You are on page 1of 8

 

1  

 
Let’s  make  pasta  
 
It  is  finally  springtime  in  Switzerland.  The  lake  of  Geneva    shines  under  the  
late  March  sun,  reflecting  crystal  blue  skies,  after  the  dreadfully  gray  and  sad  Mittel-­‐
European  winter.  
 
Sophia  is  pervaded  with  the  energy  of  springtime  this  morning,  brushing  off  
the  winter’s  lethargic  drowsiness.  She  draws  her  bedroom’s  heavy  curtains  and  
opens  all  windows  of  her  large  apartment  overlooking  the  lake  to  soak  the  sunlight  
in.    
Oh,  it  feels  so  good.  Some  warmth,  at  long  last!    
Springtime  always  makes  her  feel  like  the  girl  of  her  youth  when,  young  and  
carefree  on  a  day  like  this,  against  her  mother’s  warning  (“you  are  gonna  get  a  cold”),  
she  would  go  to  the  beach  of  Pozzuoli  and  stick  her  feet  in  the  still,  chilly  
Mediterranean  sea.  
 
It  is  such  a  gorgeous  day,  how  am  I  going  to  make  the  best  of  it?    
She  fusses  around  the  large,  opulent  apartment;  she  helps  the  maid  for  a  few  
minutes  to  clean  the  carpets  and  dust  the  heavily  gilded  antique  furniture.  Then,  
bored  and  restless,  she  watches  TV  although,  despite  having  moved  to  Geneva  with  
husband  and  children  in  tow  almost  a  decade  ago,  she  still  understands  very  little  
French.  No,  the  TV  is  not  working.    She  glances  at  the  phone  and  finally  settles  on  
making  a  call.  
 
Thirty  miles  along  the  lake,  close  to  Lousanne,  sits  a  small  village  called  
Tolochenaz.  A  few  thousand  souls  live  a  very  simple,  healthy  and  upscale  life  –  
Switzerland-­‐style.  
 
It  is  divinely  warm  and  sunny  at  La  Paisable,  the  villa  in  the  countryside  of  
Tolochenaz  that  Audrey  purchased  a  long  time  ago  when,  tired  of  the  Hollywood  
celebrity  game,  she  decided  to  take  refuge  somewhere  authentic,  European;  a  place  
she  could  call  home.    
 
Terrible  winters  notwithstanding,  she  has  been  really  happy  in  Switzerland  –  
two  husbands  later,  she  has  found  love  again  in  her  golden  years  with  Robert.    
“You  are  seven  years  younger  than  me,  people  will  talk…  Will  you  manage?”  Audrey  
asked  Robert  as  soon  as  they  started  dating,  back  in  1980.  But  people  talk  anyway  
and  she  has  never  been  happier  in  her  life.  Her  children  are  older  now,  men  -­‐  Sean  
lives  mostly  in  Los  Angeles,  Luca  shares  his  time  between  his  dad,  in  Rome,  and  her,  
in  Switzerland.  Old  age  never  felt  more  fulfilling.  
 
Perfect  day  for  gardening,  Audrey  thought,  waking  up  to  the  sunny  morning.    
And  here  she  is,  in  the  garden,  sitting  on  the  grass  surrounded  by  a  few  daffodils  
timidly  opening  up  to  the  hopeful  spring  sun,  geared  up  with  a  large  straw  hat  and  
gardening  gloves,  brandishing  scissors,  digging,  pulling,  planting,  pruning.    

 

2  

She  feels  energized,  very  much  alive.  
 
“Madame  Hepburn,  a  call  for  you,”  says  her  maid,  appearing  at  the  large  
French  doors  opening  to  the  garden.  
“Who  is  it?”  Audrey  removes  her  hat  and  dubs  a  delicate  pearl  of  sweat  from  
her  forehead.  
“Madame  Loren.”  
“Ah,  Sophia…  I’ll  be  there  in  a  second.”  
Audrey  always  takes  Sophia’s  calls  –  she  is  one  of  the  few  people  for  whom  
she  is  always  available.    
They  have  known  each  other  for  a  long  time  but  it  is  only  in  the  last  few  years,  
after  Sophia  came  back  from  her  stint  in  the  Italian  prison,  that  they  have  cemented  
a  friendship,  a  clear  case  of  opposites  attract.  
 
