of PR
practitioners in the typical corporate set-up.
The subject enables students to create both
strategic and tactical public relations plans
using the different PR tools.
Shoppers Marketing (IMC 56)
The course aims to enable students to understand the drivers that lead a consumer
to buy or not to buy a product and to know
what marketers can do to influence shopper
behavior.
Service Marketing (IMC 57)
The course studies service quality across
various service industries and focuses on the
need for companies to do better in delivering
quality service to their customers.
Business-to-Business Marketing (IMC 58)
The course discusses the theory and concepts of business marketing in the light
of business practice. It also considers the
subject through two primary themes: the
management of inter-organizational relationships, and the impact of information systems
and technology on contemporary B2B marketing practice.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements of the
program of study by the student.
Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements of
the graduate program and clear all academic
deficiencies.

55

MASTER OF ARTS IN INTEGRATED
MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
The IMC program equips its graduates with
the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively face the challenges of the 21st century
business and communications environment.
Specifically, it aims to produce graduates
with a deep understanding of the human
person, his motivations, needs, and brand
experiences to carry out effective strategic
marketing communications planning and
strategy formulation. Our graduates are
equipped to manage multiple stakeholders
(audiences), content (messages), channels
(media), and results (measurement) of brand
communication programs.
The IMC curriculum is uniquely designed to
develop three competencies: strategic thinking,
creative thinking, and communication skills.
Guided by the virtue of excellence, the curriculum promotes a multidisciplinary perspective
in creating value for customers and managing business organizations. It draws from the
fields of marketing, communications, market
research, consumer psychology, finance, and
business management. More importantly, this
curriculum highlights the need for ethics in formulating ideas and decisions that affect society
at large.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The intensive, rigorous, and demanding
program of study ensures that graduates are
highly competitive and highly valued in the
marketing communications industry.
Many are employed by leading local and
global corporations in the following fields:
• Marketing or brand management
• Strategic and account planning
• Market research
• Sales management
• Account management
• Creative copy writing and art direction
• Corporate communications
• Public relations
• Media planning and management

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Students who obtain a GWA of 2.0 or higher
after their senior year qualify for the oneyear Professional Residency Program. They
will have the opportunity to work with our
corporate partners as graduate students and

56

graduate with a Master’s Degree in Communication, Major in IMC.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year

Third Year
Fourth Year
Fifth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

26 units
26 units
26 units
26 units
6 units
27 units
27 units
22 units
23 units
20 units
22 units
251 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
For 3rd year subjects
98 – 100
1.0
95 – 97
1.25
92 – 94
1.5
89 – 91
1.75
85 – 88
2.0
80 – 84
2.25
74 – 79
2.5
67 – 73
2.75
60 – 66
3.0 (passing mark)
59 and below
3.5 (failing mark)
For 4th year and 5th year subjects
98 – 100
1.0
95 – 97
1.25
92 – 94
1.5
89 – 91
1.75
85 – 88
2.0
78 – 84
2.25
70 – 77
2.5 (passing mark)
69 and below
3.0 (failing mark)

COURSES OFFERED
Second Year – Summer
COM 20
Understanding Media and its
Content
COM 21
Business Communication
Third Year – First Semester
COM 314
Communication Research
Methods
IMC 30
Brand Communication
Management
Third Year – Second Semester
COM 312
Communication Theory
IMC 32
Advertising Management

University of Asia and the Pacific

Fourth Year – First Semester
COM 42
Communication Ethics and Law
IMC 31
Human Insight
IMC 33
Marketing Communications
Research
IMC 40
IMC Principles and Practice
IMC 41
Creative Strategy and Concept
Development
IMC 43
Brand Activation
IMC 45
IMC Business Process
Fourth Year – Second Semester
COM 43
Career Management
IMC 46
IMC Cases and Application
IMC 47
Media Decisions
IMC 48
Digital Marketing
IMC 49
Financial and Managerial
Accounting
IMC 55
Sales and Channel Management
XXX
IMC Elective
XXX
IMC Elective
Fifth Year – First Semester
IMC 501
Marketing Effectiveness Research
IMC 511
Professional Residency
Program 1
IMC 513
Professional Residency
Integration
IMC 529
Marketing Economics Research
Fifth Year – Second Semester
IMC 512
IMC Finance
IMC 521
Professional Residency
Program II
IMC 523
Thesis Integration and Revalida
IMC 530
Leadership in Media and
MarCom Organizations
IMC 540
Business Ethics
Electives
IMC 50
IMC 51
IMC 52
IMC 53
IMC 54
IMC 56
IMC 57
IMC 58

Entrepreneurial Marketing
Global Marketing
Copywriting and Art Direction
Direct Marketing/CRM
Public Relations Principles and
Practice
Shoppers Marketing
Service Marketing
Business-to-Business Marketing

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Understanding Media and its Content (COM 20)
The course aims to help students become
critical and discerning consumers of media
and develop a more sophisticated appreciation of the role of media in shaping world
events and popular culture by looking closely
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

into the interrelated subtopics of media history, media industries, media technologies,
media content, and media impact or effects.
Business Communication (COM 21)
The course covers the fundamentals in business writing and the standards, structures,
and styles of the written word as applied to
the workplace. It also provides knowledge
and insight into the nature and scope of business presentations, speech communication,
and presentation skills.
Communication Theory (COM 312)
This course examines the critical role, function, and impact of communication on life,
history, and culture. Specific emphasis is given to teaching students how to read, understand, and analyze information and messages
in everyday media and the life of the times.
Communication Research Methods (COM 314)
This course is designed to enable students
to have a firm grasp of the primary methodological approaches to communication
research.
Major Subjects
Brand Communication Management (IMC 30)
This course aims to provide basic understanding of the brand management discipline with special focus on the communication process and strategies as critical pillars
in building and managing successful brands.
Human Insight (IMC 31)
This course aims to enable students to understand consumers, how they behave, and
how marketers and advertisers can effectively communicate with them. Students are
exposed to different case studies illustrating
how these have led to successful communications across traditional and digital space.
Advertising Management (IMC 32)
The course introduces students to the field
of advertising and promotions, from operations, processes, and products of advertising
agencies. It also gives students an understanding of the major marketing communication disciplines: direct marketing, interactive
media, sales promotion, public relation, and
personal selling.
Marketing Communications Research (IMC 33)
This course introduces the principles and
methods used in the systematic search
for and analysis of information relevant to

57

marketing decision making. The students
gain (actual) exposure to the entire research
process, grasp its business application, and
learn proper and insightful analysis leading
to actionable recommendations.
IMC Principles and Practice (IMC 40)
The course engages the students in the
concept and process of integrated marketing
communications by learning its various principles and their application to actual cases.
Creative Strategy and Concept Development (IMC 41)
This course takes students from the crafting
of powerful creative briefs to the creation of
breakthrough and effective campaign ideas.
It enables students to learn how to focus (the
essence of strategic thinking) and to explore
the unexpected (the essence of creative
thinking). They also learn how to use both to
affect consumer behavior.
Communication Ethics and Law (COM 42)
The course covers the study of the basic laws
affecting communication, their limitations,
and their corresponding jurisprudence. It
includes the study of the freedom of expression and privacy in the Internet and cyberspace and its applicable jurisprudence in the
Philippines and, if any, in the United States
and the European Union.
Brand Activation (IMC 43)
The course is a theoretical and practical exposition of activation or experiential marketing and other non-advertising disciplines.
IMC Business Process (IMC 45)
The course focuses on functional integration of marketing with various organizational
units. It also involves analysis of the organization’s core competence.
IMC Cases and Application (IMC 46)
The course involves exposure to and analysis of local and global integrated marketing communications programs conducted
through the case study method.
Media Decisions (IMC 47)
This course is designed to give the upcoming marketing and advertising professional
the necessary media know-how to navigate
the evolving world of marketing communications.
Digital Marketing (IMC 48)
This course is designed to introduce students
to the rapidly evolving world of Internet

58

marketing for them to understand how developments in digital marketing are affecting
businesses and consumers.
Financial and Managerial Accounting (IMC 49)
The course aims to enable students to utilize
finance as an important decision-making tool
in all facets of their work challenges.
Sales and Channel Management (IMC 55)
This course deals with creative salesmanship
as a key driver of business success. Case
analysis and classroom workshops are used
to enhance student learning and appreciation
of selling techniques.
Fifth Year
Marketing Effectiveness Research (IMC 501)
This course provides students with the discipline of measuring the impact of marketing
activities. It provides them with a business
focus, ensuring that they understand how to
evaluate marketing programs and activities.
Professional Residency Program I (IMC 511)
This course covers the first half of an academic year of actual work experience in the
field of marketing communications in client
companies or marketing communications
companies.
IMC Finance (IMC 512)
The course focuses on two key tools used in
the quantitative analysis of communication
programs: valuation of customer segments
and estimation of return on customer investments under the contexts of business building and brand building strategies.
Professional Residency Integration (IMC 513)
The course gives students a deeper look into
the world of professional leadership and marketing and communication. Students get firsthand accounts on life in the corporate setting
through a series of talks and workshops given
by some of the biggest names in the business,
marketing, and advertising industries.
Professional Residency Program II (IMC 521)
This course covers the second half of an academic year of actual work experience in the
field of marketing communications in client
companies or marketing communications
companies.
Thesis Integration and Revalida (IMC 523)
This course builds on the learning from all
previous coursework. It assumes that students have acquired enough experience
University of Asia and the Pacific

(during their undergraduate coursework) that
necessitated the application of the principles
of integrated marketing communications.
Marketing Economics Research (IMC 529)
This course tackles business economics for
professionals and practitioners in the marketing profession. Topics include a general
analytical apparatus for industry analysis
and the value chain, cases on various types
of industries, and strategies on pricing in
specific situations and environments.
Leadership in Media and MARCOM Organizations
(IMC 530)
This is an introductory course on virtuous
leadership, which is based on the conviction
that effective leadership is all about developing the human person’s character through
the practice of classical human virtues.
Electives
Entrepreneurial Marketing (IMC 50)
This course explains the strategic constraints
and issues faced by entrepreneurs and
enables students to answer the question
“What does it take to be a successful entrepreneur?”
Global Marketing (IMC 51)
The course seeks to introduce students to the
trends that are pushing manufacturing and
marketing companies to market their brands
beyond their home countries and take advantage of the opportunities and careers in
today’s global world.
Copywriting and Art Direction (IMC 52)
The course introduces students to the craft
of selling through words and pictures.
Direct Marketing/CRM (IMC 53)
The course deals with the identification of
a company’s most valuable customers and
the building of a long-term relationship with
them.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Public Relations Principles and Practice (IMC 54)
The course identifies the role of public
relations (PR) in the integrated marketing
communications mix and the roles of PR
practitioners in the typical corporate set-up.
The subject enables students to create both
strategic and tactical public relations plans
using the different PR tools.
Shoppers Marketing (IMC 56)
The course aims to enable students to understand the drivers that lead a consumer
to buy or not to buy a product and to know
what marketers can do to influence shopper
behavior.
Service Marketing (IMC 57)
The course studies service quality across
various service industries and focuses on the
need for companies to do better in delivering
quality service to their customers.
Business-to-Business Marketing (IMC 58)
The course discusses the theory and concepts of business marketing in the light
of business practice. It also considers the
subject through two primary themes: the
management of inter-organizational relationships, and the impact of information systems
and technology on contemporary B2B marketing practice.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements of the
program of study by the student.
Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements of
the graduate program and clear all academic
deficiencies.

59

MEDIA AND ENTERTAINMENT
MANAGEMENT
Media and Entertainment Management
(MEM) is SCM’s response to emerging global
trends that have been reshaping information
and communication technology today. These
trends have also radically redefined the media and entertainment landscape.
Today’s media environment has changed
the way people and organizations use and
consume media. Media, entertainment, and
business are all converging with the help of
the digital technologies surfacing every day.
As such, there is a compelling need for a
new breed of young minds who understand
how old and new media work in order to create true value.
This program aims to develop media professionals who can adapt to the demands of a
dynamic media and entertainment environment.
The MEM program aims to produce professionals who know how to
• Produce relevant, strategic, and effective
media content;
• Optimize current and emerging media
platforms; and
• Create links between content, media platforms, and business goals.
The MEM curriculum was formulated to integrate learning from three areas:
1. Communication, media and entertainment,
2. Media management and media convergence, and
3. Business management.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of the MEM program are looking
at a bright and promising future ahead. Being educated in a highly relevant program,
their competencies can respond to the many
unconventional, specialized, and recently developed job opportunities that are surfacing
in the media and entertainment today.
Graduates can work as managers and executives of companies within the media and
entertainment industry, both local and international, such as
• TV networks
• Radio networks
• Publishing houses
• Film networks/distribution companies
• Film production
• Music production
Graduates can work as managers and selfmade entrepreneurs that serve local and
international companies, such as
• TV, radio, print companies
• Internet-based business/services
• Content development for businesses
• Telecommunications
• Graphic design outfits for all forms of
media
• Communication agencies with interactive/new media subsidiaries
• Specialized communication agencies
• Art and culture organizations

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Entry into the MEM program is open to
students who comply with the University’s
admission requirements. They should pass
the UA&P Entrance Exam and complete all
documents needed for admission.

ACADEMIC LOAD
The design brings the rich principles, current
practice, and compelling cases from these
areas in order to represent the complex
demands of the media and entertainment industry today. The multidisciplinary perspective is necessary to open the eyes of students
and be fully equipped to face the dizzying
pace in the media environment today.
MEM draws from the disciplines of strategic
business management, digital media management, entertainment culture, interactive
marketing, and integrated marketing communications.

60

First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

18 units
18 units
18 units
21 units
18 units
15 units
22 units
21 units
151 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
For 3rd year
98 – 100
95 – 97
92 – 94

1.0
1.25
1.5
University of Asia and the Pacific

89 – 91
85 – 88
80 – 84
74 – 79
67 – 73
60 – 66
59 and below

1.75
2.0
2.25
2.5
2.75
3.0 (passing mark)
3.5 (failing mark)

For 4th year
98 – 100
95 – 97
92 – 94
89 – 91
85 – 88
78 – 84
70 – 77
69 and below

1.0
1.25
1.5
1.75
2.0
2.25
2.5 (passing mark)
3.0 (failing mark)

COURSES OFFERED
Third Year – First Semester
COM 20
Understanding the Media and
its Content
COM 21
Business Communication
Third Year – Second Semester
COM 314
Communication Research
Methods
MEM 30
Introduction to Management
Fourth Year – First Semester
COM 42
Communication Ethics and Law
IMC 31
Human Insight
IMC 212
Marketing Management
MEM 40
Entertainment Culture and Society
MEM 41
Convergence (Culture,
Communities, and Connectivity)
MEM 42
Media Management and
Leadership
MEM 43
Creativity for Multi-Media
Fourth Year – Second Semester
IMC 49
Financial and Managerial
Acoounting
MEM 44
Media and Integrated Marketing
MEM 45
Media Economics and Technology
MEM 46
Digital Media Management
MEM 47
Entertainment Marketing
XXX
MEM Elective
XXX
MEM Elective
Electives
IMC 32
IMC 54
MEM 50
MEM 51
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Advertising Management
Public Relations Principles and
Practices
Journalism and The Print Media
Film Business and Executive
Production

MEM 52

The Business of Broadcasting
(TV and Radio)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Understanding Media and its Content (COM 20)
This course examines the critical role, function, and impact of communication on life,
history, and culture. Specific emphasis is given to teaching students how to read, understand, and analyze information and messages
in everyday media and the life of the times.
Business Communication (COM 21)
The course covers the fundamentals in business writing and the standards, structures,
and styles of the written word as applied to
the workplace. It also provides knowledge
and insight into the nature and scope of business presentations, speech communication,
and presentation skills.
Communication Law and Ethics (COM 42)
The course covers the study of the basic laws
affecting communication, their limitations,
and their corresponding jurisprudence. It
includes the study of the freedom of expression and privacy in the Internet and cyberspace and applicable jurisprudence in the
Philippines and, if any, in the United States
and the European Union.
Communication Research Methods (COM 314)
This course is designed to enable students
to have a firm grasp of the primary methodological approaches to communication
research.
Human Insight (IMC 31)
This course aims to enable students to understand consumers, how they behave, and
how marketers and advertisers can effectively communicate with them. Students are
exposed to different case studies illustrating
how these have led to successful communications across traditional and digital space.
Advertising Management (IMC 32)
The course provides students with a basic
understanding and appreciation of advertising as a discipline and as a major marketing
communications tool, including its principles
and processes, basic elements, and best
practices. It also acquaints them with the local advertising and marketing industry.
Financial and Managerial Accounting (IMC 49)
The course aims to enable students to utilize
finance as an important decision-making tool
in all facets of their work challenges.

61

Public Relations Principles and Practice (IMC 54)
The course identifies the role of public
relations (PR) in the integrated marketing
communications mix and the roles of PR
practitioners in the typical corporate set-up.
The subject enables students to create both
strategic and tactical public relations plans
using the different PR tools.

Media and Integrated Marketing (MEM 44)
The course focuses on a fully integrated
approach to the marketing of products that
have information and entertainment content
and is designed for students with an interest
in the management of large media companies and in further exploring the media side
of marketing communications.

Marketing Management (IMC 212)
The course introduces students to the basic
concepts, principles, processes, and practices of modern-day marketing. It covers
the nature of marketing and the marketing
planning process, the analysis that must
be undertaken in order to make marketing
decisions, and the decisions that constitute a
marketing plan.

Media Economics and Technology (MEM 45)
The course introduces students to key revenue and expense components of all media
segments (newspapers, radio, television,
cable, and new media) as well as evaluating each medium from the perspective of an
owner, consumer/user, customer/advertiser,
and employee.

Introduction to Management (MEM 30)
This course presents a thorough and systematic coverage of management theory and
practice. It focuses on the basic roles, skills,
and functions of management, with special
attention to managerial responsibility for effective and efficient achievement of goals.

Digital Media Management (MEM 46)
This course addresses new and emerging
business models and strategies in today’s
rapidly evolving media industries. Topics
include, among others, social media, online
marketing, and retail and distribution of digital, audio, and visual content including a la
carte download services.

Entertainment Culture and Society (MEM 40)
This course enables students to analyze the
role and power of entertainment in society,
thereby increasing their understanding and
appreciation of managing and creating entertainment products that promote social values.
Convergence (Culture, Communities and Connectivity) (MEM 41)
The course presents issues on media literacy
and socialization, the rise of mass mediated culture, cyberculture, recent changes in
media industries, and relationship of media
organizations and markets to structures of
power and influence in society.
Media Management and Leadership (MEM 42)
This course uses case-study discussions and
analysis to examine the latest theory and
practice in managing and valuing content,
along with the more traditional work of planning and organizing processes and directing
employees. The course emphasizes broadcast media.
Creativity for Multi-Media (MEM 43)
The course provides opportunities for developing the creative aspects necessary in
any multimedia application. It introduces the
main elements of layout, typography, and
writing for screen in a digital environment.

62

Entertainment Marketing (MEM 47)
This course teaches students to analyze arts,
entertainment, media, and fashion organizations within their environmental context to
determine how to position them in the marketplace. It broadens and deepens students’
knowledge of the management of emotional
connection, community affiliation, and
meaning making.
Journalism and The Print Media (MEM 50)
This course provides practical education and
proficiency in print (newspaper, magazines),
broadcast (television and radio), and online
journalism as well as relevant studies in
humanities such as politics and the history of
journalism.
Film Business and Executive Production (MEM 51)
This course gives an overview of the entire
process of making a film from a director and
a producer’s point of view. It covers scriptwriting, financing a film, casting, post-production (editing, music etc.), distribution, and
getting a cinema release, among others.
The Business of Broadcasting (TV and Radio) (MEM
52)
The course examines how changes in technology, consumer behavior, and deregulation
University of Asia and the Pacific

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Gladys Jane Co-Chan
Special Assistant to the President, MediaQuest Holdings
Commercial Lead for the MultiMedia Office,
Smart Communications Inc.

The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements of the
program of study by the student.

Nanette Diyco
Columnist
BusinessWorld

have transformed the broadcast media industry and its production, distribution, and consumption of content in a digital environment.

Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements of
the graduate program and clear all academic
deficiencies.

FULL-TIME FACULTY
Veronica Isla
Ph.D. Communication
University of the Philippines
Jerome Kliatchko
Ph.D. Public Communication
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Marina Caterina Lorenzo-Molo
Ph.D. Communication
University of the Philippines
Francine Michelle Marie Calero-Racho
Ph.D. Communication
University of the Philippines
Luis Tongco, Jr.
Ph.D. Communication
University of the Philippines

ADJUNCT FACULTY

Raul Esteban
Managing Director
Philippine Survey & Research Center
Pauline Fermin
Managing Director
Acumen Strategic Consulting, Inc.
Merlee Jayme
Chairman and Chief Creative Officer
DM9JaymeSyfu
Fr. Robert Latorre
Assistant Professor
University of Asia and the Pacific
Claire Lopez
Executive Creative Director and CEO
Dyll Communications
Eugene Manalo
Managing Consultant and Partner
Tiger 22 Media Corporation
Eleanor Modesto
CEO Advisor
Lowe Indonesia

Tsirol Araña
Founder and Owner
Eureka Kitchen

Angela Ong
Senior Research Consultant
Leo Burnett Philippines

Chipi Buenafe
Technology Consultant
Hewlett-Packard

Winston Conrad Padojinog, Ph.D.
Dean of School of Management
University of Asia and the Pacific

Javier Calero
Past Chairman and CEO
JWT

Jimmy Puno
Past Chairman, President & CEO
Dentsu Young & Rubicam-Alcantara

Edward Camacho
Marketing Professional and Consultant
Trans-Overseas Industrial Corp.

Toti Soliongco
Partner
Creativelab, Inc.

Liam Capati
Media Director
StarcomMediavest

John Philip Yeung
Managing Director and Consultant for Business Development Practice
Business Outcomes, Inc.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

63

School of
Economics
The School of Economics (SEC) traces its
roots to the very early days of the Center
for Research and Communication (CRC), the
University’s forerunner.
SEC was conceived when CRC began offering courses in Industrial Economics and
Applied Business Economics.
For more than 40 years now, the School has
produced professional economists, corporate
planners, and business analysts occupying
key positions in private firms and government institutions.
Recognized as a leading economics school
and as a catalyst of economic progress in
the Philippines and in Asia, SEC has earned
a reputation for highly relevant economic research. The major areas of its research activities include the fields of economic forecasting, financial markets, wage determination,
and macroeconomics.
SEC confers the following degrees:
• Bachelor of Arts in Economics
• Master of Science in Industrial Economics
• Master in (Strategic) Business Economics
• Master in Applied Business Economics

64

University of Asia and the Pacific

BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN ECONOMICS
The field of Economics is broad; it encompasses issues involving international trade,
stock markets, government policies, economic growth and development, etc. AB
Economics aims to develop in students a rigorous, quantitative, and insightful approach
to understanding the workings of Economics in today’s society. It provides students
with a solid grounding in economic theory/
frameworks. It also aims to develop among
students the analytical and statistical skills
in applying such frameworks in business,
social, financial, and policy sectors. Hence,
there is emphasis on applied research at the
industry and national policy levels.
A number of students choose this course
because it provides a good background for
careers in business, capital markets, law,
banking, real estate, and even entrepreneurship.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates with analytical skills in economics are sought after by employers from the
private and public sectors including international organizations. In general, economists
are needed in commercial and investment
banks, corporations, and consulting firms.
The government sector also offers AB Economics graduates positions as trade analysts, finance specialists, and policy analysts.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Entry into the AB Economics program is
open to students who comply with the
University’s admission requirements. They
should pass the UA&P Entrance Exam and
complete all documents needed for admission.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year

Third Year
Fourth Year
Total

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester

18 units
18 units
18 units
18 units
9 units
21 units
21 units
21 units
21 units
165 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
1.00 – 1.25
1.50 – 1.75
2.00 – 2.25
2.50 – 2.75
3.00
3.50

Excellent
Superior
Good
Competent
Passing
Failed

COURSES OFFERED
Second Year – Summer
ECN 200
Mathematical Economics 1
MGT 200
Introduction to Management
MGT 311
Accounting 1
Third Year – First Semester
ECN 311
Intermediate Macro
ECN 312
Mathematical Economics 2
Third Year – Second Semester
ECN 321
Intermediate Microeconomics
ECN 322
Business Statistics
Fourth Year – First Semester
ECN 411
Economic History
ECN 412
Advanced Macroeconomics
ECN 413
Quantitative Economics 1: Statistical Foundations of Econometrics
ECN 414
Advanced Microeconomics
ECN 415
Research Seminar I
MGT 450
Finance
Fourth Year – Second Semester
ECN 421
Economic Development
ECN 422
Social Economics
ECN 423
Quantitative Economics 2:
Econometrics
ECN 424
Industrial Organization
ECN 425
Research Seminar II
ECN 426
Public Economics
ECN 427
International Economics

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Mathematical Economics 1 (ECN 200)
This introductory course aims to familiarize students with the essential mathematical concepts and techniques necessary for
higher studies in the field of economics. It
deals with optimisation techniques, equilibrium analysis, and comparative statistics,
among other mathematical techniques.
Intermediate Macro (ECN 311)
The course discusses the various effects of
macroeconomic policies and other relevant
parameters/variables on the macroeconomic
environment.

65

Mathematical Economics 2 (ECN 312)
In this introductory course, the topics shift to
dynamic analysis and the tools of differential
and difference equations and their uses in
economic models. It also enables students
to appreciate the literature present in professional journals.
Intermediate Microeconomics (ECN 321)
This course deals with the economic behavior of consumers and producers (firms and
industries). It is meant to help students understand the basis for managerial decisionmaking and the design of public policies.
Business Statistics (ECN 322)
This course aims to provide sufficient background in graduate economics and business
(i.e., econometrics, operations research, decision sciences) and cover the material necessary to enable simple econometric model
building and/or mathematical programming
models in subsequent courses.
Economic History (ECN 411)
The course covers the historical analysis of
economic growth and economic development using theories, concepts, and principles of neoclassical and new institutional
economics.
Advanced Macroeconomics (ECN 412)
This course is oriented toward examining
real-world puzzles in domestic and international macroeconomic events and policies. It
equips students with a framework to analyze
the effects and relationships of the broad
macroeconomy to the internal affairs of a
business or firm.
Quantitative Economics 1: Statistical Foundations of
Econometrics (ECN 413)
The course discusses the mathematics of
statistics. Mathematical statistics that is
designed for econometrics provides students
with the skills needed to do constructive and
rigorous thinking on a vast range of observations, especially of a business and economic
nature.
Advanced Microeconomics (ECN 414)
This course focuses on theories that deal
with the operations of firms and the decision-making process of consumers. It aims
to give students the proper orientation for
analyzing Philippine firms and industries.

