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African

Food
Peace
Foundation
and

2013
Annual
Report

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

African Food And Peace Foundation (AFPF)

is a registered 501(c)3 public charity and the North American partner and supporter
of Uganda Rural Development and Training Programme (URDT) and
African Rural University for Women (ARU)

AFPF is a philanthropic community


investing in Africa and in groundbreaking education and leadership
for women and girls. We do this
through our partnership with URDT
and ARU.

URDT (Uganda Rural Development and Training) has engaged


with marginalized people in rural Uganda for over 25 years
to ignite mindset change and systems-wide transformation by
Awaking the sleeping genius in each of us.

ARU (African Rural University)


is the cornerstone of URDTs strategy to create a critical mass of rural transformation professionals,
to advance university-level development research, and to give rural communities
influence in the national development process.

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

Brief History of African Food and Peace Foundation (AFPF)


In 1981, the African Food and Peace Foundation was founded out of a desire to support significant, long-term development in rural Uganda. Through partnerships with local
Ugandan initiatives this vision was first realized in 1987 with the creation of the Uganda
Rural Development & Training Program (URDT).
AFPF has been a significant source of funding and support to URDT and its various
programs and initiatives. This support has led to the creation of African Rural University (ARU), Africas first all womens university with a curriculum based in rural development. Through fundraising, advising, networking, and international visits, African Food
and Peace Foundations primary goal is to support the ever-expanding reach of URDT
and ARU while strengthening the deep personal friendships that connect communities in
Uganda and the United States.

AFPF in 2013
Our local focus for 2013 was to continue to strengthen the sustainability of the Foundation by enhancing the leadership skills of the senior staff, and growing our community of
supporters. At the same time our global focus remained on ensuring that every dollar
donated was used wisely to further the development of the people of Uganda.

DONOR SPOTLIGHT
This past year, Sandy and I decided to take a fresh look at our charitable giving.
To whom do we give, and why? We concluded that we wanted to see direct, tangible and near term good being done with our donations. Once we set this standard,
URDT/AFPF went to the top of our list. Every year the projects and programs progress in ways we can see and understand. This gives us an immediate return on our
charitable investment, so to speak. We also have the benefit of hearing directly
from the people who actually have feet on the ground in Uganda. We end up comfortable that we are supporting a good cause, but even more, that we are doing
it in a highly effective fashion. With these considerations in mind, we decided to
double our annual gift to URDT/AFPF this year.
Tory Lambert, Concord MA

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

Letter from the Chair


Dear Friends,

Locally led. Education-based. Deeply committed.


These keys to deep impact in sustainable development have been signatures of Uganda
Rural Development and Training (URDT) for 26 years. We are privileged to work with
you, our fabulous partners, both in the North America and in Uganda. Thank you for this
exciting journey of learning and growth for us all. We are grateful that amidst all the
turmoil in our world, 2013 was another year of substantial good news in our work.
2013 brought us our first opportunity to bring a direct recipient of the URDT education
to a U.S. event. Make sure you read about URDT Girls School Alum, Catherine
Namwezi on pages 5 and 7.
Catch up on U.S. Foundation events, visits, and what other donors are saying about the
work in our Donor Spotlights.
See whats new in Uganda at the schools, community radio, and in the agricultural and
extension work of URDT and African Rural University (ARU) for women.
If your time is short and you want an energizing trip to a rural Ugandan community in
action, flip to the end and read the piece by Susan Warshauer on page 19.
AFPF is growing to match the growth of our partners in Uganda. It is a thrill for me to
work with Julia Pettengill and Angela Christiana as they step into senior leadership at
AFPF. Thank you for helping us expand our circle and our financial support to URDT
and ARU. Please continue to share our story with new friends. Join us on our website, on
Facebook, and at our gatherings. We love the chance to be with you, to thank you, and
to develop new initiatives together.
We look forward to connecting with you soon!
Martha Dolben

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

Catherine as a young student at URDT


In 2013 AFPF introduced you to URDT
Girls School Alum Catherine Namwezi.
She shared her powerful story of how
her Back Home Projects helped her
family to achieve their vision of a
better quality of life, better education,
and increased household income.
After my parents died, I became the
head of my family in charge of my
twin siblings who were only 5 years
old, and my grandmother. Thanks to
the skills I had gained from the URDT
Girls School, I was able to generate
enough income to keep us all in school
and support my family. I am happy
to share that all of us are still doing
great.
URDT nurtured me from a very young age to believe that I could be the change
I wanted to see in my own community, and that girls could do it too.

Catherine with her brother, Grandmother and sister today.

