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Spanish Intermediate 1

Anglia Ruskin University Language Centre


Faculty: Arts, Law and Social Sciences
Module Code: AD115091S
AD215091S
AD315091S

Academic Year: 2009/10


Semester: 2

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Contents

1. Key Information

2. Introduction to the Module

3. Intended Learning Outcomes

4. Outline Delivery (including attendance requirements)

5. Assessment

6. Anglia Ruskin Generic Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards

7. Assessment Offences

8. Learning Resources

8.1 Recommended Texts


8.2 Recommended Internet resources
8.3 Other Resources

9. Module Definition Form

10. Report on last delivery of Module

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1. Key Information

Module: Spanish Intermediate 1

Module Leader: Dr Alicia Peña Calvo


Cambridge/ Helmore/ 354
Extension 2043
Email: alicia.peña-calvo@anglia.co.uk

2. Introduction to the Module


This module is part of a continuing programme of modules open to all students who
have previously taken Spanish Foundation 2 or equivalent. It equates to the first half of
Spanish Intermediate 1 & 2. The Intermediate Language programme contributes to the
attainment of the Common European Framework level B1. It consolidates language
competence across the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in an
integrated approach and in socio-cultural contexts. You will gain a better understanding
of the Hispanic cultures and you will improve key language skills which will allow you to
engage more fully in authentic communication within a motivating and stimulating
personal environment. The focus of individual and group work and the use of different
media are set on practical tasks in contemporary contexts. One of the aims of this
module is to improve cross-cultural competence by becoming more aware of
conventional behaviour in common situations in the target culture and developing the
ability to evaluate and refine generalisations about the target culture, and to stimulate
students’ intellectual curiosity about the target culture. The module also aims to
develop investigative and analytical skills to enable students to access efficiently a
variety of sources in Spanish as well as to develop learning and communication
strategies to enable you to be an effective language user and an autonomous learner.
2 hours per week will be spent in class and a programme of guided-study will be
undertaken to be able to progress at the necessary rate. The module will develop
students’ language competence, which will enhance their employability.

3. Intended Learning Outcomes


On successful completion of this module you will be able to:

1. progress towards the equivalent of the level B1 of the Common European


Framework in all four language skills in Spanish
2. understand the main points of standard Spanish language on familiar matters
3. produce connected texts on topics which are familiar or of personal interest
4. describe experiences and events, and personal feelings

4. Outline Delivery

This is a student directed course and as such a minimum of 60 hours is required in


order to satisfy the learning outcomes

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Unit Communication Language Focus
Proyecto: Vuestra tienda Revision of Present tense, articles,
Revision multiespacio demonstratives, and vocabulary
Units 0-6
Units 0-6

Unidad 7 Describing a city Indefinite adjectives and pronouns:


Talking about the weather algún, alguno, alguna, algunos,
algunas, ningún, ninguno, ninguna.
Ciudades y barrios Talking about actions in progress
Verbal periphases: estar + gerund
Comparing
The gerund
Expressing opinion and reasoning
The imperative
Asking for agreement
Pronouns with the imperative
Expressing agreement and
disagreement. Present tense indicative: venir,
volver
Asking and giving instructions to
give directions. Services in a city / town, numbers
1000 –, seasons, weather,
distances.

Asking and giving information


Unidad 8 about habitual actions. Antes de/ después de +infinitive
Expressing likes and preferences. Verbal periphrases: soler +
Tiempo libre
infinitive; ir a + infinitive
Asking about likes and interests.
Conditional sentences: si + present
Asking for the date and place of the
tense, present tense
celebration of an event.
Ser to locate in time and space.
Expressing a wish
Present tense indicative: soler,
Expressing enthusiasm,
interesar.
indifference, unhappiness and
disappointment. Daily activities, expressions to
organise the discourse, frequency
Talking about plans and already
expressions, leisure time activities,
decided projects
expressions to talk on the phone,
time expressions to talk about the
future.

