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Lesson 9 THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH BOREDOM INTRODUCTION: Sometimes on the road to spiritual maturity

, we find ourselves sidetracked by boredom. We find a certain dullness and indifference creeping over us. Our zeal and enthusiasm may not be what it once was, or the activities of our day may lack a bit in excitement. Boredom is the loss of zest or the absence of sparkle. Boredom in the Christian life is linked to spiritual dullness or indifference. See Hebrews 6:11-12. I. THE REASONS FOR BOREDOM. The reasons are many. It may well be that we are simply weary from overwork and lack of rest. A confusion of goals or lack of progress toward those goals may leave us without a sense of purpose. We may also have unreal expectations. We also suffer boredom because our concerns are turned inward. Or still yet, we may be attempting like the children of Israel to gather enough “manna” (spiritual food) in one day, such as Sunday, to last all week, and thus our spiritual life becomes stale. II. BIBLICAL PREVENTATIVES AND CORRECTIVE STEPS WE CAN TAKE. A. Seek something fresh from the Lord each day. There are few things quite as tantalizing as the smell of freshly baked bread. The same is true for our spiritual lives. Nothing gives renewed energy like fresh “bread” from heaven, a verse of Scripture which the Holy Spirit uses to quicken our hearts. This first step in preventing or overcoming boredom is to begin the day with at least a moment of prayer and a few verses of Scripture. Psalms 59:16; Lamentations 3:22-23. B. Establish well-defined goals. When it comes to knowing where we are going as Christians, many of us do a lot of meandering, and this brings confusion and boredom to our lives. Even when we do have established goals, they may seem so far away that the present day loses its meaning. As important as long term goals are, we need to break them into “day-sized” pieces to keep our perspectives clear. A person does not become a doctor or an effective teacher in a day's time. But you can move closer to your goal by doing each day what needs to be done. See Psalms 118:24.

Let your efforts be done as service to the Lord. In Colossians the Apostle Paul is writing to Christian slaves, a group of people who no doubt had difficulty seeing their work as meaningful or fulfilling. They were probably chafing under bondage, wanting to be really “free” to do God’s will. Paul instructs them to change their attitude, not their circumstances. Colossians 3:23-24. The two elements mentioned in these verses give meaning to even the most mundane laborer. Put your heart into your vocation, and do it as a service to the Lord. Lesson 9 (cont’d) D. Learn to expect God in the ordinary. While God meets people in the church 215

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where they gather to worship Him, He also surprises us by appearing in the midst of the ordinary. The woman at the well was simply drawing water for her needs when she was introduced to the Water of Life. John 4:10. Matthew was engaged in commerce when Jesus said, "Come, follow me" in Matthew 9:9. Peter and his brother Andrew were washing their nets when Jesus called them to be His disciples in Matthew 4:18-20. The ordinary becomes extraordinary when God is in it. He does not often speak out of burning bushes, yet He speaks continually. Sometimes He speaks through the words of a small child, a rebellious teenager, or even through our business associates, or our spouses. We will discover this for ourselves if we will became aware that he walks with us through the day. E. Make a habit of turning your concern outward. Each day do something for someone else. Become concerned for someone else's need. Nothing brings our own need into true perspective like seeing what others have to deal with.

CONCLUSION: Boredom is not only unnecessary, it can and should be overcome. Consider carefully what you have studied this week and let Christ “who is our life” truly fill you with that abundant life which He so graciously promised to all who trust in Him. John 10:10.

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Lesson 9 (cont’d) Answer the following questions: 1. How many reasons for boredom can you find? 2. Under “The reasons for boredom” can you find the one that causes you to experience boredom the most? 3. What is the first step in preventing or overcoming boredom and how do you accomplish this step? a. b. 4. It is good to have long range goals but to help overcome boredom we need short “day-sized” goals, why? 5. Psalms 118:24 tells us what kind of attitude we should have concerning the day the Lord has made, what is it? 6. Paul instructs the Colossians to change their what and not their circumstances? the 7. What two elements are mentioned in Colossians 3:23-24 that give meaning even to most mundane laborer? a. b.

8. Boredom is not only unnecessary, it can and should be overcome. List the five Biblical preventatives and corrective steps we can take to overcome boredom? a. b. c. d. e.