66

Research Seminar I (ECN 415)
The course focuses on the importance of
industry analysis to firms in making strategic
decisions. It also introduces students to the
different analytical framework of industrial
organization starting from the works of Bain
to those of Porter, and their points of possible integration.
Economic Development (ECN 421)
This course focuses on the theories of economic growth and economic development.
It highlights the various analytical, empirical, and historical perspectives of economic
development and their applicability to Philippine economic conditions.
Social Economics (ECN 422)
This course integrates the findings and
limitations of mainstream economics with
specific or selected socio-economic issues,
and applies both economic and ethical solutions to such issues.
Quantitative Economics 2: Econometrics (ECN 423)
This course provides students with the key
concepts required for model building and
economic forecasting. The main topics covered are the normal linear regression model,
the violation of its assumptions and their
corresponding methods of correction, and
the various estimation methods for single
equations and systems of equations.
Industrial Organization (ECN 424)
This course is concerned with the study of
the microeconomic behavior of firms. It specifically examines the economic organization
of industry including a survey of theoretical
and applied issues in this field.
Research Seminar II (ECN 425)
The course aims to equip students with a
practical understanding of the macroeconomic environment and help them understand the interrelationships between macroeconomic variables, how changes in one
variable can affect another, and how the
macroeconomic environment as a whole can
affect conditions in specific industries.
Public Economics (ECN 426)
The course tackles the role of the government in a market economy and its financing
and spending activities. Topics include public
goods and externalities, public finance, welfare economics, public choice, and regulatory economics.
University of Asia and the Pacific

International Economics (ECN 427)
This course covers various trade theories
and dwells on trade policies and economic
integration. Special topics such as International Trade in Services, World Trade Organization, and designing foreign trade agreements are also taken up.
Introduction to Management (MGT 200)
This introductory course provides an overview of the four functional areas of management and introduces basic managerial functions, concepts, and processes. It exposes
students, as future managers, to the decision-making processes involved in management functions, provides a basic understanding of the importance of business planning,
and introduces the concept of social responsibility and environmental awareness.
Accounting 1 (MGT 311)
This course is discussed within the context
of business and decision making. It provides
students with adequate background on the
accounting cycle, taking financial reporting
and ethical standards into consideration.
Finance (MGT 450)
This course introduces students to the
fundamentals of accounting and the use of
accounting information in making business
decisions. Financial analysis and management accounting form part of the framework
for discussion.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS
The Master of Science in Industrial Economics, run by the School of Economics, is the
only economics program of its kind in the
country. It was developed in 1969 by two
of the country’s foremost economists, Dr.
Bernardo Villegas and Dr. Jesus Estanislao,
shortly after founding the Center for Research and Communication (CRC). UA&P, a
leading research institution and a catalyst
of economic progress in the Philippines and
in Asia, has earned a reputation for highly
relevant research through the works of its
teachers and students.
An intensive program of academic and
research work, MSIE equips graduates with
the proper mental and intellectual approach,
providing a mix of mathematical expertise
and a thorough understanding of how the
economy and business work. With faculty
members holding doctoral and master’s
degrees from the best institutions around the
world, the students get a truly global education. The students learn from their mentors
who have earned their reputation for highly
relevant research in the fields of economic
forecasting, financial markets, industrial economics, wage determination, and the workings of the economy.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The following are the requirements for
graduation:
1. Completion of all academic and non-academic
requirements
Candidates for graduation must complete
all academic and non-academic requirements of the program and clear all academic
deficiencies. Students are eligible for graduation only if they have successfully completed all the courses in the curriculum; otherwise, they will not be allowed to participate
in the graduation ceremony.
2. Clearance
Students must secure a clearance from
the offices concerned before they are allowed to graduate. The filing of a graduation
clearance on or before the specified deadline
signifies their intention to be included in the
list of graduates.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

The highly relevant training turns out topnotch influential people who decide the
destiny of the global economy. The program
has produced the only international trade
negotiator of the Philippines in the World
Trade Organization, the National Treasurer,
the Filipino Lead Economist of World Bank,
Tariff Commissioner, Senior Undersecretary
of DTI, and senior economic advisers to the
President and several government departments such as DOF, DOTC, DOT, and NEDA.

QUALIFICATIONS TO 5th YEAR
The students are eligible to proceed to the
fifth year when they have a general weighted
average (GWA) of 1.8 for the subjects taken
in the third year (12 units of the economic
subjects) and all the subjects in the fourth
year.
In the fifth year, the students spend a semester working in the field with corporations in
the private and public sectors. This intern-

67

ship begins in the first semester of the fifth
year and gives students a chance to apply
the tools they learn in the classroom to actual business and economic problems. During
the internship, students work for most of the
week in their host organizations and return
to UA&P on Fridays for their coursework.
One of the highlights of the program is for
the students to assist senior executives
enrolled in the Strategic Business Economics Program in their economic forecasting
exercise during an out-of-town conference.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year

Third Year
Fourth Year

Fifth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

26 units
26 units
26 units
26 units
9 units
27 units
27 units
18 units
21 units
6 units
12 units
9 units
233 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
For 3rd year subjects
1.00 – 1.25
1.50 – 1.75
2.00 – 2.25
2.50 – 2.75
3.00
3.50

Excellent
Superior
Good
Competent
Passing
Failed

For 4th and 5th year subjects
1.00 – 1.25
Excellent
1.50 – 1.75
Superior
2.00 – 2.25
Good
2.50
Passing
3.00
Failed

COURSES OFFERED
Second Year – Summer
ECN 200
Mathematical Economics 1
MGT 200
Introduction to Management
MGT 311
Accounting 1
Third Year – First Semester
ECN 311
Intermediate Macro
ECN 312
Mathematical Economics 2

ECN 322

Business Statistics

Fourth Year – First Semester
ECN 411
Economic History
ECN 412
Advanced Macroeconomics
ECN 413
Quantitative Economics 1: Math
Stat
ECN 414
Advanced Microeconomics
ECN 415
Research Seminar 1
MGT 450
Finance
Fourth Year – Second Semester
ECN 421
Economic Development
ECN 422
Social Economics
ECN 423
Quantitative Economics 2:
Econometrics
ECN 424
Industrial Organization
ECN 425
Research Seminar 2
ECN 426
Public Economics
ECN 427
International Economics
Fourth Year – Summer
ECN 510
Special Economic Topics
ECN 520
Economics of Strategy
Fifth Year – First Semester
ECN 500
Practicum
ECN 530
Economic Policy
Fifth Year – Second Semester
ECN 540
Thesis Seminar
ECN 550
Thesis Work

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Mathematical Economics 1 (ECN 200)
This course deals with optimisation techniques, equilibrium analysis, and comparative statistics, among other mathematical
techniques.
Intermediate Macro (ECN 311)
This course delves deeper into the macroeconomic issues of growth, inflation, and the
business cycle. Although the use of calculus
in economic theory, especially optimization, is introduced, the graphical approach is
stressed to reinforce the economic intuition.
The conduct of monetary and fiscal policy for
economic stabilization purposes is tackled.
Mathematical Economics 2 (ECN 312)
This course covers the use of integral calculus, differential equations, and difference
equations in dynamic economic models,
including economic growth models.

Third Year – Second Semester
ECN 321
Intermediate Microeconomics

68

University of Asia and the Pacific

Intermediate Microeconomics (ECN 321)
This second course in microeconomics
tackles the theory of choice from the perspective of the consumer and the firms. The
consumer demand functions and firm supply
curves, as well as cost curves, are derived
graphically.
Business Statistics (ECN 322)
This course instills the basic concepts in
estimation and hypothesis testing needed
in economic research and decision theory.
It covers the topics of probability density
functions, distribution functions, conditional
probability, stochastic independence, and
sufficient statistics.
Economic History (ECN 411)
This course is a study of the economic history of the Philippines from the Pre-Spanish
period to the post-World War II period. The
course also tackles briefly the economic
history of major economies like the United
States and the United Kingdom and significant economic events such as the Great
Depression.
Advanced Macroeconomics (ECN 412)
In this course, the Investment Saving–Liquidity Preference Money Supply model
(IS-LM) is treated in depth, and the aggregate demand and aggregate supply model is
derived. The micro foundations of macroeconomics is treated through individual discussion of consumption, investment, fiscal, and
monetary sectors.
Quantitative Economics 1: Math Stat (ECN 413)
This first course in econometrics has its emphasis on the multiple linear regression model.
The violations of heteroscedasticity and serial
correlation, their implications, and remedies
are discussed. The course stresses the use of
econometrics for empirical work, especially
forecasting and hypothesis testing.
Advanced Microeconomics (ECN 414)
This course presents the major topics in
microeconomic theory regarding partial and
general equilibrium, with special emphasis
on market equilibrium and market failure.
The existence of a utility function is derived
from preferences satisfying classical assumptions of completeness, transitivity, and
non-satiation.

Research Seminar I (ECN 415)
An advanced course in practical industry research, it involves the monitoring and analysis of the different forces affecting an actual
industry assigned to the student. The links
between the various Philippine industries
are studied with the Input-Output model.
It provides an in-depth analysis of market
structures and the forces that shape future
industrial development.
Economic Development (ECN 421)
This course gives an overview of the process of growth and structural change which
various countries have undergone, and thus
deepens the students’ appreciation of the
complex roles of institutions, sectors, resource endowments, national experience,
and the socio-political-cultural matrix. It also
provides a brief a survey of the various ways
economists and thinkers have understood
the mechanics of development.
Social Economics (ECN 422)
This course integrates the findings and
limitations of mainstream economics with
specific or selected socio-economic issues,
and applies both economic and ethical solutions to such issues. The selection is based
on current issues affecting Philippine society
such as the phenomenon of poverty and
microfinance; population and demographic
markets; market-led provision of basic needs
such as food, health, education and shelter;
and family and entertainment.
Quantitative Economics 2: Econometrics (ECN 423)
Econometrics 2 provides the basic tools of
applied econometric analysis. It is based on
regression analysis (covered in Econometrics 1), and it gives a thorough introduction
to the problem of endogeneity with possible
treatments, time series regressions, linear
panel models, and nonlinear probability and
censored outcomes models.
Industrial Organization (ECN 424)
The course extends the theory of market
structure to analyze how firms behave and
compete under various types of markets.
Topics covered include price discrimination,
game theory, research and development,
product differentiation, advertising, vertical
and horizontal integration, and collusion.
Research Seminar 2 (ECN 425)
The course aims to provide the students
with an analytical macro framework of the

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

69

national economy that would enable them to
competently evaluate the significant issues
prevailing in the Philippine setting. Students
are assigned specific sectors of the macroeconomy to monitor and are given exercises
involving the monitoring of macroeconomic
variables.
Public Economics (ECN 426)
This course covers theory and evidence on
government expenditure policy. Topics include the theory of public goods; education;
state and local public goods; redistribution
and welfare policy; social insurance programs such as social security and unemployment insurance; and health care policy.
International Economics (ECN 427)
Starting with David Ricardo’s theory of comparative advantage, this course traces the
development of trade theory up to the modern era, including the Heckscher-Olin and
Stolper-Samuelson theorems and those that
followed. Also covered are trade in capital,
WTO and modern trade agreements, and the
development of free trade areas.
IEP Practicum (ECN 500)
In this course, students undergo an on-thejob training in a private corporation, government agency, research institution, or nongovernment organization to expose them to
the realities of work and enable them to apply economic tools in areas such as strategic
planning, market research, macroeconomic
and industry analysis, or policy research.
Special Economic Topics (ECN 510)
This course deals with topics in economic
fields that build on the core of macroeconomic and microeconomic courses.
Economics of Strategy (ECN 520)
This course aims to explore the overlapping areas of strategy and microeconomics,
especially its subfield, industrial organization. Students are guided in the analysis of
factors shaping the industry environment
and competitive advantage of firms. Topics
include product positioning and differentiation, diversification, vertical integration,
pricing, strategic commitments, and entry
deterrence.
Economic Policy (ECN 530)
This is an integrative course which provides
the students with opportunities to synthesize
the economic theories, historical trends, and

70

the quantitative techniques absorbed in the
previous courses. An analysis of specific
policies implemented in the Philippines and
in the countries within the Asia-Pacific region
is presented.
Thesis Seminar (ECN 540)
This course assists the students in conceptualizing, organizing, and developing their
masteral thesis proposal, survey of related
literature, and analytical framework through
lectures, thesis proposal presentations, and
workshops.
Thesis Work (ECN 550)
This course consists primarily of independent research work and consultation with a
thesis advisor and a committee on the graduate student’s thesis research problem. There
may be occasional lectures on specialized
topics necessary for the research problem.
Introduction to Management (MGT 200)
This course provides an overview of the four
functional areas of management and exposes
the students to the decision-making processes
involved in management functions. It also provides a basic understanding of the importance
of business planning and introduces the concept of social responsibility and environmental
awareness.
Accounting 1 (MGT 311)
This is designed as an introductory course in
accounting for students who intend to become professional managers with an entrepreneurial and ethical mindset. The typical
transactions and accounting problems of
single proprietorships engaged in service
and merchandising businesses provide the
framework for discussion.
Finance (MGT 450)
This course covers basic financial management as the body of fundamental concepts,
principles and techniques applicable to
decision making with an eye toward creating
economic value or wealth.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The following are the requirements for
graduation:
1. Completion of all academic and non-academic requirements
2. Submission of bound thesis
3. Clearance

University of Asia and the Pacific

In order to graduate/march on time, a fifthyear student must be able to write and defend his thesis successfully on or before the
prescribed date set by the Registrar (usually
on the first week of May).
A student who is not able to complete his/
her thesis on time will be given a grade of
INC (incomplete) in thesis work, and will be
given until the end of the first semester of
the following school year to finish the thesis.
If he/she is still not able to finish the thesis
by the end of the first semester and finishes
it the following semester, then he/she will be
required to pay a thesis fee equivalent to 1
unit x fee per unit. Extensions after the student has exceeded the Maximum Required
Residency (MRR) are always subject to the
approval of the School of Economics Operations Committee.
The above requirements also apply to those
students who did not graduate (i.e., still lack
some units) and decide to come back to finish their degree.

FACULTY
Victor Abola
Ph.D. Development Management
University of Asia and the Pacific

George Manzano
Ph.D. Economics
University of New South Wales, Australia
Kristine Joy Martin
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Bienvenido Nito
Master in Business Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Edwin Pineda
M.P.S. Economics
Cornell University, USA
Ma. Cherry Lyn Rodolfo
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Cid Terosa
Ph.D. Economics
Hokkaido University, Japan
Peter Lee U
Ph.D. Economics
Purdue University, USA
Bernardo Villegas
Ph.D. Economics
Harvard University, USA

Mary Grace Agner
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Rachel Lynn Belandres
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Amado Castro
Ph.D. Economics
Harvard University, USA
James Caswang
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Jovi Dacanay
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Roberto de Vera
Ph.D. Economics
University of Pittsburgh, USA
Viory Yvonne Janeo
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

71

STRATEGIC BUSINESS
ECONOMICS PROGRAM
The Strategic Business Economics Program (SBEP) is designed for experienced executives who hold top management positions
and play an active role in formulating and
implementing the overall strategies and management policies of their organizations. The
program enables senior executives to
• Broaden their perspective and enhance
their capacity to handle strategic and
long-term policy issues that confront
their organizations;
• Identify the fundamental trends and
changes taking place in the national and
international economies, and understand
how these influence the performance and
prospects of regions, sectors, industries,
and their specific business firms;
• Access key research information to make
successful and strategic business decisions; and
• Optimize limited resources of their organization so that it becomes adaptable to
changes in the business environment,
thus, creating opportunities for growth.
With a flexible and convenient schedule for 11
months, top-class and business-honed professors, and networking opportunities involving
government officials and business leaders,
participants return to their organization reenergized and equipped with strategies and
innovative solutions leading it to success in the
new global competitive environment.
The SBEP offers senior executives a Certificate in Business Economics (CBE) and a Master in Business Economics (MBE).

PROGRAM COVERAGE
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Economics of a Nation
Economic History and Development
Economic Forecasting
Economic Policy 1
Economic Policy 2
Economic Statistics
Economics of an Industry
Economics of Finance
Economics of a Firm
Research Seminar 1: Corporate Planning
Social Economics 1
Social Economics 2
Social Economics 3
Thesis 1
Thesis 2

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Senior executives interested in our unique
executive program may comply with the following:
1. Submit an application form with the corresponding application fee.
2. Attend a program orientation to be followed by an interview with the Program
Director.
For other queries on the SBEP, please contact
The Strategic Business Economics Program,
6/F APEC Communications Building, Pearl
Drive, Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1605.
Direct Lines: (632) 634-2820 and (632) 6343095
Trunk Line: (632) 637-0912 to 26 local 222
Facsimile: (632) 634-2821
Email: sbep@uap.asia
URL: www.uap.asia

PROGRAM DELIVERY
The study sessions feature monthly lectures,
case discussions, workshops, and research
presentations by UA&P economists and
guest lecturers who represent a cross-section
of Philippine business.
There are also two out-of-town conferences
held for three consecutive days on selected
weekends to give the participants an opportunity to compare notes with one another
while in a more relaxed environment. The
program also arranges informal dialogues
and get-togethers with top government officials and business leaders to keep abreast
with topics of current interest.

72

University of Asia and the Pacific

APPLIED BUSINESS
ECONOMICS PROGRAM
The Applied Business Economics Program
(ABEP) is designed for staff people who assist top executives in corporate planning and
research, and for line people who would like to
build strong theoretical foundations in planning. Thus, corporate analysts and middlelevel managers who have such responsibilities
and objectives are encouraged to apply.
The program aims to provide the participants
with (1) an awareness of and sensitivity to the
issues and problems confronting the nation,
and (2) opportunities to apply economic
research techniques and develop analytical
and problem-solving skills, especially those
necessary to understand and evaluate the
economic environment.
The ABEP allows the participants to relate
current economic conditions and issues to
business operations at the firm level using
UA&P’s wealth of local and international research data. Since the participants are gainfully employed, the program applies to their
industry and institutional needs.

PROGRAM DELIVERY
The program runs for two years. The first
one-and-a-half years are primarily devoted
to seminars and workshops. The last semester of the second year covers thesis writing
and defense. The program consists of 36
academic units leading to a Master of Arts in
Applied Business Economics.
The program begins in July. The courses are
given in eight modules that have two subjects each. Each subject runs once a week for
ten weeks. Class hours are from 6:00 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m. every Tuesday for the Weekday
Section and from 9:00 am to 12:00 nn every
Saturday for the Weekend Section. It features
lectures, research presentations, and class
discussions.

PROGRAM COVERAGE
1. Economics of a Nation
2. Business Economics Statistical Techniques
3. Corporate Accounting
4. Economics of a Firm
5. Applied Econometrics
6. Corporate Aspects of Finance
7. Economic Development
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

Economic Policy
Industry Analysis
Operations Management
Corporate Aspects of Human Resource
Applied Business Economics Research
Business Ethics
Corporate Aspects of Marketing
Research Seminar
Thesis / Non-Thesis (Paper)

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
For admission to the program, each applicant must
1. Hold a bachelor’s degree from any college or university,
2. Have at least two years of work experience,
3. Submit
a. Collegiate transcript of record
b. Accomplished application form
c. Three letters of recommendation (one
from the immediate supervisor, one
from a former professor, and one from
a general character reference)
d. Four passport size pictures; and
4. Pass the qualifying examination to be
administered by UA&P.

DEGREE
The program is recognized by the Commission on Higher Education as a full-fledged
graduate degree course. The student receives
a master’s degree in Applied Business Economics, provided he meets the following
requirements:
1. Completion of academic requirements (attendance, research and integration papers,
examinations for the courses prescribed in
the curriculum), with no grade lower than
2.5, and
2. Submission, defense, and approval of a
thesis. The thesis must address an issue
in the industry, the sector, or the corporation the participant is in, and must demonstrate the analytical tools and skills
acquired from the program.

APPLICATION
Those interested may contact the Office of
the ABEP Director, University of Asia and
the Pacific, Pearl Drive, Ortigas Center, Pasig
City, Metro Manila.
Telephone number: 637-0912 to 26 loc. 375
Telefax number: 637-8549
E-mail: abep@uap.asia

73

School of
Education and
Human
Development
The School of Education and Human Development (SED) aims to be a catalyst to enable educators, parents, and teachers in the
Asia-Pacific region to carry out their teaching
work with personal and professional excellence anchored on technical competence and
human virtues.
To carry out its vision, the School reaches
out to a broad sector of educators—parents,
teachers, education officials, community
organizers, and others directly engaged in
development or professional education. The
School carries out institutional, national, and
regional research in major areas of development education. It organizes lectures and
seminars and develops programs for community leaders from the national down to
the barrio level.
SED confers the following degrees:
• Bachelor of Science in Child Development and Education
• Bachelor of Science in Human Capital
Development
• Master of Arts in Education Major in
Child Development and Education
• Master of Arts in Education Major in Educational Leadership
• Master in Education Major in Child Development and Education
• Master in Education Major in Educational
Leadership

74

University of Asia and the Pacific

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHILD
DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION
The Education program of the University
of Asia and the Pacific (UA&P) provides a
solid preparation for a career in education by
grounding in four areas of learning: foundational subjects, psychology, specialization
subjects, and research. These four areas of
learning are studied from and integrated by a
perspective that views the family as the first
school and parents as the primary educators
of their children.
The program offers a strong liberal arts
curriculum and rigorous courses in early
childhood education (the first eight years of
childhood). The Child Development and Education specialization forms early childhood
educators and specialists who can effectively
blend theory and practice to create positive
learning opportunities and experiences that
promote the total development of young
children.
Undergraduates attend six Field Study
courses intended to provide them with practical learning experiences related to different
components of teaching-learning processes
in actual school settings. The experiences
begin with field observation and gradually
build up toward Practice Teaching in early
childhood education (preschool setting and
the primary grades).
The program also prepares students to be
eligible to take the Professional Licensure
Examination for Teachers and pursue a master’s degree in related fields such as Special
Education, Reading, Developmental Psychology, Early Childhood Education, and Family
Life and Child Development.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of the program work as preschool
and primary school teachers, administrators, or owners; as child education program
designers, managers, or consultants; and
as specialists or policy advocates on childrelated issues.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
For admission to the program, each applicant must
1. Hold a bachelor’s degree from any college or university,

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

2. Have at least two years of work experience,
3. Submit
a. Collegiate transcript of record
b. Accomplished application form
c. Three letters of recommendation (one
from the immediate supervisor, one
from a former professor, and one
from a general character reference)
d. Four passport size pictures; and
4. Pass the qualifying examination to be
administered by UA&P.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd Semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

23 units
26 units
27 units
27 units
9 units
24 units
21 units
9 units
15 units
16 units
197 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
Grade
96-100
91-95
86-90
81-85
75-80
70-74

Point
1.00-1.25
1.50-1.75
2.00-2.25
2.50-2.75
3.00
3.50

Description
Excellent
Superior
Very Good
Good
Competent
Failed

COURSES OFFERED
First Year – Second Semester
EDCP 120 Child and Adolescent
Development
Second Year – First Semester
EDC 210
Educational Technology 1
EDC 211
Field Study 1
EDC 212
Infants and Toddlers
Development Program
EDC 213
Basic Child Health, Safety and
Nutrition
EDC 324
Theories and Approaches to
Early Childhood Education
Second Year – Second Semester
EDC 221
Facilitating Learning
EDC 222
Educational
Technology 2
EDC 223
Curriculum Development
EDC 224
Principles of Teaching 1
EDC 225
Field Study 2

75

EDC 226

Play in Child Development

Second Year – Summer
EDC 227
The Child’s Learning Environment
EDC 228
Trends and Issues in Preschool
Education
EDC 426
Family and Developmental
Psychology III: Introduction to
Home and Family Life
Third Year – First Semester
EDC 311
Philosophy of Education
EDC 314
Principles of Teaching 2
EDC 315
Assessment of Student Learning 1
EDC 316
Field Study 3
EDC 317
Field Study 4
EDC 525
Media Literacy
EDCP 127 Curriculum and Instruction in
Early Childhood Programs
Third Year – Second Semester
EDC 321
Child Development and Education 1: Practice and Strategies in
Teaching Language, Arts, Literature, and Social Studies for
Young Learners
EDC 322
Developmental Variations: Introduction to Special Education
EDC 326
Developmental Reading 1
EDC 327
Assessment of Student Learning 2
EDC 328
Field Study 5
EDC 329
Field Study 6
EDC 330
Legal Foundations of Education
and Child’s Rights
EDC 412
Child Development and Education 2: Math, Science, and
Health for Early Education
Third Year – Summer
EDC 331
Parent Education
EDC 341
Guidance and Counseling in
Preschool Education
EDC 423
Child Development and Education 3: Music and Movement,
Arts and Crafts, Blocks and Dramatic Play for the Early Education Classroom
Fourth Year – First Semester
EDC 411
The Teaching Professions
EDC 414
Practice Teaching 1
EDC 417
Preschool Materials Development
EDC 427
Inclusive Education
EDC 514
Organization and Management
of Early Childhood Programs

EDC 429
EDC 430
EDC 431
EDP 222

Social Dimensions of Education
Developmental Reading 2
Character Education for Young
Children
Home-School-Community
Collaboration

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Educational Technology 1: Principles and Theories
of Educational Technology (EDC 210)
This course introduces the basic learning
theories and principles as bases in the design,
development, implementation, and evaluation
of instruction, using educational technology.
Field Study 1 (EDC 211)
This course is designed to help Education
students verify the behavior of children in an
actual classroom setting.
Infants and Toddlers Development Program (EDC 212)
This course focuses on the planning, implementation, and evaluation of developmentally appropriate programs and routines that
nurture and meet the needs of infants and
toddlers.
Basic Child Health, Safety and Nutrition (EDC 213)
This course prepares students to create and
maintain a safe and healthy environment for
children and to create and maintain policies
that uphold that kind of environment.
Facilitating Learning (EDC 221)
This is a basic course on contemporary
theories and research on the cognitive, metacognitive, motivational, socio-cultural, and
individual difference factors in the acquisition of knowledge.
Educational Technology 2: Selection, Production
and Utilization of Appropriate Technology Tools for
Instruction (EDC 222)
This course is designed to introduce both
traditional and innovative technologies to
facilitate and foster meaningful and effective learning. The course likewise focuses
on both developing teacher support materials and the production of technology-based
student outputs.
Curriculum Development (EDC 223)
The course aims to develop teachers who can
adjust and be flexible in designing and implementing curricula in learning environments for
different students in different contexts.