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Asking and giving information Present perfect indicative
Unidad 9 about the skills of a person. The past participle
Asking for and giving help. Combination of two pronouns
¡Vamos a
conocernos mejor! Deny help and apologise Prepositions: a : a+ Direct object
Accepting apologies (person); a+ Oi
Asking for and giving permission. The character, expressions that go
Asking and answering about past with the Od; feelings; greetings
life experiences in relation with the
present.
Asking about and answering how
someone feels.
Proyecto 3: La revista de clase Revision 0-9
Revision

Units 0-9

in-class test (week 6) (40%)


ASSESSMENT (100%)
Reading (Easter Break )*
in-class test (week 12) (60%)

4.1. Attendance Requirements

Attending all your classes is very important and one of the best ways to help you
succeed in this module. In accordance with the Student Charter, you are expected to
arrive on time and take an active part in all your timetabled classes. If you are unable
to attend a class for a valid reason (eg: illness), please contact your Module Tutor.

Anglia Ruskin will closely monitor the attendance of all students and will contact you by
e-mail if you have been absent without notice for two weeks. Continued absence can
result in the termination of your registration as you will be considered to have
withdrawn from your studies.

International students who are non-EEA nationals and in possession of entry


clearance/leave to remain as a student (student visa) are required to be
in regular attendance at Anglia Ruskin. Failure to do so is considered to
be a breach of the immigration regulations. Anglia Ruskin, like all British Universities,
is statutorily obliged to inform the Border and Immigration Agency of the Home Office of
significant unauthorised absences by any student visa holders.

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5. Assessment

Week 6 (01/03/10): Listening / grammar-vocabulary in context tasks (40%) in


class assessment.

• Easter Break: Reading of a Grader Reader on line during the Easter


break as stimulus for writing and speaking.
http://cvc.cervantes.es/aula/lecturas/

Week 11 (26/04/10): Revision and mock assessment in class.

Week 12 (03/05/10): Speaking/ grammar-vocabulary/ reading comprehension/


writing tasks (60%)

Assessment Method % contribution to Learning


module mark or Outcomes
P/F
Coursework (may include more than one task e.g. 100% 1-4
oral/aural/written) 3,000 words equivalent
Wee in-class test (week 6) (40%)
k ASSESSMENT
in-class test (week 12) (60%)
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All coursework assignments and other forms of assessment must be submitted by the
published deadline which is detailed above. It is your responsibility to know when work
is due to be submitted – ignorance of the deadline date will not be accepted as a
reason for late or non-submission.

All student work which contributes to the eventual outcome of the module (ie: if it
determines whether you will pass or fail the module and counts towards the mark you
get for the module) is submitted via the iCentre using the formal submission sheet
Academic staff CANNOT accept work directly from you.

If you decide to submit your work to the iCentre by post, it must arrive by midday on
the due date. If you elect to post your work, you do so at your own risk and you must
ensure that sufficient time is provided for your work to arrive at the iCentre. Posting
your work the day before a deadline, albeit by first class post, is extremely risky and not
advised.

Any late work (submitted in person or by post) will NOT be accepted and a mark of
zero will be awarded for the assessment task in question.

You are requested to keep a copy of your work.

Feedback

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You are entitled to written feedback on your performance for all your assessed work.
For all assessment tasks which are not examinations, this is provided by a member of
academic staff completing the assignment coversheet on which your mark and
feedback will relate to the achievement of the module’s intended learning outcomes
and the assessment criteria you were given for the task when it was first issued.

Examination scripts are retained by Anglia Ruskin and are not returned to students.
However, you are entitled to feedback on your performance in an examination and may
request a meeting with the Module Leader or Tutor to see your examination script and
to discuss your performance.

Anglia Ruskin is committed to providing you with feedback on all assessed work within
20 working days of the submission deadline or the date of an examination. This is
extended to 30 days for feedback for a Major Project module (please note that working
days excludes those days when Anglia Ruskin University is officially closed; eg:
between Christmas and New Year).

At the main Anglia Ruskin University campuses, each Faculty will publish details of the
arrangement for the return of your assessed work (eg: a marked essay or case study
etc.) within 20 working days of the availability of the feedback (therefore, normally 40
working days after the submission date; 50 working days for the Major Project).

Any work which is not collected by you from the Faculty within this timeframe is
returned to the iCentres from where you can subsequently collect it. The iCentres
retain student work for a specified period prior to its disposal.
To assure ourselves that our marking processes are comparable with other universities
in the UK, Anglia Ruskin provides samples of student assessed work to external
examiners as a routine part of our marking processes. External examiners are
experienced academic staff from other universities who scrutinise your work and
provide Anglia Ruskin academic staff with feedback and advice. Many of Anglia
Ruskin’s staff act as external examiners at other universities.

