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Newspaper In Education Week

March 2-7

LANCASTER LEBANON

READING
COUNCIL

C o n te n t p rov i d e d by Lo c a l S t u d e n t s fo r Lo c a l A d ve r t i s e r s
An advertising supplement of LNP MEDIA Group, Inc.    

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MARCH 3, 2015

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Dear Readers,
Enclosed within these pages, you will find the winners of LNP Always
Lancaster’s 31st Annual NIE Week Design an Ad & Journalism Contests.
The purpose of this special section is to promote literacy, to showcase
outstanding student writing and graphic ability, and to recognize
classroom teachers for their efforts and encouragement to the next
generation of creative thinkers.

1st PLACE • EDITORIAL

The printing of this 40-page special section is made possible due to
the financial support of 25 local businesses listed on the last page. Many
of these advertisers support this project year after year. We are grateful
for the encouragement they give to the young artists that compete in our
Design an Ad Contest.
Over 1,300 students from grades 2 to 12, in 84 different classes in
public, private and home schools submitted hand-drawn and computerdesigned ads for the Design an Ad Contest. Each class was assigned one
of the 25 advertisers, who in turn selected the ad which would represent
their own business in this special section.
This year, a brand new online voting component was added to the
Design an Ad contest. Every winning ad was featured in an online gallery
and public vote determined four Best In Show winners (one winner in
grades 2-4, 5-6, 7-8, and 9-12). Best In Show winners are revealed inside
the pages of this tab.
Roughly 2,000 students participated in our Journalism Contests. Over
170 classrooms submitted entries for our Illustrating Headlines (grades
K-1), Writer’s Choice (grades 2-5), News Feature (grades 6-8), Editorial
(grades 9-12) and Photojournalism (grades 7-12) categories.
Our literacy partner, the Lancaster-Lebanon Reading Council
(LLRC), tackled the task of selecting approximately 10 finalists from
each grade level in each category of the Journalism Contest. The LLRC,
in collaboration with the editorial staff, judged the finalist entries and
selected the winners that you’ll find within these pages.
You, the readers, will see the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and honorable mention
places. Additionally, the NIE staff gave the teachers the option of selecting
one entry from each of their classes which they thought deserved special
recognition in the final publication if the piece was not selected as a
finalist.
Each year the LLRC and LNP Always Lancaster host a reception for
the 1st place Journalism and Design an Ad winners. Turkey Hill Dairy,
as well as the LLRC, generously provided the refreshments for this
reception.
LNP Media Group, Inc. is proud of all of the entries and appreciates
the efforts and enthusiasm of both the students and teachers who spend
countless hours brainstorming, editing, and submitting their work.
Please turn the pages and enjoy the creativity and talents of our local
students.

The LNP marketing team, from left: Sophia Efthymiades, marketing and
events supervisor Lauren Ditmore and Janis Harrington.

EMIILY STOLTZFUS
GRADE 12
Lampeter-Strasburg HS
Teacher: Susan Fetterolf

Miracles of
Medical Marijuana
What are the first thoughts that
come to mind when one thinks of
weed? Most people conjure up images of troubled teens and shady drug
deals. However, most fail to see the
benefits that medical marijuana can
bring to individuals. Medical marijuana should be legalized throughout the country because of the many
proven effective benefits that outweigh the negative effects.
Marijuana is illegal in almost every
state mostly because of the dangers
that the “high” can cause to the brain
and to the user. High amounts of the
chemical THC found in marijuana
can affect the brain causing the user
to feel lethargic, paranoid, uncoordinated, and anxious. However, CBD
is a different chemical also found in
marijuana that has the ability to prevent diseases and alleviate pain without the user experiencing a high.
In a documentary that CNN produced, WEED, they focused on a
young girl, Charlotte, who suffers
from severe seizures up to 300 times
per week. Her parents tried various
medications, but nothing worked.
They then purchased medicinal marijuana high in CBD and treated their
daughter with it. The marijuana reduced her seizures from 300 times
per week to only once per week.
Medical marijuana treats many
other diseases and disorders as well,
such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. The CBD in marijuana can prevent the spreading of cancer and also
ease the pain moreover; the THC
found in marijuana slows down the

formation of amyloid plaques that
cause Alzheimer’s disease. Medications other than marijuana treats
diseases such as these, but many
times they are addictive or harmful
to one’s body.
A solution to preventing and curing many diseases that harm one’s
body without the toxicity that many
other medications contain, is to legalize marijuana in America solely
for medical purposes. Much research
and many cases similar to Charlotte’s
have proven that medical marijuana
is an effective, non-toxic drug that is
beneficial for many purposes.
Works Cited:

n “CURE Epilepsy: Research: CBD and

Epilepsy.” CURE Epilepsy: Research:
CBD and Epilepsy. CURE, .d. Web. 2 Dec.
2014.
http://www.cureepilepsy.org/research/
cbd-and-epilepsy.asp.

n Loria, Jennifer Welsh and Kevin. “23

Health Benefits Of Marijuana.” Business
Insider.
Business Insider, Inc. 20 Apr. 2014. Web.
29 Nov. 2014.

n “BalancedPolitics.org.” - Free

Balanced, Non-Partisan Discussion of
Political & social
Issues for Debate (Pros and Cons.) N.p.,
n.d. Web. 02 Dec. 2014.

n “Dr Sanjay Gupta’s CNN Special

“WEED” YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web.
02 Dec. 2014.

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 3, 2015

1st PLACE • EDITORIAL

ABIGAIL VAN ROY
GRADE 11
Ephrata HS
Teacher: Gemma Rasmus

The importance
of bisexual visibility
Representation and exposure breed
normalization. The lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community has made undeniable progress
in terms of being represented and accepted, even taking back the former
slur “queer.” Unfortunately, bisexual
representation in mainstream media
is lacking.
Youths, as demonstrated in Bradley
J. Bond’s “Sexuality in the Media and
Emotional Well Being Among Lesbian,
Gay and Bisexual Adolescents” have
a healthier self-image when they are
able to identify with fictional characters. The positive portrayal of gay and
lesbian characters is growing by the
day. Unfortunately, bisexual teens get
little affirmation or recognition.
Often, examples of bisexuality are
simply erased. Take Willow Rosenberg, from Buffy the Vampire Slayer,
for example. Writers and fans were
willing to label her a lesbian after she
began her relationship with Tara, in
spite of her previous, heterosexual relationship with Oz. Willow was a leap

forward in representation, but in the
show’s haste to be inclusive of lesbians,
they shunned bisexuals.
Another form of bisexual erasure is
the “straightwashing” of an adapted
character. In other words, writers
choose to change a previously established queer character’s sexuality to
sanitize their adaptation. NBC originally planned to do this with John
Constantine, the main character of
their “Hellblazer” adaption. However,
when fans took to social media and
raised their voices, reprimanding NBC
and creating the hashtag “biblazer,”
the network was swayed.
Constantine’s confirmed sexuality has brought a bisexual leading man
to the small screen, providing much
needed affirmation for bisexual teens,
who can now see themselves in a hero.
This is a shining example of the ability of the conscious to abolish erasure.
Making voices heard where none were
to be heard before is an essential step
towards demolishing erasure and fostering the acceptance of bisexuality.

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Hinkle
Insurance
ad designed by
Amber Floyd
Pequea ES
Teacher: Lisa Frazier

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MARCH 3, 2015

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

1st PLACE • EDITORIAL

Feeling Testy
SARAH JOHNSON
GRADE 10
Ephrata HS
Teacher: Gemma Rasmus

Once upon a time, standardized
testing was a useful way to give educators a rough estimate of students’
knowledge in relation to that of
students nationally. However, this
useful tool is now a way to judge the
quality of education while punishing
educators.
The National Research on Evaluation and Standards found that
teachers have started planning their
curricula around tests. Test makers
have a difficult job of fitting a year’s
worth of information into one short
test, but they need to understand
that tests are not one-size-fits-all as
different schools teach different curricula.

As a result of “teaching to the test”,
instruction time is being consumed
by test preparation. The Center on
Education Policy found that since
2001, 44% of school districts reduced the time spent on science, social studies and the arts by an average of 145 minutes per week in order
to focus on reading and math scores.
To test makers, the ideal test question is one that is answered correctly
by only 40-60% of test takers, resulting in a variance of scores. This
means that the better job a teacher
does at teaching material, the less
likely it is to be on the test. Testing
with assessments that deliberately
avoid important items is pointless

and unproductive. A study at Michigan State University found a significant mismatch between content
in textbooks for grades 4-6 and the
standardized test for each topic.
In 2002, California state tests included instruction on what to do if
a student vomits on the test. “Test
stress” creates an environment of
fear in the classroom rather than
discovery.
A solution is a “portfolio-based
assessment”, where students’ work
is collected throughout a period of
time and evaluated at the end of a semester or year. Test makers have the
right task but the wrong tools.

1st PLACE • EDITORIAL

The Fault in Our Lunch Lines
VERONICA CAZILLO
GRADE 9
Penn Manor HS
Teacher: CeCe O’Day

Childhood obesity has become
an increasingly larger problem in
America over the past 30 years, but
are we really trying to combat it in
the right way? According to the CDC,
over one third of adolescents and
children in 2012 were overweight
or obese. The percentage of young
people struggling with obesity from
1980 until now has jumped by nearly
20%. Now we must ask ourselves,
why aren’t these numbers dropping?
Many people believe better nutrition
is the solution, however, it is yielding
no results. More physical activity in
teens and children is where the diminishment of obesity lies.
The majority of American youth do
not meet any of the recommended
daily amounts for fruit, vegetable,
and whole grain intake. Instead, they
far exceed the maximum sodium intake and find 40% of their calorie intake in fats and sugars (“Adolescent
and School Health”). Why is this
happening? The problem lies within
our schools.
Even with the “Let’s Move!” program launched by First Lady Mi-

chelle Obama, which introduced
more fruits, veggies, and whole
grains into school meals, students
can still find just as many unhealthy
options at lunch time (Let’s Move!).
Even within my own school, I see the
cause of childhood obesity every day
in the lunch line. Bacon cheeseburgers, cheese fries, cookies, cakes, large
sugary teas. Sure, they might be low
fat teas, and the buns are made of
whole wheat, but kids are eating this
every day, and the alternate option,
the regular line, can hardly be called
food at all. Clearly “healthier” diets
aren’t the solution to childhood obesity, so what is?
The CDC states that regular physical activity has a plethora of positive
impacts on children and adolescents,
including building healthy muscles
and bones, improving cholesterol
levels and blood pressure, and, most
importantly, helping control weight.
However, in a survey done by the
CDC, less than 30% of students took
part in physical activity for even 60
minutes a day. Physical education
classes are a perfect way for kids to

get the exercise they need, but in
some cases it isn’t even offered to all
grades of students, or students only
take a gym class for half the school
year (“Physical Activity Facts”).
Changing children’s diets will only
do so much to help control their
weight. The true solution to childhood obesity is physical activity. If
we really want to see this problem removed from our country, all schools
in every state should provide physical education classes to all grades,
year round. If this protocol is implemented in our schools, we will truly
start to see a change in the weight of
the youth of America.
Works Cited
n “Adolescent and School Health.”
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention. Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, 07 Oct. 2014. Web. 24
Nov. 2014.
n “Healthy Schools.” “Let’s Move! The
White House, n.d. Web. 25 Nov. 2014.

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

MARCH 3, 2015

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

1st PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

HONORABLE MENTION

AARON EBY-GOOD
GRADE 8
Reynolds MS
Teacher: Karen Morrisette

A Day in the Life of
a Physical Ed. Teacher
Gaile Gehman, a physical education middle school teacher, has been
teaching for 27 years. Often she finds
humor in her job, but sometimes it’s
the humor that finds her.
“The funniest story was years ago,”
she explains. “We were walking down
the sidewalk to our field. The students
had to wear uniforms for PE. I noticed
that this one young lady’s shirt was
extremely long. As a joke, I said to her,
‘you have shorts under that shirt don’t
you?’ She stopped, lifted her shirt part
way up, and then screamed. She had
forgotten to put her shorts on!”
Teaching middle school PE is an
adventure, but it also helps students
learn valuable skills for later on.
Gehman explains, “While some peo-

ple think PE is just for fun, students
learn more than just games. They
learn how to work together, show good
sportsmanship, and how to deal with
their peers.”
Each year, 300 students are enrolled
at Gehman’s school, and Ms. Gehman,
along with PE teacher Greg Henderson, teach them all. “Even though we
only see the students ever other day,”
she explains, “We have many more sections to grade than the core teachers.”
Ms. Gehman is committed to her students and job, even if she jokes about
them. “Middle-schoolers are ‘hormones in sneakers,’” she says, “and
that’s why I love teaching this grade
level. It’s an adventure every day!”