In  fact,  they  are  so  different,  physically  and  personality-­‐wise:  one  earth,  the  
other  air,  one  physical  and  extroverted,  the  other  reserved  and  ethereal.    
“I  should  detest  Sophia,  since  she  stole  my  Oscar,”  said  Audrey  at  a  dinner  in  honor  
of  her  friend  a  couple  of  years  before,  referring  to  her  1962  nomination  for  
Breakfast  at  Tiffany’s  and  the  Oscar  she  lost  to  Sophia  Loren  for  her  performance  in  
Two  Women,  “but  she  is  not  only  a  most  talented  actress  but  also,  and  above  all,  a  
true  friend.”  
 
“Bonjuor,  Sophia”,  says  a  perky  Audrey  over  the  phone.  “Isn’t  this  a  glorious  
day?”  
“It  is,  that’s  why  I  am  calling  you.”  
Audrey  lets  herself  fall  on  a  large,  cushy  and  comfy  chair,  the  antithesis  of  the  
dark  velvet,  stately  sofa  Sophia  is  sitting  on  in  her  intimidating  oaky  library.  
“Then,  tell  me  everything,”  continues  Audrey.  
“I  was  thinking…  Carlo  and  the  boys  are  in  Paris  until  tomorrow,  I  am  alone  
and  don’t  want  to  waste  this  gorgeous  day  –  God  knows  what  this  unpredictable  
Swiss  weather  will  bring  tomorrow…  How  about  I  drive  to  La  Paisable  and  we  spend  
the  day  together?  Unless  you  already  have  plans…”  
Audrey  stretches  her  neck  to  both  sides.  This  gardening  affair  is  old  already  
and  yes,  it  would  be  fun  to  spend  the  day  with  Sophia;  she  is  a  source  of  amusing  
stories…  And  that  accent  of  hers,  both  in  English  and  French  is  so  entertaining…  
“Sure,  I  would  love  to.  I  will  put  together  some  lunch  and  we  can  eat  in  the  garden.”  
“I  have  an  idea,  let’s  make  pasta,”  says  Sophia  enthusiastically.  She  rarely  eats  
pasta  for  the  obvious  dietary  reasons  but  today  it  is  sunny  and  she  is  in  the  mood.  
“I  am  afraid  I  don’t  have  pasta  at  home.”  
“Maro’,  you  survive  on  carrots  like  a  rabbit…  let  me  get  there  and  we’ll  go  
shopping  together.”  
It’s  a  deal.  Audrey  hangs  up  and  removes  her  gloves  and  hat.  “Marie,  would  
you  make  sure  the  gardener  cleans  up  my  mess  and  finishes  up  planting  and  all?”  
And  she  disappears  into  her  bathroom.  
 

 

3  

The  blue  Mercedes  smoothly  and  quickly  crunches  the  30  miles  that  separate  
Geneva  from  Tolochenaz.  Sophia  sits  comfortably  in  the  back  and  absorbs  the  
beauty  of  the  glistening  lake.  She  is  elegantly  casual  in  a  light  cashmere  sweater,  
flowy  pants  and  Ferragamo  moccasins.  Audrey  made  her  appreciate  moccasins,  a  
kind  of  shoes  Sophia  had  never  considered  neither  elegant  nor  flattering  before.  But  
the  way  Audrey  wore  hers,  looking  comfortable  yet  glamorous,  convinced  Sophia  to  
look  into  the  style  (especially  since  her  feet  were  tolerating  high  heels  less  and  less)  
and  call  Ferragamo’s  widow  Wanda  to  discuss  a  potential  adoption  of  the  flats.  
As  it  turned  out,  it  was  a  perfect  marriage  –  she  was  able  to  keep  her  feet  happy  and  
her  style  glitzy.  
 
