VOLUME I

ISSUE II SPRING 2008

E ng lish Newsletter
CONTENTS
1.1 MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom by Thomas Armstrong (ASCD 2000) 2nd ed. ISBN 0-87120-376-6 3.1- 3.2 OUR FAVORITE AUTHORS! Emily Dickinson & Charlotte Bronte 4.1 WEBSITES OF GENERAL
INTEREST

Multiple Intelligences in the English Classroom
1.1 Planning English lessons always involves a complex dance of balancing curriculum demands, student learning styles, assessment expectations, and a multitude of other issues. As English teachers we must include all the core skills in our lessons - reading, writing, and speaking. At times I felt like an octopus trying to keep at least 8 different things in play at the same time. Multiple Intelligences, the principles originally defined by Howard Gardner , is one of the ways at looking at how we plan and organize our lessons. As English teachers we tend to rely very much on the linguistic intelligence which is a natural outgrowth of our subject. However, we owe to ourselves and our students to include all the modes of learning in our plans. This article will suggest some basic ways to include each type of MI in the English classroom. More detail on MI and how you can use it in your classroom can be found in the resources, both text and websites, I have listed at the end of this brief article. You may find that you are already using these in your plans. If not, I hope you will try some as a
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4.2 MOVIES FROM BOOKS A list of movies, old and new, that have been made based on novels & classic literature. 4.3 BULLETIN BOARD IDEAS 5.1 YOUR PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY 5.2 PODCASTS FOR THE ENGLISH TEACHER 5.3 FAMOUS AUTHOR BIRTHDAYS 5.4 IDEA FOR THE CLASSROOM Biography in a Bag Pair/Share Worksheets 6.1 EVERYTHING ELSE FALL OF FROST a new novel based on the life of Robert Frost Headline mistakes - humorous and useful for teaching misplaced language 7.1 Poetic Elements Worksheet 8.1 Emily Dickinson Reader’s Theatre Lesson Plan

way of providing both variety and effective learning experiences for your students. At the beginning of the school year or semester, you may want to give your classes an MI Inventory to determine which of the intelligences predominate in your class. That way you will know what strengths your students have and what areas they need to develop. Good MI instruction does not simply play to the MI strength, but helps develop all the intelligences each student has. The Armstrong book contains both adult and student inventories but I have also included websites where you can get inventories to administer to your students. They usually enjoy taking these and finding out what their strengths are. Linguistic Intelligence: Choral reading - very effective with poetry; reader’s theatre. Publishing - classroom newsletters, bulletins, poetry booklets, creative writing etc. Journaling, extemporaneous speaking, books, word games, storytelling, large & small group discussions.

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Logical Mathematical Socratic Seminars - This is a specific way of organizing your class discussion that has the teacher continually asking questions to draw out students to defend their points of view. Classifications & Categorizing - Have students classify or categorize a group of vocabulary words in a variety of different ways. Formal debates- have students follow a traditional debate format and provide evidence and reasoning for their arguments Analogy analysis Spatial Intelligence Creating diorama scenes from sections of a story, play, or novel Creating a powerpoint slide show to illustrate a poem, story, etc. Create a photo essay to illustrate an issue Graphic organizers Using collages, posters, and other visuals to illustrate patterns found in a piece of literature. Teaching grammar through diagramming. It may seem old hat, but some students learn grammar this way very well because of the visual/spatial relationships. Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence Field trips. Act out scenes from

plays. Use simple props like hats or simple costumes. Build something described in the story - when I taught a Stanislaw Lem story about robots, I asked students to use the details in the story as a guide to build their own “robot” using only materials they could find at home or in the classroom. I got some really interesting products and they spent a lot of time reading and interacting with the text. If the weather is good, take a class outside for a poetry writing lesson. Reader’s Theatre, mime, acting out scenes, all can be part of any English class. Commercial games such as Guestures, Pictionary and Charades are excellent kinesthetic ways to develop vocabulary. Musical Intelligence Find ways to incorporate music with the lesson. If you teach English lit be sure to include ballads by Joan Baez when you teach the literary ballads. Many of her ballads are the traditional Child ballads. Will you teach “Richard Cory”? This poem was set to music by Simon and Garfunkel. Have students listen and compare the two. A lot of Simon and Garfunkel can be used to teach poetry. I once taught Stephen Crane’s Red Badge of Courage in part by playing the 1812 Overture and by having students

listen to the ebb and flow of battle musically. Remember School House Rock? Have students set grammar rules to rap rhythms or chants. Ask students to suggest music that would be effective backdrop to a novel they are reading and then justify it with explanation and example. Interpersonal Intelligence Board games - there are many board games worth spending time with in an English class - Scrabble is one. There are others sold through many companies that cater to English teachers. Others include Balderdash, Pictionary, Blurt, etc. These can be used as quick end-of-the week activities and you can substitute class vocab or terms for some of the items. Peer tutors - pair students up with each other for learning new material; set up study groups early in the school year for students to work together on difficult material. Use cooperative learning structures in the classroom jigsaw, pair/share, roundtable, send-a-problem... Intrapersonal Intelligence Encourage independent reading. Do some station work where students can work independently at their own pace on some units. I did a poetry unit this way and it was very satisfying.