Stauffers of
Kissel Hill
ad designed by
Briana Arnold
Central Manor ES
Teacher: Megan Quinn

The Everberry
CLAIRE FRITZ
Grade 7-12 • Elizabethtown Area MS • Teacher: Mary Jane Davies

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MARCH 3, 2015

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

1st PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

Building Character Adds Character to City

LIZZIE WEAVER
GRADE 7
Landisville MS
Teacher: Scott Feifer

If you’re walking along North Queen Street in Lancaster,
it’s easy to miss #342, since it’s a rear warehouse you access
through an alley. However, if you do find it, you will be at
Building Character, a treasure trove of over 40 shops under
a 1,000 square foot roof.
Building Character was an old warehouse due for demolition in the late 1990’s before the City denied the request. In
2007, it was bought by Marty Hulse and Tony Nies, and soon
the store was open for business. In October of 2009, Hulse
became the sole owner. “I really just wanted to open a business that mixed vintage and handmade items with recycled,
upcycled, and handmade.” says Hulse when asked why he
opened Building Character.

Today, at BC, any vendor can rent a space in the warehouse
to sell handmade art, clothing, furniture, jewelry, and much
more! Currently, there are 40+ vendors selling to the public,
many of them using environmental friendly methods to create their merchandise. BC also offers many live events instore for days like the first and third Fridays each month. (BC
is open 7 days a week!) At these events, many vendors meet
and interact with their customers. “It’s more than a store,”
says Hulse. “We are really involved in the community. We
offer live music and food events as well.” So, if you are ever
walking in Lancaster with time to spare, check out Building
Character and all the cool things they have to offer.

1st PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

Central
Market

Lancaster County’s Central Market
is a unique place in Lancaster County.
Many people who visit Lancaster County make sure to stop by Central Market.
Located at 23 N Market Street in Penn
Square, it has been around since 1889. It

is a special place to meet people, eat delicious foods, and buy unique goods.
Vendors and farmers set up stands in
the building to display foods and goods.
Many of the stands are family-owned
and have been passed down generation
to generation. Some of the stands have
been around for a long time like Stoner
Family’s Vegetable, which has been at
Central Market for over 100 years. This
is the oldest stand. Thomas Produce
has been at Central Market for over 80
years.
The Central Market started as a “rough
shed” that was built in 1757. Then, about
120 years later, the current building was
built and opened. As the “Cornerstone
of Lancaster’s living history”, it has been
a wonderful attraction to people all
around Lancaster.
This amazing market in downtown
Lancaster offers a wide selection of
foods and goods such as flowers, collectibles, and dairy. A frequent visitor
of Central Market, Emily Loney, says

VICTORIA MORRALL
GRADE 6
St. Leo the Great
Teacher: Ellen Tucker

“Central Market has many intriguing
items in it.” Kristen Woratyla says,
“My family visits there very often
and the food there is wonderful!” It is
cheaper than a regular grocery store,
and the foods are fresh. Central Market is a wonderful and fun place, so
make sure to visit there!

Furniture That
Fits
ad designed by
Alexa Pitts
Landisville MS
Teacher: Scott Feifer

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 3, 2015

1st PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

Buffalo Traffic Jam

OLIVIA HEIM
GRADE 5
Centerville ES
Teacher: Cara Greer

My face was jammed against the window of my uncle’s car. I was in Custer
State Park, South Dakota. In the distance, massive dark shapes lumbered
across the tar black road. As we drove closer, my mom realized they were colossal buffalo with their innocent calves. My brother, grandmother, uncle, mom,
and I were stuck in a buffalo traffic jam. Hundreds of bison meandered aimlessly, pausing to graze. My chest thumped. The beauty of this majestic scene
awed me. The giant boulder-like creatures were calm yet threatening. Cows,
young calves and strong bulls alike stood in a long, wide parade. It was truly a
magnificent site.
Suddenly, a jet-black bison swung his lumpy head to face my mother’s open
window. She let out a cry of pure terror and quickly shut her window for protection from the beast. Everyone in the car laughed at my crazy mom’s reaction.
Earlier we had seen one buffalo and had been wowed. Now we were trickling
through a huge herd of bison. No sooner than we crossed through, the buffalo
began to turn around. This was a unique experience I would never forget, a
buffalo traffic jam.

1st PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

DERRIK CADAVID
GRADE 4
Resurrection Catholic School
Teacher: Sylvia Buller

My Greatest Coach
I never thought I would have such
a perfect football coach. Coach Tommy would gently yell at us, but in a
way that we would know to do right.
He loved when my teammates and
I would participate well at practice.
I liked my coach because he would
support me and my teammates.
When we would do something good
like tackle, cause a fumble or sack the
quarterback, our coach would give
us a high five. When I scored my first
touchdown and sacked the quarter-

back five times, he was so proud of
me. I liked how my coach was funny,
silly, fun and a good coach. In pregame he would put music on for us to
listen to. Some practices were hard
but our coach said, “All this hard
work you’re doing right now will pay
off. I guarantee it.” At the end of every pre-game our coach would tell us
we played a nice game. My coach was
like no other coach I knew. My coach
will be in my memory when I play in
the NFL.

Ebersole’s
Vacuum
Cleaner Sales
& Service

ad designed by
Aurora Thrasher
Central Manor ES
Teacher: Jerrell Birch

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MARCH 3, 2015

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

1st PLACE • ILLUSTRATING HEADLINES

1st PLACE • ILLUSTRATING HEADLINES

Alone At The Top

Chili Weather

KAEDEN ALMODOVAR
GRADE 1
Resurrection Catholic School
Teacher: Anne Hull

PAISLEY IRVINE
Grade K
Veritas Academy
Teacher: Jacqueline Lake

1st PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

A First Airplane Ride
The motor roared to life. Slowly, the plane rolled down the
runway and took off into the beautiful blue sky. I held onto
the plastic armrests tightly. It was my first time on an airplane
and I was traveling to sunny San Francisco with my two aunts.
Rapidly, the airplane kept rising until we were in the clouds.
I bravely looked out of the window and the tiny cars reminded me of working ants scuttling around. From above, everything seemed tiny on the ground. Suddenly, the ride started
to feel bumpy. My stomach flip-flopped with worry but after

talking to my aunts I soon realized that an airplane ride can
be as bumpy as a car ride.
We flew quietly for about six hours, and then the motor
started to sound like the low grumbling voice of a tiger. From
our window, the buildings looked tilted. The airplane slowed
down until the wheels bumped onto the runway. Excited, I
sighed a huge sigh of relief because I escaped the danger of
crashing. My feet touched the ground and I was thankful to
learn that airplane rides were safe and fun!

DANNY ROMANYUK
GRADE 3
Lancaster County Christian
Teacher: Tammi Dodson

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

2nd PLACE • ILLUSTRATING HEADLINES

Woodcarver’s Art
Takes Flight

Friendly’s

ad designed by
Danielle Przywara
Smoketown ES
Teacher: Stephen
Schiedt

9

1st PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

The Crayola
Factory
I did something amazing when I was
in Kindergarten. I went to the Crayola
Factory with my Mimi, Mom, Lia, Kayla, and Mrs. Jen. I was so excited!
When I saw the building, I was
amazed because I saw big crayons on
the building! It looked like a giant yellow crayon box. First, we got tokens
and made our own crayon labels. We
used crayon machines that had crayons in them. We used a pad to type in
what name we wanted and also a little
picture to go with it. Then we went to
a different section and made markers.
There were colors of the day, and you
could even make a marker with two
colors in it!
After that we went to watch how they
make crayons. They poured hot wax
into crayon molds. Then we played

IVONGELIN MILLAN
Grade 1 • Central Manor ES • Teacher: Patti Shover

MARCH 3, 2015

DREA RICE
GRADE 2
Lampeter ES
Teacher: Kimberly Smith

with Crayola play dough. A lady used
a special stamp to make it into a puzzle. After playing on the indoor playground, we sat on big crayons while
Mom took our picture.
I loved going there because I kept
all of the things I made. I was excited
when my mom said that we could go
back again sometime soon.

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MARCH 3, 2015

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

HONORABLE MENTION

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

2nd PLACE • ILLUSTRATING HEADLINES

Woodcarver’s Art
Takes Flight

Elizabethtown Christmas Parade
PAYTON HALBLEIB
Grade 7-12 • Elizabethtown Area HS • Teacher: Kevin Goss

LAURA KLEIS
Grade K • Rheems ES • Teacher: Melissa Clark

Long
Orthodontic
Associates

ad designed by
Kailey O’Brien
Central Manor ES
Teacher: Amy Wiggins

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 3, 2015

2nd PLACE • EDITORIAL

Resuscitating the Arts
CAROLYN BAKER
GRADE 12
Lampeter-Strasburg HS
Teacher: Susan Fetterolf

The decline of arts education in
schools due to budget cuts and preparation for standardized tests could
pose as a detriment to students’ grades
and behavior. School music and art
programs lead students to discover
new interests while also keeping their
grades up and teaching them precision
and discipline.
Public schools grant students the
freedom to learn an instrument, join
a choir, study art, and participate in
a theatre production beginning in elementary school. Presented with these

options, students then have the autonomy to dabble in the arts at their
own interest. School music and art
programs provide children with the
opportunity to discover new interests
and talents: an opportunity that other
institutions may not afford to them.
Like with sports, many schools allow
only students with passing grades to
participate in extracurricular art and
music programs. Students involved in
music and art must then devote time
to schoolwork in order to remain involved. Arts programs give students
who might not otherwise care about
their grades a reason to succeed in
school.
Along with providing students with a
motivation to pass their classes, music
and art teach precision, discipline, and

2nd PLACE • EDITORIAL

School Lunches Important
CHRISTOPHER DETWILER
Grade 11
Hempfield HS
Teacher: Pamela Felegi

When entering high school, most
teens are in the middle of their growth
spurt. Because of this rapid growth,
they require more calories than normal, especially if they are involved in
sports.
According to kidshealth.org, teens
who participate in athletic activities
will require somewhere between 2,000
- 5,000 calories every day. An easy place
for teens to get those calories is during
their school lunch. The only problem is
that schools are only allowed to serve
850 calories in every lunch. That is less
than 25% of the total calories needed
by teens daily!
I believe that school lunches should
be allowed to have more calories, giving teens more energy throughout the
day, and creating a more filling and delectable lunch.
If teens don’t eat enough calories,

their bodies will not be able to reach
their maximum potential and may
start breaking down muscle instead of
building it up. They won’t be as fast or
strong as they could.
Many people may say that more calories causes obesity in teens. This is
true, but there are also many more factors that cause obesity. One is physical
inactivity. No matter how many calories teens eat, if they do not burn off
those calories, they will gain weight.
Physical activity and healthy eating
go hand-in-hand. The healthier you
eat, the more energy you have to stay
physically fit, which is what keeps body
fat low and muscle growth high.
If the government wants healthier
and smarter kids, serving more calories may be the answer. More calories
give teens the energy to get through the
school day with smiles on their faces,
and then be able to excel in their sport
or activity.
Lower calories in a meal does not
mean the meal is healthier, especially
for teens.

creativity. In order to develop a new
skill, one must practice and study tirelessly. In order to put on a production,
students must rehearse repeatedly and
adapt to working together. Arts programs can not only motivate students
to pass classes but also equip them
with the work ethic necessary to excel
in school.
Although the programs require
funding, the beneficial impact of the
arts on students outweighs the cost
of maintaining them. Ticket sales for
plays, musicals, and art shows also at
least partially cover the cost of the programs. Implementing the arts in public
schools would pose a small monetary
cost and an immense benefit to students.