On occasion, you will receive feedback and marks for pieces of work that you
completed in the earlier stages of the module. We provide you with this feedback as
part of the learning experience and to help you prepare for other assessment tasks that
you have still to complete. It is important to note that, in these cases, the marks for
these pieces of work are unconfirmed as the processes described above for the use
of external examiners will not have been completed. This means that, potentially,
marks can change, in either direction! Marks for modules and individual pieces of
work become confirmed on the Dates for the Official Publication of Results which can
be checked at www.anglia.ac.uk/results.

6 . Assessment Criteria
Note to students: You should refer to the Undergraduate Student Handbook which
contains generic Assessment Criteria for each level (year) of study (0-3) and generic
marking standards (70%-100%, 60-69%, 50-59%, 40-49%, and 0%-39%).

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ANGLIA RUSKIN UNIVERSITY GENERIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA AND MARKING STANDARDS
LEVEL 1
Marking standards (by mark band)
Assessment criteria by level
70%+ 60-69% 50-59% 40-49% 30-39% 1-29%
Generic
Fails marginally
Learning Achieves a Fails to achieve
Achieves to achieve
Outcomes marginal pass in module
Characteristics of student achievement per Achieves module module Achieves module module
the module outcome/s
mark band → outcome/s related outcome/s outcome/s related outcome/s
outcome/s related to this
(Academic to this GLO at this related to this to this GLO at this related to this
related to this GLO and is not
Regulations, Level of Study GLO at this Level of Study GLO. MDF may
GLO at this eligible for
Regulation 2.26- Level of Study permit
Level of Study compensation
2.41.2) compensation
Level 1 (Certificate) introduces students to HE. Excellent Good Satisfactory Basic information Limited Inadequate
Students are expected to demonstrate relevant information base, information information base base; omissions information information base;
skills and competencies; to be articulate in exploring and base; explores that begins to in understanding base; limited lack of
Knowledge, Understanding and

expressing ideas orally; and to be coherent and analysing the and analyses explore and of major / ethical understanding of understanding of
structured in terms of written or other media. discipline, its the discipline, its analyse the issues. Largely discipline and its discipline and its
Forms of expression at this level may be theory and ethical theory and discipline and its imitative. Some ethical ethical
Intellectual Skills

descriptive or imitative, but students are issues with ethical issues ethical issues but difficulties with dimension. dimension.
expected to demonstrate an increasing considerable with some is still mainly academic/ Weak academic/ Wholly imitative.
understanding of the theoretical background of originality. Very originality. Good imitative. intellectual skills intellectual skills Very weak
their study and the analytic competence to good academic/ academic/ Acceptable academic/
explore it, as well as its relationship, where intellectual skills intellectual skills academic/ intellectual skills
appropriate, to particular skills. Students are intellectual skills
expected to develop an awareness of strengths
and weaknesses in their skill sets

Level 1 (Certificate) introduces students to HE. Excellent Good Satisfactory use of Basic use of Limited use of Inadequate use
Students are expected to demonstrate relevant management of management of learning resources learning learning of learning
skills and competencies; to be articulate in learning learning and input to team resources with resources, No resources.
expressing ideas orally; and to be coherent and resources, resources with work. Some lack no self-direction. self-direction, Failure to
Transferable and

structured in terms of written or other media. complemented by some self- of Some input to little input to contribute to
Forms of expression at this level may be self-direction/ direction. structure/accuracy team work. team work and team work. Major
descriptive or imitative, but students are exploration. Structured and in expression. Some difficulty difficulty with problems with
expected to demonstrate an increasing Structured/ mainly accurate Satisfactory with structure structure/ structure/
understanding of the theoretical background of accurate expression. practical/professio and accuracy in accuracy in accuracy in
Practical Skills

their study and the analytic competence to expression. Very Good team/ nal skills expression. expression. expression. Very
explore it, as well as its relationship, where good team/ practical/ Developing Practical/ weak practical
appropriate, to particular skills. Students are practical/ professional practical/ professional /professional
expected to develop an awareness of strengths professional skills skills professional skills are not yet skills
and weaknesses in their skill sets skills secure

A mark of 0% may be awarded for non-submission, poor or dangerous practice, incoherent and insufficient work, and in situations where the student fails to address the assignment brief and related
learning outcomes

