Guiding Strategies for RA Supervision

Who can we view as exemplary mentors?
What are they doing? * * * * What are they not doing? * * * *

Nine Questions for Supervision/Mentoring/Advising:
1. What? 2. When? a. I hear you telling me you have dealt with these noise violations, when did you approach your residents about these issues? 3. How? 4. 5. 6. a. How did you explain to your residents their noise level was becoming a problem? Where? a. Where do you see the violations occurring most frequently? NEVER why a. Communication research has shown that “why” makes people feel very defensive and gives an accusatory/judgmental tone – not exactly developmental. Reference a. Provide examples – often useful if in a conversation where the RA is being irrational or not specific, e.g. “I don’t feel effective on my floor” – ask for times, ways, specific moments he or she has felt this way. Clarify Rearticulate a. When you have set a goal or made a commitment to making a change, help the RA to rearticulate and restate what that is. Repeat a. In particular when helping an RA through personal decisions or making sense of policy decisions – asking to repeat information can assist the RA with realizing their own contradictions in reasoning Explain a. Rationalize and discuss Reconsider a. What would he or she change/do differently?
BGSU Residence Education Staff Training July 2007 Renee Piquette - GHD

a. Ex: What do you think about the quiet hours violations on 4th floor?

7. 8.

9. 10.

Communication and supervisory style that is… Direct Style: In communicating with others, you like to feel you are in charge. You like a challenge, difficult assignments and quick action. You can be very decisive in your conversations. You may need to improve your communication methods because you tend to be too brief, a one-way communicator, a poor listener, and to sometimes comes across as blunt. You may want to freedom, power, independence and quick results. You will want these things to work for you and not against you in your communication with others. Sincere Style: In communication with others, you like to be sincere. You like to be a member of a group, and you need appreciation, stability and time to adjust to new ideas. You may not want to tell all you know. You may need to improve your communications because you tend to respond slowly for information, need too much personal attention, and may be turned off by an aggressive person. You may want to build roots, to feel needed, and to be asked – not told – what to do. Be sure these things work for you in your communications. Talkative Style: In communicating with others, you like to feel you are successful in persuading them. You like to be around people, to look successful, be popular and to be positive. You can be very talkative. You may need to improve your communication style because you tend to talk too much, speak without preparation, oversell an idea and give more information than necessary. You may want popularity, influence, acceptance and public recognition. Be sure that these things work for you in your communication with others. Organized Style: In communicating with others, you like to be thorough. You like to feel that you are in a low-risk situation, cooperative, organized and using standard operation procedures. You can be very logical in your conversations with others. You may need to improve your communication style because you tend to be excessively detailed, to write long memos, to over-emphasize when putting things in writing and slow to trust others. You may want thinking time, low-risk situations, cooperative relationships, organization, and long explanations. You should overcome the negative situations these behaviors can lead you into and use the positive to succeed. Lessons from a Second-Year – my unsolicited advice: - Don’t be afraid to ask what he or she is looking for in a supervisor – what would benefit him/her most? - Be strict and be diligent – you will not be everyone’s best friend and if you try to be you will accomplish neither being a good friend or a good supervisor. - They will hate you sometimes – move on. (But don’t worry – chances are if you’re doing the right thing no one really hates you). - Set boundaries - Have a method of tracking, organizing, and preparing for one-on-one meetings - Be open about expectations – both for the RAs you supervise and those you supervise of you - Document, document, document – do so consistently and in a timely, organized manner.
BGSU Residence Education Staff Training July 2007 Renee Piquette - GHD

Have some style!