Hinkle’s
Pharmacy

ad designed by
Chad Stoltzfus
Pequea Valley HS
Teacher: Tim Hess

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MARCH 3, 2015

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

2nd PLACE • EDITORIAL

Separation of Students by Ability
SOFIA RIVERA
GRADE 10
Manheim Township HS
Teacher: Marty Pflieger

Julius Sturgis
Bakery
Company

ad designed by
Ethan Twilley
Lancaster County
Christian School
W. Lampeter Campus
Teacher: Bethany
Rineer

Some people believe that grouping
students based on their ability has negative effects on their self-confidence;
however, throughout the nation, inclass ability grouping and tracking
are used to give all students the best
education possible. Despite the arguments against ability-based grouping,
it is very effective in allowing students
of all ability levels to succeed.
In-class ability grouping or placing
students in separate groups within
one classroom, is generally used in elementary schools. It allows students

to learn at their own pace while still
allowing for interaction between the
groups. Tracking, or placing students
in separate ability-based classes, is
more common in secondary schools.
This allows students to receive more
individualized attention from teachers
and work at their own pace.
Some opponents to ability grouping argue that separating students by
ability can be harmful to lower-level
students. However, they often feel intimidated and less self-confident in
heterogeneous classrooms; higherlevel students also become frustrated
because they are prevented from advancement. In heterogeneous classrooms, teachers are forced to teach
toward the average students, who really only make up a third of the class. In

ability-grouped classrooms, however,
the curriculum can be structured for
all of the students.
Ability-based grouping is advantageous for both students and teachers.
Not only does it allow higher-level students to advance in their stronger subjects, but it also provides lower-level
students with more self-confidence
and the opportunity to take more time
to learn difficult topics. This method of
grouping students also allows teachers
to approach the majority of their class
with lessons of true meaning and substance. Both in-class ability grouping
- at the elementary level - and tracking
- at the secondary level - should be used
to optimize the results of education.

2nd PLACE • EDITORIAL

How Children’s Books
Affect Children’s Behavior
TARA ANTHONY
Grade 9
Manheim Townshp HS
Teacher: Marty Pflieger

When you hand your child a book,
you want him to have fun reading it, but
you also want him to learn something
valuable from it. Children’s books can
have positive and negative effects on
children. According to Shelton L. Root
Jr., when a child’s brain is still developing, the child can easily be influenced
by the objects and people around them,
especially what they read or what their
parents read to them. Not just the plot
of the book can influence them, but a
single character with a larger role in
the book.
When you read to a child about a
character being disobedient or unruly,
the child might want to take on the
personality of the character and act
like him or her. The book may not even
have a bad influence on the child at all.
Sometimes it’s a good influence, rather than a bad one. In Dr. Suess’s “The

Lorax” the Lorax is trying to keep the
clothing manufacturers from cutting
down all of the trees to produce their
“snoods,” a clothing article that can
be pretty much anything that a person
can wear. The book might influence
the child to help the environment, or
to take better care of our world so we
don’t have to worry about things like
that. Take Roald Dahl’s “Matilda,” for
example. The main character, Matilda
stands up for herself and her fellow
students and teachers, using her ‘powers’ to give a message to her principal
Miss Trunchbull, to leave them alone
and exposing the way she poorly treats
the students.
So when parents are trying to pick
out a nice book for their children, they
should think about how they want
their children to act, how they want to
influence their children, or how they
want their minds to develop and grow
Because a book’s influence might just
have a huge impact on a child.

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 3, 2015 13

2nd PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

Composting’s Effect on Schools
CHRISTOPHER HYRB
GRADE 8
St. Leo the Great
Teacher: Ellen Tucker

Schools all over America are taking part in a new
method of recycling. This process saves schools
thousands of dollars each year and helps the environment too. Who would have known this method is
composting?
What is composting? Why are so many schools taking part in this world-wide phenomenon? Simply
put, composting is recycling decomposing materials
(such as vegetables) into a rich soil. This is put into
gardens to help plants and vegetation grow.
Many schools are now actively composting. St. Leo
the Great School in Lancaster has an active compost
program. Michele Zachary, St. Leo’s compost manager, has set up a compost line for students. Before the

children walk through the compost line, they separate their trash. Then, they put their plastic baggies,
tin foil, milk cartons, yogurt containers, and anything
else you can think of into different bins. Then they
put the food part of their lunch into compost bins.

Why does St. Leo compost? One reason is it
fuels the school’s garden, eliminating the need to buy
expensive and harmful fertilizer. The school garden
provides fresh fruits and vegetables for lunches. According to Michele Zachary, big companies such as
Target buy yogurt containers and milk cartons from
St. Leo’s compost program. Composting also reduces
the school’s need to buy garbage bags and pay for
trash fees.
Composting has had a huge effect on St. Leo. Many
schools are now following their program. Who
knows, maybe in the next twenty years every school
will be composting.

2nd PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

Meet Arnold: Lancaster’s
1st Therapy Pig
CASEY DECK
Grade 7
Centerville MS
Teacher: Laura Wentland

You have probably heard of a therapy
dog, even a therapy cat, but you have
probably never heard of a therapy
pig. KPETS- Keystone Pet Enhanced
Therapy Services, an organization
committed to providing therapeutic
benefits through use of animals, has a
new member, a female pig named Arnold who belongs to the Rhoads family.
She’s Lancaster County’s first registered therapy pig.
The family had many reasons for
getting a pig. “Adam [Mrs. Rhoads’s
son] really likes pigs, ever since he was
little.” Mrs. Rhoads said. One benefit
is they are nonallergenic, because pigs
have the same type of skin and hair as
humans do. After extensive research,
Mrs. Rhoads arranged to have Arnold

shipped from Texas.
Caring for pigs is similar to caring for
dogs or cats. “As long as you’re able to
take care of both you’d be able to take
care of a pig,” says Mrs. Rhoads. Pigs
are intelligent, like tricks, and keep
themselves busy.
Mrs. Rhoads decided to train Arnold
to be a therapy pig, because their dog is
already a therapy animal. To be registered, Arnold had to pass a health test.
Next KPETS officials evaluated her in
settings, like nursing homes or schools.
The process can take up to six months.
Since then, Arnold has been to many
places, bringing happiness to those in
need. Recently, Arnold visited an Autistic Support Classroom at Centerville
Middle School. It was a great experience for everyone. One thing’s for sure,
Arnold’s just getting started making
people smile.

JB Hostetter

ad designed by
Ben Wohlboune
Elizabethtown Area MS
Teacher: MaryJane
Davies

14

MARCH 3, 2015

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

2nd PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

Exit Lancaster: Working to Make
Our Community Great
EMMA CHARLINE ORTIZ TORRES
GRADE 6
Edward Hand MS
Teacher: Jane Capriotti

A&A Auto
Body & Repair
ad designed by
Emily Riggs
Central Manor ES
Teacher: Alison
Horning

Did the students forget what day
of the week it was? Can you believe
100 students would give up their Saturday morning to help the community? It was 8:30 in the morning and
the students at Edward Hand Middle
School had volunteered to help beautify downtown Lancaster. The day is
called Ruth Thomas Day of Community Service. Ruth Thomas lost her fight
against breast cancer, but always had a

love of giving back to her community.
Exit Lancaster is a program at Edward Hand Middle School. It is represented by five principles. The principles are education, community
service, wellness, business, and an appreciation for the arts. Mr. Bair, one
of the two creators of this program
says, “Our program is for any student
who is willing to embrace those five
principles.” That Saturday in October,
with joy and pride, the students started
walking downtown. With their buckets
of mulch and their wheelbarrows of
picked up trash, you could see that they
were off to a good start that day.
Exit Lancaster students also travel to

many places, often based on a book they
are reading. For example, the students
read a book called Surviving Hitler and
traveled to Washington, D.C. to the Holocaust Museum. Another example is
they read a book called Miracle Boys
and traveled to New York City to see
a Broadway show. They also traveled
to Cincinnati, Ohio to visit the Underground Railroad Museum. Depending
on how many students actively participate, they can do these trips without
having the students pay too much out
of their own pocket.
Exit Lancaster provides students
with so many learning opportunities,
very few programs can compete!

2nd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

The Monster Wave
DELANEY MINDER
Grade 5
Centerville ES
Teacher: Ric Petrosky

The calm, cold, salty water rocked
me and my friend back and forth. Sitting on my boogie board, I waited for
another wave to come. Looking back at
the shore, I realized we were far away.
Suddenly, the ocean water became
chaotic and ruff. Eager to look back,
I was hoping to see the perfect sized
wave, I realized I was wrong. A monster sized wave was hurtling towards
us! Trying to drag and kick my body

away only made it worse and the wave
was getting closer!
Before we knew it, the wave struck us
and everything turned to a dark blur
My muscles were stiff and I felt nothing while twisting and turning under
the water but, scratches, bumps, bruises, and sores covered my body.
Finally, I awakened, cheek down to
the salty shore. My knees were cut and
sore while my eyes were red and puffy
My mom was racing toward me, helping me up to the beach chairs.
The monster wave is one thing in my
life I will never forget.

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NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 3, 2015 15

2nd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

A Snowy Day
KYLA MASON
Grade 4
Lititz Christian School
Teacher: Nancy Hackman

One freezing cold afternoon, Eddie, my Dad and I bundled
up in our fuzzy, warm jackets and went outside to play in the
cold snow. I could taste the snowflakes floating gently on my
tongue. We decided to have a snowball fight. My Dad was on
one side of the driveway and Eddie and me were on the other.
Hit, bam, whack! We smacked each other with the snowballs!

After a while it was time to shovel the driveway. We shoveled
the snow into one enormous pile. Eddie and I packed it all
down and then we dug a deep hole in it. It was super deep!
My friend Rebeckah came and we played inside the fort. We
made secret holes in it so we could store food inside. After
our toes were frozen and our noses were bright red, we went
inside to drink some warm, hot chocolate. Then we went
back outside into the freezing wind and made a snowman
that was four feet tall! We made slippery slides on the top
of the snow fort. We pretended we were silky, slippery seals.
What an extraordinary fun day in the snow!

Penn Cinema

ad designed by
Melanie Martinez
Resurrection Catholic
School
Teacher: Mary Scaccia

16

MARCH 3, 2015

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

TEACHER’S PICK

Are You Being Watched?
VERONICA RINGLEIN
Grade 8
Sacred Heart School
Teacher: Ann Weaver

Security Cameras and privacy are
controversial in our society. Are these
cameras keeping us safe or violating
our rights?
In Lancaster City and around the
world privacy issues are an ongoing
debate. The Lancaster Community
Safety Coalition tries hard to protect
their residents. The cameras in Lancaster are placed at intersections.
They keep a close eye on the city.
Many people believe these cameras are there for our protection, but
some people believe these cameras
are violating the rights we have under
the fourth amendment. A resident on
Race Avenue states that these camer-

as are invading his privacy and are not
necessary for our protection.
Lancaster City security cameras
have helped catch criminals. The
monitors in the Lancaster Safety Coalition have operators watching the
rotating cameras at all times. These
cameras watch and record every move
of each person within the span of the
camera’s view.
Local high schools and colleges such
as Lancaster Catholic High school and
Franklin and Marshall college have
recently put in security camera operating systems. These security cameras
on campuses are said to be for the protection of faculty and staff.
Do you feel safe having cameras
watching you? Is it contradicting our
rights under the fourth amendment to
privacy?

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

2nd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

A Mysterious Discovery
GRETA BORNMANN
Grade 3
Lancaster Mennonite
Teacher: Sylvia M. Weaver

This past September, we were cleaning out my dad’s apartments, when I
found a mysterious trap door. When I
asked my dad about it, he said we could
go explore. So my dad said he would go
in first. After we both got down there,
we saw movement on the floor! We
couldn’t see what it was, because it
was in the shadows. Then, my dad realized it was a snake! My dad whispered
something. It sounded like “Run!” So,

I raced right up the steps and escaped
through the trap door. My heart was
pounding like a drum!
As soon as Dad slammed the door
shut, he called That Fish Place. When
they came, we showed them where we
had seen the snake. Only minutes after
we led them down there, they brought
the snake up in a cage. Then my dad
closed up the trap door.
This snake had been a pet of some
former tenants. I was glad the snake
was gone, but a little part of me wished
we could have kept it.

2nd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

Old-fashioned Windmills
JACOB ZURIN
Grade 2
Lancaster Mennonite
Teacher: Sylvia M. Weaver

“Whoosh!” Hear that wind blow! It
is a good day with no tornados. Let’s
get those windmills rolling. Go ahead!
You may go inside the windmill. Whoa!
Look up at the top and see those gigantic gears. They almost touch the
top of the windmill. Two giant straight
logs, with all their bark taken off, turn

around inside the windmill. When the
wind blows, the sails on the windmill
move. The sails are attached to one log
that has a gear on it. The other log also
has a gear, but it goes to an attachment
that grinds wheat to make flour. Flour
is one of the ingredients for making
bread. When the wind blows the sails,
it can make electricity for turning light
bulbs on, or for other electrical uses.
Some people have windmill farms.
Windmills help many people. A lot of
people think windmills are very handy.