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

AFPF 2013 Highlights


AFPF Intern Andy Smith visited URDT in January. The campus is beautiful, the people are
welcoming and kind, and the air of academia, innovation, and dedication is pervasive.

During his time at URDT and ARU, Andy was particularly impressed by the MEPE Maize Mill project.

The mini estate program is an amazing project which


boosts the incomes of local farmers while creating a
stream of revenue for URDT. - Andy Smith

DONOR SPOTLIGHT

I loved hearing about the progress being made in Uganda as a result of the fundraising and
awareness-building your organization is doing and Im happy I can be even a little tiny part
of it. This is the way to make life better for so many people, to build bridges of understanding, and to heal the world. Kathy Felgran, 2013 Spring Event Series

On April 25th, CEO, Author, Publisher and African Rural University Council Member
Patricia Seybold shared insights from her trip to Uganda and her compelling article
on the Evolution of ARU. (http://bit.ly/19011B4)

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

Annual Dinner and Fundraiser


OCTOBER 24TH, NASHAWTUC COUNTRY CLUB
URDT Girls School Alum, Catherine Namwezi,
received a standing ovation for her powerful
story. She shared how her Back Home Projects
helped her family to achieve their vision of a
better quality of life, better education, and increased household income.
AFPF WASHINGTON DC EVENT, Capitol Hill
AFPF hit the road with Catherine Namwezi, sharing her story at a great event filled with
new friends, partnerships and possibilities.

AFPF Washington DC Event


CAPITOL HILL

AFPF hit the road with Catherine Namwezi, sharing her story at a great
event filled with new friends, partnerships and possibilities.

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

Visitors to URDT & ARU

There were many visitors to the programs in 2013, including Bob Anderson, CEO of the Leadership Circle,
Martha Dolben, Adrienne Miller, Laurie Gabriel and ARU Council members Patty Seybold and Susan
Warshauer. I have not been to Uganda to visit URDT and ARU for 28 years. I was astounded by the
progress they have made and by the systemic nature and vision of what these two efforts represent.
It was a deeply moving and gratifying experience to be a part of. - Bob Anderson

The ripple effect of working with ARU students is immediately visible. They share what they learn about vision,
creating, and ethical leadership with women in the villages of the district who aspire to improve their lives. Then,
these village women organize, take action, and achieve
significant results: income generation, food security, better
health, sanitation, schools, and more. Martha Dolben

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

A look at 2013s numbers


AFPF 2013 Financials
Sources
Contributions $ 618,146.00
Other (Investment) $
636.00
Total AFPF Revenue $ 618,782.00

Uses
Grants to URDT and ARU
AFPF Program costs
AFPF Support - Fundraising
AFPF Support -Management & General
Net Assets Carried Forward

$
$
$
$
$

395,889.00
29,916.00
29,223.00
25,289.00
394,152.00

Total Expense $ 480,317.00


Changes in Net Assets $ 138,465.00
Net Assets Carried Forward $ 255,687.00
Net Assets, End of Year
*Includes year-end donations to be granted to
URDT and ARU in the coming year

$ 394,152.00

AFPF PROGRAM
COSTS

4%

AFPF SUPPORT
SERVICES

6%

GRANTS TO
URDT AND
ARU
45%
NET ASSETS
CARRIED
FORWARD
45%

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

2013 URDT
Donations

URDT Donations 2013


URDT Donations 2013
African Food and Peace Foundation (AFPF)
African Food and Peace Foundation (AFPF)
Adiutor Social Initiatives (ASI)
Adiutor Social Initiatives (ASI)
Elimu Foundation
Elimu Foundation
Wild Ganzen
Wild Ganzen
Triodos
Triodos
Carnegie Social Initiative
Carnegie Social Initiative
Agri Business Initiative
Agri Business Initiative
Other Sources (sum of below)
Other Sources (sum of below)

USD
Percentage
USD
Percentage
140,520.00
23.03%
140,520.00
23.03%
118,210.00
19.38%
118,210.00
19.38%
67,083.00
11.00%
67,083.00
11.00%
64,857.00
10.63%
64,857.00
10.63%
47,000.00
7.70%
47,000.00
7.70%
38,640.00
6.33%
38,640.00
6.33%
33,196.00
5.44%
33,196.00
5.44%
100,566.00
16.48%
100,566.00
16.48%
KIO
34,094.00
5.59%
KIO
34,094.00
5.59%
Tools to work (WWF)
20,438.00
3.35%
Tools to work (WWF)
20,438.00
3.35%
Het Bosje
19,248.00
3.16%
Het Bosje
19,248.00
3.16%
Wim Tijhaar Education Fund
10,033.00
1.64%
Wim Tijhaar Education Fund
10,033.00
1.64%
Agency for National Development
7,965.00
1.31%
Agency for National Development
7,965.00
1.31%
Sponsorships / others
6,571.00
1.08%
Sponsorships / others
6,571.00
1.08%
Nogamu
2,217.00
0.36%
Nogamu
2,217.00
0.36%
Total Donations
610,072.00
100.00%
Total Donations
610,072.00
100.00%