The  street  veers  away  from  the  lake.    A  couple  of  turns  and  a  glorious  
countryside  opens  before  Sophia’s  large  and  dark  sunglasses.  She  removes  them  to  
take  in  the  understated  beauty  of  the  large  estate  of  La  Paisable.  
 
“Sophia,  darling.”  
A  couple  of  kisses,  European  style.  
“Audrey,  you  look  gorgeous.”  
They  flow  inside,  through  a  large  and  bright  foyer,  into  the  intimate  and  cozy  
parlor.  They  sit  down.  Tea  is  immediately  served.  
“You  know  Audrey,  you  are  aging  so  gracefully.  What’s  your  secret?”  
“The  secret,  my  dear,  is  that  je  ne  give-­‐a-­‐fuck,  comprend”  
They  giggle.  Sophia  cant’  help  feeling  a  little  stab  of  jealousy  at  Audrey’s  
apparently  nonchalant  relationship  with  herself,  her  luck  of  self-­‐absorbedness  
which  makes  her  so  appealing,  confident  and  real.  Sometimes  she  would  like  to  be  
less  concerned  with  aging  and  the  image  she  has  to  keep  up  for  the  industry  and  the  
magazines  and  the  fans.  When  she  was  young,  she  was  a  carefree,  independent  spirit  
–  does  age  ruin  everything?  
“Whatever  it  is,  you  are  truly  beautiful.  Maybe  your  secret  will  rub  off  on  me.”  
“Of  course,  but  only  if  you’ll  let  it.  Listen,  we  are  supposed  to  be  fabulous,  but  
really,  screw  fabulous.  Look  at  my  hands  -­‐  I  haven’t  had  a  manicure  in  3  weeks  and  I  
don’t  care,”  says  Audrey,  proudly  showing  grown  cuticles  and  natural  nails.  She  
lights  up  a  cigarette.  
Sophia  extends  her  arm  to  admire  her  perfectly  manicured  hands.  
“Tesoro,  I  have  my  manicure  done  every  3  days  and  I  love  it!”    
“See,  we  are  who  we  are!”  says  Audrey.  
They  both  chuckle  at  their  differences,  at  the  way  they  see  life  and  what  
affects  them.  
“So,  here  we  are,  2  girls  alone  –  no  husbands,  boyfriends,  kids…  We  should  go  
wild!”  Sophia  sips  her  tea.    
“Well,  how  about  we  start  with  making  lunch?  I’m  hungry,”  says  Audrey,  
standing  up.  “Let’s  go  to  the  kitchen  and  see  what’s  in  that  sad  fridge  of  mine.”    
 
“Not  much,”  says  Sophia,  looking  for  something  edible  in  the  almost-­‐empty  
refrigerator.    
Sophia  moves  around  a  bottle  of  milk,  half  a  wheel  of  Brie  cheese,  a  box  of  crackers.  

 

4  

“No  wonder  you’re  so  skinny,”  she  says.  “So,  as  I  said  on  the  phone,  let’s  make  pasta.  
I  really  am  in  the  mood  for  some  good,  earthy  tomato  pasta  alla  sorrentina,  come  la  
faceva  mamma  quando  ero  bambina.”  
The  beauty  of  having  Audrey  as  a  friend  is  that  not  only  is  she  Audrey,  but  
also  that  she  understands  Italian  –  this  is  what  Sophia  told  her  sister  when  she  first  
cemented  this  friendship.  Having  lived  in  Italy  for  some  time  and  married  an  Italian  
man,  Audrey  is  pretty  fluent  in  Italian  and  it  works  so  well  for  Sophia,  who  
sometimes  gets  tired  of  speaking  a  foreign  language  and  easily  falls  back  to  her  
mother  tongue.  Audrey  understands  that  today’s  meal  will  be  pasta  the  way  Sophia’s  
mother  used  to  make  when  she  was  a  child,  Sorrento-­‐style.  And  she  is  looking  
forward  to  the  treat.  
 
