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What is important of Environmental management?

Environmental management can be so important because our environment gives a part of what we
are whether our culture are dirty people or clean, it is also nice to live in a nice, clean place which is
not polluted. It is also important to get people live in that place if a certain city, country is polluted no
one will think of living there and visitors will have a negative point of view on that place.

What is the main goal of environmental management?


The main goal of environmental management is to protect the environment. This is usually achieved
through minimizing a companys impact on their surroundings.

Significance

Why should you care about loss of waterfowl or other animals? In addition to
habitat, wetlands provide flood protection. A single acre of wetlands can store
up to 1.5 million gallons of water. A study by the Wetlands Initiative states
that restoration of the 100-year flood zone on the Upper Mississippi could
have mollified the property damage and crop loss of the the Great Flood of
1993. Environmental management also includes the protection of human
health through projects such as the Department of Energy's cleanup of
nuclear waste sites.

What is Environment Managament:


Environmental management is a process that industries, companies, and individuals undertake to
regulate and protect the health of the natural world. In most cases, it does not actually involve
managing the environment itself, but rather is the process of taking steps and promoting behaviors
that will have a positive impact on how environmental resources are used and protected.
Organizations engage in environmental management for a couple of different reasons, but caring for
the natural world, following local laws and rules about conservation, and saving money are usually
near the top of most lists. Management plans look different in different industries, but all aim for
roughly the same goals
Significance:
Environmental resource management is an issue of increasing concern, as reflected in its
prevalence in seminal texts influencing global socio-political frameworks such as the Brundtland
Commission's Our Common Future,[2] which highlighted the integrated nature of environment
and international development and the Worldwatch Institute's annualState of the World (book
series) reports.
The environment determines nature of every objects around the sphere. The behaviour, type of
religion, culture and economic practices
Current Scenarios

To adjust to today's environment of quick social and ecological changes, some


organizations have begun to experiment with various new tools and concepts.[43]
[44] Those that are more traditional and stick to hierarchical decision making have
difficulty dealing with the demand for lateral decision making that supports effective
participation.[43] Whether it be a matter of ethics or just strategic advantage
organizations are internalizing sustainability principles.[44][45] Examples of some of
the world's largest and most profitable corporations who are shifting to sustainable
environmental resource management are: Ford, Toyota, BMW, Honda, Shell, Du
Pont, Swiss Re, Hewlett-Packard, and Unilever.[31][32] An extensive study by the
Boston Consulting Group reaching 1,560 business leaders from diverse regions, job
positions, expertise in sustainability, industries, and sizes of organizations, revealed
the many benefits of sustainable practice as well as its viability

The National Environment Policy is intended to be a guide to action: in regulatory


reform, programmes and projects for environmental conservation; and review and
enactment of legislation, by agencies of the Central, State, and Local
Governments. . The policy also seeks to stimulate partnerships of different
stakeholders, i.e. public agencies, local communities, academic and scientific
institutions, the investment community, and international development partners, in
harnessing their respective resources and strengths for environmental
management. The dominant theme of this policy is that while conservation of
environmental resources is necessary to secure livelihoods and well-being of all, the
most secure basis for conservation is to ensure that people dependent on particular
resources obtain better livelihoods from the fact of conservation, than from
degradation of the resource

The key environmental challenges that the country faces relate to the nexus of
environmental degradation with poverty in its many dimensions, and economic
growth. These challenges are intrinsically connected with the state of environmental
resources, such as land, water, air, and their flora and fauna. The proximate drivers
of environmental degradation are population growth, inappropriate technology and
consumption choices, and poverty, leading to changes in relations between people
and ecosystems, and development activities such as intensive agriculture, polluting
industry, and unplanned urbanisation. However, these factors give rise to
environmental degradation only through deeper causal linkages, in particular,
institutional failures, resulting in lack of clarity or enforcement of rights of access
and use of environmental resources, policies which provide disincentives for
environmental conservation (and which may have origins in the fiscal regime),

market failures (which may be linked to shortcomings in the regulatory regimes),


and governance constraints. Environmental degradation is a major causal factor in
enhancing and perpetuating poverty, particularly among the rural poor, when such
degradation impacts soil fertility, quantity and quality of water, air quality, forests,
wildlife and fisheries. The dependence of the rural poor, in particular, tribal
societies, on their natural resources, especially biodiversity, is self-evident. Women
in particular face greater adverse impacts of degradation of natural resources, being
directly responsible for their collection and use, but rarely for 2 K

The principal Objectives of this policy are enumerated below. These Objectives
relate to current perceptions of key environmental challenges. They may,
accordingly, evolve over time:
Conservation of Critical Environmental Resources:
To protect and conserve critical ecological systems and resources, and invaluable
natural and man-made heritage, which are essential for lifesupport, livelihoods,
economic growth, and a broad conception of human well-being
Intra-generational Equity: Livelihood Security for the Poor:
To ensure equitable access to environmental resources and quality for all sections of
society, and in particular, to ensure that poor communities, which are most
dependent on environmental resources for their livelihoods, are assured secure
access to these resources.
Inter-generational Equity:
To ensure judicious use of environmental resources to meet the needs and
aspirations of the present and future generations.
Integration of Environmental Concerns in Economic and Social Development:
To integrate environmental concerns into policies, plans, programmes, and projects
for economic and social development.