TRIODOS
WILD GANZEN
TRIODOS 8%
WILD GANZEN
11% 8%
ELIMU11%

ELIMU
FOUNDATION
FOUNDATION11%
11%

CARNEGIE SOCIAL
CARNEGIE SOCIAL
INITIATIVE
INITIATIVE 6%
6%
AGRI BUSINESS
AGRI BUSINESS
INITIATIVE
INITIATIVE 5%
5%

OTHER SOURCES
ADIUTOR SOCIAL
O
THER SOURCES
17%
ADIUTORINITIATIVES
SOCIAL (ASI)
17%
INITIATIVES (ASI)
19%
AFRICAN FOOD
19%
AFRICAN FAND
OODPEACE
AND PEACE
FOUNDATION
FOUNDATION
(AFPF)
(AFPF) 23%
23%

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

2013 URDT Expenditures



URDT 2013 Expenditures


Directorate of Education and Training
URDT 2013 Expenditures
Capital
Investments
Directorate
of Education and Training
Institutional
Development Programme /Sustainability
Capital Investments

USD
Percentage
334,960
37.81%
USD
Percentage
135,192
15.26%
334,960
37.81%
15,560
1.76%
135,192
15.26%
Community
Corporation
&
Development
59,621
6.73%
Institutional Development Programme /Sustainability
15,560
1.76%
Mini Community
Estate
57,211
6.46%
Corporation & Development
59,621
6.73%
RuralMini
Comm.
Develop
Programme
77,400
8.74%
Estate
57,211
6.46%
Sustainability
Project
83,758
9.46%
Rural Comm. Develop Programme
77,400
8.74%
IDP Sustainability
& A Administration
122,107
13.78%
Project
83,758
9.46%
Total
Expenditures
885,809
100.00%
IDP & A Administration
122,107
13.78%

Total Expenditures
885,809
100.00%

COMMUNITY
INSTITUTIONAL
CORPORATION &
DEVELOPMENT
DEVELOPMENT
COMMUNITY
PROGRAMME
/
INSTITUTIONAL
C7%
ORPORATION &
SUSTAINABILITY
DEVELOPMENT
DEVELOPMENT
2%
PROGRAMME /
7%
SUSTAINABILITY
2%
CAPITAL

MINI ESTATE
6%
MINI ESTATE
6%

INVESTMENTS

RURAL COMM.
DEVELOP
PROGRAMME
RURAL COMM.
9%DEVELOP
PROGRAMME
9%
SUSTAINABILITY
PROJECT

15%CAPITAL

S9%
USTAINABILITY

INVESTMENTS

PROJECT

15%

9%
IDP & A
DIRECTORATE OF
EDUCATION AND
TRAINING
DIRECTORATE OF
E38%
DUCATION AND
TRAINING
38%

ADMINISTRATION
14%IDP & A
ADMINISTRATION
14%

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

2013 ARU Donations

ARU Donations 2013

ARU Donations 2013


African Food and Peace Foundation (AFPF)
African Food and Peace Foundation (AFPF)

Ford Foundation

Percentage

85.6

30,654.00

10.0

12,813.00
4.22%

4.2

303,741.00 303,741.00
100.00%

100.0

30,654.00

Carnegie Social Initiatives (CSI)

12,813.00

Donations
TotalTotal
Donations

85.69%
10.09%

FORD
FORD
FOUNDATION
F
OUNDATION
10%

10%

AFRICAN FOOD
AFRICAN FOOD
AND PEACE
AND PEACE
FOUNDATION
(AFPF)
FOUNDATION
86% (AFPF)

CARNEGIE SOCIAL
INITIATIVES (CSI)
CARNEGIE SOCIAL
4%
INITIATIVES (CSI)

86%

4%

Percenta

260,274.00

260,274.00

Ford Foundation

Carnegie Social Initiatives (CSI)