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ANGLIA RUSKIN UNIVERSITY GENERIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA AND MARKING STANDARDS
LEVEL 2
Marking standards (by mark band)
Generic Assessment criteria by level
70%+ 60-69% 50-59% 40-49% 30-39% 1-29%
Learning Fails marginally
Outcomes Achieves a Fails to achieve
Achieves to achieve
marginal pass in module
Characteristics of student Achieves module module Achieves module module
the module outcome/s
(Academic achievement per mark band → outcome/s related outcome/s outcome/s related outcome/s
outcome/s related to this
Regulations, to this GLO at this related to this to this GLO at this related to this
related to this GLO and is not
Regulation 2.26- Level of Study GLO at this Level of Study GLO. MDF may
GLO at this eligible for
2.41.2) Level of Study permit
Level of Study compensation
compensation
Level 2 (Diploma) reflects continuing Excellent Good knowledge Satisfactory Basic knowledge Limited Inadequate
development from Level 1. At this level students knowledge base, base; explores knowledge base base with some knowledge base; knowledge base;
Knowledge, Understanding and

are not fully autonomous but are able to take exploring and and analyses that begins to omissions and/or limited lack of
responsibility for their own learning with some analysing the the discipline, its explore and lack of theory of understanding of understanding of
direction. Students are expected to locate an discipline, its theory and analyse the theory discipline and its discipline and its discipline and its
Intellectual Skills

increasingly detailed theoretical knowledge of the theory and ethical ethical issues and ethical issues ethical ethical ethical
discipline within a more general intellectual issues with with some of the discipline. dimension. dimension. dimension. Very
context, and to demonstrate this through forms of considerable originality, detail Acceptable level Some difficulties Weak academic/ weak academic/
expression which go beyond the merely originality and and autonomy. of academic/ with academic/ intellectual skills. intellectual skills.
descriptive or imitative. Students are expected to autonomy. Very Good academic/ intellectual skills, intellectual skills. Still mainly Wholly imitative
demonstrate analytical competence in terms both good academic/ intellectual skills going beyond Largely imitative imitative and and descriptive.
of problem identification and resolution, and to intellectual skills description at and descriptive. descriptive.
develop their skill sets as required. times

Level 2 (Diploma) reflects continuing Excellent Good Satisfactory use of Basic use of Limited use of Inadequate use
development from Level 1. At this level students management of management of learning learning learning of learning
are not fully autonomous but are able to take learning, with a learning with resources. resources with resources, resources. Major
responsibility for their own learning with some degree of consistent self- Acceptable little self- working towards problems with
Transferable and

direction. Students are expected to locate an autonomy/ direction. structure/accuracy direction. Some self-direction. structure/
increasingly detailed theoretical knowledge of the exploration that Structured and in expression. input to team General difficulty accuracy in
discipline within a more general intellectual may exceed the mainly accurate Satisfactory team/ work. Some with structure expression. Very
context, and to demonstrate this through forms of brief. Structured/ expression. practical/professio difficulty with and accuracy in weak team/
expression which go beyond the merely accurate Good team/ nal skills. structure and expression. practical
Practical Skills

descriptive or imitative. Students are expected to expression. Very practical/ Inconsistent self- accuracy in Team/ practical/ /professional
demonstrate analytical competence in terms both good team/ professional direction expression, but professional skills. No ability
of problem identification and resolution, and to practical/ skills developing skills that are not to direct own
develop their skill sets as required. professional skills practical/ yet secure learning
professional
skills

A mark of 0% may be awarded for non-submission, poor or dangerous practice, incoherent and insufficient work, and in situations where the student fails to address the assignment brief and related
learning outcomes

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ANGLIA RUSKIN UNIVERSITY GENERIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA AND MARKING STANDARDS
(Level 3)
LEVEL 3 Marking standards (by mark band)
Assessment criteria by level
Generic 70%+ 60-69% 50-59% 40-49% 30-39% 1-29%
Learning Fails marginally
Achieves a
Achieves to achieve
Outcomes Achieves module
module Achieves module
marginal pass in
module
Fails to achieve
Characteristics of student outcome/s the module module outcome/s
outcome/s outcome/s related outcome/s
achievement per mark band → related to this outcome/s related to this GLO
(Academic related to this to this GLO at this related to this
GLO at this Level related to this and is not eligible
Regulations, GLO at this Level of Study GLO. MDF may
Regulation 2.26- of Study GLO at this for compensation
Level of Study permit
2.41.2) Level of Study
compensation
Level 3 (Degree) is characterised by an Excellent Good Satisfactory Basic knowledge Limited Inadequate
Knowledge, Understanding and