Fourth Year – Second Semester
EDC 428
Practice Teaching 2

76

University of Asia and the Pacific

Principles of Teaching 1 (EDC 224)
The course deals specifically with the principles of effective instruction and the concomitant processes involved: instructional
planning and demonstration teaching.
Field Study 2 (EDC 225)
In this course, students are expected to verify
the cognitive, metacognitive, motivational,
socio-cultural, and individual differences
factors in the acquisition of knowledge in the
classroom setting.
Play in Child Development (EDC 226)
The course is designed to help students
develop understanding and appreciation of
the complex relationships between play and
learning. Of particular interest in this course
is the use of different assessment tools in
evaluating the different play activities of
children.
The Child’s Learning Environment (EDC 227)
This course enables the students to identify
and examine the basic components of quality
and effectiveness in early childhood program
setting and how these criteria impact curriculum and the teaching-learning process.
Trends and Issues in Preschool Education (EDC 228)
This course covers current developments
and breakthroughs in preschool education
(e.g., multiple intelligences, teaching multiage, multicultural teaching, parental involvement, peer teaching, and emergent literacy).
Philosophy of Education (EDC 311)
This is a theoretical study of the reality of
education as a human activity. Specifically, it
involves a philosophical consideration of the
nature of education, its end, dimensions, and
the agents of education.
Principles of Teaching 2 (EDC 314)
The course provides prospective basic education teachers with knowledge and understanding of the subject areas in the curriculum. Topics include foundation disciplines,
structural components, and models of teaching and assessment strategies.
Assessment of Student Learning 1 (EDC 315)
The course focuses on the development and
utilization of assessment tools to improve
the teaching-learning process. A very important focus of this course is the application of
developmentally appropriate principles and
practices in assessing young children.
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Field Study 3 (EDC 316)
This course further enriches the students’
experiences in preparing teaching aids for
classroom use.
Field Study 4 (EDC 317)
This course allows the students to utilize
various teaching techniques in teaching a
subject area.
Child Development and Education 1: Practice and
Strategies in Teaching Language Arts, Literature,
and Social Studies for Young Learners (EDC 321)
The course promotes the development of
skills and techniques for working with children from K-6 in the field of language arts,
literature, and social studies. It also promotes the importance of building a strong
curriculum in the early years to develop a
lifelong love for learning.
Developmental Variations: Introduction to Special
Education (EDC 322)
This course is designed to provide CDE students with a broad and comprehensive orientation about children with special needs.
Current assessment practices and intervention strategies in Early Childhood Special
Education are discussed.
Theories and Approaches to Early Childhood Education (EDC 324)
The course examines the history, scope,
and philosophies of various early childhood
programs. It provides students with a better
understanding of the impact of the physical,
material, and social organization of the instructional environment on the young learner.
Developmental Reading 1 (EDC 326)
This course focuses on the enrichment of
reading proficiency in preparation for the
introduction to the nature of the reading process. Part of the course deals with a comprehensive view of the psychology of reading.
Assessment of Student Learning 2 (EDC 327)
The course focuses on the development and
utilization of alternative forms of assessment
in measuring authentic learning. Emphasis is given on how to assess process- and
product-oriented learning targets as well as
affective learning.
Field Study 5 (EDC 328)
This course allows the students to have
hands-on experiences in designing an assessment tool, launching this tool in the

77

classroom, and evaluating the results on the
basis of the principles of testing.
Field Study 6 (EDC 329)
This course provides opportunities for the
students to explore the utilization of alternative
assessment tools in actual classroom setting.
Legal Foundations of Education and Child’s Rights
(EDC 330)
This course focuses on the legal foundations
and aspects of education, including child’s
rights, and provides the prospective teacher
with adequate instruction and training on
the legal issues affecting public and private
schools.
Parent Education (EDC 331)
This course focuses on the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of
psycho-educational programs aimed at helping parents of young children understand
child development.
Guidance and Counseling in Preschool Education
(EDC 341)
This course is an overview of the theoretical
and philosophical foundations of guidance
and counseling and their applications to
school and family contexts.
The Teaching Professions (EDC 411)
The course deals with the teacher as an
individual and as a classroom teacher, a
community teacher, and a global teacher. It
also covers the teachers’ status, the levels of
professional rewards, and professionalism to
improve competencies.
Child Development and Education 2: Mathematics,
Science, and Health for Early Education (EDC 412)
The course aims to develop a new way of
seeing math, science, and health, consequently making them more accessible to
students. The students undergo intense
training in the practice of science and math
education as well as in the creation of teacher-made instructional materials.
Practice Teaching1: Field Experiences in Pre-school
Setting (EDC 414)
This course is primarily a student immersion
in accredited preschool settings. It provides a
venue for the students to apply what they have
learned in their Education courses, enabling
them to gain practical experience in teaching.
Preschool Materials Development (EDC 417)
The course engages the students in the discus-

78

sion of the different levels of development of
pre-school children, which helps determine the
appropriateness of the materials for children.
Students in this course acquire skills in planning, designing, preparing, using, and evaluating different instructional materials.
Child Development and Education 3: Music and
Movement, Arts and Crafts, Blocks and Dramatic
Play for the Early Education Classroom (EDC 423)
The course gives students the opportunity
to become familiar with the various approaches, methods of teaching, and developmentally appropriate materials to be used in
guiding children’s development, specifically
in creative growth.
Family and Developmental Psychology III: Introduction to Home and Family Life (EDC 426)
Through this course, teachers in the early
grades understand the family as the primary
context of child learning and development.
The course considers current issues and
trends that affect family and, consequently,
child development.
Inclusive Education (EDC 427)
The course provides students with a theoretical framework for understanding and
working with young children with special
needs as they are accommodated and
mainstreamed in a regular class. Students
are given opportunity to observe inclusion
sessions in selected schools.
Practice Teaching 2: Field Experiences in Primary
Grades (EDC 428)
This course provides a venue for the CDE
students to apply what they have learned in
the different coursework, enabling them to
gain practical experience in teaching young
children from Grades 1 to 3.
Social Dimensions of Education (EDC 429)
The course is an introduction to social science (economic, socio-cultural, political,
geographical, and environmental processes)
theory and research as it relates to education and to understanding the four pillars of
learning, which are fundamental in making
critical and logical decisions as an active
member in society and as a global citizen.
Developmental Reading 2 (EDC 430)
The course covers theories, techniques, and
materials in teaching beginning reading and
their application.

University of Asia and the Pacific

Character Education for Young Children (EDC 431)
The course dwells on the nuances of main
and secondary concepts in the education in
values, character, and morals, drawing out
fine distinctions between them and their
pedagogical implications. Likewise, ethical
issues and cases facing contemporary society,
especially in a pre-school setting, are covered.
Organization and Management of Early Childhood
Programs (EDC 514)
This course aims to provide students with
a variety of opportunities to apply their
knowledge of the basic principles of designing developmentally appropriate curriculum
and programs for the improvement of the
necessary systems and operations among
existing early education programs.
Media Literacy (EDC 525)
This one-unit, 17-hour course provides an
overview of the impact of multimedia exposure on human development with particular
focus on childhood and adolescence.
Child and Adolescent Development (EDCP 120)
This is a basic course on child and adolescent development, focusing on current
research and theory on the biological, linguistic, cognitive, social, and emotional
dimensions of development and the factors
that affect the progress of development.
Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Programs (EDCP 127)
This course provides a detailed examination of
developmentally appropriate early childhood
curricula and how to develop these curricula.
Home-School-Community Collaboration (EDP 222)
This course enables the students to draw up
effective strategies in collaborating with the
parents for the young learners’ growth, learning, and development. Students get to know
the varied responsibilities of teachers, social
services providers and administrators, as well
as family members and caregivers to the holistic development of the young learner.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

79

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
HUMAN CAPITAL DEVELOPMENT
The Human Capital Development program
of the UA&P School of Education and Human Development is the first of its kind in
the country. It aims to produce graduates
who can design, conduct, manage, and assess learning and workplace programs that
will help individuals and groups in various
types of organizations enhance their performance, productivity, and employability.
The curriculum is highly interdisciplinary,
drawing and fusing elements from education, psychology, business management,
economics, sociology, and the liberal arts.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of the program can ably fill
positions related to human resource and
organizational development and can best
function as learning specialists, training and
development program managers or officers,
and organizational performance analysts in
business enterprises, government agencies,
foundations, schools, and other not-for-profit institutions. They will also make excellent
management trainees.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Entry into the BS HCD program is open to
students who comply with the University’s
admission requirements. They should pass
the UA&P Entrance Exam and complete all
documents needed for admission.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

23 units
23 units
23 units
23 units
6 units
21 units
21 units
6 units
18 units
15 units
179 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
Grade
96-100
91-95
86-90
81-85
75-80
70-74

80

Point
1.00-1.25
1.50-1.75
2.00-2.25
2.50-2.75
3.00
3.50

Description
Excellent
Superior
Very Good
Good
Competent
Failed

COURSES OFFERED
First Year – Second Semester
HCD 101
Fundamentals of Management
and Leadership
Second Year – First Semester
HCD 210
Introduction to Educational Research and Statistics
HCD 211
Foundational Psychology for
Human Capital Development
Second Year – Second Semester
HCD 221
Philosophical Anthropological
Foundations of Human Capital
Development
HCD 222
Business, Industries and Societies
HCD 223
Human Capital Development
HCD 224
Fundamentals of Systems and
Strategic Thinking
Second Year – Summer
HCD 225
Human Behavior in Organizations
HCD 226
The Human Resource Function
in Organizations
Third Year – First Semester
HCD 311
Psychology of Learning and
Performance
HCD 312
Performance Management
Systems I
HCD 313
Psychometrics for Assessment
HCD 314
Organizational Learning and
Communication
Third Year – Second Semester
HCD 320
The Knowledge Economy and
Knowledge Management
HCD 321
Performance Management
Systems II
HCD 322
Training for Performance and the
High-Performance Workplace
HCD 323
Project Management
Third Year – Summer
HCD 324
Internship
Fourth Year – First Semester
HCD 410
Psychology of Change: Social
Change, Organizational Change
and Development
HCD 411
Workplace Learning Programs I
Fourth Year – Second Semester
HCD 420
Human Capital Development
and Strategic Management
HCD 421
Business Policy
HCD 422
Workplace Learning Programs II

University of Asia and the Pacific

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Fundamentals of Management and Leadership (HCD
101)
This course is a theoretical discussion and
presentation of application techniques of
management and leadership principles. It
provides students with an overview of business functions—from operations to support—and an introduction to organizational
leadership, and how the two areas are both
distinct and related.
Foundational Psychology for Human Capital Development (HCD 211)
This course covers three fields in psychology—industrial/organizational, developmental, and consumer psychology—that provide
foundational theories and concepts for the
students’ appreciation of human development, organizational dynamics, and customer behavior.
Philosophical Anthropological Foundations of Human Capital Development (HCD 221)
This course engages the students in a
philosophical study of concepts used in the
discourse of human resource development
(HRD) practitioners and their implications in
HRD practice.
Business, Industries and Society (HCD 222)
The course is a sociological examination of
the role of businesses in the formation of
industries, and how industries in turn affect
society’s evolution. It introduces students to
systematic thinking, emphasizing the interrelationships among the three entities, highlighting as well the cycle’s back flow where
societies influence the growth of businesses
and, consequently, of industries.
Human Capital Development (HCD 223)
This course introduces students to the
broader and more strategic notion of human development in organizations. It traces
the development of the area and highlights
the processes—formal and informal—that
develop human capital through investments
in the education, training, experience, and
health of people.
Fundamentals of Systems and Strategic Thinking
(HCD 224)
This course introduces students to the concepts, principles, and processes governing
systems and strategic thinking. The two are
taken together to emphasize the interplay
and dynamic interaction between multiple
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

stakeholder consideration in business analysis in the achievement of tactical and continuing objectives.
Human Behavior in Organizations (HCD 225)
The course orients students to management
and psychological principles governing individual and group behavior in organizations,
and how such concepts are applied in organizational issues such as employee motivation, performance, satisfaction, discipline,
and organizational socialization.
The Human Resource Function in Organizations (HCD
226)
The course covers the different functions
of human resource in organizations, such
as manpower planning and recruitment,
performance management and compensation, employee relations and discipline, and
human resource information systems design
and maintenance.
Psychology of Learning and Performance (HCD 311)
The course tackles theories, concepts, principles, and techniques that will prepare students in the formulation and implementation
of organizational learning and performance
programs. Topics include cognitive psychology, behavioral psychology, motivation, and
social learning, among others.
Performance Management Systems I (HCD 312)
This course covers the theories and concepts
related to the various phases of the performance management system—planning,
monitoring, performance evaluation, and
application—as they are tied to the different
functional areas of the organization and to
compensation management.
Psychometrics for Assessment (HCD 313)
The course orients students to the principles
and techniques of psychological measurement and the use of the same in the design,
monitoring, and evaluation of learning and
change interventions.
Organizational Learning and Communication (HCD 314)
The course provides the students with
theories on the learning and communication process in the context of the changing
organizations. The two processes—learning
and communication—are taken together to
emphasize the dynamic interplay between
designing interventions and effectively communicating such to facilitate collaboration
and change processes.

81

The Knowledge Economy and Knowledge Management (HCD 320)
This course orients students to the history
and features of the knowledge economy and
the consequent growth of knowledge-based
businesses and organizations. It also covers
the principles and concepts governing the
management of such resources and businesses.

Psychology of Change (HCD 410)
The course covers special fields in developmental, social, and organizational psychology, particularly resiliency and resistance,
social change, and organizational change.
Mainly conceptual and theoretical, the
course provides psychological grounding for
students in the design and implementation
of change interventions in organizations.

Performance Management Systems II (HCD 321)
This course allows students to design performance management programs based on
sound theoretical and conceptual grounding and using effective tools and techniques
such as mentoring, coaching, counseling,
and feedback.

Human Capital Development and Strategic Management (HCD 420)
The course allows students to apply their
knowledge of the HCD field to strategic
thinking and programming. Its approach is
integrative, linking the student’s conceptual
knowledge and workplace exposure in understanding the critical role of human capital
in pursuing organizational strategies.

Training for Performance and the High-Performance
Workplace (HCD 322)
The course imparts techniques and practices
in managing the training cycle, from needs
analysis to evaluation. It highlights the first
dimension in the strategic human resource
management framework but within the context of a high-performance workplace.
Project Management (HCD 323)
The course introduces students to the various stages of the project life cycle with a
special emphasis on learning and development-oriented projects. It highlights the operational and strategic nature of intervention
management in the context of the knowledge
economy.
Internship On Performance Issues (HCD 324)
The course provides students with workplace
awareness and experience in the area of human development. It serves as a venue for
the application and enhancement of skills developed in and from the other courses in the
program through long-term organizational
immersion.

82

Business Policy (HCD 421)
The course orients students to the legal and
procedural mechanisms behind organizational management and policy-making. It
highlights the need to be cognizant of technical processes that govern and/or support
organizational operations and strategies, and
how such impact the nature and direction of
organizational development initiatives.
Workplace Learning I and II (HCD 411 and HCD 422)
These courses provide students with workplace awareness and experience in the area
of performance management. The courses
serve as venues for the application and
enhancement of skills developed in and from
the other courses in the program through
one-time organizational projects on performance-related issues.

University of Asia and the Pacific

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
MAJOR IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT
AND EDUCATION
MASTER IN EDUCATION
MAJOR IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT
AND EDUCATION
In recent years, research on children and
families has found that the early childhood
years are the most crucial time for developing essential linguistic, cognitive, and social
skills. Furthermore, it has been shown that
quality early education, carried out in a
stimulating and supportive environment, can
have significant positive long-term—even
lifetime—effects, especially in relation to
academic achievement, employability, and
social behaviour.
In consonance with these research insights,
the School of Education and Human Development now offers a program for teachers
and other professionals interested in pursuing graduate studies and specializing in early
childhood education. The program leads to
the degree of Master of Arts in Education
(thesis track) and Master in Education (nonthesis track) major in Child Development
and Education. Participants can complete the
program in two years without having to give
up or be released from their jobs. They must
earn 39 units (33 units of coursework and
6 units of thesis writing for the thesis track,
and 6 units of Research Seminar for the nonthesis track) to be eligible for graduation.
The program seeks to form early childhood
educators and specialists (preschool and primary school teachers and administrators, child
development consultants, and researchers)
who can effectively blend theory and practice
in creating positive learning opportunities and
experiences for young children to promote
their total development. The MAE-CDE curriculum thus intertwines four areas of learning:
foundational subjects, psychology, specialization subjects, and research. These four areas
of learning are studied from and integrated by
a perspective that views the family as the first
school and parents as the primary educators of
their children.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
1. The following documents must be submitted:
• Accomplished Application Form
• Official Transcript of Records (OTR)
• Resumé
• Two copies of 1.5 x1.5 and two copies of
1x1 ID pictures
• Letter of application addressed to the
Dean of the UA&P School of Education
and Human Development
• An essay on the purpose of the study,
indicating the specific reasons why he or
she would like to enroll in UA&P MA in
Education, how the program fits his or
her professional development needs and
plans, what he or she foresees as difficulties or obstacles in taking up the program
and how to overcome them, and what he
or she intends to do after having completed the program
• Recommendation forms (one from
school head and from another person
such as a university or college professor, a former employer, or someone of
reputable standing in his or her profession who can make a fair and objective
assessment of the applicant’s ability to
pursue graduate studies in Education)
2. The applicant must also take the Graduate
Level Test (GLT) and pass the interview by
two SED faculty members.
Application forms are available at the School
of Education and Human Development Office, 7th floor, APEC Communication Building.
For inquiries, please call 634-2828.

POLICIES
Foreign students should have taken TOEFL
or its equivalent and secured an official education permit from their government.
Giving false information or withholding information on any of the above is a ground for the
removal of the student from the program.

SCHOLARSHIPS
The School, through corporate sponsors, offers scholarship grants to students based on
academic merit. These can be made available to a select group of students who are
academically deserving, awarded purely on
merits. He/She must, however, earn a grade
of no less than 2.0 in all subjects. Students
availing themselves of partial or full scholar-

83

ship grants should sign a Student Scholarship Contract upon enrolment.

STUDENT EVALUATION
Grade
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.25
2.50
3.00

Point
97 - 100
94 - 96
91 - 93
88 - 90
85 - 87
80 - 84
75 - 79
74 and below

ACADEMIC LOAD
Year I

Year II

1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
2nd semester and
summer

Total

9 units
9 units
3 units
9 units
3 units
6 units
39 units

COURSES OFFERED
Year I – First Semester
EDP 110
Philosophy of Education
EDP 111
Educational Research
EDP 112
Educational Statistics
Year I – Second Semester
EDCP 120 Child and Adolescent Development
EDCP 324 Theories and Approaches in
Early Childhood Education
EDP 121
Psychology of Teaching and
Learning
Year I – Summer
EDCP 213 Assessment and Evaluation of
Young Learners
Year II – First Semester
EDCP 124 Early Childhood Special Education
EDCP 127 Curriculum and Instruction in
ECE
EDCP 514 Organization and Management
of Early Childhood Programs
Year II – Second Semester
EDCP 220 Work and Society
Year II – Second Semester and Summer
EDN 224/
EDN 225
Research Seminar I and II or
EDP 215/
EDP 225
Thesis Writing I and II

84

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Child and Adolescent Development (EDCP 120)
This basic course in child and adolescent
development focuses on core contemporary
research findings and theories on the key
dimensions of development: biological,
linguistic, cognitive, social, emotional and
moral. Particular emphasis is given to the
factors that have been identified as having
positive or negative effects on the natural
course of these developmental processes.
Early Childhood Special Education (EDCP 124)
This course provides students with a theoretical framework for understanding and working with young children with special needs
and presents some of the major issues and
concerns related to atypical development.
Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Education (EDCP 127)
This course provides a detailed examination
of developmentally appropriate early childhood curricula and how to develop these curricula. It aims to help students develop the
ability to determine why a curriculum proves
better for some children than others, as well
as what approaches to teaching are compatible with a particular curriculum.
Assessment and Evaluation of Young Learners (EDCP
213)
This course provides an overview of measurement and evaluation as it applies to
teaching in education. It covers topics such
as test construction, validity and reliability
procedures, creative assessment instruments, screening, and eligibility determination.
Work and Society (EDCP 220)
This course seeks to deepen the students’
understanding of and appreciation for the
significance of work. Special focus is given
to the anthropological and ethical dimensions of the work of educators, in particular,
as a human activity that contributes directly
to the development of persons and, consequently, to the creation of a just and humane
society.
Theories and Approaches in Early Childhood Education (EDCP 324)
The course examines the history, scope,
and philosophies of various early childhood
programs. It provides students with better
understanding of the impact of the physical, material, and social organization of the
University of Asia and the Pacific

instructional environment on the young
learner.
Organization and Management of Early Childhood
Programs (EDCP 514)
This course aims to provide students with
opportunities to apply their knowledge in
early childhood education for the improvement of necessary systems and operations
among existing early education programs.
The final output of this course is a feasibility
study of the student’s own preschool.
Research Seminar I and II (EDN 224 and EDN 225)
The course is an examination of a special
topic related to Child Development and Education, leading to the implementation and
evaluation of a program or intervention that
addresses a learning need.
Philosophy of Education (EDP 110)
This is a theoretical study of the reality of
education as a human activity. Specifically, it
involves a philosophical consideration of the
nature of education, its end, dimensions, and
the agents of education.
Educational Research (EDP 111)
This course is designed to provide students
the conceptual, theoretical, and practical
preparation they need primarily for meeting
the research requirements of their academic
coursework and, secondarily, for carrying
out research projects and activities related to
actual school practice.

sis Writing I, the focus is on data collection
and the formulation of a thesis proposal; in
Thesis Writing II, it is on data analysis and
presentation and the preparation of a defense-ready draft of the thesis.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements of the
program of study by the student.
Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements of
the graduate program and clear all academic
deficiencies.

FACULTY (BS CDE/ BS HCD/ MA CDE/ MAEd
CDE)
Angelito Antonio
Ph.D. Child and Family Studies
Miriam College
Ma. Concha de la Cruz
MAE Major in Development Education
University of Asia and the Pacific
Lexie Estacio
MAE Major in Child Development and
Education
University of Asia and the Pacific
Esther Esteban
Ph.D. Child and Family Studies
Miriam College

Educational Statistics (EDP 112)
The course introduces students to statistical
analysis techniques relevant to data processing for research. It tackles both descriptive
and inferential statistics, with the latter being
limited to a selection of tests useful for the
four types of quantitative data.

Fe Gladys Golo
Ph.D. Educational Psychology
University of Santo Tomas

Psychology of Teaching and Learning (EDP 121)
This subject provides school administrators
and trainers with the essentials of psychology applied to school and training situations.
It expounds on the basic tenets of teaching, learning, brain studies, and theories of
motivation and how they are seen in present
realities.

Geraldine Oris
M.A. Developmental Psychology
Ateneo De Manila University

Thesis Writing I and II (EDP 215 and EDP 225)
These sequential courses are meant to guide
and support the work of graduating students
related to the preparation, completion, and
defense of their individual theses. In The-

Gizelle Tan
M.S. Early Childhood Education
Western Oregon University, U.S.A.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Evalyn Hizon
Ph.D. Philippine Studies
University of the Philippines

Joanna Paola Santos
MAE Major in Child Development and
Education
University of Asia and the Pacific

85

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
MAJOR IN EDUCATIONAL
LEADERSHIP
MASTER IN EDUCATION MAJOR
IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
For many years now, there has been a growing clamor not only for major reforms in the
country’s educational system but even for a
total transformation of schools, especially
the public ones, at all levels. In this task,
effective educational leadership is essential,
especially where it counts the most: at the
level of individual schools.
Built upon SED’s strength and record in
values education, the MA in Education major
in Educational Leadership (EL) is meant
primarily for educators who are occupying or
who are being prepared for leadership and
key academic and administrative positions
in their schools, especially those in basic
education. The curriculum for the program
intertwines courses in education, psychology, and values-based leadership and management and puts all of them at the service
of the key tasks of teaching, learning, and the
development of students into whole persons.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
1. The following documents must be submitted:
• Accomplished Application Form
• Official Transcript of Records (OTR)
• Resumé
• Two copies of 1.5x1.5 and two copies of
1x1 ID pictures
• Letter of application addressed to the
Dean of the UA&P School of Education
and Human Development
• An essay indicating the specific reasons
why the applicant would like to enroll in
UA&P MA in Education, how the program
fits his or her professional development
needs and plans, what he or she foresees
as difficulties or obstacles in taking up
the program and how to overcome them,
and what he or she intends to do after
having completed the program
• Recommendation forms (one from school
head and from another person such as
a university or college professor, a former employer, or someone of reputable
standing in his or her profession who can
make a fair and objective assessment of

86

University of Asia and the Pacific

the applicant’s ability to pursue graduate
studies in Education
2. The applicant must also take the Graduate
Level Test (GLT) and pass the interview by
two SED faculty members.
Application forms are available at the School
of Education and Human Development Office, 7th floor, APEC Communication Building.
For inquiries, please call 634-2828.

POLICIES
Foreign students should have taken TOEFL
or its equivalent and secured an official education permit from their government.
Giving false information or withholding information on any of the above is a ground for the
removal of the student from the program.

SCHOLARSHIPS
The School, through corporate sponsors,
offers scholarship grants to students based
on academic merit. These can be made
available to a select group of students who
are academically deserving, awarded purely
on merits. He/She must, however, aim for
a grade of no less than 2.0 in all subjects.
Students availing themselves of partial or
full scholarship grants should sign a Student
Scholarship Contract upon enrolment.

STUDENT EVALUATION
Grade
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.25
2.50
3.00

Point
97 - 100
94 - 96
91 - 93
88 - 90
85 - 87
80 - 84
75 - 79
74 and below

ACADEMIC LOAD
Year I

Year II

1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
2nd semester &
Summer

Total

9 units
9 units
3 units
9 units
3 units
6 units
39 units

COURSES OFFERED
Year I – First Semester
EDP 110
Philosophy of Education
EDP 111
Educational Research
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

87

EDP 112

Educational Statistics

Year I – Second Semester
EDP 121
Psychology of Teaching and
Learning
ELP 120
Lifespan Developmental
Psychology
ELP 211
Assessment and Evaluation of
Learning
Year I – Summer
ELP 123
Instructional Leadership and
Supervision
Year II – First Semester
ELP 124
School Program Design
ELP 210
Strategic Management and
Values-Based Leadership
ELP 221
School-Based Management
Year II – Second Semester
EDCP 220 Work and Society
Year II – Second Semester and Summer
EDN 224/
EDN 225
Research Seminar I and II or
EDP 215/
EDP 225
Thesis Writing I and II

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Work and Society (EDCP 220)
This course seeks to deepen the students’
understanding of and appreciation for the significance of work. Special focus is given to the
anthropological and ethical dimensions of the
work of educators, in particular, as a human
activity that contributes directly to the development of persons and, consequently, to the
creation of a just and humane society.
Research Seminar I and II (EDN 224 and EDN 225)
The course is an examination of a special
topic related to Educational Leadership, leading to the implementation and evaluation of
a program or intervention that addresses a
learning dilemma.
Philosophy of Education (EDP 110)
The course is a theoretical study of the reality of education as a human activity. Specifically, it involves a philosophical consideration of the nature of education that is valid
for any period within the human lifespan, as
well as its end, dimensions, agents of education, and processes.
Educational Research (EDP 111)
This course is designed to provide students
with the conceptual, theoretical, and practical

88

preparation they need primarily for meeting
the research requirements of their academic
coursework and, secondarily, for carrying
out research projects and activities related to
actual school practice.
Educational Statistics (EDP 112)
The course introduces students to statistical
analysis techniques relevant to data processing for research. It tackles both descriptive
and inferential statistics, with the latter being
limited to a selection of tests useful for the
four types of quantitative data.
Psychology of Teaching and Learning (EDP 121)
This subject provides school administrators
and trainers with the essentials of psychology
applied to school and training situations. It expounds on the basic tenets of teaching, learning, brain studies, and theories of motivation
and how they are seen in present realities.
Thesis Writing I and II (EDP 215 and EDP 225)
These sequential courses are meant to guide
and support the work of graduating students
related to the preparation, completion, and
defense of their individual theses. In Thesis Writing I, the focus is on data collection
and the formulation of a thesis proposal; in
Thesis Writing II, it is on data analysis and
presentation and the preparation of a defense-ready draft of the thesis.
Lifespan Developmental Psychology (ELP 120)
This course provides an overview of the principles, concepts, and theories surrounding
the nature of the psychological development
of man from conception to adulthood. It also
addresses variations in development, especially those brought about by differences in
family, class, and culture.
Instructional Leadership and Supervision (ELP 123)
This course aims at honing leadership qualities, styles, values, and skills that foster school
culture and the fulfillment of the school’s vision-mission. It further strengthens the leader’s
abilities to carry out the functions of instructing, coaching, and supervising the stakeholders in the academic community.
School Program Design (ELP 124)
The course focuses on developing an excellent school-wide program for academic
achievement. It provides students with a
practical research-based knowledge and
deeper understanding of the nature and essential elements of a school program.
University of Asia and the Pacific

Strategic Management and Values-Based Educational Leadership (ELP 210)
The course aims to help students develop
the ability to think strategically and apply
strategic thinking in leading and managing
their organizations, especially in ensuring the
alignment of organizational mission, vision,
goals, policies, systems, and practices, in the
context of a school’s internal and external
environment.
Assessment and Evaluation of Learning (ELP 211)
Together with Psychology of Learning and
Research methods, this course aims to effect
paradigm shifts needed by school leaders to
appreciate and commit to the benefits and advantages of consistently applying assessment
(for learning) and evaluation (assessment of
learning) processes to learning interventions.
School-Based Management (ELP 221)
This major course provides students with an
overview of school-based management, its
objectives, its theoretical and practical bases,
its dynamics and realities, and the role that
educational leaders play in formulating, implementing, and evaluating a school-based
management program.