USD

USD

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013



2013 ARU
Expenditures

ARU 2013 Expenditures

USD

ARU 2013
Expenditures
General
Administration

USD
47,869

General Administration
Academic
Excellence of ARU

47,869
50,113

16.65%
17.43%

50,113
133,082

17.43%
46.28%

Governance
andARU
Human
Resource
Well
Maintained
Facility

133,082
19,515

46.28%
6.79%

Well Maintained
ARU Facility
Student
Administration

19,515
17,575

6.79%
6.11%

StudentSustainability
Administration
Financial

17,575
11,804

6.11%
4.10%

Financial Sustainability
Programmatic
Costs

11,804
7,609

4.10%
2.65%

7,609
287,567

2.65%
100.00%

287,567

100.00%

Academic Excellence
ofResource
ARU
Governance
and Human

Percentage

Programmatic
Costs
Total
Expenditures

Total Expenditures

Percentage
16.65%

GENERAL
PROGRAMMATIC
COSTS

PROGRAMMATIC
3% FINANCIAL
COSTS
SUSTAINABILITY
3%
FINANCIAL
4%
SUSTAINABILITY
STUDENT
4%
ADMINISTRATION
STUDENT
6%
ADMINISTRATION
6%

ADMINISTRATION
G
ENERAL
17%
ADMINISTRATION
17%

HUMAN RESOURCE
GOVERNANCE
AND
46%
HUMAN RESOURCE

46%

17%

GOVERNANCE AND

WELL MAINTAINED
ARU FACILITY
WELL 7%
MAINTAINED
ARU FACILITY
7%

ACADEMIC
EXCELLENCE OF ARU
A17%
CADEMIC
EXCELLENCE OF ARU

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

2013 URDT At a Glance

In all its work, URDT employs the principle that people


are key to their own development. The URDT staffs
play facilitative, catalytic roles in human development
and rural transformation. URDT continued to demonstrate that more powerful results are achieved when
people focus on creating and working towards a
desired outcome rather than on fixing problems.
The shift to visionary thinking and planning is key
to sustainable development. We are grateful to all
stakeholders who shared their skills and knowledge
to develop URDT into an effective vehicle for systemic
change in rural communities. We cant thank our development partners enough for providing financial support to make our planned activities a reality. The Staff
and Board are recognized for the energy, expertise
and exceptional commitment to the URDT mission and
to serve larger goals than ourselves.
Dr. Mwalimu Musheshe , Chairman/CEO- URDT

Dr. Mwalimu Musheshe, the CEO and Founder of the Uganda Rural Development & Training Program
and the African Rural University was awarded the prestigious Golden Jubilee medal on October 9th.
Ugandan President H.E Yoweri Kaguta Museveni presented him with the award during
Ugandas 51st annual Independence Day celebrations.

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

URDT Program Highlights & Accomplishments


The URDT 80-acre campus is open to the public and through its many educational institutions,
and wide reaching radio programs, URDT has
educated and empowered thousands of people
to become leaders in their community. URDTs
innovative model provides an integrated, interconnected web of education especially serving
girls and women.
1. URDT Girls School
Founded in 2000, the award winning URDT
Girls School uses a unique Two Generation approach and Back-Home projects to keep girls
in school by increasing household income. The
school is creating a pool of educated female
leaders who are committed to taking up transformation roles in their homes and rural communities. This year all students passed the national
exams!
In a survey of 100 homes, URDT found that the Two Generation approach has successfully improved the economic circumstances for 80% of its participants. Agricultural income was diversified as families began producing both cash and food crops.
Parents also became members of groups engaged in tree planting and savings and credit associations, commercial farming of soya beans, pineapple and maize growing and apiary.
Three URDT GS students participated in the Girls Education Movement (GEM). Three students attended the
GEM camp in Kampala with the theme: Every Child, Every Girl Child, A Chance to Excel.
Three URDT Girls School students also participated in an International Youth Venture Camp in Nairobi, Kenya
organized by Ashoka, an International Organization for Social Entrepreneurs.

