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Reading Lesson Plans

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Jan. 12-16, 2015

Unit 5, Week 19

1st Grade

Unit 5 Literary Texts (4 weeks)


Connection-Communities
Unit Essential Questions
are characters and adventures from two different stories alike and different?
can we identify the story in different parts of the books we are reading?
can talking to our friends about our writing help us make it better?
can gathering and remembering information help us in our writing?
can we write an opinion piece on a topic or a book we have read?
can we write a story about something that happened in our lives?
can we use different kinds of sentences in our writing and speaking?

Required Texts
Extended Text
Mamas Birthday Present (Unit 4, RS)
Connected Short Texts
Looking for the Muffin Man (Unit 4, BM RT)
Big Ben Helps the Town (Unit 2, BM LR)
Jans New Home (Unit 3, RS)
Poem: If I Could Build a Town

Standards

Essential Questions

Suggested Texts
The Farmer in the Hat (Unit 2, RS)
Mayor Mom (Unit 2, RS Advanced LR)
The Kids Care Club (Unit 4, RS On-level LR)
Humpty Dumptys Fall (Unit 5, BM RT)
Farm Alarm (Unit 2, BM LR)
Duck for President by Doreen Cronin
My Teacher for President by Kay Winters
Our Community Garden by Barbara Pollak

Weekly Information
1RL7 Use illustrations and details to describe characters, setting, or events.
1RL10 With prompting and support, read prose and poetry of appropriate
complexity for grade one.
1RF3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skill in decoding
words.
1RF2a Distinguish long from short vowels in spoken single-syllable words.
1RF3c Know final e and common vowel team conventions for representing long
vowel sounds.
1RF3g Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
1SL3 Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather
additional information or clarify something that is not understood.

How do analyzing story elements help us to better understand a literary text?


How can we use illustrations to help us identify the story elements in a literary
text?
How do we decode long u (-e, ue) words?
How do we distinguish long and short vowel sounds in spoken words?
When do we add s or es to make a word plural?

Monday
Mini Lesson
(Incorporates
Read Aloud, ELA
skill)
Text: Little Red Hen
(Benchmark Big
Book, Unit 4)

Metacognitive Skill: Visualize


Comprehension Skill: Analyze Story Elements
Connect: Display a blank On the Farm chart (see example below). Explain that
today we will be reading a story that takes place on a farm. Ask: Who has ever
been to a farm? Who has seen a book or a movie that takes place on a farm? Have
students think about what they have seen on the farm and what the farmer does.
Record their responses on the chart.
Animals
Chicken
Pig
Horse
Cow

What a farmer does


Digs
Plants
Waters
Harvests

Tools a Farmer Uses


Tractor
Rake
Shovel
Wheelbarrow
Wagon

Teach:
Read: Display The Little Red Hen. Read the title, author, and illustrator together.
Invite students to listen and follow along as you read the complete story for their
enjoyment.
Explain: Whenever I read a story, I pay attention to the story elements. Story
elements are the characters, the setting, the problem, and the resolution.
Model: As I look at the picture, I summarize what is happening. The Little Red Hen is
carrying a bag of flour. The other animals are not helping. I think about my own
experiences. When I have work to do, it is more fun if others help me. The work also
gets done faster. I synthesize this information to figure out that the hen will have a
problem with the other animals. Now lets summarize and synthesize to identify
what problem the Little Red Hen might have with the other animals. You can tell
your ideas by saying, I think the little Red Hens problem is that ________.
Active Engagement:
Use the close read text to reread through the first half of the story. Ask questions
about the text while reading. (See examples below.) You can record students
responses on the story elements chart (BLM 2).
Pages 2-5
Who are the characters in the story?
What is the setting for this story?
What does the Little Red Hen want to do?
What do the animals want to do?
Pages 6-8
o We can see the Little Red Hen has a problem. What is the little Red Hens
problem? What does she do about it?
Pages 9-10
o What happens at the mill? How can we summarize the Little Red Hens
problem?
Link: We used words and pictures to help us summarize what happened in the story.
This helps us understand the story elements, especially identifying the problem.
These are good strategies for you to use when you are reading independently
today.