Candyology
ad designed by
Chloe Kline
Landis Run IS
Teacher: Emily Wood

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 3, 2015 17

3rd PLACE • EDITORIAL

A More Progressive Pope?
ETHAN MELDRUM
GRADE 12
Hempfield HS
Teacher: Pamela Felegi

From the moment he was elected in
March of 2013, Pope Francis’ papacy
has been surrounded by controversy.
The Pontiff has worked as a bouncer
for a nightclub, a technical chemist,
and really enjoyed dancing (scandalous!) before becoming pope. In his
short time as pope, he has done an incredible job of setting the example for
those who practice Catholicism, and
all those who just want to be a good
person.
The humility of Pope Francis is
something to be admired. Shunning
the (literal) gold trimmings that one
usually associates with the elected
pope, the new Pontiff has chosen to

wear a silver (instead of gold) piscatory ring, keep the same pectoral cross
he had when he was a cardinal, and
refuse to don the papal mozzetta cape
traditionally worn by popes of the
past. He is willing to make sacrifices
for the downtrodden, including selfless acts such as raffling off personal
gifts given to him (four-wheel drive
Fiat Panda included) and approving
public showers at the Vatican for the
homeless.
In his short time as the religious
leader of 1.2 billion people, Pope Francis has made several controversial
statements that have angered many
(including some in the church). Called
“pure Marxism” by radio personality Rush Limbaugh, his critiques of
capitalism have upset many conservative followers. However, his economic
policy of putting people before profit

3rd PLACE • EDITORIAL

Think Before You Act
BRANDON ROARK
GRADE 11
Ephrata HS
Teacher: Gemma Rasmus

One bad comment has the same effect as a hundred good ones.
According to Stopbullying.gov and
nobullying.com, over 3.2 million kids
are currently being bullied all over
the country. 160,000 kids skip school
just so they don’t become a victim of
bullying. 1 in 10 students drop out of
school because of bullying. 4,400 teens
commit suicide with over half of them
are directly or partly caused because
of bullying. And with every teen who
commits suicide, another hundred attempt suicide.
Bullying is underrated and needs
more attention. Bullying can have
drastic effects, such as depression,
self-harm, mental issues, and anxiety
problems. Most people who are bullied don’t report it to a teacher or parent because most don’t know how to
talk about it or fear the problem either
won’t be solved or will only worsen.

Most times a child is severely bullied
and no one knows until it’s too late.
Feeling lost, alone, and abandoned,
some choose suicide as a way out, a few
retaliate, but most just sit back and do
nothing.
That is why it is up to friends and
students to do something about it. Several groups such as Aevidum, STOMP,
Think Before You Speak, and many
more have been made with the goal to
end bullying nationwide. Even the UN
declared May 4th as the official AntiBullying Day, with 25 countries recognizing it including, the United States.
49 states and DC, along with several
other countries, have laws against bullying.
It is astounding the attention antibullying is getting, it’s not enough. It
is important for bystanders to report if
another kid is being bullied.
The only thing worse than causing
abuse is letting it go on. So do something. Because if you don’t, one day
there may be an empty seat in your
classroom.

reflects not his own views, but those
of Christ himself, whom all Christians
profess to follow.
However, as the head of the Catholic church, Pope Francis has been doing a phenomenal job of promoting
what it truly means to be a Christian
in today’s society. Preaching love and
tolerance, he is doing his best to be the
exemplar of what people all over the
world, religious or not, should strive
to emulate.
Works cited
n http://www.chicagotribuen.com/news/
nationworld/chi-pope-raffle-20141119story.html
n http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/
opinion/commentary/ct-pope-mythsperspec-1125-20141124-story.html#page=1

Stauffers of
Kissel Hill
ad designed by
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Manheim Twp. HS
Teacher: Julie Frey

18

MARCH 3, 2015

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

3rd PLACE • EDITORIAL

Bullying
BREANNA WINGENROTH
GRADE 10
Manheim Township HS
Teacher: Marty Pflieger

Bullying is a serious problem that affects people
all over the world every day. The average person really doesn’t take the time to think about it or even
imagine what it would be like if it was happening to
them. Bullies can be relentless and will do whatever it takes to gain power so that they can feel better
about themselves.
Over 3.2 million students are victims of bullying
each year. Every 7 minutes a kid is being bullied.

There are three different types of bullying, including verbal, social, and physical. The most common
type of bullying is verbal, which includes teasing
and name calling. Social bullying is when someone
purposely harms another’s reputation by spreading embarrassing rumors or through cyberbullying. Physical bullying is when someone purposely
causes violent, physical harm to one another.
Kids are taking their own lives and there is a
strong link between bullying and suicide incidents.
Studies by Yale University show that victims of
bullying are between 2 to 9 times more likely to
consider suicide than non-victims.
Dana Schrodel, assistant principal at Manheim

Township High School, states that staff is only notified when a teacher reports an incident of bullying and administrators would investigate everyone
involved. “Consequences for bullying vary from a
warning to OSS depending on the severity of the
incident,” he said.
Awareness of this issue can lead to changes. Bullies need to stop and bystanders need to step up
and stop acts of bullying when they see them. One
step at a time we can all make this issue disappear.
Bullying is a worldwide problem that needs to be
stopped now.

3rd PLACE • EDITORIAL

Music and Its Effects on Kids
KARINA QUINONES
GRADE 9
Manheim Township HS
Teacher: Marty Pflieger

Some people say that music negatively affects
kids, especially teens. They say it can lower their
grades, but it’s actually the reverse. Music is a good
thing especially with teens because it can improve
their attitudes. Music helps with creativity and
even problem solving.
According to an article by Quantum Jumping,
at the University of California at Irvine, some sci-

entists conducted a study with preschool-aged
children. Some children received daily lessons for
either playing an instrument or singing. The children with the lessons were significantly better able
to complete a puzzle compared to those who don’t
receive lessons. It also may create a highly focused
learning state in which vocabulary and reading
material is absorbed at a great rate, according to
a Johns Hopkins School of Education article. The
article also says that music can also help with increasing attention, improving memory, and providing inspiration and motivation.
A teacher playing a classical song during a test is

a great example of this. The music helps children
to concentrate more on the test. If the students
focus more on the test, they have a better chance
of getting a better grade. The music playing in the
background of the test, though, can also ease the
students’ nerves.
According to the same John Hopkins article, music, aside from helping to learn, also helps with atmosphere. It builds a sense of anticipation, releases tension, and adds fun. The music helps to make a
positive and desired atmosphere in the classroom.
Making a connection again with learning, kids
learn, focus, and remember more while having fun.

3rd PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

Talk About Making a Friend Request
MAX AUKAMP
GRADE 8
Centerville MS
Teacher: Jennifer Axe

Three-year-old Kennedy Stevenson was born in
Lancaster, Pennsylvania with a rare disease that
has threatened her life. She is only one in eight
people in the world that has been diagnosed with
the metabolic disorder called S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase deficiency, or AdoHcy. It affects

her brain development, muscles, nervous system
and liver.
A liver transplant was Kennedy’s chance for a
cure. Her mom, Donya McCoy, sent out a plea on
Facebook. In July, Donya sent out this request to
her 800 Facebook friends, “This is the request of
a lifetime. Is there anyone out there who has O+
blood and would be willing to donate 25% of their
liver to save Kennedy’s life?” Her prayers were answered when a high school acquaintance said he
would donate the quarter of his liver that Kennedy

needed.
The transplant took place at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh on October 28. On December 1,
metabolic tests came back and the doctors believe
that Kennedy’s transplant has cured her. Each day
she is making progress. More and more tubes are
being removed from her and she is now able to eat
and move around. Kennedy is still going to need to
remain in Children’s Hospital for the next month.
After that, she will be released to stay close by with
her mom, Donya, in The Ronald McDonald House.

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

MARCH 3, 2015 19

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

3rd PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

3rd PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

The Secret of Soil

The Taj Mahal

COURTNEY MYER
GRADE 7
Landisville MS
Teacher: Scott Feifer

Soil Secret Incorporated is one-hundred percent natural earthworm castings. It is odorless, chemical-free, contains many micro-organisms that are
crucial to healthy root systems, and is
non toxic. Earthworm castings are nature’s most effective and purest form
of soil. Nellene and Jay Myer are the
proud owners of Soil Secret. “Not only
are you feeding the plants, you are also
feeding the soil,” says owner Nellene
Myer.
The soil from Soil Secret is organic
since it is not a fertilizer. Fertilizer is
synthetic and causes fertilizer runoff,
which is when nitrogen from the fertilizer runs into water polluting it. Soil
Secret gives a stronger, healthier plant
which means the plant won’t contain

as many diseases. The castings contain
humus, which helps aerate the soil.
Aerated soil allows water to get to the
plant system quicker and easier.
Using this soil saves time because
you don’t have to tend to or water the
plant as much. “It’s hard to tell, but I’d
say there are about one-million worms
in our barn,” explains Nellene. “It takes
about one-thousand worms to make
one pound, and we sell by the pound.”
Happy and healthy worms can
double their population every three
to six months. As long as the worms
have moisture, food, and the correct temperature, they will be happy
and healthy. “My favorite parts of the
process are learning more about the
worms and the pretty flowers you get
from them,” Nellene says. Using Soil
Secret will make your plants healthy,
strong, and beautiful.

Leisure Lanes
ad designed by
SARA OLUJIC
Landisville MS
Teacher: Diane
Anderson

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EMILY LONEY
GRADE 6
St. Leo the Great
Teacher: Ellen Tucker

The Taj Mahal is an Indian restaurant that can transport someone from
Lancaster County farmlands to a foreign world. The restaurant, which
serves Indian food, is located at 2080
Bennett Ave. right off of Rohrstown
Road. Voted one of the best restaurants
in Lancaster, PA, no one will go away
hungry or unhappy.
When a person walks into the Taj
Mahal, they are greeted by a friendly
host wearing traditional Indian garb.
The walls are covered with tapestries
and Hindu sculptures are present
throughout the restaurant. After being
seated, warm towels are given for hand
washing.
A polite waiter will offer to bring

drinks. The strawberry lassi is especially delicious. It tastes like a swirl of
cream and strawberry with a pinch of
sourness.
For less daring Americans and young
children, the Taj chicken is an excellent choice. This chicken is cooked
in a cylindrical clay oven called a tandoor. The naan bread is a great food to
combine with this chicken and jasmine
rice. Naan is an Indian oven-baked flat
bread that resembles a pancake.
Besides the wonderful food and
friendly service, the Taj Mahal offers
great entertainment. The citar player
is talented and willing to make friendly
conversation. The citar is an Indian instrument that looks like a guitar with a
long handle. The music is peaceful and
relaxing.
If one is interested in escaping daily
life and traveling to a foreign land, the
Taj Mahal is the perfect place to go.