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

I really appreciated the opportunities that URDT Girls School offered me to learn beyond my academic subjects.
I conceived an idea of making herbal soaps after I learned the nutrients contained in fruits in a science lesson in the
primary school. In 2006, I started a herbal soap making project which produces herbal soaps using fruit leaves.
I am able
to
make
Vaseline using fruits as
well, but Im
still working
on an effective way to
preserve it.
As part of
my project, I
trained people in my
community
with the skills
I learned at
the school.
Sawa World
Uganda, an
organization
that identifies people
with great
solutions to
eradicate
poverty, nominated me as the youngest Sawa Potential Spark in the world. I felt encouraged to continue my
soap project and keep on helping other people in my community.
Komuhangyi Rosette - URDT Girls School, Secondary section, Class Six
2. EPICENTER PROGRAM
URDT employed 16 ARU Graduates in their Epicenter Program. These Epicenter Managers are working
with local leaders and empowering villagers in the
creation of better housing, schools, water supplies,
roads, gardens, and income generating projects. The
Epicenter managers secured a grant from World
Vision so that over 100 youth were trained by the
URDT Institute in carpentry and joinery, bricklaying,
concrete practice, agriculture and tailoring in order
to allow them to create self employment. During
2013, the Epicenter Managers collectively trained
4320 households in the application of environmentally sustainable sanitation practices and diversified
sources of income, farming, savings and credit as
well as visionary approach, creative orientation.
URDT is planning to expand the program to offer
further training in the Two Generation approach in
close collaboration with the URDT Girls School.

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

3. URDT VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE


The URDT Institute was established to create
a critical mass of young entrepreneurs who
have the capacity to improve their lives, become responsible citizens and contribute to
larger development goals. The Institute offers
both technical and life skills training.
The institute provided comprehensive training
for 208 youth of which 50 students participated in long term courses and 158 students
in the shorter term courses. For each student
the training curriculum included vocational
skills, entrepreneurship and business management, humanities and social sciences.
68 youth leaders received training to lead
commercial agricultural development in the
Bunyoro region.
The tailoring students attained skills in the
production of school uniforms. 35 graduates
received sewing machines from World Vision.
The Institute was one of the organizers of the
National Peace Week. Over 2500 community
members and dignitaries participated. The
highlight was the Kagadi Peace Marathon
which brought together 580 runners from
within and outside the district.
Since I left URDT Institute, I am doing well and
have a job that pays well. Currently, I work
on hydro power for Fort Portal in the Rwenzori region. I work with a Professor and the
students from the University of Warwick in the
UK. But more importantly I am employed by
Global Womens Water Initiative as a technology trainer for different women groups in
Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania. I can now train
others how to use interlocking stabilized soil
blocks to build water harvesting tanks. I also
coach people to construct of Ventilated Improved Pit toilets and Composting toilets, as
well as on how to make bio-sand filters and
different kinds of liquid soaps.
Thanks for the support I got from URDT Institute for the many learning opportunities that
were exposed to me during my two year
course.
Ms Businge Godliver - Alumni 2010

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

4. KKCR 91.7 Community Radio Station - reaching over 1 million listeners


URDTs community radio, established in 2000, provides a voice to the surrounding communities. It promotes
development, peace, unity, solidarity and collaboration through information sharing and dialogue. The
radio station is run by a team of professionals and over 100 volunteers, including the URDT students.
The 2013 George Atkins Communications Award was presented to two broadcasters from KKCR / URDT
to mark the International Day of Peace and the Kagadi Kibaale Community Radio 91.7 FM.
90% of KKCRs programming was educational. The station broadcasted 24 hours per day, 7 days a week
in 7 local languages and English to over 1 million listeners in 10 districts in Western Uganda.

ARU 2013 Highlights and Accomplishments


African Rural University (ARU) hosted the 38th
Ugandan Vice Chancellor Forum on September
2nd at ARU in Kagadi. Leaders from 25 of
Ugandas universities recognized African Rural
University for addressing the challenges of the
rural population. The forum promotes relationship and cooperation among recognized Universities in Uganda and enhances the sharing
of knowledge, information and good practices
in member institutions.
The demand for ARUs community-based intervention is increasing. During 2013, over
11,600 people in the sub-counties of Kibaale benefited from the ARU interventions.

The students worked directly with 750 individuals and impacted 7,600 people strengthening village Savings and
Credit Associations, nutrition based agricultural interventions, and supported the introduction of high value crops
including tomatoes, cucumbers, cocoa and coffee as a strategy for economic development of rural farmers.
ARU engaged in a research on land rights in collaboration with the Ford Foundation, URDT and the Ministry of
Lands, Housing and Urban Development.