Monday
Below-Level

Differentiated Small Group Reading


Phonological Awareness:
Listen to these words and tell me if each word has the long o sound or not. Give me thumbs up if
the word has the long o sound and thumbs down if the word doesnt have the long o sound. For
example, if the word is cop, you would show me thumbs down. If the word is cope, you would show
me thumbs up. Pronounce these words to have the students indicate if the word has the long /o/
sound:
woke
stove

Brianna
Raquez
Khristina
TyShiya

walk
float

pal
lost

pole
stomp

spoke
smoke

spot
chose

Phonics:
Sort long and short u words
Sample Words: cube, cure, cute, duke, mule, mute, rude, rule, tube, tune, use, due, glue, clue, cue,
Sue, true
Comprehension Skill from Mini-Lesson:
Review the story elements discussed during todays mini-lesson. Review the high frequency words
from this story on page 70. Take a picture walk through the story Jans New Home (Reading Street,
Unit 3). While going through the story, discuss the story elements that the students notice. Echo
read this selection, modeling for fluency and diction.

On-Level

Mekari
Serenity
Alicia
ZaNiyah
Jessie

Brett
Dameon
Victoria
Jordan

Phonological Awareness:
Listen to these words and tell me if each word has the long o sound or not. Give me thumbs up if
the word has the long o sound and thumbs down if the word doesnt have the long o sound. For
example, if the word is cop, you would show me thumbs down. If the word is cope, you would show
me thumbs up. Pronounce these words to have the students indicate if the word has the long /o/
sound:
woke
stove

walk
float

pal
lost

pole
stomp

spoke
smoke

spot
chose

Phonics:
Sort long and short u words
Sample Words: brute, cube, cure, cute duke, flute, mule, mute, prune, rude, rule, tube, tune, use,
blue, clue, cue, due, glue, Sue, true
Comprehension Skill from Mini-Lesson:
Review the story elements discussed during todays mini-lesson. Review the high frequency words
from this story on page 70. Take a picture walk through the story Jans New Home (Reading Street,
Unit 3). While going through the story, discuss the story elements that the students notice. Choral
read this selection.

Above-Level

Frances
Xiomara
David
Jada
Cameron
Tyriek

Phonological Awareness:
Listen to these words and tell me if each word has the long o sound or not. Give me thumbs up if
the word has the long o sound and thumbs down if the word doesnt have the long o sound. For
example, if the word is cop, you would show me thumbs down. If the word is cope, you would show
me thumbs up. Pronounce these words to have the students indicate if the word has the long /o/
sound:
woke
stove

walk
float

pal
lost

pole
stomp

spoke
smoke

spot
chose

Phonics:
Sort long and short u words
Sample Words: brute, chute, flute, perfume, prune, argue, blue, clue, glue, rescue, statue, tissue,
Tuesday
Comprehension Skill from Mini-Lesson:
Review the story elements discussed during todays mini-lesson. Review the high frequency words
from this story on page 70. Take a picture walk through the story Jans New Home (Reading Street,
Unit 3). While going through the story, discuss the story elements that the students notice. Take
turns reading pages from this selection.

Stations
Independent Reading-Identify the story elements in the text you are reading.
Buddy Reading-Reread The Little Red Hen. Draw a picture of the setting (Use BLM 3)
Computers-www.kizphonics.com Long u Crocodile Game
Word Work-Practice adding s or es to the endings of words (Practice book 1.2 pg. 23)
Writing-Write a journal entry about a trip you have taken.

TUESDAY
Mini Lesson
(Incorporates
Read Aloud,
ELA skill)
Text: Little Red
Hen (Benchmark
Big Book, Unit 4)

Metacognitive Skill: Visualize


Comprehension Skill: Analyze Story Elements
Connect: Yesterday, we read The Little Red Hen, and we discussed the story
elements. Lets retell what happened in the first half of the story. Raise your hand if
you would like to share. If necessary, review BLM 2 used in yesterdays lesson.
Teach:
Read: Conduct a shared reading of pages 2-10, inviting students to read along with
dramatic expression.
Review: Pause to complete the first half of the Sequence of Events graphic organizer
(BLM 4).
Continue: Read the remainder of the story, stopping throughout to discuss the
problems the Little Red Hen faced and her solutions to those problems.
After reading: Ask, Why do you think the Little Red Hen does not let the animals help
her eat the bread? Do you think what she does is fair? What lesson do you think the
other animals have learned?
Active Engagement:
Think of where we stopped Sequencing the Events of this story. Turn and talk to you
neighbor about what three things you could include to complete this graphic
organizer.
Link: We summarized and synthesized information about the characters and the
problems in this story to help us better understand it. Then, we used these ideas
to help us figure out what lesson the characters learned. Remember to analyze
story elements today when you are reading independently.