FACULTY
Ma. Riza Bondal
Ph.D. Education
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Esther Esteban
Ph.D. Child and Family Studies
Miriam College
Fe Gladys Golo
Ph.D. Educational Psychology
University of Santo Tomas
Ferdinand Pingul
Ph.D. Psychology
University of the Philippines
Emmanuel Rentoy
M.A. Creative Writing
University of Santo Tomas
Celerino Tiongco
Doctor of Philosophy
Columbia University, USA

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements of the
program of study by the student.
Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements of
the graduate program and clear all academic
deficiencies.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

89

School of Law
and Governance
The School of Law and Governance sees
itself as a graduate school recognized for the
depth, quality, and relevance of its research
in and teaching of law and governance
and for producing competent law and governance professionals who are versatile,
creative, collaborative, ethical, conscious
of human dignity, concerned for the common good; with a keen understanding of the
dynamic interplay between society, government, and business; and capable of working
with an international perspective.
The School seeks to provide a rigorous interdisciplinary education in law and governance
that facilitates a profound understanding of
the social, political, cultural, and economic
factors that shape society and organizations.
This education is aimed at the training of
competent professionals who are committed
to the values of citizenship and democratic
governance toward the pursuit of the common good.
The SLG has the following degree-granting
programs:
• Bachelor of Arts in Political Economy
(BAPE)
• Master of Arts in Political Economy
(MAPE)
• Juris Doctor

90

University of Asia and the Pacific

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
POLITICAL ECONOMY
Today’s increasingly complex national and
global environment calls for a more integrative mindset. Contemporary social, political, and economic challenges can rarely be
approached from a single perspective. The
Bachelor of Arts in Political Economy (BAPE)
and Master of Arts in Political Economy
(MAPE) programs aim to equip students with
the knowledge and analytical skills necessary
to understand the complex and dynamic interplay of political and economic institutions
that shape current social realities. Such
holistic perspective is key to being effective
decision-makers and leaders in whatever
sector of society the graduates aim to carve
out their career. Hence, the program adopts
an interdisciplinary approach to the study of
social problems and issues, using analytical
tools and methods from political science,
economics, history, sociology, public administration, and philosophy.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The Political Economy program’s rigorous
training and interdisciplinary character allow
students to distinguish themselves in different
areas of study, and inculcate critical thinking
and analysis highly valued in studies, professions, and fields such as the following:
• Law
• Academe and research
• Diplomacy and foreign service
• International organizations such as the
IMF and the United Nations
• Multinational corporations
• Banking and financial institutions
• Print and broadcast journalism
• Development-oriented work with NGOs
• Public service

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Entry into the BAPE program is open to
students who comply with the University’s
admission requirements. They should pass
the UA&P Entrance Exam and complete all
documents needed for admission.

Second Year
Third Year
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Total

21 units
3 units
21 units
18 units
3 units
176 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
1.00 – 1.25
1.50 – 1.75
2.00 – 2.25
2.50 – 2.75
3.00
3.50

Excellent
Superior
Very Good
Good
Competent
Failed/ Failed Due to Absences

COURSES OFFERED
Third Year – First Semester
ECO 311P Intermediate Macroeconomics
IPE 301
Approaches to the Study of
Politics
Third Year – Second Semester
ECO 321P Intermediate Microeconomics
IPE 302
Political Institutions and Dynamics
Third Year – Summer
STAT 300
Statistics for Social Sciences
Fourth Year – First Semester
ECO 512
International Economics
IPE 401
Theories of Political Economy
IPE 402
Theories of Development and
Underdevelopment
IPE 403
Theories of International Relations
IPE 404
Work and Society
IPE 415
Managing Governance
Fourth Year – Second Semester
ECO 429
Economic History
IPE 406
General Research Methods for
Social Sciences
IPE 411
Comparative Political Economy
IPE 412
International Political Economy
IPE 413
Seminar in Political Economy
IPE 416
Public Policy Analysis
Fourth Year – Summer
IPE405
Summer Internship Program

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year

Fourth Year

2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester

23 units
23 units
20 units
20 units
24 units

Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECO 311P)
This course equips students with a framework to analyze the effects and relationships
of the broad macroeconomy to the internal
affairs of a business or firm.

91

Intermediate Microeconomics (ECO 321P)
This course introduces the basic workings of
the market system and price mechanism. It
aims to make students understand how resources are allocated in a free market economy and how they are optimally allocated by
consumers and firms. The course also helps
students draw the policy implications for
management of firms and households and
understand the implications of the different
types of markets on competition and firm
behavior.
Economic History (ECO 429)
The course is about the historical study and
analysis of economic growth and economic
development using theories, concepts, and
principles of neoclassical and new institutional economics.
International Economics (ECO 512)
The course covers various trade theories,
trade policies and economic integration, and
special topics, such as the International Trade
in Services, World Trade Organization, and
designing free trade agreements.
Approaches to the Study of Politics (IPE 301)
This course aims to provide students with a
clear understanding of the development of
the study of politics as an organized field of
knowledge and as an academic discipline. It
introduces the students to the diverse approaches in the area of political analysis.
Political Institutions and Dynamics (IPE 302)
The course aims to enable students to know
the institutional underpinnings of the state,
the market, and civil society as agents in the
political arena; to comprehend the relations
among the institutions of the state, the state
and the market, and the state and civil society; and to understand the political dynamics
in the Philippine context.
Theories of Political Economy (IPE 401)
This course investigates some of the most
influential theories found in the tradition
of political economy. It seeks to familiarize
students with a variety of perspectives for
studying the relationship between politics,
economics, and society.
Theories of Development and Underdevelopment
(IPE 402)
The course explores the concept of development, both in its political and economic aspects, and from both theoretical and practical

92

perspectives. The course discusses the relationship between democracy and economic
growth and examines how culture shapes
the political and economic institutions and
processes.
Theories of International Relations (IPE 403)
In this course, the students learn how to
analyze and appreciate the significance of
world affairs, specifically its impact on global
relations among and within individual countries, and to understand the structure of the
international system and its ramifications in
the conduct of world affairs.
Work and Society (IPE 404)
The course aims to enable students to understand the person’s role and significance as a
worker in society and his/her role in society
as agent of change, development, and stability.
Summer Internship Program (IPE 405)
The course provides a venue for the students
to apply what they have learned in class,
allows them to gain practical experience in
their field of specialization, and prepares
them for their future careers. It immerses
students in environments where they will enrich their knowledge and acquire real-world
experience.
General Research Methods for Social Sciences (IPE
406)
This course provides students with the opportunity to apply social science research
methodology to a particular issue or area.
It allows them to analyze in depth a critical
and relevant problem and present a detailed
proposal on how to best address the identified research gap.
Comparative Political Economy (IPE 411)
The course establishes the general concept
of political economy and the comparative
methods applied to the analysis of nations’
political economy. It also reviews approaches
to comparative political economy and looks
at specific theories of comparative political
economy applied to East and Southeast Asia.
International Political Economy (IPE 412)
This course explores the ways in which
political and economic factors interact at the
global level. It also reviews the roles played
by various actors and institutions in shaping
the global economy.

University of Asia and the Pacific

Seminar in Political Economy (IPE 413)
The course seeks to answer fundamental
questions on the origin, history, nature, and
practice of political economy by re-visiting
the primary sources of classic thoughts on
the field, dissecting some of the current
models in the field, and testing its applicability and relevance to Philippine and Asia
Pacific international relations and development issues.
Managing Governance (IPE 415)
This is an introductory course to the field of
organizational and management theory as
applied in the context of the administration
and governance of public sector organizations in particular, and society in general, in a
globalizing world.
Public Policy Analysis (IPE 416)
This introductory course studies the nature
and dynamics of public policymaking. It
delves into the political economy of public
policy by examining the policy process as a
means to solve public problems in a democratic state.
Statistics for Social Sciences (STAT 300)
This course on statistical theory and methods strengthens the research capability of
the students. The numerical skills that they
learn through this course are useful in understanding economic and social phenomena
as they take place in various organizational
settings.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements of
the graduate program and clear all academic
deficiencies.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

93

MASTER OF ARTS IN
POLITICAL ECONOMY

with Specialization in International Relations
and Development

The Master of Arts in Political Economy program offers a specialization in International
Relations and Development (IRD). The program aims to help students appreciate how
our current global political and economic interdependence shapes the human and social
development dimensions of our local and
national policies. Such understanding is an
important core principle of good governance
in both domestic and international affairs.

The MAPE-IRD program also offers an opportunity for students to assess the sources
and implications of international political and
economic change and to explore the values
and specific actions of private individuals, local communities, multinational corporations,
governments, and international organizations trying to respond to the challenge of
globalization.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The Political Economy program’s rigorous
training and interdisciplinary character allow students to distinguish themselves in
different areas of study, and inculcate critical thinking and analysis highly valued in
studies, professions, and fields such as the
following:
• Law
• Academe and research
• Diplomacy and foreign service
• International organizations such as the
IMF and the United Nations
• Multinational corporations
• Banking and financial institutions
• Print and broadcast journalism
• Development-oriented work with NGOs
• Public service

QUALIFICATIONS TO 4th YEAR
A Political Economy student qualifies for the
fourth-year level so long as he/she has finished all of his/her CAS academic subjects..
This policy of IPE is in compliance with the
University’s NO CAS BACK SUBJECT Policy.

Has a weighted average of 2.0 (all fourthyear subjects including those taken during summer);
Does not have a grade of incomplete
(INC) in more than six units of course
work in the fourth year; and
Has no remaining CAS subjects.

Non-UA&P students with undergraduate degrees who would like to take the MAPE-IRD
program should submit/fulfill the following
requirements:
• Completed MAPE-IRD Application Form
• Curriculum Vitae
• Official Transcript of Records
• Photocopy of Diploma
• Interview with a senior IPE faculty member
• Prospectus of the undergraduate degree
obtained (for accreditation purposes)
Guidelines for External (Non-UA&P) Students Taking the MAPE program
• Non-UA&P students need to take a
minimum of 60 master’s units, including
Thesis (Courses that can be accredited
as part of an external student’s master’s
units should not exceed 24 units).
• Non-UA&P students who do not have a
degree in the Social Sciences must take
and pass all Third Year Pol Eco subjects
(15 units) before proceeding to the MA
courses. However, these courses shall
not be counted as part of the master’s
units of the student.
• Regardless of undergraduate/previous
degree, external students must take the
following subjects:
IPE 401
Theories of Political
Economy (3 units)
IPE 404
Work and Society (3 units)
IPE 407
Quantitative Research Methods (3 units)
IPE 408
Qualitative Research
Methods (3 units)
IPE 412
International Political Economy (3 units)
IPE 500
Thesis (6 units)
• External students have a maximum
residency of four years to finish their
master’s studies. The University policy on
accreditation should be followed.

QUALIFICATIONS TO 5th YEAR
A Political Economy student qualifies for the
fifth year provided that he/she

94

University of Asia and the Pacific

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year
Third Year

Fourth Year

Fifth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

26 units
26 units
26 units
26 units
30 units
24 units
3 units
18 units
18 units
3 units
12 units
6 units
218 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
For 3rd year subjects
1.00 – 1.25
1.50 – 1.75
2.00 – 2.25
2.50 – 2.75
3.00
3.50

Excellent
Superior
Good
Competent
Passing
Failed

For 4th and 5th year subjects
1.00 – 1.25
Excellent
1.50 – 1.75
Superior
2.00 – 2.25
Good
2.50
Passing
3.00
Failed

COURSES OFFERED
Third Year – First Semester
ECO 311P Intermediate Macroeconomics
IPE 301
Approaches to the Study of
Politics
Third Year – Second Semester
ECO 321P Intermediate Microeconomics
IPE 302
Political Institutions and Dynamics
Third Year – Summer
STAT300
Statistics for Social Sciences
Fourth Year – First Semester
ECO 512
International Economics
IPE 401
Theories of Political Economy
IPE 402
Theories of Development and
Underdevelopment
IPE 403
Theories of International
Relations
IPE 404
Work and Society
IPE 407
Quantitative Research Methods
Fourth Year – Second Semester
ECO 429
Economic History
IPE 408
Qualitative Research Methods
IPE 411
Comparative Political Economy
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

IPE 412
IPE 413
IPE 414

International Political Economy
Seminar in Political Economy
Public Policy and Governance

Fourth Year – Summer
IPE 405
Summer Internship
Fifth Year
IPE 500

Thesis

Some Electives (offered in the last 3 years)
IPE 511
Political Risk Analysis
IPE 512
Social and Political Constitution
of Economics
IPE 513
Culture and Development
IPE 514
Philippine Foreign Policy
IPE 515
Issues in Philippine Development
IPE 516
International Trade Law
IPE 517
International Law
Cultural Diplomacy
IPE 518

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECO 311P)
This course equips students with a framework to analyze the effects and relationships
of the broad macroeconomy to the internal
affairs of a business or firm.
Intermediate Microeconomics (ECO 321P)
This course introduces the basic workings of
the market system and price mechanism. It
aims to make students understand how resources are allocated in a free market economy and how they are optimally allocated
by consumers and firms. The course also
helps students draw the policy implications
for management of firms and households
and understand the implications of the different types of markets on competition and
firm behavior.
Economic History (ECO 429)
The course is about the historical study and
analysis of economic growth and economic
development using theories, concepts, and
principles of neoclassical and new institutional economics.
International Economics (ECO 512)
The course covers various trade theories,
trade policies and economic integration,
and special topics, such as the International
Trade in Services, World Trade Organization,
and designing free trade agreements.
Approaches to the Study of Politics (IPE 301)
This course aims to provide students with a
clear understanding of the development of

95

the study of politics as an organized field of
knowledge and as an academic discipline.
It introduces the students to the diverse approaches in the area of political analysis.
Political Institutions and Dynamics (IPE 302)
The course aims to enable students to know
the institutional underpinnings of the state,
the market, and civil society as agents in the
political arena; to comprehend the relations
among the institutions of the state, the state
and the market, and the state and civil society; and to understand the political dynamics in the Philippine context.
Theories of Political Economy (IPE 401)
This course investigates some of the most
influential theories found in the tradition
of political economy. It seeks to familiarize
students with a variety of perspectives for
studying the relationship between politics,
economics, and society.
Theories of Development and Underdevelopment
(IPE 402)
The course explores the concept of development, both in its political and economic aspects, and from both theoretical and practical
perspectives. The course discusses the relationship between democracy and economic
growth and examines how culture shapes
the political and economic institutions and
processes.
Theories of International Relations (IPE 403)
In this course, the students learn how to
analyze and appreciate the significance of
world affairs, specifically its impact on global
relations among and within individual countries, and to understand the structure of the
international system and its ramifications in
the conduct of world affairs.
Work and Society (IPE 404)
The course aims to enable students to understand the person’s role and significance as a
worker in society and his/her role in society
as agent of change, development, and stability.
Summer Internship Program (IPE 405)
The course provides a venue for the students
to apply what they have learned in class, allows them to gain practical experience in their
field of specialization, and prepares them for
their future careers. It immerses students in environments where they will enrich their knowledge and acquire real-world experience.

96

Quantitative Research Methods (IPE 407)
The course provides students with a working knowledge of the quantitative research
process and the appropriate tools for data
collection and analysis, and initiates them
into the process of preparing a sound and
defensible quantitative research proposal in
political economy.
Qualitative Research Methods (IPE 408)
The course is designed to introduce the
qualitative research paradigm as differentiated from the classical quantitative/positivist
paradigm.
Comparative Political Economy (IPE 411)
The course establishes the general concept
of political economy and the comparative
methods applied to the analysis of nations’
political economy. It also reviews approaches
to comparative political economy and looks
at specific theories of comparative political
economy applied to East and Southeast Asia.
International Political Economy (IPE 412)
This course explores the ways in which
political and economic factors interact at the
global level. It also reviews the roles played
by various actors and institutions in shaping
the global economy.
Seminar in Political Economy (IPE 413)
The course seeks to answer fundamental
questions on the origin, history, nature, and
practice of political economy by re-visiting
the primary sources of classic thoughts on
the field, dissecting some of the current
models in the field, and testing its applicability and relevance to Philippine and Asia
Pacific international relations and development issues.
Public Policy and Governance (IPE 414)
This course studies the nature and dynamics
of public policymaking and administration in
a political economy context. The course not
only makes use of policy and governance
cases in the Philippines as subjects of illustration and analysis, but also draws from the
examples and experiences of other countries
for comparison.
Thesis (IPE 500)
This course initiates the student to the process of doing graduate-level research and
writing a research proposal.

University of Asia and the Pacific

Statistics for Social Sciences (STAT 300)
This course on statistical theory and methods strengthens the research capability of
the students. The numerical skills that they
learn through this course are useful in understanding economic and social phenomena
as they take place in various organizational
settings.
Electives
Political Risk Analysis (IPE 511)
This course provides an overview of political risk analysis, defined here as the applied
study of how political decisions or events
may negatively impact businesses. Credit
ratings, expropriation, and social unrest are
among the concepts to be tackled.
Social and Political Constitution of Economics (IPE
512)
The course not only covers the analysis of
the interface between politics and economics
but also contextualizes the political economy
dynamic in its larger, social environment.
The subject of study is the economy with its
increasingly fast-paced changes unraveling
into other dimensions of society.
Culture and Development (IPE 513)
The course focuses on the dynamics of the
relationship between culture and development in the processes of social change in
society.
Philippine Foreign Policy (IPE 514)
The course introduces the students to the
theoretical framework of the foreign policy
process and demonstrates how this theoretical framework is applied to Philippine foreign
policy decision-making and execution.
Issues in Philippine Development (IPE 515)
This course is concerned with both the economics and politics of Philippine development. In particular, the course seeks to examine the role of the state and governmental
authority in economic development.
International Trade Law (IPE 516)
The course aims to provide specific consideration to the dispute settlement system of the
World Trade Organization as well as to the
current issues relating to trade negotiations
and free trade agreements.

of international law; have a good command
of how the system works, its processes, and
its problems and prospects; acquire the fundamentals of international legal and political
methodology and knowledge; and analyze
and critique, in a technical fashion, events,
decisions and policies.
Cultural Diplomacy (IPE 518)
This course explores the history and future potential of soft power in international
politics, primarily through the use of what is
called cultural diplomacy. As an IRD elective, the course uses two conceptual frames
in the incorporation of culture in policy
discussion: one for international relations,
another for development.
IRD Electives are seminar courses covering
specialized topics in International Relations
and Development handled by the School’s
adjunct faculty who are academic experts
and professional practitioners. Among the
topics covered are the following:
• Comparative foreign policy
• Contemporary issues in world affairs
• Cultural diplomacy
• Culture and development
• Democratic development in Southeast
Asia
• Global environmental politics
• Governance and development
• International economic law
• International security and strategic studies
• Issues in Philippine development
• Law and economics
• Philippine foreign policy
• Political economy of international finance
• Political economy of international trade
and business
• Political economy of regionalism
• Politics of the knowledge economy

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements
of the graduate program and clear all academic deficiencies.

International Law (IPE 517)
The course aims to enable students to understand the basic characteristics of the system
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

97

FACULTY
Danica Elaine Ang
Ph.D. Political Science (coursework)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. Political Economy with Specialization in
International Relations & Development
University of Asia and the Pacific

Natividad Cristina Gruet
Ph.D. Development Studies (coursework)
De La Salle University
M.A. Political Economy with Specialization in
International Relations and Development
University of Asia and the Pacific

Monica Ang
Ph.D. Development Studies
De La Salle University

Rosario Manalo
M.A. International Studies and Diplomacy
Long Island University, USA

John Lawrence Avila
Master in International Studies
University of Birmingham, United Kingdom

George Manzano
Ph.D. Economics
University of South Wales, Australia

Ramon Cabrera
M.A. Political Economy with Specialization in
International Relations and Development
University of Asia and the Pacific

Ma. Concepcion Noche
Master of Laws
Ateneo de Manila University

Charles Lawrence Ching
M.A. Political Economy with Specialization in
International Relations and Development
University of Asia and the Pacific

May Zuleika Salao
Ph.D. Philippine Studies (candidate)
University of the Philippines Diliman
M.A. Philippine Studies
University of the Philippines Diliman

Abigail De Leon
Ph.D. Philippine Studies
University of the Philippines Diliman

Corazon Toralba
Ph.D. Philosophy
University of Santo Tomas

Nanette Dungo
Ph.D. Sociology
University of the Philippines Diliman

Richard Umali
Master in Public Policy
National University of Singapore

Jeremy Benigno Gatdula
Master of Laws
University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

Emmanuel Yujuico
Ph.D. Political Science
University of Birmingham, United Kingdom

98

University of Asia and the Pacific

JURIS DOCTOR PROGRAMS

On top of the standard competencies required by the Legal Education Board, graduates of the UA&P Law programs are honed
to be skilled in legal reasoning and advocacy
and, more importantly, to be well-rounded
individuals: cultured and ethical, familiar
with both public and private sector mindset,
and capable of understanding peoples and
legal systems transcending national borders.

With the foreseen economic integration of the
10 ASEAN countries in 2015, the Law programs aim to equip the students with tools to
prepare them for practice in the region.
The 4-year Juris Doctor (JD) program is open
to college graduates who fulfill the conditions for application to law school and pass
the law school qualifying test (LSQT) and
other screening procedures.
The 7-year JD Honors Program is open only
to high school graduates who land among
the top 50 admitted applicants to the freshman undergraduate year in UA&P. Students
accepted in the program are still required to
take the LSQT and undergo other screening
procedures before admission to the JD program proper. Those who complete the program will receive a Bachelor of Arts degree
in Humanities and a Juris Doctor degree.
High school graduates who wish to apply to
the 7-year JD program should take the UA&P
entrance exams for entering college freshmen.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of the Law program are expected
to be cultured, entrepreneurial, ethical, global
advocates, capable of practicing in the ASEAN
region, and equipped with a broad understanding of the different legal systems in and
beyond national and regional borders. After
the completion of the program, graduates can
work in different areas of law, related fields,
and relevant institutions, such as:
• Private law practice or law firms
• Business or corporate work
• Judiciary and legal administration
• Elective or appointive public service
• Government or international counsel
• Academe or think tanks
• Banking and finance
• Multinational corporations and international organizations
• International dispute settlement
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Domestic or international cause-oriented
advocacy groups
Economic or political institutions and
bodies

ADMISSION
Admission to the JD program is based solely
on merit.
The Admissions Committee shall base its decision on the results of the Law School Qualifying Test (LSQT) or the Law Aptitude Score
(LAS), the General Weighted Average (GWA) in
the undergraduate course, the interview, and
other requirements as may be necessary.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR ADMISSION
The applicant must
1. Be a graduate of a Bachelor’s degree and
should have earned at least 18 units of
English, six units of Mathematics, and 18
units of Social Science subjects;
2. Have passed the LSQT;
3. Have good moral character as attested to
in the two recommendation letters from
the Dean or the Guidance Counselor of
his/her school and from a reputable person in the community; and
4. Have been qualified in an interview by
the School of Law and Governance.

THE LSQT
The Law School Qualifying Test is designed to
measure certain abilities, skills, and behavior
necessary in the study and practice of law. It
consists of four subtests in Verbal Reasoning, Critical Thinking, Quantitative Ability, and
Figural Reasoning. The LAS is the composite
score, which is based on the summation of all
the subtest scores and is taken as a general
measure of performance on the LSQT.
To take the LSQT, the applicant must submit
the following no later than two weeks before
the examination date:
• Duly accomplished registration form
• Photocopy of collegiate transcript of
records showing compliance with eligibility requirements above
• Certification of candidacy for graduation
• Three copies of 2x2 ID picture with white
background
• Proof of payment of testing fee of
PHP1,500.00

99

ACADEMIC LOAD
Year I
Year II

Year III

Year IV

1st Semester
2nd Semester
1st Semester
2nd Semester
Summer
1st Semester
2nd Semester
Summer
1st Semester
2nd Semester

Total

18 units
19 units
23 units
22 units
2 units
18 units
19 units
2 units
24 units
21 units
168 units

COURSES OFFERED
Year I – First Semester
JDCONI1
Constitutional Law I
JDCRMI1
Criminal Law I
JDItL1
Introduction to Law
JDLEGP1
Legal Profession
JDLRTW1 Legal Research and Thesis Writing
JDPFR1
Persons and Family Relations
JDPHIL1
Philosophy of Law
JDSTAT1
Statutory Construction

Year I – Second Semester
JDBLET1
Basic Legal Ethics
JDCON21 Constitutional Law II
JDCRM21 Criminal Law II
JDLEWR1 Legal Writing
JDLTAL1
Legal Technique and Logic
JDOBCO1 Obligations and Contracts
Year II – First Semester
JDALSL2
Agrarian Law & Social Registration
JDATAP2
Agency, Trust and Partnership
JDCRMP2 Criminal Procedure
JDCRTR2
Credit Transactions
JDLMED2 Legal Medicine
JDNEGO2 Negotiable Instruments
JDNREL2
Natural Resources and Environmental Law
JDPROP2 Property
JDSALE2
Sales
Year II – Second Semester
JDADML2 Administrative Law, Law on
Public Officers & Election Laws
JDCIVP2
Civil Procedure
JDCORL2 Corporation Law
JDHURL2 Human Rights Law
JDLTAD2
Land Titles and Deeds
JDPIL2
Public International Law
JDSIIL2
Special Issues on International
Law
JDTAXI2
Taxation Law I

100

University of Asia and the Pacific

Year II – Summer
JDAPRI2
Summer Apprenticeship I
Year III – First Semester
JDELEC3
Electives
JDINSU3
Insurance
JDLBLI3
Labor Law I
JDSUCC3 Succession
JDTAX23
Taxation II
JDTORT3
Torts and Damages
Year III – Second Semester
JDCOFL3
Conflict of Laws
JDELEC3
Electives
JDEVID3
Evidence
JDFRMS3 Legal Forms
JDLBL2
Labor Law II
JDSPRO3 Special Proceedings
JDTRAN3 Transportation
Year III – Summer
JDAPR23
Summer Apprenticeship II
Year IV – First Semester
JDCONR4 Constitutional Law Review
JDCVRI4
Civil Law Review I
JDELEC4
Electives
JDLBRR4
Labor Law Review
JDPRCI4
Practice Court I
JDRMRI4
Remedial Law Review I
JDTHES4
JD Thesis
Year IV – Second Semester
JDCOMR4 Commercial Law Review
JDCRMR4 Criminal Law Review
JDCVR24
Civil Law Review II
JDELEC4
Electives
JDPRC24
Practice Court II
JDRM24
Remedial Law Review II
FACULTY
The law program’s faculty consists of recognized and reputable experts with government service experience, including
incumbent and retired judges and justices;
instructors in private legal practice and business; legal scholars and jurists who have
established themselves in their respective
fields; and law practitioners with a broad
range of experience, both local and international.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

101

School of
Management
The School of Management (SMN) offers
degree and non-degree programs that shape
business leaders and entrepreneurs imbued
with ethical and moral values, a global perspective, and corporate social responsibility.
It aims to be the leading management and
business school in the Asia-Pacific region.
To achieve this, the School develops the
students’ strategic, analytical, and critical
thinking skills; imparts high quality education through distinguished teaching; conducts rigorous management and business
research; and provides a personalized approach to management education.
SMN confers the following degrees:
• Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in Management
• Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in Management with Specialization in Business Analytics
• Bachelor of Science in Entrepreneurial
Management
• Master of Science in Management
• Master of Science in Management – Evening Program

102

University of Asia and the Pacific

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
MAJOR IN MANAGEMENT
The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) is a four-year undergraduate
program of SMN. It prepares the students,
with its solid but practical general management curriculum, to work for the top 1,000
corporations and/or start their own business.
The BSBA Program has a strong emphasis
on liberal arts, governance, corporate social
responsibility, and global outlook, offering a
broad perspective and appreciation of issues
facing any future leader and manager.
Aside from classroom learning, the BSBA
also offers experience-based learning
through the two internship courses that the
students undergo. The first internship is on
organizational immersion where they see the
different tasks and processes of institutions
that they work for. For Internship 2, aside
from organizational immersion, students are
tasked to handle mini-projects for the institutions they are working for.
Currently, the BSBA program offers one
specialization, BSBA Major in Management.
Soon, patterned in this curriculum, the BSBA
program will offer the following specializations: (1) BSBA Major in Knowledge Process
Outsourcing Management and (2) BSBA
Major in Business Economics.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
A graduate with a degree of BS Business
Administration has opportunities to pursue a
professional career in the corporate environment. They can enter the different managerial fields, specifically finance, marketing, and
human resource. Aside from taking advantage of opportunities in the corporate world,
BSBA graduates can venture into start-up,
hyper growth, or emerging markets, or even
in the professionalization of family businesses.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Entry into the BSBA program is open to
students who comply with the University’s
admission requirements. They should pass
the UA&P Entrance Exam and complete all
documents needed for admission.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year
Third Year

Fourth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer

Total

23 units
23 units
17 units
23 units
18 units
24 units
4 units
23 units
23 units
5 units
183 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
Grade
97 - 100
93 - 96
89 - 92
85 - 88
82 - 84
79 - 81
76 - 78
73 - 75
70 - 72
Below 70

Point
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.25
2.50
2.75
3.00
3.5

COURSES OFFERED
Second Year – First Semester
MGT 200
Introduction to Management
Second Year – Second Semester
MGT 210
Principles of Accounting I
MGT 250
Quantitative Analysis for
Management
Third Year – First Semester
ECN 333
Managerial Economics
ICA 101
Business Writing and
Communication
MGT 211
Principles of Accounting II
MGT 220
Principles of Marketing
Third Year – Second Semester
ECN 311
Macroeconomics
MGT 201
Business Law
MGT 212
Managerial Accounting
MGT 213
Finance I
MGT 221
Industry and Regional Market
Analysis
MGT 230
Human Behavior in Organizations
Third Year – Summer
MGT 240
Internship 1: Organizational
Immersion
Fourth Year – First Semester
MGT 202
Taxation
MGT 214
Finance II

103

MGT 215
MGT 231
MGT 251
MGT 280

Management Information Systems and Technology
Human Resource Management
Operations Management
Elective

Fourth Year – Second Semester
MGT 203
Business Ethics
MGT 204
International Business
MGT 222
Consumer Behavior and Market
Research
MGT 260
MRS: Case Writing
MGT 261
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
MGT 262
Business Policy and Strategic
Management
MGT 281
Elective
Fourth Year – Summer
MGT 241
Internship 2: Professional Internship
Electives
MGT 280A
MGT 280B
MGT 281A
MGT 281B

Brand Management
Knowledge Management
Investment Management
Digital Marketing

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Macroeconomics (ECN 311)
This course in macroeconomics equips
students with a framework to analyze the
effects and relationships of the broad macroeconomy to the internal affairs of a business or firm. The framework makes use of
both qualitative and quantitative techniques,
although focus is on qualitative analysis.
Managerial Economics (ECN 333)
This course aims to equip students with the
basic concepts and tools of economic analysis used in addressing business decisionmaking problems. It provides an analytical
framework for making managerial decisions
by using economic terms and concepts, economic models, and quantitative analyses.
Business Writing and Communication (ICA 101)
The course focuses on the techniques of effective oral and written communications in
business. It deals specifically with the nature
and scope of business presentations, speech
communication, and presentation skills.
Introduction to Management (MGT 200)
This course provides an overview of the four
functional areas of management and introduces basic managerial functions, concepts,
and processes. It also exposes students,

104

as future managers, to the decision-making
processes involved in management functions.
Business Law (MGT 201)
The course introduces students to basic
laws and regulations affecting business organizations and transactions.
Taxation (MGT 202)
The course will introduce the students to the
National Internal Revenue Code, which contains the basic laws and regulations affecting
business transactions.
Business Ethics (MGT 203)
This is a philosophical study of work in the
light of its anthropological, sociological,
and ethical dimensions. It seeks to highlight
the relevance of work as a human activity,
contributing thus to the development of the
worker, co-workers, culture, and society.
International Business (MGT 204)
This is an introductory course on international business. The first part covers international marketing, describing the different
modes of engaging in international marketing. The second part dwells on various trade
theories, and the third part focuses on trade
policies and economic integration.
Principles of Accounting I (MGT 210)
This course is designed as an accounting introductory course for students who intend to
become professional managers with an entrepreneurial and ethical mindset. The typical transactions and accounting problems
of single proprietorships engaged in service
and merchandising businesses provide the
framework for discussion.
Principles of Accounting II (MGT 211)
This second introductory course on the fundamental principles of accounting covers the
following key topics: accounting for partnerships, the corporation’s balance sheet,
income statement, statement of cash flows,
and financial statement analysis.
Managerial Accounting (MGT 212)
This course covers the following key topics: management accounting, cost-volumeprofit analysis, the master budget, flexible
budgets, activity-based costing, and special
business decisions.