Efficiency in Environmental Resource Use:


To ensure efficient use of environmental resources in the sense of reduction in their
use per unit of economic output, to minimize adverse environmental impacts.
Environmental governance: To apply the principles of good governance
(transparency, rationality, accountability, reduction in time and costs, participation,
and regulatory independence) to the management and regulation of use of
environmental resources.
Enhancement of resources of environmental conservation:To ensure higher resource
flows, comprising finance, technology, management skills, traditional knowledge,

and social capital, for environmental conservation through mutually beneficial


multistakeholder artnerships between local communities, public agencies, the
academic and research community, investors, and multilateral and bilateral
development partners

Environmental Management System Objectives and Targets At each plant, we first


ascertained the type of impacts (environmental impacts) various environmental
aspect of the plants operational activities, product manufacturing and services that
have or may potentially have on the environment. We then assessed such impacts
(environmental impact assessment). Through this process, we identified which
environmental aspects have or may potentially have a major environmental impact
(identification of significant environmental impact). To reduce the risk of these
environmental impacts occurrence, we clearly set objectives and targets. The
following lists the major objectives and targets established at ISO14001-certified
plants. (1) Reduction of wastes and improvement of recycling rate (2) Promotion of
energy and resource conservation (3) Proper control of chemical substances (4)
Development of environmentally benign products To achieve such objectives and
targets, we have developed and are implementing an environmental management
system. This entails preparing an Environmental Management Program (EMP) that
specifies responsibilities, means, and schedules, among other matters; and
periodically monitoring, measuring, and keeping records of key operational
variables. Reduction of wastes and improvement of recycling rate Thorough
sorting of wastes Promotion of general waste recycling Implementation of plastic
waste recycling Improvement of recycling rate Reduction of volume of waste per
person Implementation of recycling of all concentrated liquid wastes Promotion of
energy and resource conservation Reduction of paper usage Reduction of water
usage Reduction of power usage Development of energy management systems
Proper control of chemical substances Development of chemical-substance
management systems Compliance with the PRTR system Augmentation of
chemical substance monitoring equipment and operation thereof Conduct of
emergency response drills for chemical substance safety Development of
environmentally friendly products Reduction of products energy consumption
Identification of products recyclable components Establishment of product
disposal procedu

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Environmental
management has to be
incorporated in business
processes
The Microsoft Mobile Environmental
Management System (EMS) according to the ISO
14001 standard covers our cell phone production
sites and large offices. All cell phone production
sites are included in the ISO 14001 single
certificate. Microsoft Mobile also requires a
certified EMS of contract manufacturers and
suppliers of mobile phone components.
The Microsoft Mobile Environmental Management System
consists of:
identification of environmental aspects, and evaluation of
their significance
o
objectives and programs for achieving environmental
targets
o
compliance with legal and other regulatory requirements
o
audits, management reviews, and continuous
improvement
o
operational management (data and processes) for
energy and water consumption, waste, etc.
The goal of the Environmental Management System is to
improve our environmental performance, focusing on:
o

o
o
o
o
o

energy consumption
water consumption
air emissions
waste management
packaging

national environment
policy
A diverse developing society such as ours provides numerous challenges in the
economic, social, political, cultural, and environmental arenas. All of these coalesce
in the dominant imperative of alleviation of mass poverty, reckoned in the multiple
dimensions of livelihood security, health care, education, empowerment of the
disadvantaged, and elimination of gender disparities. The present national policies
for environmental management are contained in the national forest policy,1988
National Conservation Strategy and PolicyStatement on Environment and
Development, 1992 Policy Statement on Abatement of Pollution,1992 , the ; and the
. Some sector policies such as the ; ; and ; have also contributed towards
environmental management. All of these policies have recognized the need for
sustainable development in their specific contexts and formulated necessary
strategies to give effect to such recognition. The National Environment Policy seeks
to extend the coverage, and fill in gaps that still exist, in light of present knowledge
and accumulated experience. It does not displace, but builds on the earlier policies.
National Forest Policy, 1988 National Conservation Strategy and Policy Statement on
Environment and Development, 1992 Policy Statement on Abatement of
Pollution,1992 National Agriculture Policy, 2000 National Population Policy, 2000
National Water Policy, 2002