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

ARU, URDT and the Ford Foundation have contributed to the ongoing national curriculum review led
by the National Curriculum Development Centers CURASSE program for Lower Secondary schools.
They are working on a national curriculum on Womens Land Rights that will be taught in schools
throughout Uganda.
Two ARU students were selected as Ashoka Youth Venturers and have demonstrated leadership and
entrepreneurship in use of local innovations.
African Rural University has greatly improved its sanitation facilities with the completion of bathrooms, including the universitys first ever public flush toilets and the upgrade of the running water
system. AFPF funded the program with the help of a generous donor and it was built by the construction crew of the URDT institute.
Making a Difference- Susans Story
The thirty-minute drive took us three hours and broke the springs on one side of the van. The rain
had caused deep crevices in the road and there was mud everywhere. We slid and hit rocks that
emerged iceberg-like from the huge puddles that proved deeper than they looked. We progressed
on smaller and smaller access roads until we were on paths barely the width of the van. On smaller
side paths we could see peoples huts.
When we got to our destination, they had taken advantage of a break in the rain to start the meeting. The agenda was written in chalk on a blackboard leaning against a tree.
Kyeya, a village in Ruteete, is a community that has experienced some recent economic success from
an upland rice crop which brought in some cash and started to move the farmers away from subsistence agriculture. The tree, under which we sat, looked out on lush fields of rice, gentle rolling hills,
and a patchwork of every color of green you could imagine.
A man in his 30s was standing and reading a report from a committee meeting. They stopped the
process to welcome and seat us and then continued.
At the front was Susan, educated at African Rural University, and currently employed as an Epicenter Manager in Ruteete by Uganda Rural Development and Training. At the end of the reports, she
turned to the next agenda item, a discussion of the way forward for a community built school.
At the start of her placement as an Epicenter Manager, Susan led a visioning process to help the
community identify what they wanted their village to be like. This process identified the gaps between where the village was and where it wanted to be. The farmers realized that they needed to
collaborate to get better rice harvests and prices. Next they completed projects that secured sources
of clean water. Having achieved progress on these two goals, they had turned to the next big gap
between their vision and their goals - an operational school. Kyeya has 183 students across the primary grades and needed seven classrooms to accommodate them. The current school, a deteriorating mud and wattle structure, had finally lost its roof in a big storm. The tin pieces patched together
as a roof had pretty much disintegrated and could not be reused. The only dry place left to hold
classes were two small brick and concrete classrooms recently built by the government. The villagers
had decided that the school was now their highest priority project.

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013

At the meeting, a very animated discussion took place as the community decided upon a plan to make
bricks and to collect 10,000 Ugandan Shillings (about US$ 4.00) from each family to fund the building
of the school. I did not need to understand the local language to see the passion and commitment of the
participants, nor to understand the cadence of the meeting. Susan fluidly facilitated encouraging more
members to voice their views, asking questions of the group and periodically calling for a show of hands.
The 100 or so people ranged in age and gender with the most expressive participants being men in their
30s and 40s, who had families, and thus a vested interest in the outcome of the discussion.
The energetic nature of the discussion and the drive
for consensus would be the envy of any town meeting
the world over.
Throughout, Susans calm presence, respectful listening,
pointed questions, and facilitation skills, propelled the
process forward.
The Sub-county Chief, a member of the district government, had dropped by and spent most of the meeting listening intently. She then made an impassioned
speech about how, once the new school was built, it
would become even more important for the families
to keep their children in school as opposed to pulling
them out for the semi-annual rice harvests. Many serious faces and head nods indicated that the message
was received.
One man began waving a receipt book. The community still needed to decide how to collect and process
the contributions to the school project.
Susan and the Sub-county Chief reminded the group that there already existed a trusted process to
collect, record and hold money by the local government. The group agreed that they should work within
this system, rather than creating a new process. I saw Susans facilitation as evidence of her skill in helping
connect the community with existing resources. They decided that they would look for contractors to make
the bricks and set January as the end point for completion of this phase.
As huge, black rain clouds moved towards us, the urgency to decide was increased and Susan helped the
group finish their work before the skies opened up. There was one final vote accompanied by big smiles,
and people running off to avoid the rain.
Sitting in the van, with the sound of the hard rain hitting the roof, I thought about how I had just witnessed
the application and impact of a visionary approach, systemic thinking, and enabling ownership and accountability, in order to move towards sustainable development. All under a tree, amidst rice fields, in a
rural village in Western Uganda. I shook my head in amazement.
By S. Warshauer

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE


FOUNDATION
ANNUAL
REPORT
2013 1,
AFPFANNUAL
REPORT
AFPFANNUAL
February
REPORT
1, 2013
February
12