Lesson #9 Answer Key THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH BOREDOM 1. There are listed at least six in our lesson. 2. Comment: Parents, this would be good to talk about on Saturday night. 3. a. Seek something fresh from the Lord each day. b. Begin the day in prayer and in God's Word.

4. With long term goals we may lose present day meaning. 5. Rejoicing and happiness. 6. Their attitudes. 7. 8. a. Put your heart in your work. b. Do it as to the Lord, (as if you are doing it for Him.) a. b. c. d. e. Seek something fresh from the Lord each day. Establish well-defined goals. Let your efforts be done as service to the Lord. Learn to expect God in the ordinary. Make a habit of turning your concern outward.

Lesson 10 THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH LONELINESS Part One INTRODUCTION: Loneliness is a problem for the young and old, the rich and the poor, the educated and the unlettered, the believer and the unbeliever. It is a plague that affects more people than any other problem facing us today. Loneliness is experienced by all of us at some time or other, and it can happen when we are alone or even when we are surrounded by crowds of people. To be lonely is to feel cut-off, either emotionally or physically, from friends or loved ones. It is to be denied the feeling of security of belonging or being a part of the group. I. OUR RELATIONSHIPS A. Man was created to live in relationships. He is not complete in himself. Created in the image of God, man has a need, first of all to live in relationship to his Maker. God is a knowable person and He desires to be known by us. See Genesis 1:26.

Only man, of all creation, is made in God's likeness and has the capability to communicate with God. Throughout the Scriptures there is clear evidence of God's desire to communicate with His creation. If we are to know fulfillment as a person, we must have an open, continuing relationship with God. B. Man was created to live in relationship with himself. To experience security and acceptance we must know and love ourselves. The basis of our successful relationship with others is based on our own self-acceptance. We are to love our neighbor (in the same way) as we love ourselves. See Matthew 19:19. C. Man was created to live in relationship with other like beings. Genesis 2:18. We are incomplete without interaction with other people. We are outgoing by nature. We have a need to belong to God and to each other.

Lesson 10 (cont’d) II. WHY WE EXPERIENCE LONELINESS. When these relationships are broken or inadequate, we experience loneliness. A. Our relationships with God. It is only after we come to know Christ as Savior that we truly understand how empty our lives were before we knew Him. Only God can fill the void in our lives. This inner emptiness or loneliness is not completely satisfied by coming to Christ, that is, by the experience of conversion alone. It must be maintained on a continuing basis, day by day. John 15:7. This speaks of a perpetual relationship. Whenever we fail to nourish that relationship by letting our prayer life lapse, by not reading the Word, by not worshiping with His people, we experience a sense of loneliness. B. Our relationship with ourselves. When our view of ourselves, our self-esteem, is less than it should be, we tend to withdraw into ourselves. By this very act we cut ourselves off, at least emotionally, from those who wish to share in our lives. When we lack self-confidence, we often fail to attend social functions, to go where we can become friends with new people and thus help to fill this void in our lives. C. Our relationships with others. When we do not fellowship with others because of misunderstanding or hurt feelings, we sense a lack of completeness. That which is needed to fulfill our personalities is missing and we feel lonely. The following Scriptures give a contrast between when relationships are broken and when they are whole. See Galatians 5:15 and Psalms 133:1.

CONCLUSION: Our Savior must have felt the sting of loneliness. He was "despised and rejected of men”, see Isaiah 53:3. He was betrayed by one of His disciples and forsaken by the others, with the exception of John and some of the women. On the cross He cried out, "My God, My God, why has THOU forsaken me?" He has been touched with the feeling of our infirmities. Hebrews 4:15. In times of loneliness, go to your great “high priest”, who has promised “grace to help in time of need”, Hebrews 4:16.

Lesson 10 (cont’d) Answer the following questions: you 1. Can you experience loneliness even being surrounded by crowds of people? Have ever experienced loneliness? a. YES or NO b. YES or NO 2. What is the first need of man? 3. The basis of our own successful relationship with others is based on our own what? Can you explain why this is true to your children on Saturday night? It would make a good talk. we 4. We are incomplete without interaction with other people. What kind of a nature do have and what is its meaning? a. b. 5. List the three areas in our lives in which if we fail we will experience loneliness. a. b. c. 6. Why do we withdraw into ourselves, cut ourselves off from others and not attend social functions? What is the result? 7. What is the result when our relationship with others is not what it should be? 8. Do you think Christ ever experienced loneliness? Do you think that when you are lonely and go to Him that He will understand your feelings and help you? a. YES or NO b. YES or NO