Objectives:
The principal Objectives of this policy are enumerated below. These Objectives
relate to current perceptions of key environmental challenges. They may,
accordingly, evolve over time: To protect and conserve critical ecological systems
and resources, and invaluable natural and man-made heritage, which are essential
for lifesupport, livelihoods, economic growth, and a broad conception of human wellbeing. To ensure equitable access to environmental resources and quality for all

sections of society, and in particular, to ensure that poor communities, which are
most dependent on environmental resources for their livelihoods, are assured
secure access to these resources. To ensure judicious use of environmental
resources to meet the needs and aspirations of the present and future generations.
To integrate environmental concerns into policies, plans, programmes, and projects
for economic and social development. i. Conservation of Critical Environmental
Resources: ii. Intra-generational Equity: Livelihood Security for the Poor: iii. Intergenerational Equity: iv. Integration of Environmental Concerns in Economic and
Social Development:
v)
Efficiency in Environmental Resource Use: vi. Environmental Governance: vii.
Enhancement of Resources for Environmental Conservation: To ensure efficient use
of environmental resources in the sense of reduction in their use per unit of
economic output, to minimize adverse environmental impacts. To apply the
principles of good governance (transparency, rationality, accountability, reduction in
time and costs, participation, and regulatory independence) to the management
and regulation of use of environmental resources. To ensure higher resource flows,
comprising finance, technology, management skills, traditional knowledge, and
social capital, for environmental conservation through mutually beneficial
multistakeholder partnerships between local communities, public agencies, the
academic and research community, investors, and multilateral and bilateral
development partners.

This policy has evolved from the recognition that only such development is
sustainable, which respects ecological constraints, and the imperatives of justice.
The Objectives stated above are to be realized through various strategic
interventions by different public authorities at Central, State, and Local Government
levels. They would also be the basis of diverse partnerships. These strategic
interventions, besides legislation and the evolution of legal doctrines for realization
of the Objectives, may be premised on a set of unambiguously stated Principles
depending upon their relevance, feasibility in relation to costs, and technical and
administrative aspects of their application. The following Principles, may
accordingly, guide the activities of different actors in relation to this policy. Each of
these Principles has an established genealogy in policy pronouncements,
jurisprudence, international environmental law, or international State practice

Human Beings are at the Centre of Sustainable Development Concerns:


Human beings are at the centre of concerns for sustainable development. They are
entitled to a healthy and productive life in harmony with nature.
The Right to Development:

The right to development must be fulfilled so as to equitably meet developmental


and environmental needs of present and future generations
Environmental Protection is an Integral part of the Development Process:
In order to achieve sustainable development, environmental protection shall
constitute an integral part of the development process and cannot be considered in
isolation from it.
The Precautionary Approach:
Where there are credible threats of serious or irreversible damage to key
environmental resources, lack of full scientific certainty shall not be used as a
reason for postponing cost-effective measures to prevent environmental
degradation

Economic Efficiency:
In various public actions for environmental conservation, economic efficiency would
be sought to be realized . This Principle requires that the services of environmental
resources be given economic value, and such value to count equally with the
economic values of other goods and services, in analysis of alternative courses of
action. Further implications of this Principle are as follows:
Polluter Pays : 6 7
http://envfor.nic.in/sites/default/files/introduction-nep2006e.pdf

implications of this principle:


1.polluter pays:
Impacts of acts of production and consumption of one party may be visited
on third parties who do not have a direct economic nexus with the original
act. Such impacts are termed externalities. If the costs (or benefits) of the
externalities are not re-visited on the party responsible for the original act,
the resulting level of the entire sequence of production or consumption, and
externality, is inefficient. In such a situation, economic efficiency may be
restored by making the perpetrator of the externality bear the cost (or
benefit) of the same. The policy will, accordingly, promote the internalization
of environmental costs, including through the use of incentives based policy
instruments, taking into account the approach that the polluter should, in
principle, bear the cost of pollution, with due regard to the public interest,
and without distorting international trade and investment.
2.cost minimixation:Where the environmental benefits of a course of action
cannot, for
methodological or conceptual reasons, be imputed economic value (as