“We  need  to  make  a  supermarket  run  –  there  must  be  a  supermarket  around  
here  –  and  buy  everything.  My  chauffeur  can  take  us.”  
“Ok,  let’s,  but  I’ll  drive,”  replies  Audrey.  She  grabs  a  silk  scarf  from  behind  the  
kitchen  and  quickly  wraps  it  around  her  head.  
   
“Oh,  the  wind!”  yells  Sophia  from  the  passenger  seat  of  the  spiffy,  convertible  
Austin  Martin  Audrey  is  driving  like  a  formula  one  pro.  
“Yes,  isn’t  it  fantastic?”  Audrey  yells  back.  
Sophia  grabs  her  teased  mane  of  hair  with  both  hands,  trying  to  keep  it  in  
place,  to  no  avail.  
“Just  let  it  go,  Sophia!”  incites  Audrey.  
Sophia  considers  it.  Then.  “Ok,  je  ne  give-­‐a-­‐fuck!”  she  screams  and  lets  her  
hair  go  wild  in  the  warm  wind.  Audrey  removes  her  scarf  and  does  the  same.  They  
both  explode  in  a  fragrant  laugh  and  a  hair  tornado.  
 
“Listen,  God  knows  I  love  living  in  Switzerland,  but  the  produce  here  is  
atrocious.  Looks  at  these  sad  tomatoes…”  Says  Sophia  picking  up  pale  and  shriveled  
vegetables  that  barely  resemble  tomatoes.  “Ah,  the  tomatoes  in  Napoli…”  
“Sally  Tomato…”  Smiles  Audrey  to  herself.  
“Where?  What  kind  of  tomato  is  that?”  
“It  was  the  name  of  a  character  in  Tiffany’s…”  
“Good,  but  that  won’t  help  with  the  sauce,”  replies  Sophia.  ”Here,  this  is  the  
best  of  the  worst.”  She  picks  up  a  handful  of  blush  tomatoes  and  put  them  in  a  bag.    
“The  secret  is  to  add  some  conserva,  how  do  you  call  it…?  Ah,  tomato  paste,  to  
brighten  up  the  sauce,  you  know.  They  must  have  some  here,  no?”  
They  peruse  the  small  supermarket  under  the  discreet  glances  of  the  other  
customers.  Audrey  is  not  an  unlikely  sight  around  here  but  Audrey  and  Sophia  
together,  hair  disheveled,  pushing  a  grocery  cart…  they  certainly  make  an  
impression  even  on  the  most  jaded.  
“Pasta…  Umm,  let’s  see…”  Sophia  scrutinizes  the  small  selection  of  available  
pasta  with  the  concentration  of  a  surgeon.  
“German  pasta?  Oh  Dio,  siamo  arrivato  alla  fine  del  mondo!”  

 

5  

Audrey  chuckles.  Sophia  is  so  colorful  and  her  expressions,  with  her  slight  
Neapolitan  accent,  always  crack  her  up.  “German  pasta  will  cause  the  world  to  come  
to  an  end”  –  ah!  
She  finally  settles  with  an  Italian  brand.  
“Sottomarca,”  sub-­‐brand,  she  says,  “but  at  least  it’s  Italian.”  
“You  must  have  some  basil  in  that  farm  of  yours?”  
“The  best,  plant  to  table”.  
“La  Sorrentina  also  needs  some  good,  fresh  mozzarella,  but  look  at  this  sad,  
processed  cheese…  Ok,  will  do  without.  Let’s  pay  and  go.”  
 