expectation of students’ increasing autonomy in knowledge base knowledge base knowledge base base with some knowledge knowledge base;
relation to their study and developing skill sets. that supports that supports that supports omissions at the base; limited lack of
Students are expected to demonstrate problem analysis, analysis, some analysis, level of understanding of understanding of
Intellectual Skills

solving skills, both theoretical and practical. This evaluation and evaluation and evaluation and theoretical/ethic discipline/ethical discipline/ethical
is supported by an understanding of appropriate problem-solving problem-solving problem-solving in al issues. Some issues. Weak issues. Very weak
theory; creativity of expression and thought in theory/practice/ in theory/ theory/practice/ difficulties with academic/ academic/
based in individual judgement; and the ability to ethics of practice/ ethics ethics of academic/ intellectual skills. intellectual skills.
seek out, invoke, analyse and evaluate discipline with of discipline with discipline. intellectual skills. Still mainly Unable to discuss
competing theories or methods of working in a considerable some originality. Acceptable level Restricted ability descriptive. theory or solve
critically constructive and open manner. Output originality. Very Good academic/ of academic/ to discuss theory Difficulty with problems in
includes is articulate, coherent and skilled in the good academic/ intellectual skills intellectual skills and/or or solve theory and discipline.
appropriate medium, with some students intellectual skills going beyond problems in problem solving
producing original or innovative work in their description at discipline in discipline
specialism. times

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Practical SkillsTransferable and
Level 3 (Degree) is characterised by an Excellent Good Satisfactory Basic use of Limited use of Inadequate use of
expectation of students’ increasing autonomy in management of management of management of learning learning learning resources.
relation to their study and developing skill sets. learning, with learning, with learning. Some resources with resources. Failure to contribute
Students are expected to demonstrate problem degree of consistent self- autonomy in little autonomy. Unable to work to team work. Major
solving skills, both theoretical and practical. This autonomy/ directed research but Some difficulty autonomously. problems with
is supported by an understanding of appropriate research that may research. inconsistent. with structure/ Little input to structure/ accuracy
theory; creativity of expression and thought exceed the Structured and Structured and accuracy in teams. General in expression. Very
based in individual judgement; and the ability to assessment brief. accurate mainly accurate expression, but difficulty with weak practical
seek out, invoke, analyse and evaluate Structured and expression. expression. evidence of structure/ /professional skills.
competing theories or methods of working in a creative Good team/ Satisfactory team/ developing accuracy in No ability to direct
critically constructive and open manner. Output expression. Very practical/ practical/professio team/ practical/ expression. own learning
is articulate, coherent and skilled in the good practical/ professional/pro nal/ problem- professional/ Practical/
appropriate medium, with some students team/professional blem solving solving skills problem-solving professional/
producing original or innovative work in their / problem-solving skills skills problem-solving
specialism. skills skills that are not
yet secure
A mark of 0% may be awarded for non-submission, poor or dangerous practice, incoherent and insufficient work, and in situations where the student fails to address the assignment brief and related
learning outcomes

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7. Assessment Offences
You are reminded that any work that you submit must be your own. All suspected
assessment offences will be investigated and can result in severe penalties. Please
note that it is your responsibility to consult the relevant sections of the Academic
Regulations (section 10 – see www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs) and the Student
Handbook.

When you are preparing your work for submission, it is important that you understand
the various academic conventions that you are expected to follow in order to make
sure that you do not leave yourself open to accusations of plagiarism (eg: the correct
use of referencing, citations, footnotes etc.) and that your work maintains its
academic integrity.

Plagiarism is theft and constitutes the presentation of another’s work as your own in
order to gain an unfair advantage. You will receive advice and guidance on how to
avoid plagiarism and other elements of poor academic practice during the early
stages of your studies at Anglia Ruskin.

A Guide to Academic Integrity and Good Academic Practice

A primary purpose of a University education is to instil in each student an


understanding of, and a capacity for scholarship, independent judgment, academic
rigour, and intellectual honesty.

It is the joint responsibility of university teachers, support staff and students to work
together to foster these ends through relationships which encourage freedom of
inquiry, demonstrate personal and professional integrity, and foster mutual respect.