Tuesday
Below-Level

Differentiated Small Group Reading


Phonological Awareness:
I am going to give you a word with the long // sound in it. I want you to segment the words into
individual sounds. So if I say, joke you would give me /j/, / /, k/. Pronounce these words to have
the students segment the words into phonemes.
tone
woke

rope
cope

stone
broke

vote
rode

rose
bone

cone
shore

Phonics:
Sort words that end are more than one or
Words: mixes, kisses, wishes, patches, buzzes, tosses, rushes, waxes, foxes, glasses, matches
Brianna
Raquez
Khristina
TyShiya

More Than One -es

Ending -es

Comprehension Skill from Mini-Lesson:


Review the story elements discussed during todays mini-lesson. Review the high frequency words
from this story at the beginning of the leveled reader. Take a picture walk through the story A Big
Move (Reading Street, Unit 3, Below-Level Reader). While going through the story, discuss the story
elements that the students notice. Choral read this story, practicing with decoding words. Students
will complete the A Big Move theme page.

On-Level
Brett
Mekari
Dameon
Serenity
Victoria

Phonological Awareness:
I am going to give you a word with the long // sound in it. I want you to segment the words into
individual sounds. So if I say, joke you would give me /j/, / /, k/. Pronounce these words to have
the students segment the words into phonemes.

tone
woke

Alicia
ZaNiyah
Jessie

Jordan

Advanced

stone
broke

vote
rode

rose
bone

cone
shore

Phonics:
Write the following words and have individuals read them.
Words: foxes, rushes, pushes, classes, kisses, dishes, mops, glasses, rocks, bosses, catches, kicks,
mixes, yelling, rested
Comprehension Skill from Mini-Lesson:
Review the story elements discussed during todays mini-lesson. Review the high frequency words
from this story at the beginning of the leveled reader. Take a picture walk through the story The New
Park (Reading Street, Unit 3, On-Level Reader). While going through the story, discuss the story
elements that the students notice. Choral read this story, practicing with decoding words. Students
will complete the The New Park theme page.
Phonological Awareness:
I am going to give you a word with the long // sound in it. I want you to segment the words into
individual sounds. So if I say, joke you would give me /j/, / /, k/. Pronounce these words to have
the students segment the words into phonemes.
tone
woke

Frances
Xiomara
David
Jada
Cameron
Tyriek

rope
cope

rope
cope

stone
broke

vote
rode

rose
bone

cone
shore

Phonics:
Write the following words and have individuals read them.
Words: beaches, reaches, teaches, touches, searches, leashes, marshes, babies, bunnies, studies,
scurries, spies, strawberries, scarves, leaves
Point out the words that change y to I or f to v before adding es. Discuss unfamiliar words and then
have individuals choose several words to read in a sentence.
Comprehension Skill from Mini-Lesson:
Review the story elements discussed during todays mini-lesson. Review the high frequency words
from this story at the beginning of the leveled reader. Take a picture walk through the story Pins in
the Map (Reading Street, Unit 3, Above-Level Reader). While going through the story, discuss the
story elements that the students notice. Choral read this story, practicing with decoding words.
Students will complete the Pins in the Map theme page.

Stations
Independent Reading-Identify the story elements in the text you are reading.
Buddy Reading-Reread The Little Red Hen. Draw a picture of the setting (Use BLM 3)
Computers-www.kizphonics.com Long u Crocodile Game
Word Work-Practice adding s or es to the endings of words (Practice book 1.2 pg. 23)
Writing-Write a journal entry about a trip you have taken.

Wednesday
Mini Lesson
(Incorporates
Read Aloud,
ELA skill)

Metacognitive Skill: Visualize


Comprehension Skill: Analyze Story Elements
Connect: Yesterday, we read The Little Red Hen, and we discussed the story elements. Lets
retell what happened in the story. First, lets review what weve already recorded on our
Sequence of Events graphic organizer (BLM 4). Reread the events you recorded on the graphic
organizer yesterday. Ask students to continue their retelling. You may choose to revisit specific

pages in the book as a reference.