“Here,  pick  some  good  leaves  and  wash  them  up,”  directs  Sophia.  
Audrey  carefully  selects  the  best,  greenest  basil  leaves  from  a  bunch  her  maid  
has  picked  in  the  herb  garden.  She  then  raises  the  privileged  leaves  in  front  of  her  
eyes  in  appraisal.  
“Audrey,  it’s  basil,  not  diamonds.  Just  throw  them  in  here.”  She  lifts  up  the  lid  
of  a  small  pot  where  chopped  tomatoes  are  already  simmering.  
“How  long  will  it  take?”  asks  Audrey.  
“15  minutes.  We  can  start  boiling  the  water  for  la  pasta.”    Even  though  Sophia  
has  rarely    been  inside  Audrey’s  kitchen,  she  seems  to  own  the  space.  She  
confidently  opens  doors  and  drawers  and  pulls  out  exactly  whatever  spoon,  knife,  
ladle  or  plate  she  is  looking  for.  
“Nu’  poco  ‘e  questo”,  she  says  in  Neapolitan  throwing  a  pinch  of  salt  in  the  pot,  
“Nu  poco  ‘e  quello.”  She  lets  a  touch  of  grinded  pepper  fall  on  the  red  sauce.  
Audrey  laughs  as  she  opens  a  bottle  of  Chateau  Rayas  and  lets  it  breathe  for  a  
moment.    
“You  are  a  comic  genius  in  your  native  language.  American  audiences  will  
never  know,  too  bad…”  
Sophia  puts  her  hands  on  her  hips.    “They  love  me  for  my  inner  talent…”      
Audrey  laughs  again.  Then  she  pours  2  glasses  and  hands  one  to  Sophia.  
“Here,  to  spring.”  
The  glasses  clink.  
“Che  buono  questo  vino!”  
“Robert’s  choice.  He  has  completely  re-­‐stacked  the  cellar.”  
“He  has  excellent  taste,”  says  Sophia.  
“Thank  you,  darling.”    
They  chuckle.  
“The  sauce  smells  divine,”  says  Audrey.  “How  did  you  learn  to  cook?”  
“I  don't  know…  I  guess  by  observing,  and  tasting.  Food  to  me  is  related  to  
memories;  the  nicer  the  memory,  the  better  my  food.”  
“Ah,”  chuckles  Audrey,  “here’s  the  title  of  your  cookbook,  when  you  write  
one:  Recipes  and  Memories…  Not  bad,  huh?”  
“Fantastico…  To  the  book.”  Another  toast,  another  refill.  “This  pasta,  for  
instance,”  Sophia  continues  with  her  train  of  thought,  “,My  mother  used  to  make  it  
during  the  war,  when  we  were…  on  a  budget.  Another  dish  I  make  perfectly  is  the  
Easter  Pastiera.  This  little  woman  made  it  for  me  when  I  was  in  jail…  The  guards  
delivered  it  to  me  with  a  message.  More  or  less  it  said:  “Dear  Sophia,  may  this  cake  I  

 