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One minute reflections are effective ways to transition between activities. Choices - whenever possible, allow students to make choices from among several tasks, especially useful for homework. Naturalist Intelligence Your room should include some elements of the outer world if possible plants if you have window space. I once kept a simple, inexpensive aquarium on my desk and some little gold fish . It is amazing how that aquarium helped set a different tone in the room Students enjoyed the sound of the bubbling water, watching the fish swim among the little plants etc. You don’t have to be a science teacher to bring nature into your classroom. If possible, set up a corner of your room with a chair, an artificial potted tree, and a lamp. Even when it’s not in use, it conveys a warm, homey feeling. Posters of nature scenes are always welcome. On nice days, if possible, take students outside to write about what they see and hear. There are many other examples in the Armstrong text and in many other resources. You may find you are already incorporating some of these in your classroom.

An Explanation of Learning Styles and MI: http:// www.ldpride.net/ learningstyles.MI.htm Development of MI Theory: http://www.indiana.edu/ ~intell/mitheory.shtml Implementing MI in the Classroom: http:// www.education-world.com/ a_curr/curr054.shtml MI Mind Map: http:// www.chariho.k12.ri.us/ curriculum/MISmart/ MImapDef.HTM Teaching to the MI: http:// www.mitest.com/ Multiple Intelligences Inventory: http:// surfaquarium.com/MI/ inventory.htm MI Inventory 2:http:// www.ldrc.ca/projects/ miinventory/mitest.html The Great Gatsby the MI way: http:// www.thewritingtutor.biz/ teachers_resources/Gatsbychap_present.php MI Lesson Plan Ideas: http://lth3.k12.il.us/rhampton/ mi/LessonPlanIdeas.htm
================= 3.1 Our Favorite Authors! Emily Dickinson has long been considered one of our greatest poets and with good reason. Her poetry for all its spare and concentrated verse, has a power remarkable for its imagery and language. Her
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lifestyle has long fascinated critics and fans alike and a long running Broadway play based on her life, “The Belle of Amherst” starred Julie Harris, won many Tony Awards. and continues to be produced around the country to this day. A recent novel fictionalized a relationship between a young neighbor and the reclusive poet: Afternoons with Emily by Rose MacMurray. Among the many hundreds of scholarly works published about her poetry, there are other books that celebrate her life and interests or are inspired by her poetry. I have listed a few of them here
. The Sister: A Novel of Emily Dickinson by Paola Kaufmann 5 of 5 stars Quieter than Sleep; a modern mystery of Emily Dickinson by Joanne Dobson Afternoons with Emily by Rose MacMurray 4 of 5 stars Emily Dickinson’s Gardens by Marta McDowell—5 of 5 stars The Gardens of Emily Dickinson by Judith Farr & Louise Carter 5 of 5 stars Emily Dickinson in Song (multiple composers ) CD available from Amazon Leo Smit: 33 Songs on Poems of Emily Dickinson CD available from Amazon Emily by Michael Bedard, Barbara Cooney (Children’s Book) Illustrated.Age range – 5-8. (Barnes/Noble) 5 of 5 stars)

Multiple Intelligences: http:// www.thomasarmstrong.com/ multiple_intelligences.htm
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3.2 Charlotte Bronte: Like Emily Dickinson, Charlotte
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Bronte lived an unconventional life but unlike Emily, she traveled and had an active family life. She had at least several marriage proposals and married late, dying as a result of complications from pregnancy. While other novels of hers have been published, none has reached the power and importance of Jane Eyre which was an immediate success and continues to enthrall readers with its story of love and romantic entanglements. Recently a Broadway musical based on the novel had a successful run. The novel has been made into movies for film and TV many times. Other writers have speculated on Jane’s life beyond the book and on Charlotte’s life, and I have listed below some books both fiction and non-fiction as well as other resources that owe their inspiration to Charlotte and her creation.
The Secret Adventures of Charlotte Bronte by Laura Joh Rowland 5 of 5 stars The Eyre Affair: A Thursday Next Novel by Jasper Fforde 4 of 5 stars The Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys 3 of 4 stars Tales of Angria by Charlotte Bronte 5 of 5 stars Shirley: A Tale by Charlotte Bronte Villette The Professor: A Tale