Text: Little Red


Hen (Benchmark
Big Book, Unit 4)

Teach:
Read: Conduct shared reading of the entire text, inviting students to chime in when they know
the words or assign specific lines to different group of students. For example, table one could
recite Little Red Hens lines, and table two could recite the pigs lines, etc.
Model: Model completing the Share the Book form. You may choose a book that you have
recently read, like Ruby in Her Own Time.
Active Engagement:
Decide if you would recommend this book to a friend. Complete the Share the Book form (BLM
5) listing three reasons why or why not.
Link: Remember, good readers identify the characters, setting and story problems, This helps
them better understand what they have read. Remember to think about the story elements
when you read and listen to other stories.

Below-Level
Brianna
Raquez
Khristina
TyShiya

On-Level
Mekari
Serenity
Alicia
ZaNiyah
Jessie

Brett
Dameon
Victoria
Jordan

Advanced
Frances
Xiomara
David
Jada
Cameron
Tyriek

Differentiated Small Group Reading


Phonological Awareness:
Word Building: Using a pocket chart and letter cards or magnetic letter tiles work through the word chain:
Bed, led, leg, log
Cat, cot, dot, dog
Pen, peg, beg, bug, mug
Phonics:
Play long vowel hangman. For this group, tell what rule the word followed. For example, long u, silent e.
Comprehension Skill from Mini-Lesson:
Reread Jans New Home. Complete a story elements graphic organizer for this story.
Phonological Awareness:
Word Building: Using a pocket chart and letter cards or magnetic letter tiles work through the word chain.
See words above.
Phonics:
Play long vowel hangman. For this group, tell what rule the word followed. For example, long u, silent e.
Comprehension Skill from Mini-Lesson:
Reread Jans New Home. Complete a story elements graphic organizer for this story.
Phonological Awareness:
Word Building: Using a pocket chart and letter cards or magnetic letter tiles work through the word chain.
Challenge this group to find ways to change the letters on their own to make a new word entirely.
Example: (mice to hole: mice, mile, mole, hole)
Phonics:
Play long vowel hangman. For this group, give a hint about the meaning of the word. For example, long u,
silent e.
Comprehension Skill from Mini-Lesson:
Reread Jans New Home. Complete a story elements graphic organizer for this story.

Stations
Independent Reading-Identify the story elements in the text you are reading.
Buddy Reading-Reread Tuesdays leveled reader. Complete the vocabulary master.
Computers-www.tumblebooks.com Listen to Mason Moves Away (5 minutes). Complete a story elements graphic organizer for
this story.
Word Work-Practice adding s or es to the endings of words (Spelling Practice book pg. 59)
Writing-Look back at pages 82-83. How is Jans new neighborhood different from her old one?

Thursday
Mini Lesson
(Incorporates
Read Aloud,
ELA skill)
Text: Little Red
Hen (Benchmark
Big Book, Unit 4)

Metacognitive Skill: Visualize


Comprehension Skill: Analyze Story Elements
Connect: Tell students you are going to read this story again, and you would like them to pay
careful attention to your voice. Make each characters traits more obvious by reading the hens
dialogue in a friendly, enthusiastic way and the other characters in a lazy, bored way until page
15.
Teach:
Read: After reading, invite students to comment on what they heard in your voice. Ask them
how using expression helped them understand what the characters were like and how they felt.

Reread: Read the book again, inviting students to read along with you. Tell them to put
expression into their voices, too.
Analyze: As we read The Little Red Hen, we was how the Little Red Hen worked and worked,
even when no one would help her. Lets imagine that one of the characters was sorry about
being lazy. Lets write a letter the animal might send to the Little Red Hen apologizing. Well
make a list of character traits that the animal might use to describe the Little Red Hen.
Active Engagement:
Use these questions to prompt student thinking:
*What words describe someone who works really hard? (busy, conscientious, hardworking)
*How could you describe someone who never gives up? (energetic, persistent, doesnt quit)
*How would you feel after you worked so hard? How do you think the Little Red Hen feels at
the end of the story? (proud, tired, happy)
Reread students ideas aloud.
Link: Today we analyzed the Little Red Hens character traits. We will use this to help us write
an apology letter tomorrow. Think about the characters in your books that you read
independently today. How would you describe them? Are the similar or different from the
Little Red Hen?
Below-Level
Brianna
Raquez
Khristina
TyShiya