6  

made  for  you  with  my  hands  ease  and  sweeten  your  sojourn  in  jail.’  It  was  delicious  
and  it  did!”  
“How…?”  Audrey  asks  tentatively.  
“You  can  ask,  go  on,”  invites  Sophia  with  a  relaxed  smile.  
“Well,  you  know,  how  was  it?”  
“You  know  what?  In  the  end  prison  wasn’t  that  bad.  I  mean,  at  first  it  was  
horrible.  When  I  arrived  I  was  in  shock  and  I  remember  all  these  women  in  the  
other  jails  screaming  my  name,  like  I  was  there  just  visiting  and  signing  
autographs…  When  they  closed  the  door  behind  me,  I  fell  on  the  bed  and  cried  all  
night.  Also,  the  humiliation,  Oddio…  But  then  I  got  over  it;  you  know  me,  you  need  to  
look  at  the  bright  side.  I  had  a  lovely,  freshly  painted  pink,  clean  cell,  I  had  a  TV  set,  
they  let  me  wear  a  DVF  wraparound  –  I  was  a  stylish  prisoner.”    
They  both  laugh.  
“It  was  humbling  and  liberating,”  Sophia  continues.  “No  make-­‐up,  no  false  
eyelashes,  no  wigs,  no  jewelry  –  it  was  just  me.  And  the  amazing  people  who  came  
every  day  to  leave  messages  of  support  and  encouragement  and  incredible  food.  I  
gained  two  kilos  but  je  ne  gave-­‐a-­‐fuck…”    
Another  laugh.  
“I  certainly  didn’t  feel  alone  all  along;  I  felt  I  was  surrounded  by  so  much  love.  
And  of  course  my  family  came  to  visit  every  day…  I  had  no  real  privileges  but  I  was  
treated  with  honest  respect.  It  was  spa  for  the  soul,  you  know?”  
Audrey  nods  and  smiles.    
“So,  how’s  life  in  the  love  boat?”  asks  Sophia,  lazily  stirring  the  sauce.  
“I  cannot  explain,  Sophia.  He  is  just  perfect  for  me  and  I  hope  I  am  perfect  for  
him,  too.  He  is  the  man  I  want  to  get  old  with.  Older,  I  mean.”    
Another  chuckle.  
“It’s  just  a  good  match…  Is  everything  ok  with  you  and  Carlo?”  Audrey  asks.  
“Why?  Sure,  I  mean,  we  have  been  married  for  such  a  long  time…”    
Audrey  looks  at  Sophia,  unconvinced.  
“Ecche’…  Ok,  I  love  Carlo,  he  has  been  a  good  husband,  almost  a  father  to  me.  
But  now,  looking  at  you,  how  radiant  you  are,  I  wonder…  You  had  the  courage  to  
divorce  the  men  you  didn’t  love  anymore  and  look  for  more  passion  in  your  life…  
You  didn’t  settle…  I  mean,  I  love  Carlo,  but  sometimes  I  think  about  what  I  have  been  
missing  out  on  in  life;  the  excitement  of  romance,  a  passion  that  sweeps  you  away.  
Maybe  I  should  have  married  Marcello  but  then,  on  second  thought,  I  don’t  really  
think  I  was  his  type.  Look  at  him,  he  ended  up  with  women  like  Faye  and  Catherine,  
blonde,  frosty  bitches…”  
They  laugh  and  Audrey  toasts:  “To  frosty  bitches.”  
Glasses  clink  again.  Audrey  refills  them.  
“Oh  well,”  Sophia  seems  to  wrap  all  these  considerations  up.  “And  what  about  
acting?  You  haven’t  made  a  movie  in  some  time…  Ah,  the  water  is  boiling.”  She  
opens  up  a  package  of  pasta.  Penne  sink  into  the  pot.  
She  joins  Audrey  at  the  table  and  helps  her  set  it  for  lunch.  
“Did  I  tell  you  I  have  just  accepted  a  position  with  Unicef?”  says  Audrey  as  
she  places  forks  next  to  plates.  
“Unicef?  The  big  organization  for  children?”  

 