Lesson #10 Answer Key THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH LONELINESS Part One 1. Yes. 2. Is to have a relationship with his Maker, God. 3. Self-acceptance. 4. 5. a. Gregarious. b. Sociable. Fond of the company of others. a. By letting our prayer life lapse. b. By not reading the Word. c. By not worshiping with God's people. COMMENT: When we don't do these three things then we don't have a good relationship with God and that means loneliness. 6. a. Our view of ourselves, our self-esteem, is less than it should be. b. The result is we will experience loneliness.

7. We sense a lack of completeness and we feel lonely. 8. a. Yes. b. Yes.

Lesson 11 THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH LONELINESS Part Two INTRODUCTION: We have already seen that we experience loneliness when we feel cut-off, either emotionally or physically, from friends or loved ones. Man was created to live in relationships. When these relationships are broken or inadequate, we experience loneliness. In this week's lesson we will consider the cure for loneliness. The cure is found in dealing with the causes. I. DEVELOPING OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH GOD. The theme of the Bible basically is that God loves you. He demonstrated this love by sending His son to die for you. See Romans 5:8. Now, God wants to develop a deep friendship with you. A. What does it take to develop a friendship with God? First, FAITH. Hebrews 11:6. B. Friendship with God requires an investment of time. If we are to be truly friends with someone we must spend time with that person. The same is true with God. It takes time to know God. Time to meditate on His Word, time to linger in His presence in prayer talking to Him and letting Him talk to you, listening to what He has to say to our hearts. C. Friendship also requires expression. We express our love, our caring, for the things which God cares for, by behavior that please Him, by worshiping Him with our voices, our words, songs, and our deeds. HAVING A RIGHT CONCEPT OF OURSELVES. We truly find our self-worth when we trust in God. We are only truly able to accept ourselves when we know that God accepts us. We are His children, heirs of God and joint heirs with Jesus Christ. Romans 8:17. A true self-worth begins at Calvary. To have a correct Biblical self-concept, to be truly humble, means that I am not inflated over my own importance. I don't think more highly of myself than I ought to think. Romans 12:3. Neither do I brow beat myself nor disrespect myself, not try to convince myself that I am of no worth. III. BECOMING A CARING PERSON. A. Christ's commandment and our enablement. John 15:12. We do not have to rely on our own strength to do as Christ has instructed us. The key is found in Romans 5:1, 5. When we become Christians the Holy Spirit pours His love into our hearts. II.

Lesson 11 (cont’d) B. How we become caring people. First, look around you. Become aware of others' needs. When Jesus wanted to impression his disciples the urgency of the task that lay before them, He said, “Open your eyes and look at the fields”, John 4:35. It is interesting that when the Apostle Paul speaks of our being free in Christ, he links this with serving others. Galatians 5:13. Second, begin to act like a caring person. The Apostle Paul told the Colossians that they were to act like caring people. See Colossians 3:12. CONCLUSION: We become what we give. As we give love, we become a loving person. As we act loving, endeavoring to express true caring to someone, God begins to pour love into our heart. As we keep opening our hearts to Him in this way, day after day, there will be a continual flow of love and we will indeed become the caring, loving person we want to be. The end result of all of this is the banishment of loneliness. Answer the following questions: 1. Man was created to live in what? List the three types of relationships? NOTE: It would be helpful to look at the last two weeks lessons. a. b. 1. 2. 3. 2. The theme of the Bible basically is that God loves you. How did God demonstrate that Love? What does God want to develop with you? a. b.

Lesson 11 (cont’d) 3. You can please God without faith. TRUE or FALSE 4. To have a friendship with others and even with God we must spend a great amount of ________________ with God. 5. We express our friendship with God by behavior that _________ Him, by worshiping Him with our _________, our _________, __________ our ___________. 6. True self-worth begins where? Why should that give us selfworth? a. b. 7. The Holy Spirit has poured His love into us enabling us to love others, list two ways how we become caring people? a. b. 8. Our self-worth and our relationship with others would be incomplete and we would be lonely if our relationship with Who wasn't maintained and cherished? Do you see important this relationship with Him is? a. b.

how

Lesson #11 Answer Key THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH LONELINESS Part Two 1. a. Relationships. b. 1. Relationship with God, our creator. 2. Relationship with ourselves. 3. Relationship with others. a. By sending His son Jesus to die for you. b. A deep friendship with you.

