Mahon for Congress. A button issued for the Congressional campaign of W. D.

Mahon, president of the Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Workers. While union officials running for public office was long a rarity in the U.S. labor movement, the AFL-CIO has made a push to elect members in recent years. In December 2001 they announced that across the nation 2547 union members had been elected to public office that year. "Workingmen and Working Women--Negro and White--Veterans, Youth" are urged to join the May Day Peace Parade marching from 54th Street and Eighth Avenue to Union Square on this back page of a Committe for May Day - 1948 pamphlet Cover of a pamphlet by Abner Woodruff which was called an analysis of “the movement of the working class from wage slavery to freedom.” The figure of the “advancing worker” was featured regularly in IWW publications. Bella Abzug, flamboyant feminist, peace activist, and advocate for progressive causes, almost beat Daniel P. Moynihan in the 1976 contest for the Democratic nomination for senator from New York.

Issued by the United Farm Workers, this button urges support for the workers in the strawberry fields. The "5c for Fairness" slogan refers to a formula for improving wages: a study from the California Institute for Rural Studies calculated that a mere 5 cent raise in the cost of a pint of berries could pay for an 50% increase in the average workers' piece pay rate. Union Square on May Day 1952. Henry Foner, currently co-historian for Labor Arts," was education director of the Furriers Joing Board in 1952 when he spoke at this May Day celebration in Union Square. He condemned the Taft-Hartley "slave labor " law before a crowd of several thousand May Day marchers at one of the last May Day parades. Protest rally sticker. Sticker (with glue still intact) from the March-on-Washington Movement: "Winning Democracy for the Negro Is Winning the War for Democracy," 1942. The black community fought on two fronts during World War II, for the "double V"--victory over fascism abroad and over racism at home. Organizing for the March on Washington was successful, and the mere threat of the march compelled President Franklin D. Roosevelt to establish a Fair Employment Practices Commission (FEPC) in an effort to break down discrimination in the defense and other industries.

"No Child Toilers" and "Production for Use not for Profit" are a few of the slogans woven into the giant May Day wreath held by a young woman in this unidentified May Day image on a greeting card from Bolerium Books in San Francisco. Poster for a protest against the Vietnam war in Washington D.C. on May 1, 1971, using a stoplight with the words "Washington, May, Go," on the cover of an insert published by the Red Engine collective in the Quicksilver Times. "May Day is the workers day; El Primero de Mayo, el dia del obrero" proclaims this flyer in English and Spanish advertising 1973 May Day rallies in Manhattan and the Bronx. A photo shows marchers in an earlier parade carrying a banner with "Oppressed people of the world unite" in English and Chinese. "In step with working people everywhere we march, " proclaims this 1950 pamphlet from the United Labor and Peoples Committee for May Day. The cover photo shows three uniformed service men, two of them African American, marching with an American flag

"In step with working people everywhere we march, " proclaims this 1950 pamphlet from the United Labor and Peoples Committee for May Day. The cover photo shows three uniformed service men, two of them African American, marching with an American flag. Ticket for a May Day Celebration in Chicago in the late 1940s, with drama and music and speakers on the program, including Andrew Llafin and George Kirkpatrick. Sponsored by the Socialist Party and Young People's Socialist League, admission is 50c. Note the union bug on the ticket and its envelope, which shows a newsboy carrying a copy of a paper with the headline "La Parola (The Word)." March for Peace" on May 1, 1948 proclaims this pamphlet from the Committee for May Day--1948. The back page urges men and women, black and white, vets and youth to unite. "Workingmen and Working Women--Negro and White--Veterans, Youth" are urged to join the May Day Peace Parade marching from 54th Street and Eighth Avenue to Union Square on this back page of a Committe for May Day - 1948 pamphlet.

Red flyer from the New York Committee for May Day 1970 announcing a May Day Parade and Rally, International Workers holiday. The Fred Wright drawing of a parade is explicit about the inclusiveness of the call, with a white man wearing a shirt that says "white" and a black man wearing a shirt that says "black" together carrying a red banner calling for "Labor Power" with nearby picket signs demanding "Jobs," "Peace," "Justice," "Civil rights" and "Democracy.