University of Asia and the Pacific

Finance I (MGT 213)
This course covers basic financial management as the body of fundamental concepts,
principles, and techniques applicable to
decision making with an eye toward creating
economic value or wealth.
Finance II (MGT 214)
This course focuses on the fundamental
concepts, principles, and techniques applicable to decision making with an eye toward
creating wealth. It is designed to prepare
students to make a business plan for their
project-based internship in summer.
Management Information Systems and Technology
(MGT 215)
This course exposes students to current theories and concepts of information technology, information systems, business information systems, systems analysis, and design.
It adopts the O’Brien Five Module framework
in dealing with information systems and
technology.
Principles of Marketing (MGT 220)
This course aims to enable students to
understand the dynamics of marketing as a
basic function of management. Topics covered include the principles of marketing and
the marketing process and its function in an
organization.
Industry and Regional Market Analysis (MGT 221)
This is a research seminar course that formally
introduces students to industry analysis and,
since firms compete within the context of
industries, to competitive strategy. The focus
is on mastering and applying the Five Forces
framework of Dr. Michael E. Porter.
Consumer Behavior and Market Research (MGT
222)
This course introduces students to the dynamics of market research and its process as
a basic tool in marketing and business management. The course focuses on principles
of research methodology, research methods,
data collection, sampling techniques, and
statistical tools used in research.
Human Behavior in Organizations (MGT 230)
This course introduces students to the
theories, concepts, models, and dynamics of
human behavior in organizations.
Human Resource Management (MGT 231)
The course provides students with a generalProspectus 2014 - 2016

ist’s viewpoint of human resource management as an important leadership enabler in
the achievement of business results.
Internship 1: Organizational Immersion (MGT 240)
The course aims to raise awareness about
the need to have work-life balance and the
ways to achieve it using management tools.
The course adapts the management tools of
strategic planning and balanced scorecards.
Internship 2: Professional Internship (MGT 241)
This internship requires students to have a
research-based project for the company. The
students act as junior consultants, who provide their host companies with a concrete output or report regarding their specific needs.
Quantitative Analysis for Management (MGT 250)
This course deals with the principal concepts
and applications of techniques of quantitative analysis in many types of organizational
decision-making situations. These techniques have been successfully applied to an
increasingly wide array of complex problems
in business such as marketing, financial
analysis and projection, project management, and operations management.
Operations Management (MGT 251)
The course covers the concepts and applications of operations management (OM). It
focuses on recent trends, developments, and
applications of OM principles in managing
business operations.
MRS: Case Writing (MGT 260)
The course aims to develop students who
are able to undertake research that has
practical significance and sufficient academic
rigor and, at the same time, is personally
interesting.
Entrepreneurship and Innovation (MGT 261)
This is an integrative course that allows
students to apply their knowledge of the
functional areas of management: marketing,
production, human resource, and finance;
industry and regional analysis; and quantitative decision analysis tools. As an applied
research course, the main output will be an
actual feasibility study and a business plan.
Business Policy and Strategic Management (MGT
262)
The course emphasizes the holistic application of the concepts graduate students
learned on the different functional areas of

105

management: marketing, production, human resources, and finance; and on the tools
and methods of external analysis including
industry analysis.
Electives
Brand Management (MGT 280A)
This project-based workshop involves a series of lectures prior to a supervised marketing project. The lectures establish the concepts and fundamental principles involved in
brand management activities, which include
competitive analysis, marketing research,
strategic planning, and marketing plan formulation.
Knowledge Management (MGT 280B)
This course aims to develop among the
students a foundation of knowledge and understanding of issues in knowledge management that supports successful management
of organizational learning and intellectual
capital in a rapidly growing and changing
environment.
Investment Management (MGT 281A)
The course introduces and orients students
to the basic concepts, theories, and strategies of investments. Focus is on domestic
versus international investments, and financial versus real investment opportunities.
Digital Marketing (MGT281B)
This course is designed as an introduction to
the rapidly evolving world of digital marketing, in order to help students understand
how developments in digital marketing are
affecting businesses and consumers. It delivers an overview of the interactive and digital
environment and the major channels and
tools used in interactive marketing.

FACULTY
Ma. Victoria Caparas
Ph.D. Management
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Anna Maria Mendoza
Ph.D. Business Administration
University of the Philippines Diliman
Lota Kristine San Juan-Nable
Ph.D. Business (candidate)
De La Salle University
M.S. Management
University of Asia and the Pacific
Jodie Claire Ngo
Ph.D. Business (candidate)
De La Salle University
M.S. Management
University of Asia and the Pacific
Winston Conrad Padojinog
Ph.D. Business Administration
De La Salle University
Raymund Pangilinan
Ph.D. Canon Law
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Eric Parilla
Ph.D. Business Administration
University of Northern Philippines
Brenda Quismorio
Ph.D. Business Administration
University of the Philippines Diliman
Patrick Zeta
M.S. Management
University of Asia and the Pacific

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements of the
program of study by the student.
Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements of
the program and clear all academic deficiencies.

106

University of Asia and the Pacific

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
MAJOR IN MANAGEMENT
with Specialization in Business Analytics
The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in Management with Specialization in Business Analytics (BSBA-BA)
Program is a four-year course of UA&P that
prepares students to work in a corporate
setting, specifically in companies that handle
big data or do business analytics. BSBA-BA
has a strong emphasis on liberal arts, governance, corporate social responsibility, and
global outlook, offering a broad perspective
and appreciation of issues and trends in the
business environment.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of BSBA-BA have interesting jobs
awaiting for them in any company that uses
big data. They can find themselves involved
anywhere from data stewardship to data architecture, or from data science to data consumption, taking on any of the following roles:
• Database administrator
• Research associate
• Operations analyst
• Reports developer
• Data miner
• Big data developer
• Data warehouse designer
• Statistical modeler
• Infographics designer
• Business analyst
• Creative branding designer
• Business process consultant
• Chief data officer
• Chief business strategist

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Entry into the BSBA-BA program is open to
students who comply with the University’s
admission requirements. They should pass
the UA&P Entrance Exam and complete all
documents needed for admission.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year
Third Year

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

1st Semester
2nd Semester
1st Semester
2nd Semester
1st Semester
2nd Semester
Summer

18 units
18 units
18 units
21 units
27 units
27 units
3 units

Fourth Year

1st Semester
2nd Semester
Summer

Total

24 units
21 units
3 units
180 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
Grade
Point
97-100
1.0
93-96
1.25
89-92
1.5
85-88
1.75
82-84
2.0
79-81
2.25
76-78
2.5
73-75
2.75
70-72
3.0
Below 70
3.5
COURSES OFFERED
Second Year – First Semester
MGT 200
Introduction to Management
Second Year – Second Semester
MGT 210
Principles of Accounting I
MGT 250
Quantitative Analysis for Management
Third Year – First Semester
BAFBANA Fundamentals of Business Analytics
ECN 333
Managerial Economics
ICA 101
Business Writing and Communication
MGT 211
Principles of Accounting II
MGT 220
Principles of Marketing
Third Year – Second Semester
BAFWARE Fundamentals of Data Warehousing
ECN 311
Macroeconomics
MGT 201
Business Law
MGT 212
Managerial Accounting
MGT 213
Finance I
MGT 221
Industry and Regional Market
Analysis
MGT 230
Human Behavior in Organizations
Third Year – Summer
BAINTER1 Analytics Internship 1
Fourth Year – First Semester
BAFDESC Fundamentals of Descriptive
Analytics
BAFPRED Fundamentals of Predictive
Analytics

107

MGT 202
MGT 214
MGT 222
MGT 231
MGT 251

Taxation
Finance II
Consumer Behavior and Market
Research
Human Resource Management
Operations Management

Fourth Year – Second Semester
BAFPRES Fundamentals of Prescriptive
Analytics
MGT 203
Business Ethics
MGT 204
International Business
MGT 215
Management Information Systems and Technology
MGT 260
MRS: Case Writing
MGT 261
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
MGT 262
Business Policy and Strategic
Management

tion problems are presented alongside their
limitations and applicability.
Fundamentals of Data Warehouse (BAFWARE)
The course introduces students to the fundamentals of data warehousing for managers.
It provides the fundamental data modeling
and data warehousing concepts and techniques. It also examines the critical success
factors and risk in designing, developing,
and implementing a data warehouse.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Analytics Internship 1 (BAINTER1)
Analytics Internship 2 (BAINTER2)
These two internship courses aim to prepare
students for their eventual jobs and careers
in business analytics. Students immerse
themselves in an organization and work on
simple business analytics projects such as
helping to identify opportunities for business
analytics solutions. Their output is presented
to the management for evaluation. The organization’s rating of the report forms part of
the student’s final grade.

Fundamentals of Business Analytics (BAFBANA)
The course introduces the students to business
analytics, which is a process that transforms
data into information to inspire insights that
drive decisions for positive business results. In
this course, students learn how companies use
data to gain competitive advantage. Students
are taught to identify business analytics opportunities to solve business challenges.

Macroeconomics (ECN 311)
This course in macroeconomics equips students with a framework to analyze the effects
and relationships of the broad macroeconomy to the internal affairs of a business or fi
rm. The framework makes use of both qualitative and quantitative techniques, although
focus will be on qualitative analysis.

Fundamentals of Descriptive Analytics (BAFDESC)
The course introduces the students to descriptive analytics, which make use of current transactions to enable managers to
visualize how the company is performing. It
teaches the students to prepare reports using
descriptive analytics tools.

Managerial Economics (ECN 333)
This course aims to equip students with the
basic concepts and tools of economic analysis used in addressing business decisionmaking problems. It provides an analytical
framework for making managerial decisions
by using economic terms and concepts, economic models, and quantitative analyses.

Fundamentals of Predictive Analytics (BAFPRED)
The course introduces the students to predictive analytics, which allows voluminous data
to be used for prediction, classification and
association, making it a very useful tool for
projections, forecasts, and correlations. Algorithms for prediction are presented alongside
their limitations and applicability.

Business Writing and Communication (ICA 101)
The course focuses on the techniques of effective oral and written communications in
business. It deals specifically with the nature
and scope of business presentations, speech
communication, and presentation skills.

Fourth Year – Summer
BAINTER2 Analytics Internship 2

Fundamentals of Prescriptive Analytics (BAFPRES)
The course introduces the students to prescriptive analytics, which presents options
that optimize organizational goals given a
set of constraints. Algorithms for optimiza-

108

Introduction to Management (MGT 200)
This course provides an overview of the four
functional areas of management and introduces basic managerial functions, concepts,
and processes. It also exposes students, as
future managers, to the decision-making proUniversity of Asia and the Pacific

cesses involved in management functions.
Business Law (MGT 201)
The course introduces students to basic laws
and regulations affecting business organizations and transactions.
Taxation (MGT 202)
The course will introduce the students to the
National Internal Revenue Code, which contains the basic laws and regulations affecting
business transactions.
Business Ethics (MGT 203)
This is a philosophical study of work in the
light of its anthropological, sociological,
and ethical dimensions. It seeks to highlight
the relevance of work as a human activity,
contributing thus to the development of the
worker, co-workers, culture, and society.
International Business (MGT 204)
This is an introductory course on international business. The first part covers international marketing, describing the different modes
of engaging in international marketing. The
second part dwells on various trade theories,
and the third part focuses on trade policies
and economic integration.
Principles of Accounting I (MGT 210)
This course is designed as an accounting
introductory course for students who intend
to become professional managers with an
entrepreneurial and ethical mindset. The typical transactions and accounting problems
of single proprietorships engaged in service
and merchandising businesses provide the
framework for discussion.
Principles of Accounting II (MGT 211)
This is the second of two introductory
courses for management students on the
fundamental principles of accounting. The
following key topics are covered: accounting
for partnerships, the corporation’s balance
sheet, income statement, statement of cash
flows, and financial statement analysis.
Managerial Accounting (MGT 212)
This course covers the following key topics: management accounting, cost-volumeprofit analysis, the master budget, flexible
budgets, activity-based costing, and special
business decisions.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Finance I (MGT 213)
This course covers basic financial management as the body of fundamental concepts,
principles, and techniques applicable to
decision making with an eye toward creating
economic value or wealth.
Finance II (MGT 214)
This course focuses on the fundamental
concepts, principles, and techniques applicable to decision making with an eye toward
creating wealth. It is designed to prepare
students to make a business plan for their
project-based internship in summer.
Management Information Systems and Technology
(MGT 215)
This course exposes students to current theories and concepts of information technology, information systems, business information systems, systems analysis, and design.
It adopts the O’Brien Five Module framework
in dealing with information systems and
technology.
Principles of Marketing (MGT 220)
This course aims to enable students to
understand the dynamics of marketing as a
basic function of management. Topics covered include the principles of marketing and
the marketing process and its function in an
organization.
Industry and Regional Market Analysis (MGT 221)
This is a research seminar course that formally
introduces students to industry analysis and,
since firms compete within the context of
industries, to competitive strategy. The focus
is on mastering and applying the Five Forces
framework of Dr. Michael E. Porter.
Consumer Behavior and Market Research (MGT 222)
This course introduces students to the dynamics of market research and its process as
a basic tool in marketing and business management. The course focuses on principles
of research methodology, research methods,
data collection, sampling techniques, and
statistical tools used in research.
Human Behavior in Organizations (MGT 230)
This course introduces students to the
theories, concepts, models, and dynamics of
human behavior in organizations.

109

Human Resource Management (MGT 231)
The course provides students with a generalist’s viewpoint of human resource management as an important leadership enabler in
the achievement of business results.
Quantitative Analysis for Management (MGT 250)
This course deals with the principal concepts
and applications of techniques of quantitative analysis in many types of organizational
decision-making situations. These techniques have been successfully applied to an
increasingly wide array of complex problems
in business such as marketing, financial
analysis and projection, project management, and operations management.
Operations Management (MGT 251)
The course covers the concepts and applications of operations management (OM). It
focuses on recent trends, developments, and
applications of OM principles in managing
business operations.
MRS: Case Writing (MGT 260)
The course aims to develop students who
are able to undertake research that has
practical significance and sufficient academic
rigor and, at the same time, is personally
interesting.
Entrepreneurship and Innovation (MGT 261)
This is an integrative course that allows
students to apply their knowledge of the
functional areas of management: marketing,
production, human resource, and finance;
industry and regional analysis; and quantitative decision analysis tools. As an applied
research course, the main output will be an
actual feasibility study and a business plan.
Business Policy and Strategic Management (MGT
262)
The course emphasizes the holistic application of the concepts graduate students
learned on the different functional areas of
management: marketing, production, human resources, and finance; and on the tools
and methods of external analysis including
industry analysis.

FACULTY
Ma. Victoria Caparas
Ph.D. Management
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Anna Maria Mendoza
Ph.D. Business Administration
University of the Philippines Diliman
Lota Kristine San Juan-Nable
Ph.D. Business (candidate)
De La Salle University
M.S. Management
University of Asia and the Pacific
Jodie Claire Ngo
Ph.D. Business (candidate)
De La Salle University
M.S. Management
University of Asia and the Pacific
Winston Conrad Padojinog
Ph.D. Business Administration
De La Salle University
Raymund Pangilinan
Ph.D. Canon Law
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Eric Parilla
Ph.D. Business Administration
University of Northern Philippines
Nonna Parrilla
M.S. Computer Science (candidate)
De La Salle University
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Brenda Quismorio
Ph.D. Business Administration
University of the Philippines Diliman
Leni Grace Anne Sunico
M.A. Business Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Kimberly May Vallesteros
M.S. Applied Mathematics (Operations Research)
University of the Philippines
Patrick Zeta
M.S. Management
University of Asia and the Pacific

110

University of Asia and the Pacific

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
ENTREPRENEURIAL
MANAGEMENT
UA&P’s Entrepreneurial Management (EM)
program is the only Bachelor of Science program that effectively nurtures entrepreneurial
potential as early as the adolescent years. It is
the country’s pioneer in establishing a program
for young entrepreneurs.
The EM program is an intense, holistic, and
integrated formation program uniquely
designed to breed young entrepreneurs and
develop them into mentally sharp, socially
adept, emotionally mature, physically fit and
morally grounded individuals. UA&P provides a comprehensive Liberal Education,
developing students not to be mere technicians but leaders, innovators, and thinkers
who can articulate their ideas well and aspire
to envision a better economy and society.
Under the EM program, students are challenged to start their businesses as early as
the college level. Seasoned experts provide
intense personalized business coaching and
guidance through real business applications.
Considering that the entrepreneurial spirit is
the backbone of any economy, the program
aspires to make a significant contribution to
the national economy by nurturing entrepreneurial talent among the youth.
EM students take part in exclusive activities,
such as the EM Cup, the Business Entrepreneur’s Forum, and the Grand Welcome, Incorporation, Installation, Recognition Rites. They
also participate in seminar-recollections.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
True to the program’s mission of forming holistic and innovative startup business owners,
EMP graduates are spread across the country’s
business and entrepreneurial landscape. Most
of them are at the helm of diverse and growing
ventures in businesses such as food manufacturing and retail, garments, printing, agriculture, aquaculture, construction, restaurant,
events management, and export; others have
taken over and expanded existing family businesses. EMP alumni continue to be a moving
force behind the country’s economic development, a testament to the Program’s uniqueness and achievements.
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
1. Accomplished application form (or an online application)
2. Secondary school record (enclosed in a
sealed envelope and the flap signed by
the School Registrar)
3. Recommendation form (enclosed in a
sealed envelope and the flap signed by
the Principal or Guidance Counselor)
4. Personal essay (typewritten on short
bond paper) that conveys interests (visual/theater arts, sports, music, gourmet
cooking, etc.); accomplishments; family,
educational, entrepreneurial, and social
experiences; future goals; strengths,
weaknesses, and potentials that positively contribute to the development of the
University (maximum of 250 words)
5. Parents’ information sheet
6. Three 2x2 identical pictures
7. Accomplished scholarship / financial
aid application and recommendation form for those applying for grants
8. Photocopy of NSO-authenticated birth
certificate

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year

Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

24.5 units
24.5 units
6 units
23 units
26 units
25.5 units
19.5 units
23.5 units
16.5 units
189 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
97-100
93-96
89-92
85-88
82-84
79-81
76-78
73-75
70-72
Below 70 (F)

1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.25
2.50
2.75
3.0
3.5

COURSES OFFERED
First Year – First Semester
MGT 200
Introduction to Management
PDS 101a Self-Awareness/Self Discovery
First Year – Second Semester
MGT 210
Principles of Accounting 1

111

MGT 220
PDS 101b

Principles of Marketing
Self-Awareness/Self Discovery

Second Year – First Semester
ICA
Business Writing and Communication
MGT 211
Principles of Accounting 2 (Cost
Accounting)
MGT 222
Consumer Behavior and Market
Research
NBV 1
Business Opportunities 1
(Innovation/Modeling)
Second Year – Second Semester
BMT 1
Business Mathematics
ECOa
Microeconomics
MGT 212
Managerial Accounting
MGT 251
Operations Management
NBV 2a
Business Plan 1 (Marketing to
Operations Plan)
Third Year – First Semester
ECOb
Macroeconomics
IPD-CSR
Corporate Social Responsibility
MGT 201
Business Law
MGT 213
Finance 1
MGT 230
Human Behavior in Organizations
NBV 2b
Business Plan 2 (Financial and
Business Plan)
Third Year – Second Semester
EMEB
Entrepreneurial Behavior
MGT 202
Taxation
MGT 231
Human Resource Management
MGT 252
Operations Research
NBV 3
Business Implementation 1
(Register and Set-up)
PDS 102b Family Life Education
Fourth Year – First Semester
COMP 1
Computer
MGT 262
Business Policy and Strategic
Management
NBV 4
Business Implementation 2 (Operate)
PDS 103a Work-Life Balance
Fourth Year – Second Semester
NBV 5
Entrepreneurship Integration
(Audit)
PDS 103b Work-Life Balance

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Business Mathematics (BMT 1)
This course brings together basic statistical
and other mathematical modeling tools that
are intended to assist students in analyzing
and logically interpreting data that may be
relevant to their future business ventures.
It also provides a foundation for a future
course in Operations Research.
Computer (COMP 1)
The course aims to provide students with
the substance and skills necessary to make
sound business decisions relating to information systems and how to apply them in
start-up businesses.
Microeconomics (ECOa)
As a practical application of the theories and
concepts in microeconomics, the course
employs a number of auxiliary case studies,
reports, and papers from a variety of contemporary sources.
Macroeconomics (ECOb)
This course provides students with an understanding of the workings of the economy as
a whole. In particular, the course focuses on
the Philippine macroeconomy.
Entrepreneurial Behavior (EMEB)
This is a specialized psychology course designed especially for EM students in order to
deepen their understanding and internalization of entrepreneurial behavior, which starts
with an entrepreneurial mindset and the
development of innate innovative behaviors.
Business Writing and Communications (ICA101)
The course focuses on the techniques of effective oral and written communications in
business. It deals specifically with the nature
and scope of business presentations, speech
communication, and presentation skills.
Corporate Social Responsibility (IPD-CSR)
IPD-CSR is a three-unit course that focuses
on the study of the proper role of a corporation in society and on how it can best
contribute to economic, social, and environmental sustainability. The course framework
is anchored on the social doctrine of the
Church.
Introduction to Management (MGT 200)
The course discusses in detail and in the
practical sense a wide range of basic management principles, such as planning and

112

University of Asia and the Pacific

decision making, organizing, controlling,
motivating and leading, and dealing with
change, conflict, and negotiation.
Business Law (MGT 201)
The course introduces students to basic laws
and regulations affecting business transactions in the Philippines.
Taxation (MGT 202)
The course introduces students to the National Internal Revenue Code, which contains
the basic laws and regulations affecting business transactions.

and significance of market research as well
as the entire market research process.
Human Behavior in Organizations (MGT 230)
The course provides an eclectic view of how
people, from a universal perspective, act, react, behave, get stimulated and motivated, as
well as pursue goals as leaders, individuals,
and members of teams in an organization.
Human Resource Management (MGT 231)
The course provides students with a generalist’s viewpoint of human resource management as an important leadership enabler in
the achievement of business results.

Principles of Accounting 1 (MGT 210)
In this course, the typical transactions and
accounting problems of single proprietorships engaged in service and merchandising businesses provide the framework for
discussion. Students are also introduced to
businesses done through corporations.

Operations Management (MGT 251)
The course covers the concepts and applications of operations management (OM). It
focuses on recent trends, developments, and
applications of OM principles in managing
business operations.

Principles of Accounting 2 (Cost Accounting) (MGT
211)
This course covers the following key topics:
accounting for partnerships, the corporation’s balance sheet, income statement,
statement of cash flows, and financial statement analysis.

Operations Research (MGT 252)
The course introduces students to the use
of quantitative methods and techniques in
solving business decision problems. It deals
specifically with linear programming, inventory management, PERT/CPM, networking,
and probability decision tree analysis.

Managerial Accounting (MGT 212)
This course introduces the students to the
formal and practical challenges and practice
of business planning.

Business Policy and Strategic Management (MGT
262)
The course emphasizes the holistic application of the concepts graduate students
learned on the different functional areas of
management: marketing, production, human
resources, and finance; and on the tools and
methods of external analysis.

Finance 1 (MGT 213)
This introductory course on the theory and
practice of corporate finance covers topics
on the goal of the firm, time value of money,
valuing bonds and common stock, risk and
return, cost of capital, investment criteria,
financial planning and analysis, and working
capital management.
Principles of Marketing (MGT 220)
This course aims to enable students to
understand the dynamics of marketing as a
basic function of management. Topics covered include the principles of marketing, the
marketing process, and its function in an
organization.
Consumer Behavior and Market Research (MGT 222)
This course aims to enable students to understand the dynamics of market research as
a basic tool in marketing and business management. The students learn the rationale
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Business Opportunities 1 (Innovation/Modeling)
(NBV1)
This introductory module seeks to deepen
the students’ awareness of entrepreneurial
traits and their appreciation of what makes a
successful entrepreneur. It focuses on developing in the students a strategic orientation.
Business Plan 1 (Marketing to Operations Plan)
(NBV 2a)
This course introduces the students to the formal and practical challenges and practice of
business planning.
Business Plan 1 (Financial and Business Plan) (NBV
2b)
This course focuses on creating a realistic
financial plan. It requires putting into num-

113

bers all aspects of the business covered by
the marketing and operations plans. Further,
the students are guided in tying up all work
done into one coherent final business plan.
Business Implementation 1 (Register and Set-up)
(NBV3)
This course covers the set-up stage in establishing the new business. Students are asked
to organize, operationalize, and program the
business such that needed funds are available; required documentation, registration,
and approval and permits are in order; and
systems are in place prior to the start of
business operations.
Business Implementation 2 (Operate) (NBV4)
The course is primarily concerned with
achieving viability of a business, which is
measured by the achievement of a minimum
level of profitability. At this point, students
should have completed the basic set-up
requirements and should have started or are
ready to start actual operations.
Entrepreneurship Integration (Audit) (NBV5)
In this course, the students are expected
to have been running their business for at
least six months and earning an average
of P20,000 a month. This module helps the
entrepreneur to know where he is and to
prepare for the next stage.
Self-Awareness/Self Discovery (PDS 101a)
The course aims to elevate the sense of
responsibility and maturity level of students
through increased self-awareness and enhanced self-esteem by means of the development of self-discipline and control.
Self-Awareness/Self Discovery (PDS 101b)
The course aims to elevate the maturity level
of students by discussing the fundamental
importance of self-mastery as a springboard
toward self-giving for the sake of others.
Family Life Education (PDS 102a)
The course is designed to familiarize the
students with the origin, nature and purpose, and principles pertaining to the family
from the perspective of the teachings of the
Gospel and natural law and the provisions of
the Family Code.
Family Life Education (PDS 102b)
The course provides various situational insights unfolding in the course of living in the
community of persons known as the family.