On-Level
Mekari
Serenity
Alicia
ZaNiyah
Jessie

Brett
Dameon
Victoria
Jordan

Advanced
Frances
Xiomara
David
Jada
Cameron
Tyriek

Differentiated Small Group Reading


Phonological Awareness:
Word Building: Using a pocket chart and letter cards or magnetic letter tiles work through the word chain:
Pen, peg, beg, bug, mug
Sun, run, ran, rat, hat
Bat, bag, big, wig
Phonics:
Sort and review compound words.
Sample words: anthill, cupcake, wishbone, classmate, jellyfish, lipstick, pigpen, catfish, lookout, racetrack
Compound Word
First Word
Second Word
Phonological Awareness:
Word Building: Using a pocket chart and letter cards or magnetic letter tiles work through the word chain.
See words above.
Phonics:
Sort and review compound words.
Sample words: hangout, kingfish, sinkhole, stingray, cupcake
Compound Word
First Word

Second Word

Phonological Awareness:
Word Building: Using a pocket chart and letter cards or magnetic letter tiles work through the word chain.
Challenge this group to find ways to change the letters on their own to make a new word entirely.
Example: (duck to cake: duck, luck, lack, lace, lake, cake)
Phonics:
Sort and review compound words.
Sample words: scarecrow, thunderstorm, inchworm, understand, tablecloth, sweatshirt, seashore,
sailboat, peppermint
Compound Word
First Word
Second Word

Stations
Independent Reading-Identify the story elements in the text you are reading.
Buddy Reading-Reread Tuesdays leveled reader. Complete the vocabulary master.
Computers-www.tumblebooks.com Listen to Mason Moves Away (5 minutes). Complete a story elements graphic organizer for
this story.
Word Work-Practice adding s or es to the endings of words (Spelling Practice book pg. 59)
Writing-Look back at pages 82-83. How is Jans new neighborhood different from her old one?

Friday
Mini Lesson
(Incorporates
Read Aloud,
ELA skill)
Text: Little Red
Hen (Benchmark
Big Book, Unit 4)

Metacognitive Skill: Visualize


Comprehension Skill: Analyze Story Elements
Connect: Yesterday, we made a list of traits for the little Red Hen. Lets reread the ideas we
wrote in the chart.
Teach:
Discuss: As a group, decide what character will write the letter. Then choose two or three
character traits of the Little Red Hen and decide which details in the story support them.
Active Engagement:
Prompt:
*What are some words that we can use to describe the Little Red Hen?
*What did the Little Red Hen do that shows she is like this?
Character Trait
Evidence from the Story
Write: Review the parts of a friendly letter. Use what was recording in the chart to complete a
friendly letter to the hen. If you have enough time, you can edit and revise this work.
Link: We analyzed a character by brainstorming character traits. Think about the characters in
the texts you read independently today.

Below-Level
Brianna
Raquez
Khristina
TyShiya
On-Level
Mekari
Brett

1.
2.
3.

Differentiated Small Group Reading


Spelling Test
Dibels Testing
High Frequency Word Assessments

1.
2.

Spelling Test
Dibels Testing

Serenity
3. High Frequency Word Assessments
Dameon
Alicia
Victoria
ZaNiyah
Jordan
Jessie
Advanced
1. Spelling Test
2. Dibels Testing
Frances
3. High Frequency Word Assessments
Xiomara
David
Jada
Cameron
Tyriek
Stations
Independent Reading-Identify the story elements in the text you are reading.
Buddy Reading-Reread Tuesdays leveled reader. Complete the vocabulary master.
Computers-www.tumblebooks.com Listen to Mason Moves Away (5 minutes). Complete a story elements graphic organizer for
this story.
Word Work-Practice adding s or es to the endings of words (Spelling Practice book pg. 59)
Writing-Look back at pages 82-83. How is Jans new neighborhood different from her old one?