7  

“Yes.  I  will  be  their  Goodwill  Ambassador.”  
“Gesu’,  and  what  would  you  be  doing?”  
“Well,  basically  my  task  is  to  inform,  to  create  awareness  on  the  needs  of  
children.”  
Sophia  looks  at  Audrey  questioningly.  
“I  will  become  their  spokesperson,  their  image,  if  you  will.  This  assignment  is  
designed  for  me  to  attract  attention  to  the  poorest  countries  in  the  world,  where  
children  are  most  in  need  of  food,  medicines  –  you  name  it.  They  want  me  to  travel  
the  world.  I  would  be  going  to  Southeast  Asia,  Africa,  poverty-­‐stricken  countries,  
meet  with  the  deprived  and  the  destitute  and  just  raise  awareness.  I  will  be  followed  
by  reporters  and  photographers…”  
“In  Africa?  Who’s  going  to  do  your  hair  and  make  up?”  
They  laugh.  
“I  know,  I  know  it  is  not  about  glamour,  Audrey…    But  what  they  are  asking  of  
you  seems  to  be  really  tough.”  
“It  is,  and  I  thought  about  it.  I  discussed  it  with  Robert  and  with  the  kids…  It  
is  something  I  have  to  do  and  they  are  supporting  me.”  
Audrey  sits  down  at  the  table  and  collects  her  thoughts.  
“I  was  just  a  little  girl  when  my  parents  divorced.    My  mother  was  Dutch  and  
she  decided  to  move  back  to  the  Netherlands  and  took  me  with  her.  That’s  where  we  
were  when  the  war  broke  out;  we  were  in  Arnhem  when  the  Nazi’s  occupied  
Holland.  
“My  mom  was  blue-­‐blooded,  a  baroness,  and  we  were  used  to  certain  
comforts…  Well,  after  Hitler  invaded  us,  there  were  no  more  comforts.  Times  
became  hard  for  everybody,  aristocracy  included.  We  had  land  and  palaces  but  no  
food.  I  suffered  from  malnutrition.  I  was  sensitive  and  became  depressed  and,  in  the  
end,  the  only  thing  I  was  able  to  feed  was  my  malaise.  Food  became  my  obsession,  
hunger  my  sickness…  
“Millions  of  children  are  starving  from  famine,  drought,  wars…  I  am  just  not  
able  to  neglect  it  any  longer.  I  never  cared  much  for  celebrity,  you  know  that,  but  
now  I'm  really  glad  I've  got  a  name  because  I'm  using  it  for  what  it's  worth.  It's  like  a  
bonus  that  my  career  has  given  to  me.”  
Sophia  absorbs  the  moving  speech,  visibly  touched.  
“You  ask  about  my  acting,  well  I  have  recently  realized  I’ve  been  auditioning  
my  whole  life  for  this  role  -­‐  and  I  finally  got  it.”  
Sophia  quickly  wipes  a  tear  from  her  eye.  
“Mi  fai  piangere…”  
“Oh,  don’t  cry  darling.”  
“You  are  just  too  good,  una  santa!”  
“Hardly  a  saint…  I  am  just  a  mother  and  so  are  you.  Listen,  make  me  a  
promise,  today,  here:  promise  me  that  should  anything  happen  to  me,  should  I  not  
be  able  to  do  this  at  some  point,  you  will  step  in  and  become  a  Goodwill  Ambassador  
for  Unicef  too…”  
“Me?”  Sophia  is  astounded.  
“Yes.  Do  promise!”  

 

8  

Sophia  smiles  uncomfortably  for  a  second,  maybe  looking  for  a  way  out.  But  
Audrey  has  pinned  her  with  her  stern  glance  and  unmovable  resolve.  Sophia  sighs.  
“E  prometto,  prometto…  I  promise.  You’re  going  to  be  a  hundred  and  still  travel  
around  the  world  for  your  children…”  
   
They  look  at  each  other  with  the  affection  of  old  friends.  
“I’ll  drink  to  that!”  Audrey  raises  her  glass,  Sophia  joins  her  in  a  toast.  
They  down  the  wine.  Then  -­‐  
“Uhhh,  la  pasta…”  
Sophia  runs  to  the  stove  and  removes  the  pot  with  the  boiling  pasta.  Swiftly,  
she  drains  it  and  pours  it  in  a  large  bowl.    
She  ladles  rich  tomato  sauce  on  top,  sprinkles  it  with  basil  and,  after  
vigorously  stirring  the  pasta,  brings  it  to  the  table.  
“Mon  Dieu,  che  spettacolo!”  exclaims  Audrey.  
Sophia  smiles  and  spoons  very  generous  portions  onto  their  plates.  
“Here,  eat.  You’re  not  going  to  get  this  pasta  in  Africa”.  
 
The  End