20

MARCH 3, 2015

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

A Special Thank You to All the Participating Teachers
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
COLUMBIA
Taylor Elementary
Christina Warfel

CONESTOGA VALLEY
J.E. Fritz Elementary
Khris Brubaker
Sue Gehman
Smoketown Elementary
Steve Scheidt

DONEGAL
Donegal Intermediate
Sarah Lawrence

ELIZABETHTOWN AREA
Elizabethtown Area High
Kevin Goss
ElizabethtownArea Middle
Mary Jane Davies
Rheems Elementary
Melissa Clark

EPHRATA AREA
Clay Elementary
Beth Garrison
Alycia Kauffman
Deborah Sheaffer
Ephrata High
Gemma Rasmus
Fulton Elementary
Matt Becker

HEMPFIELD
Centerville Elementary
Cara Greer
Sylvia Kilheffer
Ric Petrosky
Centerville Middle
Jennifer Axe
Cristin Kramer
Laura Wentland
Hempfield High
Pamela Felegi
Chris Hanusa
Andy Wise
Landisville Intermediate
Clare Daher
Jess Wise

Landisville Middle
Diane Anderson
Scott Feifer
Christine LeFevre
Kim Petrosky

Nathan C. Schaeffer ES
Allison Zell

Landisville Primary
Sandy McConnell
Nancy Neff

PENN MANOR

LAMPETER-STRASBURG
Hans Herr Elementary
Beth Hendrix
Lampeter Elementary
Lauren Burns
Suzanne Mannix
Gini Sitler
Kimberly Smith
Allison Wagner
Lampeter-Strasburg High
Angela Depew
Susan Fetterolf
Benjamin Krothe
Martin Meylin Middle
Jennifer Risser
Timothy Shoff

LANCASTER COUNTY
CAREER AND
TECHNOLOGY CENTER
(LCCTC)
Brownstown Campus
Randy Hess
Willow Street Campus
Mark Maisano

MANHEIM CENTRAL
Doe Run Elementary
Leisa Bowman
Carol Hess
JoAnn Sunderland
Manheim Central Middle
Julie Hibsman
Keisha McCauley

MANHEIM TOWNSHIP
Landis Run Intermediate
Emily Wood
Manheim Township High
Julie Frey
Marty Pflieger
Manheim Township Middle
Brooke Hall

Hilary Horst

William E. Nitrauer ES
Nancy Cooper

Central Manor Elementary
Jerrell Birch
Jenna Boyd
Tracy Cornell
Karen Devenburgh
Becca Eichler
Laura Heverling
Allison Horning
Shelly Kyle
Jen Loreto
Beth Mader
Emily Mattern
Heather Piatt
Carol Purzycki
Megan Quinn
Casie Saxton
Beth Schoelkopf
Patti Shover
Laura Stephan
Johanna Treier
Stacey White
Amy Wiggins
Emily Wise
Conestoga Elementary
Meridith Eckroat
Fred S. Eshelman ES
Elizabeth Kaplan
Wendy Terry

Salisbury Elementary
Aftan Fisher

SCHOOL DISTRICT
OF LANCASTER
Burrowes Elementary
Barb Heister
Stephanie Mowery
Jeanne Oakes
Hand Middle
Jane Capriotti
J.P. McCaskey High
Lisa Wolf
Lafayette Elementary
Christine Kowalski
Martin Elementary
Darrell Yoder
Reynolds Middle
Karen Morrisette
Ross Elementary
Eilene Euston
Wickersham Elementary
Angela DiTomasso

SOLANCO
Bart-Colerain Elementary
Melissa Evans
Greg Schmitt
Sheila Schmitt
Clermont Elementary
Christina Olindo

Martic Elementary
Candy Steiner

George A. Smith Middle
Emily Ritholz

Penn Manor High
Cece O’Day

WARWICK

Pequea Elementary
Lisa Frazier

PEQUEA VALLEY
Paradise Elementary
Jodi Shenberger
Pequea Valley High
Tim Hess

Kissel Hill Elementary
Barb Jones

NONPUBLIC
SCHOOLS
LANCASTER COUNTY
CHRISTIAN SCHOOL
Tammi Dodson

Jessica Hoover
Bethany Rineer
Alecia Weaver

LANCASTER
MENNONITE

Sylvia Weaver

LINVILLE HILL
CHRISTIAN SCHOOL
Joe Luethy
Karen Donaldson

LITITZ CHRISTIAN
SCHOOL
Betsy Echternach
Nancy Hackman

OUR MOTHER OF
PERPETUAL HELP
Natasha Drum

RESURRECTION
CATHOLIC

Sylvia Buller
Annemarie Hull
Kim Ingram
Kimberly Kramer
Kristy Legenstein
Mary Scaccia

SACRED HEART
SCHOOL

Erin Ague
Jackie Muchleisen
Ann Weaver

ST. LEO THE GREAT
Stacey Berger
Jan Bixby
Jennifer Harrington
Dagny Heidig
Ellen Tucker

VERITAS ACADEMY
Jacqueline Lake

HOMESCHOOL
EDUCATORS

Debbie Sullivan

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

MARCH 3, 2015 21

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

NIE Week Reception

Advertisers & Design an Ad Winners

A Special Thank You to All
Participating Advertisers, Judges & Staff
Judges

Audrey Stinson
A&A AUTO
Emily Riggs
Central Manor ES

Richard Atwater
FURNITURE THAT FITS
Alexa Pitts
Landisville MS

Lancaster Lebanon Reading Council

LNP Editorial Staff

Julie Baumbach
Kathy Brabson
Bill Coble
Cindy Coble
Diane Donate
Mary Flory
Mrs. Linda Fogg
Sandy Haines
Beth Hendrix
Dr. Janet Josephson
Bev Kreiger
Dave Martin

Writing
Larry Alexander
Tim Buckwalter
Claudia Esbenshade
Jo-Ann Greene
Brett Hambright
Jed Kensinger
Dan Nephin
Kara Newhouse
Dave O’Connor
Paula Wolf
Mary Ellen Wright
Art
Chris Emlet
Todd Spidle
Photos
Blaine Shahan
Suzette Wenger

Sue Martin
Becky McClure
Andy Morrison
Sue Mowery
Dr. Kelly Poniatowski
Donna Railing
Emily Ritholz
Brenda Roark
June Shultz
Barb Walker
Dr. Linda Young
Eileen Zaledonis

Staff
Joe Legenstein
CERTIFIED CARPET
Wren Miller

Karyn Miller
HINKLE INSURANCE
Amber Floyd

Larry Guengerich
LANDIS COMMUNITIES
Quaden Fogleman

Brian Frailey
DOG STAR BOOKS
Scarlett Weiss

Martin Meylin MS

Nitrauer ES

Pequea ES

Landisville IC

Lancaster Lebanon
Reading Council Officers
President
Sandra Haines
President-Elect
Michelle Trasborg
Past President
Jody Allen
Vice-President
Raluca Snyder
Secretary
Angela Philip
Treasurer
Cindy Anderson

LNP Staff
Marketing & Events Supervisor
Lauren Ditmore
Marketing & Events Specialist
Janis Harrington
Marking & Events Specialist
Sophia Efthymiades
Photographer
Joyce Fitzpatrick

A special thank you to Turkey Hill
for its generous contribution to the
NIE Week winners’ reception.

22

MARCH 3, 2015

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

3rd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

3rd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

Swim!

Adoption Day

SOPHIA ROEDEMA
GRADE 5
Centerville ES
Teacher: Ric Petrosky

I waited for the whistle, and I was focused on the water. I could not see anything around me. Then a sharp noise
came into my ears and up to my brain.
It was time to swim. I formed a point
over my head with my arms and dived.
The water was cold, but I didn’t care.
I gradually rose from underneath the
water and started kicking. I immediately started pulling one arm out from
the water. Then I would make my arm

go as far as it could reach. After my arm
did that, it gracefully traveled back to
my side underwater.
I would then take my other arm and
do the same thing. I would keep repeating these movements, kicking
the whole time. Every three or four
strokes, I would quickly turn my head
to the side and grab a breath of fresh
air.
My muscles were starting to ache
now. When I got to the end of the pool,
I did a flip turn. I swam to the other end
of the pool. I got out, shivering.
The judges told me I had won the
swimming race!

JAYDON BACHMAN
GRADE 4
Lancaster County Christian School
Teacher: Alecia Weaver

BAM! It was adoption day. Leah (my
almost sister) was about to be adopted.
I woke up believing it was a normal
school day, but wait....Leah! It’s adoption day! “NO SCHOOL!!” I thought.
I leapt into my dress and helped Leah
with hers. Leah had no idea what was
happening or that it was a special day.
She called my mom, “Mommy” as well
as my dad, “Daddy”. She was only 1 year
old. We ventured to the Courthouse,

our whole family, including grandparents and a few close friends. The judge
asked, “What is her name and what will
it become?” We declared, “She is Leah
Marie Bachman and will be Leah Marie Bachman” because her birth mom
is our cousin. I had such a phenomenal
time in the court room, we sat in spinning chairs and the kids twirled round
and round. It was an amazing day.
Leah’s name means delicate or weary.
She is not usually very delicate but, she
is all ours and we love her very much!!
I’m thrilled to finally be a big sister to
my third sibling. God knew Leah was
meant to complete our family!

3rd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

3rd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

The Big Surprise

Our Cool Specials

REBEKAH FREUND
GRADE 3
Lancaster County Christian School
Teacher: Bethany Rineer

“Come on guys,” said grandpa. I was
excited! We were going to meet someone special tonight. The car ride was
long, but it was satisfying because
songs filled the air. When we arrived I
scampered into the hospital and waited to see which room my parents were
in. I was nervous. I had never been to a
hospital before.
Soon we were in my parents’ room.
Cheerfulness filled the air and I was

not afraid anymore. I spotted my dad
and raced into his arms and gave him
a gigantic hug. Then he asked, “Do you
want to meet your new, baby sister, Rachel?” She looked so tiny and cuddly,
bundled up in my mom’s arms. I wished
that I was snuggled up there with her. I
couldn’t calm down. Caleb and I kept
turning on and off the lights. Finally, it
was my turn to climb up in the bed and
snuggle my sister in my arms. We had a
birthday cake to welcome my sister! It
was a wonderful day I will never forget.

MORGAN HOUCK
GRADE 2
J.E. Fritz ES
Teacher: Khris Brubaker

Second grade goes to specials every
day. Here are three of our specials.
One of the specials we go to is gym. We
have an awesome gym teacher. He lets
us play lots of games. In gym we run
around the gym five times. We run at
our own pace. We do gym Olympics in
gym. We get in shape. We climb on the
rock wall. In gym we play Hungry Hippos. It is fun! We go on the scooters. Another special we go to every week is art.

In art we wove a mat to put food on. We
also draw and color in art. We use clay
and Model Magic. We research animals
and draw them and write about the
animals. We weave stuff like baskets. In
art we do not do free draw. Instead, we
use different kinds of rulers. Another
special we go to is music. We play different instruments like zylophones.
We play different songs every day. In
music, if we get stars we get a prize. We
play different games in music. Oh, and
our music teacher is nice. She shows us
the different signs for music. Those are
the things we do in our specials.

March
2-7, 2015

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 3, 2015 23

HONORABLE MENTION

Common Rotten Core
JUSTIN BURKETT
GRADE 11
Lampeter-Strasburg HS
Teacher: Angela Depew
It is two o’clock, Friday, in the Lampeter-Strasburg school
district. In L-S High School, the seniors are leaving on senior
privilege, some students go to clubs or band, and still others
work busily in study hall.
And then there are those in remediation. Those souls who did
not live up to expectations on their Keystones. They toil away
in specially created classes made at the expense of the school
at large. For forty-five minutes a day, the school is turned into
a mental pressure cooker, with teachers furiously trying to set
the dials all the same.
It’s time to face facts. Common Core is doing more harm than
good, turning places of learning into intellectual factories. Removing Common Core is becoming the nation’s only option.

A system that provides the targets for instruction and student
learning essential for success in all academic areas is a charming thought, one easy all-subject system, until you realize one
doesn’t learn chemistry in Shakespearian rhyme (Brady). In
New York alone, only 31% of students, grades three through
eight, actually passed the Standard’s test. The abysmal showing was because of the system being put to work before it was
even ready. Some states even “adopted them without seeing a
finished draft” (Ravitch).
Just look at the facts and statistics, ironically the one thing
the Standards love. In 2013, 76% of teachers supported Common Core. Within a year, that number had dropped to 46%,
while opposition grew from 12% to 40% (Bidwell). In another
year, opposition may well overtake support.
So what is the answer? Already eight states have either repealed or refused to adopt the standards. Personally, I’m quite
confident in my teachers’ abilities to teach me. What I’m leery
of is why a politician wants me to be educated...and with what.