The Twelve Adventurers and Other Stories Jane Eyre: the Musical (Original Broadway cast) 4 of 5 stars CD available from Amazon -----------------------------------4.1 Websites of General Interest to English Teachers

Authorstream: Powerpoints and other presentations uploaded for your use as teachers . Review for use but many are very useful. http:// www.authorstream.com/ Jane Eyre lesson plans: http:// www.webenglishteacher.com/ cbronte.html EdSitement: Many lesson plans and resources for all areas: http://edsitement.neh.gov/ sitemap.asp
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Young Adult Lesson Literature Lesson plans: http:// www.webenglishteacher.com/ ya.html Grammar and Parts of Speech lessons: http:// www.webenglishteacher.com/ grammar.html Outa Ray’s Head- website with many great resources for teachers: http://home.cogeco.ca/ ~rayser3/litera1.htm American Literature Comes of Age – multiple sites for American Lit: http:// falcon.jmu.edu/~ramseyil/ amlitage.htm Teachnology: http://www.teachnology.com/teachers/ lesson_plans/literature/high/ Emily Dickinson poetry unit: http://www.wps.k12.va.us/ tchrstaf/lessplan/plans/ emilyplan.pdf Teaching Literature and Writing with Technology: http://thwt.org/ poets&poetry.htm The Life and Poetry of Emily Dickinson – lesson plan: http:// www.lessonplanspage.com/ LALifeAndPoetryOfEmilyDicki nson79.htm
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4.2 Movies from Books
I am Legend from the book by Richard Matheson. This is the most recent filming of this apocalyptic tale of the future. Stars Will Smith. Available on DVD or Netflix. Jane Eyre - at least 11 different versions - my favorite is the A& E version with Ciran Hinds & Samantha Morton. Beowulf - again,many versions. The most recent and highly praised featured Angelina Jolie as Grendel’s mother. Sense and Sensibility -the most recent Masterpiece Theatre PBS presentation Pride and Prejudice-the one with Colin Firth is still the best. Into the Wild - tragic and moving story of a young man’s search for himself in the wilderness of Alaska. The Golden Compass- based on the Phillip Pullman novels. This movie is violent but does not emphasize the more controversial religious doctrine of the book. I,Robot - loosely based on the Isaac Asimov robot stories. The Seeker- the Dark is Rising based on the Susan Cooper series.

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The Tenant of Wildfell Hall based on Anne Bronte’s novel. Of Human Bondage- an oldie but goodie - based on Maugham’s novel. Gone with the Wind - needs no intro Lord of the Flies - several versions including one recent (2000) got 3/5 stars Adventures of Huckleberry Finn -several versions including one very recent (2005) 3/5 stars Of Mice and Men - several versions, including one in 2003 (4 1/2 of 5 stars) All these films are available from Amazon or Netflix. Please check ratings for appropriate use in classrooms and for accuracy to the text. Film viewing should always be used to supplement not replace reading of the text.
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Scholastic Earth Day resources: http:// teacher.scholastic.com/ lessonrepro/lessonplans/ earthday/index.htm May Days Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week- week 1 Flower Month National Photo Month May 6 – National Teacher Appreciation Day May 11 – Twilight Zone Day – In the English class, isn’t every day a twilight zone? May 12 – Limerick Day May 15 – L.Frank Baum (author of Wizard of Oz); National Chocolate Chip Day -----------------------------5.1 Your Professional Library As before I will use this space to recommend some useful resources that you might want to add to your professional library. I have either read or reviewed these materials/resources. Designing Brain Compatible Learning by Terence Parry & Gayle Gregory (Skylight Training & Pub.)1998. ISBN 1-57517-042-6 Newest edition in paperback is $40.00 at Amazon. Earlier editions are still available in paperback for much less. When Kids Can’t Read; What Teachers Can Do - A Guide
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for Teachers 6-12 by Kylene Beers (Heinemann) 2003. ISBN 0-86709-519-9 $26.55 at Amazon The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing; Making the Words Come Alive by Thomas Armstrong (ASCD) 2003 ISBN 0-87120-718-4 $20.66 at Amazon --------------------------------------5.2 PODCASTS FOR THE ENGLISH TEACHER You can access all these podcasts through iTunes either with a Mac or a PC. They are all free and can be downloaded to your computer. I have identified categories in (parentheses) to help you locate each of the podcasts I have listed below. (American Public Media) Prairie Home Companion Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac The Story Podcast (current events) American RadioWorks (current events) Word for Word (featuring the very best of recent speeches) (Arts) Selected Shorts Selected short stories read in live performance by stars of stage and screen. Also can be heard at 10pm on WHYY. The Horror - Old time radio horror shows; The Art of Storytelling with Children. Reduced Shakespeare Company The renowned comedy Shakespeare company.