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3. False. 4. Time. 5. Pleases, Voices, Words, Songs, Deeds. 6. 7. 8. a. At Calvary. b. Jesus died for me to show me that I am worth something. a. Become aware of others needs. b. Begin to act like caring people. a. God. b. Yes.

Lesson 12 THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH CRITICISM Part One INTRODUCTION: Criticism is the emotion of shame, rejection and failure. The extent of these feelings is directly related to how much we value the opinion of the one giving the criticism. Our ability to accept and deal with criticism also has a great deal to do with our own feelings of inadequacy. Criticism hurts because it suggests change or inadequacy on our part. We sometimes respond by deep feelings of failure, rejection and despondency. In general, we are criticized because of what we have done, what we have not done, or our inabilities or lack in some area. No one really enjoys criticism but we can learn from the Word of God how, through the power of the Holy Spirit, to make criticism a creative force in our lives. I. A. CRITICISM IN THE LIFE OF THE BELIEVER. We will be criticized, even by fellow believers. Because mankind is endowed with the ability to reason and make judgments, he will do so. There is more than one way to get a task accomplished and as many opinions as to how it is to be done as there are persons involved.

Jesus had much to say about judging each other and the necessity of first dealing with our own personal problems before setting ourselves up as the judge of others. Luke 6:37-42. When we see a brother fall into sin, we are to go to him and help to restore him. See Galatians 6:1. We are not to go through life completely ignoring each others actions, but whatever we do is to be heavily seasoned with love. I John 3:10-11. Thus, God’s corrections of us may come through fellow believers in the form of loving criticism. Hebrews 3:13. The only way to avoid criticism is to do as little as possible, and then you will be criticized for not doing something. B. Whether criticism is a positive or negative force in our lives depends on our reactions. We can allow it to immobilize us, to defeat us, or we can turn it into a creative force for good. Our lives are not to be directed by other people's criticisms. If we try to please every person who criticizes us, we will soon find ourselves in a real bind. You cannot please all the people all the time, and usually not the majority of the people most of the time. Our decisions should be made according to what we feel is God’s will for us.

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Lesson 12 (cont’d) II. OUR LORD AND CRITICISM. Isaiah prophesied that when the Messiah came He would be despised and rejected by men. Isaiah 53:3. The religious leaders of His day not only rejected Jesus but also made it their business to openly criticize Him and attempt to "trip Him up." See Luke 6:7. How did Jesus respond? He healed the man's hand. He answered His critics with a higher law. He did not allow them to keep Him from doing the will of God. Refer to Luke 6:810. We do not find Jesus lashing out at people because of their attacks on His person. Even in the judgment hall when He was rejected as the Son of God and beaten and cursed, He answered His critics with a meek spirit and few words. Read John 19:1-11. CONCLUSION: Next week we will study the Lord's provision for us in dealing with criticism and how we should respond to another person's critical spirit. Answer the following questions: 1. Criticism hurts because it suggests change or ___________ on our part? 2. How can we make criticism a creative force in our lives? 3. Will we be criticized by other Christians? YES or NO 4. Jesus said that we were not to set ourselves up judging others but first we are to do what? 5. Good or bad the effect of criticism is determined by our ________________? 6. Should our lives be directed by other peoples criticism? decisions be made? a. b. 7. Was Jesus ever criticized by the religious leaders? YES or NO 8. Did this criticism from the religious leaders keep Jesus from doing God's will? If not, how should our

Lesson #12 Answer Key THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH CRITICISM Part One 1. Inadequacy. 2. Through the Word of God and by the power of the Holy Spirit. . 3. Yes. 4. Judge our own personal problems before setting ourselves up as the judge of others. 5. Our reactions. 6. No - To what we feel is God's will for us. 7. Yes. 8. No.