HONORABLE MENTION

Color in the Classroom
ELLA TICE
GRADE 12
Lampeter-Strasburg HS
Teacher: Susan Fetterolf

Imagine a world in black and white.
Without color the world would be boring. Color is found to improve and
stimulate the human brain. So why isn’t
color used in classrooms? If color stimulates the body to increase the amount of
information it can receive, then why are
schoolrooms grey? After all, to achieve
the best learning environment in school
is the goal. In short: Color in the classroom is crucially important in increasing learning productivity from students.
Grey is most often found to have no
intellect-stimulating powers. School is
a place where students should be stimulated to learn, so grey walls are not
helping with stimulation. “Color is the
most powerful stimulus for the brain.
It opens up other areas of the brain and
allows greater and easier learning and
remembering” ( Jana). Certain colors,
in fact, stimulate different areas of the
brain. Orange is a color that stimulates
the brains mental activity by increasing
oxygen supply. Orange is also found to
increase social interaction. Pale blue is
found to increase productivity, intuition
and creative thinking. “A research study

by the University of British Columbia
has proven that blue color enhances creativity and the color red helps create focus and has positive effects on memory”
(“Effect of Different...”). If all of these
colors help to increase things like productivity and creativity then why aren’t
school classrooms painted in color.
Color is the first thing to stimulate the
brain and once stimulated a person’s
working memory runs much more efficiently. In turn, the sensible solution is
to spread color into the classroom. Paint
is relatively low in cost so the solution
to add color is very feasible. Just a dash
of color in the classroom can stimulate
a student’s brain and that will lead to
more efficient students.
Work Cited

n “Effect of Different colors on Human

Mind and Body : Human N Health. “Effect
of Different Colors on Human Mind and
Body : Human N Health. Editorial Staff, 5
Oct. 2014. Web

n 04 Dec. 2014. http://humannhealth.

com/effect-of-different-colors-on-humanmind-and-body/243/.

n Jan, Jana. “How Colors Can Enhance

Memory Performance?” The Edynco Blog.
N.p., 13 Jan.

n 2014. Web. 04 Dec. 2014. http://blog.

edynco.com/instructional-design/howcolors-can-enhance-memory-performance/.

Extinctions
ad designed by
Chanel Figles
Landisville IS
Teacher: Clare Daher

24

MARCH 3, 2015

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

3rd PLACE • ILLUSTRATING HEADLINES

3rd PLACE • ILLUSTRATING HEADLINES

Eagles in Holiday Mood

Plenty of Options for Local Giving

JACK ROSS
Grade 1 • Lampeter ES • Teacher: Suzanne Mannix

ABBY MILLAY-STIPE
Grade K • St. Leo the Great • Teacher: Dagny Heidig

HONORABLE MENTION

Racism in the Modern World
JOSEPH VALENT
GRADE 10
Ephrata HS
Teacher: Gemma Rasmus
With all the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, it is currently debated in the country
if there is still racism in this world, and if there are any progressive steps being
taken to eliminate racism.
On Aug. 9, Officer Darren Wilson shot and killed 18 year-old Michael Brown,
who was unarmed, says the St. Louis County Police Chief Joe Belmar in a conference. A total of six shots were fired into Brown, four to the right arm, and two to
the head. Autopsy reports declare that he was shot from the front, contradicting
eye-witness statement saying he had been shot fleeing the scene.
Yet despite these facts, no actions were made against Wilson. The most press-

ing fact is a white police officer claims he felt “threatened” by an unarmed, 18
year-old black teen enough to not take him into custody. But to murder him?
Many riots have plagued the city, with hundreds of arrests. Not all protestors
are criminals, so the police should not treat them as such. It is widely speculated
if the police force is operating inside the law and work ethic that is supposed to
be used in a government-sanctioned occupation. Many wonder if police are really acting in the public’s best interests-including the interests of blacks.
It is a gray area to some, but countless instances exist where it is simply black
and white. Ferguson is a predominantly black community; however, the grand
jury presiding over the indictment had only three black jurors and six white: a
clear statement showing where the judicial system truly lies. An actual investigation and jury from the highest echelon of the government should preside over
this obvious violation of human rights and the right of a fair trial.

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

MARCH 3, 2015 25

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

HONORABLE MENTION

HONORABLE MENTION

The Positive
Post-It Movement

Autistic Support

JISELA TERON
GRADE 7
Resurrecton Catholic School
Teacher: Kim Ingram
Caitlin Prater-Haacke from Alberta,
Canada, was a victim of severe bullying.
Bullies from George McDougall High
School bullied her by breaking into her
locker and posting hate comments on
her Facebook telling her to die. Right
away Caitlin knew that something had
to change! She didn’t get mad, or even,
but she did get positive.
Caitlin bought over 100 post-it sticky
notes and spent her time writing positive thoughts and sayings on each sticky
note. After that, she posted them on every single locker at her school. She got
into trouble because the post-it notes
everywhere was considered vandalism.
When she was interviewed she said, “It

takes two seconds and it shows someone you really care.”
Her city council of Airdrie passed the
positive sticky note as a campaign day.
After Caitlin’s moving story and wonderful reaction, tons of high schools and
workers started spreading her movement. Jennifer Ferguson put sticky
notes everywhere at her job. Kristina
Weenink did the same.
These people are great because they
are setting a great example for the people who bully others because the whole
point of why Caitlin did this was because she wanted to show everyone that
you can make something positive out
of something wrong. It also makes the
world a much better place. That’s why
we should appreciate and thank people
like Caitlin Prater-Haacke.

Brooklawn
Paving
ad designed by
Eve Sheaffer
Manheim Central MS
Teacher: Keisha
McCauley

YASIRA TEJEDA
GRADE 8
Reynolds MS
Teacher: Karen Morrisette
An autistic person is someone with
a developmental disability caused by
brain abnormalities. Someone with autism typically has difficulty with social
and communication skills. There are autistic students like this in almost every
school, yet not everyone really knows
about them. Mrs. McDonnell, an autistic support teacher from Reynolds Middle School, understands what it’s like to
have students who sometimes can’t or
don’t know how to express themselves.
Mrs. McDonnell discussed the challenges of her career and the true rewards of being a teacher of autistic

children. For any other teacher with a
“normal” class it might be easy for them
to know what their students need, but
for Mrs. McDonnell and many other autistic support teachers, knowing their
students’ needs is a little harder, especially when sometimes things could get
physically demanding or even violent.
For teachers like Mrs. McDonnell, it’s
more than just teaching reading and
writing. Her students have a mental
disorder and often “act out.” They need
more help with the everyday tasks we
take for granted.
All students are part of our school
and the environment. Other students
see students with a disorder and think
they’re “acting weird.” They are quick to
judge because they are too confused or
scared by the behaviors.

26

MARCH 3, 2015

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

HONORABLE MENTION

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

HONORABLE MENTION

First Man on the Moon

Test Your Knowledge of Holiday TV Specials

BRYCE JORDAN
Grade 1 • Landisville Primary Center • Teacher: Nancy Neff

AVA PISANO
Grade K • St. Leo the Great • Teacher: Jan Bixby

HONORABLE MENTION

Bullying
CYANNIE CORONADO
GRADE 6
Resurrection Catholic School
Teacher: Kim Ingram
Scared, nervous, sad; everyday many kids wake up with the
fear of going to school. This is because they are being bullied.
Bullying can happen anywhere; on the internet, on the street,
on the bus, but it happens mostly in school. It can be done by a
group or just one person. Whether it’s with words, pushing or
hurting others feelings, this abuse can be very dangerous.
Feeling jealous of others, not getting enough attention, or
taking their problems out on others causes kids to become bullies. A bully feels in control because they are hardly ever alone.
They always have a group of friends to back them up with what

they say or do. Most of the time bullies are usually stronger and
taller than the other kids. Some ways of bullying are teasing,
name calling, threatening, hitting, and there are many more.
Why do kids become bullies? It can be because they live in
homes where violence is used to fix problems or have parents
that don’t pay enough attention to what they are doing. Also,
school can lead to bullying because many students have their
own groups of friends and others feel left out. Bullies could
have also been a victim of bullying at one point in their life, so
they feel that they should let their anger out on others.
Bullying has a serious effect on the bullies themselves, those
being bullied, and the ones who watch it happen.

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

HONORABLE MENTION

The Cellar
ELISE GONZALEZ
GRADE 5
Ross ES
Teacher: Eilene Euston
There was a repetitive ding at my door.
I thought it was the Ding Dong Ditchers, who ring doorbells and run, but it
was raining out and lightning. Usually
they don’t come when it’s pouring and
there’s lightning. I opened the door. No
one was there. Boom! There was a loud
noise in the cellar. I felt the vibration on
my feet. The electricity went out. I was
having second thoughts about going
into the cellar. I started to walk through

the hallway....there was a squeaky noise.
I grabbed a flashlight but it wouldn’t
turn on. I headed down the steps very
slowly. I heard a creak in the floor. I
panicked and ran into a corner. I heard
a voice, “Amanda?” My heart pounded
fast! “Who is there?” I asked. I turned
on the power. There was an old lady in
front of me. “Grandma, why are you
here”? I asked. “I didn’t want to stand
outside in the rain so I came to your
back door,” she replied. “Why were you
making scary noises?” “I wasn’t. I was
tripping on your junk.” “Grandma you
scared me!”

HONORABLE MENTION

Baking Delicious Cookies
LILIANA LEHMAN
GRADE 3
Lancaster Mennonite
Teacher: Sylvia M. Weaver
One fall evening, I was as bored as a
bear waiting to hibernate. It was my
sister’s birthday, and so we decided to
bake some delicious cookies. First we
made the dough for the cookies. I liked
taking huge finger dips of it. Then we
had to add in chocolate chips. We put
the dough in the freezing refrigerator
for it to hold its form more easily. After
about one hour, we took the dough out

MARCH 3, 2015 27

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

and spooned the cookies onto a pan.
It felt like it would take forever until
they were done, so I watched TV. Because I was so sleepy, I curled up like a
cat and took a nap. When it was time to
take them out of the oven, they were all
baked, but smooshed together. I wanted
to taste them so badly, but by then it was
9 o’clock, and so I did not.
The next day, I went flying out of my
bedroom to eat some of my cookies, but
they had disappeared! And guess what?
There were in the oven being warmedup.

Landis Homes
ad designed by
Quaden Fogleman
Nitrauer ES
Teacher: Nancy
Cooper

HONORABLE MENTION

Trick-or-Treat
TYLER BURTON
GRADE 4
Hans Herr ES
Teacher: Beth Hendrix
Boo! It’s Halloween. On the last day
of October, put on your costume, get
together with friends, decorate your
house, and go Trick-Or-Treating. I
think that the spookiest night of the
year is Halloween.
To begin with, you have to pick out or
make a costume for trick-or-treating.
You can dress up as a goblin, Batman or
Superman. Design is scary, huge monster by knitting or yarning. Pick out a
scary costume at Party City or Target.
Additionally, you can always decorate

your house in a spooky way. A lot of people love to carve horrifying pumpkins
and make a face. Some people make
their house really scary by putting wrapping paper on a bush to make it look like
spider webs. Also, you can create a little
graveyard from plastic and mulch to
scare the trick-or-treaters.
Also, going Trick-Or-Treating is one
of the best parts of Halloween. Some
people are so pumped to go Trick-OrTreating they sprint to every house in
the neighborhood. You can get lots of
your favorite candy like Twix or Kit Kat.
Going trick-or-treating is a blast.
In conclusion, out of all of holidays,
Halloween is the best holiday ever.

28

MARCH 3, 2015

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

1st PLACE • FEATURE PHOTO

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

1st PLACE • NEWS PHOTO

Waiting for Santa Paws
JULIA RAYBOLD
Grade 7-12 • Elizabethtown Area MS
Teacher: Mary Jane Davies

2nd PLACE • NEWS PHOTO

Runaway Horses
SAMANTHA RODRIGUEZ
Grade 11 • Elizabethtown Area HS
Teacher: Kevin Goss

Window Decorating
JULIA WHITMAN
Grade 11 • Elizabethtown Area HS • Teacher: Kevin Goss

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

MARCH 3, 2015 29

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

2nd PLACE • FEATURE PHOTO

3rd PLACE • FEATURE PHOTO

Stormy Beach
GABRIELLE BRUNO
Grade 7-12 • Elizabethtown Area MS • Teacher: Mary Jane Davies

3rd PLACE • NEWS PHOTO

A Walk Through The Woods
DENILSON GODINEZ
Grade 7-12 • Elizabethtown Area MS • Teacher: Mary Jane Davies

ETV News Helps Connect Students
KEARNEY NEVILLS
Grade 12 • Elizabethtown Area HS • Teacher: Kevin Goss

30

MARCH 3, 2015

TEACHER’S PICK

Dancing for
Pediatric Cancer
EMILY SMOKER
GRADE 6
Linville Hill Christian School
Teacher: Karen Donaldson
Every year since 1973, Penn State University holds a dance marathon. This
year it will take place at the Bryce Jordan Center in State College, Pennsylvania. Thon is the largest student-run
philanthropy in the world.
On February 20 to 22, 2015 students
from Penn State University will dance
for pediatric patients. Pediatric cancer
is the number one disease among children in the United State. Around 2,300
children lose their battle to pediatric
cancer every year.
The dancers raise money by getting
sponsors. They will dance for 46 hours
with no sleeping or sitting. They will

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

start dancing at 6:00 p.m. Friday and
will end at 4:00 p.m. Sunday.
Last year’s total amount of money
raised was $13,343,517.33. Thousands
of people from the public will be in the
stands supporting the dancers and families on the floor.
Shows such as a pep rally featuring some of the Penn State University
sports teams, a fashion show with pediatric patients, and a Four Diamonds line
dance held every hour.
Four Diamonds was started by a boy
named Christopher Millard, who eventually lost his fight to pediatric cancer at
age 14.
The four sides of the diamond represent courage, wisdom, honesty, and
strength. The organization helps pediatric patients pay for their hospital stays
and for research.