4.3 BULLETIN BOARD IDEAS APRIL: National Poetry Month
Lesson Plans for National Poetry Month: http://www.educationworld.com/a_special/ poetrymonth.shtml NEA resources for National Poetry Month: http:// www.nea.org/webresources/ poetry0604.html Poetry slideshows, podcasts, and lesson plans for National Poetry Month: http:// www.teachervision.fen.com/poetry/ teacher-resources/6657.html

Earth Day/Month Earth Day Events: http:// www.epa.gov/earthday/ International Earth Day resources: http:// www.earthsite.org/

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I will highlight more podcasts in future newsletters.

--------------------------------------5.3 FAMOUS AUTHOR BIRTHDAYS
April 3 - Washington Irving April 4 - Maya Angelou April 13 - Samuel Beckett April 15 - Henry James April 21 - Charlotte Bronte April 23 - William Shakespeare April 28 - Harper Lee May 7 - Robert Browning May 12 - Edward Lear May 18 - Irene Hunt May 22 - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle May 23 - Susan Cooper; Scott O’Dell May 29 - Ian Fleming; T.H. White

================================= 5.4 IDEAS FOR THE CLASSROOM I. BIOGRAPHY IN A BAG This is a great activity for the beginning of the school year, the beginning of a semester, the beginning of a biography unit or for many other uses. It is lowstress for students because they have lots of choice and can use props in a presentation. The steps in the activity are as follows: a. Each student is given a brown paper grocery size bag.

b. Into this bag the student will place a number of items that tell us something about him/her and/or the student can find pictures of things, places, people, to glue onto the outside of the bag that are part of the student’s “autobiography”. c. The student will then present his/her bag to the class by explaining how each object or picture tells us something about him/her. d. An alternate use for this activity is to use the biography bag for students to use it as a book report. Into the bag they would put objects or things that they think relates to the book they have read and then they would introduce each one to the class as they told about the book. Because they can focus on the objects they are presenting, students tend to be less nervous when speaking to a group. II. The Pair/ Share Worksheet When you want students to work together with a partner prepare a worksheet for 2 students (A/B), so that student A answers the odd numbered items and student B answers the even
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numbered items and each partner checks the other To be sure they stay “honest”, I usually required that two different inks or pencil types be used and the handwriting be distinctly different. This was an effective way to use the pair/share cooperative technique. This issue’s worksheet is set up with that format for you to use as a model. ----------------------------------6.1 EVERYTHING ELSE Fall of Frost by Brian Hall (Viking) a new biographical novel based on the life of Robert Frost. As most Frost poetry lovers know, his poetry and life were far darker than the poems sometimes implied. This novel delves into the struggles of his life in a way a true biography never could. The next time you need some examples of misplaced modifiers and other grammatical mistakes, try these actual headlines gleaned from various newspapers: Squad Helps Dog Bite Victim Enraged Cow Injures Farmer with Ax Plane Too Close to Ground, Crash Probe Told Miners Refuse to Work after Death Juvenile Court to Try Shooting DefendantTree Drunken Drivers Paid $1000
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Poetry Elements Practice
Pair/Share Worksheet: Working with a partner, read the items below and decide which of the poetic elements each underlined part illustrates. Divide the work so that partner A answers the odd numbered items (1,3,5,7, 9...) and partner B answers the even numbered items (2,4,6,8, 10...). After one partner has answered the item, the other partner should check the answer for correctness. Items below will illustrate one of the following poetic devices/elements: alliteration rhyme metaphor assonance rhythm personification consonance imagery onomatopoeia simile

A: __________________________________ 1. The gray sea and the long black land And the yellow half moon large & low.... ---------------------------------------------------------3. Joy and Temperance and Repose Slam the door on the doctor’s nose.

B:

______________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2. O tenderly the haughty day Fills his blue urn with fire ----------------------------------------------------------4. The tawny-hided desert crouches watching her........

----------------------------------------------------------5. The green lizard and the golden snake Like unimprisoned flames out of their trance awake

----------------------------------------------------------6. Many-maned scud thumper, tub of male whale, maker.....

-----------------------------------------------------------7. What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up Like a raisin in the sun?