Lesson 13 THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH CRITICISM Part Two INTRODUCTION: We have already seen that criticism is the emotion of shame, rejection and failure. The reason someone's criticism of us usually results in a negative response is because it suggests change or inadequacy on our part. This week we want to consider our Lord s provision for us in dealing with criticism and what our response should be when we are criticized. I. OUR LORD'S PROVISION FOR US. We readily accept Christ's suffering for our release from the penalty of sin. We do not always see that Jesus, on the Cross, bore the shame of our sins. He experienced the rejection, the feelings of humiliation, that go along with the fact of our sins. See Colossians 2:14. The Greek word used here means to literally “wash over”. The ink used in Paul's day could be erased by washing the surface of the papyrus on which the words were written. It would then be clean as if it had never been written on before. Not only is the sin gone, but the shame connected with it is also gone. A second key point in regard to criticism is that Christ has made us acceptable to God. Because of His death we have been adopted into the family of God. He has made it possible for us to be presented before God "holy and without blame" in His sight. Ephesians 1:4-6. The forgiveness and acceptance by God through Jesus Christ is the foundation for our self-esteem. It is only within the framework of this loving acceptance by God that we will be able to deal with criticism -- both that which is deserved and that which is undeserved. Knowing that we are beloved children of God and no less loved because we have failed or do not measure up according to men's standards, gives us a basis to positively consider criticism. Knowing our inadequacies, knowing full well that we could not be His witnesses in our own strength, Jesus promised to send us the Comforter, the Enabler, the Holy Spirit, to dwell within us. See John 14:16. The Holy Spirit is sent to guide us. Read John 16:13. He empowers us to be His witnesses, Acts 1:8. This includes the grace to react graciously and honestly to criticism and to learn from it. II . A. OUR RESPONSE TO CRITICISM. Be gracious in your attitude. This is the ideal. Realistically, some of us do not express love all the time. Sometimes our reaction to criticism is quite natural. We want to lash out, to defend our actions, to tell the person how "wrong" they are. To be gracious in our response will take the enabling of the Holy Spirit. This does not mean that we accept the criticism as justified. It simply means that we respond in love to the person offering the criticism. Sometimes we have to "bite our tongue" and breathe a silent prayer to remind us that our strength comes from God.

Lesson 13 (cont’d) B. Consider the source. Learn to lay aside the words themselves long enough to consider the person behind the words. Is this person basically critical? Or does

he love me enough to want to help me? Is the criticism laced with malice or is it given in Love? Could it be that God is using this person to point out to me an area in my life where change is needed? C. Evaluate the criticism honestly. This is often the hard part. We work overtime defending our actions. We rationalize and we excuse when we need to take it before the Lord in prayer. As much as we hate to admit it, sometimes criticism is justified. D. Accept or reject criticism and put it to rest. If the criticism is justified, then the appropriate action is to ask God's forgiveness, and then set about changing whatever can be changed. If the criticism is unwarranted, then we simply have to leave it with the Lord. It is important that we put it to rest and do not brood over it. CONCLUSION: Look up and read these Scriptures that deal with criticism: Romans 12:3, I Peter 4:14 and Proverbs 15:32. Answer the following questions: 1. The first thing we are to see in dealing with criticism is that not only did Christ suffer for our release from the penalty of sin but that He also bore the _______ of our sins? 2. Who has made us acceptable to God? 3. The forgiveness and acceptance by God through Jesus Christ is the ____________ for our self-esteem. 4. Only by what can we deal with deserved or undeserved criticism? 5. List at least five things the Holy Spirit will do? a. b. c. d. 6. What will it take to be gracious in our response to criticism? What does it mean to BE gracious and NOT gracious? a. b. c. 7. We are to consider the source but also to evaluate if the criticism is justified. TRUE or FALSE NOTE: Sometimes criticism is justified. 8. What are we to do if criticism is justified? What are we to do if criticism is not justified? a. b. Lesson #13 Answer Key THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH CRITICISM Part Two 1. Shame. e.

2. Jesus. 3. Foundation. 4. Only the loving acceptance by God we are able to deal with criticism. 5. a. Dwell within us. b. Guide us. c. Empower us to witness. d. Give us the grace to react graciously and honestly to criticism. e. To help us to learn from criticism. 6. a. The enabling of the Holy Spirit. b. It simply means that we respond in love to the person offering the criticism. c. It does not mean that we accept the criticism as justified. 7. True. 8. a. Ask God's forgiveness and then set about changing what needs to be changed. b. We simply have to leave it with the Lord, but put it to rest and not brood over it.