TEACHER’S PICK

Best Vacation Ever!
ETHAN SCHMITT
GRADE 5
Columbia MS - Taylor Campus
Teacher: Tina Warfel
In the summer of 2014, I went to the
town of Jim Thorpe, in Pennsylvania,
where I had the best vacation ever! Jim
Thorpe is a very small town stuck between a deep river valley and a steep hill.
Once in Jim Thorpe you will notice
there stand two mansions on the top
of the hill: on the left is the Asa Packer
Mansion and, on the right, the Henry
Packer Mansion. The Asa Packer Mansion is open for tours. It holds a lot of
history and the architecture was beauti-

ful. On the woodwork alone there were
over 2,000 flowers that were all carved
by hand. The amazing part was each
flower was a different species! It is definitely something everyone should go
see!
Jim Thorpe is an amazing small town
to visit. In addition to great food and
antiques, which ladies will enjoy, you
can also visit the Old jail Museum, the
Number 9 Coal Mine or go whitewater rafting. There is plenty of history
and activities to experience in this very
small town. With so much to see and do,
I would love to visit again, and I think
others should visit too!

HONORABLE MENTION

All About Dogs
IVY SWIFT
GRADE 2
J.E. Fritz ES
Teacher: Khris Brubaker
Dogs are interesting animals! First of
all, there are all different kinds of dogs.
Different types of dogs are bulldogs,
golden retrievers, chihuahuas and poo-

dles. Second, dogs eat different things.
Dogs eat meat, dog food, vegetables and
treats. Third, dogs play in some funny
ways. That might surprise you. They
chase balls, jump, run, and chase cats
some times. Last, dogs live in different
places. Dogs live in dog houses, in the
wild and in homes. Now you know about
dogs!

La Voz Hispana
ad designed by
Katelyn Wiglesworth
Landisville MS
Teacher: Scott Feifer

LANCASTER, PA | LNP

MARCH 3, 2015 31

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TEACHER’S PICK

An Unforgettable Day
MADISON MINNEY
GRADE 4
Sacred Heart School
Teacher: Jackie Muchleisen
One June 21, 2013 after driving home
from Lowes, my mom asked my brother and I to take the skateboard in the
house. So we got on it and before long
started to teter toter. That’s when it
happened. I fell of the skateboard, twisted my leg, and landed on it. It hurt really
bad and I was screaming. My parents
took me to the hospital. They took an
x-ray of my leg which was really painful.

After waiting and watching some TV, a
doctor came in and told us that I broke
my tibia. Nurses came and put a split on
my leg and gave me some crutches but I
rode out of the hospital in a wheelchair.
Then finally getting a cast on my leg, I
chose the color light blue. I still couldn’t
was on it so we had to get a wheelchair.
I tried many different ones before finding one that fit. While recuperating I
got many cards, gifts, and phone calls. It
took three months for my leg to heal and
one month of physical therapy after that
but no my leg is stronger than ever.

TEACHER’S PICK

My Pets
ADDYSON BUECHI
GRADE 4
Doe Run on Gramby ES
Teacher: Leisa Bowman
I love having pets. I have four of them:
one dog and three cats. My dog’s name
is Roxie. Every weekend my Dad makes
Roxie scrambled eggs. He does that because his grandmother used to feed his
dog eggs every Sunday. Roxie also sleeps
with her tongue hanging out of her
mouth a little bit. Her teeth show, too,
and it looks adorable.
I have three cats. Two of them are
male. Their names are Sabre and Burn-

aby. The two boys like to be outside, and
they hunt together. Sabre will sometimes sleep with me at night. When he
does, it is usually on my chest of face. It
is kind of annoying but also really cute.
My other male cat, Burnaby, is not a very
smart cat. He walks into walls sometimes. My other cat is a female named
Crystal. She is very lazy. Crystal is afraid
of my dog, Roxie, because Roxie is mean
to Crystal by chasing her away from her
own food. Crystal also loves to get petted.
I love having pets. They are fun, funny
and they love me as much as I love them!

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Grove and Son
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Landisville MS
Teacher: Diane
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TEACHER’S PICK

The Time I Slept Over
At The Barnstormers
RYAN FOREACRE
GRADE 3
Bart-Colerain ES
Teacher: Sheila Schmitt
The time I slept over at the Barnstormers was an amazing experience
that I can’t forget. It was really exciting.
First, getting ready took forever. We
arrived at the stadium. I had to wait for
15 minutes in the car. My mom could
not stay because she needed to take care
of our friend’s dog. We went through the
office because the main gate was closed.
Next, we played on the playground.
Alyssa and I went to the big playground.

There was a spinning O that was fun,
and I saw fireworks. My dad had to wait
in line to set up the tent. He set up the
tent while I ran around all the other
tents. Dad ordered fries for the movie.
Finally, we watched the movie. It was
called Free Birds. The movie started and
I drank all ketchup. The movie was over
and we went to bed at 12:00. I woke up in
the morning and I was being rained on.
We packed up all our stuff and we got
some cereal. Mom came and drove us
home. When we got home, I took a nap
and then I continued my normal day.
It was very fun.

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MARCH 3, 2015

TEACHER’S PICK

40 Heroes Remembered
JENNA MARTIN
GRADE 7
Linville Hill Christian School
Teacher: Karen Donaldson
On September 11, 2001, the sounds of
a plane crashing into the ground filled
the usual silence of the wetlands. Now,
thirteen years later, we are still grieving the deaths of forty heroes that rode
on United flight 93.
The Flight 93 memorial is going to
have many different features located
on 2,200 acres of land. It is located in
Somerset County, near Shanksville,
Pennsylvania. A memorial plaza walkway gives a close up look of the crash
site, also known as Sacred Ground. A
large boulder marks the spot where
Flight 93 crashed. Beside the Sacred
Ground, is the Wall of Names. Inscribed on the wall are the forty names

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of the people who died in the crash.
In the future, there will be a ninetythree foot tall tower with forty aluminum wind chimes called the Tower of
Voices. A visiting and learning center
will be set up with a show of exhibits,
videos, photographs, and history testimonies. Also an entry portal and a field
of honor will open up a door to what
happened on 9/11. It is estimated that
$9.5 million will be used for the memorial, and $2 million of the money is to
be donated.
Many volunteers have been helping
out to make the memorial a success.
The Flight 93 Memorial is an awe-inspiring place to look back at 9/11 and
remember the forty heroes’ lives that
were tragically taken on that fateful
day.

TEACHER’S PICK

The House That
Hershey Built

CORBIN WALTER
Grade 1 • Landisville Primary • Teacher: Sandy McConnell

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Teacher: Jennifer Risser

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TEACHER’S PICK

The Music Plays On

TEACHER’S PICK

Malala Yousafzai Wins
Nobel Peace Prize
ADELINE HIBSHMAN
GRADE 8
Our Mother of Perpetual Help
Teacher: Natasha Drum
On October 10, 2014, Malala Yousafzai
received the Nobel Peace Prize. Malala
was awarded the prize for her ongoing fight for education rights of girls in
Pakistan. When Malala was 14, she was
threatened by the Taliban and was shot
in the head for fighting for educational
rights. It is amazing that she survived.
The bullet went into the side of her face
between her skull and skin and down
into her neck. After doctors removed
the bullet, she was put into a medically
induced coma, and was taken to the U.K.
After three months Malala recovered.
The world was sympathetic and sup-

SOPHIA KRESGE
Grade 1 •Clay ES • Teacher: Alycia Kauffman

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Teacher: Timothy J.
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porting. Malala became a global symbol
for girls to have an education. She gave
a speech at the United Nations on her
16th birthday in 2013. She also wrote a
book called I Am Malala: The Girl Who
Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by
the Taliban, which was also released in
2013. She is still a target of the Taliban.
Malala is the youngest person to receive a Nobel Peace Prize. She received
it along with the Indian children’s rights
activist, Kailash Satyarthi. Last year
Malala was nominated for a Nobel Peace
Prize, however she did not win. She has
become an inspiration for many, and
provides hope for many young girls who
desire an education. Malala has made a
huge effort to make the world a better
place.

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TEACHER’S PICK

Onomatopoeia

TEACHER’S PICK

The Music Plays On

JORDAN RODRIGUEZ
GRADE 5
Elizabeth R. Martin ES
Teacher: Darrell E. Yoder

“Crack! Crack!” My mom was cracking an egg.

Then she gave me orange juice. “Slurp! Slurp!”

Then I ate some chips. “Crunch! Crunch!”

Then I fell asleep. “Greeeee!”

Then I woke up. “Uuuugh!” and brushed my teeth. “Brush! Brush!”

“Splash! Splash!” I put water on my face.

Then I went outside. It was freezing cold so I did not stay outside. When I

slammed the door, the picture broke! “Crack! Crack!”

“Nooooo!!!!!”

SARAH HERR
Grade 1 • Doe Run on Gramby • Teacher: Joann Sunderland

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My Writing Journey
DIAVIONNE MUSSER
GRADE 5
Donegal IS
Teacher: Sarah Lawrence
Writing used to be something I had to
do so my grades didn’t slip. I wrote the
words down on paper but they meant
nothing to me. But one rainy day, I was
bored out of my mind. So I decided to
make a book. I gathered crayons and
started to write. When I was done, I ran
into the living room and proudly showed
my dad my work. Since then, writing has
been one of my hobbies.
Last year, I found out about a poetry

contest going on at my school. I was determined to enter. I spent the next two
weeks writing poems until I found the
perfect one. A week later, I learned that
I was in the top four for my grade and
would receive a prize.
I sat down in one of the many chairs
in the gymnasium waiting anxiously
to hear my name. “Second place… Diavionne Musser!” I ran up to the stage
and got my prize. Joy filled my heart as
I stood there with everyone clapping
around me.
In the future, I want to become an author and write books for people of all
ages, to inspire others to follow their
dreams.

TEACHER’S PICK

The 5K Color Run
ALYSON RUNNER
GRADE 3
Paradise ES
Teacher: Jodi Shenberger
First, I had delicious pancakes at my
Aunt Suzy’s house. Then I got to the 5k
color run. Then I got a white t-shirt so
the color would go on to it. I got sand art
and a sand bucket with a shovel. Then I
went to the starting line and started to
run. We ran and ran. I stopped for one

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NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

drink and then I was running. I was excited to cross the finish line. I CROSSED
it! It was so fun. After we went to go get
something to eat, I got a hot dog, chips
and a lot more stuff, it was yummy. I
loved it. After that I went to the museum
it was even more fun going there. I think
it was called, “Please Touch” you could
touch anything. I went on a train I got to
steer. Then I went on a hamster wheel.
I went upside down it was AMAZING! I
loved my 5k color run.

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TEACHER’S PICK

A Moment in Time
COURTNEY TAYLOR
GRADE 5
Kissel Hill ES
Teacher: Barb Jones
I stood backstage watching the other
dancing duets perform, my heart was in
my mouth. I was at the Nexstar Dance
Competition, a dance competition that
my studio performs in. I bit my lip and
ran over the steps in my head. My palms
were damp and hot, and I took a deep
breath and walked onto the stage with
my partner, Abby.
The adrenaline quickly turned into
anticipation and excitement. The lights
flashed on and we heard our song being played. I counted the beats that ran
slowly through my head.
As our dance concluded, the applause

rained over us. I smiled with gratification.
20 minutes later, the dancers walked
onto the stage once more to accept the
awards. As they announced the group
winners, I was a bundle of nerves.
Finally, the announcer broadcasted
the winners. Third and second were
not awarded to us, and I had almost lost
hope.
“First place goes to, Red Rose!”
I looked around, astonished. We
walked to the front of the stage grinning
from ear to ear. Together, we accepted
the award. I couldn’t believe that out of
all the acts in our category, we were unrivaled.
I’m Courtney Taylor, future broadway
performer.