----------------------------------------------------------8. Three grey geese in a green field grazing,

----------------------------------------------------------9. Far and away I heard The sweet “tweet,tweet” of a strange new comer.....

----------------------------------------------------------10. On moonlit heath and lonesome bank The sheep beside me graze;

Permission is granted to copy this page for classroom use. ENGLISH NEWSLETTER VOLUME I ISSUE II SPRING 2008 BELINDA BAIR 7

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Lesson Plan - Reader’s Theatre & a Emily Dickinson Poem
1. Objective: 4.3 The student will evaluate textual changes in a work and explain how these changes alter tone,
clarify meaning, address a particular audience, or fulfill a purpose. The student will use oral interpretation techniques of vocal tone, enunciation, and emphasis to present the poem aloud to an audience. Reader’s Theatre is an excellent way to involve students in oral interpretation of literature and poems lend themselves very well to this form of performance. It is a very “low risk” activity because students will have the text before them and can practice before reading aloud before a group. RT also helps students focus on important literary elements such as point of view, voice, and tone. The selection need not be a narrative poem in order for you to find different “speakers” within a text. I have included some websites and text references that may help you plan and prepare your own RT scripts or teach students how to do their own. A few basics to know when you are dividing a work into various speakers: a. Look closely for logical “breaks”, for changes in point of view or where a speaker changes or could change b. Speakers need not have names but can simply be designated as speaker 1, 2, etc. c. Girls are considered generally to have “light” voices, i.e. softer, voices higher in the register; boys have “darker” voices, i.e. deeper, voices, lower in the register. d. Encourage the use of punctuation to help students understand when to pause, how to emphasize certain parts, etc. e. Consider pacing, enunciation, and pronunciation as important parts of the presentation and try varying the way the poem is read for different effects. In the example below I have created one sample script for Emily Dickinson’s poem “Because I could not stop for Death...”. There are many possibilities. In the second column I have offered an analysis of what I have done and why, and how it might be presented.

Because
I
Could
Not
Stop
for
Death
Speaker
1:

Because
I
could
not
stop
for
Death
­ 






















He
kindly
stopped
for
me Speaker
2:

The
Carriage
held
but
just
Ourselves
­ 























And
Immortality. Speaker
1:
We
slowly
drove
­
He
knew
no
haste 





















And
I
had
put
away
 





















My
labor
my
leisure
too, Speaker
2:
For
His
Civility
­ Speaker
1:
We
passed
the
School,
where
Children
strove 





















At
recess
­
in
the
Ring­­ Speaker
2:

We
passed
the
Fields
of
Gazing
Grain
­ 



















We
passed
the
Setting
Sun
­
 Speaker
1:

Or
rather
­
He
passed
Us
­
 


















The
Dews
drew
quivering
and
chill
­
 


















For
only
gossamer,
my
Gown
­ 


















My
Tippet
­
only
Tulle
­­ Speaker
2:

We
paused
before
a
house
that
seemed 

















A
Swelling
of
the
Ground
­­ 

















The
Roof
was
scarcely
visible­ 

















The
Cornice
­
in
the
Ground
­
 
 Speaker
1:

Since
then
­
‘tis
Centuries
­
and
yet 

















Feels
shorter
than
the
Day 

















I
Nirst
surmised
the
Horses’
Heads
 

















Were
toward
Eternity
­­ I divided the poem into two speakers: one is the “I” persona in the poem, the other is the “Immortality” or “He” referred to but who never actually speaks in the way ED wrote the poem. By creating a RT version, I can allow the other character to come out. Who is this “Immortality”? How does your feeling about the poem change by letting this other character speak? If I were to create a picture of these two, I would have Speaker 1 as a girl in white, Speaker 2 as a formally dressed male. His manner would be kindly, hers would be tentative, yet accepting. I do not change any of the words of the poem. I wrote it exactly as it appears. Often, however, in translating a work into a RT piece, you may want to make some alterations or adaptations to meet the needs of the character/speakers. For example, I might change pronouns for speaker 2 to first person “I” in some cases, or alter who says each part. There are many ways to interpret the relationships in the poem. Through creating a RT script, you and the students can see the poem (or any other literary work) in a whole new light.

Reader’s
Theatre
Editions‐
free
RT
scripts
for
your
use
http://www.aaronshep.com/rt/RTE.html Reader’s Theatre Scripts and Plays: more free scripts http://www.teachingheart.net/readerstheater.htm RT – Lesson Plans: http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=172

Introduction
to
Reader’s
Theatre
Introduction
to
Reader’s
Theatre
by
Gerald
Lee
Ratliff

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