Lesson 14 THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH IMPULSIVENESS Part One INTRODUCTION: Impulsiveness is that impetus or driving force which causes us to act spontaneously. There is also the element of an irresistible urge to act. Impulsiveness usually is seen in one who has potential leadership and strong faith. Impulsiveness, is in fact, two-sided. There is something very refreshing about spontaneity, or the eager response to become involved. This is especially so when compared with indifference or apathy. The problem comes when a person acts on emotions alone. To act impulsively is to act in response to one's emotions without taking time for the mind to evaluate the situation or for the will to exercise control which is the fruit of the Spirit. Galatians 5:23-24. THE HOLY SPIRIT AND OUR EMOTIONS. Learning to respond to the direction of the Holy Spirit and to lean on His power during times of stress, is a growing experience. As we begin to walk day by day, moment by moment, in fellowship with and in dependence on the Lord, we begin to feel the influence of the Holy Spirit on our mind -- which tells us how we think; on our emotions -- which tells us how we feel, and on our will -- which determines how we react in a given situation. To invite the Lord, through the power of the Holy Spirit, to enter into our emotional life is not to do away with our emotions. It is rather to bring about a balance, an inner control, so that our emotional life comes under the influence of the Holy Spirit and thus can be enhanced and brought to completeness. It is not God's desire to take away our spontaneity but rather to harness and channel that energy for His glory. As Christians, we are instructed to "walk in the Spirit”, Galatians 5:16. What this means in a practical sense is that we learn to go throughout the various activities of the day with an awareness of the indwelling Holy Spirit. It is to live in dependence on His power. II. THE PERSON OF THE HOLY SPIRIT AND OUR RELATIONSHIP TO HIM. Before Jesus returned to the Father He promised His disciples that He would send the Comforter (“one called alongside to help”). He said that the power of the indwelling Holy Spirit would enable them to be His witnesses. See Acts 1:8. A. The Holy Spirit is a person. He is the third person of the Trinity. "A personalized aspect of God's being." Just as Jesus has always been, the Holy Spirit always existed. B. The Holy Spirit always speaks of and glorifies Jesus. Read John 15:26 and 16:14. I.

Lesson 14 (cont’d) C. The Holy Spirit has a particular mission in your life and mine. Through the work of the Holy Spirit our spirits are made alive and we are born into the family of God. See John 3:5-6. He comes to convict of sin. Refer to John 16:8. He enables us to be witnesses of Christ, see Luke 24:49. It is the power of the Holy Spirit working in us that transforms us into the image of God's Son. II Corinthians 3:18. He guides us into truth John 16:13. He prays for us when we don't know what we ought to pray for, Romans 8:26-27. He is, in short, our helper, our enabler. CONCLUSION: The Holy Spirit makes His power available to us only when we surrender. God works in the lives of those who willingly open their lives to Him. He will not intrude upon us even though His coming is for our benefit. The Holy Spirit will not seize control, He will only accept and enter the territory when He is invited. Answer the following questions: 1. List the two sides of impulsiveness that were given in the introduction. a. b. we 2. Learning to respond to the Holy Spirit's direction and power comes to us as soon as get saved. TRUE or FALSE 3. When we grow in the grace of the Lord the Holy Spirit's influence is on three areas of our lives. List them and give their meaning. a. b. c. 4. It is not God's desire to take away our spontaneity but rather to _________ and _______ that energy for His glory. 5. What does it mean to “walk in the Spirit”? 6. The Holy Spirit is not a person and He always speaks of Himself. TRUE or FA SE 7. There are at least six things in our lesson that the Holy Spirit will do in our lives if we let Him, list them. a. b. c. d. e. f. 8. What is the meaning of the “Comforter” and is that meaning true to your daily life? Lesson #14 Answer Key THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH IMPULSIVENESS

Part One 1. a. The eager response to become involved. b. A problem arises when we act on emotions alone. 2. False. It is a growing experience. 3. a. On our minds - which tells us how we think. b. On our emotions - which tells us how to feel. c. On our will - which determines how we react in a given situation. 4. Harness and channel. 5. That we learn to go throughout the activities of the day with the awareness of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, and to live in dependence of His power. 6. False. He is a person. The third person of the Trinity, and He only speaks of and glorifies Jesus. 7. a. Our spirit is made alive and we our born into God's family. b. He convicts of sin. c. He enables us to witness of Christ. d. He works in us to transform us into the image of Christ. e. He guides us into truth. f. He is our prayer partner. 8. It means, “One called alongside to help”.