12

Martha Dolben, Chair and Executive Director


Martha has been Executive Director and Chair of African Food & Peace Foundation
since 1997. She was rst associated with AFPF in the 1980s, when she was a Board
Member supporting the work of Uganda Rural Development and Training Program in
its earliest days. Martha served as a founding member of the African Rural University
Council. She is an educator and poet working with womens circles to advance personal
agency, friendship, and fruitful conversation on all manner of subjects.
Martha Dolben, Chair and Executive Director
Martha has been Executive Director and Chair of African Food & Peace Foundation
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since 1997. She was rst associated with AFPF in the 1980s, when she was a Board
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the AFPF
Treasurer.
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retired
years ago from
the
Sydney
Levine
raised
funds
to
build
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on
the
URDT
campus.
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banking industry, where she focused on delivery automation.! She works with a number
teaches
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High
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a twelve-year
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County
California.
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since 1981
when
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began
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in 2007
when
thenworking
12-year-old
daughter
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is a long-time
andon
hasthe
been
Secretary
since
2005. She
Sydney
Levine
funds to Board
build aMember
greenhouse
URDT
campus.
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has
beenSocial
the Ofce
Manager
for Circleand
Furniture
16 Domenico
years.
teaches
Justice,
Global Studies,
Ethics atforSan
High School in
Marin County California.
Bryan Smith, Board Member
Bryan
joined the AFPF
Boardof
in 2005.
He has been involved in the facilitation of
Judy Murdock,
Secretary
the Board
systems
and shared
visioning
programs
at the
Kagadi
with
Judy hasthinking
been involved
with AFPF
since
1981 when
sheURDT
began campus
working in
with
Silvana
both
staff
and
students.
He
was
a
founding
member
of
the
ARU
Council.
With
Peter
Veltcamp.! Judy is a long-time Board Member and has been Secretary since 2005. She
Senge,
hethe
is aOfce
co-author
of four
books: The
Fifth
Discipline Fieldbook (1994); The
has been
Manager
forbestselling
Circle Furniture
for 16
years.
Dance of Change (1999); Schools that Learn (2000, 2012) and The Necessary Revolution (2010).
All four books are full of practical tools and experience from his in-depth work helping
Bryan Smith,
Board
Member
organizations
create
sustainable
change.
Bryan joined the AFPF Board in 2005. He has been involved in the facilitation of
Cindy thinking
Thomashow,
Board
Member
systems
and shared
visioning
programs at the URDT campus in Kagadi with
Michael
Stacy,
Board
Member
Cindy
joined
the
AFPF
Board
in
2009.
Cindy
and her
Mitch, who
wasPeter
then
both staff and students. He was a founding
member
of husband,
the ARU Council.
With
Mike
joined
the
AFPF
Board
in
2005
and
visited
the
URDT
campus
that
same
year.
President
of
Unity
College,
arranged
for
honorary
certicates
of
completion
for!
theThe
Senge, he is a co-author of four bestselling books: The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook (1994);
Mike
is
CEO
of ID90
Technologies
providing
airlines
withNecessary
a non-revenue
travel
researcher
/students
who
helped
the ARU
curriculum,
and
for Revolution
an honorary
Dance
of the
Change
(1999);
Schools
that create
Learn (2000,
2012)
and The
(2010).
solution
that
reduces
their
costs
and
improves
the
employee
experience.
Mike
has
been
doctoral
degree
in
Environmental
Policy
and
Management
for
Mwalimu
Musheshe,
the
All four books are full of practical tools and experience from his in-depth work helping
the
CEO
or President
of isa the
number
of successful
rms in the
travel industry.
CEO
of URDT.!Cindy
Education
and Professional
Development
Manager for the
organizations
create sustainable
change.
Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education.!
Michael
Stacy,
Samantha
van Board
Putten,Member
Board Member
Mike
joined
the
AFPF
Board
2005
and visitedinthe
URDT
campusjoined
that same
year. in
With a passion for education in
and
development
Africa,
Samantha
the board
Mike
is
the
CEO
of
ID90
Technologies
providing
airlines
with
a
non-revenue
travel
2011 after spending the summer working as an AFPF intern. She is studying business at
solution
that reduces
their costsand
andwill
improves
theinemployee
the University
of Richmond,
graduate
2013. experience. Mike has been
the CEO or President of a number of successful rms in the travel industry.
Susan Warshauer, Board Member
Susan joined the AFPF Board in 2009 and by the summer of that year she was living in
Uganda as the newly appointed Vice Chancellor of African Rural University. She
worked with the Ugandan team to gain licensure for ARU from the National Council of
Higher Education in Uganda. As a Social Psychologist, Susan has a long career
dedicated to helping prot and non-prot organizations develop their leadership, and
has a special interest in womens issues and education.