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NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Bart-Colerain’s Melissa Evans wins Kindle Fire
Melissa Evans, a fourth-grade teacher at Bart-Colerain Elementary School
in the Solanco School District, is this
year’s winner of a Kindle Fire HD.
Evans’ name was selected in a random drawing from all teachers who
participated in this year’s NIE Journalism and Design an Ad Contest. All
teachers whose entries are received
before the deadline are eligible to win
this prize for use in the classroom.
Both contests, sponsored by LNP
Media Group and the Lancaster Lebanon Reading Council (LLRC), continue a 30-year tradition of supporting
young writers and artists.
Sandy Haines, president of the LLRC
and principal of Bart-Colerain Elementary School, said she appreciates
that LLRC members remain actively
involved in this program and that the
newspaper continues to support students in grades K-12. Her school staff
has participated for many years.
“It helps students to write for an
authentic audience,” she said, adding
when “judges recognize their writing
and individually designed advertisements, it is a bonus.”
To see their work published in the
NIE special section is a proud moment.
For Evans, winning the Kindle Fire
was unexpected and exciting. Shortly
after the Kindle Fire was presented
to the class, she organized a student
search of the books which they would
like to download and add to their classroom library. The other benefits of the
Kindle Fire’s use in the classroom are
limitless and yet to be discovered.
Evans’ students are the perfect examples of what earns a school the right
to be labeled a Blue Ribbon School in
2006 and 2013. They are bright and
enthusiastic about reading.
At the time the prize was presented, Gordon Mitchem was finishing
“20,000 Leagues Under the Sea” and
Levi Zook was making progress in the
502-page “The Book of Olympians. “
Both Madison Houghton and David
Ray Whisman spoke of how much they
like writing and drawing. Kendall Himmelright added that reading on her
mom’s tablet when she has finished her
chores is a good part of her day.
Easton Baker, who hopes to be a policeman, also likes reading at night and
believes his family is a good influence
on his reading habits. Gavin Buhl’s

JOYCE FITZPATRICK

Front row, from left: Makenna Gaskill, Julia Blevins, Madison Houghton, Ellie Hazell, Ray Whisman, Todd Fritz, Easton Baker
Middle row, from left: Evelyn Jacobsen, Levi Zook, Andrew Smith, Gavin Buhl
Back row, from left: Kendall Himelright, Paige Palmer, Luke Piskun, Mrs. Evans, Weston Hoffman, Gordon Mitchem, Josh Clifford,
Justin McCauley.
Not pictured: Nathan Barrow, Jimmy Barbour, Morgan Robertson, Nathan Rowe

electronic interest lies in research,
which helps him in social studies, his
favorite class.
The students also participate in extracurricular activities. Ellie Hazell
plays soccer. Todd Fritz plays football
and baseball. Joshua Clifford has many
interests in sports, art and reading. And
Nathan Rowe loves to read anything
about Peyton Manning. Justin McCauley, who hopes to be a pilot, wrestles.
Yet they all find time to read.
Each of the students brings special
talents and interests to the classroom.
Julia Blevins’ first love is math, but
she sees art in the drawing of fractions and liked drawing her ad. Paige
Palmer likes to draw, and she pays at-

tention to details, which was evident
in her design. Evelyn Jacobsen loves
the intricacies of long division. Andrew
Smith beamed with tales of his pets,
his brother, his turtles and electronics. Luke Piskum likes to understand
computer-generated games.
At the mention of electronic gadgets,
the enthusiasm rose in the classroom;
they wanted to try out the new addition to their class immediately.
Evans, who is in her 23rd year of
teaching, enters the contest each year.
She encourages her students to enter
the Journalism and Design An Ad Contest because she likes the opportunities and freedom of the assignment.
She is not the only faculty member

who participates.
McKenna Gaskill, who is proud of her
family’s tradition of reading, remembers the Design An Ad Contest from
third grade. Some of the students even
remembered older siblings writing stories and drawing ads.
Evans recognizes the diverse talents
and interests of the students. She includes technology with the basic curriculum requirements. She sets high
standards.
Weston Hoffman summarized the
camaraderie the students feel when
they are in her classroom. “I feel safe
here with my friends and classmates.”
A positive classroom atmosphere has
a tremendous effect on each student.

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TEACHER’S PICK
My Favorite Birthday
ERIN SAHD
GRADE 2
Eshelman ES
Teacher: Elizabeth Kaplan
At my favorite birthday, I had my
friends come. I had three of my friends
come to my party. I had my friends Avery, Morgan, and Kiaya came to my
birthday party. Avery showed up first
then Kiaya and Morgan.
My party was a camping party. We
filled our kiddy pool and put rubber fish
on a pole and tried to throw it out the
farthest. We played camping with a pretend camp fire pit, fire, and blanket tent.

We drew with chalk on my drive way
and watched while we held sparklers.
My favorite birthday happed last year.
I turned six last year. The day I turned
six was June 30th. My birthday party
was July 13th. I like having my birthday
in June because I love summer time a
lot.
My party was at my house. I had my
party outside in my yard and garden. My
garden has eight bushes lining the house
and a flower fence. My yard has a wing in
the front and a path made of stone to my
front steps. It has a big bunch of trees in
the front and in the back. I had so much
fun at my favorite birthday party.

TEACHER’S PICK

My Gift at Knoebels
KATANA RODRIGUEZ
GRADE 3
Fulton ES
Teacher: Matt Becker
This past summer, I went to Knoebels. I was with Dad, Porcelain, Drave,
Grandpa, Bubba, and Deanna. On the
second day we were there, we traveled
to the park on a bus. The first thing we
did was to go on some frightening rides.
We went on the haunted house ride and
I was SCARED STIFF! I went on some
other rides also.
As we were waiting for my dad who
was on a ride, I saw out of the corner of

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NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

my eye hermit crabs. I told Deanna and
she said “We can go look, but only until
your dad gets off the ride he’s on.” So we
looked and I saw this one I really wanted, I said “Can you buy this one for me?”
She replied “Maybe dad can?”
After I asked my dad two more times
about getting the hermit crab, I decided
to go on a ride with my sister. I do not
remember the name of the ride, but it
rolled like a wheel. At last we were about
to leave the park and I heard a rattling
sound from the backpack. I asked my
dad, “What was that?”
My dad answered, “O.K. Porcelain, get
the present out!”

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Teacher: Candy
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TEACHER’S PICK
Never Say Never!
ALLIE GROFF
GRADE 5
Conestoga ES
Teacher: Meridith Eckroat
“We will never get pulled over,” said
my sister. Boy, was she wrong! Screech,
went the brakes! The loud siren
screamed behind us. It caused my hands
to sweat and my heart to pound. Finally,
we came to a stop.
The police officer climbed out of his
car. We tried hard not to burst out laughing. I mean, come on … we were on a surrey! My sisters and I held our hands over
our mouths. I looked at my younger sister, and she was almost crying from trying not to laugh.

The police stepped up next to my dad,
the driver. Then it hit me like a soccer
ball out of nowhere. Why were we being
pulled over?
The police answered my question,
“Why don’t you have helmets?” My dad
gulped and answered, “The shop we
rented from said we didn’t need helmets.”
As my dad explained the situation, the
officer glanced at the name of the bike
shop on the surrey. He told us to head
back, and he climbed into his car and
drove off.
We all burst out laughing! What a foolish mistake! My sister was wrong … it is
possible to get pulled over on a surrey!

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MARCH 3, 2015

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TEACHER’S PICK

Looking Out for
Mother Earth

TEACHER’S PICK

The Music Plays On

ALYSIA VASQUEZ
Grade 1 • Clay ES • Teacher: Beth Garrison

ABDIEL LARA-VAZQUEZ
Grade 1 • Burrowes ES • Teacher: Barb Heister

TEACHER’S PICK

Getting My Very Own Dog
HALEY DAGEN
GRADE 3
Bart-Colerain ES
Teacher: Greg Schmitt
The time I got my very own dog was an
awesome day! It was so exciting!
First, we got into the truck and started
to drive. I started to wonder of a perfect
name for my German Shepherd dog. She
was going to make my house so much
more fun than I already have. It was a
long dreadful, dropy and wet drive. So in
the result of that, I played my tablet.
Finally, we arrived at her home. They

lived right next to a very long river. He
and his family were moving to Iowa.
That’s why they were getting rid of their
dog. They were very friendly people.
We looked at the pretty and beautiful
creature. I went over to her and felt her
warm, fuzzy fur, and hugged her. She
was the fluffiest dog in the world!
Then, we talked to the guy. He said
that she is a purebred. That means her
father and mother were both German
Shepherds. She also has a lot of important papers. His daughter told me that
her birthday is April 12. She already had
two litters of playful puppies.

Next, we bought her. We loaded her
up and went home. She is the very first
girl dog we ever had! As we were in the
truck, I still couldn’t think of a spectacular name for her. After a little while
a name struck my mind. Her new name
was going to be Lightning. We got home
and walked her around on a leash. I new
right away that she would be my best
friend. She is the playfullest dog in the
universe! I love her.
The time I got my very own dog was an
unforgettable day. It was so amazing!

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McCaskey High School
Mentorship Program
SCOTTY REYNOLDS
GRADE 6
Landis Run IS
Teacher: Emily Wood
My father, Chase Reynolds, is one of
the many members of the Rotary Club
of Lancaster. Members of the club can
join a committee to help their community. The chairman, Rich Wolman, along
with members, Alicia Moranz, Larry
Helicher, and Paul Lynch, chose to become a mentor at the McCaskey High
School.
Chase Reynolds said he wanted to join
because, “It sounded like a program that
interested me and I had the opportunity
to work with kids.” The mentors meet
once a month with over twenty students
during the school year at McCaskey
High School.
Students participating in this program choose a concentration of study

MARCH 3, 2015 39

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

and are matched with mentors of similar professions. This program allows
Rotary members to mentor students in
groups of one or more and also allows
the kids to interact with experienced
professionals outside of school. It provides them with different viewpoints of
business people from all walks of life.
Each meeting provides a chance for
the kids to engage in activities that encourage critical thinking and develop
their communication skills. When the
school year is over, all the participating
seniors “graduate” from the program.
In conclusion, the McCaskey Mentorship Program provides a resource
for students to help them achieve their
goals and draw on the experience as
they continue in their education. If you
go to McCaskey and want to become a
better student, join this team of committed mentors that will benefit you
through high school!

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ad designed by
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Manheim Twp. MS
Teacher: Brook Hall

TEACHER’S PICK

Is There Anything
She Can’t Do?
LILY ZBAN
GRADE 7
Landisville MS
Teacher: Diane K. Anderson
An artist, Kelli Zban, from Lancaster,
PA, can do anything. From sewing to
making furniture, whatever she sees in
her head she can make. Fashion, colorworks, and collages led her to sewing
ever since she was eleven. Kelli is a self
taught seamstress. Fur Junior High and
High School dances, she would make her
own dresses so she could be as unique as
her personality. “It was a necessity that
I kept sewing. The price of clothes and
furniture led me to make my own.” Soon
others started to ask Kelli to make them

dresses because they were one of a kind.
Not only is her sense of style creative,
but so are her art pieces. “Coloring turns
into more, when you practice,” she says.
She has an art studio in downtown Lancaster where she paints, sketches and
practices other ways to make her art
pieces really pop.
Halloween is a really fun time for her
because it combines all the skills she
has into one Holiday. While Kelli still
very much enjoys creating pieces, she
doesn’t make a living out of it. “Living
with my art around me gives it a place
of purpose,” she says. The items she creates are not up for sale but that’s what
makes her house so unique.

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MARCH 3, 2015

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Thank you to all our advertisers
who make NIE Week a success
l A&A Auto Body & Repair

l Hinkle’s Pharmacy

l Brooklawn Paving

l JB Hostetter

l Candyology

l Julius Sturgis Bakery Co.

l Certified Carpet

l LancasterOnline.com

l Coupon Saver

l La Voz Hispana

l CTC Lollipop

l Landis Homes

l Dog Star Books

l Leisure Lanes

l Ebersole’s Vacuum

l 
LNP-Always Lancaster

Cleaner Sales and Service

l Long Orthodontic Associates

l Extinctions*

l Penn Cinema

l Friendly’s

l Stauffers of Kissel Hill

l Furniture That Fits*
l George J. Grove & Son Inc.
l Hinkle Insurance

Garden Center
l Stauffers of Kissel Hill
Supermarket

* These advertisers will display student-created advertisements during NIE Week (March2-7)