114

Such issues as parenting, leadership, communications, and dealing with adolescent
members are addressed.
Work-Life Balance (PDS 103a)
The course deals with how individual employees can achieve balance between work
and family life. It also covers the concept of
career success.
Work-Life Balance (PDS 103b)
The course deals with the interface of work
and family in organizations.
Electives
Sales Management (MGT 290)
This course provides students with a clear
understanding of sales management as it
relates to marketing in order to ensure the
effective implementation of marketing plans
and programs.
Business Ethics (MGT 291)
This course seeks to highlight the relevance
of work as a human activity, contributing thus to the development of the worker,
co-workers, culture and society. The ethical
dimensions treated here are focused on the
individual worker’s personal development as
worker regardless of specialization.
Managing Family Business (MGT 292)
This course is a study of the nature of family businesses, management, and leadership
processes specific to family enterprises, and
the best practices to ensure their growth and
continuity.
Financial Integration (MGT 293)
The course provides a strategic framework to
integrate finance in doing business, with emphasis on its implication toward operational
or policy decisions, investment decisions,
and financing decisions.
Venture Capital (MGT 294)
This course focuses on financing issues facing
the entrepreneur, the tools and methods used
in determining how much money a venture
actually needs in order to be viable, and the
different types of financing alternatives available to new and early stage ventures.
E-Commerce (MGT 295)
This course is a study of the fundamentals
of conducting business and commerce using
the Internet facilities and network. It deals
specifically with business strategies for electronic commerce, electronic commerce techUniversity of Asia and the Pacific

nology and security issues, and laws regulating e-commerce in the Asia Pacific Region.
International Business (MGT 297)
This course discusses the prevailing dynamics
of the global operating environment, especially
in the existing trading partners and emerging
prospective markets. It familiarizes students
with the intricate processes and practices of
importing from and exporting to various international markets with differing transactional
requirements and documentations.

FACULTY
Raymond Abrea
Master in Business Administration - REGIS
Program
Ateneo Graduate School of Business
Roberto Anonas
Master in Business Administration
IMD, Switzerland
Virgilio Avila
Master in Business Administration
De La Salle University
Antonio Barcelo
Ph.D. Management
Walden University, USA
Jesusa Bigay
Master in Business Administration
De La Salle University
Dorothy Ann De Jesus
M.S. Management
University of Asia and the Pacific
Benjamin Dy
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Nathaniel Lim
Master in Business Administration
Fordham University, USA
Gregorio Mabbagu
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Diosdado Marasigan
Juris Doctor
Ateneo De Manila School of Law
Eligio Ma. Santos
Ph.D. Organizational Development
South East Asia Disciplinary Development
Institute
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

115

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
MANAGEMENT
The Management program combines business and academics that stimulate students’
lives in the real world after graduation. In the
process, the program equips students with
the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary
to transform the challenges of the 21st century into opportunities for sustainable businesses and socially responsible enterprises.
The Management program aims to develop
the Management ACES—management
students who are analytical, have excellent
communication skills, are ethical, and show
the necessary soft skills (i.e., emotional and
professional maturity, and ability to work in
a team).
The Master of Science in Management is the
flagship graduate program of the School of
Management. It is a unique five-year program that equips its students with the knowhow and determination to convert present
challenges into opportunities to build businesses and socially responsible enterprises.
It arms them with strong analytical skills,
communication skills, ethical sensitivity, and
soft skills, making them dynamic and flexible
in meeting the ever-changing demands of
the business environment
MScM offers, in the first year of specialization, a strategic view of basic management
functions (finance, human resources, marketing, operations, and enterprise resource systems). On the second year of specialization,
the focus is on a multi-disciplined analytical
framework, a holistic and strategic perspective to decision-making, and a systematic
approach to implementation.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of the Master of Science in Management have broader opportunities in the
corporate world through their vast knowledge of the different managerial functions
such as marketing, human resource, operations, accounting, and finance. Aside from
this, MScM Graduates are also trained in
the area of research through the different
projects that they have accomplished, which
include feasibility studies, market research,
industry analysis, HR planning, and operations management.

116

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
(1) UA&P Students
Entry into the MScM program is open to
students who comply with the University’s academic retention requirements
for incoming third year students. They
should pass the Diagnostic Exam (which
covers math and verbal skills, learning
styles, and dichotic/thinking style) and
the interview. They should also attend
the activity on Self-Discovery, “Knowing
your Thinking and Learning Style.”
The following documents must be submitted:
1. Filled out application form
2. Temporary transcript of records
3. Two 2x2 ID pictures
(2) External Students/Working Professionals
It is offered to individuals who have
earned their graduate degree from other
universities. It is also open to those who
are currently employed and can take the
MScM Evening Program. External students must also take the MScM Qualifying Program (MQP), which is given annually during summer before the first term.
The following documents must be submitted:
1. Filled out application form
2. Transcript of records
3. Resumé
4. Reference letter from the current employer or last school attended
For Foreign Applicants, if English is not the
native language or medium of instruction,
the candidate should take the Test of English
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and obtain a
minimum score of 600.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

Fifth Year
Total

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer
1st semester
2nd semester

26 units
26 units
26 units
26 units
2 units
30 units
24 units
5 units
19 units
21 units
3 units
19 units
15 units
242 units

University of Asia and the Pacific

STUDENT EVALUATION
For 3rd year subjects
1.00 – 1.25
1.50 – 1.75
2.00 – 2.25
2.5 – 2.75
3.00
3.50

Excellent
Superior
Good
Competent
Passing
Failed

For 4th year and 5th year subjects
1.00 – 1.25
Excellent
1.50 – 1.75
Superior
2.00 – 2.25
Good
2.5
Passing
3.00
Failed

COURSES OFFERED
Second Year – Summer
MGT 203
Decision Analysis and Quantitative Techniques I

MGT 451
MGT 470

Finance II
Competitive Strategy Analysis

Fourth Year – Summer
MGT 400B Personal and Professional Development 1B
Fifth Year – First Semester
MGT 510
Corporate Planning and Business Policy
MGT 511
Management Research Seminar I
MGT 516
Organizational Development
and Corporate Culture
MGT 530
International Business and International Economics
MGT 540
Project Management (MScM)
MGT 571
Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Third Year – First Semester
MGT 303
Decision Analysis and Quantitative Techniques II
MGT 311
Principles of Accounting I

Fifth Year – Second Semester
MGT 500
Business Academe Partnership
(Internship 2)
MGT 512
Management Research Seminar II
MGT 515
Strategic Thinking and Management

Third Year – Second Semester
MGT 210
Introduction to Management I
MGT 310
Introduction to Management II
MGT 312
Principles of Accounting II

Electives
ELEC 432
ELEC 535
ELEC 536

Third Year – Summer
MGT 302
Business IT with Financial Modelling
PHL 104M Work and Society (MScM)

ELEC 550

Fourth Year – First Semester
ECO 426
Managerial Economics (MScM)
MGT 420
Managing People in Organization with Human Behavior in
Organizations
MGT 430
Marketing Management
MGT 440
Operations Management
MGT 450
Finance I
MGT 460
Management Information Systems and Technology
MGT 480
Organization and Leadership
Fourth Year – Second Semester
ECO 311
Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECO 429
Economic History and Development
MGT 300
Business Writing and Presentation
MGT 400A Personal and Professional Development 1A
MGT 421
Human Resource Management
(MScM)
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

ELEC 555
ELEC 560
ELEC 581
ELEC 599
ELEC 600
ELEC 601

Brand Management
Advanced Market Research
Retail and Franchise Management
Marketing Research: A Tool for
Brand Management
Investment Management
Applied Finance
Business Law
Internet Sales and Marketing
Credit Risk Analysis and Fixed
Income Investments
Analysis of Equity Investments
and the Fundamentals of Mergers and Acquisitions

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECO 311)
This course equips students with a framework to analyze the effects and relationships
of the broad macroeconomy to the internal
affairs of a business or firm. The framework
makes use of both qualitative and quantitative techniques, although focus is on qualitative analysis.
Managerial Economics (MScM) (ECO 426)
This course on managerial economics aims
to equip students with the basic concepts and
tools of economic analysis used in addressing business decision-making problems.

117

Economic History and Development (ECO 429)
The course focuses on providing the frameworks for understanding economic history and
economic development and in relating them
to management problems and concerns. The
course is divided into two parts: economic history and economic development.
Decision Analysis and Quantitative Techniques I
(MGT 203)
This course introduces the basic mathematical and statistical techniques for solving
management problems and issues.
Introduction to Management I (MGT 210)
This course gives students a background
of the management process, management
functions, skills, tasks, and roles. It also gives
an overview of management as a science
and an art and its application to both business and non-business enterprise.
Business Writing and Presentation (MGT 300)
This is a workshop designed to sharpen the
skills of students in preparing reports and
other written requirements in their fourth
and fifth year in the course. The emphasis is
on skill development and exercises involving
research, writing, and revising drafts.
Business IT with Financial Modelling (MGT 302)
This course addresses the four main activities of a knowledge worker: finding information, organizing information, creating knowledge, and sharing knowledge. The second
part of the course (Financial Modelling) uses
a very practical approach combining lectures
and hands-on exercises on the computer.
Decision Analysis and Quantitative Techniques II
(MGT 303)
This course introduces the principal concepts
and applications of quantitative techniques
(operations research) to solve management
problems. The course highlights statistical
calculations, decision-making tools, sensitivity analysis, linear programming, forecasting,
and project management.
Introduction to Management II (MGT 310)
The course introduces students to key concepts in business management and the evolution of management theory.
Principles of Accounting I (MGT 311)
This course is designed as an accounting
introductory course for students who intend
to become professional managers with an

118

entrepreneurial mindset. The typical transactions and accounting problems of single
proprietorships engaged in service and merchandising businesses provide the framework for discussion.
Principles of Accounting II (MGT 312)
The course covers the following key topics:
accounting for partnerships, the corporation’s balance sheet, income statement and
statement of cash flows, and financial statement analysis.
Personal and Professional Development 1 (MGT 400)
This is a six-unit course whose main requirements are attendance in personal and professional activities and internship in an organization. The internship program exposes students
to private, government, or non-governmental
organizations in and out of the Philippines.
Managing People in Organization with Human Behavior in Organizations (MGT 420)
The course focuses on, among others, the
content of the managerial processes, the
abilities and skills required of managers in
order for them to carry out their management activities, and the evaluation of managerial decisions.
Human Resource Management (MScM) (MGT 421)
The course focuses on the effective structuring of the organization: the planning, acquisition, training and development, retention,
satisfaction and renewal of the organization’s
human resources. It also repositions the human resources function as a strategic partner
of top management, thus assuming a proactive role in enhancing the competency and
capability build-up of an organization.
Marketing Management (MGT 430)
This course is designed to provide students
with a formal training on the concepts and
basic principles of marketing. It also aims to
enable students to understand the dynamics of
marketing as a basic function of management.
Operations Management (MGT 440)
The course covers the concepts and application techniques of operations management
(OM). It focuses on recent trends, developments, and applications of OM principles in
managing business and non-business operations.
Finance I (MGT 450)
This course covers basic financial manageUniversity of Asia and the Pacific

ment as the body of fundamental concepts,
principles, and techniques applicable to
decision making with an eye toward creating
economic value or wealth.
Finance II (MGT 451)
The course is concerned with the maintenance and creation of economic value or
wealth. It is designed to prepare students to
make a business plan for their project-based
internship in summer.
Management Information Systems and Technology
(MGT 460)
This course focuses on the ways information
systems affect the management of business
entities, particularly in personal productivity,
business operations and integration, and decision making. The discussion is supported
by laboratory exposures on modeling and
databases.
Competitive Strategy Analysis (MGT 470)
This is a research seminar course that focuses on the analysis of a subsector that comprises the economy: industries.

Management Research Seminar I (MGT 511)
This is an introductory research seminar
course that seeks to assist fifth-year MScM
students in deeply appreciating and applying the attitudes, principles, and skills of
management research needed to address
the management dilemma faced by the client
company.
Management Research Seminar II (MGT 512)
Second of two parts of the research seminar
course, this course is intended to enrich students on the dynamic nature of the triad relationship among the mentor-mentee-client
in the successful completion of the project
deemed to add value to the respective target
organization.
Strategic Thinking and Management (MGT 515)
Strategy making is considered the high point
of managerial activity. This course seeks to
cover both the literature and the field practice in strategy formation and management
to set out its different angles, orientations,
and tendencies.

Organization and Leadership (MGT 480)
This course addresses the challenge of using
an ethical framework to manage organizations and business activity. It is concerned
with developing a new management philosophy where personal, ethical, and organizational criteria are central to management
policy, alongside business and financial
issues.

Organizational Development and Corporate Culture
(MGT 516)
Offered to fifth-year MScM students who are
being molded to gain a general management
perspective with preferred areas of practice,
this course aims to contribute toward the
process whereby individual managers acquire the knowledge and understanding that
will lead to effective behaviors in implementing change.

Business Academe Partnership (Internship 2) (MGT
500)
The Business Academe Partnership is the
second of the two internships of the MScM
program. It is a seven-month project-based
and research-based internship program
where the interns are assigned to projects
that address their employers’ specific management or business issues through specific
outcomes.

International Business and International Economics
(MGT 530)
The course consists of two parts: (1) the international environment analysis that covers
various trade theories, trade policies, economic integration, and exchange rate issues;
and (2) a more practical understanding of
international business. Ethics is the foundation of the course as nations continue to look
beyond their boundaries.

Corporate Planning and Business Policy (MGT 510)
Competitive Strategy Analysis (CSA) II (Corporate Planning and Business Policy) emphasizes the holistic application of the concepts
that graduate students learned in the fourth
year to the different functional areas of
management and the tools and methods of
external analysis, including Industry Analysis
(CSA I).

Project Management (MScM) (MGT 540)
The course covers the latest planning and
control techniques of project management.
It covers nine project management bodies
of knowledge that are now used outside the
traditional project industries and adopted by
many large companies in an effort to keep
their work small and manageable.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

119

Entrepreneurship and Innovation (MGT 571)
This is an integrative course that allows students to apply their knowledge of (a) the four
functional areas of management: marketing,
production, human resource, and finance;
(b) industry and regional analysis; and (c)
quantitative decision analysis tools. The
main output is an actual feasibility study and
a business plan.
Work and Society (MScM) (PHL 104M)
A philosophical study of work, the worker,
and his multi-dimensional realities, this
course focuses on an analysis of man and
his interactions, examining his personal and
social significance as an economic agent in
society relative to its given institutions.
Electives
Brand Management (ELEC 432)
This project-based workshop involves a series of lectures prior to a supervised marketing project. The lectures establish the concepts and fundamental principles involved in
brand management activities, which include
competitive analysis, marketing research,
strategic planning, and marketing plan formulation.
Advanced Market Research (ELEC 535)
This course introduces students to marketing research as a process and a basic tool
in marketing and business management. It
is also intended to provide a description of
the underlying principles and applications of
marketing research both from the user and
doer perspectives.
Retail and Franchise Management (ELEC 536)
This course is designed for graduate students to acquire skills and knowledge on the
various roles and responsibilities of retail
and franchise professionals.
Marketing Research: A Tool for Brand Management
(ELEC 550)
This course focuses on the ABC’s of marketing research. Although students may not
choose market research as a career, they
would most likely be dealing with market
researchers either on their own company’s
internal research department or with outside
research suppliers. Consequently, familiarity
with and internalization of theories, processes, and applications would be important.
Investment Management (ELEC 555)
The course introduces and orients students

120

University of Asia and the Pacific

to the basic concepts, theories, and strategies of investments. Focus is on domestic
versus international investments, and financial versus real investment opportunities.
Applied Finance (ELEC 560)
This course is an introduction to investment
analysis and portfolio management. Topics
revolve around the concept of risk and return
as presented in portfolio theory and the
absolute and relative valuation techniques
and technical analysis as applied to equity
portfolio management. It also aims to combine theory and practice by letting students
compete with each other in a stock market
trading game.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements of the
program of study by the student.
Students who make it to the 5th year need
only pass all their subjects, with a grade not
lower than 2.5, in order to receive their Master’s degree. Candidates for graduation must
complete all academic and non-academic
requirements of the graduate program and
clear all academic deficiencies.

Business Law (ELEC 581)
This course provides a basic review of Philippine laws and principles that govern or affect
business or commercial transactions. By the
end of the course, students are expected to
gain a general knowledge of these laws and
be able to apply these to situations they encounter in their business environment.
Internet Sales and Marketing (ELEC 599)
This course teaches sales and marketing
through experience using the Internet. Students handle web marketing and sales for
real businesses. Topics include ROI or conversion-driven web design and optimization,
web advertising (primarily Google Adwords),
and decision making through web analytics.
Credit Risk Analysis and Fixed Income Investments
(ELEC 600)
The course covers the basic principles of
analyzing credit risk, the types of corporate
funding, the various credit facilities and instruments, and the application of the general
principles of credit risk analysis. It also deals
with tradable fixed income investments
including corporate notes, bonds, and other
treasury instruments.
Analysis of Equity Investments and the Fundamentals
of Mergers and Acquisitions (ELEC 601)
The course includes discussions on the purpose and function of the stock market and an
overview of equity securities and markets. It
also deals with the valuation of equity investments and the fundamental principles of
mergers and acquisitions.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

121

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
MANAGEMENT –
EVENING PROGRAM
The program offers, in the first year, a strategic view of basic management functions (finance, human resources, marketing, operations, and enterprise resource systems). On
the second year, the focus is on a multi-disciplined analytical framework, a holistic and
strategic perspective to decision making, and
a systematic approach to implementation.
The program is also offered to individuals
who have earned their graduate degree from
other universities. Applicants must first take
the MScM Qualifying Program (MQP), which
is given annually during summer before the
first term.

ADMISSION CRITERIA
1. Graduate of any degree
2. Satisfactory interview results
3. Proficiency in oral and written communication skills

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
(to be submitted in a short brown envelope)
1. Completed MScM application form
2. Transcript of records (original copy)
3. Curriculum vitae (with 2x2 photo)
4. Two 2x2 pictures (white background)
5. Two letters of recommendation (from
supervisor or former professors)

GRADING SYSTEM
1.00 – 1.25
1.50 – 1.75
2.00 – 2.25
2.5
3.00

Excellent
Superior
Good
Passing
Failed

MGT 480

Year I – Second Semester
ECO 311
Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECO 429
Economic History and
Development
MGT 300
Business Writing and
Presentation
MGT 400A Personal and Professional
Development 1A
MGT 421
Human Resource Management
(MScM)
MGT 451
Finance II
MGT 470
Competitive Strategy Analysis
Year I – Summer
MGT 400B Personal and Professional
Development 1B
Year II – First Semester
MGT 510
Corporate Planning and
Business Policy
MGT 511
Management Research Seminar I
MGT 516
Organizational Development
and Corporate Culture
MGT 530
International Business and
International Economics
MGT 540
Project Management (MScM)
MGT 571
Entrepreneurship and
Innovation
Year II – Second Semester
MGT 500
Business Academe Partnership
(Internship 2)
MGT 512
Management Research Seminar II
MGT 515
Strategic Thinking and
Management
Electives
ELEC 432
ELEC 535
ELEC 536
ELEC 550

COURSES OFFERED
Preliminary Course
MGT 210
Principles of Accounting
Year I – First Semester
ECO 426
Managerial Economics (MScM)
MGT 420
Managing People in Organization with Human Behavior in
Organizations
MGT 430
Marketing Management
MGT 440
Operations Management
MGT 450
Finance I
MGT 460
Management Information
Systems and Technology

122

Organizations and Leadership

ELEC 555
ELEC 560
ELEC 581
ELEC 599
ELEC 600
ELEC 601

Brand Management
Advanced Market Research
Retail and Franchise Management
Marketing Research: A Tool for
Brand Management
Investment Management
Applied Finance
Business Law
Internet Sales and Marketing
Credit Risk Analysis and Fixed
Income Investments
Analysis of Equity Investments
and the Fundamentals of
Mergers and Acquisitions

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECO 311)
This course equips students with a frameUniversity of Asia and the Pacific

work to analyze the effects and relationships
of the broad macroeconomy to the internal
affairs of a business or firm.
Managerial Economics (MScM) (ECO 426)
This course on managerial economics aims
to equip students with the basic concepts and
tools of economic analysis used in addressing
business decision-making problems.
Economic History and Development (ECO 429)
The course focuses on providing the frameworks for understanding economic history and
economic development and in relating them
to management problems and concerns. The
course is divided into two parts: economic history and economic development.
Principles of Accounting (MGT 210)
This course is designed as an accounting
introductory course for students who intend
to become professional managers with an
entrepreneurial mindset. The typical transactions and accounting problems of single
proprietorships engaged in service and merchandising businesses provide the framework for discussion.
Business Writing and Presentation (MGT 300)
Business Writing is a workshop designed to
sharpen the skills of students in preparing
reports and other written requirements in their
fourth and fifth year in the course. The emphasis is on skill development and exercises
involving research, writing, and revising drafts.
Personal and Professional Development 1 (MGT
400)
The Personal and Professional Development
I course is a six-unit course whose main
requirements are attendance in personal
and professional activities and internship
in an organization. The internship program
exposes students to private, government, or
non-governmental organizations in and out
of the Philippines.
Managing People in Organization with Human Behavior in Organizations (MGT 420)
This course focuses on, among others, the content of the managerial processes, the abilities
and skills required of managers in order for
them to carry out their management activities,
and the evaluation of managerial decisions.
Human Resource Management (MScM) (MGT 421)
The course focuses on the effective structuring of the organization and repositions
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

the human resources function as a strategic
partner of top management, thus assuming a
proactive role in enhancing the competency
and capability build-up of an organization.
Marketing Management (MGT 430)
This course is designed to provide students
with a formal training on the concepts and
basic principles of marketing. It also aims to
enable students to understand the dynamics
of marketing as a basic function of management.
Operations Management (MGT 440)
The course covers the concepts and application techniques of operations management
(OM). It focuses on recent trends, developments, and applications of OM principles in
managing business and non-business operations.
Finance I (MGT 450)
This course covers basic financial management as the body of fundamental concepts,
principles, and techniques applicable to
decision making with an eye toward creating
economic value or wealth.
Finance II (MGT 451)
Financial Management is concerned with
the maintenance and creation of economic
value or wealth. This course is designed to
prepare students to make a business plan for
their project-based internship in summer.
Management Information Systems and Technology
(MGT 460)
This course focuses on the ways information
systems affect the management of business
entities, particularly in personal productivity,
business operations and integration, and decision making. The discussion is supported
by laboratory exposures on modeling and
databases.
Competitive Strategy Analysis (MGT 470)
This is a research seminar course that focuses on the analysis of a subsector that comprises the economy: industries.
Organization and Leadership (MGT 480)
This course addresses the challenge of using
an ethical framework to manage organizations and business activity. It is concerned with
developing a new management philosophy
where personal, ethical, and organizational criteria are central to management policy, alongside business and financial issues.

123

Business Academe Partnership (Internship 2) (MGT
500)
The Business Academe Partnership is the
second of the two internships of the MScM
program. It is a seven-month project-based
and research-based internship program where
the interns are assigned to projects that address their employers’ specific management or
business issues through specific outcomes.
Corporate Planning and Business Policy (MGT 510)
Competitive Strategy Analysis (CSA) II (Corporate Planning and Business Policy) emphasizes
the holistic application of the concepts that
graduate students learned in the fourth year to
the different functional areas of management
and the tools and methods of external analysis, including Industry Analysis (CSA I).
Management Research Seminar I (MGT 511)
This is an introductory research seminar
course that seeks to assist fifth-year MScM students in deeply appreciating and applying the
attitudes, principles, and skills of management
research needed to address the management
dilemma faced by the client company.
Management Research Seminar II (MGT 512)
Second of two parts of the research seminar
course, this course is intended to enrich students on the dynamic nature of the triad relationship between the mentor-mentee-client
in the successful completion of the project
deemed to add value to the respective target
organization.
Strategic Thinking and Management (MGT 515)
Strategy making is considered the high point
of managerial activity. This course seeks to
cover both the literature and the field practice in strategy formation and management
to set out its different angles, orientations,
and tendencies.
Organizational Development and Corporate Culture
(MGT 516)
Offered to fifth-year MScM students who are
being molded to gain a general management
perspective with preferred areas of practice,
this course aims to contribute toward the
process whereby individual managers acquire the knowledge and understanding that
will lead to effective behaviors in implementing change.
International Business and International Economics
(MGT 530)
The course consists of two parts: (1) the in-

124

ternational environment analysis that covers
various trade theories, trade policies, economic integration, and exchange rate issues;
and (2) a more practical understanding of
international business. Ethics is the foundation of the course as nations continue to look
beyond their boundaries.
Project Management (MScM) (MGT 540)
The course covers the latest planning and
control techniques of project management.
It covers nine project management bodies
of knowledge that are now used outside the
traditional project industries and adopted by
many large companies in an effort to keep
their work small and manageable.
Entrepreneurship and Innovation (MGT 571)
This is an integrative course that allows students to apply their knowledge of (a) the four
functional areas of management: marketing,
production, human resource, and finance;
(b) industry and regional analysis; and (c)
quantitative decision analysis tools. The
main output is an actual feasibility study and
a business plan.
Electives
Brand Management (ELEC 432)
This project-based workshop involves a series
of lectures prior to a supervised marketing
project. The lectures establish the concepts
and fundamental principles involved in brand
management activities, which include competitive analysis, marketing research, strategic
planning, and marketing plan formulation.
Advanced Market Research (ELEC 535)
This course introduces students to marketing research as a process and a basic tool
in marketing and business management. It
is also intended to provide a description of
the underlying principles and applications of
marketing research both from the user and
doer perspectives.
Retail and Franchise Management (ELEC 536)
This course is designed for graduate students to acquire skills and knowledge on the
various roles and responsibilities of retail
and franchise professionals.
Marketing Research: A Tool for Brand Management
(ELEC 550)
This course focuses on the ABC’s of marketing research. Although students may not
choose market research as a career, they
would most likely be dealing with market
University of Asia and the Pacific

researchers either on their own company’s
internal research department or with outside
research suppliers. Consequently, familiarity
with and internalization of theories processes
and applications would be important.

pose and function of the stock market and an
overview of equity securities and markets. It
also deals with the valuation of equity investments and the fundamental principles of
mergers and acquisitions.

Investment Management (ELEC 555)
The course introduces and orients students to
the basic concepts, theories, and strategies of
investments. Focus will be on domestic versus
international investments, and financial versus
real investment opportunities.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Applied Finance (ELEC 560)
This course is an introduction to investment
analysis and portfolio management. Topics
revolve around the concept of risk and return
as presented in portfolio theory and the
absolute and relative valuation techniques
and technical analysis as applied to equity
portfolio management. It also aims to combine theory and practice by letting students
compete with each other in a stock market
trading game.
Business Law (ELEC 581)
This course provides a basic review of Philippine laws and principles that govern or affect
business or commercial transactions. By the
end of the course, students are expected to
gain a general knowledge of these laws and
be able to apply these to situations they encounter in their business environment.
Internet Sales and Marketing (ELEC 599)
This course teaches sales and marketing
through experience using the Internet. Students handle web marketing and sales for
real businesses. Topics include ROI or conversion-driven web design and optimization,
web advertising (primarily Google Adwords),
and decision making through web analytics.
Credit Risk Analysis and Fixed Income Investments
(ELEC 600)
The course covers the basic principles of
analyzing credit risk, the types of corporate
funding, the various credit facilities and instruments, and the application of the general
principles of credit risk analysis. It also deals
with tradable fixed income investments
including corporate notes, bonds, and other
treasury instruments.
Analysis of Equity Investments and the Fundamentals
of Mergers and Acquisitions (ELEC 601)
The course includes discussions on the purProspectus 2014 - 2016

The awarding of a degree from the University is premised on the satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements of the
program of study by the student.
Candidates for graduation must complete all
academic and non-academic requirements of
the graduate program and clear all academic
deficiencies.