in the case of Incomparable Entities [see below]), in any event the


economic costs of realizing the benefits should be minimized.
Efficiency of resource use may also be accomplished by the use of
policy instruments that create incentives to minimize wasteful use and
consumption of natural resources. The principle of efficiency also
applies to issues of environmental governance by streamlining
processes and procedures in order to minimize costs and delays.
.3.Entities with incomparable values:
Significant risks to human health, life, and environmental life-support
systems, besides certain other unique natural and man-made entities,
which may impact the well-being, broadly conceived, of large numbers of
persons, may be considered as Incomparable in that individuals or
societies would not accept these risks for compensation in money or
conventional goods and services. A conventional economic cost-benefit
calculus would not, accordingly, apply in their case, and such entities
would have priority in allocation of societal resources for their conservation
without consideration of direct or immediate economic benefit .
4.Equity:
The cardinal principle of equity or justice requires that human beings
cannot be treated differently based on irrelevant differences between them.
Equity norms must be distinguished according to context, i.e. procedural
equity, relating to fair rules for allocation of entitlements and obligations,
and end-result equity, relating to fair outcomes in terms of distribution of
entitlements and obligations. Each context, in addition, must be
distinguished in terms of intra-generational equity, relating to justice
within societies, and in particular, providing space for the participation of
the underprivileged, and inter-generational equity, relating to justice
between generations.

Equity, in the context of this policy refers to both equity in entitlements to,
and participation of, the relevant publics, in processes of decision-making
over use of environmental resources

Legal Liability:
The present environmental redressal mechanism is predominantly based
on doctrines of criminal liability, which have not proved sufficiently
effective, and need to be supplemented.
Civil liability for environmental damage would deter environmentally
harmful actions, and compensate the victims of environmental damage.
Conceptually, the principle of legal liability may be viewed as an
embodiment in legal doctrine of the polluter pays approach, itself
deriving from the principle of economic efficiency
The State is not an absolute owner, but a trustee of all natural resources,
which are by nature meant for public use and enjoyment, subject to
reasonable conditions, necessary to protect the legitimate interest of a large
number of people, or for matters of strategic national interest.
Decentralization involves ceding or transfer of power from a Central
Authority to State and Local Authorities, in order to empower public
authorities having jurisdiction at the spatial level at which particular
environmental issues are salient, to address these issues

Process of Formulation of this Policy:


The preparation of this Policy has involved inputs and consultations with diverse
experts, and stakeholders.
A draft of the National Environment Policy was prepared through an intensive
process of consultation within the Government and inputs from experts The

draft, in English and Hindi was posted on the website of the Ministry of
Environment and Forests and responses were invited from individuals and
organizations, through advertisements in national and regional newspapers..
The draft was open for public consultation from 21 August, 2004 to 31
December, 2004. Consultations were held with concerned Ministries of the
Central Government, and all State/UT governments at meetings of the State
Environment Ministers and senior officials. The latter were encouraged to
undertake local level public consultations. The draft was also provided to the
Members of Parliament and their views and suggestions were invited. The
Ministry of Environment and Forests also held consultations with
representatives of major academic and research institutions, and key Industry
Associations, Voluntary Organisations, and individuals who are well known in
the field. Detailed summaries of responses were prepared and the various
concerns expressed by the respondents were addressed. Many of the
suggestions received have been incorporated in the Policy

Environmental management is a systematic approach to finding


practical ways for saving water, energy, and materials, and reducing
negative environmental impacts. A proactive environmental
management program is a win-win-win proposition because it can
help a property save money, get recognized for environmental
leadership, and preserve and protect unique destinations.

Environmental Management is a Win-Win-Win Proposition


Win 1 Save money
Sound environmental management reduces operating costs and
improves profitability. According to a recent survey1 of Caribbean
hoteliers by PA Government Services, 50% of Caribbean hotels spend
over 10% of operating costs on utilities, and 21% spend over 20%.
Most hotels can quickly achieve substantial cost savings with a

modest investment. Figure 1. shows the actual results from


implementing an environmental program at Sea Splash Resort, a 15suite property in Jamaica. The property reduced water and electricity
consumption by 35% and 24%, respectively, and is now saving almost
US$19,000 per year. Sea Splash achieved these savings with a modest
investment in simple, low-cost technologies and practices, and has
realized an annual return on investment (ROI) of 100%.

2.Get recognized for environmental leadership


Adopting environmental best practices can help you stand out from the
competition and be recognized through certification programs, awards,
tour operator programs, and other special promotions. Getting
recognized for your commitment to environmental management can
enhance your propertys image with environmentally conscious guests
and tour operators.
Win 3 Protect and preserve destinations
Each year more than 30 million tourists
flock to the Caribbean to experience the
natural and cultural treasures that the region
has to offer. The hospitality industry, while
a critical engine for economic growth, also
puts a tremendous strain on the natural
"assets" such as beaches, reefs, rivers, and
forests.
A recent poll conducted by Cond Nast Traveler revealed that:
91% of the respondents were concerned about the environmental
conditions at their chosen destination.
50% claimed that the environment had become a factor in their
travel planning over the last ten years.
25% have changed travel plans because of what they perceived to

be an environmental issue at their chosen destination.


Protecting the attractions that bring visitors to your destination helps
ensure the long-term sustainability of your business.