Good academic practice refers to the process of completing your academic work
independently, honestly and in an appropriate academic style, using good
referencing and acknowledging all of your sources.

To demonstrate good academic practice this you must:

• develop your own independent evaluation of academic issues;


• draw upon research from academics in your field of study;
• discuss and evaluate existing concepts and theories;
• demonstrate your understanding of the key literature;
• develop your own arguments.

To support your own good academic practice you will need to develop:

• study and information skills (eg. reading, note-taking, research etc);


• skills of critical enquiry and evaluation (eg. taking a balanced opinion, using
reasoning and argument);
• appropriate academic writing skills (eg. for essays, reports, dissertations etc);
• referencing skills;
• examination techniques (eg. preparation and timing etc).

Achieving good academic practice is not as complicated as it may appear. In a


nutshell, you need to:

• know the rules;


• make sure you reference all sources.

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Poor academic practice or academic dishonesty (plagiarism, cheating, fraud etc.) is
sometimes caused by insecurity as to what is expected and what is allowed. If you
are in any doubt you should talk to a librarian and/or your module or personal tutor.

Our Expectations of Students

The Student Charter (available at: http://web.anglia.ac.uk/anet/students/pdfs/


11473_Charter_16ppA5.pdf) requires you to ‘be aware of the academic rules relating
to your studies’, p9). We expect you to agree that you will:

i) ensure that you are familiar with the academic conventions regarding the citing
(acknowledgement, referencing) of the work of others (see
http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/referencing.htm for assistance);
ii) only hand in your own original work for assessment;
iii) correctly reference all the sources for the information you have included in your
work;
iv) identify information you have downloaded from the internet;
v) never use another student’s work as if it were your own work;
vi) never use someone else’s artwork, pictures or graphics (including graphs,
spreadsheets etc. and information from the internet) as if they were made by
you;
vii) never let other students use or copy from your work;
viii) work through ‘PILOT’, the online tutorial available on the University library
website (http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/pilot/). PILOT addresses a number of study
skills which will help you develop good academic practice.

8. Learning Resources
8.1 Recommended Texts

Course material (Key texts):


 Español Lengua Viva 1, Cuaderno de ejercicios , Editorial Santillana.
 Gramática y Recursos Comunicativos 1, Santillana

Books for sale in John Smiths Books, ARU

Recommended:

 Aula 2, Jaime Corpas et al. Difusión

8.2. Recommended Internet Resources


Access to networked computers and multimedia language laboratories
Centro Virtual Cervantes http://cvc.cervantes.es/aula/lecturas/intermedio/
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/spanish/specials/default.stm
Spanish Grammar web sites http://www.colby.edu/~bknelson/exercises
- BBC Language sites http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/spanish
-Newspaper sites such as http://elpais.es, http://www.elmundo.es, etc

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audio and audio-visual materials related to the course book as available in the
Language Centre and the university library

8.3. Other Resources


The Library has a large collection of Spanish Grammar books;

Batchelor, R. E. 2006 A student grammar of Spanish. CUP: Cambridge


Muñoz, P. 2006 . A Spanish learning grammar .
Batchelor, R. E. 2005 Practising Spanish Grammar. CUP: Cambridge.
Zollo, M. 2005 Spanish grammar made easy. Bottom of Form
Butt, John, 2004 A new reference grammar of modern Spanish. CUP: Cambridge.
Butterfield, J. 2004 Collins Spanish dictionary .Collins

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9. Module Definition Form

Module Definition Form (MDF)

Module Code:AD115091S Version: 2 Date amended: 11.06.07


1. Module Title: maximum 100 characters
Spanish Intermediate 1

2a. Module Leader: 2b. Department: 2c. Faculty:


Dr Alicia Peňa Calvo ECFM ALSS

3a. Level: see guidance notes 3b. Module Type: see guidance notes
1 Standard

4a. Credits: see guidance notes 4b. Study Hours: see guidance notes
15 150

5. Restrictions
Pre-requisites: Spanish Foundation 2 or equivalent

Co-requisites:

Exclusions:

Pathways to which this


module is restricted:

LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT INFORMATION


6a. Module Description: 200 – 300 words
This module is part of a continuing programme of modules open to all students who have previously taken Spanish
Foundation 2 or equivalent. The Intermediate Language programme contributes to the attainment of the Common
European Framework level A2. It focuses on all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) in an
integrated approach. It introduces key structures and vocabulary relevant to topics studied, and provides initial insights
into Spanish society and culture. It combines a communicative approach to language with the development of basic
reading and writing skills. It also expects students to undertake a programme of guided independent learning in support
of class sessions. The module will develop students’ language competence, which will enhance their employability.
6b. Outline Content:
To improve the development of linguistic skills by participating in a variety of activities such as:
• dialogues
• conversations
• group discussions
• listening exercises
• letter writing
• brief presentations
6c. Key Texts/Literature:
Key text as indicated by module leader.
Reference books:
Jarman, B (2003) Oxford Spanish Dictionary 3rd ed. Oxford; O.U.P

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Or Butterfield, J. (ed.) (2004) Collins Spanish Dictionary, Glasgow; Harper Collins
Spinelli, E (1999) English Grammar for Students of Spanish, London; Arnold
6d. Specialist Learning Resources:
Access to networked computers and multimedia language laboratories
Websites:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/spanish/index http://cvc.cervantes.es/aula http://www.linguanet.org.uk/websites/span
http://www.lang.anglia.ac.uk:8300/call/learnes1.htm

7. Learning Outcomes (threshold standards):


On successful completion of this module the student will be expected to be able to:

Knowledge and 5. progress towards the equivalent of the level A2 of the Common European Framework in
understanding all four language skills in Spanish
6. understand the main points of standard Spanish language on familiar matters

Intellectual, practical, 7. produce connected texts in Spanish on topics which are familiar or of personal interest
affective and 8. describe experiences and events, and personal feelings in Spanish
transferable skills

8. Learning Activities
Learning Details of duration, frequency and
Learning Activities Hours
Outcomes other comments
Lectures: 0 2 hrs per week over one semester; to include
1-4
Other teacher managed learning: 24 laboratory work
Student managed learning: 126 1-4 students will be expected to undertake 10 hours
weekly additional learning activities - A variety of
tasks to improve oral and written communication
TOTAL 150

9. Module Assessment
% Weighting & Qualifying
Learning
Method Fine Grade (FG) Mark see Length/duration and other comments
Outcomes
or pass/fail (PF) guidance notes

Coursework 1-4 FG 100% 30% 3,000 words equivalent


may include more than one task e.g.
oral/aural/written
In order to pass this module, students are required to achieve an overall mark of 40%.
In addition, students are required to:
(a) achieve the qualifying mark for each element of fine graded assessment as specified above
(b) pass any pass/fail elements

OTHER TECHNICAL DETAILS


10. Delivery of the Module Please delete as appropriate
Delivery This module is delivered over… Yes or No? Indicate which by deleting as appropriate

1 …a single semester Y Semester 1 Semester 2

11. Subject: see guidance notes

5
1. Report on last delivery of module

MODULE REPORT FORM

This form should be completed by module tutors (where there is more than one delivery) and forwarded to Module
Leaders who compiles the results on to one form for use at the Programme Committee and other methods of
disseminating feedback to students.

Module Code and Title: Spanish Intermediate 1

Anglia Ruskin Department: Languages and IC

Location(s) of Delivery: Cambridge

Academic Year: 2008/09 Semester/Trimester: 2

Enrolment Numbers (at each location): 19

Module Leader: Dr Alicia Peña Calvo

Other Module Tutors: Alexandra Simon

Student Achievement Provide a brief overview of student achievement on the module as evidenced by the
range of marks awarded. A detailed breakdown of marks will be available at the Departmental Assessment Panel.
19 students took this module. 4 students got an A; 20 a B. 3 a C and a 2D.

Feedback from Students Briefly summarise student responses, including any written comments
Materials introducing Hispanic culture

Module Leader/Tutor’s Reflection on Delivery of the Module, including Response to


Feedback from Students (including resources if appropriate)
Students progressed well. More practice is needed and we will be using a new workbook
accessible from the University bookshop next academic year. Students need to have a clear idea
of the assessment tasks, sometimes students join the module late and they have missed that
information.

Developments during the current year or planned for next year (if appropriate)
Revision of materials used in the course.
A text book following the European Framework with listening and grammar / vocabulary practice
will be selected and used. All Spanish modules will help to prepare for the DELE Exams.

External Examiner’s Comments State whether the external examiner agreed the marks and/or commented on the
module
Marks and comments agreed