Lesson 15 THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH IMPULSIVENESS Part Two INTRODUCTION: Impulsiveness is usually seen in those who are eager to get things accomplished. The Apostle Peter is an outstanding example of an impulsive person. There were times, especially in his earlier Christian life, when his impulsiveness got him into trouble. See John 18:10-11. We are not to conclude from this that impulsiveness is always a harmful emotion. As we have seen in the first lesson, the problem comes when a person acts on emotions alone. The Holy Spirit is our helper in dealing with impulsiveness, just as He is in dealing with all our emotional problems. See Romans 8:26-27. I. A COMPARISON BETWEEN NATURAL AND SPIRIT-DIRECTED IMPULSIVENESS. A. Natural impulsiveness acts on the emotion of the moment. Luke 9:49-56. Spiritdirected impulsiveness feels the same compulsion to respond, but mentally evaluates what God would desire, then acts as the Spirit impresses. Both the mind and the will are brought into play. B. Natural impulsiveness has a flash of faith or quick assurance that anything is possible. Strong, sustained faith tests "feeling" by the Word and then acts on the basis of Biblical truth which is the foundation for a strong, sustained faith. Acts 17:10-11; I Thessalonians 2:13.

The Holy Spirit brings a balance to our lives, thus a greater sense of satisfaction and fulfillment. The end result of Spirit-directed impulsiveness will be fewer "false starts," fewer projects begun and a larger percentage completed, fewer words to retract and fewer fences to mend. II. HOW WE CAN BEGIN TO BRING OUR IMPULSIVE SPIRIT UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE HOLY SPIRIT A. Think before acting. To really walk in the Spirit is to come under the leadership of the Holy Spirit. It is to recognize His right now to guide and influence our actions. B. Weigh your desires. What is your real motivation? Why do you want to do this thing or say this word? What is it that you really want to accomplish? Is it a true desire to see God's name glorified or is it selfish ambition? C. Act responsibly in consideration of others. All through the epistles we find that those who "walk in the Spirit" are also those who care for others, who consider the feelings of others. Galatians 5:13-16.

Lesson 15 (cont’d) CONCLUSION: It is good to take inventory now and then. Take a few moments to take stock of the

"tasks" you have begun in the past few months. How many have you completed? If not, where did you drop out? Galatians 5:7. This question was asked of those who had turned aside from the truth. but it is a good question to ask ourselves in many situations. It may be that we need to ask if there is an area in our lives which is out of balance. Is there some area where we need to allow the Holy Spirit to direct us more closely? As we yield to the influence of the Holy Spirit, He begins to "help our infirmities." Our impulsiveness, and all our emotional problems are brought under His control. The result is balanced Christian living. Answer the following questions: 1. Who is an example of an impulsive person mentioned in the New Testament? as 2. Who is our helper to help us deal with impulsiveness and all the rest of our emotions well? Do you remember what the Lord called Him and what does that name mean? a. b. 3. Does the Spirit directed impulsiveness feel the same compulsion as the natural impulsiveness? If not, what is the difference? 4. By what are we to test our feelings? If we do what is the results? a. b. 5. If we let the Holy Spirit He will bring what to our lives and what is the results? a. b. 6. List the three ways to bring our impulsiveness under the direction of the Holy Spirit. a. b. c. 7. Which of the three do you need the Holy Spirit to help you the most? be 8. As we yield our lives and our emotions to the influence of the Holy Spirit what will the results?

Lesson #15 Answer Key THE CHRISTIAN AND HIS EMOTIONS DEALING WITH IMPULSIVENESS Part Two 1. Peter. 2. a. The Holy Spirit b. The Comforter, which means, “One called alongside to help”. 3. Yes, but the Spirit mentally evaluates what God would desire, then acts as the Spirit impresses for both the will and mind are brought into play. 4. a. By the Word of God. b. We will have a strong foundation for faith. 5. a. Balance. b. A greater sense of satisfaction and fulfillment and fewer false starts, fewer words to retract, and fewer fences to mend. 6. a. Think before acting. b. Weigh your desires. c. Act responsibly in consideration of others. 7. Parents this would be a wonderful discussion with your children for Saturday night family time. 8. We would have a balance Christian life and all our emotional problems will be under His control.