FACULTY
Ma. Victoria Caparas
Ph.D. Management
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Anna Maria Mendoza
Ph.D. Business Administration
University of the Philippines Diliman
Lota Kristine San Juan-Nable
Ph.D. Business (candidate)
De La Salle University
M.S. Management
University of Asia and the Pacific
Jodie Claire Ngo
Ph.D. Business (candidate)
De La Salle University
M.S. Management
University of Asia and the Pacific
Winston Conrad Padojinog
Ph.D. Business Administration
De La Salle University
Raymund Pangilinan
Ph.D. Canon Law
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Eric Parilla
Ph.D. Business Administration
University of Northern Philippines
Brenda Quismorio
Ph.D. Business Administration
University of the Philippines Diliman
Patrick Zeta
M.S. Management
University of Asia and the Pacific

125

School of
Sciences and
Engineering
The School of Sciences and Engineering
(SSE) aims to form its students into Renaissance scientists and engineers with a unique
portfolio of knowledge, abilities, skills and
habits, ensured by the University’s longstanding tradition in the liberal arts.
UA&P’s pioneers saw the need to humanize
the sciences and engineering, both of which
experienced rapid technological growth at
the turn of the century. The sense of the
transcendent–of the ‘beyond what is apparent’–was lost on the way and such loss led to
greater materialism. Today’s engineers and
scientists may have effective models to earn
profits or invent things, but all at the cost of
ethical conduct. The School of Sciences and
Engineering aims to address that.
Under SSE are the following departments:
• Department of Engineering
• Department of Mathematics
• Department of Natural Sciences
• Department of Information Technology
SSE confers the following degrees:
• Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics
• Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering
• Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

126

University of Asia and the Pacific

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
The BS Applied Mathematics program is a
four-year program that provides students
with an integral and relevant professional
training. It aims to prepare them to become
a highly competent and liberally educated
mathematicians who can construct mathematical models of real-world situations to
aid in decision making and effectively communicate the results of their research.
The BS Applied Mathematics program rests
on a strong liberal arts foundation and is
directed toward an understanding of mathematical theories and their application to
different fields of study. Emphasis is placed
on precision of definition, reasoning to arrive
at accurate conclusions, and analysis and
formulation of solutions to problems using
mathematical principles.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
A graduate of the BS Applied Mathematics program can be a risk manager, finance
engineer, actuary, decision manager, quality
control manager, securities trader, financial
advisor, computer programmer, information
and software engineer, research engineer,
mathematical biologist, mathematical modeler, computational scientist, mathematical
economist, math researcher, or math professor.
He or she can also earn important roles in the
following emerging fields both in the Philippines and abroad: bioinformatics and systems
biology, data mining, materials science, computer animation and digital imaging, finance
and economics, ecology, epidemiology, climatology, and environmental issues.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Incoming freshman must qualify for admission into the School of Sciences and Engineering through the UA&P College Entrance
Test (CET) and must make it to the BS Applied Mathematics program cut-off score of
60% in the math component.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester

22 units
22 units
22 units
23 units

Third Year
Fourth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

21 units
21 units
21 units
18 units
170 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
1.00 – 1.25
1.50 – 1.75
2.00 – 2.25
2.5 – 2.75
3.00
3.50

Excellent
Superior
Very Good
Good
Competent
Failed

COURSES OFFERED
First Year - First Semester
AMC 100
Precalculus Mathematics
First Year – Second Semester
AMC 101
Calculus 1
Second Year - First Semester
AMC 102
Calculus 2
AMC 110
Discrete Mathematics
Second Year - Second Semester
AMC 103
Calculus 3
AMC 111
Linear Algebra
AMC 150
Statistics
ITB 121L
Introduction to Computing/L
Third Year - First Semester
AMC 113
Differential Equations 1
AMC 180
Operations Research 1
ITB 122L
Computing 1/L
Third Year - Second Semester
AMC 117
Numerical Analysis
AMC 151
Probability
AMC 160
Theory of Interest
XXX
Free Elective 1
Fourth Year - First Semester
AMC 112
Advanced Calculus 1
AMC 199
Undergraduate Research
AMEXXX
AM Elective 1
AMEXXX
AM Elective 2
Fourth Year - Second Semester
AMEXXX
AM Elective 3
AMEXXX
AM Elective 4
AMEXXX
AM Elective 5
XXX
Free Elective 2
Electives
AMC 114

Differential Equations II
(Introduction to Partial Differential Equations)

127

AMC 115
AMC 118
AMC 119
AMC 120
AMC 140
AMC 152
AMC 153
AMC 154
AMC 155
AMC 156
AMC 161
AMC 162
AMC 163
AMC 170
AMC 171
AMC 181
AMC 182

Differential Equations II
(Nonlinear Dynamics)
Simulation
Mathematical Modeling
Fundamental Concepts in
Mathematics
Mathematical Finance
Applied Multivariate Analysis
Sampling Theory
Statistical Theory
Time Series Analysis
Linear Models
Actuarial Mathematics I
Actuarial Mathematics II
Risk Theory
Data Structures and Algorithms
Theory of Databases
Operations Research II
Operations Research III

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Precalculus Mathematics (AMC 100)
The course covers, among others, the real
number system, algebraic expressions, the
one- and two-dimensional coordinate systems, functions, equations and inequalities,
variation, progression, and circular functions
identities.
Calculus 1 (AMC 101)
This course is an introduction to calculus
with analytic geometry. It covers lines, circles, conic sections, special functions, limits,
continuity, derivatives and their applications,
differentials, antiderivatives, and definite
integrals and their applications.
Calculus 2 (AMC 102)
This course covers the derivatives and integrals of transcendental functions, techniques
of integration, approximations of definite
integrals, polar coordinate system, vectors,
and curves and surfaces in three-dimensional space.
Calculus 3 (AMC 103)
This course covers calculus of functions of
several variables, sequences, infinite series,
and power series.
Discrete Mathematics (AMC 110)
This course covers the fundamentals of
logic and sets, the fundamental principles of
counting, algorithms, and some concepts in
graph theory.
Linear Algebra (AMC 111)
This course covers matrices, systems of lin-

128

ear equations, vector spaces, linear independence, linear transformations, determinants,
eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, and inner product spaces.
Advanced Calculus 1 (AMC 112)
This is the first of two courses that introduce
mathematical analysis beyond the calculus
series. Topics include the real number system, point set topology, limits and continuity, the derivatives, multivariable differential
calculus, implicit functions, and extremum
problems.
Differential Equations 1 (AMC 113)
This course focuses primarily on techniques
for finding explicit solutions to linear ordinary differential equations.
Numerical Analysis (AMC 117)
This course covers error analysis, solutions
of linear equations, numerical integration
and differentiation, and numerical solutions
of ordinary equations.
Statistics (AMC 150)
This course is an introduction to statistics
and data analysis. It covers the following:
reasons for doing statistics; collection, summarization, and presentation of data; basic
concepts in probability; point and interval
estimation; and hypothesis testing.
Probability (AMC 151)
This introductory course in probability covers axiomatic probability space, discrete and
continuous random variables, special distributions, mathematical expectation, conditional
probability and independence, multivariate
distributions, Laws of Large Numbers, and the
Central Limit Theorem.
Theory of Interest (AMC 160)
This course covers measures of interest,
present and future values, equations of
value, annuity-certains, general annuitycertains, yield rates, bonds, securities, and
extinction of debts.
Operations Research 1 (AMC 180)
This course covers basic concepts, problem
formulation, graphical solution for two-variable problems, simplex algorithm and other
algorithms for special linear programming
problems, and duality and sensitivity analysis.
Undergraduate Research (AMC 199)
This course covers the preparation, presentaUniversity of Asia and the Pacific

tion, and defense of a research project in the
student’s chosen field of specialization, guided
by a research paper adviser.
Introduction to Computing/L (ITB 121L)
This course in programming covers algorithms and their properties and uses the C
language to discuss control constructs of
sequence, selection and repetition, and the
concept of a function.
Computing 1/L (ITB 122L)
This is an introductory course on ObjectOriented Programming. It covers essential
computer programming concepts and exposes students to algorithm development,
which equips them with the tools needed to
develop basic Java applications.
Electives
Differential Equations II (Introduction to Partial Differential Equations) (AME 114)
This course covers first-order linear partial differential equations, initial and boundary conditions, wave equation, diffusion (heat) equation,
boundary problems, Fourier series solutions,
and Laplace’s equation.
Differential Equations II (Nonlinear Dynamics) (AME
115)
This course includes first-order differential
equations and their bifurcations, one-dimensional map, logistic map, Lyapunov exponent,
universality and renormalization methods,
phase-plane analysis, limit cycles and their bifurcations, and Poincare-Bendixson Theorem.
Simulation (AME 118)
The course discusses basic discrete event
simulation, input and output analysis of
simulations, and simulation development via
programming in a programming language.
Mathematical Modeling (AME 119)
The course introduces students to the process of modeling real world phenomena
using the tools of mathematics.

instruments, determinants of the interest rate
levels, stochastic interest rates, option pricing model, Cox-Ross-Rubenstein Model for
stock models, and conditional expectation
and European and American options.
Applied Multivariate Analysis (AME 152)
This course is concerned with statistical
methods of describing and analyzing multivariate data. Topics include dependence and
interdependence techniques for data reduction and analysis.
Sampling Theory (AME 153)
This course provides a discussion of the
basic principles behind probability sampling
and estimation.
Statistical Theory (AME 154)
This course focuses on the basic theory of
statistical inference. It covers basic random
sampling, sampling distributions, point and
interval estimation, and hypothesis testing.
Time Series Analysis (AME 155)
This course deals with the different methods of
forecasting stationary and non-stationary time
series data. The theoretical and building issues
of classical smoothing techniques, seasonal
decomposition, and the use of Univariate BoxJenkins statistical models are discussed.
Linear Models (AME 156)
This course is concerned with various linear
statistical models for regression, analysis
of variance, and experimental designs that
arise in practice.
Actuarial Mathematics I (AME 161)
This course covers the mathematical theory
of life contingencies involving single-life
functions, mortality, life annuities, and insurances and reserves.
Actuarial Mathematics II (AME 162)
This course covers multiple decrement theory, disability and mortality, monetary applications, and introduction to pension theory.

Fundamental Concepts in Mathematics (AME 120)
This course covers sets, principles of logic,
methods of proof, relations, functions, integers, binary operations, complex numbers,
matrices and matrix operations, and introduction to mathematical systems.

Risk Theory (AME 163)
The course covers economics of insurance
and financial instruments, utility and loss
theory, risk formulation, and stochastic models and applications.

Mathematical Finance (AME 140)
This course covers the Truth in Lending Act
and its applications, introduction to financial

Data Structures and Algorithms (AME 170)
This course covers the different ways of representing and storing data, including stacks,
queues, trees, and graphs. It includes the

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

129

study of algorithms used to create, update,
and access these data structures.
Theory of Databases (AME 171)
This course provides an introduction to database analysis, design, and implementation
techniques and includes the following topics:
data organization, relational algebra, functional dependencies, and normalization and
query optimization.

FACULTY
Ma. Garnet Biason
M.S. Applied Mathematics
(Operations Research)
University of the Philippines
Ana Liza Dela Cruz
M.S. Applied Mathematics
(Operations Research)
University of the Philippines

Operations Research II (AME 181)
This course introduces the students to nonlinear programming and its applications.
Topics include unconstrained/constrained
optimization, quadratic and convex programming, Kuhn-Tucker conditions, gradient
search, and method of steepest ascent.

Tessalynn Marie Endozo
M.A. Mathematics
University of the Philippines

Operations Research III (AME 182)
The course introduces the students to dynamic programming and its applications. It
includes deterministic and stochastic programming, allocation problems, inventory
problems, forward and backward algorithms,
and Markov Chains.

Jovel Nabia
M.S. Statistics (candidate)
University of the Philippines
B.S. Statistics
University of the Philippines

Basic Economics* (FOS101)
The first part of the course covers macroeconomics and introduces the students to the
workings of the economy. The second part
takes up microeconomics and tackles the
resource allocation problem from the point
of view of the firm and markets.
Political Thought* (FOS102)
This course is designed to provide students
with a deeper understanding and appreciation of the philosophical underpinnings of
democracy, not only as a form of rule but
also as a system of political ethics.
*Free elective

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To acquire the BSAM degree, the student
should accomplish all the academic requirements of the program.

130

Sol Marian Mariano
M.S. Applied Mathematics
University of the Philippines

Maria Veronica Quilinguin
Ph.D. Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Eva Rodriguez
Ph.D. Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Michael Sanchez
M.S. Applied Mathematics
(Actuarial Science)
University of the Philippines
Durwin Santos
M.S. Applied Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Noemi Barcial-Torre
Ph.D. Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Kimberly May Vallesteros
M.S. Applied Mathematics
(Operations Research)
University of the Philippines

University of Asia and the Pacific

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering (BSIE) program aims to produce engineering professionals who can plan, design,
and implement ethical, socially relevant,
and environmentally sound engineering and
technology-based solutions to complex economic, management, and industrial problems.
Using an in-depth education in the liberal arts
as the student’s intellectual foundation, the
BSIE program combines UA&P’s expertise in
economics, management, and information
technology with competent instruction in the
theoretical and applied sciences and mathematics and the core engineering courses. The
UA&P BSIE graduate is a true Renaissance Engineer of the new millennium who knows how
best to organize resources—people, money,
and materials—in an information-intensive,
technology-based economy without neglecting
their humanist dimensions.
The BSIE program builds on the foundational
courses for engineering such as calculus, engineering fundamentals, physics, and chemistry. All students go through common core
subjects that include computer science, information management, organization theory,
mathematical modeling, optimization, probability and statistics, finance and production.
The mathematics and science components
are augmented and delivered with the rigor
required to prepare the student for an engineering course. The core subjects expose
students to the breadth of the industrial
engineering field, and put them in a good
position to choose a concentration during
their fourth year. During the summer term of
their fourth year, they undergo 240 hours of
on-the-job training (OJT) and work on actual projects at any of UA&P’s business and
industry partners.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The graduates of the BSIE program have a
variety of career opportunities, holding positions such as the following:
• Supply chain analyst
• Strategic and operational planner
• Safety and health engineer
• Quality engineer
• Quality assurance staff
• Project and information analyst
• Productivity consultant and specialist
Prospectus 2014 - 2016













Production supervisor
Production staff
Operations research analyst
Operations and production manager
Operations auditor
Operations analyst/engineer
Methods and systems analyst
Manufacturing engineer
Management trainee
Logistics analyst
Inventory control analyst
Businessman
Academician

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The five-year BSIE program admits secondary school graduates with an average of 85
or above or its equivalent in their high school
mathematics and science subjects. They
should also pass the UA&P entrance examination and must obtain at least 50% in the mathematics subtest. Students who are shifting
from other UA&P programs or transferring
from other universities should have no grades
below 2.0 or its equivalent in their mathematics and science courses.
Students under the five-year curriculum of
the BSIE program must meet the following
standards:
• Attain a weighted average of 2.75 in their
freshman, sophomore, and junior years
• Pass at least 70% of the total number of
academic units coursed in the fourth year
(including the summer term)
• Pass all the required subjects for graduation in the fifth year
• Limit residency to seven years

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year

Fifth Year

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
Summer term
1st semester
2nd semester

Total

22 units
23 units
21 units
21 units
23 units
21 units
21 units
21 units
3 units
21 units
15 units
212 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
1.00 – 1.25
1.50 – 1.75
2.00 – 2.25

Excellent
Superior
Very Good

131

2.5 – 2.75
3.00
3.50
3.50
INC

Good
Competent
Failed
Failed due to absences
Incomplete

COURSES OFFERED
First Year - First Semester
AMC 100
Algebra and Trigonometry
First Year - Second Semester
IE 110
Solid Mensuration
MA 100.1
Advanced Algebra
SC 111
General Chemistry (Lecture)
SC 111.1
General Chemistry (Lab)
Second Year - First Semester
EIT 110L
Computer Fundamentals and
Programming
FOS 101
Basic Economics
IE 101
Engineering Drawing
MA 101.1
Calculus 1
SC 112
Physics 1 (Lecture)
SC 112.1
Physics 1 (Lab)
Second Year - Second Semester
IE 102
Computer-Aided Drafting
MA 102.1
Calculus 2
MGT 216
Financial Accounting
SC 113
Physics 2 (Lecture)
SC 113.1
Physics 2 (Lab)
STAT 402
Probability and Statistics
Third Year - First Semester
AMC 113
Differential Equations
IE 111
Statics of Rigid Bodies
IE 103
Industrial Materials and
Processes (Lecture)
IE 103.1
Industrial Materials and
Processes (Lab)
IE 122
Engineering Management
IE 131
Environmental Engineering
IE 172
Advanced Statistics
Third Year - Second Semester
IE 112
Dynamics of Rigid Bodies
IE 113
Mechanics of Deformable Bodies
IE 121
Engineering Economy
IE 141
Safety Management
IE 151
Methods Engineering (Lecture)
IE 151.1
Methods Engineering (Lab)
IE 171
Advanced Mathematics for Industrial Engineers
MGT 212
Managerial Accounting
Fourth Year - First Semester
IE 133
Essentials in Electrical
Engineering

132

IE 152
IE 154
IE 154.1
IE 173

Industrial Quality Control
Ergonomics (Lecture)
Ergonomics (Lab)
Operations Research 1

Fourth Year - Second Semester
IE 132
Thermodynamics
IE 161
Production Systems
IE 174
Operations Research 2
IE XXX
IE Elective 1
IE XXX
IE Elective 2
Fourth Year - Summer
IE 155
On-the-job Training
Fifth Year - First Semester
IE 153
Project Feasibility (Lecture)
IE 153.1
Project Feasibility (Lab)
IE 162
Facilities Planning & Design
IE 163
Systems Engineering
IE XXX
IE Elective 3
ITB 150
Information Systems
Fifth Year – Second Semester
IE 142
Engineering Ethics
IE 199
Undergraduate Research
(Lecture)
IE 199.1
Undergraduate Research (Lab)
IE XXX
IE Elective 4

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Algebra and Trigonometry (AMC 100)
The course covers, among others, real number system, algebraic expressions, one- and
two-dimensional coordinate systems; functions, equations and inequalities; and word
problems, variation, progression, and circular functions.
Differential Equations (AMC 113)
This course covers differentiation and integration in solving first-order, first-degree
differential equations, linear differential
equations of order n, and Laplace transforms
in solving differential equations.
Computer Fundamentals and Programming (EIT 110L)
This course covers basic information technology concepts, fundamentals of algorithm
development, high-level language and
programming applications, and computer
solutions of engineering problems.
Basic Economics (FOS 101)
This course introduces students to economic
theories and applications.
Engineering Drawing (IE 101)
The course covers, among others, practices
University of Asia and the Pacific

and techniques of graphical communication;
application of drafting instruments, lettering
scale, and units of measure; dimensioning;
sectional views; pictorial drawings; and assembly and exploded detailed drawings.
Computer-Aided Drafting (IE 102)
The course introduces students to the computer-aided drafting (CAD) environment, the
terminologies used, and the general operating procedures and techniques in entering
and executing basic CAD commands.
Industrial Materials and Processes (IE 103)
The course covers the uses and production
processes of metals, plastics, glass, ceramics, elastomers, wood, pulp, and other common engineering materials as well as their
effects on production system decisions.
Solid Mensuration (IE 110)
The course covers lines and planes, Cavalieri’s and other volume theorems, formulas
for areas of plane figures; volumes of solids,
volumes and surface areas of spheres, pyramids, and cones; zone, sector, and segment
of a sphere; and the theorems of Pappus.
Statics of Rigid Bodies (IE 111)
The course covers force systems, structure
analyses, friction, centroids and centers of
gravity, and moments of inertia.
Dynamics of Rigid Bodies (IE 112)
The course covers kinetics and kinematics of a
particle, kinetics and kinematics of rigid bodies,
work energy method, and impulse and momentum.
Mechanics of Deformable Bodies (IE 113)
The course covers axial stress and strain,
stresses for torsion and bending, combined
stresses, beam deflections, indeterminate
beams, and elastic instability.
Engineering Economy (IE 121)
The course covers the time value of money
and equivalence, basic economy study methods, decisions under certainty, decisions
recognizing risk, and decisions admitting
uncertainty.
Engineering Management (IE 122)
The course covers decision making, functions of management, managing production
and service operations, managing the marketing function, and managing the finance
function.
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Environmental Engineering (IE 131)
The course covers the ecological framework
of sustainable development; pollution of environments: water, air, and solid; waste treatment processes, disposal, and management;
government legislation, rules, and regulation
related to the environment and waste management; and environmental management
system.
Thermodynamics (IE 132)
The course covers thermodynamic properties of pure substances; ideal and real gases;
and the study and application of the laws of
thermodynamics in the analysis of processes
and cycles. It also introduces vapor and gas
cycles.
Essentials in Electrical Engineering (IE 133)
The course covers the principles, basic laws,
and theorems used in analyzing electrical
circuits in both direct current and alternating
current conditions.
Safety Management (IE 141)
The course covers, among others, the evolution of safety management; the safety
programs adopted by high-risk industries;
and the hazards in the construction, manufacturing, gas and power plants, and other
engineering industries and how to prevent or
mitigate them.
Engineering Ethics (IE 142)
The course provides students with insights
on values, value system, value formation,
and value clarification processes; work and
responsibilities of an industrial engineer; and
the relations of the industrial engineer with
the state, the public, the clients, the employers, other engineers, and other professionals.
Methods Engineering (IE 151)
The course covers productivity concepts
and techniques, methods on study and work
measurement, wage payment, indirect and
expense labor standards, and training practices.
Industrial Quality Control (IE 152)
The course covers natural and assignable variations, Central Limit Theorem, process control,
tools for process control, benefits of control
charts, traditional control chart for variables,
traditional control charts for attributes, process
capability, and acceptance sampling.

133

Project Feasibility (IE 153)
The course covers the phases of project feasibility studies. It highlights project development, evaluation, and management.

proach and methodology; linear programming formulation and solution techniques,
duality theory, sensitivity analysis; transportation and assignment problems; and network models.

Ergonomics (IE 154)
The course covers the origins and development of human factors and ergonomics and
the tools and techniques of ergonomic risk assessment. It also explains movement and the
cognitive and environmental factors in ergonomic workplace design and evaluation.

Operations Research 2 (IE 174)
The course covers integer linear programming, dynamic programming, queuing
theory, decision theory, game theory, and the
Markov theory.

On-the-Job Training (IE 155)
This course covers the students’ on-the-job
training and actual work (240 hours) during
the fourth-year summer term.

Undergraduate Research (IE 199)
The course introduces students to the fundamentals of research design, quantitative
research methodologies, conduct of actual
research, and research proposal and report
writing.

Production Systems (IE 161)
The course covers analysis, design, and management of production systems; productivity
measurement; forecasting techniques; project
planning; line balancing; inventory systems;
aggregate planning; master scheduling; operations scheduling; and modern approaches to
production management.
Facilities Planning and Design (IE 162)
The course covers the principles and practices in planning the facility layout and material
handling equipment for manufacturing and
service systems, and the analytical approaches in site location, facility layout, material
handling, and storage systems. It also includes discussion on systematic procedures
and computer-aided techniques.
Systems Engineering (IE 163)
The course covers total systems analysis and
design and the integration of subsystems with
concentration on optimal total systems implementation.
Advanced Mathematics for Industrial Engineers (IE 171)
The course covers matrices, determinants,
systems of linear and nonlinear equations,
elements of error analysis, real roots of an
equation, polynomial approximation by finite
difference and least squares methods, and
numerical solution on systems of linear and
nonlinear equations.
Advanced Statistics (IE 172)
The course covers regression, correlation,
and design of experiments and their applications in industrial engineering.
Operations Research 1 (IE 173)
The course covers operations research ap-

134

Information Systems (ITB 150)
The course covers concepts and frameworks
of information systems as well as analysis
and design of information systems.
Advanced Algebra (MA 100.1)
The course covers matrices and determinants, arithmetic and geometric series, solution sets of different types of inequalities and
systems involving quadratics, and solution
of linear equations using determinants and
matrices.
Calculus 1 (MA 101.1)
This course is an introduction to calculus
with analytic geometry and covers lines,
circles, conic sections; special functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, and their applications; and differentials, antiderivatives, and
definite integrals and their applications.
Calculus 2 (MA 102.1)
This course covers derivatives and integrals
of transcendental functions, techniques of
integration, approximations of definite integrals, polar coordinate system, vectors, and
curves and surfaces in three-dimensional
space.
Managerial Accounting (MGT 212)
This course covers the uses of accounting
information for managerial planning and
control.
Financial Accounting (MGT 216)
The course covers accounting concepts and
principles applied to service, merchandising,
and manufacturing operations; partnerships
and corporations; and analysis, interpretation,
and use of accounting data for management.
University of Asia and the Pacific

General Chemistry (SC 111)
This course covers, among other topics,
basic concepts of matter and its classification; mass relationships in chemical reactions; properties of gases, liquids, and solids;
and concepts of thermochemistry, quantum
theory, and electronic behavior.
Physics 1 (SC 112)
This course covers vectors, kinematics,
dynamics, work, energy, power, impulse and
momentum, rotation, dynamics of rotation,
elasticity, and oscillation.
Physics 2 (SC 113)
This course covers fluids, thermal expansion,
thermal stress, heat transfer, calorimetry,
waves, electrostatics, electricity, magnetism,
optics, image formation by plane and curved
mirrors, and image formation by thin lenses.

Control (DMAIC) method for reducing product defects.
Project Management (IE 188)
The course covers the latest planning and control techniques of project management. It covers nine project management bodies of knowledge that are now used outside the traditional
project industries and adopted by many large
companies in an effort to keep their work small
and manageable.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The B.S. in Industrial Engineering degree
is granted to all students who satisfactorily
complete all the academic requirements of
the program, including the summer on-thejob training.