AFRICAN FOOD AND PEACE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2013


13
13

doctoral degree
Environmental
and Management for Mwalimu Musheshe, the
Samantha
vaninPutten,
Board Policy
Member
CEO
URDT.!Cindy
is theand
Education
and Professional
Development
Manager
for the
With aofpassion
for education
development
in Africa, Samantha
joined
the board
in
Association
for
the
Advancement
of
Sustainability
in
Higher
Education.!
2011 after spending the summer working as an AFPF intern. She is studying business at
the University of Richmond, and will graduate in 2013.
Samantha van Putten, Board Member
With a passion for education and development in Africa, Samantha joined the board in
Susan
Warshauer,
Board
Member
2011 after
spending the
summer
working as an AFPF intern. She is studying business at
Susan
joined
the
AFPF
Board
in
and by the
the University of Richmond, and2009
will graduate
in summer
2013. of that year she was living in
Uganda as the newly appointed Vice Chancellor of African Rural University. She
worked with the Ugandan team to gain licensure for ARU from the National Council of
Susan
Board Member
Higher Warshauer,
Education in Uganda.
As a Social Psychologist, Susan has a long career
Susan
joined
the AFPF
Board
2009 andorganizations
by the summer
of thattheir
yearleadership,
she was living
dedicated
to helping
prot
andinnon-prot
develop
and in
Uganda
as
the
newly
appointed
Vice
Chancellor
of
African
Rural
University.
She
has a special interest in womens issues and education.
worked with the Ugandan team to gain licensure for ARU from the National Council of
Higher
EducationBoard
in Uganda.
As a Social Psychologist, Susan has a long career
Joel
Yanowitz,
Member
dedicated
helping
non-prot
organizations
theirtoleadership,
and
Joel
joinedtothe
AFPF prot
Boardand
in 1985
and has
contributeddevelop
extensively
building the
has
a
special
interest
in
womens
issues
and
education.
intellectual capital resident in the unique URDT integrated systemic approach to
development. A co-founder of Innovation Associates, he has over 30 years experience
Joel
Yanowitz,
Board
Member
helping
organizations
address
pressing business and organizational challenges. He is a
Joel
joined
the
AFPF
Board
in
1985executives
and has contributed
extensively
building
highly recognized advisor to senior
and entrepreneurs
whotoneed
help the
intellectual capital
in the
unique
URDT
systemic approach to
accelerating
the rateresident
of growth
and
innovation
in integrated
their organizations.
development. A co-founder of Innovation Associates, he has over 30 years experience
helping organizations address pressing business and organizational challenges. He is a
highly recognized advisor to senior executives and entrepreneurs who need help
accelerating
the rate ofDirector
growth and
in their organizations.
Angela Christiana,
of innovation
Operations
Angela began at AFPF in October 2011 working in fund raising, communications and
operations. !She served on the board of Coro Allegro for 3 years, rst as Annual Fund
Chair, then as Development Director. ! Her educational and professional background is
Angela
Christiana,
of Operations
in classical
vocal musicDirector
performance
and cognitive science, but after starting a family,
Angela
began
at
AFPF
in
October
2011
fund
raising,
communications
and
she realized that she wanted to use her lifeworking
to serveinthe
needs
of others
more directly.
!
operations. !She served on the board of Coro Allegro for 3 years, rst as Annual Fund
Chair,Pettengill,
then as Development
! Her educational and professional background is
Julia
DirectorDirector.
of Development
in classical
musicteam!!in
performance
and2010.
cognitive
but after
family,
Julia
!joinedvocal
the!AFPF
January
Julia science,
was motivated
tostarting
work inaAfrican
she
realized
that
she
wanted
to
use
her
life
to
serve
the
needs
of
others
more
directly.
rural development initiatives by her upbringing in rural Zambia, Zimbabwe and later!
South Africa.!Her post- graduate work both in South Africa and the US has been
Julia
Pettengill,
of Development
focused
on literacyDirector
and language
studies.!Her experience in other developmental
Julia
!joined
the!AFPF
team!!in
January
Julia was
to workand
in African
agencies,
including
FAO
and GTZ,
have2010.
contributed
to motivated
her commitment
passion
rural
development
initiatives
by
her
upbringing
in
rural
Zambia,
Zimbabwe
and
later
for women's education and leadership in rural Africa.
South Africa.!Her post- graduate work both in South Africa and the US has been
focused on literacy and language studies.!Her experience in other developmental
agencies, including FAO and GTZ, have contributed to her commitment and passion
for women's education and leadership in rural Africa.

AFPF STAFF

AFPF STAFF

AFPF STAFF

Yona Carmichael, Office Manager and Bookkeeper


Yona joined the AFPF team in March 2013, She has been keeping the books for
non-profit organizations for over 15 years, and is excited to be working with a team
of dedicated professionals and volunteers on such a worthy endeavor.