Probability and Statistics (STAT 402)
This course covers regression, correlation,
and design of experiments and their applications in Industrial Engineering.
Electives
Selected IE elective courses will be offered to
fourth and fifth year BSIE students in the areas of production engineering, organization
and decision systems, ergonomics or human
factors engineering, and other IE-related topics. For School Year 2014-2015, the following
elective courses are being offered:
Supply Chain Management (IE 181)
The course offers quantitative techniques
and best-practice strategies for cost-effective
solutions to critical issues and for continuous improvement of a company’s operation
efficiency and strategic position in today’s
highly dynamic and competitive marketplace.
Systems Simulation (IE 182)
The course covers representation and simulation of industrial systems, random number
generation, and record processing and generation of statistics.
Six Sigma (IE 184)
This is an introductory course to the Lean Six
Sigma approach of solving fact-based problems, process optimization, quality improvement, and reduction in process variability. It
integrates the Lean manufacturing tools for
continuous workplace improvement with the
Six Sigma Define-Measure-Analyze-ImproveProspectus 2014 - 2016

135

FACULTY
Chiqui Calayag
M.S. Industrial Engineering
University of the Philippines
Ramon Enriquez
M.E. Industrial Engineering and Management
Asian Institute of Technology
Jeffrey Espineli
M.S. Industrial Engineering (on-going)
University of the Philippines
Florencio Gaa
Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering
University of New South Wales, Australia
Hannalee Gomez
B.S. Industrial Engineering
University of the Philippines
James Lactao
B.S. Chemistry
University of the Philippines
Liza Leander
M.S. Industrial Engineering
University of the Philippines
Enrique Ligot
B.S. Mechanical Engineering
University of the Philippines
Edwin Olmos
Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering
University of the Philippines
Juan Carlos Quinto
M.S. Industrial Engineering (on-going)
University of the Philippines
Ma. Isabel Reyes
M.S. Industrial Engineering
University of the Philippines
Amado Saquido
Ph.D. Finance
University of the Philippines
Maria Lourdes U
Ph.D. Industrial Engineering
Purdue University, USA

136

University of Asia and the Pacific

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
The Information Technology (IT) program
aims to produce the complete IT professional—equally capable as a software engineer,
systems administrator, business analyst, and
researcher. It does this by providing IT training in the context of a liberal arts education
that focuses on the development of intellectual
abilities and not just the acquisition of skills.
The IT program aims to produce graduates
who excel not only in terms of knowledge
and know-how but also in terms of sophistication, adaptability, and professionalism.
The program takes students beyond the
traditional confines of computer science by
exposing them to an environment oriented
to both business and technology. It prepares
the students to meet the demands of the
fast-paced IT industry through a work-andstudy approach combining strong theoretical foundations with practical training and
liberal education.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
BSIT graduates can pursue careers as systems analysts, software engineers, solutions
architects, and project managers. Some of
them may be database systems and network administrators. For the more businessinclined students, there are also careers in
technical sales, marketing management,
and business development. The majority of
graduates work for companies in the software, business-process outsourcing, manufacturing, and telecommunication industries,
while a number of them have set up their
own high-technology outfits.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for the BSIT program, students
must have a good scholastic performance in
high school and pass the university admissions test.

ACADEMIC LOAD
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year
Total
Prospectus 2014 - 2016

1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester

22 units
22 units
23 units
23 units
21units
21 units
21 units
21 units
174 units

STUDENT EVALUATION
1.00 – 1.25
1.50 – 1.75
2.00 – 2.25
2.5 – 2.75
3.00
3.50

Excellent
Superior
Very Good
Good
Competent
Failed

COURSES OFFERED
First Year - First Semester
ITB 110L
Introduction to IT/L
ITB 111
Mathematics for Computing
MA 111
Algebra and Trigonometry
First Year - Second Semester
ITB 121L
Introduction to Computing/L
ITB 141
Computer Systems
MA 112
Calculus 1
Second Year - First Semester
ITB 122L
Computing 1/L
ITB 142L
Fundamentals of Networking/L
ITB 151
IT Organization and Management
Second Year - Second Semester
ITB 123L
Computing 2/L
ITB 143
Computer Security
ITB 152
Business Information Systems
MGT 216
Financial Accounting
Third Year - First Semester
ITB 131L
Database Design and System
Management/L
ITB 161
Project Management
ITE 1
IT Elective 1
STAT 401
Applied Statistics
Third Year - Second Semester
ITB 124L
Computing 3/L
ITB 132
Systems Analysis and Design
ITB 190
Corporate Internship 1
ITE 2
IT Elective 2
Fourth Year - First Semester
COM 313
Business Communications
ITB 112L
Multimedia Systems/L
ITB 133L
Software Engineering/L
ITE 3
IT Elective 3
Fourth Year - Second Semester
ITB 153L
Technopreneurship/L
ITB 162
IT Consulting
ITB 191
Corporate Internship 2
ITE 4
IT Elective 4
Electives
ITE 120

Special Topics on Advanced
Computing

137

ITE 130
ITE 131
ITE 132
ITE 133
ITE 134
ITE 140
ITE 150
ITE 151
ITE 152
ITE 153
ITE 154
ITE 155
ITE 156
ITE 170
ITE 171
ITE 172

Rapid Application Development
Client Server Applications
Development I
Client Server Applications
Development II
Solution Architecture
C#
Unix Fundamentals
IT Marketing
Risk Management
Customer Relationship
Management
Enterprise Resource Planning
Strategy Planning
Business Process Re-engineering
Knowledge Management
Human Computer Interaction
Emerging Technologies
Groupware Computing

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Business Communications (COM 313)
The course covers basic and advanced business correspondence and documents together with relevant communication strategies.
It aims to train students in creating clear,
complete, and organized documentation
of computer systems as well as persuasive
business presentations.
Introduction to IT/L (ITB 110L)
This course introduces students to a wide
range of topics in computing and information and communications technology with
focus on business information systems.
Mathematics for Computing (ITB 111)
The course covers matrix operations and
applications, mathematical induction, formal
logic, and analysis of algorithms and trees.
Multimedia Systems/L (ITB 112L)
This course integrates the familiarity with the
available multimedia technologies with the
sensibility to create aesthetically excellent
multimedia projects.
Introduction to Computing/L (ITB 121L)
This course in programming covers algorithms and their properties and uses the C
language to discuss control constructs of
sequence, selection and repetition, and the
concept of a function.
Computing 1/L (ITB 122L)
This is an introductory course on ObjectOriented Programming. It covers essential
computer programming concepts and ex-

138

poses students to algorithm development,
which equips them with the tools needed to
develop basic Java applications.
Computing 2/L (ITB 123L)
This is an intermediate course on ObjectOriented Programming. It covers essential
object-oriented programming and design
concepts and data structures, and exposes
students to algorithm development.
Computing 3/L (ITB 124L)
This advanced course in programming covers topics such as graphical user interface,
database connectivity, web applications,
and network communications. The course is
geared toward the development of enterprise
services.
Database Design and System Management /L (ITB
131L)
The course introduces the field of database
systems and database design. It discusses
the main techniques for database analysis
and design and how they can be applied in a
practical way.
Systems Analysis and Design (ITB 132)
The course introduces students to the concepts of information systems analysis and
design in an organization using information
techniques for data flows and processes.
Software Engineering/L (ITB 133L)
This course covers information systems
design and implementation and allows
students to showcase their mastery of the
design process through the implementation
of their systems analysis projects.
Computer Systems (ITB 141)
The course is an overview of the architecture
and organization of the computer systems
and the underlying operating system concepts.
Fundamentals of Networking/L (ITB 142L)
The course provides an in-depth knowledge
of data communications and networking
requirements including networking and telecommunications technologies. Management
of networks, cost-benefit analysis, and evaluation of connectivity options are covered.
Computer Security (ITB 143)
This introductory course on computer security covers computer ethics, administration,
network security, personal computer, cryptography, and other minor topics.
University of Asia and the Pacific

IT Organization and Management (ITB 151)
The course introduces students to fundamental management concepts such as
understanding a manager’s job, managing
organizations, and planning and strategic
management.
Business Information Systems (ITB 152)
The course explains the different business
processes in an organization and how information systems can be used for business
purposes. Topics covered include e-commerce, organizational applications, enterprise resource planning, customer relationship management, knowledge management,
and decision support systems.
Technopreneurship/L (ITB 153/L)
The course provides a comprehensive
overview of the major elements of hightechnology entrepreneurial activity, including
intellectual property protection, financing,
team building, product development, and
exit strategies.
Project Management (ITB 161)
The course aims to introduce the students
to the basic concepts, processes, and knowledge areas of project management as well
as to the various methodologies, tools, and
techniques used in professionally managed
projects.
IT Consulting (ITB 162)
The course covers the key elements of running an information-technology consulting
organization. Three key components are
examined: people, clients, and profitability.
Corporate Internship (ITB 190 and ITB 191)
The course aims to enable students to obtain
practical experiences in the field of information technology by engaging in a variety of
significant assignments and applying academic skills and knowledge in a corporate
environment.
Algebra and Trigonometry (MA 111)
The course covers, among other topics, real
number system, algebraic expressions, the
one- and two-dimensional coordinate systems, functions, equations and inequalities,
circular functions identities, and solutions of
equations involving circular functions.
Calculus 1 (MA 112)
This course is an introduction to calculus
with analytic geometry. It covers lines, cirProspectus 2014 - 2016

cles, conic sections, special functions, limits,
continuity, derivatives and their applications,
differentials, antiderivatives, and definite
integrals and their applications.
Financial Accounting (MGT 216)
The course introduces students to the basic
concepts and principles in accounting and
finance used in recording transactions and
preparing financial statements. The course
also covers analysis and interpretation of
accounting and financial data as a basis for
making sound economic decisions.
Applied Statistics (STAT 401)
This course covers statistical theory and
methods strengthening the research capability of the students. It aims to enable
students to formulate hypotheses, process
data scientifically, and arrive at intelligent
conclusions and recommendations based on
statistical findings.
Electives
Special Topics on Advanced Computing (ITE 120)
The course covers the elementary ways of
representing and storing data. It includes the
study of algorithms used to create, update,
and access these data structures.
Rapid Application Development (ITE 130)
The course is an introduction to the concepts
of rapid application development and visual
programming.
Client Server Applications Development I (ITE 131)
The course introduces the students to client/
server application architecture and development. Client/Server is a computational
architecture that involves client processes
requesting service from server processes.
Client Server Applications Development II (ITE 132)
The course provides advanced concepts on
client/server technologies with emphasis on
database applications.
Solution Architecture (ITE 133)
This course equips students with the needed
conceptual tools and techniques to properly
integrate information and communication
technology (ICT) into business by investigating the arguments of numerous debates in
the literature on architecture, project management, and organization theory.
C# (ITE 134)
This course introduces students to C#, a

139

simple, modern, object-oriented, and typesafe programming language that provides
access to the Microsoft.NET framework,
which includes a common execution engine
and a rich class library.
Unix Fundamentals (ITB 140)
The course covers the basic structure, capabilities, and tools of the UNIX operating
system, including an introduction to shell
scripting. The second half of the course covers basic system and network administration.
IT Marketing (ITE 150)
The course aims to provide an understanding of the concepts of basic marketing as
well as internet marketing.
Risk Management (ITE 151)
The course introduces students to the identification of threats and the analysis of the
impact of these threats to the business, with
the idea of coming up with sound treatment
plans to mitigate/minimize the adverse effects on the business or create opportunities
from these threats.
Customer Relationship Management (ITE 152)
The course focuses on the business processes used to optimize the value of customer
relationships.
Enterprise Resource Planning (ITE 153)
The course aims to provide an understanding of how businesses work (particularly how
functional areas operate) and how an integrated information system fits into business
operations. Special emphasis is given to
operations management.
IT Strategy Planning (ITE 154)
This course tackles strategy planning for
professionals and practitioners in the information technology profession. Topics include
a general analytical apparatus for industry
analysis and the value chain.
Business Process Re-engineering (ITE 155)
The course aims to provide students with
skills in identifying processes to reengineer,
envisioning performance breakthroughs, and
designing solutions in achieving business
goals.
Knowledge Management (ITB 156)
This course intends to provide students with
an understanding of knowledge management and how it contributes to the fulfillment
of an organization’s mission and objectives.

140

It integrates various disciplines that deal with
key information and knowledge management components: people, processes, content, and technology.
Human Computer Interaction (ITE 170)
This course focuses on the human-computer
interaction design process and covers the
underlying cognitive scientific principles,
design methodologies, and state-of-the-art
interface technologies and paradigms.
Emerging Technologies (ITE 171)
The course covers emerging and peripheral
technologies relevant to information technology. The applicability, market potential,
implication, and social impact are embodied
to extract a better and holistic understanding
of the technologies.
Groupware Computing (ITE 172)
The course aims to provide students with a
clear understanding of the concepts behind
Groupware, Workflow, and Workgroup Computing. It also aims to enhance the students’
ability to work harmoniously in a team-based
organization.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The students should fulfil all the academic
requirements to earn the BSIT degree.

FACULTY
Department of Engineering
Florencio Gaa
Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering
University of New South Wales, Australia
Liza Leander
M.S. Industrial Engineering
University of the Philippines
Juan Carlos Quinto
B.S. Materials Engineering
University of the Philippines
Ma. Isabel Reyes
M.S. Industrial Engineering
University of the Philippines
Amado Saquido
Ph.D. Finance
University of the Philippines
Maria Lourdes U
Ph.D. Industrial Engineering
Purdue University, USA
University of Asia and the Pacific

Department of Information Science and
Technology
Rey Vincenzo Cruz
M.S. Applied Mathematics
(Computer Science)
University of the Philippines
Maria Asuncion Sahagun-De Venecia
M.S. Information Technology
University of Asia and the Pacific
Joel Mendoza
M.S. Media Informatics
RWTH Aachen University, Germany
Nonna Parrilla
M.S. Computer Science (candidate)
De La Salle University
M.S. Industrial Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Joel Pira
M.S. Applied Mathematics
University of the Philippines
John Peter Abraham Ruero
M.S. Information Management
Ateneo IT Institute
Leni Grace Anne Sunico
M.A. Business Economics
University of Asia and the Pacific
Christian Vallez
M.S. Information Technology
University of Asia and the Pacific
Romeo Venes
Ph.D. Information Technology (on-going)
De La Salle University
M.S. Computer Science
Ateneo de Manila University

Department of Mathematics
Ana Liza Dela Cruz
M.S. Applied Mathematics
(Operations Research)
University of the Philippines
Tessalynn Marie Endozo
M.A. Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Sol Marian Mariano
M.S. Applied Mathematics
University of the Philippines

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

141

Jovel Nabia
M.S. Statistics (candidate)
University of the Philippines
B.S. Statistics
University of the Philippines Diliman
Maria Veronica Quilinguin
Ph.D. Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Eva Rodriguez
Ph.D. Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Michael Sanchez
M.S. Applied Mathematics
(Actuarial Science)
University of the Philippines
Durwin Santos
M.S. Applied Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Noemi Torre
Ph.D. Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Kimberly May Vallesteros
M.S. Applied Mathematics
(Operations Research)
University of the Philippines

Department of Natural Sciences
Mary Chona Del Castillo
Master in Agriculture Sciences
University of Queensland, Australia
Master of Science in Fisheries
University of the Philippines
Panfilo Amadeo David
Doctor of Medicine
St. Louis University
Sofia Maria Perpetua David
Ph.D. Philosophy (Bioethics) (coursework)
University of the Philippines
Ph.D. Pedagogy
Universidad de Navarra, Rome campus
James Lactao
B.S. Chemistry
University of the Philippines
Edwin Olmos
Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering
University of the Philippines

142

University of Asia and the Pacific

Dr. Theta Ponce
Ph.D. Physics
University of Chicago

PART-TIME FACULTY
Cyrus Paolo Buenafe
M.S. Information Technology
University of Asia and the Pacific
Chuchi Hawkins
M.S. Information Systems
Stevens Institute of Technology, USA
Ruel Maningas
Ph.D. Extension Education,
Cognate in Computer Science
University of the Philippines Los Baños
Jose Marie Olloren
Ph.D. Distributed Relational Database Design, Implementation, Optimization
Progress Technical Institute, USA
Arturo Tan
Ph.D. Business Administration
University of the Philippines
Delia Tantuico
Master of Laws
University of San Francisco, USA

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

143

Frequently Asked Questions
1. Who can apply for admission?
The following qualify for regular admission
as freshmen:
• Graduates of Department of Educationaccredited high schools:
- High school seniors (equivalent to 4th
year or grade 12, depending on the
educational system that the school
follows) expecting to graduate at the
end of the school year
- High school students who have not
taken any college work and hold
Philippine Educational Placement Test
(PEPT) certificates indicating their
eligibility for admission to college
- Transfer students from other universities and colleges accredited by the
Commission on Higher Education
(willing to start again as freshmen)

Filipinos who have graduated from secondary schools abroad

Foreign applicants who are graduating
or have graduated from a high school
abroad

2. How do I qualify for admission?
The Admissions Committee selects potential
students primarily on the basis of the College
Entrance Examination (CEE), academic performance in high school, recommendation
from the guidance counselor, and personal
interview results. The CEE contains subtests
in English, Math, and Abstract Reasoning.
Transferees who apply for admission should
have earned no less than 30 units and attained a cumulative general weighted
average (GWA) of 2.0 in another college
or university. If they satisfy this initial criterion, they will be advised to apply and take
the CEE. The College of Arts and Sciences
reserves the right not to credit any subject
taken elsewhere and to require transferees
accepted into the University to start as freshmen.

144

3. How do I apply in UA&P as an incoming
freshman?
You can (a) download the application form or
(b) secure an application form from UA&P.
(Note: Accomplish the application form completely and accurately. Please print all your
responses using black ink. Do not use abbreviations. If a question is not applicable, write
NA on the space provided.)
If application form is downloaded:
1. Submit application form and other requirements to the Admissions Office. Secure
and fill out the Applicant Information Slip.
(Note: While inside the UA&P campus,
please observe the proper dress code –
no sleeveless shirts, shorts, and skirts
above the knee.)
2. Submit the Applicant Information Slip to
the cashier at the Financial Management
and Reporting (FMR) office, 2nd floor, College of Arts and Sciences Building. Pay the
admissions processing fee.
a. For students from local private
schools: PHP 600
b. For students from local public
schools: PHP 250
(Note: Applicants from public schools
should present their student ID to the
cashier.)
c. For students from foreign schools:
US$50
3. Go to the Admissions Office to present
your Official Receipt and get your test
permit. The College Entrance Exam (CEE)
testing date and time will be indicated in
your test permit.
4. Go to #5 of the next section.
If application form is secured from UA&P:
1. Secure from the Admissions Office the
Applicant Information Slip. Fill out the
slip and submit it to the cashier at the
Financial Management and Reporting
(FMR) office, 2nd floor, College of Arts
and Sciences Building.
2. Secure an application form from the cashier and pay the admissions processing
University of Asia and the Pacific

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

fee. This fee covers the application form
with test date/schedule, UA&P brochure,
list of requirements and submission
dates, testing, and processing of the application.
a. For students from local private
schools: PHP 600
b. For students from local public
schools: PHP 250
(Note: Applicants from public schools
should present their student ID to the
cashier.)
c. For students from foreign schools:
US$50
Submit to the Admissions Office the accomplished application form and other
required documents.
Get your test permit. The College Entrance Exam (CEE) testing date and time
will be indicated in your test permit.
Take the CEE. Present your test permit.
Latecomers will not be permitted to take
the exam. Requests for a re-scheduling of
the entrance exam are allowed, but are
not encouraged. A PHP300.00 deferment
fee will be charged, regardless of the
reason given.
For EM applicants: Wait for a notice regarding an interview. The EM Office will
inform you of the personal or the panel
interview schedule not later than 60 days
after your exam date. You will be notified
through any of the following: school’s
guidance counselor, home telephone, or
mobile phone.
The list of accepted applicants will be
posted at the UA&P website www.uap.
asia and at the Admissions Bulletin Board
located at the Ground Floor, CAS Building, UA&P campus.
Acceptance letters will be sent to the
applicant by registered mail or courier
service. If you do not receive your letter
by the first week of March, please inquire
immediately from the Admissions Office
at telephone number 634-2809 (telefax)
or 637-0912 loc. 321.
For admitted applicants: Read carefully
the attachments to your acceptance letter (Instructions for Incoming Freshmen,
Schedule of Fees, and the Confirmation
Fee Slip.) The date for enrollment will be
indicated in your acceptance letter.
Prepare these documents for enrollment:
• Form 138 (Original senior report card)
• Form 137 (Transcript of Records, if
available at the time of enrollment)

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

4. What are the required documents for
enrollment?
(Note: Please make sure that all the requirements are complete in order to facilitate the
processing of the application. All credentials,
including the application form submitted to
the University Admissions Office, become
property of the school. They will not be returned to the applicant.)
A. For fourth-year graduating students
1. Accomplished application form
2. Secondary school record (enclosed in a
sealed envelope and the flap signed by
the School Registrar)
3. Recommendation form (enclosed in a
sealed envelope and the flap signed
by the Principal or Guidance Counselor)
4. Personal essay (printed on short bond
paper) that conveys your interest (visual/theater arts, sports, music, gourmet cooking, etc.); accomplishments;
family, educational, entrepreneurial,
and social experiences; future goals;
strengths, weaknesses, and potentials
that positively contribute to the development of the University (maximum
of 250 words)
5. Three 2x2 identical pictures (two for
the application form and one for the
exam permit)
6. Accomplished Scholarship/Financial
Aid form and other required documents for those applying for grants
7. NSO-authenticated Birth Certificate
B. For transferees
(Note: The University accepts transfer students
from other universities and colleges accredited by the Commission on Higher Education
(CHED) who are willing to start again as freshmen.)
For evaluation prior to application: Transfer
credentials and official transcript of records.
The General Weighted Average should be 2.0
or higher, and a minimum of 30 units should
have been taken. If the transferee meets the
requirements, he or she will be advised to proceed with the application.
The following documents should then be
submitted:
1. Accomplished application form
2. Two letters of recommendation from
a professor or teacher who knows the
transferee well

145

3. Three 2x2 identical pictures (two for the
application form and one for the test
permit)
4. Photocopy of NSO-authenticated birth
certificate
C. For foreign applicants
1. Accomplished application form
2. Certificate of evidence of SAT1 results
(must be submitted by December 31)
(Note: An applicant who is a foreigner
or resides outside the Philippines
may opt to substitute the College Entrance Exam (CEE) with the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT1) results. The
applicant must obtain a minimum
combined score of 1600 on the SAT1.
For more information on the SAT1,
you may ask your guidance counselor
or visit http://www.collegeboard.com/
student/testing/sat/about.html)
3. Official secondary school transcript of
records
4. Accomplished recommendation form
from the applicant’s guidance counselor
5. Certificate of evidence of TOEFL
results (must be submitted by December 31)
Note: If the foreign applicant’s native
language or medium of instruction in
secondary school is not English, he
or she should take the Test of English
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The
applicant must obtain a minimum
score of 500 for the paper-based test
or 62 for the Internet-based test. More
information can be obtained from
www.toefl.org or the TOEFL office:
TOEFL Services
P.O. Box 6151
Princeton, NJ 08541-6151 USA
6. Authenticated Birth Certificate/
Household Register
7. Photocopy of passport (Original must
be presented to the Admissions Office)
8. Photocopy of Alien Certificate of
Registration (ACR) (Original must be
presented to the Admissions Office
9. Personal essay (printed on short bond
paper) that conveys your interest (visual/theater arts, sports, music, gourmet cooking, etc.); accomplishments;
family, educational, entrepreneurial,
and social experiences; future goals;
strengths, weaknesses, and potentials
that positively contribute to the devel-

146

opment of the University (maximum
of 250 words)
10. Three 2x2 identical pictures (two for
the application form and one for the
test permit)
(Note: The applicant should apply for a
Student Visa at the Philippine Embassy or
Consulate only after receiving the official letter of acceptance from the University. Inquiries may be made at the Embassy regarding
a Student Visa.)

5. How do I find out the results of my application?
Letters of acceptance or non-acceptance will
be sent to the applicant by registered mail or
courier service.
The names of those who qualify will be
posted at the UA&P website and the UA&P
Admissions Bulletin Board located at the
Ground Floor, CAS Building.

6. I need a scholarship/financial aid. How
do I go about applying for it?
UA&P offers merit scholarships and financial
aid to deserving students.
Merit scholarships are highly competitive
study grants that may cover up to 100% of
tuition fees. Those who qualify are valedictorians and salutatorians from select high
schools, as well as applicants whose high
school average is at least 90%.
The University also gives financial aid to
Filipino students who meet the following
criteria: financial need, as attested to by the
family’s finances, and recommendations,
academic competence (high school average
of at least 85% and passing entrance exam
results), and interview evaluation.
Follow these procedures:
1. Fill out a Merit Scholarship/Financial Aid
Form, which may be obtained from the
UA&P Financial Management and Reporting Group or downloaded from the
UA&P website: www.uap.asia.
2. Submit the accomplished Merit Scholarship/Financial Aid Form together with the
application for admission. The following
documents must also be submitted:
• A letter addressed to the Scholarship
Committee stating why the applicant
University of Asia and the Pacific

should be considered for the Merit
Scholarship or the Financial Aid program
A clear photocopy of the most recent
Income Tax Return of each parent and
sibling who are employed or selfemployed, and the Tax Withheld on
Compensation Certificates
Certifications from the current employer of each employed parent and sibling
on the annual gross income (breakdown); for those working on contractual basis, a copy of the employment
contract stating the duration of the
contract and compensation package
(Note: The Financial Aid grant is
open only to students whose family’s gross annual income is less
than Php 800,000.00.)
For those who are not filing income
tax returns (whether they are unemployed or self-employed with a
business earning not more than Php
100,000.00 annually), a certificate of
tax exemption (which can be obtained from the BIR district office)
Recommendation form (to be filled
out by a teacher or counselor who
knows the student and his or her family circumstances well)

All the requirements need to be complete in
order to facilitate the processing of the Merit
Scholarship/ Financial Aid application.

Prospectus 2014 - 2016

7. Is there a dress code?
UA&P adheres to a dress code in order to
create a professional culture on campus.
Most of the courses require the 4th- and 5thyear students to be in business attire when
they attend their major subjects. The undergraduate students may come to school in
casual wear.

8. What is the role of Opus Dei in UA&P?
Opus Dei has been contracted by the University to help in the spiritual and moral development of the students, faculty, and staff.
It also ensures the doctrinal integrity of the
Theology subjects taught as part of the curriculum.
Opus Dei neither owns the University nor
runs administrative matters that are outside
the scope mentioned above. The University
is a project of the UA&P Foundation, while
its administration is taken care of by the University’s management staff.

9. I do not have a place to stay in Manila.
Where can I stay?
The Center for Student Affairs facilitates
housing arrangements for university students, especially if they are from the province or another country. There are housing
units around the campus that the students
may choose from. If interested, please contact the Center for Student Affairs at 6370912 local 280.

147

How to Get to UA&P

Driving directions from EDSA Quezon Avenue:
1. Head southeast on EDSA toward Mo. Ignacia Avenue
2. Take the exit on the left onto Ortigas Avenue
3. Turn right onto F. Ortigas Jr. Road
4. Turn right onto Doña Julia Vargas Avenue
5. Take the 1st left turn onto San Miguel Avenue
6. Take the 1st left turn onto Exchange Road
7. Take the 1st right turn onto Pearl Drive
8. Take the 1st right turn onto Amethyst Street
9. Turn left onto Pearl Drive
10. Destination straight ahead
Driving directions from EDSA Magallanes:
1. Head east on EDSA
2. Slight right toward Shaw Boulevard
3. Turn right onto Shaw Boulevard
4. Turn left onto San Miguel Avenue
5. Turn the 1st right turn onto Lourdes Drive
6. Turn left onto Pearl Drive
7. Destination to your right

148

University of Asia and the Pacific

Contact Us

USE OF THIS PROSPECTUS

Trunk Line

The contents of this Prospectus have been compiled and
organized to provide enrolled and prospective students
and others with an overview of the programs and policies
of the University of Asia and the Pacific. It presents in general the manner in which the University intends to proceed
regarding the matters covered, but the University reserves
the right to make changes without prior notice. This Prospectus is not intended to be and should not be regarded
as a contract between the University and any student or
other person.

Local numbers
Cashier

637-0912
631-2181; 338; 634-2832 (telefax)

Center for Research and Communication
Center for Social Responsibility

350
302; 360

Chaplain

227

College of Arts and Sciences

277; 278

Corporate Communications Office

301 (Publications);
342 (Marketing)

Don Emilio Ejercito Library

292

Don Eugenio Lopez, Sr. Library

291

Guidance Desk
Office of Alumni Affairs

365; 300
397; 635-3141 (direct fax)

Registrar’s Office

226; 322 (telefax)

Safety and Security Section

315

School of Communication

232

School of Economics

362; 637-8549 (telefax)

School of Education and Human Development 271; 220
School of Law and Governance

368; 323

School of Management

243; 244

School of Sciences and Engineering

316; 354

Mailing address
University of Asia and the Pacific
P.O. Box 13673, Ortigas Center Post Office
Pasig City 1605, Metro Manila, Philippines
Street address
University of Asia and the Pacific
Pearl Drive, Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1605
Metro Manila, Philippines
Web address
http://uap.asia

Prospectus

2014 - 2016

CONTACT US
Admissions Office
G/F APEC Communications Building
University of Asia and the Pacific
Pearl Drive, Ortigas Center
Pasig City, Philippines 1605
Telephone: (+632) 637-0912 to 26 loc. 310 or 321
Fax: (+632) 634-2809
admissions@uap.asia
www.uap.asia